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Sample records for autoimmune myasthenia gravis

  1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  2. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  3. Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease that causes weakness in your voluntary muscles. These are the muscles that you control. ... worse with activity, and better with rest. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease. Your body's immune system ...

  4. Myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasthenia gravis is a type of autoimmune disorder . An autoimmune disorder occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. Antibodies are proteins made by the body's immune system when ...

  5. Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an acquired autoimmune disorder causing skeletal muscle fatigue and weakness. This is a report of one woman and her daughter presenting with myasthenia and gravis and Grave\\'s disease. It highlights possible hereditary component of this condition which has not been commonly reported in ...

  6. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  7. Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The name myasthenia gravis, which is Latin and Greek in origin, means "grave, or serious, muscle weakness." The hallmark of myasthenia gravis is muscle weakness that worsens after periods of activity and improves after periods of rest. ...

  8. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... targeted in other autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune thyroid disease. How is ocular myasthenia gravis treated? People with ocular MG and their caregivers should balance the severity of the symptoms with the risks and benefits of treatment. People ...

  9. Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throat muscles, which can cause: Altered speaking. Your speech may sound very soft or nasal, depending upon which muscles ... tumors, called thymomas, aren't cancerous (malignant). Other disorders People with myasthenia gravis are more likely to ...

  10. Myasthenia gravis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - myasthenia gravis ... The following organizations provide information on myasthenia gravis : Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America -- www.myasthenia.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver- ...

  11. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis and dysautonomia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajanayake, I; Niessen, S J M; Cherubini, G B; Shelton, G D

    2008-11-01

    A two-year-old male entire border collie dog was evaluated for a short history of mixed bowel diarrhoea, coughing, vomiting and stranguria. Physical examination revealed dyspnoea with increased ventral lung sounds and a flaccidly distended bladder. Neurological examination revealed poor pupillary light reflexes, an absent gag reflex and a poor anal tone. Thoracic radiography was consistent with megaoesophagus and aspiration pneumonia. Clinicopathological testing revealed an elevated muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody titre. The dog was euthanased because of clinical deterioration. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected immediately post-mortem revealed macrophagic pleocytosis. Post-mortem histopathological examination was consistent with dysautonomia. This is the first report of coexisting autoimmune myasthenia gravis and dysautonomia in a non-human species. The concomitant diseases may suggest a common immunopathological aetiology.

  12. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  13. Ephedrine for myasthenia gravis, neonatal myasthenia and the congenital myasthenic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrinten, C.; van der Zwaag, A.M.; Weinreich, S.S.; Scholten, R.J.; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myasthenia is a condition in which neuromuscular transmission is affected by antibodies against neuromuscular junction components (autoimmune myasthenia gravis, MG; and neonatal myasthenia gravis, NMG) or by defects in genes for neuromuscular junction proteins (congenital myasthenic

  14. RARITY OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN NORTHERN NIGERIANS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 4 patients were identified from the hospitals records. Myasthenia gravis appears uncommon in this environment. Reasons for the apparent rarity of this condition and other autoimmune diseases in the environment are discussed. Key words: Myasthenia gravis, northern Nigeria, autoimmunity (Annals Af Med: 2002 1(1): ...

  15. Diagnosis and management of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Christopher

    2017-06-21

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare long-term neurological condition that is characterised by fluctuating skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue, as well as respiratory difficulties. It is both an acquired autoimmune disease and a chronic neuromuscular disorder. Because of its rarity, myasthenia gravis is relatively unknown and may be unfamiliar to many nurses. While there are various types of myasthenia, this article focuses on myasthenia gravis, exploring its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, and examining the nurse's role in managing the condition. The symptoms of myasthenic crisis and cholinergic crisis are also explained, and the experience of patients with myasthenia gravis in hospital and community settings is illustrated using case studies.

  16. Ocular myasthenia gravis: Side effect of urografin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Modi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. Diplopia and ptosis are common symptoms at the onset of ocular myasthenia gravis. It may occur due to the antibodies developed against various drugs. We are reporting a case of ocular myasthenia gravis which was developed in a patient post angiography which may be due to antibody developed against the dye used in angiography.

  17. Prophylactic Effect of Probiotics on the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Chang-Suk; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are live bacteria that confer health benefits to the host physiology. Although protective role of probiotics have been reported in diverse diseases, no information is available whether probiotics can modulate neuromuscular immune disorders. We have recently demonstrated that IRT5 probiotics, a mixture of 5 probiotics, could suppress diverse experimental disorders in mice model. In this study we further investigated whether IRT5 probiotics could modulate the progression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T cell dependent antibody mediated autoimmune disorder in which acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction is the major auto-antigen. Oral administration of IRT5 probiotics significantly reduced clinical symptoms of EAMG such as weight loss, body trembling and grip strength. Prophylactic effect of IRT5 probiotics on EMAG is mediated by down-regulation of effector function of AChR-reactive T cells and B cells. Administration of IRT5 probiotics decreased AChR-reactive lymphocyte proliferation, anti-AChR reactive IgG levels and inflammatory cytokine levels such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17. Down-regulation of inflammatory mediators in AChR-reactive lymphocytes by IRT5 probiotics is mediated by the generation of regulatory dendritic cells (rDCs) that express increased levels of IL-10, TGF-β, arginase 1 and aldh1a2. Furthermore, DCs isolated from IRT5 probiotics-fed group effectively converted CD4+ T cells into CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells compared with control DCs. Our data suggest that IRT5 probiotics could be applicable to modulate antibody mediated autoimmune diseases including myasthenia gravis. PMID:23284891

  18. Prophylactic effect of probiotics on the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Suk Chae

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live bacteria that confer health benefits to the host physiology. Although protective role of probiotics have been reported in diverse diseases, no information is available whether probiotics can modulate neuromuscular immune disorders. We have recently demonstrated that IRT5 probiotics, a mixture of 5 probiotics, could suppress diverse experimental disorders in mice model. In this study we further investigated whether IRT5 probiotics could modulate the progression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG. Myasthenia gravis (MG is a T cell dependent antibody mediated autoimmune disorder in which acetylcholine receptor (AChR at the neuromuscular junction is the major auto-antigen. Oral administration of IRT5 probiotics significantly reduced clinical symptoms of EAMG such as weight loss, body trembling and grip strength. Prophylactic effect of IRT5 probiotics on EMAG is mediated by down-regulation of effector function of AChR-reactive T cells and B cells. Administration of IRT5 probiotics decreased AChR-reactive lymphocyte proliferation, anti-AChR reactive IgG levels and inflammatory cytokine levels such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17. Down-regulation of inflammatory mediators in AChR-reactive lymphocytes by IRT5 probiotics is mediated by the generation of regulatory dendritic cells (rDCs that express increased levels of IL-10, TGF-β, arginase 1 and aldh1a2. Furthermore, DCs isolated from IRT5 probiotics-fed group effectively converted CD4(+ T cells into CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells compared with control DCs. Our data suggest that IRT5 probiotics could be applicable to modulate antibody mediated autoimmune diseases including myasthenia gravis.

  19. A Case Series of Patients With Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Association With Invasive Thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe, Pamela; Raj, Meenakshi; Henderson, Robert; Blum, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    In some patients, autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is associated with thymic hyperplasia or thymoma, and in some patients the thymoma is invasive. Little is known about the clinical course of subjects who present with MG and are found to have invasive thymoma. We reviewed the patients at our clinic with MG and invasive thymoma, and have described their clinical features. Six MG patients were diagnosed with invasive thymoma. The subjects had extensive multimodal therapy. Two subjects died from uncontrolled neuromuscular respiratory failure despite aggressive immunosuppression, 2 subjects had other autoimmune disorders (Morvan syndrome and polymyositis), and 2 subjects are controlled on immunosuppression. Patients with invasive thymoma and MG can have a poor outcome, with difficulty in controlling myasthenic symptoms and can have other clinically important autoimmune diseases.

  20. Nutrition and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good nutrition is important for everyone. This is especially true when you have a chronic disorder like myasthenia gravis ( ... difficulty with chewing and swallowing may interfere with nutrition and create safety issues. Diet modifications may be ...

  1. Silencing miR-146a influences B cells and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JunMei; Jia, Ge; Liu, Qun; Hu, Jue; Yan, Mei; Yang, BaiFeng; Yang, Huan; Zhou, WenBin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of immune homeostasis as patients with aberrant microRNA expression appeared to be more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. We recently found that miR-146a was up-regulated in activated B cells in response to rat acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit 97-116 peptide, and this up-regulation was significantly attenuated by AntagomiR-146a. Our data also demonstrated that silencing miR-146a with its inhibitor AntagomiR-146a effectively ameliorated clinical myasthenic symptoms in mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, multiple defects were observed after miR-146a was knocked down in B cells, including decreased anti-R97-116 antibody production and class switching, reduced numbers of plasma cells, memory B cells and B-1 cells, and weakened activation of B cells. Previously, miR-146a has been identified as a nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene and predicted to base pair with the tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) genes to regulate the immune response. However, our study proved that miR-146a inhibition had no effect on the expression of TRAF6 and IRAK1 in B cells. This result suggests that the function of miR-146a in B cells does not involve these two target molecules. We conclude that silencing miR-146a exerts its therapeutic effects by influencing the B-cell functions that contribute to the autoimmune pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. B-Cell-Activating Factor and Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Ragheb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BAFF is a potent B-cell survival factor, and it plays an essential role in B-cell homeostasis and B-cell function in the periphery. Both normal and autoreactive B cells are BAFF dependent; however, excess BAFF promotes the survival, growth, and maturation of autoreactive B cells. When overexpressed, BAFF protects B cells from apoptosis, thereby contributing to autoimmunity. Three independent studies have shown higher BAFF levels in the circulation of MG patients. BAFF may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MG. BAFF antagonists may well provide new treatment options for MG patients, particularly those patients with thymic lymphoid follicular hyperplasia.

  3. Treatment for Myasthenia Gravis (MG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individualized There are many effective treatments for myasthenia gravis. Spontaneous improvement and even remission (although uncommon) may ... by Kellen Interactive Web Design © copyright 2010 Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America, Inc.

  4. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  5. Specific removal of autoantibodies by extracorporeal immunoadsorption ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Dalianoudis, Ioannis; Baltatzidi, Vasiliki; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2017-11-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by autoantibodies, the majority of which target the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Plasmapheresis and IgG-immunoadsorption are useful therapy options, but are highly non-specific. Antigen-specific immunoadsorption would remove only the pathogenic autoantibodies, reducing the possibility of side effects while maximizing the benefit. We have extensively characterized such adsorbents, but in vivo studies are missing. We used rats with experimental autoimmune MG to perform antigen-specific immunoadsorptions over three weeks, regularly monitoring symptoms and autoantibody titers. Immunoadsorption was effective, resulting in a marked autoantibody titer decrease while the immunoadsorbed, but not the mock-treated, animals showed a dramatic symptom improvement. Overall, the procedure was found to be efficient, suggesting the subsequent initiation of clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole-genome analysis in Korean patients with autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sang-Jun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, So Won; Kim, Dae-Seong; Shon, Eun Hee; Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Seung Min; Choi, Young-Chul

    2014-05-01

    The underlying cause of myasthenia gravis (MG) is unknown, although it likely involves a genetic component. However, no common genetic variants have been unequivocally linked to autoimmune MG. We sought to identify the genetic variants associated with an increased or decreased risk of developing MG in samples from a Korean Multicenter MG Cohort. To determine new genetic targets related to autoimmune MG, a whole genome-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) analysis was conducted using an Axiom™ Genome-Wide ASI 1 Array, comprising 598375 SNPs and samples from 109 MG patients and 150 neurologically normal controls. In total, 641 SNPs from five case-control associations showed p-values of less than 10⁻⁵. From regional analysis, we selected seven candidate genes (RYR3, CACNA1S, SLAMF1, SOX5, FHOD3, GABRB1, and SACS) for further analysis. The present study suggests that a few genetic polymorphisms, such as in RYR3, CACNA1S, and SLAMF1, might be related to autoimmune MG. Our findings also encourage further studies, particularly confirmatory studies with larger samples, to validate and analyze the association between these SNPs and autoimmune MG.

  7. Study of the prevalence of familial autoimmune myasthenia gravis in a Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvado, Maria; Canela, Merce; Ponseti, Jose Maria; Lorenzo, Laura; Garcia, Cecilia; Cazorla, Sonia; Gili, Gisela; Raguer, Nuria; Gamez, Josep

    2016-01-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by a failure of neuromuscular transmission. Familial clustering has been reported despiteMG usually manifesting as a sporadic condition presumed not to be inherited. Our study investigated the prevalence of FAMG in a Spanish cohort, characterizing their phenotype,antibody titres and thymus findings. We investigated the presence of familial cases in 462 MG patients, characterizing by age and MGFA class at debut, quantitative MG score, antibody titres, MGFA post-intervention status and thymus pathology. Sixteen cases from8 unrelated pedigrees were identified. The prevalence of FAMG caseswas 3.46%.Mean age at onset was 57.8 ± 17.4 years (range=23–82). Distribution at debut was: 6 ocular, 4 IIa, 4IIb, 1 IIIa and 1 IIIb. Thymoma was identified in two of the 7 thymectomized individuals. The prevalence of FAMG in Spain is similar to other populations. Post-intervention status did not differ from sporadic autoimmune MG. As in other neuromuscular disorders, phenotype and inheritance heterogeneity are present in FAMG. In addition to the interfamilial heterogeneity observed, members of the same family affected with FAMG may even present different ages of onset, severity and thymus involvement. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of genetic risk factors in this form of autoimmune MG.

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Incidence of seropositive myasthenia gravis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a treatable autoimmune disease in which the autoantibody is directed at the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) on the postsynaptic neuromuscular junc- tion. AChR antibodies are identifiable in 85 - 90% of patients with generalised myasthenia, and are highly specific for MG.1,2. Traditionally MG was ...

  9. Blepharoptosis in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronuovo, S; Krohel, G B; Kristan, R W

    1983-08-01

    We reviewed the records of 23 patients with systemic myasthenia gravis and blepharoptosis. The overall prognosis for improvement of blepharoptosis in these patients was favorable when multiple modes of therapy, including anticholinesterase medication, were used. Four of five patients with disabling blepharoptosis were stable enough after three to four years of their disease to consider corrective lid surgery. Two patients underwent levator resection with good results. Patients with systemic and ocular myasthenia gravis who are refractory to systemic therapy should be considered candidates for ptosis surgery when their blepharoptosis has been stable over a three- to four-year period.

  10. Masticatory performance in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Oudenaarde, [No Value; Bosman, F

    Masticatory muscle electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis chewed artificial food and compared with those of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission who had previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis and healthy

  11. [An update on myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Torre, S; Gómez Molinero, I; Martínez Girón, R

    2018-03-16

    Myasthenia gravis is one of the most common disorders that affect neuromuscular transmission. It is currently one of the most understood and characterised autoimmune disorders Its typical symptoms are fluctuating weakness and fatigue that affects a combination of ocular muscles, bulbar functions, as well as limb and respiratory muscles, which are due to an immune attack against the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is based on clinical and serological test. It is a disease that can be effectively controlled with the current therapeutic lines, even achieving a complete remission. An update of this interesting disorder is now presented. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical predictors for the prognosis of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Zhang, Yun; He, Maolin

    2017-04-19

    Clinical predictors for myasthenia gravis relapse and ocular myasthenia gravis secondary generalization during the first two years after disease onset remain incompletely identified. This study attempts to investigate the clinical predictors for the prognosis of Myasthenia Gravis. Eighty three patients with myasthenia gravis were concluded in this study. Baseline characteristics were analyzed as predictors. Relapse of myasthenia gravis developed in 26 patients (34%). Generalization developed in 34 ocular myasthenia gravis patients (85%). Other autoimmune diseases were observed more commonly in relapsed myasthenia gravis (P = 0.012). Second generalization group contained more late onset patients (P = 0.021). Ocular myasthenia gravis patients with thymus hyperplasia progressed more rapidly than those with other thymus pathology (P = 0.027). Single onset symptom of ocular myasthenia gravis such as ptosis or diplopia predicted early progression than concurrence of ptosis and diplopia (P = 0.027). Treatment effect including glucocorticoid, pyridostigmine, thymectomy, IVIG, immunosuppressive drugs did not show significant difference between the relapsed and non-relapsed groups. The treatment outcome also showed no difference between the single OMG and second generalized groups. Occurrence of associated autoimmune disease can serve as a potential predictor for myasthenia gravis relapse. Either ptosis or diplopia, as well as thymic hyperplasia can predict generalization in the first six months.

  13. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kaminski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM, diaphragm (DIA, and extensor digitorum (EDL of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, three hundred and fifty-nine probes (1.16% with greater than 2 fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism.

  14. [Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Jun; Wang, Ji-Ming; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Xin-Jun; Ma, Feng-Xia; Yang, Shao-Guang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-06-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UCMSC) transplantation has been widely used in the treatment of a variety of diseases due to their advantages such as abundant resources, low immunogenicity and large ex vivo expansion capacity. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of UCMSC on experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) rats. The distribution of human-derived cells was observed by immunofluorescence method, the effect of MSC on B-cell in situ-secreted antibodies was assayed by ELISPOT, the secreted IFN-γ level was detected by using Transwell test. The results showed that UCMSC were able to migrate to inflammation region and lymph nudes, moreover human-derived cells could be detected in medulla zone of lymph nudes. In vitro in situ detection of AchR specific antibody secretion revealed that the full contact of MSC with lymphnode-derived lymphocytes could effectively inhibit production of AchR antibody. Transwell test indicated that the direct contact of UCMSC with CD4 T cells could effectively decrease production of IFN-γ, which modulated the unbalance between Th1/Th2 to a certain extent. It is concluded that UCMSC can regulate the immune system by direct cell-cell contact or/and release of cytokines, which bring a new insight into knowledge about MSC-based therapy for EAMG.

  15. Myasthenia Gravis (MG): Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Many drugs and procedures are available for treating ... on prepubescent children. For more about myasthenia gravis management, see: Managing Myasthenia Keeping Your Focus: Eye Care ...

  16. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis may occur in the context of a polarized Th1- or Th2-type immune response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saoudi, A; Bernard, I; Hoedemaekers, A

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is a T cell-dependent, Ab-mediated autoimmune disease induced in rats by a single immunization with acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although polarized Th1 responses have been shown to be crucial for the development of mouse EAMG, the role of Th cell...

  17. Myasthenia Gravis and Its Aeromedical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagathesan, Tania; O'Brien, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune condition where antibodies form against the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, eventually causing damage to the motor end plate. The clinical features include muscle fatigability as well as ocular, bulbar, and limb weakness, which can have implications on the role of a pilot or air traffic controller. This retrospective study reviewed the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority (UK CAA) experience of myasthenia gravis. A search of the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority medical records database from 1990 to 2016 identified 11 individuals with a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Data were extracted for the class of medical certificate, age at diagnosis, symptoms, acetylcholine receptor antibody status, treatment, the time from diagnosis to loss of medical certification, and the reasons for loss of certification. There were two Class 1 certificate holders (for professional flying) and six Class 2 certificate holders (for private pilot flying) and three air traffic controllers. The mean and median ages at diagnosis were 53 and 57 yr, respectively, with a range of 28-67 yr. The mean and median intervals from diagnosis to loss of certification were 22 and 11 mo, respectively, with a range of 0 to 108 mo. The aeromedical implications of myasthenia gravis, including complications, types of treatment, and functional impact, are considered. A policy for medical certification following a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is proposed.Jagathesan T, O'Brien MD. Myasthenia gravis and its aeromedical implications. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):30-33.

  18. Coexistent Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy and Myasthenia Gravis Associated with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Black, Bonnie K.; Raj, Satish R.; Donofrio, Peter; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 55 year old man with non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation, chemotherapy with carbotaxol and paclitaxel, and left upper lobe removal two years prior to evaluation. He was referred for disabling orthostatic hypotension (113/69 supine, 66/47 mmHg standing after 10 minutes without a compensatory heart rate increase (57 to 59 bpm), fatigue, and constipation with episodes of ileus. Clinical examination showed mild ptosis bilaterally, fatiguable neck flexor weakness and hip flexor weakness. Blood pressure response to Valsalva maneuver was abnormal with absence of phase 4 overshoot and a Valsalva heart rate ratio of 1.04, The plasma norepinephrine level was low (79 pg/ml supine to 330 pg/ml standing). Single fiber EMG of the right extensor digitorum communis revealed normal mean MCD (jitter) but several pairs exceeded a jitter of 100 µs. Antibodies against muscle acetylcholine receptor [(AChR) 0.66 nmol/L, normal <0.02] and ganglionic AChR (0.34 nmol/L, normal <0.02) were present. Treatment with plasma exchange normalized responses to standing posture (105/68 supine to 118/82 mmHg standing, 66 to 79 bpm), to Valsalva (normal blood pressure overshoot, HR ratio 1.47), norepinephrine (194 pg/ml supine, 763 standing), and jitter measurements. We conclude that autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy and myasthenia gravis can coexist and suggest that the latter should be excluded in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy who complain of fatigue that is improved with non-supine rest. PMID:19882640

  19. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  20. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  1. Myasthenia gravis: subgroup classification and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2015-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by muscle weakness and fatigue, is B-cell mediated, and is associated with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase (MUSK), lipoprotein-related protein 4 (LRP4), or agrin in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Patients with myasthenia gravis should be classified into subgroups to help with therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Subgroups based on serum antibodies and clinical features include early-onset, late-onset, thymoma, MUSK, LRP4, antibody-negative, and ocular forms of myasthenia gravis. Agrin-associated myasthenia gravis might emerge as a new entity. The prognosis is good with optimum symptomatic, immunosuppressive, and supportive treatment. Pyridostigmine is the preferred symptomatic treatment, and for patients who do not adequately respond to symptomatic therapy, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and thymectomy are first-line immunosuppressive treatments. Additional immunomodulatory drugs are emerging, but therapeutic decisions are hampered by the scarcity of controlled studies. Long-term drug treatment is essential for most patients and must be tailored to the particular form of myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  3. MuSK induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis does not require IgG1 antibody to MuSK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükerden, Melike; Huda, Ruksana; Tüzün, Erdem; Yılmaz, Abdullah; Skriapa, Lamprini; Trakas, Nikos; Strait, Richard T; Finkelman, Fred D; Kabadayı, Sevil; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2016-06-15

    Sera of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with muscle-specific receptor kinase-antibody (MuSK-Ab) predominantly display the non-complement fixing IgG4 isotype. Similarly, mouse IgG1, which is the analog of human IgG4, is the predominant isotype in mice with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by MuSK immunization. The present study was performed to determine whether IgG1 anti-MuSK antibody is required for immunized mice to develop EAMG. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between clinical severity of EAMG and levels of MuSK-binding IgG1+, IgG2+ and IgG3+ peripheral blood B cells in MuSK-immunized wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, MuSK-immunized IgG1 knockout (KO) and WT mice showed similar EAMG severity, serum MuSK-Ab levels, muscle acetylcholine receptor concentrations, neuromuscular junction immunoglobulin and complement deposit ratios. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant anti-MuSK isotypes in WT and IgG1 KO mice, respectively. These observations demonstrate that non-IgG1 isotypes can mediate MuSK-EAMG pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of sarcoidosis and myasthenia gravis: Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whereas the coexistence of different autoimmune or rheumatologic diseases with myasthenia gravis (MG) is well documented, its combination with sarcoidosis is extremely rare. Presented here is an interesting case with coexisting MG and sarcoidosis.

  5. Tongue force in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Wassenberg, MWM; Bosman, F

    2000-01-01

    Objectives - The aim was to study tongue force in patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis and compare it with that of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission who previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis, and healthy subjects. Material and methods - Tongue force

  6. Multiple Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Seo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The actual incidence of multiple thymoma is unknown and rarely reported because it remains controversial whether the cases represent a disease of multicentric origin or a disease resulting from intrathymic metastasis. In this case, a patient underwent total thymectomy for multiple thymoma with myasthenia gravis via bilateral video-assisted thoracic surgery. A well-encapsulated multinodular cystic mass, measuring 57 mm×50 mm×22 mm in the right lobe of the thymus, and a well-encapsulated mass, measuring 32 mm×15 mm×14 mm in the left lobe, were found. Both tumors were type B2 thymoma. Few cases of multiple thymoma with myasthenia gravis have ever been reported in the literature. We report a case of synchronous multiple thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GP, Tzartos SJ, Poulas K. Recent advances in genetic predisposition of myasthenia gravis. Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:404053. doi: 10.1155/2013/404053. Epub 2013 Nov 5. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed ... from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its ...

  8. Acquired generalised neuromyotonia, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and alopecia areata in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    We describe a patient with the diagnoses of acquired neuromyotonia, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and alopecia areata, occurring many years after a thymectomy for myasthenia gravis associated with a thymoma. We review the current literature on autoimmune conditions associated with myasthenia gravis and thymectomy. To our knowledge, this combination of multiple autoimmune conditions has not been reported previously.

  9. New diagnosis myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, John; Balson, Ian Frank; Dennis, Alicia T

    2015-02-26

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease of neuromuscular transmission resulting in fatigable skeletal muscle weakness. Preeclampsia is a multisystem disease of pregnancy which is characterised by hypertension and involvement of one or more organ systems. Both diseases are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality for mother and fetus. The occurrence of both preeclampsia and myasthenia gravis in pregnancy is very rare, and conflicts arise when considering the optimal management of each disease.We present a case of a parturient who was newly diagnosed with both myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia in late pregnancy. Myasthenia treatment was started with prednisolone and pyridostigmine, and delivery was by caesarean section at 37 weeks gestation under spinal anaesthesia. Postnatally, the patient developed worsening of myasthenia and preeclampsia symptoms. We consider the anaesthetic implications for both diseases and describe our approach for the management of this case. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Myasthenia gravis: an update for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieb, J P

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides a thorough overview of the current advances in diagnosis and therapy of myasthenia gravis (MG). Nowadays the term 'myasthenia gravis' includes heterogeneous autoimmune diseases, with a postsynaptic defect of neuromuscular transmission as the common feature. Myasthenia gravis should be classified according to the antibody specificity [acetylcholine, muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), seronegative], thymus histology (thymitis, thymoma, atrophy), age at onset (in children; aged less than or more than 50 years) and type of course (ocular or generalized). With optimal treatment, the prognosis is good in terms of daily functions, quality of life and survival. Symptomatic treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibition is usually combined with immunosuppression. Azathioprine still remains the first choice for long-term immunosuppressive therapy. Alternative immunosuppressive options to azathioprine include cyclosporin, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Rituximab is a promising new drug for severe generalized MG. Emerging therapy options include belimumab, eculizumab and the granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor. One pilot study on etanercept has given disappointing results. For decades, thymectomy has been performed in younger adults to improve non-paraneoplastic MG. However, controlled prospective studies on the suspected benefit of this surgical procedure are still lacking. In acute exacerbations, including myasthenic crisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption are similarly effective. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  11. [Myasthenia gravis, Graves-Basedow disease and other autoimmune diseases in patient with diabetes type 1 - APS-3 case report, therapeutic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenczar, Karolina; Deja, Grażyna; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes type 1(T1D) is the most frequent form of diabetes in children and young people, which essence is autoimmune destruction of pancreatic B cells islet. Co-occurrence of other autoimmune diseases is observed in children with T1D, the most often are: Hashimoto disease or coeliac disease. We report the case of the patient, who presents coincidence of T1D with other rare autoimmune diseases such as: Graves - Basedow disease, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo and IgA deficiency. All mentioned diseases significantly complicated both endocrine and diabetic treatment of our patient and they negatively contributed her quality of life. The clinical picture of the case allows to recognize one of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes: APS-3 and is associated with still high risk of developing another autoimmune disease. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  12. Miastenia gravis juvenil Juvenile myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Papazian

    2009-01-01

    administración endovenosa de gamma globulina.Juvenile myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disorder which occurs when serum antibodies combine with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the muscle membrane of the motor endplate imparing the neuromuscular transmission. It results in early muscle fatigability with progression to a complete paralysis during repetitive muscle contraction (movements or steady muscle contraction (postures, and less common persistent paralysis at rest. The cranial nerves, mainly the one innervating the extraoccular and palpebral levator, are the most susceptible to permanent weakness and paralysis at rest. Initial clinical presentations are generalized, ocular and respiratory forms. The diagnosis is suspected through medical history of abnormal fatigability and corroborated by physical examination, repetitive nerve stimulation of an affected but not complete paralyzed muscle, correction of fatigability by the intravenous administration of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors, and by the presence of serum acetylcholine receptors antibodies (ACRA. The long term treatment is symptomatic (acetylcholine inhibitors and etiopathogenic (immunosupresor drugs, plasmapheresis, intravenous gamma globulin and thymectomy. Spontaneous or post symptomatic and etiopathogenic treatment remissions occur from 1 to 10 years. Fatality is rare but children are at high risk during myasthenia crisis.

  13. Ocular myasthenia gravis: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Venkatramani, Devendra V; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disease that affects the neuro-muscular junction resulting in classical symptoms of variable muscle weakness and fatigability. It is called the great masquerader owing to its varied clinical presentations. Very often, a patient of MG may present to the ophthalmologist given that a large proportion of patients with systemic myasthenia have ocular involvement either at presentation or during the later course of the disease. The treatment of ocular MG involves both the neurologist and ophthalmologist. Thus, the aim of this review was to highlight the current diagnosis, investigations, and treatment of ocular MG. PMID:25449931

  14. Early-onset acquired myasthenia gravis secondary to anti-muscle-specific kinase autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Gokben, Sarenur; Serdaroglu, Gul; Akcay, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is rarely seen during infancy. Similar to adults, 85% to 90% of generalized pediatric myasthenia gravis cases have acetylcholine receptor antibodies. Approximately 30% of the remaining cases have antibodies against muscle-specific kinase. Information on the clinical course, treatment alternatives, and prognosis of pediatric muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis is limited because of the small number of cases. Here, we present a 14-month-old girl with muscle-specific kinase antibody-positive myasthenia gravis as one of the youngest patients described so far in the literature.

  15. MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Soltanzadeh

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction. In children, the disease may be congenital or due to an autoimmune process. Clinical manifestations may be purely ocular or may include generalized weakness, fatigability, dysphagia, and disorders of speech."nIn this article, 27 children (14 female, 13 male were prospectively studied from birth to age fifteen. Disease presentation was ocular in all the cases, with ptosis and diplopia. In 6 patients (all female, the disease was purely ocular, in the remaining 21, the disease was generalized. There was one case of transient neonatal myasthenia born to a myasthenic mother. Nine patients underwent thymectomy; all were reported as hyperplasia. Clinical consequences of the surgery were satisfactory. Five cases had hereditary myasthenia. In three brothers from one family, and a brother and sister from another family, disease presented from the neonatal period."nOverall, compared to adults, myasthenia seems to have a more favorable course in children. In the autoimmune form of the disease, thymectomy has a very good result. Thymoma was not observed in these cases. MG in the newborn of myasthenic mothers had a very good prognosis, and treatment is necessary in the first few weeks only in the presence of clinical manifestations. In the congenital form of the disease, there is no indication for administration of steroids, thymectomy, or plasmapheresis.

  16. RARITY OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN NORTHERN NIGERIANS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a 10 year retrospective review of patients managed at the Ahmadu Bello Teaching hospital, Zaria, Nigeria for myasthenia gravis. Only 4 patients were identified from the hospitals records. Myasthenia gravis appears uncommon in this environment. Reasons for the apparent rarity of this condition and other ...

  17. Isolated laryngeal myasthenia gravis for 26 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Hedayat, Amir; Gagnard, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Laryngeal myasthenia gravis is a relatively rare variant of myasthenia gravis. A vast portion of patients with initial laryngeal myasthenia gravis develop involvement of ocular and/or extra-ocular muscles during the years after symptom onset although a minority of laryngeal myasthenia gravis patients continues to have isolated laryngeal muscle involvement for several years. We present a 58-year-old woman with recurrent episodic isolated dysphonia (associated with diffuse bilateral vocal cord paresis on laryngoscopy) since the age of 32. Dysphonia became permanent since 6 months. A diagnosis of laryngeal myasthenia gravis was made based on abnormal single-fiber electromyography and spectacular response to pyridostigmine treatment. Repetitive nerve stimulation was normal and anti-acetylcholine receptor and anti-muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were absent. This case shows that laryngeal myasthenia gravis can be isolated during 26 years of follow-up. We propose that even when myasthenia gravis seems unlikely as underlying mechanism of isolated dysphonia (because of lack of antibodies, normal repetitive nerve stimulation, and absence of extra-laryngeal involvement after years of follow-up), single-fiber electromyography should be performed and myasthenia gravis treatment should be tried. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A strategy for cell-based multiplex diagnostics of Myasthenia gravis and autoimmune encephalitis by modifying the subcellular localization of cell membrane autoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S; Georgi, M; Roggenbuck, D; Conrad, K; Küpper, J-H

    2014-01-01

    Many autoimmune diseases are characterized by autoantibodies directed against cell membrane proteins. We were intrigued to develop a strategy for targeting individual cell membrane proteins to various subcellular compartments as a prerequisite for their simultaneous immunofluorescence detection. We first employed GFP and RFP reporters that were equipped with defined intracellular localization signals. Expressing these protein reporters in HEp-2 cells we found by using fluorescence microscopy that protein localization in cytoplasm or at mitochondria can be clearly discriminated from localization at Golgi, ER or lysosomes. We then tested for muscle-specific kinase, a relevant cell membrane autoantigen in Myasthenia gravis, and NMDA receptor which is relevant for autoimmune encephalitis, whether these autoantigens can be localized to the same intracellular compartments. To this end, we successfully targeted muscle-specific kinase to Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and cytoplasm. We found that its Golgi localization can be clearly distinguished from its natural cell membrane localization. The same we found for Golgi-localized NMDA receptor 1. Interestingly, cell membrane proteins kept at the Golgi system accumulated in higher amounts than their wild-type counterparts. The obtained results are the basis for the further development of multiplex assays for the immunofluorescence diagnostics of Myasthenia gravis and autoimmune encephalitis.

  19. Immune mechanism of thymomas in the development of myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an acquired autoimmune disorder which is cellular-immunity-dependent, humoral-immunity¬mediated and complement participated. It is still not clear which initial factor causes the immune response. The characteristic of myasthenia gravis is that many of the patients have an abnormality in their thymus. So it is speculated that the immune response is initiated in thymus. The thymus is the central organ of the immune system, playing the key role in T cell generation, diversification and maturation. T cells are positively selected for their recognition of antigens associated with MHC expressed in the thymus, and negatively selected according to their response to the self-antigens. The result of these selection is that the T cell use the MHC expressed on the other cells of the body for recognition of foreign antigens but do not react with self-antigens. Perhaps the most important role of thymus is the induction of immune self-tolerance that functions to prevent self-harm or autoimmunity. Thymomas are functional tumors originated from epithelial of the thymus, which have the capacity to induce T cell to differentiate and mature. What mechanism is Myasthenia gravis associated thymoma initiated by? This review will summarize the existing evidence of thymus, thymoma and myasthenia gravis and try to clarify the immune mechanism of initiation of myasthenia gravis associated thymomas.

  20. Myasthenia Gravis Medication Information Card (Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in Myasthenia Gravis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MYASTHENIA GRAVIS MEDICATION INFORMATION CARD Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in MG My Name _______________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________ City ______________________ ... MGFA web site; reference document “Medications and Myasthenia Gravis (A Reference for Health Care Professionals.” www.myasthenia. ...

  1. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis may occur in the context of a polarized Th1- or Th2-type immune response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saoudi, A; Bernard, I; Hoedemaekers, A

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is a T cell-dependent, Ab-mediated autoimmune disease induced in rats by a single immunization with acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although polarized Th1 responses have been shown to be crucial for the development of mouse EAMG, the role of Th cell......-gamma neutralization strongly influenced the Th1/Th2 balance in BN rats, it did not affect the disease outcome. These data demonstrate that a Th1-dominated immune response is not necessarily associated with disease severity in EAMG, not only in rats with disparate MHC haplotype but also in the same rat strain......, and suggest that in a situation where complement-fixing Ab can be generated as a consequence of either Th1- or Th2-mediated T cell help, deviation of the immune response will not be an adequate strategy to prevent this Ab-mediated autoimmune disease....

  2. Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis: A Paediatric Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Finnis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease in which antibodies are directed against the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, resulting in muscle weakness and fatigability. Juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG is a rare condition of childhood and has many clinical features that are distinct from adult MG. Prepubertal children in particular have a higher prevalence of isolated ocular symptoms, lower frequency of acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and a higher probability of achieving remission. Diagnosis in young children can be complicated by the need to differentiate from congenital myasthenic syndromes, which do not have an autoimmune basis. Treatment commonly includes anticholinesterases, corticosteroids with or without steroid-sparing agents, and newer immune modulating agents. Plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG are effective in preparation for surgery and in treatment of myasthenic crisis. Thymectomy increases remission rates. Diagnosis and management of children with JMG should take account of their developmental needs, natural history of the condition, and side-effect profiles of treatment options.

  3. Incidence of seropositive myasthenia gravis in Cape Town and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a treatable autoimmune disease characterised by fatiguable weakness of skeletal muscles. More than 85% of MG patients have antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction or are seropositive for MG (SPMG). In the developed world the incidence of ...

  4. Psychiatric disorders in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Ybarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. METHOD: Forty-one patients with MG answered to a structured psychiatric interview (MINI-Plus. RESULTS: Eleven (26.1% patients were diagnosed with a depressive disorder and 19 (46.3% were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Patients with dysthymia were older (p=0.029 and had longer disease duration (p=0.006. Patients with social phobia also had longer disease duration (p=0.039. CONCLUSION: Psychiatric disorders in MG are common, especially depressive and anxiety disorders.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score and the Myasthenia Gravis Composite Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Carolina; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Katzberg, Hans; Bril, Vera

    2015-09-02

    The Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score and the Myasthenia Gravis Composite are two commonly used outcome measures in Myasthenia Gravis. So far, their measurement properties have not been compared, so we aimed to study their psychometric properties using the Rasch model. 251 patients with stable myasthenia gravis were assessed with both scales, and 211 patients returned for a second assessment. We studied fit to the Rasch model at the first visit, and compared item fit, thresholds, differential item functioning, local dependence, person separation index, and tests for unidimensionality. We also assessed test-retest reliability and estimated the Minimal Detectable Change. Neither scale fit the Rasch model (X2p Gravis Composite had lower discrimination properties than the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Scale (Person Separation Index: 0.14 and 0.7). There was local dependence in both scales, as well as differential item functioning for ocular and generalized disease. Disordered thresholds were found in 6(60%) items of the Myasthenia Gravis Composite and in 4(31%) of the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score. Both tools had adequate test-retest reliability (ICCs >0.8). The minimally detectable change was 4.9 points for the Myasthenia Gravis Composite and 4.3 points for the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score. Neither scale fulfilled Rasch model expectations. The Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score has higher discrimination than the Myasthenia Gravis Composite. Both tools have items with disordered thresholds, differential item functioning and local dependency. There was evidence of multidimensionality in the QMGS. The minimal detectable change values are higher than previous studies on the minimal significant change. These findings might inform future modifications of these tools.

  6. Standardization of the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model by immunization of rats with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptors--Recommendations for methods and experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Molenaar, Peter C; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates; Brenner, Talma; Duan, Rui-Sheng; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon; Kusner, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is characterized by a chronic, fatigable weakness of voluntary muscles. The production of autoantibodies involves the dysregulation of T cells which provide the environment for the development of autoreactive B cells. The symptoms are caused by destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and degradation of the AChR by IgG autoantibodies, predominantly of the G1 and G3 subclasses. Active immunization of animals with AChR from mammalian muscles, AChR from Torpedo or Electrophorus electric organs, and recombinant or synthetic AChR fragments generates a chronic model of MG, termed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). This model covers cellular mechanisms involved in the immune response against the AChR, e.g. antigen presentation, T cell-help and regulation, B cell selection and differentiation into plasma cells. Our aim is to define standard operation procedures and recommendations for the rat EAMG model using purified AChR from the Torpedo californica electric organ, in order to facilitate more rapid translation of preclinical proof of concept or efficacy studies into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Standardization of the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model by immunization of rats with Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptors — Recommendations for methods and experimental designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losen, Mario; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Molenaar, Peter C.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates; Brenner, Talma; Duan, Rui-Sheng; Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon; Kusner, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is characterized by a chronic, fatigable weakness of voluntary muscles. The production of autoantibodies involves the dysregulation of T cells which provide the environment for the development of autoreactive B cells. The symptoms are caused by destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and degradation of the AChR by IgG autoantibodies, predominantly of the G1 and G3 subclasses. Active immunization of animals with AChR from mammalian muscles, AChR from Torpedo or Electrophorus electric organs, and recombinant or synthetic AChR fragments generates a chronic model of MG, termed experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). This model covers cellular mechanisms involved in the immune response against the AChR, e.g. antigen presentation, T cell-help and regulation, B cell selection and differentiation into plasma cells. Our aim is to define standard operation procedures and recommendations for the rat EAMG model using purified AChR from the Torpedo californica electric organ, in order to facilitate more rapid translation of preclinical proof of concept or efficacy studies into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. PMID:25796590

  8. A Novel Approach to Reinstating Tolerance in Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis Using a Targeted Fusion Protein, mCTA1–T146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Alessandra; Sharma, Sapna; Schön, Karin; Lebrero-Fernández, Cristina; Rinaldi, Elena; Lycke, Nils Yngve; Baggi, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    Reinstating tissue-specific tolerance has attracted much attention as a means to treat autoimmune diseases. However, despite promising results in rodent models of autoimmune diseases, no established tolerogenic therapy is clinically available yet. In the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model several protocols have been reported that induce tolerance against the prime disease-associated antigen, the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. Using the whole AChR, the extracellular part or peptides derived from the receptor, investigators have reported variable success with their treatments, though, usually relatively large amounts of antigen has been required. Hence, there is a need for better formulations and strategies to improve on the efficacy of the tolerance-inducing therapies. Here, we report on a novel targeted fusion protein carrying the immunodominant peptide from AChR, mCTA1–T146, which given intranasally in repeated microgram doses strongly suppressed induction as well as ongoing EAMG disease in mice. The results corroborate our previous findings, using the same fusion protein approach, in the collagen-induced arthritis model showing dramatic suppressive effects on Th1 and Th17 autoaggressive CD4 T cells and upregulated regulatory T cell activities with enhanced IL10 production. A suppressive gene signature with upregulated expression of mRNA for TGFβ, IL10, IL27, and Foxp3 was clearly detectable in lymph node and spleen following intranasal treatment with mCTA1–T146. Amelioration of EAMG disease was accompanied by reduced loss of muscle AChR and lower levels of anti-AChR serum antibodies. We believe this targeted highly effective fusion protein mCTA1–T146 is a promising candidate for clinical evaluation in myasthenia gravis patients. PMID:28959261

  9. Successful use of sugammadex for caesarean section in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyoral, Lokman; Goktas, Ugur; Cegin, Muhammed Bilal; Baydi, Volkan

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness that fluctuates, worsening with exertion, and improving with rest. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is made following clinical and physical examination and is confirmed by serum immunoassays to measure autoantibody levels. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease, and its course is unpredictable. We described the second report about use of sugammadex after rocuronium for a caesarean delivery with myasthenia gravis, but, unlike our case that formerly was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, the patient was extubated on postoperative successfully and we did not encounter any respiratory problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. [Successful use of sugammadex for caesarean section in a patient with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyoral, Lokman; Goktas, Ugur; Cegin, Muhammed Bilal; Baydi, Volkan

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness that fluctuates, worsening with exertion, and improving with rest. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is made following clinical and physical examination and is confirmed by serum immunoassays to measure autoantibody levels. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease, and its course is unpredictable. We described the second report about use of sugammadex after rocuronium for a caesarean delivery with myasthenia gravis, but, unlike our case that formerly was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, the patient was extubated on postoperative successfully and we did not encounter any respiratory problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed Diagnosis of Atypical Presentation of Myasthenia Gravis

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    Moneeb Sefeldawla Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction, resulting in muscle fatiguability and weakness. The pathological characteristics of the disorder include ocular weakness resulting in diplopia and/or ptosis. More generally, the disease can result in fluctuant weakness of skeletal muscle, predominantly affecting ocular, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Autoimmunity in this instance is mediated by IgG anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies that results in an impaired structure of postsynaptic neurotransmission. Approximately 15% of patients with myasthenia gravis present with bulbar symptoms, of which isolated bulbar symptoms are seen only on occasion. As with our patient, this presentation is most commonly seen in men with late-onset myasthenia gravis. We present a case of an 83-year-old male who presented with a 1 year history of dysphagia for solids and fatigable dysarthria. Following a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, he was initiated on corticosteroid treatment. He later descended into myasthenic crisis, requiring invasive ventilation measures due to a failure of both non-invasive ventilation and intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG to achieve therapeutic goals.

  12. Multiple thymoma in a patient with myasthenia gravis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jin Jong [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk Sik [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    A thymoma often occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis, but the development of multiple thymoma is very rare. The authors report the radiologic and pathologic findings of multiple invasive thymoma in a 59-year-old male with myasthenia gravis.

  13. An increase in circulating B cell-activating factor in childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Inaba, Yuji; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Nakazawa, Yozo; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disorder. The pathophysiology of childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis remains unclear. We investigated serum B cell-activating factor levels and other immunological parameters in child patients with ocular myasthenia gravis. Blood samples were obtained from 9 children with ocular myasthenia gravis and 20 age-matched controls. We assayed serum concentrations of B cell-activating factor, anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers, 7 types of cytokines (interleukins-2, -4, -6, -10, and -17A; interferon-γ; tumor necrosis factor-α) as well as the percentages of peripheral blood CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells. Serum B cell-activating factor levels were significantly higher before immunosuppressive therapy in patients with childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis than in controls and decreased after immunosuppressive therapy. A significant positive correlation was observed between serum B cell-activating factor levels and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers in patients with myasthenia gravis. Serum B cell-activating factor concentrations did not correlate with the percentages of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells or the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. No significant differences were observed in the levels of the 7 different types of cytokines examined, including interleukin-17A, between preimmunosuppressive therapy myasthenia gravis patients and controls. Circulating B cell-activating factor may play a key role in the pathophysiology of childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Familial myasthenia gravis: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lamartine de Assis

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available Two pairs of siblings with myasthenia gravis, belonging to two different families, are reported. This is the only record of familial myasthenia during the past twenty years, in a total of 145 patients seen at the Neurological Clinic of the São Paulo Medical School. In spite of the fact that myasthenia gravis does not show hereditary characteristics, the peculiar features of the four cases justify the present report. The two pairs of siblings were born from non myasthenic nor consanguineous parents. The disease started at birth showing bilateral partial eyelid ptosis in all patients. The course of the illness has been favorable. There was no thymoma.

  15. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.

  17. An occasional diagnosis of myasthenia gravis - a focus on thymus during cardiac surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainese Luca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myasthenia gravis, an uncommon autoimmune syndrome, is commonly associated with thymus abnormalities. Thymomatous myasthenia gravis is considered to have worst prognosis and thymectomy can reverse symptoms if precociously performed. Case report We describe a case of a patient who underwent mitral valve repair and was found to have an occasional thymomatous mass during the surgery. A total thymectomy was performed concomitantly to the mitral valve repair. Conclusion The diagnosis of thymomatous myasthenia gravis was confirmed postoperatively. Following the surgery this patient was strictly monitored and at 1-year follow-up a complete stable remission had been successfully achieved.

  18. Randomized Trial of Thymectomy in Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Gil I; Kaminski, Henry J; Aban, Inmaculada B; Minisman, Greg; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Marx, Alexander; Ströbel, Philipp; Mazia, Claudio; Oger, Joel; Cea, J Gabriel; Heckmann, Jeannine M; Evoli, Amelia; Nix, Wilfred; Ciafaloni, Emma; Antonini, Giovanni; Witoonpanich, Rawiphan; King, John O; Beydoun, Said R; Chalk, Colin H; Barboi, Alexandru C; Amato, Anthony A; Shaibani, Aziz I; Katirji, Bashar; Lecky, Bryan R F; Buckley, Camilla; Vincent, Angela; Dias-Tosta, Elza; Yoshikawa, Hiroaki; Waddington-Cruz, Márcia; Pulley, Michael T; Rivner, Michael H; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Pascuzzi, Robert M; Jackson, Carlayne E; Garcia Ramos, Guillermo S; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Massey, Janice M; Kissel, John T; Werneck, Lineu C; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J; Tandan, Rup; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Conwit, Robin; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Sonett, Joshua R; Jaretzki, Alfred; Newsom-Davis, John; Cutter, Gary R

    2016-08-11

    Thymectomy has been a mainstay in the treatment of myasthenia gravis, but there is no conclusive evidence of its benefit. We conducted a multicenter, randomized trial comparing thymectomy plus prednisone with prednisone alone. We compared extended transsternal thymectomy plus alternate-day prednisone with alternate-day prednisone alone. Patients 18 to 65 years of age who had generalized nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis with a disease duration of less than 5 years were included if they had Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America clinical class II to IV disease (on a scale from I to V, with higher classes indicating more severe disease) and elevated circulating concentrations of acetylcholine-receptor antibody. The primary outcomes were the time-weighted average Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis score (on a scale from 0 to 39, with higher scores indicating more severe disease) over a 3-year period, as assessed by means of blinded rating, and the time-weighted average required dose of prednisone over a 3-year period. A total of 126 patients underwent randomization between 2006 and 2012 at 36 sites. Patients who underwent thymectomy had a lower time-weighted average Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis score over a 3-year period than those who received prednisone alone (6.15 vs. 8.99, Pgravis. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; MGTX ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00294658.).

  19. Current and emerging treatments for the management of myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. There are several treatment options, including symptomatic treatment (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors), short-term immunosuppression (corticosteroids), long-term immunosuppression (azathioprine, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, tacrolimus), rapid acting short-term immunomodulation (intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange), and long-term immunomodulation (thymectomy). This review explores in detail these different treatment options. Potential future treatments are also discussed. PMID:21845054

  20. Sensory aspects in myasthenia gravis: A translational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Leon-Ariza, Juan S; Prada, Diddier; Leon-Ariza, Daniel S; Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V

    2016-09-15

    Myasthenia gravis is a paradigmatic muscle disorder characterized by abnormal fatigue and muscle weakness that worsens with activities and improves with rest. Clinical and research studies done on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have advanced our knowledge of the muscle involvement in myasthenia. Current views still state that sensory deficits are not "features of myasthenia gravis". This article discusses the gap that exists on sensory neural transmission in myasthenia that has remained after >300years of research in this neurological disorder. We outline the neurobiological characteristics of sensory and motor synapses, reinterpret the nanocholinergic commonalities that exist in both sensory and motor pathways, discuss the clinical findings on altered sensory pathways in myasthenia, and propose a novel way to score anomalies resulting from multineuronal inability associated sensory troubles due to eugenic nanocholinergic instability and autoimmunity. This medicine-based evidence could serve as a template to further identify novel targets for studying new medications that may offer a better therapeutic benefit in both sensory and motor dysfunction for patients. Importantly, this review may help to re-orient current practices in myasthenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Seronegative myasthenia gravis associated with malignant thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jason; Howard, James F

    2017-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is generally caused by antibodies directed against the neuromuscular junction, including antibodies against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Pathologic abnormalities of the thymus gland, including thymoma, are associated with MG. We report a 56-year-old woman who presented with double vision. Single fiber EMG confirmed myasthenia gravis. AChR, striational muscle and MuSK antibodies were absent in the serum. Chest CT demonstrated a malignant thymoma. We report the first case of seronegative myasthenia gravis associated with malignant thymoma. The case challenges the conventional wisdom that all patients with thymoma associated MG test positive for antibodies against AChR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Refractory myasthenia gravis - clinical profile, comorbidities and response to rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sepehrar, Mona; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Settikere Nataraju, Aravinda; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody mediated autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. A proportion of myasthenia gravis patients are classified as refractory due to non responsiveness to conventional treatment. This retrospective study was done to evaluate clinical profile, epidemiological, laboratory, and features of patients with MG and mode of management using rituximab and complications. Methods: Data of myasthenia gravis patients admitted or presented to outpatient department (previous medical records) with MG between January 2008 and January 2016 were included. A total of 512 patients fulfilled the clinical and diagnostic criteria of myasthenia gravis of which 76 patients met the diagnostic certainty for refractory myasthenia gravis and were evaluated. Results: Out of 76 refractory MG patients, 53 (69.73%) patients fulfilled all the three defined criteria. The median age of onset of the refractory MG group was 36 years with a range of 27-53 years. In our study 25 patients (32.89%) belonged to the age group of 21-30 years. Anti-MuSK antibodies were positive in 8 non-refractory MG patients (2.06%) and 36 refractory MG patients (47.36%). Mean HbA 1C was found to be 8.6±2.33. The dose of administered prednisone decreased by a mean of 59.7% ( p =3.3x10 -8 ) to 94.6% ( p =2.2x10 -14 ) after the third cycle of rituximab treatment. Conclusion: The refractory MG patients are most commonly female with an early age of onset, anti-MuSK antibodies, and thymomas. Refractory MG patients have higher prevalence and poor control (HbA 1C >8%) of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia probably due to increased steroid usage. Rituximab is very efficient in treatment of refractory MG with adverse effects being low.

  3. Coexistence of Pernicious Anemia and Myasthenia Gravis—A Rare Combination of Autoimmune Diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available About 5-10% of patients with myasthenia gravis concomitantly have other autoimmune diseases. However, the coexistence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia is rare. Here, we report a 73-year-old Taiwanese woman who developed myasthenia gravis 5 months after the onset of pernicious anemia. Her myasthenic and pernicious anemia symptoms markedly improved after pyridostigmine, prednisolone and hydroxo-cobalamine treatment. It is important to recognize concurrence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia in the same patient because the therapeutic results for both diseases are rewarding.

  4. Maximal bite force and surface EMG in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Wokke, JHJ; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Bosman, F

    2000-01-01

    Masticatory muscle strength was quantified in patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis and compared with that of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission (whether or not pharmacological) who previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis, and healthy subjects. Maximal

  5. Immunopathogenesis in Myasthenia Gravis and Neuromyelitis Optica

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    Zhen Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG and neuromyelitis optica (NMO are autoimmune channelopathies of the peripheral neuromuscular junction (NMJ and central nervous system (CNS that are mainly mediated by humoral immunity against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR and aquaporin-4 (AQP4, respectively. The diseases share some common features, including genetic predispositions, environmental factors, the breakdown of tolerance, the collaboration of T cells and B cells, imbalances in T helper 1 (Th1/Th2/Th17/regulatory T cells, aberrant cytokine and antibody secretion, and complement system activation. However, some aspects of the immune mechanisms are unique. Both targets (AChR and AQP4 are expressed in the periphery and CNS, but MG mainly affects the NMJ in the periphery outside of CNS, whereas NMO preferentially involves the CNS. Inflammatory cells, including B cells and macrophages, often infiltrate the thymus but not the target—muscle in MG, whereas the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, in NMO, is always observed in the target organ—the spinal cord. A review of the common and discrepant characteristics of these two autoimmune channelopathies may expand our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of both disorders and assist in the development of proper treatments in the future.

  6. Immunopathogenesis in Myasthenia Gravis and Neuromyelitis Optica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Yan, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are autoimmune channelopathies of the peripheral neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and central nervous system (CNS) that are mainly mediated by humoral immunity against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4), respectively. The diseases share some common features, including genetic predispositions, environmental factors, the breakdown of tolerance, the collaboration of T cells and B cells, imbalances in T helper 1 (Th1)/Th2/Th17/regulatory T cells, aberrant cytokine and antibody secretion, and complement system activation. However, some aspects of the immune mechanisms are unique. Both targets (AChR and AQP4) are expressed in the periphery and CNS, but MG mainly affects the NMJ in the periphery outside of CNS, whereas NMO preferentially involves the CNS. Inflammatory cells, including B cells and macrophages, often infiltrate the thymus but not the target—muscle in MG, whereas the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, in NMO, is always observed in the target organ—the spinal cord. A review of the common and discrepant characteristics of these two autoimmune channelopathies may expand our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of both disorders and assist in the development of proper treatments in the future. PMID:29312313

  7. Emergency Management of Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to weakened throat muscles and accumulated secretions. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF MG The MGFA mission is to facilitate ... fax mgfa@myasthenia.org • www.myasthenia.org EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF MG Emergency Management Important information for the ...

  8. Myasthenia Gravis: a population-based epidemiological study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rutledge, S

    2016-02-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a disorder affecting components of the neuromuscular junction. Epidemiological studies show rising incidence and prevalence rates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and prevalence of MG in the Republic of Ireland. Data sources included patient lists from consultant neurologists and ophthalmologists, a neuroimmunology laboratory, general practitioners and the Myasthenia Gravis Association. A total of 1,715 cases were identified, of which 706 definite, probable or possible autoimmune and congenital MG cases were included. The overall prevalence rate from the data obtained is 15.38\\/100,000. The study demonstrated a female preponderance (female:male of 1.3: 1) and some geographical variation within Ireland. The average incidence rate for the years 2000 to 2009 was 11.3 per year; the rate for the current decade is 18 per year. The increasing number of diagnoses may be due to improved access to diagnostic investigations and increasing awareness of the clinical manifestations.

  9. CT evaluation of thymus in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guk Hee; Kang, Eun Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between myasthenia gravis and the thymus was well establish and myasthenia gravis occurs in the presence of thymic hyperplasia or thymoma or occasionally in histologically normal thymus. Since not every patients with myasthenia gravis is a candidate for thymectomy, unless a thymoma is present, the differentiation of normal and hyperplastic thymus from thymoma becomes important. Authors reviewed retrospectively clinical records and chest CT scans of 18 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent thymectomy during recent 5 years, to evaluate the role of CT scan. The results were as follows. 1 Of total 18 cases, 5 cases had normal thymus, 6 cases had thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases had benign thymoma and 3 cases had malignant thymoma. 2. Of 5 cases of normal thymus, no false positive cases were noted in CT scan. 3. Of 6 cases of thymic hyperplasia, CT findings were normal except 1 cases of thickened left thymic lobe. 4. Of 7 cases of thymoma, no false negative cases were noted in CT scan. 5. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval shaped, discrete, slightly enhancing soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum. 6. CT findings of malignant thymoma were lobulated contoured, infiltrative, soft tissue mass lesion in anterior mediastinum with calcifications, pleural tumor implants, and SVC compression. CT yielded valuable information on differential diagnosis of thymoma, thymic hyperplasia and normal thymus. Also CT was a highly sensitive method in the detection of thymoma and determining the extent and invasiveness

  10. Early onset bilateral juvenile myasthenia gravis masquerading as simple congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam, Md. Shahid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction. Ocular myasthenia gravis presents as ptosis with extraocular motility restriction and is prone to be misdiagnosed as third nerve palsy or congenital or aponeurotic ptosis. Juvenile ocular myasthenia gravis in very young children is difficult to diagnose and can be easily labeled as a case of congenital ptosis, the more so when the condition is bilateral. We present a case of a two-year-old child who presented with bilateral ptosis and was diagnosed as a case of simple congenital ptosis elsewhere with the advice to undergo tarsofrontalis sling surgery. The child was diagnosed with juvenile myasthenia gravis on thorough history, examination, and systemic evaluation and was started on anti-myasthenic treatment.

  11. Association of myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisabay, Aysin; Sari, Ummu Serpil; Boyaci, Recep; Batum, Melike; Yilmaz, Hikmet; Selcuki, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of neuromuscular junction due to auto-immune destruction of the acetylcholine receptors. Behçet's disease, on the other hand, is a multisystemic vascular-inflammatory disease. Both conditions are not common in the general population although their association has not been reported in the literature. We wanted to present our patient who developed clinical course of myasthenia gravis following discontinuation of medications due to complications of corticosteroid for Behçet's disease. It was observed that clinical findings of myasthenia gravis recovered following restarting steroid treatment and he did not experience attacks of both conditions. Although Myasthenia gravis and Behçet's disease are distinct entities clinically as well as in terms of pathogenesis, they share common physiopathological features and their treatment is based on their common features. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Myasthenia Gravis: Unusual Presentations and Diagnostic Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolico, Carmelo; Parisi, Daniela; Portaro, Simona; Biasini, Fiammetta; Sinicropi, Stefano; Ciranni, Annamaria; Toscano, Antonio; Messina, Sonia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Vita, Giuseppe; Girlanda, Paolo

    2016-08-30

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with fluctuating, fatigable muscle weakness. Initial symptoms classically involve ocular and proximal limb muscles. Rarely, MG may onset with unusual features, so it can be misdiagnosed with other neuromuscular diseases. To describe unusual and atypical presentations of MG in a large cohort of patients, considering and discussing diagnostic difficulties and pitfalls. We report on 21 out of 508 MG patients, coming to our department in the last 27 years and presenting with atypical or unusual features. The diagnosis was achieved performing a careful clinical examination, a proper neurophysiological assessment, the neostigmine test, the AChR and MuSK antibodies assay and chest CT-scan. Patients with atypical/unusual MG onset were the 4.4% of all MG patients population. We describe seven different clinical categories: asymmetric distal upper limbs weakness, foot drop, isolated triceps brachii weakness and foot drop, post exertional axial weakness with dropped head, acute facial dyplegia, limb-girdle MG and MG with sudden lower limbs weakness and recurrent falls. Atypical and unusual presentations may increase the risk to misdiagnose or delay MG diagnosis. Isolated limb-girdle presentation is the most frequent atypical form in our series.

  13. Unusual association of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myasthenia gravis: A dysregulation of the adaptive immune system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mar Amador, Maria; Vandenberghe, Nadia; Berhoune, Nawel; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Gronier, Sophie; Delmont, Emilien; Desnuelle, Claude; Cintas, Pascal; Pittion, Sophie; Louis, Sarah; Demeret, Sophie; Lenglet, Timothée; Meininger, Vincent; Salachas, François; Pradat, Pierre-François; Bruneteau, Gaëlle

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder affecting neuromuscular junctions that has been associated with a small increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we describe a retrospective series of seven cases with a concomitant diagnosis of ALS and myasthenia gravis, collected among the 18 French reference centers for ALS in a twelve year period. After careful review, only six patients strictly met the diagnostic criteria for both ALS and myasthenia gravis. In these patients, limb onset of ALS was reported in five (83%) cases. Localization of myasthenia gravis initial symptoms was ocular in three (50%) cases, generalized in two (33%) and bulbar in one (17%). Median delay between onset of the two conditions was 19 months (6-319 months). Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies testing was positive in all cases. All patients were treated with riluzole and one had an associated immune-mediated disease. In the one last ALS case, the final diagnosis was false-positivity for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. The co-occurrence of ALS and myasthenia gravis is rare and requires strict diagnostic criteria. Its demonstration needs thoughtful interpretation of electrophysiological results and exclusion of false positivity for myasthenia gravis antibody testing in some ALS cases. This association may be triggered by a dysfunction of adaptive immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus in tumor-infiltrating B cells of myasthenia gravis thymoma: an innocent bystander or an autoimmunity mediator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Paola; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Franzi, Sara; Galbardi, Barbara; Maggi, Lorenzo; Motta, Teresio; Ghislandi, Raffaella; Buzzi, Antonella; Spinelli, Luisella; Novellino, Lorenzo; Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Conforti, Fabio; De Pas, Tommaso Martino; Barberis, Massimo; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-01-01

    The thymus plays a key role in myasthenia gravis (MG), a B cell-mediated autoimmune disorder affecting neuromuscular junction. Most MG patients have thymic abnormalities, including hyperplasia and thymoma, a neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with autoimmune diseases and tumors. Recently, we showed EBV persistence and reactivation in hyperplastic MG thymuses, suggesting that EBV might contribute to intra-thymic B cell dysregulation in MG patients. Here, we investigated EBV involvement in thymoma-associated MG, by searching for EBV markers in MG (n=26) and non-MG (n=14) thymomas. EBV DNA and EBV-encoded small nuclear RNA (EBER) 1 transcript were detected in 14/26 (53.8%) and 22/26 (84.6%) MG thymomas, and only in 3 of 14 (21.4%) non-MG thymomas. Latent EBNA2 and late gp350/220 lytic transcripts were undetectable in all, but one, thymomas, and early lytic BZLF1 transcript was absent in all samples, suggesting that early infection events and EBV reactivation were very rare in thymomas. EBER1 and 2-positive cells were detected in MG, but not in non-MG, thymomas, as well as cells expressing EBV latency proteins (EBNA1, LMP1, LMP2A), that were mainly of B cell phenotype, indicating EBV association with MG rather than with thymoma. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 transcriptional levels were higher in MG than non-MG thymomas and positively correlated with EBER1 levels, suggesting a role for EBERs in TLR3 activation. Our findings show that EBV is commonly present in thymoma-infiltrating B cells of myasthenic patients, indicating a contribution of EBV to B cell-mediated autoreactivity in MG associated with thymic tumor. PMID:29221139

  15. Miastenia gravis juvenil Juvenile myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Papazian; Israel Alfonso; Nayle Araguez

    2009-01-01

    La miastenia gravis juvenil (MGJ) es un trastorno crónico auto inmune en el cual existen anticuerpos séricos que al unirse a los receptores de acetilcolin nicotínicos de la membrana muscular de la placa motora alteran la transmisión neuromuscular. El resultado es fatiga muscular precoz con progresión a la parálisis durante estados de contracción muscular iterativos (movimientos) o sostenidos (posturas) y más raramente parálisis permanente durante el reposo. Los músculos inervados por los nerv...

  16. Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis in Adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Prasad K; Balaiah, K; Nayak, Ganesh; Shetty, Prasanna K

    2011-01-01

    Thymomas are exceedingly rare in the first 20 years of life, Thymic lesions comprise approximately 2–3% of all pediatric mediastinal tumors and include thymic cysts, hyperplasia, carcinoma, and thymomas. Fewer than 30 cases in children have been described in the literature. Thymomas in adults are commonly associated with other diseases, the most frequent being myasthenia gravis. However, this association has been rarely reported in childhood. These tumors are typically aggressive, with poor ...

  17. Myasthenia Gravis in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Berlit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To present a case of maternal myasthenia gravis in pregnancy and give a systematic review of the literature. Case. We report the case of a 38-year-old parturient with a life-threatening complication of immune-mediated myasthenia gravis shortly after an elective cesarean section on patient's request under spinal anesthesia at 35 + 3 weeks of gestation. The newborn was transferred to the pediatric unit for surveillance and did not show any signs of muscular weakness in the course of time. The mother developed a respiratory insufficiency on the second day postpartum. The myasthenic crisis led to a progressive dyspnoea within minutes, which exacerbated in a secondary generalized seizure with cardiac-circulatory arrest. After successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the patient was transferred to intensive care. The interdisciplinary therapeutic approach included ventilatory assistance via endotracheal intubation, parenteral pyridostigmine, azathioprine, and steroids. By interdisciplinary measures, a stable state was regained. Conclusion. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease. As this disease predominantly occurs in women of reproductive age, it is important to be aware of this condition in obstetrics and its interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  18. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Kusner

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  19. An Unusual Presentation of Myasthenia Gravis | Chijioke | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACK GROUND: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is generally a rare disorder and may thus be easily misdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis is even more likely when the presentation is atypical. OBJECTIVE: To present and discuss an unusual presentation of myasthenia gravis METHOD: A 67-year-old man presented with progressive ...

  20. Neuromuscular disease mimicking myasthenia gravis in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : Nemaline rod disease is a congenital myopathy, presentation of which may mimic myasthenia gravis. Methods : We report a suspected case of nemaline rod disease in a female adolescent who presented with features similar to myasthenia gravis but failed to respond effectively to its conventional management ...

  1. Suppression of CHRN endocytosis by carbonic anhydrase CAR3 in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Feng, Kuan; Zhang, Shuangyan; Huang, Jiefang; Miao, Xiang; Baggi, Fulvio; Ostrom, Rennolds S; Zhang, Yanyun; Chen, Xiangjun; Xu, Congfeng

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction manifested as fatigable muscle weakness, which is typically caused by pathogenic autoantibodies against postsynaptic CHRN/AChR (cholinergic receptor nicotinic) in the endplate of skeletal muscle. Our previous studies have identified CA3 (carbonic anhydrase 3) as a specific protein insufficient in skeletal muscle from myasthenia gravis patients. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of how CA3 insufficiency might contribute to myasthenia gravis. Using an experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis animal model and the skeletal muscle cell C2C12, we find that inhibition of CAR3 (the mouse homolog of CA3) promotes CHRN internalization via a lipid raft-mediated pathway, leading to accelerated degradation of postsynaptic CHRN. Activation of CAR3 reduces CHRN degradation by suppressing receptor endocytosis. CAR3 exerts this effect by suppressing chaperone-assisted selective autophagy via interaction with BAG3 (BCL2-associated athanogene 3) and by dampening endoplasmic reticulum stress. Collectively, our study illustrates that skeletal muscle cell CAR3 is critical for CHRN homeostasis in the neuromuscular junction, and its deficiency leads to accelerated degradation of CHRN and development of myasthenia gravis, potentially revealing a novel therapeutic approach for this disorder.

  2. A Genome-wide Association Study of Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Alan E.; Pliner, Hannah A.; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A.; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W.; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J.; Sanders, Donald B.; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M.; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F.; Koopman, Wilma J.; Nicolle, Michael W.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M.; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We calculated P values for association between 8114394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0 × 10−8 was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. RESULTS In the over all case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P = 3.98 × 10−8; odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25–1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P = 1.08 × 10−8; odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02 – 2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.60 × 10−9; odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29–1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.32 × 10−12; odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44–1.68) and the other was detected

  3. Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 antibodies in myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romi, F.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, N.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Plant, G.T.; Gilhus, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by skeletal muscle weakness mainly caused by acetylcholine receptor antibodies. MG can be divided into generalized and ocular, and into early-onset (<50 years of age) and late-onset (≥50 years of age). Anti-Kv1.4 antibodies targeting

  4. Focal Myasthenia Gravis in Two Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Atiba

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two dogs were presented with history of regurgitation. Both dogs were diagnosed with focal myasthenia gravis (FMG. Thoracic radiography was consisted with megaesophagus. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs antibody titer was positive. Both dogs were treated with pyridostigmine bromide as sole treatment. One case rapidly resolved with the recovery of the esophagus, while the other case even the AChRs antibody titer was normalized after 60 days but the clinical remission was occurred after long time. This report suggested that clinical signs of FMG were resolved, but we can’t predict the time required, additionally, pyridostigmine bromide might be effective for palliation of symptoms.

  5. Immune-mediated rippling muscle disease and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Mariela; Gonorazky, Hernan; Chaves, Marcelo; Fulgenzi, Ernesto; Figueredo, Alejandra; Christiansen, Silvia; Cristiano, Edgardo; Bertini, Enrico S; Rugiero, Marcelo

    2016-10-15

    Cases of acquired rippling muscle disease in association with myasthenia gravis have been reported. We present three patients with iRMD (immune-mediated rippling muscle disease) and AChR-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. None of them had thymus pathology. They presented exercise-induced muscle rippling combined with generalized myasthenia gravis. One of them had muscle biopsy showing a myopathic pattern and a patchy immunostaining with caveolin antibodies. They were successfully treated steroids and azathioprine. The immune nature of this association is supported by the response to immunotherapies and the positivity of AChR-antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cigarette Smoking and Activities of Daily Living in Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Sean M; Herro, Angela M; Feuer, William J; Lam, Byron L

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction, commonly affecting the ocular muscles. Cigarette smoking has been shown to influence many autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, but its effect on myasthenia gravis has not been well studied. We sought to determine whether cigarette smoking influenced disease-related symptoms in ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG). We performed a prospective, clinic-based cross-sectional study in a single academic neuro-ophthalmology practice. All patients diagnosed with OMG between November 2006 and April 2014 were included. A prospective telephone survey was administered to determine smoking status and myasthenia gravis-related symptom severity. The main outcome measure was the myasthenia gravis-specific activities of daily living (MG-ADL) score, a well-validated marker of symptoms and quality of life in myasthenia gravis. Forty-four patients were included in the analysis. Comparison of MG-ADL ocular subscores between current smokers (3.4 ± 2.6), former smokers (1.8 ± 2.1), and never smokers (1.1 ± 1.5) revealed a statistically significant relationship (P = 0.031) where current smokers had the highest MG-ADL ocular subscores and never smokers the lowest. Comparison of MG-ADL total scores revealed the same relationship (current 5.6 ± 4.5, former 2.9 ± 3.1, never 1.4 ± 2.5, P = 0.003). There were borderline significant correlations of pack years with MG-ADL ocular subscore (r = 0.27, P = 0.074) and MG-ADL total score (r = 0.30, P = 0.051). Our findings indicate an association between cigarette smoking and symptom severity in OMG. This association suggests that smoking cessation in OMG patients may lead to improved symptom-related quality of life.

  7. Animal models of myasthenia gravis: utility and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Renato; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Consonni, Alessandra; Baggi, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by the immune attack of the neuromuscular junction. Antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) induce receptor degradation, complement cascade activation, and postsynaptic membrane destruction, resulting in functional reduction in AChR availability. Besides anti-AChR antibodies, other autoantibodies are known to play pathogenic roles in MG. The experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) models have been of great help over the years in understanding the pathophysiological role of specific autoantibodies and T helper lymphocytes and in suggesting new therapies for prevention and modulation of the ongoing disease. EAMG can be induced in mice and rats of susceptible strains that show clinical symptoms mimicking the human disease. EAMG models are helpful for studying both the muscle and the immune compartments to evaluate new treatment perspectives. In this review, we concentrate on recent findings on EAMG models, focusing on their utility and limitations. PMID:27019601

  8. Myopathy in Childhood Muscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzinger, Lukas; Khomenko, Andrei; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Backhaus, Roland; Platen, Sabine; Schalke, Berthold

    2016-12-01

    Adult and pediatric patients suffering from MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) -antibody positive myasthenia gravis exhibit similar features to individuals with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies, but they differ in several characteristics such as a predominant bulbar, respiratory and neck weakness, a generally worse disease severity and a tendency to develop muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy is a rare phenomenon that is usually restricted to the facial muscles. We describe a girl with MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis who developed a myopathy with severe generalized muscular weakness, muscle atrophy, and myopathic changes on electromyography. This is the first published example of a generalized myopathic syndrome in myasthenia gravis. We review the relevant literature and discuss the hypothesis of a mitochondrial myopathy as a pathogenic mechanism in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Myasthenia Gravis – a beginning with no end

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croitoru Cristina Georgiana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is one of the neurological diseases with a relatively recent history, full of mistakes, in which the British and German neurology schools have attempted to find answers when confronted with the unknown. The paper aims at making a historical account of the disease from its discovery in the 16th century, when the first case of myasthenia gravis was medically diagnosed, to the beginning of the 20th century, when the dawn of modern therapy started to show.

  10. Thymectomy is a beneficial therapy for patients with non-thymomatous ocular myasthenia gravis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kai; Li, Jiaoxing; Huang, Xin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Weibin; Chen, Jiaxin; Chen, Pei; Feng, Huiyu

    2017-10-01

    Ocular myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease, is characterized by extraocular muscle weakness. Myasthenia gravis is closely associated with the functional status of the thymus gland. The efficacy of thymectomy for non-thymomatous ocular myasthenia gravis remains controversial. Here, we present the first systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the outcome of thymectomy in patients with non-thymomatous ocular myasthenia gravis and found that the pooled rate of complete stable remission was 0.5074 with considerable heterogeneity. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that the efficacy of thymectomy differed according to geographical location. Furthermore, thymectomy outcomes are better in children than they are in adults. Thymectomy clearly represents an effective treatment for patients with non-thymomatous ocular myasthenia gravis. However, more multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trials are now required to confirm these conclusions.

  11. Myasthenia gravis and pregnancy: clinical implications and neonatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estanol Bruno

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myasthenia gravis is twice as common in women as in men and frequently affects young women in the second and third decades of life, overlapping with the childbearing years. Generally, during pregnancy in one third of patients the disease exacerbates, whereas in two thirds it remains clinically unchanged. Complete remission can occur in some patients. Methods To describe the clinical course, delivery and neonatal outcome of 18 pregnant women with the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Retrospective chart review of pregnant patients with myasthenia gravis, followed at the National Institute of Perinatology in Mexico City over an 8-year period. Data was abstracted from the medical records on the clinical course during pregnancy, delivery and neonatal outcome. Results From January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2003 18 patients with myasthenia gravis were identified and included in the study. The mean ± SD maternal age was 27.4 ± 4.0 years. During pregnancy 2 women (11% had an improvement in the clinical symptoms of myasthenia gravis, 7 women (39% had clinical worsening of the condition of 9 other patients (50% remained clinically unchanged. Nine patients delivered vaginally, 8 delivered by cesarean section and 1 pregnancy ended in fetal loss. Seventeen infants were born at mean ± SD gestational age of 37.5 ± 3.0 weeks and a mean birth weight of 2710 ± 73 g. Only one infant presented with transient neonatal myasthenia gravis. No congenital anomalies were identified in any of the newborns. Conclusions The clinical course of myasthenia gravis during pregnancy is variable, with a significant proportion of patients experiencing worsening of the clinical symptoms. However, neonatal transient myasthenia was uncommon in our patient population.

  12. Severe Preeclampsia in the Setting of Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Lake

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a rare autoimmune disease that leads to progressive muscle weakness and is common during female reproductive years. The myasthenic mother and her newborn must be observed carefully, as complications during all stages of pregnancy and the puerperium may arise suddenly. Preeclampsia is a common obstetrical condition for which magnesium sulfate is used for seizure prophylaxis. However, magnesium sulfate is strongly contraindicated in MG as it impairs already slowed nerve-muscle connections. Similarly, many first-line antihypertensive medications, including calcium channels blockers and β-blockers, may lead to MG exacerbation. This case describes the effective obstetrical management of a patient with MG who developed severe preeclampsia. The effective use of levetiracetam and various antihypertensive medications including intravenous labetalol is described. A review of the ten reported cases of MG complicated by preeclampsia is examined to aggregate observations of clinical care, with focus on delivery methods, anticonvulsants, and antihypertensive medications.

  13. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Hasan Huseyin; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Teke, Turgut; Altas, Mustafa; Karatas, Emine

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO 2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure.

  14. Thymoma related myasthenia gravis in humans and potential animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan; Belharazem, Djeda; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Schalke, Berthold; Ströbel, Philipp; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-08-01

    Thymoma-associated Myasthenia gravis (TAMG) is one of the anti-acetylcholine receptor MG (AChR-MG) subtypes. The clinico-pathological features of TAMG and its pathogenesis are described here in comparison with pathogenetic models suggested for the more common non-thymoma AChR-MG subtypes, early onset MG and late onset MG. Emphasis is put on the role of abnormal intratumorous T cell selection and activation, lack of intratumorous myoid cells and regulatory T cells as well as deficient expression of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) by neoplastic thymic epithelial cells. We review spontaneous and genetically engineered thymoma models in a spectrum of animals and the extensive clinical and immunological overlap between canine, feline and human TAMG. Finally, limitations and perspectives of the transplantation of human and murine thymoma tissue into nude mice, as potential models for TAMG, are addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Orbital mantle cell lymphoma presenting as myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Justin; Peck, Travis; Prenshaw, Karyn; Portell, Craig A; Kirzhner, Maria

    2017-12-01

    A 69-year-old man, previously treated with pyridostigmine for myasthenia gravis (manifesting as ptosis and diplopia) was evaluated for several concomitant bilateral anterior orbital masses. Imaging revealed 3 discrete, solid masses within and around the orbits. An incisional biopsy demonstrated atypical lymphocytes positive for CD20 and Cyclin-D1, consistent with mantle cell lymphoma. The patient received induction chemotherapy with a rituximab-based regimen. He experienced resolution of his diplopia and ptosis after one cycle of chemotherapy and achieved complete remission of the orbital masses and myasthenia symptoms after 6 cycles. Myasthenia gravis is most commonly associated with thymoma, but may also be observed with other malignancies. Recognition that orbital lymphoma may coexist with myasthenia gravis will help in expediting the diagnosis of future cases and in guiding treatment decisions.

  16. Pembrolizumab-induced myasthenia gravis: A fatal case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Katherine L; Samarin, Michael J; Sodhi, Amik; Owens, Ryan E

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Pembrolizumab, a monoclonal antibody which inhibits the programmed cell death 1 receptor, has been shown to efficaciously enhance pre-existing immune responses to malignancies. However, safety concerns must also be considered as pembrolizumab use has been associated with several life-threatening immune-related adverse events (irAEs). We report a fatal case of pembrolizumab-induced myasthenia gravis in a patient with no prior myasthenia gravis history. Case report A 63-year-old male presented with right eyelid drooping, puffiness, blurred vision, and shortness of breath two weeks after an initial infusion of pembrolizumab. He was subsequently diagnosed with new onset acetylcholine-receptor positive myasthenia gravis. Despite aggressive treatment with corticosteroids, pyridostigmine, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis, the patient clinically deteriorated and ultimately expired from acute respiratory failure after a 12-day hospitalization. Discussion Current package labeling for pembrolizumab warns against various irAEs associated with its use including pneumonitis, colitis, and endocrinopathies. To date, only one case of new onset myasthenia gravis and two case reports of myasthenia gravis exacerbation have been identified. This case further highlights the mortality risk associated with development of irAEs. Conclusion While rare, evidence for the development of MG associated with pembrolizumab is growing. Prompt recognition of symptoms and discontinuation of pembrolizumab is necessary to help improve prognosis.

  17. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Huseyin Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure (ARF is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure. Keywords: Acute respiratory failure, Myasthenia graves, Emergency medicine

  18. 317 Myasthenia Gravis and Asthma, Relationship between Two Different Disorders of the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease caused by absence of neuromuscular transmission due to antibodies directed against the nicotinic AChR located at the neuromuscular junction. The main symptoms include muscle weakness in the affected muscles, which is worse after its use. Diagnosis is made upon clinical manifestations and finding of IgG. Only 80 to 90% of patients with generalized disease are positive to these antibodies, and 30 to 50% with ophthalmologic manifestations. Ot...

  19. Rare association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis in a patient with other immune disorders: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Almeida-Menezes

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease is described in association with several autoimmune diseases, but rarely with myasthenia gravis. Case Report: We describe the case of a 31-year-old white woman with celiac disease who presented manifestations related to a hyperactive immune system, including macroamylasemia, false-positive anti-HCV, positive antinuclear antibody, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The Introduction of a gluten-free diet (GFD resolved these features, but myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms unexpectedly occurred on that occasion. Discussion: The role of a GFD in the course of autoimmune diseases has been studied and improvement has been reported in many diseases. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the course of neurological disorders associated with celiac disease. In the present case, a GFD did not prevent the appearance of symptoms related to myasthenia gravis. There are few reports on the association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis and therefore little is known about the course and time of onset of myasthenia in celiac patients. The present case increases the knowledge about this unusual autoimmune neurological disease associated with celiac disease.

  20. Rare association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis in a patient with other immune disorders: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Menezes, Marcela; Ribeiro Cabral, Vírginia Lúcia; Lorena, Sônia S; Nucci, Anamarli; Andrade Santana, Priscila; Queiroz Silva, Cecília

    2016-09-01

    Celiac disease is described in association with several autoimmune diseases, but rarely with myasthenia gravis. We describe the case of a 31-year-old white woman with celiac disease who presented manifestations related to a hyperactive immune system, including macroamylasemia, false-positive anti-HCV, positive antinuclear antibody, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The introduction of a gluten-free diet (GFD) resolved these features, but myasthenia gravis (MG) symptoms unexpectedly occurred on that occasion. The role of a GFD in the course of autoimmune diseases has been studied and improvement has been reported in many diseases. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the course of neurological disorders associated with celiac disease. In the present case, a GFD did not prevent the appearance of symptoms related to myasthenia gravis. There are few reports on the association of celiac disease with myasthenia gravis and therefore little is known about the course and time of onset of myasthenia in celiac patients. The present case increases the knowledge about this unusual autoimmune neurological disease associated with celiac disease.

  1. A case of late-onset, thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis with ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies and concomitant granulomatous myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, M I; Komorowski, L; Kade, S; Bornemann, A; Ziemann, U; Synofzik, M

    2016-09-13

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder, which has only rarely been reported to co-manifest with myositis. The diagnosis of concomitant myositis in patients with myasthenia gravis is clinically challenging, and requires targeted investigations for the differential diagnosis, including EMG, autoantibody assays, muscle biopsy and, importantly, imaging of the mediastinum for thymoma screening. This report presents a case-vignette of a 72-year-old woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness and myalgias, diagnosed with thymoma-associated myasthenia and bioptically verified granulomatous myositis, with positive autoantibody status for ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies. The diagnosis of concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis, especially in the presence of ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies, should lead neurologists to adopt different treatment strategies compared to those applied in myasthenia or myositis alone. Moreover, further evidence is warranted that titin and, particularly, ryanodine receptor antibodies may co-occur or be pathophysiologically involved in myasthenia-myositis cases.

  2. Myasthenia gravis: recent advances in immunopathology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John-Ih; Jander, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the most frequent acquired disorder of neuromuscular transmission. In the majority of cases, pathogenic antibodies against components of the postsynaptic muscle endplate membrane can be detected. In recent years there have been significant advances in the pathophysiological understanding and therapy of the disease. Areas covered: PubMed searches were conducted for the term 'myasthenia gravis' cross-referenced with the terms 'immunology', 'subgroups', 'antibody', 'ocular', 'thymoma', 'treatment' and 'thymectomy'. Additionally, we summarized the current state of immunopathology and therapy. Expert commentary: Immunological research defined new target antigens at the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction which along with clinical features allow a refined definition of disease subgroups. Overall the prognosis of myasthenia gravis with best possible symptomatic, immunosuppressive and supportive treatment is good but new immunomodulatory treatment options are developed for patients who do not respond well to the first line therapy. For most patients individually adapted long-term drug therapy is needed.

  3. Recurrence of thymoma with pleural invasion in a patient with myasthenia gravis and pure red blood cell aplasia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Sonia Pilar; Zuluaga, Claudia Patricia; Uriza, Luis Felipe C; Sanchez M, Jully Mariana

    2008-01-01

    Thymoma are thymic tumors that arise from epithelial cells, they have different morphological characteristics. It is known for its association with autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplasia, systemic lupus erythematosus, or hipogamaglobulinemia pemphigus foliaceus. The association thymoma-myasthenia gravis-pure red cell aplasia is a rare one; there will be a case report with the corresponding discussion and review of the literature

  4. Refractory myasthenia gravis – clinical profile, comorbidities and response to rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sepehrar, Mona; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Settikere Nataraju, Aravinda; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody mediated autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. A proportion of myasthenia gravis patients are classified as refractory due to non responsiveness to conventional treatment. This retrospective study was done to evaluate clinical profile, epidemiological, laboratory, and features of patients with MG and mode of management using rituximab and complications. Methods: Data of myasthenia gravis patients admitted or presented to outpatient department (previous medical records) with MG between January 2008 and January 2016 were included. A total of 512 patients fulfilled the clinical and diagnostic criteria of myasthenia gravis of which 76 patients met the diagnostic certainty for refractory myasthenia gravis and were evaluated. Results: Out of 76 refractory MG patients, 53 (69.73%) patients fulfilled all the three defined criteria. The median age of onset of the refractory MG group was 36 years with a range of 27–53 years. In our study 25 patients (32.89%) belonged to the age group of 21–30 years. Anti-MuSK antibodies were positive in 8 non-refractory MG patients (2.06%) and 36 refractory MG patients (47.36%). Mean HbA1C was found to be 8.6±2.33. The dose of administered prednisone decreased by a mean of 59.7% (p=3.3x10–8) to 94.6% (p=2.2x10–14) after the third cycle of rituximab treatment. Conclusion: The refractory MG patients are most commonly female with an early age of onset, anti-MuSK antibodies, and thymomas. Refractory MG patients have higher prevalence and poor control (HbA1C >8%) of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia probably due to increased steroid usage. Rituximab is very efficient in treatment of refractory MG with adverse effects being low. PMID:27790079

  5. Prevalence of myasthenia gravis in the Catalan county of Osona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, J M; Altimiras, J; Roura, P; Alonso, F; Bufill, E; Munmany, A; Alfonso, S; Illa, I

    The reported prevalence of myasthenia gravis ranges between 5 and 24 cases per 100,000, and people over 65years account for less than 50% of all cases. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of myasthenia gravis in the county of Osona were studied in patients younger and older than 65. The study draws from the county-based prospective myasthenia gravis register implemented by the Neurology Department at Hospital General de Vic in 1991. The prevalence of myasthenia gravis was 32.89×10 5 inhabitants (95%CI, 23.86-41.91). The standardized prevalence (European population) was 35.47×10 5 inhabitants (95%CI, 26.10-44.84). The ratio of women to men was 1.3. Overall, the group of patients older than 65 accounted for 62.75% of all cases. The prevalence of myasthenia gravis increased considerably in older age groups. No cases were registered among patients under 25years old, prevalence was 21.87×10 5 in the 25 to 64 age group, and prevalence in patients over 65 years increased to 122.35×10 5 . The clinical characteristics prior to treatment and at the cut-off date are similar (P>.05) in patients younger than 65 and those aged 65 and older. These figures show the highest prevalence rate reported to date. This high prevalence is due to the rate observed among patients older than 65. These results provide a new warning that myasthenia gravis may be underdiagnosed in the elderly population. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognosis of Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: Retrospective Multicenter Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagia, Lina; Lemos, Joao; Abusamra, Khawla; Cornblath, Wayne T; Eggenberger, Eric R

    2015-07-01

    To calculate the rate and timing of conversion from ocular myasthenia gravis to generalized myasthenia gravis. Retrospective multicenter analysis. Patients included in the study were diagnosed with ocular myasthenia gravis without the presence of generalized disease at onset. We conducted a retrospective multicenter analysis. We reviewed charts of 158 patients who met diagnostic criteria for ocular myasthenia gravis. Patients were divided into 2 subgroups: an immunosuppressant treatment group and a nonimmunosuppressant treatment group. Timing of conversion to generalized disease and duration of follow-up also was evaluated. Additional data such as clinical symptoms at presentation, laboratory test results, and chest imaging results also were recorded. Conversion rates to generalized myasthenia at 2 years, effect of immunosuppression on conversion, and timing of conversion. The 158-patient cohort included 76 patients who received immunosuppressant therapy; the remaining 82 patients did not. The overall conversion rate to generalized disease was 20.9%. At 2 years, generalized myasthenia developed in 8 of 76 patients in the treated group and in 15 of 82 patients in the nonimmunotherapy group (odds ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.32). Median time for conversion to generalized disease was 20 months in the nonimmunosuppressant group and 24 months in the immunosuppressant group. Conversion occurred after 2 years of symptom onset in 30% of patients. Conversion rates from ocular to generalized myasthenia gravis may be lower than previously reported both in immunosuppressed and nonimmunosuppressed patients. A subset of patients may continue to convert to generalized disease beyond 2 years from onset of symptoms, and close monitoring should be continued. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Visualization of the thymus in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Midori; Tanaka, Makoto; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku; Heshiki, Atsuko

    1982-01-01

    We investigated whether CT had any advantage over pneumomediastinography (PMG) for the visualization of thymus in twenty-one patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). In two cases of thymoma which had been suspected with chest radiography, CT demonstrated an anterior mediastinal tumor distinguishable from other mediastinal organs, and for these cases PMG was not performed. Excluding three patients who were submitted to PMG only, CT of the anterior mediastinum was carried out in sixteen patients of MG, revealing thymic shadows in seven (44%). PMG followed by conventional tomography was done subsequently in three of these seven cases, for whom thymectomy was indicated because of uncontrollable myasthenic symptoms, and in all patients finger-like thymic shadows were disclosed. The vertical extension of thymus was more easily demonstrable by PMG than CT. PMG was carried out in six of nine patients in whom CT was negative, and in all cases thymic shadows were obvious with subsequent conventional tomography. Consequently, false negative rate of CT was at least 38% (6/16) with regard to the visualization of the nontumorous thymus. Although CT of the anterior mediastinum is useful as a screening method because of its non-invasiveness, its negative result does not rule out an absence of the pathologic thymus in view of its high false negative rate. In this regard, PMG is still necessary for the final determination of the thymic configuration in the MG patients. (J.P.N.)

  8. Factors affecting outcome in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jintana B; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Sanders, Donald B

    2016-12-01

    Information from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients treated and evaluated for at least 2 years between 1980 and 2014 was reviewed to assess the effect of demographics, antibody status and titer, thymus histology, and clinical severity on outcome after 2, 5, and 10 years of treatment. Among 268 patients, 74% had acetylcholine receptor antibodies, 5% had muscle specific tyrosine kinase-antibodies, and 22% had neither. Optimal outcome was achieved by 64% of patients at 2 years of follow-up, 73% at 5 years, and 75% after 10 years. Optimal outcome was achieved more often in patients with late onset, in those who had thymectomy, and in those with ocular-only disease at maximum severity. The only consistent independent predictor of optimal outcome was onset after age 50 years on multivariate analysis. Prognosis is favorable for the majority of MG patients, regardless of age, maximum disease severity, or antibody status. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 54: 1041-1049, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Myasthenia Gravis Impairment Index: Responsiveness, meaningful change, and relative efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Carolina; Bril, Vera; Kapral, Moira; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Davis, Aileen M

    2017-12-05

    To study responsiveness and meaningful change of the Myasthenia Gravis Impairment Index (MGII) and its relative efficiency compared to other measures. We enrolled 95 patients receiving prednisone, IV immunoglobulin (IVIg), or plasma exchange (PLEX) and 54 controls. Patients were assessed with the MGII and other measures-including the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score, Myasthenia Gravis Composite, and Myasthenia Gravis Activities of Daily Living-at baseline and 3-4 weeks after treatment. Statistical markers of responsiveness included between-groups and within-group differences, and we estimated the relative efficiency of the MGII compared to other measures. Patient-meaningful change was assessed with an anchor-based method, using the patient's impression of change. We determined the minimal detectable change (MDC) and the minimal important difference (MID) at the group and individual level. Treated patients had a higher change in MGII scores than controls (analysis of covariance p 1 favoring the MGII. The MGII demonstrated responsiveness to prednisone, IVIg, and PLEX in patients with myasthenia. There is a differential response in ocular and generalized symptoms to type of therapy. The MGII has higher relative efficiency than comparison measures and is viable for use in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. A conceptual framework for evaluating impairments in myasthenia gravis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Barnett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis is characterized by weakness and fatigability of different muscle groups, including ocular, bulbar and the limbs. Therefore, a measure of disease severity at the impairment level in myasthenia needs to reflect all the relevant impairments, as well as their variations with activity and fatigue. We conducted a qualitative study of patients with myasthenia, to explore their experiences and related impairments, aimed at developing a conceptual framework of disease severity at the impairment level in myasthenia gravis. METHODS: Twenty patients representing the spectrum of disease participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were recorded and the transcripts were analyzed by content analysis using an inductive approach with line-by-line open coding. Themes were generated from these codes. RESULTS: Two main themes were identified: the severity of the impairments and fatigability (i.e., triggering or worsening of an impairment with activity. The impairments were further classified within body regions (ocular, bulbar and axial/limbs. Fatigability was described as a phenomenon affecting the whole body but also affecting specific impairments, and was associated with fluctuation of the symptoms. Patients were concerned that clinical examination at a single point in time might not reflect their true clinical state due to fatigability and fluctuations in severity. CONCLUSIONS: This conceptual framework reflects the relevance of both severity and fatigability in understanding impairment-based disease severity in myasthenia. This framework could inform the development of impairment measures in myasthenia gravis.

  11. [Symptoms of myasthenia gravis in a patient with a history of thymectomy for invasive thymoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Lilliana María; Duque, Camilo; Uribe, Carlos Santiago; Hernández, Olga Helena

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease. Approximately 10-15% of patients present with a thymoma, the presence of which is associated with greater severity of symptoms, myasthenic crisis, and irresponsiveness to front-line therapy. A thymectomy is recommended in young patients with generalized myasthenia gravis and in all patients presenting with thymoma. The patient was a 43-year-old woman, who first showed symptoms of myasthenic crisis in 2005 and presented with invasive thymoma managed with thymectomy and radiotherapy. In the subsequent three years, the patient presented with severe symptoms and two myasthenic crises that required mechanical ventilation and immunoglobulin treatment. Contrast chest computed tomography examinations showed no recurrence. Between 2009 and 2012, the patient experienced decreased symptom severity. In 2013, the patient presented with an exacerbation of symptoms; a contrast chest magnetic resonance scan showed a lesion in the anterior mediastinum, previously observed in 2011, suggestive of residual tissue as opposed to fibrosis. Regular management was started with immunoglobulins; a positron emission tomography scan was inconclusive, requiring a new resection, which showed no evidence of tumor recurrence. Patients with myasthenia gravis and those with myasthenia-related thymoma both share thymectomy as an element of treatment. However, following the procedure, exacerbation or reappearance of symptoms does not necessarily represent new alterations in the thymus.

  12. Thymoma with immunodeficiency/Good syndrome associated with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Shunsuke; Tagawa, Asako; Ogawa, Tomoko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noriko; Okada, Shinya

    2017-05-27

    Good syndrome is a rare condition in which thymoma is associated with hypogammaglobulinemia; it is characterized by repeated respiratory or systemic infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and fungi, as well as with various autoimmune disorders such as pure red cell aplasia. A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with ptosis and abdominal muscle weakness. Based on the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor (Ach-R) antibodies, she was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). At that time, invasive thymoma of Masaoka stage IVa was also detected. Regression of thymoma and clinical remission of MG was achieved by chemotherapy followed by high-dose corticosteroid. However, several months later, the patient started developing repeated bacterial respiratory tract infections, cytomegalovirus infections, and esophageal and systemic candidiasis. Laboratory tests revealed a marked decrease of serum gamma-globulin levels (IgG 586 mg/dl, IgA 32 mg/dl, IgM 29 mg/dl) and severe reduction in the B cells ratio, as well as a decrease in the CD4+CD25+T cell to CD4+CD25-T cell ratio indicative of deregulation of CD4+T cell activation. These results suggested that the patient impaired humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. We continued the treatment with antibiotics and regular immunoglobulin supplementation through intravenous injections. Although autoimmune disorders are often observed in Good syndrome, the association with MG is quite rare. The case report is followed by the review of literature.

  13. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Aline Mansueto; Gomez, Rodrigo Santiago; Barbosa, Luiz Sergio Mageste; Freitas, Denise da Silva; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth Regina; Kummer, Arthur; Lemos, Stella Maris Aguiar; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-07-01

    The aims of the current study were 1) to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale and 2) to investigate the quality of life of Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis and its determinants. This cross-sectional study included 69 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent neurological evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms. The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale showed high internal consistency and good concurrent validity with the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study and its subscales. Determinants of quality of life in Brazilian patients with myasthenia gravis included the current status of myasthenia gravis as assessed by the Myasthenia Gravis Composite, the current prednisone dose and the levels of anxiety and depression. The Brazilian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale is a valid instrument. Symptom severity, prednisone dosage and anxiety and depression levels impact the quality of life of patients with myasthenia gravis.

  14. Muscle-Specific Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (MuSK) Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rebecca L; Gooch, Clifton L

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is the prototypic, antibody-mediated neuromuscular disease and is characterized by a decrease in the number of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) within the muscle end plate zone of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although the pathophysiology of AChR-mediated myasthenia gravis has been extensively studied over the last 40 years since its original description by Patrick and Lindstrom (Science 180:871-872, 1973), less is known about the much more recently described muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) antibody-mediated MG. MuSK-MG has features clinically distinct from Ach-R MG, as well as a different pattern of response to treatment and a unique immunopathogenesis.

  15. Results of surgical treatment for juvenile myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Roque, F J; Hernández-Oliver, M O; Medrano Plana, Y; Castillo Vitlloch, A; Fuentes Herrera, L; Rivero-Valerón, D

    2017-04-01

    Radical or extended thymectomy is an effective treatment for myasthenia gravis in the adult population. There are few reports to demonstrate the effectiveness of this treatment in patients with juvenile myasthenia gravis. The main objective of this study was to show that extended transsternal thymectomy is a valid option for treating this disease in paediatric patients. Twenty-three patients with juvenile myasthenia gravis underwent this surgical treatment in the period between April 2003 and April 2014; mean age was 12.13 years and the sample was predominantly female. The main indication for surgery, in 22 patients, was the generalised form of the disease (Osserman stage II) together with no response to 6 months of medical treatment. The histological diagnosis was thymic hyperplasia in 22 patients and thymoma in one patient. There were no deaths and no major complications in the postoperative period. After a mean follow-up period of 58.87 months, 22 patients are taking no medication or need less medication to manage myasthenic symptoms. Extended (radical) transsternal thymectomy is a safe and effective surgical treatment for juvenile myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Intensive Care Management of Myasthenia Gravis After Thymectomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim:To evaluate the management of post thymectomy myasthenia gravis (MG) patient in our centre; to highlight those aspects of patient care that could improve outcome and to serve as a bench mark for developing a standardized protocol for management. Method: A retrospective study of 5 cases of post thymectomy MG ...

  17. neuromuscular disease mimicking myasthenia gravis in a nigerian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neuromuscular diseases characterized by abnormal neurotransmission at the motor endplate resulting .... Gait was normal. An assessment of background Myasthenia Gravis in remission with Cor Pulmonale to rule out. Cardiomyopathy and Chronic renal failure was made. She was commenced on intravenous frusemide ...

  18. Thymoma Presenting with Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 20 year old man was referred to Mulago hospital with a diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis (MG) which was suspected to be due to a thymoma. The patient came with complaints of blurring of vision for one year and body weakness for six months. He was investigated using conventional X-rays and C.T. The chest CT scan ...

  19. Myasthenia gravis exacerbation and diarrhea associated with erythromycin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in management of the case with myasthenia gravis (MG is the control of exacerbation. There are several possible causes of exacerbation of MG including the use of drug. Here, the authors report a case of MG exacerbation and diarrhea associated with erythromycin treatment.

  20. Ectopic cervical thymoma in a patient with Myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ectopic cervical thymoma is rare and is often misdiagnosed as a thyroid tumor or other malignancy. Ectopic thymic tissue can be found along the entire thymic descent path during embryogenesis. However, a thymoma arising from such ectopic thymic tissue is extremely rare. Herein we report a patient with ectopic cervical thymoma and myasthenia gravis (MG and discuss the management.

  1. Transient neonatal myasthenia gravis due to a mother with ocular onset of anti-muscle specific kinase myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Min, Ju-Hong; Han, Sueng-Han; Han, Jinu

    2017-07-01

    We describe a 27-year-old pregnant female with new onset of conjugate gaze deficit during the third trimester of pregnancy. Repetitive nerve stimulation tests, neostigmine tests, and acetylcholine receptor antibody assays were all negative. The patient delivered a normal healthy baby at a local clinic via cesarean section. The baby became hypotonic and had respiratory failure several minutes after birth. The result of acetylcholine receptor antibody was negative in the neonate. The neonate became healthy spontaneously and was extubated after 21 days of ventilation care. Two months after delivery, the mother developed ptosis and generalized symptoms and subsequent workup revealed she was muscle specific kinase (MuSK) antibody positive. The neonate was presumed to have an anti-MuSK-mediated transient neonatal myasthenia gravis. Although MuSK antibody testing is rarely indicated in ocular myasthenia gravis, MuSK antibody testing is necessary in pregnant women who are presumed ocular myasthenia gravis to warn occurrence of transient neonatal myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DIAGNOSIS OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS USING FUZZY GAZE TRACKING SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Rasti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia Gravis (MG is an autoimmune disorder, which may lead to paralysis and even death if not treated on time. One of its primary symptoms is severe muscular weakness, initially arising in the eye muscles. Testing the mobility of the eyeball can help in early detection of MG. In this study, software was designed to analyze the ability of the eye muscles to focus in various directions, thus estimating the MG risk. Progressive weakness in gazing at the directions prompted by the software can reveal abnormal fatigue of the eye muscles, which is an alert sign for MG. To assess the user’s ability to keep gazing at a specified direction, a fuzzy algorithm was applied to images of the user’s eyes to determine the position of the iris in relation to the sclera. The results of the tests performed on 18 healthy volunteers and 18 volunteers in early stages of MG confirmed the validity of the suggested software.

  3. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Renato; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Antozzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmmune disease in which autoantibodies to different antigens of the neuromuscular junction cause the typical weakness and fatigability. Treatment includes anticholinesterase drugs, immunosuppression, immunomodulation, and thymectomy. The autoimmune response is maintained under control by corticosteroids frequently associated with immunosuppressive drugs, with improvement in the majority of patients. In case of acute exacerbations with bulbar symptoms or repeated relapses, modulation of autoantibody activity by plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins provides rapid improvement. Recently, techniques removing only circulating immunoglobulins have been developed for the chronic management of treatment-resistant patients. The rationale for thymectomy relies on the central role of the thymus. Despite the lack of controlled studies, thymectomy is recommended as an option to improve the clinical outcome or promote complete remission. New videothoracoscopic techniques have been developed to offer the maximal surgical approach with the minimal invasiveness and hence patient tolerability. The use of biological drugs such as anti-CD20 antibodies is still limited but promising. Studies performed in the animal model of MG demonstrated that several more selective or antigen-specific approaches, ranging from mucosal tolerization to inhibition of complement activity or cellular therapy, might be feasible. Investigation of the transfer of these therapeutic approaches to the human disease will be the challenge for the future. PMID:21552317

  4. Total body irradiation for myasthenia gravis with thymoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kim, In Ah [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is relatively rare occuring as one of important autoimmune disease to affect neuromuscular junction. This study was clinically to evaluate total body irradiation (TBI) against two patients including 33-year and 39-year females for chronic MG with thymoma who hospitalized in the St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University since 1994 as well as who showed no response by thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. TBI designed by the dose of 150-180 cGy consisting of 10 cGy per fraction, three times a week, for 5-6 weeks using linear accelerator of 6 MV. During the treatment of TBI, they did complain acute side effect such as vomiting and also appear improved physical condition from 4-6 weeks after TBI. Through the follow-up period of 18 or 42 months after TBI, they did not have any symptomatic recurrence. Consequently, the results suggest that TBI can be used as an alternative tool for the patients concurrently for MG with thymoma who had been refractory to various conventional therapies like thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  5. Three Types of Striational Antibodies in Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeaki Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is caused by antibodies that react mainly with the acetylcholine receptor on the postsynaptic site of the neuromuscular junction. A wide range of clinical presentations and associated features allow MG to be classified into subtypes based on autoantibody status. Striational antibodies, which react with epitopes on the muscle proteins titin, ryanodine receptor (RyR, and Kv1.4, are frequently found in MG patients with late-onset and thymoma. Antititin and anti-RyR antibodies are determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblot. More recently, a method for the detection of anti-Kv1.4 autoantibodies has become available, involving 12–15% of all MG patients. The presence of striational antibodies is associated with more severe disease in all MG subgroups. Anti-Kv1.4 antibody is a useful marker for the potential development of lethal autoimmune myocarditis and response to calcineurin inhibitors. Detection of striational antibodies provides more specific and useful clinical information in MG patients.

  6. Total body irradiation for myasthenia gravis with thymoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kim, In Ah

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is relatively rare occuring as one of important autoimmune disease to affect neuromuscular junction. This study was clinically to evaluate total body irradiation (TBI) against two patients including 33-year and 39-year females for chronic MG with thymoma who hospitalized in the St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University since 1994 as well as who showed no response by thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. TBI designed by the dose of 150-180 cGy consisting of 10 cGy per fraction, three times a week, for 5-6 weeks using linear accelerator of 6 MV. During the treatment of TBI, they did complain acute side effect such as vomiting and also appear improved physical condition from 4-6 weeks after TBI. Through the follow-up period of 18 or 42 months after TBI, they did not have any symptomatic recurrence. Consequently, the results suggest that TBI can be used as an alternative tool for the patients concurrently for MG with thymoma who had been refractory to various conventional therapies like thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy

  7. [Juvenile myasthenia gravis in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of two consanguine sisters born from consanguinity in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneh, Nidain; Apetse, Kossivi; Diatewa, Bénédicte Marèbe; Domingo, Sidik Abou-Bakr; Agba, Aidé Isabelle; Ayena, Koffi Didier; Balogou, Koffi Agnon; Balo, Komi Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare acquired autoimmune pathology causing neuromuscular transmission impairment. Juvenile onset of myasthenia gravis is often characterized by ocular involvement. We report two cases of ocular juvenile myasthenia gravis (JMG) in two siblings. They were two young girls, XA and XB, aged 11 and 9 years, of Malian origin, residing in Togo, born from first-degree of consanguinity presenting to Ophthalmology due to progressive decrease in visual acuity. XA showed visual acuity 8/10 on both eyes while XB showed improvement in visual acuity from 3/10 to 7/10 using a pinhole occluder, suggesting ametropia. XA had a 2-year history of bilateral ptosis lifting the upper eyelid of 7 mm, while XB had a 3-year history of bilateral ptosis with no lifting of the upper eyelid. Ice pack test was strongly positive in both patients. They had Cogan's lid twitch with paresis of the oculomotor nerve without diplopia. The dosage of acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies was normal. The diagnosis of JMG associated with ametropia was suspected. Ametropia was corrected by glasses and a specific treatment with pyridostigmine was initiated, but both patients were lost to follow-up. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis with inaugural ophthalmologic manifestation is rare but it can occur among children living in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies should be conducted to establish the features of this disease.

  8. Outcomes after major surgery in patients with myasthenia gravis: A nationwide matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Wen; Chou, Yi-Chun; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Hung, Chih-Jen; Lin, Chao-Shun; Chen, Ta-Liang; Liao, Chien-Chang

    2017-01-01

    To validate the comprehensive features of adverse outcomes after surgery for patients with myasthenia gravis. Using reimbursement claims from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we analyzed 2290 patients who received major surgery between 2004 and 2010 and were diagnosed with myasthenia gravis preoperatively. Surgical patients without myasthenia gravis (n = 22,900) were randomly selected by matching procedure with propensity score for comparison. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of postoperative adverse events associated with preoperative myasthenia gravis were calculated under the multiple logistic regressions. Compared with surgical patients without myasthenia gravis, surgical patients with myasthenia gravis had higher risks of postoperative pneumonia (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.65-2.65), septicemia (OR = 1.31; 95% CI: 1.05-1.64), postoperative bleeding (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.07-2.72), and overall complications (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.44-2.00). The ORs of postoperative adverse events for patients with myasthenia gravis who had symptomatic therapy, chronic immunotherapy, and short-term immunotherapy were 1.76 (95% CI 1.50-2.08), 1.70 (95% CI 1.36-2.11), and 4.36 (95% CI 2.11-9.04), respectively. Patients with myasthenia gravis had increased risks of postoperative adverse events, particularly those experiencing emergency care, hospitalization, and thymectomy for care of myasthenia gravis. Our findings suggest the urgency of revising protocols for perioperative care for these populations.

  9. Association of HLA-DQA1*0101/2 and DQB1*0502 with myasthenia gravis in southern Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefipour, Gholam-Ali; Salami, Zahra; Farjadian, Shirin

    2009-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular junction characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and fatigability. Different genes may control the induction and clinical presentation of this disease. Various HLA alleles are reported as predisposing or protective genetic elements in myasthenia gravis. The aim of this study was to investigate the probable association between HLA-DQ alleles and myasthenia gravis in southern Iranian patients. HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were determined in 104 sporadic patients with myasthenia gravis using polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism method and the results were compared to 816 healthy controls. HLA-DQA1*0101/2 (39.4%) and DQB1*0502 (21.6%) were the most frequent alleles in southern Iranian patients with myasthenia gravis. These alleles revealed positive associations with the disease with relative risks of 1.69 and 2.41, respectively. The most common haplotype was DQA1*0101/2-DQB1*0502 in these patients. According to the results of this study, DQA1*0101/2 and DQB1*0502 alleles might be considered as predisposing genetic factors to myasthenia gravis while DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 and *0602/3 show protective roles against this disease.

  10. Clinical Profile and Outcome of Postthymectomy versus Non-Thymectomy Myasthenia Gravis Patients in the Philippine General Hospital: A 6-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roxas, Ranhel C; Bagnas, Marjorie Anne C; Baldonado, Jobelle Joyce Anne R; Rivera, Jonathan P; Roxas, Artemio A

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by the production of abnormal autoantibodies directed against the receptors present in the neuromuscular junction. It has been the standard practice to offer thymectomy in all generalized myasthenia gravis patients despite the lack of robust evidence. The objectives of this study are to describe the clinical profile and differentiate the clinical outcomes of thymectomy versus non-thymectomy and thymomatous versus non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients in the Philippine General Hospital. Between 2009 and 2014, a total of 69 postthymectomy and 16 non-thymectomy patient records were successfully retrieved. The demographic characteristics, surgical approach, and histopathologic results were obtained. The clinical outcome after 6 months or 1 year-follow-up was also determined and grouped according to the following: (1) complete remission, (2) pharmacological remission, (3) no clinical change, (4) worsening symptoms, and (5) mortality. Majority of the patients were females (68.0%) with a mean age of 39.8 years and a mean duration of myasthenic symptoms of 21 months. Using the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America classification, 54.1% of patients fell under Class II and 48.2% of them presented with generalized weakness. In this study, 60.8% of postthymectomy myasthenia gravis patients had either complete remission or pharmacologic remission compared with 12.5% among non-thymectomy patients (p-value <0.001). No significant difference in the clinical outcome was found between thymomatous and non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis after thymectomy (p-value = 0.29). This study showed that both thymomatous and non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients who underwent thymectomy had a higher incidence of complete stable remission and pharmacologic remission as compared with myasthenia gravis patients who did not undergo thymectomy.

  11. Future perspectives in target-specific immunotherapies of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-11-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by complement-fixing antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChR); antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) and T helper (Th) 17+ cells are essential in antibody production. Target-specific therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed against antibodies, B cells, complement and molecules associated with T cell signaling. Even though the progress in the immunopathogenesis of the disease probably exceeds any other autoimmune disorder, MG is still treated with traditional drugs or procedures that exert a non-antigen specific immunosuppression or immunomodulation. Novel biological agents currently on the market, directed against the following molecular pathways, are relevant and specific therapeutic targets that can be tested in MG: (a) T cell intracellular signaling molecules, such as anti-CD52, anti-interleukin (IL) 2 receptors, anti- costimulatory molecules, and anti-Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK3) that block the intracellular cascade associated with T-cell activation; (b) B cells and their trophic factors, directed against key B-cell molecules; (c) complement C3 or C5, intercepting the destructive effect of complement-fixing antibodies; (d) cytokines and cytokine receptors, such as those targeting IL-6 which promotes antibody production and IL-17, or the p40 subunit of IL-12/1L-23 that affect regulatory T cells; and (e) T and B cell transmigration molecules associated with lymphocyte egress from the lymphoid organs. All drugs against these molecular pathways require testing in controlled trials, although some have already been tried in small case series. Construction of recombinant AChR antibodies that block binding of the pathogenic antibodies, thereby eliminating complement and antibody-depended-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, are additional novel molecular tools that require exploration in experimental MG.

  12. Do associated auto-antibodies influence the outcome of myasthenia gravis after thymectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzers, Marlies; Damoiseaux, Jan; Vigneron, Alain; Bodart, Nicolas; Kessels, Alfons; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Hochstenbag, Monique; Maessen, Jos; De Baets, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular autoimmune disease, where antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor destroy this receptor. The role of thymectomy in the treatment of MG remains controversial. Because of the frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, we hypothesized that patients with multiple autoantibodies (autoAbs) might have a lower chance of reaching complete stable remission after thymectomy. We analyzed sera of 85 MG patients who underwent a thymectomy between April 2004 and December 2012. We used four different immunodot kits (D-Tek, Mons, Belgium): ANA25 Quantrix, Synthetase 10 Diver, Myositis 7 Diver and Liver 10 profile Diver, all automatized on the BlueDiver Instrument (D-Tek). The Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) postintervention status was used to determine the outcome after thymectomy. AutoAbs other than anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies were detected in 29.4% of the patients of whom 16.5% clinically had a second autoimmune disease. In none of the seronegative patients other autoAbs were detected. No significant difference was observed in the 3-years remission rate after thymectomy in patients with or without antibodies other than anti-AChR antibodies. Although these autoAbs do not predict outcome in our MG patient cohort, screening for multiple autoAbs in MG patients might be warranted to identify patients with additional autoimmune diseases.

  13. Bleeding Jejunal Diverticulosis in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zuber-Jerger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with severe myasthenia gravis and an episode of obscure bleeding. There was a history of gastric ulcer leading to Billroth II surgery twenty-five years ago. Upper endoscopy revealed no pathology. Colonoscopy showed a few solitary diverticula and traces of old blood in the terminal ileum. Capsule endoscopy pictured red smear in the upper jejunum. Diverticula were seen as well. Suspecting bleeding jejunal diverticulosis double balloon enteroscopy was performed. The complete jejunal ascending loop and about 100 cm of the jejunum through the descending jejunal loop could be inspected. Large diverticula with fecoliths were found in both loops. Bleeding had ceased. The patient was discharged to neurology for optimizing therapy for myasthenia gravis.

  14. Microthymoma in elderly-onset myasthenia gravis detected preoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Haruaki; Nishimura, Takashi; Seki, Atsuko; Nitadori, Jun-Ichi; Arai, Tomio; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-10-01

    A 77-year-old woman with a 3-month history of muscle weakness was diagnosed with elderly-onset generalized myasthenia gravis (Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America classification IIa) based on a high serum acetylcholine receptor antibody level (25.4 nmol·L -1 ) and neurological findings. Computed tomography detected a small nodule (diameter 15 mm) in the anterior mediastinum, which was suspected to be a thymoma. An extended thymectomy was performed. The pathological examination revealed a 6-mm-diameter thymoma, termed a microthymoma, accompanied with a unilocular thymic cyst without capsule formation (type B2 according to the World Health Organization classification). Some fat tissue was also found within the tumor. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. A new approach to anesthesia management in myasthenia gravis: reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Driessen, J.J.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2010-01-01

    A neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB) in patients with myasthenia gravis usually dissipates either spontaneously or by administration of neostigmine. We administered sugammadex to a patient with myasthenia gravis to reverse a rocuronium-induced profound NMB. NMBDs

  16. Exercise in myasthenia gravis: A feasibility study of aerobic and resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Martin Amadeus; Mikkelsen, Erik Elgaard; Overgaard, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: It has not been established whether progressive resistance training (PRT) and aerobic training (AT) are feasible and efficient in myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: Fifteen subjects with generalized MG (Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) clinical classification II-IV) were...

  17. Difference in distribution of muscle weakness between myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, PW; Sotodeh, M; Nijnuis, M; van Doorn, PA; van Engelen, BGM; Hintzen, RQ; de Kort, PLM; Kuks, JB; Twijnstra, A; de Visser, M; Visser, LH; Wokke, JH; Wintzen, AR; Verschuuren, JJ

    2002-01-01

    Background: Myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) may have a similar distribution of muscle weakness. Deciding on a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis or LEMS on clinical grounds may therefore be difficult. Objective: To compare the localisation of initial muscle weakness

  18. [Pharmacological treatment compliance and a description of its associated factors in patients with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiaquez, J F; Gonzalez, S; Lasso-Penafiel, J; Barnett, C

    2018-01-01

    Medication adherence is a public health problem and this has not been previously studied in myasthenia gravis patients. To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis are adherent to treatment and to describe the clinical factors of patients who are non-adherent to treatment. Cross-sectional study of patients with myasthenia gravis followed at Padre Hurtado Hospital, Santiago de Chile, who received their medication through the hospital and therefore were on the pharmacy's list. Patients' participation was voluntary and anonymous. Medication adherence was assessed with the Morisky-Green-Levine survey (4 items). Patients were assessed for myasthenia gravis severity with the Manual Muscle Test, and myasthenia gravis-related quality of life with the MG-QOL15. Finally, patients were screened for depression with the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire. 26 patients were enrolled and 15 (57.7%) were women. Only 10 (38.5%) of patients were adherent to treatment. Patients who were not adherent to medication had more weakness (p = 0.06), worse quality of life (p = 0.008), were taking a greater number of myasthenia gravis drugs (p = 0.003) and had a higher risk of depression (p = 0.03). In this cohort of myasthenia gravis patients, three out of five patients were not adherent to treatment. These patients tended to have more weakness, worse quality of life and higher risk of depression. Medication adherence should be assessed routinely in patients with myasthenia gravis.

  19. Epidemiology of myasthenia gravis with anti-muscle specific kinase antibodies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niks, Erik H.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.

    The epidemiology of myasthenia gravis subtypes and the frequency of antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) was studied in patients with generalised myasthenia gravis without anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies who had an onset of symptoms between 1990 and 2004 in a well-defined region in the

  20. Minimal change disease in a patient with myasthenia gravis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis superimposed with proteinuria is a very rare disorder with only 39 cases reported so far. Of these cases, the most commonly associated disorder is minimal change disease. Myasthenia gravis and minimal change disease are both related to the dysfunction of T lymphocytes and hence the 2 disorders may be connected. Here we report the first case on a patient diagnosed with myasthenia gravis concurrently with the minimal change disease, and it was presented in the absence of thymoma or thymic hyperplasia. Treatment for myasthenia gravis also lowered proteinuria of minimal change disease. He ever experienced good control for myasthenia gravis and minimal change disease. However, pneumonia related septic shock occurred to him and finally he was dead. Minimal change disease is generally considered to occur subsequent to the onset of myasthenia gravis with causal association. After extensive literature review, we noted only 47.8% minimal change disease had occurred after the onset of myasthenia gravis. Minimal change disease mostly occurs in children and if diagnosed in adults, clinicians should search for a potential cause such as myasthenia gravis and other associated thymic disorders.

  1. Eight-year follow-up of patients with myasthenia gravis after thymectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S; Li, F; Chen, B; Lin, J; Yang, M; Fu, X; Li, J; Bu, B

    2015-02-01

    To depict the long-term outcome of patients with myasthenia gravis after thymectomy in combination with immunotherapy, and the factors that may potentially affect the outcome. The 306 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent extended thymectomy from January 1984 to December 2011 at Tongji Hospital were retrospectively evaluated. The patients consisted of 174 cases with thymoma and 132 cases without thymoma. Pharmaceutical treatment was tailored for each case during follow-up. Nine patients with thymomatous myasthenia gravis died during the perioperative period, and 297 patients were followed for 8.6 years. By their latest visits, 241 patients (81.1%) gained satisfactory efficacy, 24 cases died (8.1%), and 32 cases (10.8%) remained unchanged or deteriorated. Favorable factors for satisfactory efficacy included the presence of ocular myasthenia gravis before operation, no presence of thymoma, and lack of concomitant diseases. It is interesting to mention that, patients with non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis obtained significantly higher rates of complete stable remission and clinical remission than the patients with thymomatous myasthenia gravis. Extended thymectomy combined with immunotherapy is a preferred treatment with a satisfactory long-term remission rate. Patients with non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis have a much more promising prognosis than the patients with thymomatous myasthenia gravis. However, appropriate caution must be taken to discontinue pharmaceutical therapy as relapse remains a major concern after a patient who has already undergone thymectomy becomes symptom-free. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Difference in distribution of muscle weakness between myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, P.W.; Sotodeh, M.; Nijnuis, M.; Doorn, P.A. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hintzen, R.Q.; Kort, P.L.M. de; Kuks, J.B.M.; Twijnstra, A.; Visser, M. de; Visser, L.H.; Wokke, J.H.J.; Wintzen, A.R.; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myasthenia gravis and the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) may have a similar distribution of muscle weakness. Deciding on a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis or LEMS on clinical grounds may therefore be difficult. OBJECTIVE: To compare the localisation of initial muscle weakness

  3. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Iron Deficiency Anemia, and Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füsun Mayda Domaç

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG may occur in association with other organ- specific or nonspecific autoimmune diseases. In our study, we present a patient with ocular myasthenia, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and iron deficiency anemia who later developed reactive hypoglycemia. A 25-year-old woman with complaints of fluctuating extraocular muscle weakness, ptosis, and diplopia was examined. MG, type I (ocular MG, was confirmed by an elevated titer of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in serum (7 nmol/l, normal <0.6 and positive edrophonium test. Nerve conduction studies, needle electromyography, repetitive stimulation tests, and mediasten MRI were normal. The coexistence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed by the presence of a diffuse thyroid enlargement, elevated titers of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (211.8 IU/ml, normal 0-115, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (356.4 IU/ml, normal 0-34, thyroid stimulating hormone (8.21 uIU/ml, normal 0.27-4.2, and a decreased titer of free-T4 (1.03ng/dl normal 1.8-4.6. Diplopia and ptosis have regressed with 180 mg/day pyridostigmine bromide. On her follow-up period, 8 months later, reactive hypoglycemia has been diagnosed. The coexistence of myastenia gravis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and reactive hypoglycemia was not found in the literature. We should take into consideration the association and the importance of recognizing and treating these pathologies in myastenia gravis. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 31-3

  4. Low antioxidant status of serum bilirubin, uric acid, albumin and creatinine in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dehao; Su, Zhongqian; Wu, Shengjie; Bi, Yong; Li, Xiang; Li, Jia; Lou, Kangliang; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress and low antioxidant status play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune condition targeting the neuromuscular junction, and its antioxidant status is still controversial. Our study aimed to investigate the correlation between the clinical characteristics of MG and the serum antioxidant status of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine. We measured serum antioxidant molecule levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine in 380 individuals, including 166 MG and 214 healthy controls. We found that MG patients had significantly lower serum levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine than healthy controls, whether male or female. Moreover, it was also shown in our study that uric acid, albumin and creatinine levels in patients with MG were correlated with disease activity and classifications performed by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America. Our findings demonstrated that serum levels of bilirubin (Tbil, Dbil and Ibil), uric acid, albumin and creatinine were reduced in patients with MG. This suggested an active oxidative process in MG patients who had low antioxidant status.

  5. Clinical follow-up of pregnancy in myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Renata D; Lorenzoni, Paulo J; Kay, Claudia S K; Werneck, Lineu C; Scola, Rosana H

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the outcome and impact of pregnancy in women with myasthenia gravis (MG). Obstetric and clinical data were retrospectively analyzed before, during and after pregnancy. Predictors of outcome were studied. We included 35 pregnancies from 21 MG patients. In the course of MG symptoms in 30 pregnancies with live births, 50% deteriorated (mainly during the second trimester, p = 0.028), 30% improved, and 20% remained unchanged. The deterioration group had more frequent abnormal repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) (p = 0.028) and lower myasthenia gravis composite (MGC) scores (p = 0.045) before pregnancy. The improvement group was associated with higher MGC scores (p = 0.012) before pregnancy. The no-change group was associated with longer duration of MG (p = 0.026) and normal RNS (p = 0.008) before pregnancy. The course of MG in the second pregnancy was different from that in the previous pregnancy in 65.3% of cases. Obstetric complications were reported in 20 pregnancies; the most common was preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) (25.8%), and the most severe were abortion (11.4%) and fetal death (2.9%). Most of the patients delivered via caesarean section (66.7%). Spinal anesthesia was performed in 73.3%. Transient neonatal myasthenia gravis occurred in 12.9% of live-born infants, and no predictors were found. In conclusion, severity and duration of MG, RNS and treatment influence MG and pregnancy. Pregnant MG patients have greater rates of PPROM and caesarean delivery. Our data suggest that duration of MG, MGC and RNS before pregnancy may be useful in helping to predict the course of MG during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Thymoma in Myasthenia Gravis: From Diagnosis to Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Romi, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    One half of cortical thymoma patients develop myasthenia gravis (MG), while 15% of MG patients have thymomas. MG is a neuromuscular junction disease caused in 85% of the cases by acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. Titin and ryanodine receptor (RyR) antibodies are found in 95% of thymoma MG and 50% of late-onset MG (MG onset ≥50 years), are associated with severe disease, and may predict thymoma MG outcome. Nonlimb symptom profile at MG onset with bulbar, ocular, neck, and respiratory s...

  7. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Phillips

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR. They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK, or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4, are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms.

  8. Pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis: update on disease types, models, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, William D.; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) caused by antibodies that attack components of the postsynaptic membrane, impair neuromuscular transmission, and lead to weakness and fatigue of skeletal muscle. This can be generalised or localised to certain muscle groups, and involvement of the bulbar and respiratory muscles can be life threatening. The pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis depends upon the target and isotype of the autoantibodies. Most cases are caused by immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG3 antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). They produce complement-mediated damage and increase the rate of AChR turnover, both mechanisms causing loss of AChR from the postsynaptic membrane. The thymus gland is involved in many patients, and there are experimental and genetic approaches to understand the failure of immune tolerance to the AChR. In a proportion of those patients without AChR antibodies, antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or related proteins such as agrin and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), are present. MuSK antibodies are predominantly IgG4 and cause disassembly of the neuromuscular junction by disrupting the physiological function of MuSK in synapse maintenance and adaptation. Here we discuss how knowledge of neuromuscular junction structure and function has fed into understanding the mechanisms of AChR and MuSK antibodies. Myasthenia gravis remains a paradigm for autoantibody-mediated conditions and these observations show how much there is still to learn about synaptic function and pathological mechanisms. PMID:27408701

  9. Demyelinating disease in patients with myasthenia gravis Doenças desmielinizantes em pacientes com miastenia gravis

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    Denis Bernardi Bichuetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness, caused by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Patients with MG can present other autoimmune diseases in association, commonly hypo or hyperthyroidism. The association of MG to demyelinating disease is rare and has been described before. We report on three Brazilian patients with MG that presented distinct demyelinating diseases, two monophasic and one recurrent neuromyelitis optica, several years after the diagnosis of MG, and discuss their clinical courses.Miastenia gravis (MG é doença autoimune caracterizada por episódios de fraqueza muscular alternados com melhora, causada por bloqueio da junção neuromuscular. Pacientes com MG podem apresentar outras doenças autoimunes, comumente hipo ou hipertiroidismo, e a associação de MG com doenças desmielinizantes é raramente descrita. Relatamos três pacientes brasileiros com MG que desenvolveram doenças desmielinizantes, dois monofásicos e um neuromielite óptica recorrente, vários anos após o diagnóstico de MG e discutimos seus cursos clínicos.

  10. Worsening of myasthenia gravis after administration of injectable long-acting risperidone for treatment of schizophrenia; first case report and a call for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ismail, Ismail Ibrahim; John, John K; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to autoantibodies affecting the neuromuscular junction. Co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and schizophrenia is very rare and raises a challenge in management of both diseases. Antipsychotic drugs exhibit anticholinergic side effects and have the potentials of worsening myasthenia. Long-acting risperidone is an injectable atypical antipsychotic drug that has not been previously reported to worsen myasthenia gravis in literature. We report the first case report of worsening of myasthenia after receiving long-acting risperidone injection for schizophrenia in a 29-year-old female with both diseases. She started to have worsening 2 weeks following the first injection and her symptoms persisted despite receiving plasma exchange. This could be explained by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. We recommend that long-acting risperidone should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, and clinicians must be aware of the potential risks of this therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-MuSK-Positive Myasthenia Gravis in a Patient with Parkinsonism and Cognitive Impairment

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    S. Lanfranconi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle-specific tyrosine kinase- (MuSK- antibodies-positive Myasthenia Gravis accounts for about one third of Seronegative Myasthenia Gravis and is clinically characterized by early onset of prominent bulbar, neck, shoulder girdle, and respiratory weakness. The response to medical therapy is generally poor. Here we report a case of late-onset MuSK-antibodies-positive Myasthenia Gravis presenting with signs of cognitive impairment and parkinsonism in addition to bulbar involvement and external ophthalmoplegia. The pattern of involvement of both peripheral and central nervous system dysfunction might suggest a common pathogenic mechanism, involving impaired cholinergic transmission.

  12. Muscle-specific kinase antibody associated myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation.

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    Heidarzadeh, Zeinab; Mousavi, Seyyed-Asadollah; Ostovan, Vahid Reza; Nafissi, Shahriar

    2014-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare complication of bone marrow transplantation and graft versus host disease. We report a 30-year-old woman presented with oculobulbar and proximal limb weakness after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Also, she developed graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplantation. Investigations led to the diagnosis of muscle specific kinase antibody related myasthenia gravis. There have been only two case reports of muscle specific kinase antibody positive myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation in the literature, but none of the previously reported cases had graft versus host disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A patient with myasthenia gravis and a large arachnoid cyst - report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucuk, Mira; Gasparovic, Iva; Sonnenschein, Ivan; Perkovic, Olivio

    2017-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by weakening of voluntary muscles during the day and a marked restitution of function during the night and after rest. The symptoms may worsen over days or weeks, sometimes even in a few hours, and are usually well controlled by appropriate therapy. Arachnoid cysts are congenital or acquired deformities of the arachnoid membrane and are usually too small to cause distinct clinical symptomatology. We describe a case of a 76-year-old myasthenia gravis patient with an arachnoid cyst. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of these two comorbidities together.

  14. Myasthenia gravis mimicking stroke: a case series with sudden onset dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Giopato, Federico; Piatti, Maria Luisa; Rigamonti, Andrea; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by fluctuating fatigue of skeletal muscles, often involving extrinsic ocular or bulbar districts. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly is an under-recognized condition, sometimes confused with cerebrovascular disease. Here we present a case series of myasthenia patients which onset was characterized by sudden dysarthria, clearly raising this diagnostic dilemma. In the workout of sudden onset isolated dysarthria, MG should be always considered. In fact, even if myasthenia is a rare condition, lacunar stroke only with this clinical presentation is also unusual, and significant risks may arise (e.g., unexpected myasthenic crisis).

  15. Anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis with prolonged remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwyn, Jean Paul; Magnier, Patrick; Bédat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Ahtoy, Patrick; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a rare disorder of neuromuscular transmission affecting preferentially bulbar, neck and respiratory muscles. We report the case of a 22-year-old man who presented with diplopia on lateral gaze to both sides, facial diplegia, nasal dysarthria and dysphagia. Repetitive nerve stimulation of the trapezius and orbicularis oculi muscles showed amplitude decrements of 19% and 41% respectively supporting the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. MUsK antibodies were positive. Corticosteroids were introduced and then tapered and discontinued at 6 months after initiation. The patient remained in remission and asymptomatic for 4 years without ongoing treatment or prior treatment with rituximab after this first relapse of MuSK-MG. MuSK- MG is considered a hard-to-treat condition and patients generally remain dependent on immunosuppression or prior treatment with rituximab. Our observation highlights that patients with MuSK-MG can have a benign course and that continued immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy may not always be required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (pgravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Invasive medullary thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis: an unusual case Miastenia gravis em um paciente com timoma medular invasivo: relato de caso

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    JORGE S. REIS FILHO

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Thymomas are tumors characterized by a remarkable morphological heterogeneity and variable clinical behavior. This tumor has unique clinical associations, most notably with hematological abnormalities and myasthenia gravis. According with the Müller-Hermelink criteria, there are significant differences between the histological types of thymomas and the association with myasthenia gravis. Among the different histological types, medullary thymoma is the least frequent variant associated with this autoimmune disease. In this report we describe a case of medullary thymoma presenting in a 71-year- old woman with a myasthenic syndrome.Os timomas são tumores caracterizados por grande heterogeneidade morfológica e comportamento clínico variável. Este tumor apresenta associações clínicas singulares, principalmente com doenças hematológicas e com a miastenia gravis. De acordo com a classificação de Müller-Hermelink, existem diferenças significativas entre as variedades histológicas dos timomas e sua associação com a miastenia gravis. Entre os diferentes tipos histológicos, o timoma medular é a variante menos frequentemente associada com esta doença autoimune. Neste relato, nós descrevemos caso de timoma medular em uma paciente de 71 anos de idade com síndrome miastênica.

  18. The emerging role of tacrolimus in myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Marissa L.; Vanderman, Adam J.; Brown, Jamie N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe and evaluate the available evidence assessing the role of tacrolimus in the management of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Data sources: A literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to September 2014) and EMBASE (1947 to September 2014) was performed using the terms ‘tacrolimus’ and ‘myasthenia gravis’. Citations of retrieved articles were examined for relevance. Study selection and data extraction: The search was limited to prospective clinical trials focused on clinical outcomes in patients with generalized MG. Case reports, retrospective evaluations and non-English articles were excluded. Data synthesis: A total of 12 studies met inclusion criteria, of which seven articles evaluated tacrolimus in steroid-dependent patients and two examined the utility of tacrolimus in patients failing corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Other studies evaluated early initiation of tacrolimus after thymectomy, effectiveness of tacrolimus in de novo MG and the effectiveness of tacrolimus post-thymectomy in thymoma patients versus nonthymoma. A total of eight trials showed statistically significant improvements in quantitative MG score (QMGS) and postintervention status criteria – Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (PSC-MGFA). Of the trials examining steroid reduction with tacrolimus, two reported high rates of complete withdrawal; however, the most robust trial was unable to detect a difference in mean steroid dose. Long-term effects of tacrolimus (up to 5 years) were assessed in eight trials, which consistently showed positive effects on QMGS or reduction in adjunct therapies. Conclusions: There is limited yet promising information to suggest a beneficial role for tacrolimus in reducing QMGS and corticosteroid burden in patients with refractory symptoms or new-onset MG. Long-term use appears to be safe in this population. PMID:25922621

  19. Trismus as a first presenting complaint in a case of myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibu S Simon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial presentation of myasthenia gravis as trismus is very rare and no previous reports have been found in the literature. A 35-year-old male presented to the outpatient unit of our department with inability to clench well and to open his mouth. Physical examination revealed that he had clinical findings consistent with the signs and symptoms of myasthenia gravis. He was immediately referred to a neurologist, who confirmed that he was in an advanced stage of myasthenia gravis with severe deficit to his respiratory muscles and he was promptly treated. He is presently on a maintenance drug therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of myasthenia gravis whose initial presentation was trismus. This case presents a rare but important diagnosis that should be added to the differential diagnosis of trismus.

  20. The utility of a single simple question in the evaluation of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alon; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D; Bril, Vera

    2018-02-01

    Assessing myasthenia gravis (MG) can be challenging, and multiple scales are available to evaluate disease severity. We evaluated the utility of a single, simple question, as part of the MG evaluation: "What percentage of normal do you feel regarding your MG, 0%-100% normal?" A retrospective chart review of patients attending the neuromuscular clinic from January 2014 to December 2015 was performed. Responses were correlated with symptoms and signs, the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score (QMGS), the Myasthenia Gravis Impairment Index (MGII), and the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life scale (MG-QOL15). The total cohort included 169 patients. The percentage of normal correlated strongly with limb muscle weakness and MG scales, moderately with bulbar and respiratory symptoms, and weakly with ocular manifestations. The question, "What percentage of normal do you feel regarding your MG?" is feasible and valid, and can be incorporated easily into routine clinical evaluation. Muscle Nerve 57: 240-244, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Malignant thymona with symptoms of myasthenia gravis; Grasiczak zlosliwy z objawami nuzliwosci miesni

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    Miarzynska, M.; Szlezak, L.; Fibak, J.; Wolski, M.; Lis-Podrzycka, E.; Miarzynski, K. [Szpital im. F. Raszei, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The rare case of malignant tumor of thymus - Thymoma malignum was described. The initial diagnosis was difficult, because of the irregular symptoms of myasthenia gravis. The diagnostic difficulties, treatment and clinical features of this neoplasm were also discussed. (author)

  2. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a rare interferon gamma receptor 1 mutation associated with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin; Xue, Yinping

    2018-02-13

    Our study is aimed to explore the underlying genetic basis of myasthenia gravis. We collected a Chinese pedigree with myasthenia gravis, and whole-exome sequencing was performed on the two affected siblings and their parents. The candidate pathogenic gene was identified by bioinformatics filtering, which was further verified by Sanger sequencing. The homozygous mutation c.G40A (p.V14M) in interferon gamma receptor 1was identified. Moreover, the mutation was also detected in 3 cases of 44 sporadic myasthenia gravis patients. The p.V14M substitution in interferon gamma receptor 1 may affect the signal peptide function and the translocation on cell membrane, which could disrupt the binding of the ligand of interferon gamma and antibody production, contributing to myasthenia gravis susceptibility. We discovered that a rare variant c.G40A in interferon gamma receptor 1 potentially contributes to the myasthenia gravis pathogenesis. Further functional studies are needed to confirm the effect of the interferon gamma receptor 1 on the myasthenia gravis phenotype.

  3. Study of demographic, clinical, laboratory and electromyographic symptoms in Myasthenia Gravis patients referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram hospital in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Y; Haghi-Ashtiani, B; Zamani, B; Akhundi, F H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Myasthenia Gravis is an autoimmune disorder, which is clinically a neuromuscular illness that shows itself as muscular weakness and fatigue. The diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis depends on clinical evaluation, electrophysiological assessment, and autoantibody detection in serum. Known antibodies could be found in about 90% of the patients, which had a causative relation with disease symptoms. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was a survey on demographic features, clinical, laboratorial, and electromyographic signs of patients with Myasthenia Gravis referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram hospital. Materials and methods. This study was a descriptive cross-sectional one that used an easy sampling method: 54 patients with Myasthenia Gravis who were referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram were elected in 2015. The patients' information was recorded in the checklists based on the variables and the data were analyzed by using SPSS software version 21. The results. The demographic and the clinical symptoms data of 54 known Myasthenia Gravis patients, whose diagnosis was made according to the clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and autoantibody detection, were analyzed in this paper. There were 31 females (57.4%) and 23 males (42.6%) with an average age of 47.3 years. The average age of diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis in these patients was 42.8 years. Among the patients, 19 (35.2%) had a hospitalization history because of their disease. Due to laboratory findings, 10 patients (18.5%) had Musk antibody, 34 patients (62.9%) had acetylcholine receptor antibodies and 10 patients (18.5%) had none of these two antibodies. Moreover, in electromyographic findings, 38 patients (70.37%) had positive findings and 16 patients (29.6%) had normal findings. Discussion and Conclusion. Due to the chronic nature of this disease, and its rising trend, educating the people for the early detection of the disease, was necessary as soon as possible so

  4. The diagnosis of thymoma and thymic atrophy in patients with myasthenia gravis; Dignostikk av tymom og thymusatrofi hos pasienter med myasthenia gravis

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    Sund, K.K.; Skeie, G.O.; Gilhus, N.E.; Aarli, J.A.; Varhaug, J.E. [Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway)

    1997-11-01

    The authors have compared clinical, immunological and radiological data in 20 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymoma and in 21 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymic atrophy. The median age at onset was 54 years in the thymoma group and 63 years in the thymic atrophy group. The severity of the disease was similar in the two groups, and there was no significant difference in the concentration of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CA antibodies were demonstrated in 17/20 thymoma patients and in 6/21 with thymic atrophy, while 19/20 thymoma patients had antibodies to titin, compared with 9/21 among those with thymic atrophy. The diagnosis and treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis is based upon an evaluation of clinical, immunological and radiological data. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Tacrolimus Improves Symptoms of Children With Myasthenia Gravis Refractory to Prednisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanchan; Gui, Mengcui; Cao, Yayun; Lin, Jing; Li, Yue; Ji, Suqiong; Bu, Bitao

    2017-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis tends to affect children in China. Oral pyridostigmine and prednisone could effectively improve the symptoms, but multiple side effects become a major concern after long-term oral prednisone. To avoid the long-term complications of prednisone therapy and to obtain more satisfactory improvement, we tested the efficacy and safety of tacrolimus in children with myasthenia gravis. Children with myasthenia gravis who had not achieved satisfactory improvement or who experienced severe side effects after prednisone therapy were recruited between January 2015 and December 2016 at Tongji Hospital. All the children were treated with tacrolimus 1 mg to 2 mg daily and the dose was adjusted on the basis of the clinical response and the serum concentration. The dosage of prednisone, the severity of symptoms, blood samples, the serum concentration of tacrolimus, and titers of antiacetylcholine receptor antibodies were evaluated every four weeks. Fourteen children were enrolled. One child withdrew two weeks after the enrollment. Thirteen children have completed the therapy for one year. At the end point, the dosage of prednisone was significantly decreased (P gravis score, and myasthenia gravis-specific manual muscle testing and myasthenia gravis-activities of daily living scores were significantly improved (P gravis. Randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm the observation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. IFNA-AS1 regulates CD4+T cell activation in myasthenia gravis though HLA-DRB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mengchuan; Liu, Xiaofang; Meng, Huanyu; Xu, Liqun; Li, Yi; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Chang; Luo, Yue-Bei; Hu, Bo; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yu; Luo, Zhaohui; Yang, Huan

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal CD4 + T cell activation is known to play roles in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis (MG). However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the roles of lncRNAs in regulating CD4 + T cell. In this study, we discovered that the lncRNA IFNG-AS1 is abnormally expressed in MG patients associated with quantitative myasthenia gravis (QMG) and the positive anti-AchR Ab levels patients. IFNG-AS1 influenced Th1/Treg cell proliferation and regulated the expression levels of their transcription factors in an experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG)model. IFNG-AS1 could reduce the expression of HLA-DRB and HLA-DOB and they had a negative correlation in MG. Furthermore IFNG-AS1 influenced the expression levels of CD40L and CD4 + T cells activation in MG patient partly depend on effecting the HLA-DRB1 expression. It suggests that IFNG-AS1 may be involved in CD4 + T cell-mediated immune responses in MG. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Response to rocuronium and its determinants in patients with myasthenia gravis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Masafumi; Terasaki, Shuhei; Nishi, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Several previous studies using univariate analysis have suggested that the pre-anaesthetic train-of-four (TOF) ratio, concentration of anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and the presence of preoperative generalised muscular involvement are determinants of an increased response to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in patients with myasthenia gravis. However, the determinants of the response of patients with myasthenia gravis to rocuronium, which is expected to be used more frequently since the advent of sugammadex, have not been studied. To clarify whether previously suggested determinants of the response to other intermediate-acting NMBAs would also affect the response to rocuronium and to reveal the determinants of the increased response to rocuronium in individual patients with myasthenia gravis using multivariate analysis. Case control study. Kumamoto University Hospital, November 2010 to September 2013. Thirty-eight patients with myasthenia gravis having surgery using a total intravenous anaesthetic technique were investigated. After induction of general anaesthesia, the 95% effective dose (ED95) of rocuronium was calculated using cumulative dose-finding methods. Neuromuscular function was monitored by acceleromyographic assessment of TOF responses of the adductor pollicis muscle to ulnar nerve stimulation. Patients were then divided into the increased response (ED95 gravis in the two groups were compared. Stepwise logistic regression identified baseline TOF ratio and age of onset of myasthenia gravis as determinants of the increased response to rocuronium in patients with myasthenia gravis [odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 0.87 (0.77 to 0.98; P = 0.02) and 0.92 (0.86 to 0.99; P = 0.03), respectively]. Multivariate analysis identified baseline TOF ratio and age of disease onset as determinants of the increased response to rocuronium in patients with myasthenia gravis. Registered with UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, identifier: UMIN

  8. [Onset of myasthenia gravis in primary care. Presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission involving the production of autoantibodies directed against skeletal muscle receptors, in most cases of acetylcholine. Clinically it is characterized by the appearance of muscle weakness after prolonged activity, which tends to recover after a period of rest, or administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. It is a relatively rare disease, although the prevalence has increased by improved diagnosis and increased longevity of the population. The diagnosis can be based on evidence after it is suspected using pharmacological, immunological or electrophysiology tests. Treatment can be divided into: symptomatic, short term and long term. We report the case of a patient who complained of diplopia, this muscle weakness being the most common initial symptom of the disease. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscle satellite cells are functionally impaired in myasthenia gravis: consequences on muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Mohamed; Maurer, Marie; Robinet, Marieke; Le Grand, Fabien; Fadel, Elie; Le Panse, Rozen; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disease caused in most cases by anti-acetyl-choline receptor (AChR) autoantibodies that impair neuromuscular signal transmission and affect skeletal muscle homeostasis. Myogenesis is carried out by muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs). However, myogenesis in MG had never been explored. The aim of this study was to characterise the functional properties of myasthenic SCs as well as their abilities in muscle regeneration. SCs were isolated from muscle biopsies of MG patients and age-matched controls. We first showed that the number of Pax7+ SCs was increased in muscle sections from MG and its experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) mouse model. Myoblasts isolated from MG muscles proliferate and differentiate more actively than myoblasts from control muscles. MyoD and MyoG were expressed at a higher level in MG myoblasts as well as in MG muscle biopsies compared to controls. We found that treatment of control myoblasts with MG sera or monoclonal anti-AChR antibodies increased the differentiation and MyoG mRNA expression compared to control sera. To investigate the functional ability of SCs from MG muscle to regenerate, we induced muscle regeneration using acute cardiotoxin injury in the EAMG mouse model. We observed a delay in maturation evidenced by a decrease in fibre size and MyoG mRNA expression as well as an increase in fibre number and embryonic myosin heavy-chain mRNA expression. These findings demonstrate for the first time the altered function of SCs from MG compared to control muscles. These alterations could be due to the anti-AChR antibodies via the modulation of myogenic markers resulting in muscle regeneration impairment. In conclusion, the autoimmune attack in MG appears to have unsuspected pathogenic effects on SCs and muscle regeneration, with potential consequences on myogenic signalling pathways, and subsequently on clinical outcome, especially in the case of muscle stress.

  10. Myasthenia gravis in pregnancy: Experience of a portuguese center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, António Costa; Pinto, Clara; Santos, Ernestina; Braga, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the clinical course during pregnancy and neonatal outcomes of a cohort of Portuguese women with myasthenia gravis (MG). Retrospective study. Twenty-five patients with 30 pregnancies were included. Mean maternal age was 32.4 ± 4.1 years. Miscarriage rate was 6.7%, with delivery of 28 newborns. Deterioration in MG during pregnancy occurred in 43.3%, and 46.4% occurred at postpartum. Eighty percent were medicated with pyridostigmine, 43.3% with corticosteroids, and 40% with intravenous immunoglobulin. There were no maternal or neonatal deaths. Mean gestational time at delivery was 38.2 weeks. No cases of fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, or fetal demise were observed. Global cesarean rate was 64.3%. Two newborns developed transient neonatal myasthenia. A high rate of clinical worsening of MG in the mother was observed in this retrospective study, which highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach for avoiding maternal adverse outcomes. Muscle Nerve 54: 715-720, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Immunization of mice with LRP4 induces myasthenia similar to MuSK-associated myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shuuichi; Motohashi, Norio; Takashima, Rumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Since the first report of experimental animal models of myasthenia gravis (MG) with autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), there have not been any major reports replicating the pathogenicity of anti-LRP4 antibodies (Abs). Recent clinical studies have cast doubt on the specificity and pathogenicity of anti-LRP4 antibodies for MG, highlighting the need for further research. In this study, we purified antigens corresponding to the extracellular region of human LRP4 stably expressed with chaperones in 293 cells and used these antigens to immunize female A/J mice. Immunization with LRP4 protein caused mice to develop myasthenia having similar electrophysiological and histological features as are observed in MG patients with circulating Abs against muscle-specific kinase (MuSK). Our results clearly demonstrate that active immunization of mice with LRP4 proteins causes myasthenia similar to the MG induced by anti-MuSK Abs. Further experimental and clinical studies are required to prove the pathogenicity of anti-LRP4 Abs in MG patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaesthetic Management of a patient with Myasthenia Gravis and Small Bowel Intussusception for Jejuno-Ileal Anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting voluntary skeletal muscles. The altered sensitivity of acetylcholine receptors to muscle relaxants and concomitant treatment with anticholinesterase in these patients affect their anaesthetic management. Patients who have undergone bowel anastomosis and are on regular anticholinesterase treatment are susceptible to anastomotic leaks. We report successful anaesthetic management of class I myasthenic patient with coexisting small bowel intussusception operated for jejuno-ileal anastomoses using regional, inhalational and intravenous (i.v anaesthesia based on train of four responses, and avoiding the use of reversal (anticholinesterase.

  13. Caesarean section in a patient with Myasthenia Gravis: A bigger challenge for the anesthesiologist than the obstetrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Sanwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia Gravis (MG is an acquired, autoimmune disorder affecting neuromuscular junction presenting with easy fatigability, progressive weakness, diplopia, difficulty in speaking and swallowing and even ventilatory failure in severe cases. During pregnancy the disease may go into remission or may exacerbate at any time during first, second and third trimesters or postpartum period. We are reporting the case of a 28 year old primigravida, known case of MG, who underwent caesarean section and developed muscular weakness on third postoperative day. Her neonate also had tachypnoea and hypotonia, Both, the mother and the baby were managed aggressively and responded well to therapy.

  14. An association of myasthenia gravis with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in a patient with a multinodular goitre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Siti Fatimah Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of myasthenia gravis (MG with other autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is well recognised, although rare. The occurrence of both diseases can occur in two ways: either disease preceding the other, or concurrently. The presentation of MG in association with ATD can range from ocular to generalised disease. Case Summary: A 26-year-old Malay female with persistent hyperthyroidism secondary to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in multinodular goitre was diagnosed with generalised MG after 2 years. She presented with right eye ptosis (ocular and difficulty in swallowing and chewing (bulbar. The diagnosis of MG was confirmed by fatigability testing, electromyography and the presence of AChR antibodies. Her symptoms showed improvement with pyridostigmine (Mestinon 60 mg 6-hourly. Her antithyroid drug was tapered down according to her thyroid function test. Throughout a year of follow-ups, her hyperthyroidism and fatigability symptoms improved with treatment. She was later counselled for total thyroidectomy and thymectomy. Conclusion: Myasthenia gravis and hyperthyroidism may present with similar symptoms such as dysphagia due to neuromuscular weakness or fatigue. When the diseases occur together, one of the diagnoses may be missed. Therefore, the occurrence of new symptoms in a patient with underlying ATD should should trigger the early identification of other autoimmune diseases by primary care doctors.

  15. Onset and Evolution of Clinically Apparent Myasthenia Gravis after Resection of Non-Myasthenic Thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Tamburrini, Alessandro; Schillaci, Orazio; Ambrogi, Vincenzo

    2018-03-06

    Patients with thymoma and without clinical or electromyographical myasthenic signs may occasionally develop myasthenia several years after thymectomy. Hereby, we investigated the predictors and the evolution of this peculiar disease. We performed a retrospective analysis in 104 consecutive patients undergoing thymectomy between 1987 and 2013 for thymoma without clinical nor electromyographic signs of myasthenia gravis. Predictors of post-thymectomy onset of myasthenia gravis were investigated with univariale time-to-disease analysis. Evolution of myasthenia was analyzed with time-to-regression analysis. Eight patients developed late myasthenia gravis after a median period of 33 months from thymectomy. No significant correlation was found for age, gender, Masaoka's stage and World Health Organization histology. Only high preoperative serum acetylcholine-receptor antibodies titer (>0.3 nmol/L) was significantly associated with post-thymectomy myasthenia gravis at univariale time-to-disease (p=0.003) analysis. Positron emission tomography was always performed in high-titer patients detecting activity in 4 of these. Surgical treatment through redo-sternotomy or video-thoracoscopy was performed in these last cases with a remission in all patients after 12, 24, 32 and 48 months, respectively. No patient under medical treatment has yet developed a complete remission. In our study the presence of pre-operative high-level serum acetylcholine receptor antibodies was the only factor significantly associated with the development of post-thymectomy myasthenia gravis. The persistence of residual islet of ectopic thymic tissue was one of the causes of the onset of myasthenia and surgical removal of these achieved satisfactory results. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Adhesive Ileus Complicating Recurrent Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Seretis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is considered to be one of the most frequent gastrointestinal manifestations of myasthenia gravis, accompanied by the presence of neoplasia of the thymus gland in the vast majority of the cases presented in the international literature. Despite the fact that myasthenia gravis has been implicated to be the cause of recurrent episodes of intestinal pseudo-obstruction, adhesive ileus has never been reported to complicate this – in any sense rare – condition. We present a unique case of a patient with myasthenia gravis, free of thymus neoplasia, who was submitted to emergency surgery due to the presence of extended adhesive ileus as a complication of chronic intestinal functional obstruction.

  17. The diagnosis of thymoma and thymic atrophy in patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, K.K.; Skeie, G.O.; Gilhus, N.E.; Aarli, J.A.; Varhaug, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have compared clinical, immunological and radiological data in 20 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymoma and in 21 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymic atrophy. The median age at onset was 54 years in the thymoma group and 63 years in the thymic atrophy group. The severity of the disease was similar in the two groups, and there was no significant difference in the concentration of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CA antibodies were demonstrated in 17/20 thymoma patients and in 6/21 with thymic atrophy, while 19/20 thymoma patients had antibodies to titin, compared with 9/21 among those with thymic atrophy. The diagnosis and treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis is based upon an evaluation of clinical, immunological and radiological data. 28 refs., 2 tabs

  18. [Clinical and neurologic characteristic and principles of therapy of late-onset Myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosachev, V D; Alekseeva, T M; Khalmurzina, A N

    2016-01-01

    In the present work the results of the clinic-epidemiological analysis of 223 patients with the onset of the myasthenia at 60 y. o. and later, admitted and treated in the clinic of neurology for the passed 25years are represented. A dynamic growth of incidence of the late-onset myasthenia through the passed 10 years was administered. We administered a prevalence of the generalized form of the myasthenia gravis (61,5 %). The whole clinical table of the myasthenia was developed during an year in 76,7 % of the cases. A wide range of the concomitant somatic pathology in this group of the patients (especially, with a cardio-vascular pathology - 93,3 %) was found to worsen the course of the myasthenia itself. We found that the set of the therapeutic measures in myasthenia in the elderly is determined by the course of the myasthenia and the multiple organ failure due to the concomitant diseases. The scheme of complex corrective therapy of myasthenia gravis in elderly was developed.

  19. Assessment of physical fatigability and fatigue perception in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Berit; Mehl, Theresa; Schweden, Tabea L K; Menge, Uwe; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Fatigue includes both performance fatigability and fatigue perception. In 32 stable patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) and 17 controls, time-dependent physical performance was assessed by the arm movement test (AMT) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). MG patients presented with low quantitative MG scores (mean 0.5, SD 0.5) and without pathologic decrement. Fatigability was based on calculation of linear trend (LT) reflecting dynamic performance within subsequent constant time intervals. Perception of physical fatigue was analyzed using fatigue questionnaires. MG patients showed a negative LT in both AMT and 6MWT, significantly differing from stable performance in controls. LT inversely correlated with elevation of acetylcholine receptor antibodies (r = -0.59, P perception. LT allows quantification of fatigability as an objective measurement of decline in individual performance, even in patients without obvious neuromuscular deficits in routine testing. The missing correlation of experienced fatigue supports the multidimensional fatigue model. Muscle Nerve 55: 657-663, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Myasthenia gravis in children: analysis of 18 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Maria da Penha A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG in childhood is rare comprising 10 to 20 % of all myasthenic patients. We studied 18 patients with MG whose first symptoms started from 1 to 12 years of age, followed at the Department of Neurology of the UNIFESP-EPM, from January 1983 to August 1997. There were 10 girls and 8 boys (1.2:1. Eleven patients (61% presented moderate or severe generalized disease and 4 (22% had at least one myasthenic crisis. EMG with supramaximal repetitive nerve stimulation was diagnostic in 8 (47% out of 17 patients, and chest CT was normal in 14 patients. Seropositivity to acetylcholine receptor antibodies was found in 81.6% (9 out of 11 tested and the levels had no relation to clinical severity. Nine out of 16 patients (56% worsened with pyridostigmine alone and were treated with prednisone. Four out of those nine continued worsening despite steroids and were subjected to thymectomy (all showed thymic lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. Three patients (75% improved markedly after thymectomy and one (25% worsened, eventually getting better with intravenous immunoglobulin and oral azathioprine. MG treatment, using all resources available, has to be individualized for each child.

  1. Myasthenia gravis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A pathogenic overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotaas, Håvard Torvik; Skeie, Geir Olve; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to examine potential joint disease mechanisms for myasthenia gravis (MG) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through the examination of long-term patient cohorts for comorbidity. Recent studies support early involvement of the neuromuscular junction in ALS patients with subsequent degeneration of motor neurons. Medical records at Haukeland University Hospital from 1987 to 2012 were examined for International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes for MG and ALS. Sera were re-tested for antibodies to acetylcholine receptor, titin, MuSK and GM1. We report one patient with both MG and ALS, and another 3 patients with suggestive evidence of both conditions. This is far more than expected from prevalence and incidence figures in this area if the disorders were unrelated. Our data suggest that immunological mechanisms in the neuromuscular junction are relevant in ALS pathogenesis. Attention should be given to possible therapeutic targets in the neuromuscular junction and muscle in ALS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography of the thymus in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Shigeo; Sakaguchi, Kozo; Tomoyasu, Hiroshi; Banba, Jiro; Masaki, Mikio; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Matsushita, Hisashi

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of preoperative CT diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis for the thymus were studied in 39 patients with myasthenia gravis. The patients consisted of 10 patients with thymoma and 29 without thymoma confirmed at the operation. CT diagnosis was 11 thymomas, 18 thymic hyperplasias and 10 normal thymuses. Eleven thymomas revealed histopathologically 9 thymomas, one follicular lymphoid hyperplasia (FLH) and one involved thymus. Out of 18 thymic hyperplasias 15 cases were FLH and 3 involved thymus. There were 5 involved thymuses, 4 FLHs and one thymoma in the 10 normal thymuses on CT. The finding of 'reticular pattern', many small nodules scattered reticularly in the thymus, in computed tomography could be regarded as a sign suggesting FLH of the thymus. The accuracy of this finding of CT was 83% for FLH. The finding of thymoma on CT revealed 82% of the accuracy. Therefore, CT was very useful in the diagnosis of the localization of the thymoma but not for the diagnosis of FLH of the thymus. Nevertheless the finding of 'reticular pattern' on CT was helpful in the diagnosis of FLH. (author)

  3. Radiographical diagnosis of the thymus in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Shigeo; Banba, Jiro; Masaki, Mikio; Irimoto, Masahiro; Matsushita, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of radiographical findings of the thymus between pneumomediastinography and computed tomography were studied in 35 patients with myasthenia gravis. The patients consisted of 10 patients with thymoma and 25 without thymoma confirmed at the operations. Pneumomediastinography was very useful to discern whether the thymoma was invasive or noninvasive, but not contributory to know whether the thymus was composed of folicular lymphoid hyperplasia or normal thyimic tissues. Computed tomography was also useful to dertermine the localization and the invasiveness of the thymoma, but not helpful to know whether the thymus was of follicular lymphoid hyperplasia or normal tissues. However, the finding of ''reticular pattern''-many small nodules scattered resicularly in the thymus-in computed tomography could be regarded as a sign suggesting follicular lymphoid hyperplasia of the thymus. Therfore, both pneumomediastinography and computed tomography were very useful in the diagnosis of the localization and the invasiveness of the thymoma but not for the diagnosis of follicular lymphoid hyperplasia of the thymus. Neverethless the finding of ''reticular pattern'' computred tomography was helpful in the diagnosis of follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. (author)

  4. Computed tomography of the thymus in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimura, Shigeo; Sakaguchi, Kozo; Tomoyasu, Hiroshi; Banba, Jiro; Masaki, Mikio; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Matsushita, Hisashi [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Comparison of preoperative CT diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis for the thymus were studied in 39 patients with myasthenia gravis. The patients consisted of 10 patients with thymoma and 29 without thymoma confirmed at the operation. CT diagnosis was 11 thymomas, 18 thymic hyperplasias and 10 normal thymuses. Eleven thymomas revealed histopathologically 9 thymomas, one follicular lymphoid hyperplasia (FLH) and one involved thymus. Out of 18 thymic hyperplasias 15 cases were FLH and 3 involved thymus. There were 5 involved thymuses, 4 FLHs and one thymoma in the 10 normal thymuses on CT. The finding of `reticular pattern`, many small nodules scattered reticularly in the thymus, in computed tomography could be regarded as a sign suggesting FLH of the thymus. The accuracy of this finding of CT was 83% for FLH. The finding of thymoma on CT revealed 82% of the accuracy. Therefore, CT was very useful in the diagnosis of the localization of the thymoma but not for the diagnosis of FLH of the thymus. Nevertheless the finding of `reticular pattern` on CT was helpful in the diagnosis of FLH. (author).

  5. Value of radiologic imaging of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glathe, S.; Neufang, K.F.R.; Haupt, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic imaging in myasthenia gravis is used for the evaluation of pathologic changes of the thymus gland. Computed tomography can demonstrate tumors of the anterior mediastinum in nearly 90% and is therefore superior to conventional radiography.Because of the variety of size and shape of the normal thymus gland, differentiation between normal thymus, follicular hyperplasia and thymoma is rarely possible especially in younger patients. In elderly patients with myasthenia gravis and involution of the thymus gland tumors of the thymus are reliably detected by computed tomography, whereas the ability of computed tomography to predict the histological diagnosis is poor even with intravenous administration of contrast media. (orig.) [de

  6. Clinical Utility of Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Testing in Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Crandall E; De Lott, Lindsey B; Nagia, Lina; Lemos, Joao; Eggenberger, Eric R; Cornblath, Wayne T

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody testing is thought to be lower in ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG) compared with generalized disease, although estimates in small-scale studies vary. There is little information in the literature about the implications of AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. To test the hypothesis that serum AChR antibody testing is more sensitive in OMG than previously reported and to examine the association between AChR antibody levels and progression from OMG to generalized myasthenia gravis. A retrospective, observational cohort study was conducted of 223 patients (mean [SD] age, 59.2 [16.4] years; 139 [62.3%] male) diagnosed with OMG between July 1, 1986, and May 31, 2013, at 2 large, academic medical centers. Baseline characteristics, OMG symptoms, results of AChR antibody testing, and progression time to generalized myasthenia gravis (if this occurred) were recorded for each patient. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the association between all clinical variables and antibody result. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to examine time to generalization. Among the 223 participants, AChR antibody testing results were positive in 158 participants (70.9%). In an adjusted model, increased age at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P = .007) and progression to generalized myasthenia gravis (OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.18-7.26; P = .02) were significantly associated with positive antibody test results. Women were less likely to have a positive antibody test result (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.68; P = .002). Patients who developed symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis had a significantly higher mean (SD) antibody level than those who did not develop symptoms of generalized myasthenia gravis (12.7 [16.5] nmol/L vs 4.2 [7.9] nmol/L; P = .002). We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of AChR antibody testing than previously reported in the

  7. Hope, Coping, and Quality of Life in Adults with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Wilma J; LeBlanc, Nicole; Fowler, Sue; Nicolle, Michael W; Hulley, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis significantly impacts quality of life. However, the relationship between hope, coping, and quality of life (QOL)in myasthenia patients has not been studied (Kulkantrakorn & Jarungkiatkul, 2009; Raggi et al., 2010). The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between hope, coping, and quality of life in adults with myasthenia gravis. Subjects with MG (n = 100) completed six questionnaires, including a demographic profile, the Myasthenia Gravis Activities of Daily Living Scale (MG-ADL), Herth Hope Index (HHI), Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS), Myasthenia Gravis Quality-of-Life Scale (MG-QOL15), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36v2). Mean hope scores indicated a high level of hope. An optimistic coping style was the most common and effective coping strategy identified by subjects. Positive thinking and humour were also frequently used strategies. Participants identified quality of life as good tolerability, above general population mental well-being, and below general populationphysical well-being. Participants who identified good quality of life had low scores on the MG-QOL15 scale and high scores on the SF36v2. Hope and independence for activities of daily living were found to correlate with improved quality of life and mental well-being(p life in the relationship between hope and coping. Hope and coping were not important factors for well-being or quality of life. Nurses caring for adults with myasthenia gravis should use interventions that continue to support hope, quality of life, and coping throughout the unpredictable and chronic course of MG.

  8. Myasthenia gravis: An emerging toxicity of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, D; Horwood, K; Coward, J I G

    2017-09-01

    The advent of immunotherapy has heralded a number of significant advances in the treatment of particular malignancies associated with poor prognosis (melanoma, non-small-cell lung, renal and head/neck cancers). The success witnessed with therapeutic agents targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4, programmed cell death protein 1 and programmed cell death ligand 1 immune checkpoints has inevitably led to an explosion in their clinical application and the subsequent recognition of specific toxicity profiles distinct from those long recognised with chemotherapy. Consequently, as the utility of such therapies broaden, understanding the nature, timing and management of these immune-related adverse events (irAEs) becomes increasingly significant. Although neurological irAEs are considered relatively rare in comparison with hepatitis, colitis, pneumonitis and endocrinopathies, one emerging side-effect is myasthenia gravis (MG). Among the 23 reported cases of immune checkpoint inhibitor-associated MG, 72.7% were de novo presentations, 18.2% were exacerbations of pre-existing MG and 9.1% were exacerbations of subclinical MG. The average onset of symptoms was within 6 weeks (range 2-12 weeks) of treatment initiation. In addition, there was no consistent association with elevated acetylcholine antibody titres and the development of immune checkpoint inhibitor-related MG. Significantly, there was a 30.4% MG-specific-related mortality, which further emphasises the importance of early recognition and robust treatment of this toxicity. In addition to a review of the existing literature, we present a new case of pembrolizumab-induced MG and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The clinical outcome of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirsharifi R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a neuromuscular disorder with weakness of skeletal muscles. Thymectomy is now recognized as a treatment modality in MG. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of thymectomy on MG. "nMethods: MG patients with history of thymectomy at a tertiary referral center during twelve year period were included. The medical records were reviewed and telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the effects of thymectomy. "nResults: Sixty MG patients, 46 females and 14 males, aged 30.4±11.1 years, underwent open (n=48 or video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy (n=12 during study period. The mean dosage of preoperative pyridostigmine was 235.4±86.2mg/day. This figure reached to 129±18mg/day after thymectomy (p<0.0001. 17 patients (28.3% had complete remission (complete freedom of symptoms without medications. Improve-ment (improved symptoms or less medication requirement was seen in 34 patients (56.6%. There was no response to surgical therapy in six patients (10%. Three patients (5% had experienced progression of disease postoperatively. Overall, benefit of thymectomy was observed in 85% of patients. Age, sex, duration and severity of disease, quantity of preoperative drugs, surgical approach, and presence of thymoma did not affect the outcome. Satisfaction was stated as excellent in 17%, good in 43%, moderate in 35% and poor in 5% of patients after operation. "nConclusion: Thymectomy is an effective treatment for MG which leads to less severity of disease and less drug requirement. It would be considered in all myasthenic patients regardless of age, sex, duration and severity of disease and presence of thymoma.

  10. Myasthenia Gravis and Anesthesia – A Review of the Literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immunological disorder characterized by damaged acetylcholine receptors (AchR) due to antibody, which not only blocks the receptor site but also causes degenerations of the receptors.. It is closely associated with disorders of similar pathogenesis, such as pernicious anaemia, thyrotoxicosis, ...

  11. Disability and Functional Profiles of Patients with Myasthenia Gravis Measured with ICF Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Matilde; Raggi, Alberto; Antozzi, Carlo; Confalonieri, Paolo; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Mantegazza, Renato

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe functional profiles of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and the relationships among symptoms, activities and environmental factors (EF), by using WHO's International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF). Patients were consecutively enrolled at the Besta Institute of Milan, Italy.…

  12. Nonmelanoma skin cancer risk awareness in azathioprine-treated myasthenia gravis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, Iain J

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of NMSC (nonmelanoma skin cancer) have recently been reported in people with MG (myasthenia gravis) receiving azathioprine treatment. Guidelines on azathioprine for patients with dermatological and gastrointestinal disorders stress the importance of NMSC risk awareness and prevention. The aim of this study is to assess whether MG patients are being informed of this risk.

  13. Open source modular ptosis crutch for the treatment of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Trust; Sivarasu, Sudesh; Douglas, Tania S

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of Myasthenia Gravis presents challenges due to poor tolerability in some patients. Conventional ptosis crutches have limitations such as interference with blinking which causes ocular surface drying, and frequent irritation of the eyes. To address this problem, a modular and adjustable ptosis crutch for elevating the upper eyelid in Myasthenia Gravis patients has been proposed as a non-surgical and low-cost solution. Areas covered: This paper reviews the literature on the challenges in the treatment of Myasthenia Gravis globally and focuses on a modular and adjustable ptosis crutch that has been developed by the Medical Device Laboratory at the University of Cape Town. Expert commentary: The new medical device has potential as a simple, effective and unobtrusive solution to elevate the drooping upper eyelid(s) above the visual axis without the need for medication and surgery. Access to the technology is provided through an open source platform which makes it available globally. Open access provides opportunities for further open innovation to address the current limitations of the device, ultimately for the benefit not only of people suffering from Myasthenia Gravis but also of those with ptosis from other aetiologies.

  14. Diurnal and day-to-day variation of isometric muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, Lotte; Jakobsen, Johannes; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), muscle strength is expected to decrease gradually during the day due to physical activities. METHODS: Isometric muscle strength at the shoulder, knee, and ankle was determined in 10 MG patients (MGFA class II-IV) who were receiving usual...

  15. ANTIBODIES TO SKELETAL-MUSCLE IN MYASTHENIA-GRAVIS .2. PREVALENCE IN NON-THYMOMA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; LIMBURG, PC; HORST, G; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    1993-01-01

    Anti-skeletal muscle antibodies (AMA) were measured in 340 non-thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) by both an ELISA with citric acid muscle extract and by immunofluorescence assay. Three a-AChR negative but AMA-positive patients were found. The occurrence of AMA was related to the age at

  16. Antibodies to skeletal muscle in myasthenia gravis. Part 1. Diagnostic value for the detection of thymoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuks, J B; Limburg, P C; Horst, G; Dijksterhuis, J; Oosterhuis, H J

    1993-01-01

    The role of anti-muscle antibodies (AMA) in the diagnosis of thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is evaluated. We compared ELISA and Western blot assay for antibodies to citric acid muscle extract (a-CAE) with an immunofluorescence assay (IF). Sera from 234 selected MG patients and 123

  17. CT and myasthenia gravis: Correlation between mediastinal imaging and histopathological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Kraker (Marjolein); J. Kluin (Jolanda); N.S. Renken (Nomdo); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); W. Walker (W.); A. Toker (A.); S.M. Zielinski (Stephanie)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe surgical strategy in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is influenced by the suspicion of thymoma based on mediastinal imaging. Aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the accuracy of CT of the mediastinum in predicting the histological findings in patients with MG referred

  18. Docetaxel/cisplatin therapy in myasthenia gravis with hypertension/diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Guoyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic options for thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (MG patients complicated with hypertension and/or diabetes post thymectomy are often conventional steroids. As the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension globally increases, other therapeutic options for these patients are of great importance.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of methotrexate for patients with generalized myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; He, Jianghua; Herbelin, Laura; Burns, Ted M; Nations, Sharon; Bril, Vera; Wang, Annabel K; Elsheikh, Bakri H; Kissel, John T; Saperstein, David; Shaibani, J Aziz; Jackson, Carlayne; Swenson, Andrea; Howard, James F; Goyal, Namita; David, William; Wicklund, Matthew; Pulley, Michael; Becker, Mara; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Benatar, Michael; Pazcuzzi, Robert; Simpson, Ericka; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Statland, Jeffrey M; Barohn, Richard J

    2016-07-05

    To determine the steroid-sparing effect of methotrexate (MTX) in patients with symptomatic generalized myasthenia gravis (MG). We performed a 12-month multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of MTX 20 mg orally every week vs placebo in 50 acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive patients with MG between April 2009 and August 2014. The primary outcome measure was the prednisone area under the dose-time curve (AUDTC) from months 4 to 12. Secondary outcome measures included 12-month changes of the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score, the Myasthenia Gravis Composite Score, Manual Muscle Testing, the Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life, and the Myasthenia Gravis Activities of Daily Living. Fifty-eight patients were screened and 50 enrolled. MTX did not reduce the month 4-12 prednisone AUDTC when compared to placebo (difference MTX - placebo: -488.0 mg, 95% confidence interval -2,443.4 to 1,467.3, p = 0.26); however, the average daily prednisone dose decreased in both groups. MTX did not improve secondary measures of MG compared to placebo over 12 months. Eight participants withdrew during the course of the study (1 MTX, 7 placebo). There were no serious MTX-related adverse events. The most common adverse event was nonspecific pain (19%). We found no steroid-sparing benefit of MTX in MG over 12 months of treatment, despite being well-tolerated. This study demonstrates the challenges of conducting clinical trials in MG, including difficulties with recruitment, participants improving on prednisone alone, and the need for a better understanding of outcome measure variability for future clinical trials. This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with generalized MG MTX does not significantly reduce the prednisone AUDTC over 12 months of therapy. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Clinical and pathological aspects of microscopic thymoma with myasthenia gravis and review of published reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mitsuro; Higuchi, Mitsunori; Owada, Yuki; Inoue, Takuya; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Yamaura, Takumi; Muto, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Microscopic thymomas, defined as epithelial proliferations smaller than 1 mm in diameter, characteristically occur in patients with myasthenia gravis without macroscopic thymic epithelial tumors. However, some clinical and pathological aspects of this entity are still unclear. This retrospective study includes five consecutive patients who had undergone extended thymectomy for myasthenia gravis at our institution from April 2007 to March 2016 and in whom microscopic thymomas were diagnosed by histopathological examination of the resected specimens. During the same period, we performed 32 extended transsternal thymothymectomies/thymectomies in patients with myasthenia gravis, including the above five cases. We here review 18 cases of microscopic thymoma, including our five cases and 13 previously reported cases. The incidence of previously undiagnosed microscopic thymoma in patients undergoing thymectomy for myasthenia gravis in our institution is 15.2%. Serum preoperative anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AchR Ab) titers were abnormally high in all of our five cases h (74.4±53.3 nmol/L) and decreased significantly after surgery (11.7±13.5 nmol/L, P=0.037). We divided our cases into the following three groups: microscopic thymoma group (Group M), thymoma group (Group T) and non-thymic tumor group (Group N). The mean preoperative anti-AchR Ab titers of these groups were 74.4, 26.5, and 368 nmol/L, respectively. All these values decreased postoperatively. The mean anti-AchR Ab titer was significantly higher in Group M than in Group T (P=0.034). All five cases in Group M were found by post-operative pathological examination to have multifocal type A thymomas. Microscopic thymomas tend to be multifocal type A thymomas. Anti-AchR Ab titers decreased significantly in all groups. It is very important to both perform complete extended thymectomies in patients with myasthenia gravis and pathological examination of thin slices of thymic tissue to maximize detection

  1. Netrin-1 receptor antibodies in thymoma-associated neuromyotonia with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Mancheño, Nuria; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chumillas, María J; Moris, Germán; Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme; Sevilla, Teresa; Vílchez, Juan J; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bataller, Luis

    2017-03-28

    To identify cell-surface antibodies in patients with neuromyotonia and to describe the main clinical implications. Sera of 3 patients with thymoma-associated neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis were used to immunoprecipitate and characterize neuronal cell-surface antigens using reported techniques. The clinical significance of antibodies against precipitated proteins was assessed with sera of 98 patients (neuromyotonia 46, myasthenia gravis 52, thymoma 42; 33 of them with overlapping syndromes) and 219 controls (other neurologic diseases, cancer, and healthy volunteers). Immunoprecipitation studies identified 3 targets, including the Netrin-1 receptors DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinoma) and UNC5A (uncoordinated-5A) as well as Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). Cell-based assays with these antigens showed that among the indicated patients, 9 had antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (7 with additional Caspr2 antibodies) and 5 had isolated Caspr2 antibodies. Only one of the 219 controls had isolated Caspr2 antibodies with relapsing myelitis episodes. Among patients with neuromyotonia and/or myasthenia gravis, the presence of Netrin-1 receptor or Caspr2 antibodies predicted thymoma ( p thymoma, myasthenia gravis, and neuromyotonia, often with Morvan syndrome ( p = 0.009). Expression of DCC, UNC5A, and Caspr2 proteins was demonstrated in paraffin-embedded thymoma samples (3) and normal thymus. Antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors (DCC and UNC5a) and Caspr2 often coexist and associate with thymoma in patients with neuromyotonia and myasthenia gravis. This study provides Class III evidence that antibodies against Netrin-1 receptors can identify patients with thymoma (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Lupus eritematoso sistêmico associado a miastenia gravis: relato de caso Systemic lupus erythematosus and myasthenia gravis: case report

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    MARCIO F. DE CARVALHO

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma mulher branca de 24 anos de idade admitida com lupus eritematoso sistêmico (com 4 anos de evolução de doença e início recente de miastenia gravis. São discutidos os principais diagnósticos diferenciais para a fraqueza muscular e a fadiga apresentadas por esta paciente. Uma revisão de literatura abordando a associação de miastenia gravis e lupus eritematoso é feita, com ênfase às características clínicas desses pacientes e ao papel do timoma e timectomia no desenvolvimento de lupus eritematoso em pacientes previamente miastênicos.We report the case of a 24-year-old white woman admitted with a four year diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus and the recent onset of myasthenia gravis discussing the main differential diagnosis of weakness and fatigue in this patient. A review of literature approaching the association of myasthenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus is also done with emphasis on the clinical characteristics of these patients and the role of thymoma and thymectomy in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus in myasthenic patients.

  3. Muscle-specific kinase myasthenia gravis IgG4 autoantibodies cause severe neuromuscular junction dysfunction in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, R.; Plomp, J.J.; Huijbers, M.G.; Niks, E.H.; Straasheijm, K.R.; Detmers, F.J.M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Sleijpen, K.; Verrips, A.; Losen, M.; Martinez-Martinez, P.; Baets, M.H.V. de; Maarel, S.M. van der; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a paralytic disorder with autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. A proportion of patients instead has antibodies against muscle-specific kinase, a protein essential for acetylcholine receptor clustering. These are generally of the

  4. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibody-associated myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis induced by nivolumab in a patient with melanoma.

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    Shirai, Takushi; Sano, Tasuku; Kamijo, Fuminao; Saito, Nana; Miyake, Tomomi; Kodaira, Minori; Katoh, Nagaaki; Nishie, Kenichi; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Uhara, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We reported an 81-year-old woman with metastatic melanoma, in whom myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis developed after nivolumab monotherapy. The first symptom of myasthenia gravis was dyspnea. Ultrasonography detected hypokinesis of the bilateral diaphragm suggesting myasthenia gravis, although there was no abnormal finding of the lungs in computed tomography images. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies were low-titer positive in the preserved serum before administration of nivolumab, strongly suggesting that the myasthenia gravis was a nivolumab-related immune adverse event. Despite the remarkable clinical benefits of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced melanoma, it is important to recognize unexpected immune-related adverse events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Anestesia peridural torácica para cirurgia plástica de mama em paciente portadora de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Anestesia peridural torácica para cirugía plástica de mama en paciente portadora de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Thoracic epidural anesthesia for mammaplasty in myasthenia gravis patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A miastenia gravis é uma doença crônica, auto-imune, caracterizada pela fraqueza da musculatura esquelética em decorrência da diminuição dos receptores de acetilcolina na junção neuromuscular. O objetivo deste relato é mostrar um caso de paciente com miastenia gravis submetida a anestesia peridural torácica para cirurgia plástica de mama. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente com 51 anos, portadora de miastenia gravis foi submetida a anestesia peridural torácica com bupivacaína e fentanil. Não houve sinais de depressão respiratória. A paciente recebeu alta hospitalar após 36 horas. CONCLUSÕES: O presente caso sugere como conduta anestésica para o paciente portador de miastenia gravis a anestesia peridural como técnica única, sem a obrigatoriedade de intubação orotraqueal.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La miastenia gravis es una enfermedad crónica, auto-inmune, caracterizada por la debilidad de la musculatura esquelética resultante de la disminución de los receptores de acetilcolina en la unión neuromuscular. El objetivo de este relato es mostrar el caso de una paciente con miastenia gravis sometida a anestesia peridural torácica para una cirugía plástica de mama. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo femenino, 51 años, portadora de miastenia gravis fue sometida a anestesia peridural torácica con bupivacaína y fentanil. No hubo señales de depresión respiratoria. La paciente recibió alta hospitalaria después de 36 horas. CONCLUSIONES: Este actual caso sugiere como conducta anestésica para el paciente portador de miastenia gravis la anestesia peridural como única técnica, sin la obligatoriedad de intubación orotraqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by skeletal muscles weakness promoted by decreased acetylcholine receptors in the neuromuscular junction. This report aimed at describing a case of myasthenia gravis patient submitted to thoracic

  6. Structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of myasthenia gravis and their therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noridomi, Kaori; Watanabe, Go; Hansen, Melissa N.; Han, Gye Won; Chen, Lin (USC)

    2017-04-25

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a major target of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease that causes neuromuscular transmission dysfunction. Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms underlying MG have not been fully elucidated. Here, we present the crystal structure of the nAChR α1 subunit bound by the Fab fragment of mAb35, a reference monoclonal antibody that causes experimental MG and competes with ~65% of antibodies from MG patients. Our structures reveal for the first time the detailed molecular interactions between MG antibodies and a core region on nAChR α1. These structures suggest a major nAChR-binding mechanism shared by a large number of MG antibodies and the possibility to treat MG by blocking this binding mechanism. Structure-based modeling also provides insights into antibody-mediated nAChR cross-linking known to cause receptor degradation. Our studies establish a structural basis for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic development of MG.

  7. Keep An Eye Out For Myasthenia Gravis Patients With An Eye Out

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    A Arturo eLeis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eye trauma and blindness are common in the United States, with an incidence of over 2 million cases per year and 25 million blind adults, respectively. However, literature is surprisingly scarce on the potential confounding effect of eye trauma or blindness on the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis (MG, an autoimmune neuromuscular disease in which fluctuating ocular symptoms are the most distinguishing feature. We present the case of a 75 year-old man with eye enucleation referred for electrodiagnostic evaluation of the right upper limb after an accidental fall. Neurological examination showed proximal muscle weakness, but MG was not initially considered because the patient lacked the classic ocular symptoms of MG. The delay in diagnosis resulted in worsening of systemic MG symptoms, although in other patients it may have precipitated MG crisis or possibly death. Greater awareness that eye trauma or blindness can prevent expression of ocular symptoms in neuromuscular disorders is needed to avoid morbidity associated with an erroneous or delayed diagnosis.

  8. Coexistence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in a patient with myasthenia gravis

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    P J Lorenzoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is an immune-mediated disease that compromises the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is considered an immune-mediated cholestatic liver disease. Both MG and PSC include an autoimmune pathogenesis, so there is some evidence that patients with MG or PSC have a higher risk of developing autoantibodies and other immune disorders than normal controls, but the coexistence of these two disorders has never been documented. We report a 40-year-old woman who presented with MG when she was 20 years old and developed PSC 20 years after a thymectomy. Liver biochemistry revealed cholestasis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal strictures and beads involving the intrahepatic bile ducts. A liver biopsy confirmed sclerosing cholangitis. Serological analysis demonstrated positive autoantibodies (Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-smooth muscle antibodies. Repetitive stimulation had a decremental response, and antibodies to acetylcholine receptors were detectable. To our knowledge, this is the first case of PSC in a patient with MG. The main characteristics of both MG and PSC combination are discussed.

  9. Effective humoral immunity against diphtheria and tetanus in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Czirják, László; Hóbor, Renáta; Illes, Zsolt; Bánáti, Miklós; Rajczy, Katalin; Tordai, Attila; Füst, George

    2013-07-01

    Controversy exists about the effectiveness of vaccine-induced immune response in patients with immunoregulatory disorders. Our aim was to determine the antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus in patients with either of two autoimmune diseases. 279 patients with SLE (205 females, aged 45.0 ± 13.8 years), 158 patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) (101 females, aged 55 ± 18.7 years) and 208 healthy subjects (122 females, aged 48 ± 14.6 years) were enrolled. Serum concentrations of diphtheria-antitoxin-IgG (A-DIPHTH) and tetanus-antitoxoid-IgG (A-TET) were determined with ELISA. Equal proportions of healthy subjects, as well as patients with SLE or MG exhibited proper antibody responses and immune protection against diphtheria and tetanus. In all three test groups, serum concentration of A-DIPHTH decreased significantly (p60-years-old) subjects. There were no significant differences among the groups in the age-related changes of A-TET and A-DIPHTH except that in diphtheria and tetanus infections in patients with SLE or MG is comparable to the healthy population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of combined traditional Chinese medicine with immunosuppressive agents for patients with myasthenia gravis

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    Qi, Guoyan; Gu, Shanshan; Liu, Peng; Yang, Hongxia; Dong, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a kind of autoimmune disease induced by transferring dysfunction of neuromuscular junction. In the present study, we developed an integrated therapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine and immuno suppressive agents to seek for an effective treatment of MG. 220 MG patients were randomly divided into two groups with different therapies. Plasma levels of acetylcholine receptors antibodies (AchRAb) and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Treg) were conducted through ELISA and flow cytometry. The amount of AchRAb (8.52±0.96 vs. 5.22±0.46) and CD4+CD25+Treg (1.94±1.21 vs. 3.21±0.96) in Group A receiving integrated therapy were significantly improved compared with Group B; the clinical performance of group treated with the integrated therapy was also much better. The integrated therapy in the present study could significantly improve the condition of MG with high recovery rate and low recurrence rate, which can be employed in future clinical treatment of MG. PMID:26770531

  11. The Role of Osteopontin and Its Gene on Glucocorticoid Response in Myasthenia Gravis

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    Yanchen Xie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers that assess treatment response for patients with the autoimmune disorder, myasthenia gravis (MG, have not been evaluated to a significant extent. We hypothesized the pro-inflammatory cytokine, osteopontin (OPN, may be associated with variability of response to glucocorticoids (GCs in patients with MG. A cohort of 250 MG patients treated with standardized protocol of GCs was recruited, and plasma OPN and polymorphisms of its gene, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, were evaluated. Mean OPN levels were higher in patients compared to healthy controls. Carriers of rs11728697*T allele (allele definition: one of two or more alternative forms of a gene were more frequent in the poorly GC responsive group compared to the GC responsive group indicating an association of rs11728697*T allele with GC non-responsiveness. One risk haplotype (AGTACT was identified associated with GC non-responsiveness compared with GC responsive MG group. Genetic variations of SPP1 were found associated with the response to GC among MG patients.

  12. B cells produce less IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Parman, Yeşim G; Direskeneli, Haner; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-06-01

    B cells from myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with autoantibodies (Aab) against acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) or with no detectable Aab were investigated as cytokine producing cells in this study. B cells were evaluated for memory phenotypes and expressions of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12A. Induced productions of IL-10, IL-6, IL-12p40, TNF-α and LT from isolated B cells in vitro were measured by immunoassays. MG patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment had higher proportions of memory B cells compared with healthy controls and untreated patients. With CD40 stimulation MG patients produced significantly lower levels of IL-10, IL-6. With CD40 and B cell receptor stimulation of B cells, TNF-α production also decreased in addition to these cytokines. The lower levels of these cytokine productions were not related to treatment. Our results confirm a disturbance of B cell subpopulations in MG subgroups on immunosuppressive treatment. B cell derived IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α are down-regulated in MG, irrespective of different antibody productions. Ineffective cytokine production by B cells may be a susceptibility factor in dysregulation of autoimmune Aab production.

  13. Imaging of thymus in myasthenia gravis: From thymic hyperplasia to thymic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priola, A.M.; Priola, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder often associated with thymic abnormalities. At onset, thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and thymoma can be found in up to 65% and 15% of patients, respectively. Diagnostic imaging is crucial in this setting in order to detect the presence and type of the thymic abnormality and in the preoperative planning, when indicated. Chest radiography has a minor role due to its low accuracy. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice, although the differentiation between a small thymoma and TLH that appears as a focal soft-tissue mass may be not possible. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not usually employed, but it is useful in equivocal cases, especially in differentiating focal TLH from thymoma by using chemical-shift sequences for defining the proper management. In addition, diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI can differentiate lipid-poor normal/hyperplastic thymus from thymoma and could be useful in differentiating non-advanced from advanced thymomas. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT is not helpful in distinguishing early from advanced thymoma but can be used to differentiate thymic carcinoma from thymoma. Hereby, we discuss the imaging features of thymic abnormalities in MG, even focusing on novel aspects of chemical-shift and DW-MRI

  14. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia gravis in vitro: the "guided missile" strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J M; Wu, B; Miagkov, A; Adams, R N; Drachman, D B

    2001-03-15

    We describe a strategy for specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis (MG) based on genetic engineering of antigen presenting cells (APCs) to present the autoantigen acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and express the "warhead" Fas ligand (FasL). For transduction of APCs we prepared recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus vectors carrying the following three gene constructs: (i) AChR fused to LAMP1 to present AChR and target AChR-specific T cells; (ii) FasL to eliminate the targeted T cells; and (iii) truncated FADD to protect APCs from self-destruction by FasL. The engineered APCs effectively expressed the genes of interest and killed AChR-specific T cells in culture by the Fas/FasL pathway. T cells specific for an unrelated antigen were spared. Our in vitro demonstration that engineered APCs target and kill antigen-specific T cells represents a promising novel strategy for specific immunotherapy of MG and other autoimmune diseases. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. IVIG Versus PLEX in the Treatment of Worsening Myasthenia Gravis: What is the Evidence?: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Priya S; Goodman, Brent P; Harper, Charles M; Bosch, Peter E; Hoffman-Snyder, Charlene R; Wellik, Kay E; Wingerchuk, Dean M; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2015-05-01

    Immune therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasma exchange (PLEX) are first line in the treatment of worsening myasthenia gravis. Although PLEX is favored in myasthenic crisis, IVIG is increasingly used in exacerbations due to cost and ease of administration. To review and critically assess current evidence on the effects of IVIG and PLEX on functional outcomes in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis. A structured critical appraisal was conducted on the objective topic. This included a creation of a structured question based on a clinical scenario, comprehensive literature search, selection of evidence for review, and critical appraisal of selected evidence. Evidence was summarized and commentary provided. Participants included consultant and resident neurologists, a medical librarian, clinical epidemiologists, and content experts in the field of neuromuscular neurology. A single-blinded, randomized-controlled trial that compared IVIG and PLEX in 84 patients with worsening myasthenia gravis was selected for review. Primary outcome measure was functional status at 14 days after treatment, as assessed by the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score. Change in Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score at day 14 for all subjects was 4.0, without statistically significant differences between IVIG and PLEX groups. IVIG and PLEX are equally effective in worsening myasthenia gravis. Treatment decisions may depend on several variables, including presence of respiratory distress, medical comorbidities, access to medication, and cost. PLEX will likely remain the treatment of choice in true myasthenic crisis.

  16. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly: Is it different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarli, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    We have defined myasthenia gravis (MG) in the elderly as onset after the age of 50 years. MG is diagnosed more often today than previously. The increase is mainly found in patients over the age of 50 years. Neurologists therefore see more old patients with MG now than before. Prevalence of the early-onset form of MG seems to be unchanged. Recent data indicate that MG may still be substantially underdiagnosed in very old people. Ptosis, diplopia, weakness of the facial muscles, and problems of articulation are important clinical signs in MG and are easier to detect in a youthful appearance. Since ageing causes a decrease in the total eyelid area with sagging of the lower eyelids, a ptosis may be more difficult to diagnose in the elderly. In addition, diplopia may not be detected because of reduced vision due to macular degeneration or cataract formation. Ocular symptoms of MG are therefore more easily missed in the elderly. Thymomatous MG is more common among older patients than it is in younger onset. The mean age at onset of MG for thymoma cases is 50-60 years. Approximately 10-15% of all MG patients have a thymoma, and around 40% of all thymoma cases are associated with MG. During normal aging, the thymus tissue becomes atrophic and replaced with fat. Recent data on MG thymus pathology suggest that lymphocyte accumulation indicating residual thymus may also be found in the elderly, and that there is little qualitative difference between the young and the old thymus from MG patients. The mean concentration of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is lower in MG in the elderly than in early-onset or thymoma-associated MG. Seronegative MG is less common among older patients. Approximately 30% of patients with late-onset, nonthymoma MG have antibodies to titin, while such antibodies are extremely scarce in early-onset MG. Titin antibodies in MG patients seem to be associated with a higher frequency of DR7 antigen and a decrease of DR3 antigen. The antibody

  17. Response to treatment of myasthenia gravis according to clinical subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaishi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yasushi; Imai, Tomihiro; Tsuda, Emiko; Minami, Naoya; Nagane, Yuriko; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Masuda, Masayuki; Konno, Shingo; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Murai, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Masashi; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki

    2016-11-17

    We have previously reported using two-step cluster analysis to classify myasthenia gravis (MG) patients into the following five subtypes: ocular MG; thymoma-associated MG; MG with thymic hyperplasia; anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (AChR-Ab)-negative MG; and AChR-Ab-positive MG without thymic abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the reproducibility of this five-subtype classification using a new data set of MG patients and to identify additional characteristics of these subtypes, particularly in regard to response to treatment. A total of 923 consecutive MG patients underwent two-step cluster analysis for the classification of subtypes. The variables used for classification were sex, age of onset, disease duration, presence of thymoma or thymic hyperplasia, positivity for AChR-Ab or anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibody, positivity for other concurrent autoantibodies, and disease condition at worst and current. The period from the start of treatment until the achievement of minimal manifestation status (early-stage response) was determined and then compared between subtypes using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. In addition, between subtypes, the rate of the number of patients who maintained minimal manifestations during the study period/that of patients who only achieved the status once (stability of improved status) was compared. As a result of two-step cluster analysis, 923 MG patients were classified into five subtypes as follows: ocular MG (AChR-Ab-positivity, 77%; histogram of onset age, skewed to older age); thymoma-associated MG (100%; normal distribution); MG with thymic hyperplasia (89%; skewed to younger age); AChR-Ab-negative MG (0%; normal distribution); and AChR-Ab-positive MG without thymic abnormalities (100%, skewed to older age). Furthermore, patients classified as ocular MG showed the best early-stage response to treatment and stability of improved status, followed by those classified as

  18. Familial aggregation of myasthenia gravis in affected families: a population-based study

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    Liu FC

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fu-Chao Liu,1,2 Chang-Fu Kuo,2–5 Lai-Chu See,4,6 Hsin-I Tsai,1,2,7 Huang-Ping Yu1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 3Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 4Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 5Office for Big Data Research, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 6Biostatistics Core Laboratory, Molecular Medicine Research Center, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Republic of China Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG is clinically heterogeneous and can be life-threatening if bulbar or respiratory muscles are involved. However, relative contributions of genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental factors to MG susceptibility remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the familial aggregation and heritability of MG and the relative risks (RRs of other autoimmune diseases in the relatives of patients with MG.Methods: A population-based family study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI Database was conducted. Participants included all individuals (N=23,422,955 who were actively registered in the NHI Database in 2013, 15,066 of whom had at least one first-degree relative with MG. We identified 8,638 parent–child relationships, 3,279 with an affected offspring, 3,134 with affected siblings, and 26 with affected twins. Prevalence and RRs of MG and other autoimmune diseases in the relatives of patients as well as the relative contributions of heritability, shared, and nonshared environmental factors to MG susceptibility were measured.Results: RRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs] for MG were 17.85 (8.71–36.56 for patients’ siblings, 5.33 (2.79–10.18 for parents, 5.82 (3.03–11.16 for offspring, and 1.42 (0.20–10.10 for spouses without genetic similarities. RRs (95% CIs in individuals with a first-degree relative with MG were 2

  19. Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico com fraqueza muscular por Miastenia Gravis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with muscle weakness due to Myasthenia Gravis

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    Sâmia Araújo de Sousa Studart

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico (LES e a Miastenia Gravis (MG são doenças autoimunes cuja associação em um mesmo paciente é raramente descrita. Essas patologias compartilham algumas características como acometimento de mulheres jovens, positividade para anticorpos antinucleares, evolução em períodos de exacerbações e remissões. O presente relato de caso analisa as possíveis hipóteses diagnósticas para um quadro clínico de ptose palpebral e fraqueza muscular proximal em uma paciente portadora de lúpus recente que evoluiu com MG associada.Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and myasthenia gravis (MG are autoimmune diseases, whose association in the same patient is rarely reported. Both pathologies share the following characteristics: affect mainly young women; alternate exacerbation and remission periods; and have positive antinuclear antibody (ANA test. This case report assesses possible diagnostic hypotheses for the clinical findings of eyelid ptosis and proximal muscle weakness in a female patient recently diagnosed with SLE, who evolved with associated MG.

  20. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy in a Morbidly Obese Patient with Myasthenia Gravis: A Review of the Management

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    Megana Ballal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis, a disorder of neuromuscular transmission, presents a unique challenge to the perioperative anesthetic management of morbidly obese patients. This report describes the case of a 27-year-old morbidly obese woman with a past medical history significant for myasthenia gravis and fatty liver disease undergoing bariatric surgery. Anesthesia was induced with intravenous agents and maintained with an inhalational and balanced intravenous technique. The nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker Cisatracurium was chosen so that no reversal agents were given. Neostigmine was not used to antagonize the effects of Cisatracurium. The goal of this approach was to reduce the risk of complications such as postoperative mechanical ventilation. The anesthetic and surgical techniques used resulted in an uneventful hospital course. Therefore, we can minimize perioperative risks and complications by adjusting the anesthetic plan based on the patient’s physiology and comorbidities as well as the pharmacology of the drugs.

  1. T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma and myasthenia gravis in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, K; Masters, N; Rivers, S; Berry, K; Routh, A; Lamm, C

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Memory in myasthenia gravis: neuropsychological tests of central cholinergic function before and after effective immunologic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennerster, A; Palace, J; Warburton, D; Oxbury, S; Newsom-Davis, J

    1996-04-01

    There are reports of central cholinergic deficits in myasthenia gravis (MG) describing impaired performance on a variety of tests of memory with varying benefits from plasmapheresis. We tested 11 patients with symptomatic MG at the start of a trial of immunosuppressive treatment (prednisolone plus azathioprine or placebo) and again when in remission. The tests included the Logical Memory and Design Reproduction parts of the Wechsler Memory Scale, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Peterson-Peterson task, and an auditory vigilance task. Muscle strength improved significantly over the period of treatment, but overall performance on tests of memory or attention did not. These results fail to substantiate reports of functionally significant and reversible central deficits in myasthenia gravis.

  3. Clinical features of patients with Myasthenia gravis from the Henan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Zhao, Xue; Zhang, Jing; Cui, Xinzheng; Zhang, Yingna; Li, Qianru; Liu, Pingping; Fang, Hua; Du, Ying; Zhang, Qingyong; Yang, Junhong; Zhang, Yunke

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) occurs globally, and many studies have indicated that there are regional differences in epidemiology, biomarkers, and prognosis of MG. A total of 478 patients with MG who visited hospitals in the Henan Province between January 2010 and February 2014 were included. Age, gender, age at onset, serum antibody, thymus pathology, treatment information, and Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) classification were assessed. Compared with previous reports from other areas, we found some differences in MG patients from Henan. The proportion of childhood MG in our study was lower than other reports of Oriental patients with MG. There seems to be an association between onset age, muscle involvement, and acetylcholine receptor antibody levels. Thymectomy improved the symptoms in 78.5% of thymectomy-treated patients. These differences are likely related to geographical, environmental, and ethnic differences. Understanding these differences will help us to define more specific treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neurologic disorders: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, and poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, T J; Kimmelman, C P

    1982-01-01

    The patient who has multiple cranial neuropathies may pose a diagnostic dilemma. The neurologic disorders of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and poliomyelitis often cause bulbar dysfunctions such as diplopia, facial weakness, slurred or hypernasal speech, dysphagia, and hoarseness. In general, treatment is supportive and is directed toward restoring or aiding lost function (i.e., tracheostomy, esophagostomy, and cricopharyngeal myotomy). The relative infrequency of these disorders can lead to delays in diagnosis and rehabilitative therapy.

  5. Appearance of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis following Thymectomy: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-A; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients who had undergone thymectomy. SLE developed in the patients 3 months or 13 yr after thymectomy, and polyarthritis was the main clinical manifestation of SLE. Both patients fulfilled at least four of the revised criteria for the classification of SLE. In this report, we describe two postthymectomy lupus patients and perform a comparative review of previous cases.

  6. Failure of treatment of myasthenia gravis by cyclosporin-A: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marchiori, Paulo E.; Assis, J. Lamartine de; Scaff, Milberto

    1989-01-01

    Recently, cyclosporin-A (Cy-A) has been used in the treatment oy myasthenia gravis (MG). This drug could be employed in some patients refractory to classic treatments or that develop undesirable side effects. It is reported the case of a 22 year-old woman with generalized and severe MG, and diabetes mellitus. She had been submitted to thymectomy and reoperated, to the classic ethiopathogenic methods of therapy, and to total body irradiation. No therapeutical results were observed. Also, she d...

  7. Von Hippel-Lindau disease associated with myasthenia gravis not related to thymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pozzato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by an increased risk of tumours in a number of locations (eyes, brain, adrenal gland, pancreas, liver, kidneys, or other areas of the body. It is caused by germline mutation in the VHL gene. The VHL gene is a tumour suppressor gene that has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 3. CASE REPORT We report a case of a 60 year-old female with the clinical diagnosis of VHL type 1 (cerebellar haemangioblastoma, pancreatic cysts with subsequent steatorrhoea, and bilateral renal carcinoma who developed weakness and fatigability of skeletal muscles, left lid ptosis, snarling expression and nasal timbre speech. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative in serum, while the electrodiagnostic test demonstrated an alteration of neuromuscolar junction which was consistent with the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Contrast-enhanced TC scan of the anterior mediastinum was performed, which excluded thymus enlargement. VHL gene evaluation in this patient identified a new mutation (c279delC9 and polymorphism c291C>G. At present the patient still suffers from ataxia and dysmetria due to cerebellar involvement in VHL, while fatigue and lid ptosis improved after the treatment with oral pyridostigmine 60 mg tid. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge this is the first report of a case of VHL associated with myasthenia gravis without thymoma. A case of VHL associated with a form of myasthenia gravis related to thymoma has been recently reported. In our case the absence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies may suggest a genetic origin also for the myasthenia gravis.

  8. Clinical outcome and predictive factors of postoperative myasthenic crisis in 173 thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Pei; Chen, Zhenguang; Su, Chunhua; Luo, Chuanming; Feng, Huiyu; Liu, Weibin

    2018-02-01

    Thymectomy is the first-line therapy for thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients. The aim of this study is to explore the clinical outcome and predictors of postoperative myasthenic crisis (POMC) in these patients. Clinical data of 173 thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients undergoing thymectomy from January 2000 to March 2013 were, retrospectively reviewed. Variables potentially affecting the occurrence of POMC were evaluated using binary logistic regression analysis. The difference in survival was determined by the log-rank test. Fifty-one patients experienced POMC. Univariate analysis revealed that events significantly associated with increased risk of POMC include symptom duration before operation >2.75months, preoperative bulbar symptoms, incomplete resection, operation time ≥122.5 min and advanced stages (stage III or IV). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative bulbar symptoms (OR = 3.207 [1.413-7.278]; P = 0.005) and incomplete resection (OR = 4.182 [1.332-13.135]; P = 0.014) were independent risk factors for POMC. Twenty-eight patients (16.9%) died during the follow-up. The log-rank test revealed survival for patients with POMC was significantly worse than that for patients without POMC (P = 0.042). The important risk factors for developing POMC in thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients include the preoperative bulbar symptoms and incomplete resection of thymoma. Moreover, the patients with POMC had a worse prognosis compared with patients without POMC. Our study highlights the need of appropriate preoperative management of thymomatous myasthenia gravis patients to prevent the occurrence of POMC.

  9. Teste do gelo no diagnóstico de miastenia gravis Ice pack test in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Lopes da Fonseca Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a sensibilidade e especificidade do teste do gelo no diagnóstico diferencial de ptose palpebral por miastenia gravis. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo tipo ensaio clínico com grupo controle. Foi realizado o teste do gelo em pacientes portadores de ptose palpebral. Os pacientes foram divididos em 2 grupos, sendo o grupo I constituído por pacientes com miastenia gravis e o grupo II (controle formado por pacientes portadores de ptose congênita, miogênica não-miastênica ou aponeurótica. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes do grupo I tiveram aumento da fenda palpebral de, no mínimo, 3 mm após a aplicação do gelo. Nenhum paciente do grupo II apresentou incremento da fenda palpebral após o teste. CONCLUSÃO: O teste do gelo mostrou-se específico para detecção de ptose palpebral de causa miastênica.PURPOSE: To demonstrate the sensitivity and the specificity of the ice test in the differential diagnosis of ptosis in myasthenia gravis. METHODS: Prospective trial with a control group. The patients were instructed to hold a frozen ice pack on the closed ptotic eyelid. They were divided into 2 groups, with group I consisting of patients with myasthenia gravis and group II (control consisting of patients with congenital, non-myasthenic myogenic or aponeurotic ptosis. RESULTS: All patients in group I had increased palpebral fissure for at least 3 mm after the application of ice pack. No patient in group II showed increased palpebral fissure after the ice test. CONCLUSION: Ice test proved to be specific for the detection of myasthenic ptosis.

  10. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  11. Myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia: Dot all the I's and cross all the T's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hassan, FCPS

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although rare, the co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and preeclampsia during pregnancy is responsible for considerable maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Both careful selection of medications and a multidisciplinary approach are required for treating such cases. This study presents a case report of a patient with a known history of generalized myasthenia gravis who presented with preeclampsia at 33 weeks' gestation. Subsequently, the patient developed recurrent seizures that necessitated the use of multiple medications, including phenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, and propofol. Magnesium sulphate was not administered due to its blocking effect on calcium channels at the neuromuscular junction. The patient underwent a caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia and gave birth to a baby with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Blood pressure control was achieved with the administration of methyldopa and parenteral hydralazine, an increased dose of pyridostigmine, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. The status of the patient's myasthenia gravis remained stable. This case serves to highlight the conflicts in the management of these two disorders and suggests strategies to resolve these conflicts in clinical management.

  12. QMG and MG-ADL correlations: Study of eculizumab treatment of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James F; Freimer, Miriam; O'Brien, Fanny; Wang, Jing Jing; Collins, Stephen R; Kissel, John T

    2017-08-01

    A phase 2 study of eculizumab for treating myasthenia gravis (MG) used the quantitative myasthenia gravis score (QMG) and myasthenia gravis activities of daily living profile (MG-ADL) to evaluate baseline disease severity and treatment response. Correlations were then analyzed between these assessments. Patients were given eculizumab or placebo during the first 16-week treatment period of the crossover study, with treatment assignments reversed for the second treatment period following a 5-week washout. QMG and MG-ADL scores at baseline and endpoint of each treatment period generated correlation coefficients for baseline status and treatment response during eculizumab therapy. Correlation strength between QMG and MG-ADL scores was higher for treatment response (R = 0.726; 95% confidence interval, 0.264-0.907; P = 0.0036) than for assessing baseline disease status (R = 0.552; 95% confidence interval, -0.022-0.839; P = 0.0495). MG-ADL may be more sensitive for assessing treatment response than point-in-time disease status. Muscle Nerve 56: 328-330, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Exercise in myasthenia gravis: A feasibility study of aerobic and resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbek, Martin Amadeus; Mikkelsen, Erik Elgaard; Overgaard, Kristian; Vinge, Lotte; Andersen, Henning; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-10-01

    It has not been established whether progressive resistance training (PRT) and aerobic training (AT) are feasible and efficient in myasthenia gravis (MG). Fifteen subjects with generalized MG (Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) clinical classification II-IV) were randomly assigned to 20 training sessions during 8 weeks of either PRT or AT. Feasibility was evaluated based on adherence, drop-out rate, adverse events, and Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) score. Twelve subjects (MGFA II, n = 11; MGFA III, n=1) completed the intervention with a mean adherence of 95 % ± 8. One dropout (PRT) could potentially be related to PRT. Both groups reported adverse events, including bulbar symptoms (n = 2) and increased fatigue (n = 3), but no change in QMG score was observed in either group. The PRT group showed increases in maximal strength and functional capacity. Eight weeks of moderate to high intensity AT and PRT were feasible for most patients with mild MG. Maximal strength and functional capacity increased in the PRT group. Muscle Nerve 56: 700-709, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis in Korea: Subgroup Analysis According to Sex and Onset Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Neul; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Seung Min; Sunwoo, Il Nam; Lee, Young-Mock

    2016-12-01

    Juvenile myasthenia gravis presents before 18 years of age with different characteristics according to racial background and pubertal development. The authors aimed to determine the clinical characteristics of children and adolescents of Korean ethnicity with myasthenia gravis, and evaluate the presentation and clinical outcomes according to the sex and onset age of the patients. The authors recruited 88 Korean juvenile myasthenia gravis patients between September 2005 and August 2015. Worse clinical severity from presentation, more aggressive treatment strategies, and worse final treatment outcomes were noted in girls with postpubertal onset than in the other patients. The symptoms were milder (pure ocular presentation in 96.6% [85/88]) and the disease course was more benign (94.3% [83/88]) in this study than in the literature. The homogenous racial background might have contributed to these results. These findings highlight the influence of pubertal development and the need for timely and appropriate active treatment, including thymectomy, to improve prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Is thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis of any benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Andres; Black, Edward; Dunning, Joel

    2014-03-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was if thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis was of any benefit? Overall, 137 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The outcome variables were similar in all of the papers, including complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacological remission, age at presentation, gender, duration of symptoms, preoperative classification (Oosterhius, Osserman or myasthenia gravis Foundation of America (MGFA)), thymic pathology, preoperative medications (steroids, immunosuppressants), mortality and morbidity. We conclude that evidence-based reviews have shown that relative rates of thymectomy patients compared with non-thymectomy patients attaining outcome indicate that the former group of patients is more likely to achieve medication-free remission, become asymptomatic and clinically improve (54%, P gravis showed 11% stronger association with favourable outcomes after thymectomy. Some studies show early remission rates (RRs), as early as 6 months post-thymectomy, of 44%. Overall, the reported remission rate for non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis is between 38 and 72% up to 10 years of follow-up. Among these patients, those with thymic hyperplasia show the best complete stable remission rates (42%, P gravis patients receiving and not receiving thymectomy, the non-randomized nature of class II studies and the lack of Class I evidence to support its use. There is currently a randomized trial ongoing looking at thymectomy by sternotomy vs controls and the results are eagerly awaited.

  16. Myasthenia gravis: a comprehensive review of immune dysregulation and etiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by muscle weakness caused by antibodies directed against proteins of the neuromuscular junction. The main antigenic target is the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), but the muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP4) are also targets. This review summarizes the clinical and biological data available for different subgroups of patients, who are classified according to antigenic target, age of onset, and observed thymic abnormalities, such as follicular hyperplasia or thymoma. Here, we analyze in detail the role of the thymus in the physiopathology of MG and propose an explanation for the development of the thymic follicular hyperplasia that is commonly observed in young female patients with anti-AChR antibodies. The influence of the pro-inflammatory environment is discussed, particularly the role of TNF-α and Th17-related cytokines, which could explain the escape of thymic T cells from regulation and the chronic inflammation in the MG thymus. Together with this immune dysregulation, active angiogenic processes and the upregulation of chemokines could promote thymic follicular hyperplasia. MG is a multifactorial disease, and we review the etiological mechanisms that could lead to its onset. Recent global genetic analyses have highlighted potential susceptibility genes. In addition, miRNAs, which play a crucial role in immune function, have been implicated in MG by recent studies. We also discuss the role of sex hormones and the influence of environmental factors, such as the viral hypothesis. This hypothesis is supported by reports that type I interferon and molecules mimicking viral infection can induce thymic changes similar to those observed in MG patients with anti-AChR antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, JS; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, VC; Massey, JM; Sanders, DB; Weinhold, KJ; Guptill, JT

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T-cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T-cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T-cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T-cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in Treg function or number. PMID:24378287

  18. The pattern and presentation of myathenia gravis in Al-Shaab and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common acquired autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. It has different patterns of presentation. Objective: to study the pattern and mode of presentation of Myasthenia Gravis in Al-Shaab and Omdurman Teaching Hospitals, Khartoum Sudan. Methods: The ...

  19. Criteria for Postoperative Mechanical Ventilation After Thymectomy in Patients With Myasthenia Gravis: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigurupati, Keerthi; Gadhinglajkar, Shrinivas; Sreedhar, Rupa; Nair, Muraleedharan; Unnikrishnan, Madathipat; Pillai, Manjusha

    2018-02-01

    To determine the criteria for postoperative mechanical ventilation after thymectomy in patients with Myasthenia Gravis. Retrospective study. Teritiary care centre. 77 Myasthenia gravis patients operated for thymectomy were studied. After obtaining clearance from Institutional ethics committee, medical records of 77 patients with MG, who were operated for thymectomy between January 2005 and December 2015 were reviewed in a retrospective manner. Perioperative variables collected from the patient records were demographic data, duration of the disease, Osserman and Genkin classification, Anti-acetylcholine antibody (AChR) positivity, preoperative daily dose of drug, history of preoperative myasthenic crisis, preoperative vital capacity, technique of anesthesia, drugs used for anesthesia, perioperative complications, and duration of postoperative mechanical ventilation. The patients were divided into two groups, group I and group II consisting of those who required postoperative ventilation for 300 minutes, respectively. The determinants of prolonged postoperative ventilation were studied. The requirement of mechanical ventilation was higher in patients with higher Osserman's grade of myasthenia gravis. Duration of the disease had no effect on the duration of mechanical ventilation in myasthenic patients post thymectomy (p = 0.89). The patients with a preoperative history of myasthenic crisis had a requirement for prolonged mechanical ventilation (p=0.03). Patients with preoperative vital capacity mechanical ventilation with p values mechanical ventilation (p=0.026). Preoperative dose of pyridostigmine and the choice of continuation or discontinuation of antcholinesterases on the day of surgery had no influence on the duration of mechanical ventilation (p value of 0.19 and 0.36 respectively). Epidural analgesia intra and postoperatively significantly reduced the requirement of mechanical ventilation (p=0.006). The predictors of postoperative ventilation in myasthenic

  20. Thoracic computer tomography for the evaluation of the thymus gland in cases of myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druschky, K.F.; Stadler, H.W.; Daun, H.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    1981-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thymus gland is observed in 65% of all patients with myasthenia gravis, while the incidence of thymus tumor is reported to be 8.5-28%. Conventional radiological techniques provide little information in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Even a clearly developed thymus tumor can escape clinical detection. Since March 1978 thoracic computer tomography has been performed in addition to X-rays of the chest in a series of 19 patients with myasthenia ravis, 10 women and 9 men ranging in age from 15-71 years and in 3 patients with suspected thymomas but without myasthenia gravis. These examinations were carried out with a Somatom II (Siemens) since September 1979. On the average 15-20 scans were made at the level of the upper two-third of the sternum. The chest X-rays in 2 planes revealed signs of a thymus tumor in 3 female patients. Thoracic computer tomography showed definite signs of a space-occupying lesion in the anterior mediastinum in 11 cases. At thymectomy 6 patients were found to have hyperplasia of the thymus, 2 patients had a benign thymoma and 3 patients a malignant thymoma. In 6 cases computer tomography showed only slight changes and in 5 patients no pathological findings could be demonstrated in the thymus gland. Thoracic computer tomography is a relatively harmless diagnostic measure without any risk for the patient. It has a high resolution and great accuracy in the evaluation of the thymus gland and is therefore the method of choice for the diagnosis of patients with myasthenia gravis. (orig.) [de

  1. Two simultaneous autoimmune processes in a patient presenting with respiratory insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Troy, Lauren; Hamor, Paul; Bleasel, Jane; Corte, Tamera

    2013-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including dermatomyositis, are uncommon acquired autoimmune diseases, sometimes associated with interstitial lung disease. Myasthenia gravis, a separate autoimmune disorder involving the neuromuscular junction, has some overlapping clinical features but has only rarely been reported to occur simultaneously within the same patient. Here we present the first reported case of concomitant dermatomyositis, myasthenia gravis, and interstitial lung disease.

  2. Familial myasthenia gravis: report of four cases Miastenia grave familial: registro de quatro casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lamartine de Assis

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available Two pairs of siblings with myasthenia gravis, belonging to two different families, are reported. This is the only record of familial myasthenia during the past twenty years, in a total of 145 patients seen at the Neurological Clinic of the São Paulo Medical School. In spite of the fact that myasthenia gravis does not show hereditary characteristics, the peculiar features of the four cases justify the present report. The two pairs of siblings were born from non myasthenic nor consanguineous parents. The disease started at birth showing bilateral partial eyelid ptosis in all patients. The course of the illness has been favorable. There was no thymoma.Os autores registram dois pares de gêmeos com miastenia grave, pertencentes a duas famílias diferentes. Este é o único registro de miastenia familial durante os últimos 20 anos, num total de 145 pacientes examinados na Clínica Neurológica da FMUSP. Apesar do fato de a miastenia grave não ter características hereditárias, os aspectos peculiares dos quatro pacientes justificam o presente registro. Os dois pares de gêmeos nasceram de pais não miastênicos e sem consanguinidade. A doença iniciou-se no nascimento, evoluindo com ptose bilateral parcial da pálpebra superior precocemente em todos os pacientes. O curso da moléstia tem sido favorável. Não havia timoma.

  3. [Value of the albumin to globulin ratio in predicting severity and prognosis in myasthenia gravis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D H; Su, Z Q; Chen, Y; Chen, Z B; Ding, Z N; Weng, Y Y; Li, J; Li, X; Tong, Q L; Han, Y X; Zhang, X

    2016-03-08

    To assess the predictive value of the albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) in evaluation of disease severity and prognosis in myasthenia gravis patients. A total of 135 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients were enrolled between February 2009 and March 2015. The AGR was detected on the first day of hospitalization and ranked from lowest to highest, and the patients were divided into three equal tertiles according to the AGR values, which were T1 (AGR 1.53). The Kaplan-Meier curve was used to evaluate the prognostic value of AGR. Cox model analysis was used to evaluate the relevant factors. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to find the predictors of myasthenia crisis during hospitalization. The median length of hospital stay for each tertile was: for the T1 21 days (15-35.5), T2 18 days (14-27.5), and T3 16 days (12-22.5) (Pgravis. At the multivariate Cox regression analysis, the AGR (Pgravis patients. Respectively, the hazard ratio (HR) were 4.655 (95% CI: 2.355-9.202) and 0.596 (95% CI: 0.492-0.723). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed the AGR (Pgravis.

  4. Progressive outer retinal necrosis and immunosuppressive therapy in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  5. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solène Coisy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report: A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion: VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  6. Refractory myasthenia gravis, dysphagia and malnutrition: a case report to suggest disease-specific nutritional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Emanuele; Beltramolli, Dario; Pedrolli, Carlo; Costa, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    We describe a case of refractory myasthenia gravis with bulbar involvement and the nutritional treatment solutions proposed to treat the associated dysphagia and malnutrition. A 39-y-old woman with refractory myasthenia gravis was referred to our clinical nutrition unit for deteriorating dysphagia and progressive malnutrition. The first-line nutritional approach consisted of dietary counseling and thickened meals. Unfortunately, no adequate oral intake was achieved and an enteral nutrition treatment was proposed. A nasogastric tube was removed after a few days due to local pain and poor quality of life. Despite consistent weight loss and overt malnutrition, the patient refused percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. Neurologic symptoms did not show any improvement but unexpectedly the patient's weight started to increase to previous values. Anamnestic recall revealed that the patient learned by herself how to position the nasogastric tube that is now temporarily used for formula infusion coinciding with neurologic poussés. Current guidelines consider chronic neurologic diseases with associated dysphagia, where refractory myesthania gravis has also been considered, a unique category. Chronic neurogenic dysphagia with high risk of aspiration, long-term inability to obtain adequate oral intakes, and malnutrition are established indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. However, patients may need different forms of nutritional intervention during the course of their illness and choices and indications should contemplate ethical reasons, clinical benefits, minimal risks, and acceptable quality of life. Minimally invasive intermittent enteral nutrition might be considered a possible clue for nutritional management of exacerbating dysphagia.

  7. Safety and efficacy of eculizumab in anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis (REGAIN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, James F; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Benatar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    on MGFA disease classification. Where possible, patients were maintained on existing myasthenia gravis therapies and rescue medication was allowed at the study physician's discretion. Patients, investigators, staff, and outcome assessors were masked to treatment assignment. The primary efficacy endpoint...... common adverse events in both groups were headache and upper respiratory tract infection (ten [16%] for both events in the eculizumab group and 12 [19%] for both in the placebo group). Myasthenia gravis exacerbations were reported by six (10%) patients in the eculizumab group and 15 (24%) in the placebo...

  8. Review article Prevalence and clinical specificity of fatigue symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and myasthenia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Treder; Krzysztof Jodzio

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a critical review of the psychological and related literature on fatigue resulting in both mental and physical experiences. On one hand, prolonged severe fatigue is a prominent disabling symptom in various diseases of different aetiology – psychiatric (e.g. depression), somatic (e.g. some infections) and neurologic (e.g. multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis). For instance, fatigue is a main symptom of myasthenia that leads to pathological skeletal muscle weakness. Furth...

  9. Paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis and polymyositis secondary to a thymoma in a young woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzatian-Ahar, Shabnam; Pedersen, Emil Arnspang; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who within weeks developed severe swallowing difficulties and weakness in her limbs to an extent requiring hospitalization. Workup confirmed clinically suspected diagnoses of polymyositis and autoimmune myasthenia. A suspicion of malignant thymoma based...

  10. Bilateral single-port thoracoscopic extended thymectomy for management of thymoma and myasthenia gravis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronia, Francesco Paolo; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Arrigo, Ettore; Trovato, Sebastiano; Santini, Mario; Monte, Attilio Ignazio Lo

    2016-11-22

    Video-assisted thoracoscopy is become a widely accepted approach for the resection of anterior mediastinal masses, including thymoma. The current trend is to reduce the number of ports and minimize the length of incisions to further decrease postoperative pain, chest wall paresthesia, and length of hospitalization. Herein, we reported an extended resection of thymoma in a patient with myasthenia gravis through an uniportal bilateral thoracoscopic approach. A 74 years old woman with myasthenia gravis was referred to our attention for management of a 3.5 cm, well capsulate, thymoma. All laboratory and cardio-pulmonary tests were within normal; thus, she was scheduled for thymoma resection through an uniportal bilateral thoracoscopic approach. Under general anaesthesia and selective intubation, the patient was placed in a 60° right lateral decubitus. A 3 cm skin incision was performed in the fourth right intercostal space and, through that a 30° video-camera and working instruments were inserted without rib spreading. After complete dissection of the thymus and mediastinal fat, the contralateral pleura was opened, and, through that the specimen was pushed into the left pleural cavity. Then, the patient was placed in the left lateral decubitus. Similarly to the right side procedure, a 3-cm incision was performed in the fourth left intercostal space to complete thymic dissection and retrieve the specimen. No intraoperative and post-operative complications were found. The patient was discharged four days later. Pathological examination revealed a type A thymoma (Masaoka stage I). No recurrence was found at 18 months of follow-up CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral single-port thoracoscopy is an available procedure for management of thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. The less post-operative pain, the reduction of hospital stay and the better esthetic results are all potential advantages of this approach over traditional technique. Obviously, our impression should be

  11. The Myotonic Plot Thickens: Electrical Myotonia in Antimuscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis

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    Marcus Magnussen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical myotonia is known to occur in a number of inherited and acquired disorders including myotonic dystrophies, channelopathies, and metabolic, toxic, and inflammatory myopathies. Yet, electrical myotonia in myasthenia gravis associated with antibodies against muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK has not been previously reported. We describe two such patients, both of whom had a typical presentation of proximal muscle weakness with respiratory failure in the context of a significant electrodecrement in repetitive nerve stimulation. In both cases, concentric needle examination revealed electrical myotonia combined with myopathic motor unit morphology and early recruitment. These findings suggest that MuSK myasthenia should be included within the differential diagnosis of disorders with electrical myotonia.

  12. Anti-musk positive myasthenia gravis and three semiological cardinal signs

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    André P.C. Matta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG is a relatively uncommon disorder with an annual incidence of approximately 7 to 9 new cases per million. The prevalence is about 70 to 165 per million. The prevalence of the disease has been increasing over the past five decades. This is thought to be due to better recognition of the condition, aging of the population, and the longer life span of affected patients. MG causes weakness, predominantly in bulbar, facial, and extra-ocular muscles, often fluctuating over minutes to weeks, in the absence of wasting, sensory loss, or reflex changes. The picture of fluctuating, asymmetric external ophthalmoplegia with ptosis and weak eye closure is virtually diagnostic of myasthenia. We report an atypical MG case with three semiological cardinal signs.

  13. Thymoma-associated Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus (PERM) with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morise, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masataka; Morita, Jun-Ichi; Miyake, Kousuke; Kunieda, Takenobu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 72-year-old woman who initially presented with symptoms of bulbar myasthenia and was positive for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. She subsequently developed painful muscle spasms, myoclonus, and stiffness. Thymoma was detected, and both anti-glycine receptor and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies were found. She was diagnosed with thymoma-associated progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM). She experienced marked improvement after thymectomy followed by plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin and prednisolone. This case suggests that thymectomy followed by sufficient immunosuppression may be useful in the treatment of thymoma-associated PERM. Myasthenia gravis may develop in thymoma-associated PERM patients.

  14. Thymus and Myasthenia Gravis: what can we learn from DNA microarrays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizeron-Clairac, Géraldine; Le Panse, Rozen; Frenkian-Cuvelier, Mélinée; Meraouna, Amel; Truffault, Frédérique; Bismuth, Jacky; Mussot, Sacha; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2008-09-15

    This review is dedicated to John Newsom-Davis, who was an exceptional colleague and friend, always exchanging ideas with respect and consideration. We shall not forget his involvement and passion in search for the truth on the role of thymectomy in the management of Myasthenia Gravis (MG). In this short review, we shall summarize what we learnt from DNA microarrays applied to MG thymus. We shall focus on three main comparisons of the thymic transcriptomes: 1) highly hyperplastic MG patients versus non-MG adults; 2) corticosteroid-treated versus untreated seropositive MG patients; and 3) seronegative versus seropositive MG patients.

  15. Benefits of Comprehensive Rehabilitation Therapy in Thymectomy for Myasthenia Gravis: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogi, Vincenzo; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio

    2017-02-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of a comprehensive program of rehabilitation therapy in patients undergoing thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG). From 2005 to 2010, 46 consecutive patients affected by MG underwent a rehabilitation program both before and after thymectomy. We matched each patient with a "control patient" who underwent thymectomy within the period 1999 to 2004 with no preoperative rehabilitation, who had the closest propensity score matching. All patients but 2 were able to complete the intended program. Eighteen patients (41%) experienced mild fatigue (>25 at MG quantitative score). Propensity score selected a group of 17 patients for the matching process. The group of patients who underwent the rehabilitation program showed significant preoperative improvement associated with a reduced operative risk, a decreased early postoperative morbidity, a lower rate of postoperative intensive care unit needed (12% vs 35%; P = 0.01) and a shorter hospital stay (3 vs 5 days; P = 0.04). After the expected perioperative decline, all major myasthenic outcomes demonstrated a significant faster recovery at 3 months. Complete stable remission did not reveal significant differences. Exercise is not necessarily a contraindication in MG, and rehabilitation can be safely performed before and after thymectomy, reducing operative risks and decreasing recovery time. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCMECME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to do the following: (1) appreciate the benefits of physical therapy in individuals with myasthenia gravis; (2) describe the benefits of physical therapy on postoperative morbidity in myasthenia gravis patients who undergo thymectomy; and (3) incorporate appropriate rehabilitation into the treatment plan of patient with myasthenia gravis. AdvancedACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation

  16. Successful salvage chemotherapy with amrubicin for invasive thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshirou; Gomi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2014-11-01

    Anthracycline-based regimens with cisplatin have been commonly used for inoperable and relapsed thymoma. However, little information is available regarding the usefulness of salvage chemotherapy. Here, we describe a case of invasive thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis that showed a marked response to third-line chemotherapy, with single-agent amrubicin, a synthetic anthracycline analog and potent deoxyribonucleic acid topoisomerase II inhibitor. Amrubicin appears to have significant activity against invasive thymoma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Major motor-functional determinants associated with poor self-reported health-related quality of life in myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioncoloni, David; Casali, Stefania; Ginanneschi, Federica; Carone, Marisa; Veronica, Boni; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder in which disabling muscle weakness may affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to investigate which common motor-functional deficits and corresponding severity are most determinant of poor HRQoL in these patients. In 41 patients, the dichotomized first item of the Italian Myasthenia Gravis Questionnaire (IMGQ), categorizing patients who report "good" and "poor" HRQoL, was chosen as dependent-outcome variable. All items composing the myasthenia gravis-specific scale (MG-ADL), i.e. talking, chewing, swallowing, breathing, impairment of ability to brush teeth or comb hair, impairment of ability to rise from chair, double vision, and eyelid droop were acquired as independent variables and dichotomized. Stepwise backward LR multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. In addition, the main characteristics of patients were compared. MG-ADL items "chewing" ≥1, i.e. "fatigue chewing solid food", and "breathing" ≥2, i.e. "shortness of breath at rest" proved to be significant determinants. Higher dose of corticosteroid therapy was significantly (p = 0.027; r s  = -0.35), correlated with poor HRQoL. At diagnosis, a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) from the abductor pollicis brevis was significantly more frequent in patients with poor HRQoL. In conclusion, impaired "chewing" and "breathing" functions indicate the need for careful planning of rehabilitation, re-education and patient management. Moreover, decremental response to RNS at diagnosis may identify patients at risk for poor HRQoL.

  18. Transcervical excision of thymoma and video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) for ectopic cervical thymoma with myasthenia gravis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Sachiko; Ishibashi, Hironori; Takahashi, Ken; Okubo, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the most common disease associated with thymoma, but it is rarely accompanied by ectopic thymoma. We describe a 47-year-old woman who presented with an ectopic cervical thymoma with myasthenia gravis. She was admitted to our neurology department with ptosis, diplopia, and mandibular muscle fatigue, and was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. The mass was located posterior to the right lobe of thyroid gland on computed tomography and was diagnosed as ectopic thymoma on fine-needle aspiration biopsy examination. Transcervical excision of thymoma and VATET were performed. The patient has been free of neurological symptoms and has displayed no evidence of recurrent thymoma for 2 years.

  19. Ocular myasthenia gravis induced by human acetylcholine receptor ϵ subunit immunization in HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaorong; Tuzun, Erdem; Saini, Shamsher S; Wang, Jun; Li, Jing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Huda, Ruksana; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-12-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOM) are preferentially involved in myasthenia gravis (MG) and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive MG patients may occasionally present with isolated ocular symptoms. Although experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by whole AChR immunization closely mimics clinical and immunopathological aspects of MG, EOM are usually not affected. We have previously developed an EAMG model, which imitates EOM symptoms of MG by immunization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic mice with α or γ-subunits of human AChR (H-AChR). To investigate the significance of the ϵ-subunit in ocular MG, we immunized HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice with recombinant H-AChR ϵ-subunit expressed in Escherichia coli. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice showed significantly higher clinical ocular and generalized MG severity scores and lower grip strength values than HLA-DQ8 mice. H-AChR ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mice had higher serum anti-AChR antibody (IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgM) levels, neuromuscular junction IgG and complement deposit percentages than ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Control mice immunized with E. coli extract or complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) did not show clinical and immunopathological features of ocular and generalized EAMG. Lymph node cells of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DR3 mice showed significantly higher proliferative responses than those of ϵ-subunit-immunized HLA-DQ8 mice, crude E. coli extract-immunized and CFA-immunized transgenic mice. Our results indicate that the human AChR ϵ-subunit is capable of inducing myasthenic muscle weakness. Diversity of the autoimmune responses displayed by mice expressing different HLA class II molecules suggests that the interplay between HLA class II alleles and AChR subunits might have a profound impact on the clinical course of MG. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Successful low-dose azathioprine for myasthenia gravis despite hepatopathy from primary sclerosing cholangitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höflich Sonja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although myasthenia gravis is frequently associated with other disorders, it has not been reported together with primary sclerosing cholangitis, complicating the administration of liver-toxic immunosuppressive therapy. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of arterial hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, glaucoma, right-sided ptosis and later generalized weakness, was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. Additionally, primary sclerosing cholangitis was detected, initially prohibiting the administration of immunosuppressants. Despite treatment with steroids and pyridostigmine she repeatedly experienced myasthenic crises. After the fifth crisis and after antibody titers had reached levels > 100 nmol/L during two years of follow-up, it was decided to restart azathioprine. Interestingly, low-dose azathioprine (1.5 mg/kg/day was well tolerated, had a positive clinical and immunological effect and did not worsen primary sclerosing cholangitis. Conclusion Myasthenia gravis may occur together with primary sclerosing cholangitis in the same patient. Mild immunosuppression with azathioprine is feasible and effective in such a patient, without worsening myasthenia gravis or primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  1. Successful low-dose azathioprine for myasthenia gravis despite hepatopathy from primary sclerosing cholangitis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although myasthenia gravis is frequently associated with other disorders, it has not been reported together with primary sclerosing cholangitis, complicating the administration of liver-toxic immunosuppressive therapy. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of arterial hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, glaucoma, right-sided ptosis and later generalized weakness, was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. Additionally, primary sclerosing cholangitis was detected, initially prohibiting the administration of immunosuppressants. Despite treatment with steroids and pyridostigmine she repeatedly experienced myasthenic crises. After the fifth crisis and after antibody titers had reached levels > 100 nmol/L during two years of follow-up, it was decided to restart azathioprine. Interestingly, low-dose azathioprine (1.5 mg/kg/day) was well tolerated, had a positive clinical and immunological effect and did not worsen primary sclerosing cholangitis. Conclusion Myasthenia gravis may occur together with primary sclerosing cholangitis in the same patient. Mild immunosuppression with azathioprine is feasible and effective in such a patient, without worsening myasthenia gravis or primary sclerosing cholangitis. PMID:21059205

  2. Analysis of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and receptors and implications in thymus biology and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatli, Irem; Akkaya, Bahar; Uysal, Hilmi; Kahraman, Sevim; Sanlioglu, Ahter Dilsad

    2017-02-01

    Myasthenia Gravis is an autoantibody-mediated, neuromuscular junction disease, and is usually associated with thymic abnormalities presented as thymic tumors (~10%) or hyperplastic thymus (~65%). The exact role of thymus in Myasthenia Gravis development is not clear, yet many patients benefit from thymectomy. The apoptotic ligand TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand is thought to be involved in the regulation of thymocyte counts, although conflicting results are reported. We investigated differential expression profiles of TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand and its transmembrane receptors, Nuclear Factor-kB activation status, and apoptotic cell counts in healthy thymic tissue and pathological thymus from Myasthenia Gravis patients. All tissues expressed TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand and its receptors, with hyperplastic tissue having the highest expression levels of death receptors DR4 and DR5. No detectable Nuclear Factor-kB activation, at least via the canonical Protein Kinase A-mediated p65 Ser276 phosphorylation, was evident in any of the tissues studied. Apoptotic cell counts were higher in MG-associated tissue compared to the normal thymus. Possible use of the TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand within the concept of an apoptotic ligand-mediated medical thymectomy in thymoma- or thymic hyperplasia-associated Myasthenia Gravis is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ANTIBODIES TO SKELETAL-MUSCLE IN MYASTHENIA-GRAVIS .1. DIAGNOSTIC-VALUE FOR THE DETECTION OF THYMOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; LIMBURG, PC; HORST, G; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    1993-01-01

    The role of anti-muscle antibodies (AMA) in the diagnosis of thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is evaluated. We compared ELISA and Western blot assay for antibodies to citric acid muscle extract (a-CAE) with an immunofluorescence assay (IF). Sera from 234 selected MG patients and 123

  4. Thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis: On the search for a pathogen signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cufi, Perrine; Soussan, Patrick; Truffault, Frédérique; Fetouchi, Rachid; Robinet, Marieke; Fadel, Elie; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mainly mediated by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. In the late onset, a thymoma, tumor of the thymus, is quite frequent. However, the events leading to thymoma and MG are not understood. As thymoma-associated MG (MG-T) patients also display anti-interferon type I (IFN-I) neutralizing antibodies, we investigated if MG-T could be associated with an anti-viral signature. RT-PCR analyses demonstrated huge increases of IFN-I subtypes, IFN-α2, -α8, -ω and -β, in thymoma-associated MG but not in thymomas without MG or in control thymuses. Next, we investigated if dsRNA signaling pathway involvement could be observed in MG-T, as recently observed in early-onset MG. We observed an abnormal regulation of dsRNA-sensing molecules with an increase of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), and a decrease of protein kinase R (PKR) and dsRNA helicases (RIG-I and MDA5) in thymoma from MG patients. We also detected a decreased expression of p53, the tumor suppressor that is known to be down-regulated by dsRNA. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that MG-T could be linked to a viral infection. As p16 (CDKN2A), a marker of HPV infections, was up-regulated in MG-T, we thus screened DNA from thymomas for human papillomavirus (HPV) by real-time PCR using HPV consensus SPF10 primers. RT-PCR results were negative for all samples tested. We confirmed the absence of HPV DNA detection by end point PCR using FAP primers to amplify a larger panel of HPV genotypes. Our data clearly demonstrate INF-I overexpression together with the activation of innate immunity pathways in thymoma-associated MG suggesting that MG might develop after a pathogen infection. We were not able to relate thymoma to HPV infections and the implication of other pathogens is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Validation of the italian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality-of-Life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Alberto; Leonardi, Matilde; Ayadi, Roberta; Antozzi, Carlo; Maggi, Lorenzo; Baggi, Fulvio; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-10-01

    In this study we assess the Italian version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality-of-Life questionnaire (MG-QOL15). The validation protocol included the MG-QOL15, the 36-item Short Form (SF-36), the Besta Neurological Institute Rating Scale for Myasthenia Gravis, and the MG-Composite. We used the Cronbach α to test reliability, the Spearman correlation to test short-term test-retest, the Kruskal-Wallis test to assess differences in MG-QOL15 between patients with different disease severity, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to assess sensitivity to change. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. The mean MG-QOL15 score was 15.2 ± 12.2, with α = 0.93 and test-retest correlation = 0.93. Compared with the SF-36, the MG-QOL15 was superior in differentiating patients with different MG types (P = 0.041) and severity (P = 0.004), showed higher sensitivity to change (P = 0.003 for improved and P = 0.024 for worsened patients), and had higher correlations with the MG-Composite (rho = 0.367 vs. -0.213 and -0.154). The Italian version of the MG-QOL15 is valid, reliable, stable, and sensitive to changes. Muscle Nerve 56: 716-720, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Maintenance plasma exchange treatment for muscle specific kinase antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chisa; Teener, James W; Davenport, Robertson D; Cooling, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Anti-muscle specific kinase antibody positive myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is often characterized by a relatively severe and progressive course, refractoriness to standard myasthenia gravis (MG) medications, and an increased risk of myasthenic crisis. We report here successful management of three MuSK MG patients using maintenance therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) treatment for up to 4.5 years. The study was a 5-year retrospective review of all MG patients treated with TPE between 2008 and 2013 at University of Michigan. Inclusion criteria of MuSK MG were positive for anti-MuSK antibodies and a diagnosis of MuSK MG by staff neurologists. Patient data included age, gender, diagnostic testing results, medications, and the dates and response to TPE treatments. A total of 153 MG patients underwent at least one course of TPE between 2008 and 2013. A total of 12 patients (7.8%) were positive for anti-MuSK antibodies. Patients were predominantly female (83.3%) and a median age of onset was 46-years old. Three MuSK MG patients were successfully managed with maintenance TPE. Maintenance TPE may be an effective option for MuSK MG patients. The key of successful maintenance treatment at our institution has been to tailor the TPE frequency for each individual, and to modify the treatment interval in conjunction with medical management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Oral and parenteral pyridostigmine in preparing Myasthenia Gravis patients for thymectomy;a randomized Clinical trial

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    Tadjeddein A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory failure and crisis is one of major complications of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients. There are different medication regimes for preparing these patients for surgery and reducing post-operative side effects. The goal of this study is to compare respiratory complications of oral vs. Parenteral preoperative administration of anticholinesterase agents for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis patients. Methods: This randomized controlled trial included 101 patients in class IIA or IIB of myasthenia gravis according to the Osserman classification system. The control group fasted for eight hours before surgery and oral anticholines-terase agents were replaced with parenteral ones. The case group also fasted for 8 hours before surgery, but pyridostigmine was continued at its usual dose until the time of operation and the last dose was given to patients with a small amount of water in the operating room on the operating bed. Results: There was no statistically meaningful difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex and pathologic findings. In comparison, the mean hospital stay for the case group was 3.98 days and 6.34 for the control group (p value = 0.003. There were eight cases of respiratory crisis or failure (16% in the control group but only 1 case (2% was observed in case group (p value = 0.014. Only one patient in the case group required re-intubation after the surgery; however, six patients in control group were re-intubated (p value = 0.053. Plasmapheresis was required for five patients in the control group and one patient in the case group (p value = 0.098. Tracheostomy was performed on two patients in the control group to accommodate prolonged intubation, but none of the case group required this procedure. Conclusion: This study shows that continuing oral anticholinesterase agents up to the time of operation, with the last dose at the operative theater, lowers the incidence of post-operative myasthenia

  8. [The relationship between myasthenia gravis and the different pathological type of thymoma patients' operation and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Yu, Lei; Jing, Yun; Ke, Ji

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the different pathological and clinical characteristics of thymomas with and without myasthenia gravis (MG) and to determine whether the presence of MG influences the prognosis in thymoma patients. The clinical data from 228 consecutive patients (median sternotomy were used in 153, video-assisted thoracoscopic themectomy were used in 75) operated on from January 1992 to December 2007 was analyzed retrospectively. These thymoma patients had been subdivided into two groups: thymoma with MG (n = 125) and thymoma without MG (n = 103). All thymic epithelial tumors were classified according to the WHO histologic classification and the Masaoka clinical staging system. The result was evaluated according to the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America's criterion. The clinical features of the 2 test was compared between the two groups by χ² test, and the survival were compared between the two groups by Cox analysis. There were no peri-operative deaths. 19 cases were inoperable (6 in the group with MG, 13 without MG (χ² = 4.52, P = 0.035)). The proportions of type A and thymic carcinoma were 0 in the group with MG, 10.5% (11/103) and 11.6% (12/103) respectively in the group without MG. According to the Masaoka's clinical staging, in the group MG, 24.8% (31/125) patients were stage III and IV; in the group without MG, 33.0% (34/103) patients were stage III and IV. There was a significant difference between hyperplastic paraneoplastic thymus coexisting in 28.8% (36/125) patients with MG and only 5.8% (6/103) in patients without MG (χ² = 20.91, P = 0.000) Microthymoma was identified in the paraneoplastic thymus of 3 patients with MG. There were 198 patients followed up, the rate was 86.8% (198/228). There was no recurrence in patients with type A and a few patients with type AB, B1, B2, B3 thymoma and thymic carcinoma recurred. The actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates were 89.3% and 81.2% for patients with MG respectively, and 90.0% and 78.9% for patients

  9. Myasthenia gravis in Ceará, Brazil: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline de Almeida Xavier Aguiar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective chart review was performed on patients diagnosed as having myasthenia gravis in Ceará State, Brazil and who were followed from October 1981 to June 2009. Clinical and epidemiologic aspects were evaluated. In this work, 122 patients were studied, of whom 85 (69.7% were females and 37 (30.3% were males. The disease duration ranged from five months to 50 years (8.9±8.1 years. Age at the first symptoms varied from 0 to 74 years (31.9±14.4 years. The first main symptoms and signs were ptosis, diplopia and limb weakness. Generalized myasthenia was the most common clinical presentation, but 5.1% (n=6 persisted as ocular myasthenia. Thymectomy was performed in 42.6% (n=52 of myasthenic patients. A thymoma was present in 10 patients. Serum acetylcholine receptor (AChR antibodies were present in 80% (n=20 of specimens tested. The data presented are similar to those of studies performed in other countries.

  10. Paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis and polymyositis secondary to a thymoma in a young woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzatian-Ahar, Shabnam; Pedersen, Emil Arnspang; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2016-01-01

    on chest computed tomography was histologically verified. Patient treatment and response are presented. The case emphasizes the importance of recognizing that thymomas, in rare instances, may present with a combination of neuromuscular disorders in the same patient.......We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who within weeks developed severe swallowing difficulties and weakness in her limbs to an extent requiring hospitalization. Workup confirmed clinically suspected diagnoses of polymyositis and autoimmune myasthenia. A suspicion of malignant thymoma based...

  11. Association of early onset myasthenia gravis in Newfoundland dogs with the canine major histocompatibility complex class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zena; Vernau, Karen; Safra, Noa; Shelton, G Diane; King, Jason; Owen, Joseph; Weich, Kalie; Bannasch, Danika

    2017-05-01

    Acquired Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder whose development in humans has been associated with the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) or Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA). There is a form of early onset MG (EOMG) in Newfoundland dogs that mimics the clinical presentation in humans and appears to have familial inheritance. Genotyping of three classical Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA) class II genes, DLA-DRB1, DLA-DQA1 and DLA-DQB1, in 16 Newfoundlands with EOMG and 46 unaffected Newfoundlands, identified DLA-DQB1 *00301 (p-value = 0.0051 OR: 7.41) as a risk locus for the development of EOMG in this breed. In order to further investigate the extent of the association to the entire MHC region, 208 additional SNPs were genotyped in two phases. Both a risk locus for EOMG to the DLA class I (chr12: 458483-506460) and a protective locus for EOMG susceptibility that extends outside of the DLA class I (chr12: 89701-475348) were identified. Four additional dog breeds with an elevated risk for the development of MG were SNP genotyped, but no shared or significant associations were found. MHC involvement in canine MG disease manifestation overlaps with loci identified in human studies and highlights the value of dogs as a model for genetic studies of naturally occurring diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anestesia ambulatorial para radioterapia em paciente portador de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Anestesia ambulatorial para radioterapia en paciente portador de miastenia gravis: relato de caso Outpatient anesthesia for radiotherapy in a patient with myasthenia gravis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marcondes Bussolotti

    2006-08-01

    , 87 años, 87 kg, estado físico ASA III, con historial de miastenia gravis; accidente vascular encefálico previo (AVE; marcapaso por bloqueo atrio-ventricular total; hipertensión arterial sistémica (HAS. Fueron programadas siete sesiones de radioterapia de 20 minutos para tratamiento del tumor de parótida bajo anestesia general. En la sala de radioterapia fue monitorizado con cardioscopio, monitor de presión arterial no invasiva, oxímetro de pulso y sometido a anestesia general con propofol y sevoflurano. Después de la inducción, se mantuvo en ventilación espontánea con cánula de Guedel y catéter nasofaríngeo con O2 /sevoflurano, para acomodación de la máscara de inmovilización. En la sala de recuperación postanestésica, no presentó complicaciones. CONCLUSIONES: La elección de los anestésicos y el acompañamiento clínico de criterio permitieron la buena evolución del paciente, con AVE previo, cardiopata y anciano, sometido a la anestesia general balanceada para procedimiento de aplicación de radioterapia, en régimen ambulatorial.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a rare autoimmune disease, characterized by the reduction in the number of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular junction, with an incidence of 14/100,000. The objective of this report is to describe the case of a patient with myasthenia gravis who underwent balanced general anesthesia for radiotherapy of a spinocellular carcinoma of the parotid gland as an outpatient. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 87 years old, 87 kg, physical status ASA III, with a prior history of myasthenia gravis; stroke; pacemaker for a third-degree AV block; and hypertension. He was scheduled for seven 20-minutes radiotherapy sessions under general anesthesia. In the radiotherapy room he was monitored with a cardioscope, noninvasive blood pressure, pulse oxymeter, and underwent general anesthesia with propofol and sevoflurane. After the induction, he maintained spontaneous ventilation with a

  13. Bilateral single-port thoracoscopic extended thymectomy for management of thymoma and myasthenia gravis: case report

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    Francesco Paolo Caronia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Video-assisted thoracoscopy is become a widely accepted approach for the resection of anterior mediastinal masses, including thymoma. The current trend is to reduce the number of ports and minimize the length of incisions to further decrease postoperative pain, chest wall paresthesia, and length of hospitalization. Herein, we reported an extended resection of thymoma in a patient with myasthenia gravis through an uniportal bilateral thoracoscopic approach. Case presentation A 74 years old woman with myasthenia gravis was referred to our attention for management of a 3.5 cm, well capsulate, thymoma. All laboratory and cardio-pulmonary tests were within normal; thus, she was scheduled for thymoma resection through an uniportal bilateral thoracoscopic approach. Under general anaesthesia and selective intubation, the patient was placed in a 60° right lateral decubitus. A 3 cm skin incision was performed in the fourth right intercostal space and, through that a 30° video-camera and working instruments were inserted without rib spreading. After complete dissection of the thymus and mediastinal fat, the contralateral pleura was opened, and, through that the specimen was pushed into the left pleural cavity. Then, the patient was placed in the left lateral decubitus. Similarly to the right side procedure, a 3-cm incision was performed in the fourth left intercostal space to complete thymic dissection and retrieve the specimen. No intraoperative and post-operative complications were found. The patient was discharged four days later. Pathological examination revealed a type A thymoma (Masaoka stage I. No recurrence was found at 18 months of follow-up Conclusions Bilateral single-port thoracoscopy is an available procedure for management of thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. The less post-operative pain, the reduction of hospital stay and the better esthetic results are all potential advantages of this approach over

  14. Muscle strength and fatigue in newly diagnosed patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinge, Lotte; Andersen, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Dynamometry is increasingly used as an objective measurement of muscle strength in neurological diseases. No study has applied dynamometry in untreated newly diagnosed patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Isometric muscle strength at the shoulder, knee, and ankle was determined in 21 MG patients before and after initial anti-myasthenic treatment. Isometric strength was compared with MG evaluation scales. Muscle strength was reduced for knee extensors and shoulder abductors but normal for ankle extensors. Isometric muscle strength did not correlate significantly with manual muscle testing (MG Composite). Dynamometry revealed improved muscle strength of up to 50% (median 17%; range -1.8-49.8) despite no change in the MG Composite score. Dynamometry appears to be a more sensitive method of identifying changes in limb strength than MG evaluation scales. This supports the use of dynamometry in MG patients, especially for evaluation of the effect of anti-myasthenic treatment. Muscle Nerve 54: 709-714, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Myasthenia gravis with the electrographic response of a myasthenic syndrome. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck, L C; Bittencourt, P C; Nóvak, E M

    1985-06-01

    It is reported a case of a 61 years-old man with progressive asthenia, disfagia, disphonia and diplopia, of variable intensity during the day, who had a very good response to anticolinesterasic drugs and corticosteroids. The repetitive stimulation tests at low frequency, resulted in large increment (maximum 275%) of the basal voltage after exercise. At high frequency he also had a large increment. Radiological and laboratory investigation three times in a seven-year period was normal, without evidence of any neoplasia. Muscle biopsy showed a type II muscle fiber atrophy. The repetitive stimulation tests repeated three times, was typical of myasthenia gravis in one occasion and in the other two, typical of myasthenic syndrome (increment of 418%). A discussion about other cases with similar findings is made after a review of the literature.

  16. Miastenia grave: aspectos históricos Myasthenia gravis: historical aspects

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    FRANCISCO MARCOS B. CUNHA

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram pesquisados aspectos históricos da miastenia grave desde as primeiras descrições da doença em 1672, pelo clínico inglês Thomas Willis. São descritas as dificuldades encontradas no manuseio dos primeiros pacientes diagnosticados. Pesquisaram-se fatos históricos ligados à investigação da doença, o tratamento, bem como curiosidades pouco citadas na literatura.We studied historical aspects of myasthenia gravis starting from its first description by the English physician, Sir Thomas Willis, in 1672. We also describe the difficulties in managing triating the first diagnosed patient. Historical facts related to the investigation and the initial treatment of this disorder as well as curiosities seldom mentioned in the literature are part of this paper.

  17. Haptoglobin study in myasthenia gravis Estudo sobre a haptoglobina na miastenia grave

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    Leonardo H. Mendonça Oliveira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A cross-sectional study of haptoglobin (Hp in myasthenia gravis (MG was designed, with the objective to identify its values and correlate them with different disease status. METHOD: 46 patients were enrolled in the study, all having disease severity established according to the quantitative myasthenia gravis strength scores (QMGSS. Based on the functional scale determined by Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA recommendations, patients were classified as having: complete stable remission (CSR; n=10; minimal manifestations-0 (MM0; n=6, minimal manifestations-1 (MM1; n=4; pharmacological remission (PR; n=6. Two other groups participated: thymomatous patients (T; n=10 and patients without imunosuppression or thymectomy, until the assessment for Hp (WIT; n=10. Hp dosage was done by immunonephelometry, blindly to clinical data. Student's t-test, Anova test and linear regression were employed for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences occurred between CSR+MM0xWIT groups (86.62x157.57, pOBJECTIVO: Desenhou-se estudo transversal sobre a haptoglobina (Hp na miastenia grave (MG com o objetivo de identificar seus valores e correlacioná-los a diferentes condições na doença. MÉTODO: 46 pacientes foram incluídos, todos tendo a gravidade da doença estabelecida segundo escores internacionais (QMGSS. Os pacientes tiveram seu estado funcional determinado de acordo com a Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of América (MGFA e classificados em: remissão completa estável (CSR; n=10; mínima manifestação-0 (MM0; n=6, mínima manifestação-1 (MM1; n=4; remissão farmacológica (PR; n=6. Dois outros grupos participaram: pacientes timomatosos (T; n=10 e pacientes sem imunossupressão ou timectomia, até o momento da inclusão no estudo (WIT; n=10. A dosagem de Hp foi realizada por imunonefelometria, de modo cego quanto à clínica. As análises estatísticas incluíram o teste de Student, Anova e regressão linear

  18. Prevalence and clinical aspects of immigrants with myasthenia gravis in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldingh, Marion Ingeborg; Maniaol, Angelina; Brunborg, Cathrine; Dekker, Luuk; Lipka, Alexander; Harmen Niks, Erik; Verschuuren, Jan; Tallaksen, Chantal

    2017-06-01

    Multiethnic studies can provide etiological clues toward the genetic and environmental influence of a disease. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence and clinical features of myasthenia gravis (MG) in immigrants compared with native patients in 2 population-based cohorts. This cross-sectional study included 843 MG patients (375 from Norway and 468 from the Netherlands). Ethnic background was defined by questionnaires. Among the participating MG patients, 163 of 843 (19.3%) were first or second generation immigrants, mainly from Europe, Asia, and South America. No marked prevalence differences were found between immigrants and native ethnic groups. MG with muscle specific kinase antibodies and MG with thymoma were more frequent in Asian MG immigrants compared with other ethnic groups (8% vs. 0-4%; P immigrant MG patients carry genetic factors or environmental/lifestyle factors which contribute to their specific phenotype, even after migration. Muscle Nerve 55: 819-827, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis in Patients with Elderly Onset at Advanced Age

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    Noriko Nishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with late-onset myasthenia gravis (MG among patients ≥50 years has been increasing recently. We encountered three patients who developed elderly-onset MG at a particularly advanced age (≥80 years. All were female and positive for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. About 4 years have passed since MG onset in all three patients and symptoms have been controlled without recurrence using a combination of oral low-dose prednisolone and tacrolimus. As many cases of elderly-onset MG do not require strong immunosuppression, we recommend minimum immunosuppressive treatment to avoid adverse events, particularly in patients at an advanced age of ≥80 years.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of MuSK Antibody-positive Myasthenia Gravis in Taiwan

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    Yung-Chuan Huang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Circulating antibodies of the acetylcholine receptor (AchRAb are detectable in most patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG. A newly discovered antibody against muscle-specific kinase (MuSKAb has been detected in 40–70% of AchRAb-negative MG patients. We report a series of Taiwanese MuSKAb-positive patients, and compare their clinical features with MuSKAb-negative patients and also with MuSKAb-positive Caucasians. Five out of 44 seronegative generalized MG patients (11.4% were positive for MuSKAb. Patients with MuSKAb tended to have severe disability and bulbar involvement, and more often experienced crisis or impending crisis. Although all of these patients showed an initial response to immunosuppressant therapy, they had greater disability at follow-up. The clinical features of Taiwanese MuSKAb-positive patients were not different from those of Caucasians, except for a lower prevalence.

  1. The Clinical Outcome and Therapeutic Treatment of a Patient with Double Seronegative Myasthenia Gravis

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    Azanjac Ana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prikazali smo slučaj 22-godišnjeg muskarca sa kliničkom slikom otežanog gutanja i dvoslika. Bolest myasthenia gravis (MG je dijagnostikovana na osnovu pozitivnog faramakološkog testa, pozitivnog testa neuromišićne transmisije, kompjuterizovane tomografije medijastinuma. Antitela protiv acetilholinskog receptora (AChR i antitela protiv mišićno specifičnog receptora za tirozin kinazu (MuSK. bila su negativna. Zabeleženo je delimično poboljšanje u neurološkom nalazu na ordiniranu terapiju Piridostigminom, Ciklosporinom, kortikosteroidima. Bolesnik je imao povoljan odgovor na izmenu plazme sa povlačenjem svih kliničkih siimptoma što potvrdjuje hipotezu o učešću humoralnih faktora u patogenezi dvostruko negativne MG.

  2. Computed tomography of the thymus after pneumomediastinography in patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Genjiro; Yamamoto, Teiji; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi; Saeki, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    Nine patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) had plain chest X-ray, tomography, computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, pneumomediastinography (PMG) and post-PMG CT scans. Routine chest radiography detected mediastinal masses in two patients and conventional laminogram provided no additional informations. CT yielded anterior mediastinal increased densities in seven patients (78%), whereas post-PMG CT delineated masses (thymoma or thymic hyperplasia) or thymic gland in all cases (100%), but these procedures could not distinguish thymic tumor from nontumorous conditions. PMG and post-PMG CT scans are superior to other radiographic techniques in detecting mediastinal abnormalities with more clear delineation of thymoma or thymic gland. When an abnormal density is present in the mediastinum of a patient with MG, PMG and post-PMG CT scans should be done to outline the mediastinal anatomy, to determine the size, extent, invasiveness of thymoma or thymic gland prior to thymectomy. (author)

  3. [The role of TNIP1 in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis among patients with thymoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yingcai; Song, Yu; Zhang, Zhenming; Zhang, Hanlu; Huang, Yi; Wang, Yun

    2016-10-01

    To explore the role of TNFα induced protein 3 interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis (MG) among patients with thymoma. From December 2014 to March 2015, 11 patients with MG associated thymoma (MGT) and 11 non-MG thymoma (NMGT) patients receiving thymectomy were selected. Thymus specimens were obtained during surgery, and peripheral venous blood samples were obtained before the surgery. For the MGT cohorts, peripheral venous blood samples were also collected at 3-6 months after the surgery. TNIP1 mRNA was determined with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and its protein expression was evaluated by Western blotting. For both thymus specimen and peripheral blood samples, the levels of TNIP1 mRNA and protein in the MGT group were both significantly lower than those of the NMGT patients (Pthymoma. Thymectomy may help to recover the expression of TNIP1 among such patients.

  4. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia gravis in vitro and in vivo: the Guided Missile strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W; Adams, R N; Miagkov, A; Lu, Y; Juon, H-S; Drachman, D B

    2012-10-15

    Current immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis (MG) is often effective, but entails risks of infection and neoplasia. The "Guided Missile" strategy described here is designed to target and eliminate the individual's unique AChR-specific T cell repertoire, without otherwise interfering with the immune system. We genetically engineered dendritic cells to present AChR epitopes and simultaneously express Fas ligand in an ongoing EAMG model. In both in vitro and in vivo experiments, these engineered cells specifically killed AChR-responsive T cells without otherwise damaging the immune system. AChR antibodies were markedly reduced in the treated mice. Translation of this method to treat human MG is possible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients with ocular symptoms referred for electrodiagnosis: how many of them suffer from myasthenia gravis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelis, Th; Pappas, V; Kokotis, P; Zouvelou, V; Karandreas, N

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was the diagnosis of patients with isolated ocular manifestations (ptosis and/or diplopia) referred for electrophysiological evaluation to the electrodiagnostic laboratory of a University Neurological Department. Examination was performed either in inpatient status or in outpatient basis. We analyzed the clinical, electrophysiological and other laboratory data in 79 subjects. Myasthenia gravis (MG) was diagnosed in 38 %, 45.6 % in other diseases (Graves disease, blepharospasm, IIId cranial verve palsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke, etc.), while in 16.5 %, the cause remained unidentified. Symptoms fluctuation was significantly more frequent in the myasthenic patients, compared to patients with other diseases. The presence of both diplopia and ptosis are more likely due to MG rather than other pathology.

  6. Guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of the acetylcholine receptor-specific passive transfer myasthenia gravis model - recommendations for methods and experimental designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusner, Linda L.; Losen, Mario; Vincent, Angela; Lindstrom, Jon; Tzartos, Socrates; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) are the most common cause of myasthenia gravis (MG). Passive transfer of AChR antibodies from MG patients into animals reproduces key features of human disease, including antigenic modulation of the AChR, complement-mediated damage of the neuromuscular junction, and muscle weakness. Similarly, AChR antibodies generated by active immunization in experimental autoimmune MG models can subsequently be passively transferred to other animals and induce weakness. The passive transfer model is useful to test therapeutic strategies aimed at the effector mechanism of the autoantibodies. Here we summarize published and unpublished experience using the AChR passive transfer MG model in mice, rats and rhesus monkeys, and give recommendations for the design of preclinical studies in order to facilitate translation of positive and negative results to improve MG therapies. PMID:25743217

  7. Use of Toll-Like Receptor Agonists to Induce Ectopic Lymphoid Structures in Myasthenia Gravis Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Marieke; Villeret, Bérengère; Maillard, Solène; Cron, Mélanie A.; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. MG symptoms are characterized by muscle weaknesses. The thymus of MG patients is very often abnormal and possesses all the characteristics of tertiary lymphoid organs such as neoangiogenesis processes, overexpression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and infiltration of B lymphocytes leading to ectopic germinal center (GC) development. We previously demonstrated that injections of mice with polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic double-stranded RNA mimicking viral infection, induce thymic changes and trigger MG symptoms. Upon Poly(I:C) injections, we observed increased thymic expressions of α-AChR, interferon-β and chemokines such as CXCL13 and CCL21 leading to B-cell recruitment. However, these changes were only transient. In order to develop an experimental MG model associated with thymic GCs, we used Poly(I:C) in the classical experimental autoimmune MG model induced by immunizations with purified AChR emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant. We observed that Poly(I:C) strongly favored the development of MG as almost all mice displayed MG symptoms. Nevertheless, we did not observe any ectopic GC development. We next challenged mice with Poly(I:C) together with other toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists known to be involved in GC development and that are overexpressed in MG thymuses. Imiquimod and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that activate TLR7 and TLR9, respectively, did not induce thymic changes. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide that activates TLR4 potentiated Poly(I:C) effects and induced a significant expression of CXCL13 mRNA in the thymus associated with a higher recruitment of B cells that induced over time thymic B-lymphoid structures. Altogether, these data suggest that tertiary lymphoid genesis in MG thymus could result from a combined activation of TLR signaling pathways. PMID

  8. Miastenia gravis análise de 90 casos tratados com timectomia myasthenia gravis

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    Almeida Fábio Henrique Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A Miastenia Gravis é uma doença auto-imune caracterizada por auto-anticorpos contra receptores nicotínicos de acetilcolina da placa neural. O tratamento clínico básico para as formas generalizadas é feito com drogas anticolenesterásicas, mas em algumas fases podem ser necessários outras modalidades de tratamento, tais como a corticoterapia e a plasmaferese. O tratamento cirúrgico, a timectomia, é uma forma de abordar a causa base da doença e tem resultados bastante encorajadores, visto que é atribuída ao timo a produção dos auto-anticorpos. Apresentamos neste trabalho o quadro clínico, os resultados cirúrgicos e as alteração anátomo-patológicas dos 90 casos estudados.

  9. The benefits and tolerance of exercise in myasthenia gravis (MGEX): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Simone; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Porcher, Raphael; Portero, Pierre; Clair, Bernard; Eymard, Bruno; Demeret, Sophie; Bassez, Guillaume; Gargiulo, Marcela; Louët, Estelle; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Jobic, Asmaa; Aegerter, Philippe; Thoumie, Philippe; Sharshar, Tarek

    2018-01-18

    Research exploring the effects of physical exercise in auto-immune myasthenia gravis (MG) is scarce. The few existing studies present methodological shortcomings limiting the conclusions and generalisability of results. It is hypothesised that exercise could have positive physical, psychological as well as immunomodulatory effects and may be a beneficial addition to current pharmacological management of this chronic disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the benefits on perceived quality of life (QOL) and physical fitness of a home-based physical exercise program compared to usual care, for patients with stabilised, generalised auto-immune MG. MGEX is a multi-centre, interventional, randomised, single-blind, two-arm parallel group, controlled trial. Forty-two patients will be recruited, aged 18-70 years. Following a three-month observation period, patients will be randomised into a control or experimental group. The experimental group will undertake a 40-min home-based physical exercise program using a rowing machine, three times a week for three months, as an add-on to usual care. The control group will receive usual care with no additional treatment. All patients will be followed up for a further three months. The primary outcome is the mean change in MGQOL-15-F score between three and six months (i.e. pre-intervention and immediately post-intervention periods). The MGQOL-15-F is an MG-specific patient-reported QOL questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include the evaluation of deficits and functional limitations via MG-specific clinical scores (Myasthenia Muscle Score and MG-Activities of Daily Living scale), muscle force and fatigue, respiratory function, free-living physical activity as well as evaluations of anxiety, depression, self-esteem and overall QOL with the WHO-QOL BREF questionnaire. Exercise workload will be assessed as well as multiple safety measures (ECG, biological markers, medication type and dosage and any disease exacerbation or crisis

  10. Impact of radiotherapy on myasthenia gravis in patients with malignant thymomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Xiuyu; Xu Yonggang; Gao Hong; Li Ming; Li Gaofeng; Liu Mingyuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the change of myasthenia gravis(MG) during radiotherapy for patients with malignant thymomas. Methods: Forty-five with malignant thymomas patients with were analyzed. The median total dose was DT54.2 Gy in 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 clays a week. Anti-cholinesterase, such as pyridostigmine was used to control the MG symptoms. Results: Forty-five patients completed radiotherapy on schedule except one from whom the treatment was was with drawn because of respiratory muscle involvement. Among these 44 patients, myasthenic symptom was relieved in 4 to various degrees, 4 progressed, 34 no change and 2 developed cholinergic crisis. Myasthenic symptom was not changed in one patient for whom radiotherapy had been standed before operation nor during the course of postoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: A course of radiotherapy of DT54.2 Gy, on fractionation of DT1.8-2.0 Gy modal would not aggravate myasthenia. However, proper use of anti-cholinesterase, careful observation and timely drug-adjustment are necessary. (authors)

  11. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  12. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  13. Timectomía videotoracoscópica en la miastenia gravis Video-laparoscopic thymectomy in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Martín González

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el tratamiento videotoracoscópico permite la exéresis del timo y de la grasa peritímica, como en la cirugía abierta, pero con las ventajas del mínimo acceso. Objetivo: evaluar los resultados de esta vía con nuestros primeros pacientes. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo y prospectivo de 10 pacientes con miastenia gravis desde enero de 2007 hasta agosto de 2008, en el hospital "Hermanos Ameijeiras". Los resultados se presentaron en por cientos y para la relación de las variables se empleó chi cuadrado. Resultados: según la clasificación de Osserman de la miastenia, 8 se ubicaron en el grado II B, y 2 en el II A. El 50 % (5 de ellos tenía un timoma asociado. En el 50 % se emplearon 3 puertos de entrada. El tiempo quirúrgico varió de 60 a 180 minutos. Hubo un 37,5 % (3 de complicaciones posoperatorias sin mortalidad. En el informe anatomopatológico de la pieza (4 el 50 % tenía un timoma, todos en el estadio I de Masaoka. El 50 % (4 se encuentra en remisión y el otro 50 % en mejoría significativa. Conclusiones: la timectomía videotoracoscópica tiene grandes ventajas, ya que sin cambiar la técnica quirúrgica los pacientes se benefician de todas las ventajas del mínimo acceso.Introduction: the video-laparoscopy treatment allows the thymus exeresis and the peri-thymic fat like in the open surgery, but with the advantages of a minimal access. Objective: to assess the results of this route achieved in our first patients. Methods: a prospective and descriptive study was conducted in 10 patients presenting with myasthenia gravis from January, 2007 to August, 2008 admitted in the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital. The results were showed in percentages and for the relation of variables chi² was used. Results: according to the Osserman's classification of the myasthenia, 8 were located in the IIB degree and 2 in the IIA one. The 50 % (5 of them had an associated thymoma. In the 50 % three

  14. Doença de Castleman associada a sarcoma de células dendríticas foliculares e miastenia gravis Castleman's disease associated with follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and myasthenia gravis

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    Fernando Luiz Westphal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Castleman é um distúrbio linfoproliferativo atípico, de etiologia desconhecida, que pode estar associada a uma série de condições clínicas, inclusive doenças de caráter autoimune e neoplasias malignas. No presente relato, uma paciente de 72 anos foi encaminhada ao serviço de cirurgia torácica do Hospital Universitário Getúlio Vargas, localizado na cidade de Manaus (AM para a ressecção de um tumor de mediastino posterior. Três meses antes, havia sido internada em UTI com um quadro de dispneia intensa, ocasião na qual foi diagnosticada miastenia gravis. Após a ressecção da massa mediastinal, a análise histopatológica revelou doença de Castleman hialino-vascular complicada por sarcoma de células dendríticas foliculares. Até o momento da redação deste estudo, a paciente utilizava um anticolinesterásico e corticoides para o controle da miastenia gravis.Castleman's disease is an atypical lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, which might be associated with various clinical conditions, including autoimmune diseases and malignant neoplasms. We report the case of a 72-year-old female patient who was referred to the thoracic surgery department of Getúlio Vargas University Hospital, in the city of Manaus, Brazil, for the resection of a posterior mediastinal tumor. Three months prior, the patient had been admitted to the ICU with signs of severe dyspnea, at which time she was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. After the resection of the mediastinal tumor, the histopathological examination revealed hyaline vascular-type Castleman's disease, complicated by follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. At this writing, the patient was being treated with an anticholinesterase agent and corticosteroids for the control of myasthenia gravis.

  15. Clonal heterogeneity of thymic B cells from early-onset myasthenia gravis patients with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor.

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    Vrolix, Kathleen; Fraussen, Judith; Losen, Mario; Stevens, Jo; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Molenaar, Peter C; Somers, Veerle; Bracho, Maria Alma; Le Panse, Rozen; Stinissen, Piet; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Maessen, Jos G; Van Garsse, Leen; Buurman, Wim A; Tzartos, Socrates J; De Baets, Marc H; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) is considered as a prototypic autoimmune disease. The thymus is important in the pathophysiology of the disease since thymus hyperplasia is a characteristic of early-onset AChR-MG and patients often improve after thymectomy. We hypothesized that thymic B cell and antibody repertoires of AChR-MG patients differ intrinsically from those of control individuals. Using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus and Toll-like receptor 9 activation, we isolated and characterized monoclonal B cell lines from 5 MG patients and 8 controls. Only 2 of 570 immortalized B cell clones from MG patients produced antibodies against the AChR (both clones were from the same patient), suggesting that AChR-specific B cells are not enriched in the thymus. Surprisingly, many B cell lines from both AChR-MG and control thymus samples displayed reactivity against striated muscle proteins. Striational antibodies were produced by 15% of B cell clones from AChR-MG versus 6% in control thymus. The IgVH gene sequence analysis showed remarkable similarities, concerning VH family gene distribution, mutation frequency and CDR3 composition, between B cells of AChR-MG patients and controls. MG patients showed clear evidence of clonal B cell expansion in contrast to controls. In this latter aspect, MG resembles multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, but differs from systemic lupus erythematosus. Our results support an antigen driven immune response in the MG thymus, but the paucity of AChR-specific B cells, in combination with the observed polyclonal expansions suggest a more diverse immune response than expected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Predictive value of ultrasonic diaphragm thickening fraction on successful weaning for patients with myasthenia gravis crisis].

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    Sun, Qiang; Shan, Feng; Dong, Hai; Jiang, Yan; Sun, Yongmei; Sun, Yunbo

    2017-07-01

    To confirm the predictive value of diaphragm thickening fraction (DTF) on successful weaning by bedside ultrasound in patients with myasthenia gravis crisis. A prospective study was conducted. The patients with myasthenia gravis crisis undergoing mechanical ventilation admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University from March 2015 to February 2017 were enrolled. All patients underwent a low level pressure support mode of spontaneous breathing test (SBT), and rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) was recorded. The indicators of right diaphragm thickness at the end of inspiration (DTei) and expiration (DTee) were determined by bedside ultrasound at 5 minutes and 60 minutes of SBT, and DTF was calculated, the changes in above parameters were observed during SBT. The patients were divided into successful weaning group and failure weaning group, and the differences in above indexes were compared between the two groups. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was used to evaluate the predictive value of DTF and RSBI at 60 minutes of SBT on successful weaning. A total of 37 patients were enrolled in the study. Ultrasonic measurement data of 63 person-times at 5 minutes of SBT and 50 at 60 minutes of SBT were obtained. There were no statistical differences in RSBI, DTei, DTee, and DTF at 5 minutes of SBT between successful weaning group (n = 33) and failure weaning group (n = 30). At 60 minutes of SBT, compared with successful weaning group (n = 33), the patients in failure weaning group (n = 17) had a higher RSBI (times×min -1 ×L -1 : 80.41±29.08 vs. 63.94±23.84, t = 2.146, P = 0.037), and lower DTee, DTei and DTF [DTee (mm): 22.00±6.25 vs. 25.45±4.99, t = 2.127, P = 0.039; DTei (mm): 27.94±6.19 vs. 38.48±6.15, t = 5.731, P = 0.000; DTF: (24.46±14.11)% vs. (62.04±30.21)%, t = 4.845, P = 0.000]. There were no statistical differences in RSBI, DTei, DTee, and DTF between 5 minutes and 60 minutes of SBT in 33

  17. Palpebral portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle to repetitive nerve stimulation testing: A potential assessment indicator in patients with generalized myasthenia gravis.

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    Yan, Chong; Song, Jie; Pang, Song; Yi, Fangfang; Xi, Jianying; Zhou, Lei; Ding, Ding; Wang, Weifeng; Qiao, Kai; Zhao, Chongbo

    2018-02-01

    Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) is a valuable diagnostic method for myasthenia gravis (MG). However, its association with clinical severity was scarcely studied. We reviewed medical records and retrospectively enrolled 121 generalized MG patients. Sensitivity of different muscles to RNS and clinical scoring systems was evaluated. RNS testing revealed facial muscles have the highest positive rate, followed by proximal muscles and distal muscles, with the palpebral portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle most sensitive. Amplitude decrement of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in the palpebral portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle is related to quantitative myasthenia gravis (QMG) scores, MG-specific manual muscle testing (MMT) scores and myasthenia gravis-related activities of daily living (MG-ADL) scores. We suggest that RNS testing of the palpebral portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle is a potential assessment indicator in patients with generalized MG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative High-Dose Steroid Has Long-Term Beneficial Effects for Myasthenia Gravis

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    Syuichi Tetsuka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies addressing preoperative steroid treatment have revealed that control of myasthenia gravis (MG with steroids prior to surgery appeared to stabilize postoperative status. The purpose of our study was to clarify the clinical benefits of the preoperative programmed high-dose steroid treatment on the long-term outcomes of MG patients. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 171 MG patients who were followed up after undergoing thymectomy in our hospital between 1988 and 2006. One hundred and thirteen patients in the programmed treatment group had received preoperative steroid treatment, while 58 patients received no steroid treatment during the preoperative period. Clinical remission, which was defined as the achievement of the modified pharmacologic remission (PR for at least 1 year, and clinical benefits were compared between the two groups. With regard to the remission after thymectomy, Kaplan-Meier life-table curves for patients in the preoperative steroid treatment group versus those for patients in the no steroid preoperative treatment group revealed a significantly higher probability of the PR in the preoperative steroid treatment group (log-rank test, P<0.01. This study might be the first, as per our knowledge, to indicate that preoperative programmed high-dose steroid treatment has long-term beneficial effects for MG patients.

  19. Factors predicting the outcomes of elderly hospitalized myasthenia gravis patients: a national database study

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    Tiamkao S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Somsak Tiamkao,1,2 Sineenard Pranboon,3 Kaewjai Thepsuthammarat,4 Kittisak Sawanyawisuth1,5,6 1Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 2The Neuroscience Research and Development Group, 3Nursing Division, Srinagarind Hospital, 4Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, 5Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance (BNOJPH, 6Ambulatory Medicine Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Myasthenia gravis (MG in elderly populations is increasing. This study aimed to evaluate predictors for treatment outcomes in elderly hospitalized MG patients using the national database. Methods: We collected data of elderly hospitalized MG patients from the National Health Security Office from October 2009 to September 2010. Predictors for treatment outcomes were examined. Results: During the study period, 1,948 identified MG patients were admitted to hospitals throughout Thailand. Of those, 441 patients (22.64% were aged ≥ 60 years. There were 66 patients (14.97% who had poor outcomes. There were only three significant factors in the final model. Presence of pneumonia, use of mechanical ventilators, and septicemia had adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval of 2.83 (1.03, 7.75, 5.33 (2.24, 12.72, and 4.47 (1.86, 10.75, respectively. Conclusion: Pneumonia, being on a mechanical ventilator, and septicemia were independent factors associated with poor treatment outcomes in elderly hospitalized MG patients according to national data. Keywords: pneumonia, ventilator, mortality, predictor 

  20. [Description of the resting electrocardiogram in a series of patients with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Enrique; Gómez, María; Narváez, René; Castillo, Lilia; Oseguera, Jorge; Dorantes, Joel; Orea, Arturo; Hernández, Pablo; Rebollar, Verónica

    2003-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disease characterized by the presence of acetylcholine receptor-directed autoantibodies. Functional cardiac disorders are the most common since there is no neuro-muscular plate in the heart. Autonomic nervous system is involved in MG, but the cardiac manifestations of such an involvement remain unclear. Previous EKG studies in patients with MG show heterogeneous results. A retrospective, descriptive and observational study was performed to know the main electrocardiographic characteristics and some autonomic nervous function in a series of patients with MG. One-hundred seventeen patients with EKG were analyzed. Twenty-eight were 47.9 +/- 20 years-old males, and 89 were women of 35.2 +/- 7.7 years (p = 0.001). 49 (41.9%) EKG had no changes, while 68 (58.1%) did. The main QT dispersion was 35.5 +/- 18.4 ms among those with some anomaly (p = 0.27). In 54 (78.3%) patients with an abnormal EKG there was T wave alternans, which was also present in 35 (71.4%) (p = 0.32) patients with normal EKG. MG is frequently associated to unspecific EKG changes. Dynamic electrocardiography allows a precise evaluation of the kind of cardiac involvement derived from MG, specifically the one related to the autonomic function, that is apparently affected in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms.

  1. Diagnostico y tratamiento de la myasthenia gravis estudio de una poblacion hospitalaria

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    Roberto D. Rey

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante la observacion de 50 pacientes con Myasthenia gravis entre los anos 1974 y 1987 se encontro un predominio del sexo femenino en la proporcion de 2,5 a 1 y mayor frecuencia de presentacion en Ias 3ª y 5ª décadas de la vida. Luego de la evaluacion clínica, el diagnóstico fué confirmado mediante: (1 prueba dei edrofonio, (2 estímulo nervioso repetitivo, (3 dosaje de anticuerpos antirreceptor colinérgico y (4 transferencia pasiva del suero al raton con ulterior niedicion de la amplitud de mepp's. La positividad diagnostica vario entre el 90 y el 100%, segun el tipo de prueba empleada. El estúdio radiológico del timo fué hecho con neumomediastinografía. obteniendose excelente correlación con la descripcion histológica de la glândula, y con tomografia computada, que demostro menor eficiência diagnostica. El tratamiento fué implementado en base a anticolinesterásicos, timectomía y corticoterapia inmunosupresora, evidenciandose con esta última mejores resultados. Nueve pacientes desarrollaron peoria transitória del cuadro muscular al iniciarse el tratamiento esteroideo, 6 de ellos exhibieron posteriormente evolucion desfavorable. Esta observacion aparenta tener valor pronóstico en la evolucion de la MG.

  2. High prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus in 78 myasthenia gravis patients: a clinical and serologic study.

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    Sthoeger, Zev; Neiman, Alexander; Elbirt, Daniel; Zinger, Hiedy; Magen, Eli; Burstein, Rimona; Eitan, Sara; Abarbanel, Jakov; Mozes, Edna

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Seventy-eight MG patients recruited unselectively from Israeli MG database were evaluated by medical history, physical examination and serology (ANA at 1:100 and anti-ds-DNA at 1:10 dilution) for the presence of SLE, which was defined by the presence of four or more American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria. Thirty-one (40%) of our patients were males and 47 (60%) were females. Their mean age at time of the study was 51.5 +/- 14.5 years. Forty patients (51%) had an early-onset disease (lupus-related neurologic manifestations. All six patients were females with an early onset generalized MG. High prevalence of SLE and lupus-related autoantibodies exist in female MG patients. Thus, MG patients should be evaluated for the coexistence of SLE, and assessment for MG is suggested in lupus patients with unexplained muscular weakness.

  3. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  4. Association between myasthenia gravis and cognitive function: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Zhifeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The course of myasthenia gravis (MG is complicated by increased reports of cognitive defects in both human and animal models, which suggests potential central nervous system (CNS damage. We conducted a systematic review of the relationships between MG and cognitive function. This systematic review followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines. Major databases were searched to examine the neuropsychological studies of adults with MG. Weighted effect sizes were pooled by cognitive domain. Eight studies representing 300 subjects were included. Eight cognitive domain categories were identified: (i Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, (ii language, (iii processing speed, (iv verbal learning and memory, (v visual learning and memory, (vi attention span, (vii response fluency, and (viii motor performance. Nine (cognitive domain categories, MMSE, language, processing speed, verbal learning and memory (except for delayed recall memory, and motor performance of 16 cognitive tasks revealed significant moderate effect sizes. Verbal logical-delayed memory, finger tapping with the preferred hand, and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test showed a greater magnitude relationship to cognitive function than did other specific cognitive domains. Verbal learning and memory seems to be the most significant affected according to cognitive domain categories. For MG, the ability of attention, response fluency, visual learning, and memory seems to be reserved. The MG patients seem to perform significantly worse than the non-MG controls in a range of cognitive domains. Our findings should be interpreted with caution because of the clinical and methodological heterogeneity of included studies.

  5. Docetaxel/cisplatin Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis with Hypertension/diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Xue, Yinping; Li, Yongzhao; Yang, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Therapeutic options for thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (MG) patients complicated with hypertension and/or diabetes post thymectomy are often conventional steroids. As the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension globally increases, other therapeutic options for these patients are of great importance. Material/methods 9 patients with thymoma-associated MG complicated with hypertension and/or diabetes after thymectomy were administered 75 mg/m2 of docetaxel and 70 mg/m2 of cisplatin on day 1. The treatment could be repeated at 3-week intervals, ranging from 1 to 4 cycles according to the status of the patients. Therapeutic efficacy and side effects were evaluated. Results 2 patients were complicated with type 2 diabetes, 6 with hypertension, and 1 with both diabetes and hypertension. After docetaxel/cisplain therapy, the MG symptoms were markedly improved in all patients (2, complete remission; 3, basic remission; 3, marked improvement; 1, improvement). Acetylcholine receptor (AchR) antibody levels were decreased in 8 patients. Minor adverse effects were observed in 2 patients, 1 with Grade II gastrointestinal reaction, and the other with pulmonary infection. Conclusion Docetaxel plus cisplatin might be an effective therapeutic option for thymoma-associated MG patients complicated with hypertension /diabetes post thymectomy without worsening thymoma and hypertension / diabetes. PMID:29318185

  6. When myasthenia gravis is deemed refractory: clinical signposts and treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Renato; Antozzi, Carlo

    2018-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) has improved significantly over the past half century, including substantial reductions in mortality and morbidity. However, approximately 10% of patients fails to respond adequately to current therapies and are considered treatment refractory, or treatment intolerant, and up to 80% have disease that fails to achieve complete stable remission. Although patients with autoantibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (anti-MuSK positive) are more likely to become treatment refractory than those with autoantibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (anti-AChR positive), each of these serotypes is substantially represented in the refractory MG population. Other risk factors for becoming treatment refractory include history of thymoma or thymectomy and female sex. A modified treatment algorithm for MG is proposed: patients who have disease that fails to respond to the stepwise approach to therapy, are treatment intolerant, or who require chronic rescue measures despite ongoing therapy, should be considered treatment refractory and emerging therapies should be considered. Three emerging monoclonal antibody-based therapies are discussed: the anti-B-cell agent rituximab; the terminal complement activation inhibitor eculizumab; and belimumab, which targets B-cell activating factor. Increased understanding of molecular pathophysiology and accurate antibody subtyping in MG should lead to the use of new therapeutic agents and successful management of treatment-refractory patients. PMID:29403543

  7. Myasthenia gravis with muscle specific kinase antibodies mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Huijbers, Maartje G; Niks, Erik H; Klooster, Rinse; de Visser, Marianne; Kuks, Jan B; Veldink, Jan H; Klarenbeek, Pim; Van Damme, Philip; de Baets, Marc H; van der Maarel, Silvère M; van den Berg, Leonard H; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2016-06-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG) is hallmarked by the predominant involvement of bulbar muscles and muscle atrophy. This might mimic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presenting with bulbar weakness. We encountered four cases of MuSK MG patients with an initial misdiagnosis of ALS. We analyzed the clinical data of the four misdiagnosed MuSK MG patients, and investigated the presence of MuSK autoantibodies in a group of 256 Dutch bulbar-onset ALS patients using a recombinant MuSK ELISA and a standard MuSK radioimmunorecipitation assay. Clues for changing the diagnosis were slow progression, clinical improvement, development of diplopia and absence of signs of upper motor neuron involvement. No cases of MuSK MG were identified among a group of 256 bulbar ALS patients diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria. A misdiagnosis of ALS in patients with MuSK MG is rare. We recommend to carefully consider the diagnosis of MuSK MG in patients presenting with bulbar weakness without clear signs of upper motor neuron dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-LRP4 autoantibodies in Chinese patients with myasthenia gravis.

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    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Yifan; Cai, Gang; He, Dian; Dai, Qingqing; Xu, Zhu; Chu, Lan

    2017-11-01

    We assessed antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4-Ab) in a Chinese population with myasthenia gravis (MG). Serum samples from 116 patients and 80 controls were collected. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies(AChR-Ab) and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibodies (MuSK-Ab) were tested using an enzyme-linked immune absorption assay, and LRP4-Ab was identified using a cell-based assay. MG patients with neither AChR-Ab nor MuSK-Ab were defined as double-seronegative MG (dSN-MG). Two of 116 (1.7%) of all patients and 2 of 50 (1%) dSN-MG patients were positive for LRP4-Ab. These 2 patients had ocular MG. Following treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and prednisone, both achieved full remission. This study shows that LRP4-Ab is a pathogenic antibody in MG. LRP4-MG seems to be characterized by mild disease severity and favorable therapeutic effect in contrast with other types of MG. Muscle Nerve 56: 938-942, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Electrocardiography as the First Step for the Further Examination of Cardiac Involvement in Myasthenia Gravis

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    Takao Kato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiac involvement of myasthenia gravis (MG accompanies a poor prognosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between ECG abnormality and cardiac involvement. Methods. Of 178 patients diagnosed with MG between 2001 and 2013 at our hospital, we retrospectively analyzed consecutive 58 patients who underwent both ECG and echocardiography and without underlying cardiovascular disease. ECG abnormalities were defined by computer-assigned Minnesota-codes. Cardiac damage was defined as either (1 ejection fraction (EF 8 on echocardiography. Results. Thirty-three patients (56.8% had ECG abnormality. An elevated E/e′ was observed in patients with ECG abnormality compared to those without ECG abnormality (11.2±3.2, 8.7±2.2, resp., p=0.03. Among patients with ECG abnormality, 14 of 15 patients showed cardiac damage. Among patients without ECG abnormality, 6 of 33 patients showed cardiac damage (p=0.003. Reduced EF was observed in five patients (8.6% with ECG abnormality and none in patients without ECG abnormality. Conclusions. ECG may aid as the first step for the further examination of cardiac damage in patients with MG.

  10. Thymic lesions and myasthenia gravis. Diagnosis based on mediastinal imaging and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirronti, T.; Rinaldi, P.; Marano, P.; Batocchi, A.P.; Evoli, A.; Di Schino, C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the role of CT and MR imaging in the study of the mediastinum in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods: Mediastinal CT and MR findings were correlated with the histopathological results in 104 thymectomized MG patients. Results: CT was performed in 104 patients; in 11 of them, MR was also carried out. 44 patients had hyperplasia at histology. On CT, thymic hyperplasia was confirmed in 16 cases, thymoma was diagnosed in 10 and a normal thymus in 18 (sensitivity 36%, specificity 95%). Of 52 patients with thymoma at histology, CT showed thymoma in 46, hyperplasia in 1, and normal thymus in 5. CT showed 88.5% sensitivity and 77% specificity for thymoma. In 10 patients with invasive thymoma, CT was indiscriminate, while invasiveness was detected in 7 cases at MR (70% sensitivity) and at CT in 1 case. Both CT and MR detected tumor recurrence in 5 cases, but the exact localization and degree of invasion were best defined by MR. Conclusion: In MG patients CT is a sensitive, specific and efficient modality for detecting thymoma, but is less so for detecting thymic hyperplasia. MR was shown to be accurate in detecting invasive thymoma both preoperatively and in postoperative follow-up

  11. CXCR4 overexpression correlates with poor prognosis in myasthenia gravis-associated thymoma.

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    Wang, Wei; Liu, Dazhong; Yang, Lei; Li, Yi; Xu, Hao; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Jiaying; Zhang, Linyou

    2016-03-01

    Thymoma is 1 rare type of tumor developed on the thymic epithelium; patients with thymoma also might have myasthenia gravis (MG). Because of the scarcity and complexity of MG-associated thymoma, its pathogenesis and etiology still remain unclear nowadays. The expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is absent or low in most healthy tissues but highly expressed in various types of tumors. Here, to determine the prognostic significance of CXCR4 in MG-associated thymoma, a total of 84 tissue samples were retrospectively examined. Our data demonstrated that CXCR4 was strongly associated with worse overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.11) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.29). Furthermore, both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that CXCR4 was an independent factor in predicting unfavorable overall survival. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CXCR4 might contribute to the clinical cancer progression, and CXCR4 could be a valuable prognostic biomarker in the therapy of MG-associated thymoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thymic lesions and myasthenia gravis. Diagnosis based on mediastinal imaging and pathological findings

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    Pirronti, T.; Rinaldi, P.; Marano, P. [Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Inst. of Radiology; Batocchi, A.P.; Evoli, A.; Di Schino, C. [Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Inst. of Neurology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the role of CT and MR imaging in the study of the mediastinum in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods: Mediastinal CT and MR findings were correlated with the histopathological results in 104 thymectomized MG patients. Results: CT was performed in 104 patients; in 11 of them, MR was also carried out. 44 patients had hyperplasia at histology. On CT, thymic hyperplasia was confirmed in 16 cases, thymoma was diagnosed in 10 and a normal thymus in 18 (sensitivity 36%, specificity 95%). Of 52 patients with thymoma at histology, CT showed thymoma in 46, hyperplasia in 1, and normal thymus in 5. CT showed 88.5% sensitivity and 77% specificity for thymoma. In 10 patients with invasive thymoma, CT was indiscriminate, while invasiveness was detected in 7 cases at MR (70% sensitivity) and at CT in 1 case. Both CT and MR detected tumor recurrence in 5 cases, but the exact localization and degree of invasion were best defined by MR. Conclusion: In MG patients CT is a sensitive, specific and efficient modality for detecting thymoma, but is less so for detecting thymic hyperplasia. MR was shown to be accurate in detecting invasive thymoma both preoperatively and in postoperative follow-up.

  13. Rare association of thymoma, myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis : a case report

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    Kurukumbi Mohankumar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The association of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG is well known. Thymoma with sarcoidosis however, is very rare. We presented an interesting case with coexisting thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis. Case presentation A 59-year-old female patient with a history of sarcoidosis was admitted to the hospital with a one-day history of sudden onset of right-sided partial ptosis and diplopia. Neurosarcoidosis with cranial nerve involvement was considered, but was ruled out by the clinical findings, and MG was confirmed by the positive tensilon test, electrophysiological findings and positive acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies. On further evaluation, a CT chest scan showed a left anterior mediastinal mass and bilateral lymphadenopathy. Post surgical diagnosis confirmed the thymoma and sarcoidosis in the lymph nodes. Conclusion When two or more diseases of undetermined origin are found together, several interesting questions are raised. It is important to first confirm the diagnoses individually. Immunologic mechanisms triggering the occurrence of these diagnoses together, are difficult to address. Although the coexistence of thymoma, MG and sarcoidosis may be coincidental, it is noteworthy to report this case because of the multiple interesting features observed as well as the rarity of occurrence.

  14. Significance of B10 cell in patients with thymoma complicated with myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Meng, Fanjie; Yang, Yang; Li, Lan; Wang, Donghao; Cui, Yuantao; Dong, Shangwen; Wang, Wanhua

    2017-01-01

    A subset of regulatory B cells in humans has been identified as B10 cell which has the function of secreting interleukin-10. We evaluated the significance of B10 cell in patients with thymoma complicated with myasthenia gravis. In this study, 156 patients diagnosed with thymoma were enrolled, FCM was used to detected the percentage of Breg/CD19+B cells and CD19+B cells/PBMC, ELISA to evaluate the serum concentration of the relevant immunological markers; purified CD19+B cells in tissues by MACS; gene and protein expressions of CD19 and IL-10 by Real-time PCR and Western-Blot; double immunofluorescence staining to detect the distribution of CD19 and IL-10 in thymus tissues. Thymoma patients without MG mainly display the types A and AB of thymoma, whereas the thymoma patients with MG mainly display type B (B1, B2 and B3) thymoma; AChR-Ab in Tm + MG group was the highest, with the progress of the disease, the percentage of Breg/CD19+B cells increased and B10/CD19+B cells decreased (p thymoma, the infiltration of Breg in tumour tissue increases; however, as the severity of MG increases, the function of Breg (B10 cell) in peripheral blood decreases and the cut-off point is 0.55%. PMID:29088744

  15. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki; Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author)

  16. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    1989-08-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author).

  17. Skeletal-muscle CT, with special reference to polymyositis and myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Yasuto; Ono, Shimato; Yasuda, Takeshi; Morimoto, Kenji; Terao, Akira; Shirabe, Teruo; Yokobayashi, Tsuneo

    1984-01-01

    We here report on skeletal-muscle CT at the thigh level as studied using a whole-body CT scanner, with special reference to polymyositis (PM) and myasthenia gravis (MG). Early diseased muscles appeared homogenous and were likely to be almost normal. The first sign of muscular atrophy was the apperance of small, patchy or linear, low-density tissues in several muscles. These low-density tissues gradually increased in number until finally the diseased muscles were totally replaced by low-density tissue. These pathological findings were more severe in PM than in MG. There was a maldistribution of low-density tissue in several cases of PM. According to these findings, skeletal-muscle CT was thought to be of great help for the recognition of the general condition of muscles and for the follow-up on the patients. We think skeletal-muscle CT has a very practical application for the better selection of suitable muscular biopsy and EMG sites and for the better clinical interpretation of these findings. (author)

  18. [Case of awake intubation in semi-sitting position for a patient with myasthenia gravis combined with cervical disc hernia utilizing Pentax-AWS Airwayscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Tomita, Yukihiko; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh; Tashiro, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of awake intubation utilizing Pentax-AWS Airwayscope in semi-sitting position. A 74-year-old man with myasthenia gravis and cervical disc hernia was scheduled for distal gastrectomy under general anesthesia. He could not move his head due to severe cervical disc hernia and also could not sufficiently breathe due to the fatigue of respiratory muscles by myasthenia gravis in supine position. With fentanyl bolus administration and lidocaine spray for laryngotracheal anesthesia, we performed awake intubation in semi-sitting position with AWS from cranial side. The patient did not buck during intubation and no hemodynamic change was observed.

  19. Direct and indirect cost of myasthenia gravis: A prospective study from a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkar, Kamlesh Kumar; Bhoi, Sanjeev Kumar; Dubey, Deepanshu; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha Kant

    2017-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) requires lifelong treatment. The cost of management MG is very high in developed countries but there is no information on the cost of management of MG in the developing countries. This study reports the direct and indirect cost and predictors of cost of MG in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India. In a prospective hospital based study, from a tertiary hospital in India 66 consecutive patient during 2014-2015 were included. The age of the patients ranged between 6 and 75years. The severity of MG was assessed by myasthenia gravis foundation association (MGFA) class (MGFA) I-V. The patient data was collected s and their direct cost was calculated from the computerized Hospital information system. The indirect cost was calculated from patient's memory, checking the bills of transportation and wages loss by the patient or the care giver. Total annual cost of MG ranged between INR (4560-532227) with median INR 61390.5 (US$911.64). The median cost of outpatient department (OPD) consultation of 16 patients was INR 20439.9 (US$303.53), of 50 admitted patients was INR 44311.8 (US$658.03) and 21 intensive care unit (ICU) patients was INR 59574.3 (US$ 884.6) and the direct cost of thymectomy was INR 45000 (US$ 668.25). Direct cost was related to indirect cost (r=0.55; p=0.0001). Predictors of patient outcome were severity of MG, ICU admission, and thymectomy. The total median cost for management of myasthenia gravis was INR 61390.5 (4560-532227, US$911.64) per year, and the cost was mainly determined by the severity of MG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Emergency Department Management of a Myasthenia Gravis Patient with Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Does Initial Antibiotic Choice Lead to Cure or Crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Megan A; Twilla, Jennifer D; England, Bryan S

    2016-02-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a rare, yet serious condition that carries a 3%-8% mortality rate. Although infection is a common cause of decompensation in myasthenia gravis, several antibiotics classes have also been associated with an exacerbation. Selecting antibiotics can be a daunting clinical task and, if chosen inappropriately, can carry significant deleterious consequences. Not only do clinicians have to focus on treating the underlying infection appropriately, but avoiding antibiotics that may potentiate a myasthenic crisis is also vital. An 85-year-old female with a history of myasthenia gravis presented to the emergency department (ED) with increasing generalized weakness and shortness of breath. Clinical work-up was consistent with a community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis. Her medical history included a myasthenia gravis exacerbation shortly after receiving moxifloxacin for CAP. After reviewing the patient's allergies, as well as potential antibiotic triggers, the decision was made to treat with tigecycline. The patient responded well to tigecycline therapy and was deemed stable for discharge on day 4 of hospitalization. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Evaluation of the myasthenia gravis patient frequently originates in the ED. It is important for clinicians to be able to distinguish between an underlying illness and a myasthenic crisis. In the event of an infectious process causing clinical deterioration in a myasthenia patient, optimal antibiotic selection becomes paramount. This patient case highlights the addition of tigecycline to the armamentarium of therapies available to treat myasthenia gravis patients presenting to the emergency department with CAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Tacrolimus in Myasthenia Gravis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuojie; Yang, Chunsong; Zhang, Lingli; Yi, Qiusha; Hao, Zilong

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether treatments with tacrolimus would provide benefit for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The databases of Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and four Chinese databases were searched for eligible studies. Weighted mean differences and standardized mean differences (SMD) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to summarize the primary outcome, namely, steroid-sparing effect of tacrolimus in maintaining minimal manifestations, and the secondary outcome, namely, the effect of tacrolimus in reducing the severity of MG, respectively. After systematic retrieval, 13 researches with two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 11 prospective open-label single-arm clinical trials were included in the study. For the primary outcome of two RCTs, one RCT which was followed up for 1 year showed a positive effect and the other RCT which was associated with treatment duration of 28 weeks showed a negative result. For the secondary outcome, meta-analyses of other 11 trials showed a benefit effect, overall. For the quantitative MG (QMG) score, there were significant differences with high heterogeneity (SMD: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.14-4.73; I 2 = 86%). In contrast, for MG activities of daily living (MGADL) score, it was reduced by tacrolimus with significant SMD and less heterogeneity (SMD: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.33-0.85; I 2 = 7%). Adverse effects were mentioned as mild. The opposite results of two RCTs showed that tacrolimus with enough treatment duration might have positive steroid-sparing effect. The most possible cause of heterogeneity in the outcome of QMG score between trials was the baseline severity of MG. The above finding suggests that there might be a potential beneficial role with no serious side effects of tacrolimus, and additional better RCTs including larger sample sizes and long-term study are needed to confirm or refute the results.

  2. Fixation stability of the upward gaze in patients with myasthenia gravis: an eye-tracker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Miharu; Hayashi, Atsushi; Fujita, Kazuya; Kakeue, Ken; Tamura, Ryoi

    2017-01-01

    To quantify fixation stability of the upward gaze in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) using an eye tracker. In this study, 21 normal subjects, 5 patients with MG with diplopia, 5 patients with MG without diplopia and 6 patients with superior oblique (SO) palsy were included. Subjects fixated on a target in the upward direction for 1 min. The horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) eye positions were recorded using an eye tracker. Fixation stability was first quantified using the bivariate contour ellipse areas (BCEA) of fixation points as an index of whole stability. Then, the SDs of the X and Y eye positions (SDX and SDY, respectively) were quantified as indices of directional stability, with the data divided into three 20 s fractions to detect temporal fixation fluctuation. BCEAs were larger in patients with MG (both with and without diplopia) than normal subjects and patients with SO palsy, without significant differences among the three 20 s fractions. Compared with normal subjects, SDXs were larger only in patients with MG with diplopia; SDYs were larger in both patients with MG with and without diplopia. In addition, SDYs in patients with MG with diplopia were larger than those in patients with MG without diplopia and patients with SO palsy. Furthermore, a significant difference among the three 20 s fractions was detected for SDYs in patients with MG with diplopia. Patients with MG, especially those with diplopia, exhibit fixation instability in the upward gaze. Non-invasive quantification of fixation stability with an eye tracker is useful for precisely identifying MG-specific fatigue characteristics. UMIN000023468; pre-results.

  3. Validity of Forced Eyelid Closure Test: A Novel Clinical Screening Test for Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apinyawasisuk, Supanut; Zhou, Xinkai; Tian, Jack J; Garcia, Giancarlo A; Karanjia, Rustum; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2017-09-01

    Forced eyelid closure test (FECT) is a clinical screening test developed from the original Cogan lid twitch (CLT) sign to assist in the diagnosis of ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG), We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of FECT compared with CLT and benchmarked to standard diagnostic tests. This study was a retrospective chart review of 48 patients using electronic medical records of those that presented with ptosis and/or diplopia at Doheny Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles between February 2015 and April 2016. Patients without FECT testing were excluded. FECT and CLT results, and final diagnosis were recorded. To perform FECT, the patient was asked to squeeze his or her eyelids shut for 5-10 seconds then open quickly and fixate in primary position. The excessive upward overshoot of eyelids movement indicated a positive FECT. The test was performed by a neuro-ophthalmologist before establishing the diagnosis. Patients who had equivocal test results and/or inconclusive final diagnosis were excluded. Of the 48 patients studied, 18 patients (37.5%) had positive FECT; 15 of whom had a final diagnosis of OMG (83.3%). Of the 30 patients with negative FECT, 1 had OMG (3.3%). Of the 48 patients, 35 patients also had a documented CLT result (72.9%). CLT was positive in 11 of these 35 patients (31.4%), and 9 of these 11 had OMG (81.8%). Of the 24 patients with negative CLT, 2 of them had OMG (8.3%). Sensitivity and specificity of FECT were 94% and 91% (joint 95% confidence region: sensitivity × specificity = [0.70, 1] × [0.75, 1]). The relative true-positive fraction (rTPF) between FECT and CLT was 1.15; the relative false-positive fraction was 1.31. FECT is a simple clinical screening test with good sensitivity and specificity for OMG.

  4. [Concurrence of myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroiditis and eosinophilia in a patient with type B1 thymoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manabu; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Shinde, Akiyo; Satoi, Hitoshi; Makino, Fumi; Kanda, Masutarou; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    We presented a 43-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed weakness of all extremities and difficulty in swallowing and drooping of eyelids, characterized by easy fatigability at the end of December, 2005. On general physical examination, she had moderate goiter. No cervical lymphadenopathy, cardiac murmur, or skin rash was noted. Neurologically, she had blepharoptosis, more on the right, only in the upright position with easy fatigability and marked weakness in the neck flexor, trunk, and all limb muscles much more proximally than distally. She had neither muscular atrophy nor upper motor neuron sign. Laboratory data showed slight leukocytosis with eosinophilia (up to 31%), and serum creatine kinase was markedly increased to over 2,000 IU/l. TSH receptor antibody (11.9%) and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (46.6 nmol/L) were also increased. Edrophonium test was positive. Electrophysiologically, muscle evoked potentials by repetitive motor nerve stimulation showed 13% and 50% waning in abductor pollicis brevis and deltoid muscle, respectively, at low frequency and no waxing at high frequency. Needle EMG showed fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in proximal muscles. Polymyositis was diagnosed by muscle biopsy which showed infiltration of lymphocytes in the endomysium and around non-necrotic muscle fibers. Upper arm muscle MRI showed multifocal high signal intensity lesions on T2-weighted images which were likely related to myositis. This finding is atypical for polymyositis. X-ray and CT of chest showed a mass lesion in the left pulmonary hilum, which was histologically diagnosed as type B1 thymoma. Thus, the present case had myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, thyroidititis and eosinophilia associated with type B1 thymoma. After the thymectomy, corticosteroid administration and immunoadsorption therapy, clinical symptoms and all laboratory abnormalities markedly improved.

  5. Epidemiological study of myasthenia gravis in the province of Reggio Emilia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, D; Sabadini, R; Bondavalli, M; Cavalletti, S; Lodesani, M; Mantegazza, R; Cosi, V; Solime, F

    1998-06-01

    We carried out a retrospective incidence, prevalence and mortality survey of myasthenia gravis in the province of Reggio Emilia in Northern Italy. Based on 49 patients, the mean incidence per year for the period 1980 through 1994 was 7.8 per 1,000,000. On 31 December 1994 the prevalence rate was 117.5 per 1,000,000 for all patients, either active or recovered (50 cases in a population of 427,493) and 103.4 per 1,000,000 for the active disease. In the 15-year period 1980-1994 the average mortality rate was 1.0 per 1,000,000 per year. The average age at onset was 44.6 +/- 21.0, and the average age at the time of prevalence determination was 51.1 +/- 19.6 for the active disease. At the time of diagnosis, 21 patients (36.8%) were classed in group I according to Osserman's criteria, 31 in group II (54.4%), (19 in group II-A and 12 in group II-B), and the other 5 (8.8%) in group III. Of all the prevalence cases, 6 (12%) were in remission without therapy and 6 with therapy, while most of the others 16 (32%) were classed in group I, 15 (30%) in group II, and 1 (2%) in group III. Thymectomy was performed in 20 patients (35.1%), 12 (21%) had thymoma (malignant in 4 cases), 6 had thymic hyperplasia while in two patients thymic histology was normal. The relation the grade of Osserman's scale at the time of incidence and the presence of thymoma were significant. Higher grades of Osserman's scale were associated were malignant thymoma. Furthermore the relationship between thymectomy and the grade of Osserman's scale at the date of prevalence was significant for the presence of lower grades of Osserman's scale in the patients submitted to thymectomy.

  6. The presence of dysautonomia in different subgroups of myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Ana; Perić, Stojan; Nišić, Tanja; Popović, Srdjan; Ilić, Miroljub; Stojanović, Vidosava Rakočević; Lavrnić, Dragana

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the presence of autonomic dysfunction in different subgroups of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. Standard cardiovascular reflex tests according to Ewing, spectral and time domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) at rest were assessed in 27 patients with thymoma-associated acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-positive MG, 25 AChR-positive MG patients without thymoma and 23 patients with muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) MG. All patients were compared to the healthy controls, matched for sex and age. In the group of AChR-positive MG patients with thymoma, hand grip (p < 0.05), orthostasis (p < 0.05), breathing test (p < 0.05) and Valsalva maneuver (p < 0.01) were more often pathological than in the controls. Analysis of the spectral domain of HRV showed increased low-frequency (p < 0.05) and decreased high-frequency component (p < 0.05). Time domain parameters of HRV and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) at rest were significantly reduced (p < 0.01). In the patients with AChR MG without thymoma, Valsalva maneuver test was more often pathological (p < 0.05) and higher rate of supraventricular extrasystoles (p < 0.01) was registered than in the healthy controls. In the patients with MuSK-positive MG, hand grip and Valsalva maneuver tests were more often pathological than in the controls (p < 0.05). Low-frequency component of the spectral domain of HRV (p < 0.05) and the frequency of cardiac arrhythmia were increased. BRS at rest was significantly lower in patients compared to the controls (p < 0.01). We determined the presence of autonomic failure in all subgroups of MG patients. Since autonomic dysfunction can lead to cardiac arrhythmias and even sudden death, it is of major importance to be aware of this association and to properly diagnose and treat these patients.

  7. Evaluation of the quality of guidelines for myasthenia gravis with the AGREE II instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs are systematically developed statements to assist practitioners in making decisions about appropriate healthcare in specific clinical circumstances. The methodological quality of CPGs for myasthenia gravis (MG are unclear. OBJECTIVE: To critically evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs for MG using AGREE II instrument. METHOD: A systematical search strategy on PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC and the Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM was performed on September 20th 2013. All guidelines related to MG were evaluated with AGREE II. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. RESULTS: A total of 15 CPGs for MG met the inclusion criteria (12 CPGs in English, 3 CPGs in Chinese. The overall agreement among reviews was moderate or high (ICC >0.70. The mean scores (mean ± SD for al six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (60.93% ± 16.62%, stakeholder involvement (40.93% ± 20.04%, rigor of development (37.22% ± 30.46%, clarity of presentation (64.26% ± 16.36%, applicability (28.19% ± 20.56% and editorial independence (27.78% ± 28.28%. Compared with non-evidence-based CPGs, evidence-based CPGs had statistically significant higher quality scores for all AGREE II domains (P0.05. The quality scores of CPGs developed by NGC/AAN were higher than the quality scores of CPGs developed by other organizations for all domains. The difference was statistically significant for all domains with the exception of clarity of presentation (P = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: The qualities of CPGs on MG were generally acceptable with several flaws. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers, particularly in China.

  8. Efficacy and safety of tacrolimus in myasthenia gravis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuojie Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was designed to determine whether treatments with tacrolimus would provide benefit for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. Materials and Methods: The databases of Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and four Chinese databases were searched for eligible studies. Weighted mean differences and standardized mean differences (SMD with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to summarize the primary outcome, namely, steroid-sparing effect of tacrolimus in maintaining minimal manifestations, and the secondary outcome, namely, the effect of tacrolimus in reducing the severity of MG, respectively. Results: After systematic retrieval, 13 researches with two randomized controlled trials (RCTs and 11 prospective open-label single-arm clinical trials were included in the study. For the primary outcome of two RCTs, one RCT which was followed up for 1 year showed a positive effect and the other RCT which was associated with treatment duration of 28 weeks showed a negative result. For the secondary outcome, meta-analyses of other 11 trials showed a benefit effect, overall. For the quantitative MG (QMG score, there were significant differences with high heterogeneity (SMD: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.14–4.73; I2 = 86%. In contrast, for MG activities of daily living (MGADL score, it was reduced by tacrolimus with significant SMD and less heterogeneity (SMD: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.33–0.85; I2 = 7%. Adverse effects were mentioned as mild. Discussion: The opposite results of two RCTs showed that tacrolimus with enough treatment duration might have positive steroid-sparing effect. The most possible cause of heterogeneity in the outcome of QMG score between trials was the baseline severity of MG. Conclusion: The above finding suggests that there might be a potential beneficial role with no serious side effects of tacrolimus, and additional better RCTs including larger sample sizes and long-term study are needed to confirm or refute the results.

  9. Surgical Correction of the Intractable Blepharoptosis in Patients With Ocular Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung Sheng; Lai, Ya Wei; Huang, Shu Hung; Lee, Su Shin; Chang, Kao Ping; Chen, Austin Deng

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of blepharoptosis caused by ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG) is challenging in patients with serious side effects or failed response to medical therapy. Only a few surgical reports have been published for refractory myathenic blepharoptosis. This study is aimed at the evaluation of the surgical outcome of blepharoptosis correction in intractable OMG patients. Twelve OMG patients who accepted frontalis sling with frontalis orbicularis oculi muscle (FOOM) flap for blepharoptosis correction were reviewed. Patients' demographies, perioperative changes of the interpalpebral fissure height (IPFH), margin reflex distance 1 (MRD1), levator function (LF), and quality of life (QOL) score were evaluated. The duration of OMG ranged from 3 to 31 years. LF was normal in 6 patients, good in 5, and poor in 1. There is no significant change of LF before and after surgery. MRD1 improved significantly from -1.8 mm (range, 0 to -5 mm) preoperatively to 2.9 mm (range, 2-4 mm) postoperatively. IPFH improved significantly from 3.8 mm (range, 2-6 mm) preoperatively to 7.8 mm (range, 6-9 mm) postoperatively. Upper eyelid margin was above the pupil in all patients. QOL score improved significantly from 18.2 (range, 14-23) preoperatively to 5.8 (range, 0-10) postoperatively. Our report reveals that surgical correction of the blepharoptosis is effective for patients with intractable OMG and that frontalis suspension with FOOM flap is a valuable option because of its ready availability and pliability. All patients are satisfied with the results, especially the improvement of QOL.

  10. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Background Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. Material/Methods MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. Results Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. Conclusions The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:28278141

  11. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-03-09

    BACKGROUND Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. RESULTS Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. CONCLUSIONS The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma.

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Docetaxel plus Cisplatin Chemotherapy for Myasthenia Gravis Patients with Metastatic Thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-04-01

    The prognosis of myasthenia gravis (MG) in association with invasive or metastatic thymoma is usually worse, and therapeutic options are quite limited. Here, we retrospectively reported the therapeutic effect of docetaxel plus cisplatin (docetaxel/cisplatin) chemotherapy in 7 MG patients with metastatic thymoma. Previously, all patients underwent thymectomy at the first onset of thymoma. After the metastasis of thymoma, none of the patients received thymectomy due to unresectable conditions after surgeon's evaluation for great risk of myasthenic crisis (n = 5) or patients' refusal (n = 2). All patients received docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 ) and cisplatin (70 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 (d1) every 21 days, with the cycle ranging from 1 to 4. After docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy, one patient achieved partial response, and 6 with stable disease of the tumors. The clinical symptoms of MG were alleviated in all patients, 2 with complete remission and the other 5 with marked improvement. Myelosuppression was the major adverse event, occurring in 2 patients (grade II and IV). MG relapse occurred in one patient during the follow-up. Our study presented a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma who underwent docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy. Besides the improved/stabilized thymoma, markedly improvement of MG with the tolerable adverse events was achieved. Docetaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy appears to be an effective treatment for selected patients with MG in association with unresectable metastatic thymoma. Further follow-up of these patients and additional subjects will be needed to determine whether the therapeutic benefits are durable.

  13. cFLIP overexpression in T cells in thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belharazem, Djeda; Schalke, Berthold; Gold, Ralf; Nix, Wilfred; Vitacolonna, Mario; Hohenberger, Peter; Roessner, Eric; Schulze, Torsten J; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Ott, German; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective The capacity of thymomas to generate mature CD4+ effector T cells from immature precursors inside the tumor and export them to the blood is associated with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (TAMG). Why TAMG(+) thymomas generate and export more mature CD4+ T cells than MG(−) thymomas is unknown. Methods Unfixed thymoma tissue, thymocytes derived thereof, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), T-cell subsets and B cells were analysed using qRT-PCR and western blotting. Survival of PBMCs was measured by MTT assay. FAS-mediated apoptosis in PBMCs was quantified by flow cytometry. NF-κB in PBMCs was inhibited by the NF-κB-Inhibitor, EF24 prior to FAS-Ligand (FASLG) treatment for apoptosis induction. Results Expression levels of the apoptosis inhibitor cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in blood T cells and intratumorous thymocytes were higher in TAMG(+) than in MG(−) thymomas and non-neoplastic thymic remnants. Thymocytes and PBMCs of TAMG patients showed nuclear NF-κB accumulation and apoptosis resistance to FASLG stimulation that was sensitive to NF-κB blockade. Thymoma removal reduced cFLIP expression in PBMCs. Interpretation We conclude that thymomas induce cFLIP overexpression in thymocytes and their progeny, blood T cells. We suggest that the stronger cFLIP overexpression in TAMG(+) compared to MG(−) thymomas allows for the more efficient generation of mature CD4+ T cells in TAMG(+) thymomas. cFLIP overexpression in thymocytes and exported CD4+ T cells of patients with TAMG might contribute to the pathogenesis of TAMG by impairing central and peripheral T-cell tolerance. PMID:26401511

  14. Validation of the MG-DIS: a disability assessment for myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Alberto; Leonardi, Matilde; Schiavolin, Silvia; Antozzi, Carlo; Brenna, Greta; Maggi, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed to present the validation of the myasthenia gravis disability assessment (MG-DIS), a MG-specific patient-reported disability outcome measure. Consecutive MG patients were enrolled, followed-up for 12 months and administered the SF-36, the WHO disability assessment schedule (WHODAS 2.0) and the preliminary 31-item MG-DIS addressing impairments and activity limitations. Factor structure and metric properties were assessed. In total, 109 patients were enrolled: 76 were females, mean age 50, mean MG duration 10.4 years, 86 were AChR-positive. The MG-DIS was reduced to 20 items, explaining 70.6 % of the original questionnaire variance, four subscales (generalized impairment-related problems; bulbar function-related problems; mental health and fatigue-related problems; vision-related problems) and an overall disability index. The MG-DIS has good metric properties (Cronbach's alpha ranging between .808 and .930), is stable, showed to be more sensitive than the WHODAS 2.0 and SF-36 to detect group differences and longitudinal changes and was well correlated with the MG-composite (.642). The MG-DIS includes items representing ocular, generalized, bulbar and respiratory symptoms, and is therefore well-built around MG-specific features. MG-DIS can be used in clinical trials as well as in observational or epidemiological studies to characterize patients' disability level and address the amount of improvement in disability. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of a shorter disability scale.

  15. Resolution of Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea after Treatment of Anti-Muscle Kinase Receptor-Positive Myasthenia Gravis Despite 60-Pound Weight Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenstern, Michael; Singas, Effie; Zleik, Bashar; Greenberg, Harly

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be caused by reduced pharyngeal dilator muscle activity. We report a patient with anti-muscle kinase receptor MG with severe OSA and hypoventilation that resolved upon successful treatment of MG despite a 60-lb weight gain.

  16. The Myasthenia Gravis-specific Activities of Daily Living scale as a useful outcome measure and in routine clinical management in Polish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmilowska, Izabela Monika; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika Helena; Czyzewski, Damian

    2018-01-11

    The Myasthenia Gravis-Activities of Daily Living scale (MG-ADL) is a short, and easy to use disease-specific quality of life during daily routine tool in myasthenia gravis. The purpose of our work was to evaluate neurological condition patients with myasthenia gravis using the form MG-ADL in order to enable the introduction in common use of an instrument which allows for the assessment of patients with myasthenia gravis. The total number of 50 patients with MG were qualified for the examination. Each patient underwent neurological examination and completed the quality of life evaluation questionnaire MQ-ADL. Additionally, each patient was asked to evaluate the quality of his/her life by means of questionnaire MG-QOL 15 and MG Composite in Polish language version. Our analysis showed a positive correlation with other scales used - MG-QOL 15, MGFA, MG Composite. The intensification of neurological symptoms showed significant relation with obtained higher number of points in MG-ADL questionnaire. The MG-ADL was found to have high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity. We confirmed reliability and dependability of the questionnaire in the the test-retest assessment. The MG-ADL is accepted to be a reliable and valuable tool for measuring disease-specific QOL in Polish patients with MG. Copyright © 2018 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis: an uncommon presentation of thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendogni, Paolo; Rosso, Lorenzo; Tosi, Davide; Palleschi, Alessandro; Righi, Ilaria; Minonzio, Francesca; Fusco, Nicola; Nosotti, Mario

    2016-11-11

    In a substantial proportion of patients with thymoma, many different types of paraneoplastic syndromes are observed. The association between thymoma and autoimmune liver diseases, however, has been found in very few cases. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by autoimmune hepatitis associated with myasthenia gravis and thymoma, successfully treated with extended thymectomy. The patient is free from neoplastic and hepatic disease 4 years after surgery. Eighteen months after thymectomy, an exacerbation of hepatitis was successfully treated with steroids. To the authors' knowledge, only 7 cases of myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and autoimmune hepatitis have been reported in the English-language literature. The exact role of thymoma in immune-mediated hepatitis is unclear. It seems likely that thymoma-associated T-cell abnormalities, due to the presence of thymoma, may have a role in the development of this rare clinical triad of autoimmune hepatitis, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

  18. Comorbid Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Muscle-Specific Kinase (MuSK) Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherpa, Michael; Metai, Ravi K; Kumar, Viki; Hirachan, Tinu; Ahmed, Kawser U; Atkinson, Sharon J

    2017-04-20

    BACKGROUND HIV infections with concomitant immunologically-mediated disorders have been frequently described but there has been little research on the association between HIV and myasthenia gravis. MuSK myasthenia gravis coexisting with HIV is an even a rarer entity and can occur as a part of immune restoration disease. We report the case of a patient with asymptomatic HIV infection who presented with new-onset MuSK myasthenia gravis. CASE REPORT A 44-year-old African-American woman with HIV since 2004 and on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) presented to the ED with complains of double vision and difficulty swallowing for 2 weeks. The patient was intermittently on HAART therapy. On examination, she had bilateral ptosis, weak orbicularis oris and orbicularis oculi, along with mild lateral gaze palsy of the left eye. Her CD4 count was 383 and the viral load was undetectable. An MRI of the brain produced normal results and a CT chest did not show thymus enlargement. Due to worsening symptoms and high suspicion for myasthenia gravis, she was started on IVIG at 0.4 mg/kg/day for 5 days, and her symptoms markedly improved. She was found to have strongly positive MuSK antibody and negative Ach receptor antibody. Repetitive nerve stimulation showed a 13% decrease in the right median nerve, which confirmed the diagnosis. She was subsequently discharged to home on pyridostigmine. Azathioprine was added at clinic follow-up. The patient continues to improve. CONCLUSIONS As the use of antiretroviral therapy increases, immune reconstitution syndromes have become more common. Rare associations like HIV and MuSK myasthenia gravis are being increasingly reported. The use of immunosuppressants in the treatment of these conditions should be carefully evaluated.

  19. Safety and efficacy of eculizumab in anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis (REGAIN): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, James F.; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Benatar, Michael; Murai, Hiroyuki; Barohn, Richard J.; Illa, Isabel; Jacob, Saiju; Vissing, John; Burns, Ted M.; Kissel, John T.; Muppidi, Srikanth; Nowak, Richard J.; O'Brien, Fanny; Wang, Jing-Jing; Mantegazza, Renato; Mazia, Claudio Gabriel; Wilken, Miguel; Ortea, Carolina; Saba, Juliet; Rugiero, Marcelo; Bettini, Mariela; Vidal, Gonzalo; Garcia, Alejandra Dalila; Lamont, Phillipa; Leong, Wai-Kuen; Boterhoven, Heidi; Fyfe, Beverly; Roberts, Leslie; Jasinarachchi, Mahi; Willlems, Natasha; Wanschitz, Julia; Löscher, Wolfgang; de Bleecker, Jan; van den Abeele, Guy; de Koning, Kathy; de Mey, Katrien; Mercelis, Rudy; Wagemaekers, Linda; Mahieu, Delphine; van Damme, Philip; Smetcoren, Charlotte; Stevens, Olivier; Verjans, Sarah; D'Hondt, Ann; Tilkin, Petra; Alves de Siqueira Carvalho, Alzira; Hasan, Rosa; Dias Brockhausen, Igor; Feder, David; Ambrosio, Daniel; Melo, Ana Paula; Rocha, Rosana; Rosa, Bruno; Veiga, Thabata; Augusto da Silva, Luiz; Gonçalves Geraldo, Jordana; da Penha Morita Ananias, Maria; Nogueira Coelho, Erica; Paiva, Gabriel; Pozo, Marina; Prando, Natalia; Dada Martineli Torres, Debora; Fernanda Butinhao, Cristiani; Coelho, Erica; Renata Cubas Volpe, Luciana; Duran, Gustavo; Gomes da Silva, Tamires Cristina; Otavio Maia Gonçalves, Luiz; Pazetto, Lucas Eduardo; Souza Duca, Luciana; Suriane Fialho, Tomás Augusto; Gheller Friedrich, Maurício André; Guerreiro, Alexandre; Mohr, Henrique; Pereira Martins, Maurer; da Cruz Pacheco, Daiane; Macagnan, Ana Paula; de Cassia Santos, Aline; Bulle Oliveira, Acary Souza; Amaral de Andrade, Ana Carolina; Annes, Marcelo; Cavalcante Lino, Valeria; Pinto, Wladimir; Miranda, Carolina; Carrara, Fernanda; Souza, Iandra; Genge, Angela; Massie, Rami; Campbell, Natasha; Bril, Vera; Katzberg, Hans; Soltani, Mehran; Ng, Eduardo; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Phan, Celile; Blackmore, Derrick; Vohanka, Stanislav; Bednarik, Josef; Chmelikova, Magda; Cierny, Marek; Toncrova, Stanislava; Junkerova, Jana; Kurkova, Barbora; Reguliova, Katarina; Zapletalova, Olga; Pitha, Jiri; Novakova, Iveta; Tyblova, Michaela; Wolfova, Marcela; Jurajdova, Ivana; Andersen, Henning; Harbo, Thomas; Vinge, Lotte; Mogensen, Anita; Højgaard, Joan; Witting, Nanna; Autzen, Anne Mette; Pedersen, Jane; Färkkilä, Markus; Atula, Sari; Nyrhinen, Anne; Erälinna, Juha-Pekka; Laaksonen, Mikko; Oksaranta, Olli; Eriksson, Jaana; Harrison, Tuula; Desnuelle, Claude; Sacconi, Sabrina; Soriani, Marie-Hélène; Decressac, Sonia; Moutarde, Julie; Lahaut, Pauline; Solé, Guilhem; Le Masson, Gwendal; Wielanek-Bachelet, Anne-Cécile; Gaboreau, Morgane; Moreau, Caroline; Wilson, Amy; Vial, Christophe; Bouhour, Françoise; Gervais-Bernard, Helene; Merle, Hélène; Hourquin, Caroline; Lacour, Arnaud; Outteryck, Olivier; Vermersch, Patrick; Zephir, Hélène; Millois, Edouard; Deneve, Michel; Deruelle, Fabienne; Schoser, Benedikt; Wenninger, Stephan; Stangel, Martin; Alvermann, Sascha; Gingele, Stefan; Skripuletz, Thomas; Suehs, Kurt-Wolfram; Trebst, Corinna; Fricke, Karin; Papagiannopoulos, Sotirios; Bostantzopoulou, Sevasti; Vlaikidis, Nicholas; Zampaki, Martha; Papadopoulou, Nikoletta; Mitsikostas, Dimos-Dimitrios; Kasioti, Eleni; Mitropoulou, Efstathia; Charalambous, Despoina; Rozsa, Csilla; Horvath, Melinda; Lovas, Gabor; Matolcsi, Judit; Szabo, Gyorgyi; Szabadosne, Brigitta; Vecsei, Laszlo; Dezsi, Livia; Varga, Edina; Konyane, Monika; Gross, Bella; Azrilin, Olga; Greenbereg, Nelly; Bali Kuperman, Hila; Antonini, Giovanni; Garibaldi, Matteo; Morino, Stefania; Troili, Fernanda; Di Pasquale, Antonella; Filla, Alessandro; Costabile, Teresa; Marano, Enrico; Sacca, Francesco; Marsil, Angela; Puorro, Giorgia; Maestri Tassoni, Michelangelo; de Rosa, Anna; Bonanno, Silvia; Antozzi, Carlo; Maggi, Lorenzo; Campanella, Angela; Angelini, Corrado; Cudia, Paola; Pegoraro, Valentina; Pinzan, Elena; Bevilacqua, Francesca; Orrico, Daniele; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Evoli, Amelia; Alboini, Paolo Emilio; D'Amato, Valentina; Iorio, Raffaele; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Fionda, Laura; Frasca, Vittorio; Giacomelli, Elena; Gori, Maria; Lopergolo, Diego; Onesti, Emanuela; Gabriele, Maria; Patti, Francesco; Salvatore Caramma, Andrea; Messina, Silvia; Reggio, Ester; Caserta, Cinzia; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kanai, Tetsuya; Mori, Masahiro; Kaneko, Yoko; Kanzaki, Akiko; Kobayashi, Eri; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Matsuse, Dai; Matsushita, Takuya; Uehara, Taira; Shimpo, Misa; Jingu, Maki; Kikutake, Keiko; Nakamura, Yumiko; Sano, Yoshiko; Nagane, Yuriko; Kamegamori, Ikuko; Fujii, Yuko; Futono, Kazumi; Tsuda, Tomoko; Saito, Yuka; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Morikawa, Miyuki; Samukawa, Makoto; Kamakura, Sachiko; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Mitazaki, Teiichiro; Motomura, Masakatsu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Shunsuke; Asada, Shizuka; Kobashikawa, Tomomi; Koga, Megumi; Maeda, Yasuko; Takada, Kazumi; Takada, Mihoko Takada; Yamashita, Yumi; Yoshida, Seiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Akiyama, Tetsuya; Narikawa, Koichi; Tsukita, Kenichi; Meguro, Fumie; Fukuda, Yusuke; Sato, Miwako; Matsuo, Hidenori; Fukudome, Takayasu; Gondo, Yuichiro; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Nagaishi, Akiko; Nakane, Shunya; Okubo, Yoshinori; Okumura, Meinoshin; Funaka, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Makamori, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masanori; Hasuike, Tomoya; Higuchi, Eriko; Kobayashi, Hisako; Osakada, Kaori; Taichi, Namie; Tsuda, Emiko; Hayashi, Takashi; Hisahara, Shin; Imai, Tomihiro; Kawamata, Jun; Murahara, Takashi; Saitoh, Masaki; Shimohama, Shun; Suzuki, Shuichiro; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Konno, Shingo; Imamura, Tomomi; Inoue, Masashi; Murata, Mayumi; Nakazora, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Ritsu; Ikeda, Yasuko; Ogawa, Miki; Shirane, Maoko; Kanda, Takashi; Kawai, Motoharu; Koga, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Junichi; Omoto, Masatoshi; Sano, Yasuteru; Arima, Hideki; Fukui, Sachie; Shimose, Shigemi; Shinozaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshikawa, Chieko; van der Kooi, Anneke; de Visser, Marianne; Gibson, Tamar; Maessen, Jos; de Baets, Marc; Faber, Catherine; Keijzers, Maria Johanna; Miesen, Monique; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Kaminska, Anna; Kim, Byung-Jo; Lee, Chang Nyoung; Koo, Yong Seo; Seok, Hung Youl; Kang, Hoo Nam; Ra, HyeJin; Kim, Byoung Joon; Cho, Eun Bin; Lee, HyeLim; Min, Ju-Hong; Seok, Jinmyoung; Koh, Da Yoon; Kwon, JuYoung; Lee, JiEun; Park, SangAe; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, MiRi; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Yool-Hee; Lee, Hyung Seok; Shin, Ha Young; Hwang, Eun Bi; Shin, MiJu; Sazonov, Denis; Yarmoschuk, Asya; Babenko, Larisa; Malkova, Nadezhda; Melnikova, Anna; Korobko, Denis; Kosykh, Evgeniya; Pokhabov, Dmitry; Nesterova, Yulia; Abramov, Vladislav; Balyazin, Victor; Casasnovas Pons, Carlos; Alberti Aguilo, Maria; Homedes-Pedret, Christian; Palacios, Natalia Julia; Lazaro, Ana; Diez Tejedor, Exuperio; Fernandez-Fournier, Mireya; Lopez Ruiz, Pedro; Rodriguez de Rivera, Francisco Javier; Salvado Figueras, Maria; Gamez, Josep; Salvado, Maria; Cortes Vicente, Elena; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Querol Gutierrez, Luis; Rojas Garcia, Ricardo; Vidal, Nuria; Arribas-Ibar, Elisabet; Piehl, Fredrik; Hietala, Albert; Bjarbo, Lena; Lindberg, Christopher; Jons, Daniel; Andersson, Blanka; Sengun, Ihsan; Ozcelik, Pinar; Tuga, Celal; Ugur, Muzeyyen; Boz, Cavit; Altiparmak, Didem; Gazioglu, Sibel; Ozen Aydin, Cigdem; Erdem-Ozdamar, Sevim; Bekircan-Kurt, Can Ebru; Yilmaz, Ezgi; Acar, Nazire Pinar; Caliskan, Yagmur; Efendi, Husnu; Aydinlik, Seda; Cavus, Hakan; Semiz, Cansu; Tun, Ozlem; Terzi, Murat; Dogan, Baki; Onar, Musa Kazim; Sen, Sedat; Cavdar, Tugce Kirbas; Norwood, Fiona; Dimitriou, Aikaterini; Gollogly, Jakit; Mahdi-Rogers, Mohamed; Seddigh, Arshira; Maier, Gal; Sohail, Faisal; Sathasivam, Sivakumar; Arndt, Heike; Davies, Debbie; Watling, Dave; Rivner, Michael; Hartmann, J. Edward; Quarles, Brandy; Smalley, Nicole; Amato, Anthony; Cochrane, Thomas; Salajegheh, Mohammed; Roe, Kristen; Amato, Katherine; Toska, Shirli; Wolfe, Gil; Silvestri, Nicholas; Patrick, Kara; Zakalik, Karen; Katz, Jonathan; Miller, Robert; Engel, Marguerite; Bravver, Elena; Brooks, Benjamin; Plevka, Sarah; Burdette, Maryanne; Sanjak, Mohammad; Kramer, Megan; Nemeth, Joanne; Schommer, Clara; Juel, Vern; Guptill, Jeffrey; Hobson-Webb, Lisa; Beck, Kate; Carnes, Donna; Loor, John; Anderson, Amanda; Lange, Dale; Agopian, Eliz; Goldstein, Jonathan; Manning, Erin; Kaplan, Lindsay; Holzberg, Shara; Kassebaum, Nicole; Pascuzzi, Robert; Bodkin, Cynthia; Kincaid, John; Snook, Riley; Guinrich, Sandra; Micheels, Angela; Chaudhry, Vinay; Corse, Andrea; Mosmiller, Betsy; Ho, Doreen; Srinivasan, Jayashri; Vytopil, Michael; Ventura, Nicholas; Scala, Stephanie; Carter, Cynthia; Donahue, Craig; Herbert, Carol; Weiner, Elaine; McKinnon, Jonathan; Haar, Laura; McKinnon, Naya; Alcon, Karan; Daniels, Kevin; Sattar, Nadia; Jeffery, Dennis; McKenna, Kaitlyn; Guidon, Amanda; David, William; Dheel, Christina; Levine-Weinberg, Mark; Nigro, Catherine; Simpson, Ericka; Appel, Stanley H.; Lai, Eugene; Lay, Luis; Pleitez, Milvia; Halton, Sharon; Faigle, Casey; Thompson, Lisa; Sivak, Mark; Shin, Susan; Bratton, Joan; Jacobs, Daniel; Brown, Gavin; Bandukwala, Ibrez; Brown, Morris; Kane, Jennifer; Blount, Ira; Freimer, Miriam; Hoyle, J. Chad; Agriesti, Julie; Khoury, Julie; Marburger, Tessa; Kaur, Harpreet; Dimitrova, Diana; Mellion, Michelle; Sachs, George; Crabtree, Brigid; Keo, Roseann; Perez, Ele Kim; Taber, Sandra; Gilchrist, James; Andoin, Angela; Darnell, Taylor; Goyal, Neelam; Sakamuri, Sarada; So, Yuen T.; Welsh, Lesly Welsh; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna; Tobon Gonzalez, Alejandro; Jones, Floyd; Saklad, Amy; Nations, Sharon; Trivedi, Jaya; Hopkins, Steve; Kazamel, Mohamed; Alsharabati, Mohammad; Lu, Liang; Mumfrey-Thomas, Sandi; Woodall, Amy; Richman, David; Butters, Janelle; Lindsay, Molly; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Cash, Tiyonnoh; Goyal, Namita; Roy, Gulmohor; Mathew, Veena; Maqsood, Fatima; Minton, Brian; Jones, H. James; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Garcia, Rebekah; Garcia, Sonia; Echevarria, Laura; Pulley, Michael; Aranke, Shachie; Berger, Alan Ross; Shah, Jaimin; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Smith, Lisa; Varghese, Mary; Gutmann, Laurie; Gutmann, Ludwig; Swenson, Andrea; Olalde, Heena; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Kwan, Justin; Zilliox, Lindsay; Callison, Karen; DiSanzo, Beth; Naunton, Kerry; Bilsker, Martin; Sharma, Khema; Reyes, Eliana; Cooley, Anne; Michon, Sara-Claude; Steele, Julie; Karam, Chafic Karam; Chopra, Manisha; Bird, Shawn; Kaufman, Jacob; Gallatti, Nichole; Vu, Tuan; Katzin, Lara; McClain, Terry; Harvey, Brittany; Hart, Adam; Huynh, Kristin; Beydoun, Said; Chilingaryan, Amaiak; Droker, Brian; Lin, Frank; Shah, Akshay; Tran, Anh; Akhter, Salma; Malekniazi, Ali; Tandan, Rup; Hehir, Michael; Waheed, Waqar; Lucy, Shannon; Weiss, Michael; Distad, Jane; Downing, Sharon; Strom, Susan; Lisak, Robert; Bernitsas, Evanthia; Khan, Omar; Kumar Sriwastava, Shitiz; Tselis, Alexandros; Jia, Kelly; Bertorini, Tulio; Arnold, Thomas; Henderson, Kendrick; Pillai, Rekha; Liu, Ye; Wheeler, Lauren; Hewlett, Jasmine; Vanderhook, Mollie; Dicapua, Daniel; Keung, Benison; Kumar, Aditya; Patwa, Huned; Robeson, Kimberly; Nye, Joan; Vu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Complement is likely to have a role in refractory generalised myasthenia gravis, but no approved therapies specifically target this system. Results from a phase 2 study suggested that eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, produced clinically meaningful improvements in patients with

  20. Review article Prevalence and clinical specificity of fatigue symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Treder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a critical review of the psychological and related literature on fatigue resulting in both mental and physical experiences. On one hand, prolonged severe fatigue is a prominent disabling symptom in various diseases of different aetiology – psychiatric (e.g. depression, somatic (e.g. some infections and neurologic (e.g. multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis. For instance, fatigue is a main symptom of myasthenia that leads to pathological skeletal muscle weakness. Furthermore, 40 to 90 per cent of individuals suffering from multiple sclerosis confirm they have experienced fatigue, which impairs their cognitive functioning. In both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia, fatigue has not only a physical but also a psychological dimension. On the other hand, fatigue can be seen as an isolated set of symptoms of unknown origin called the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. The development of the concept, diagnostic criteria and some strategies of coping with CFS are presented. Various somatic disorders, as well as subjective cognitive and emotional complaints, are common and well documented in patients with CFS. The most typical include depression, as well as problems with concentration of attention, decision-making and reasoning in complex situations. However, general intellectual abilities and higher order cognitive skills are intact. Directions for future research are outlined.

  1. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Myasthenia Gravis Overlap Syndrome: A Review of Two Cases and the Associated Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Tai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo describe the characteristics of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and myasthenia gravis (MG overlap syndrome and explore the relationship between the two diseases.MethodsWe conducted a search of medical records at Peking Union Medical University Hospital from 1983 to 2015 for coexistence of ALS and MG and searched the PubMed database for all literature describing ALS and MG overlap syndrome published through December 2016. We analyzed the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of patients by groups according to strict diagnostic criteria.ResultsWe presented 2 patients in our database with combined ALS and MG, and together with 25 cases reported in the literature, the patients were divided into 4 groups: 12 patients with MG followed by ALS, 8 patients with ALS followed by MG, 5 ALS patients with false-positive anti-acetylcholine receptor, and the other 2 ALS patients with only myasthenia symptoms. Most patients had limb onset ALS, and myasthenia symptoms mainly affected ocular and bulbar muscles. Clinical and neurophysiological characteristics were summarized.ConclusionThese findings support the conclusion that immunological mechanisms and alterations in the neuromuscular junction are related to ALS pathogenesis.

  2. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    KAUST Repository

    Heckmann, J M

    2009-08-13

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198CG SNP (odds ratio8.6; P0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5?-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198CG SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility of full and rapid neuromuscular blockade recovery with sugammadex in myasthenia gravis patients undergoing surgery – a series of 117 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vymazal T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Vymazal,1 Martina Krecmerova,1 Vladimír Bicek,1 Robert Lischke2 1Department of Anaesthesiology and ICM, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 23rd Surgical Department of 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic Purpose: Myasthenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune disease interfering with neuromuscular transmission. Patients are at risk of postoperative residual curarization (PORC if nondepolarizing muscle relaxants are used. Clinically inapparent insufficient muscle strength may result in hypoventilation and postoperative bronchopneumonia. We describe a cohort of 117 cases in which sugammadex was used in MG patients undergoing surgery with muscle relaxation with rocuronium.Methods and patients: We anesthetized 117 patients with MG using rocuronium and sugammadex as neuromuscular blockade reversal agent. One hundred five patients underwent surgical thymectomy and 12 underwent cholecystectomy (five laparotomic and seven laparoscopic. We measured time from sugammadex administration to recovery and to extubation, using the TOF-Watch® (series of four consecutive electrical impulses [the train-of-four] >0.9. We tracked peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2 <95%, elevation of partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2 >10% above baseline, number of reintubations within the first 48 hours, and number of pneumonias within 120 hours, postoperatively. Results were processed as average, minimum, and maximum values.Results: The period needed to reach train-of-four of 0.9 following sugammadex administration was on average 117 seconds (minimum of 105 seconds/maximum of 127 seconds and differed within deviation <10%. The time to extubation following sugammadex administration was on average 276 seconds (minimum of 251 seconds/maximum of 305 seconds and differed minimally among patients as well. We observed no SpO2 <95%, no pCO2 elevation >10% above a baseline, no emergent reintubation within the

  5. MRI manifestations of thymus in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients in various age groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Peng Xi; Li Zhizhao; Jiang Kuiming; Song Ting; Dong Tianfa; Xiao Youcheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study MRI findings of the thymus in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) in different age groups and to analyze the relationship between the morphological changes of thymus and the MG. Methods: In total 90 patients with MG (male: female=43:47) received MR scan and were divided into four groups (group A, B, C and D) by age. Fourteen patients out of 90 received additional enhanced scan. Group A included 33 patients aged under 10 years (m:f=18:15); 27 patients aged 11-25 years were in group B (m:f=12:15); group C had 17 patients aged 26-50 years (m:f=6:11); and in group D there were 13 patients whose ages were over 51 years (m:f=7:6). And 30 Non-MG patients aged 8-75 years were selected as control group, in which the thickness, the fat collection, and glandulous atrophy of thymus was studied on CT. Results: 1) The thymus was unremarkable in 44 cases out of 90 (48.88%). 2) Enlarged thymus was shown in 42 cases out of 90 (46.66%), in which non-nodular enlargement was revealed in 34 cases and nodular enlargement in 8 cases. There were 27 cases with abnormality of thymus out of 33 (81.81%) in group A, 12 cases out of 27 (44.44%) in group B and 3 cases in group C, but no abnormality was found in group D. 3) Only 4/90 patients (4.44%) had thymic mass that respectively seen in one case of group B, two of group C and one of group D. No evidence of the involvement of the adjacent structure was found on MRI in the cases of thymic mass. No thymus enlargement was revealed in control group. Fat collection in thymus was seen in both study groups and control group. Conclusion: Intimate relationship between the abnormality of the thymus gland and MG exists in children and teenagers. While in the middle-aged patients or the seniors, further studies should be made to find out whether there is a correlation

  6. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

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    Guo-Yan Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS and relative scoring (RS system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P<0.000 in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2 significantly smaller (P<0.05 than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5. At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9 compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1. The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7 for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P<0.05 than 2–12 days (mean 7.8 for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%, significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%. Slight side effects (18.75% included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy.

  7. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI) on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG) symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT) and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW) were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS) and relative scoring (RS) system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P < 0.000) in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2) significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5). At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9) compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1). The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7) for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P < 0.05) than 2–12 days (mean 7.8) for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%), significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%). Slight side effects (18.75%) included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy. PMID:24348721

  8. Detection and clinical significance of serum autoantibodies in patients with myasthenia gravis

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    Yun LIU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the expressions and clinical significance of serum anti - acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR-Ab, anti-Titin antibodies (Titin-Ab, and anti-Ryanodine receptor antibodies (RyR-Ab in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. Methods Serum AChR-Ab, Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 182 MG patients, 105 patients of other neurological diseases (OND and 62 normal controls. Results Serum AChR-Ab, Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab were detected positive respectively in 68.13% (124/182, 64.29% (117/182 and 67.03% (122/182 of patients in MG group. The positive rates of those antibodies in MG group were significantly higher than those in OND group (P = 0.000, for all and control group (P = 0.000, for all. When 3 antibodies coexisted, the sensitivity in the diagnosis of MG was 41.21%, with 99.40% of specificity. There was no significant difference in the positive rate of serum AChR-Ab, Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab between early-onset MG subgroup and late-onset MG subgroup (P > 0.05, for all. The positive rates of AChR-Ab were significantly higher in MG patients with thymoma than in those without thymoma (P = 0.004. There was no significant difference in the positive rate of Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab between MG with thymoma subgroup and MG without thymoma subgroup (P > 0.05, for all. The prevalence of AChR-Ab in generalized MG (GMG atients (Ⅱa and Ⅱb was higher than those in ocular MG (OMG patients (typeⅠ; P = 0.005, 0.012. There was no significant difference in the positive rate of Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab between GMG subgroup and OMG subgroup (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusions Serum AChR-Ab, Titin-Ab and RyR-Ab can be used as ndicators of the diagnosis of MG. Patients with 3 coexisted positive antibodies are highly suspected as MG. Higher AChR-Ab level in serum of OMG patients indicates the possibility of progressing to GMG. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.10.007

  9. Frequency of myasthenic crisis in relation to thymectomy in generalized myasthenia gravis: A 17-year experience

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    Shalmani Hamidreza

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myasthenic crisis is the most serious life-threatening event in generalized myasthenia gravis (MG patients. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term impact of thymectomy on rate and severity of these attacks in Iranian patients. Methods We reviewed the clinical records from 272 myasthenic patients diagnosed and treated in our neurology clinic during 1985 to 2002. Fifty-three patients were excluded because of unconfirmed diagnosis, ocular form of MG, contraindication to surgery, concomitant diseases and loss to follow-up. The Osserman classification was used to assess the initial severity of the disease. Frequency and severity of the attacks were compared between two groups with appropriate statistical tests according to the nature of variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of myasthenic crisis in the group of patients without thymoma. Results 110 patients were in thymectomy group and the other 109 patients were on medical therapy. These two groups had no significant differences with respect to age at onset, gender, Osserman score in baseline and follow up period. 62 patients (28.3% of all 219 patients had reported 89 attacks of myasthenic crisis. 20 patients of 62 (32% were in thymectomy group and 42 (68% were in the other group. There was significant difference between the two groups in number of patients with crisis (P = 0.001; odds ratio = 2.8 with 95% CI of 1.5 to 5.2. In addition, these attacks were more severe in group of non-thymectomized patients as the duration of ICU admission was longer and they needed more ventilatory support during their attacks. Regression model showed thymectomy and lower age at onset as two predictors of decrement in myasthenic crisis rate in non-thymomatous MG patients. Conclusions It is suggested that frequency and severity of myasthenic attacks as important endpoints in evaluation of MG patients. Thymectomy seems to have a

  10. Social disadvantages associated with myasthenia gravis and its treatment: a multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagane, Yuriko; Murai, Hiroyuki; Imai, Tomihiro; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Tsuda, Emiko; Minami, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasushi; Kanai, Tetsuya; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Masuda, Masayuki; Konno, Shingo; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Aoki, Masashi; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki

    2017-02-23

    To clarify the social disadvantages associated with myasthenia gravis (MG) and examine associations with its disease and treatment. Cross-sectional study. We evaluated 917 consecutive cases of established MG seen at 13 neurological centres in Japan over a short duration. All patients completed a questionnaire on social disadvantages resulting from MG and its treatment and a 15-item MG-specific quality of life scale at study entry. Clinical severity at the worst condition was graded according to the MG Foundation of America classification, and that at the current condition was determined according to the quantitative MG score and MG composite. Maximum dose and duration of dose ≥20 mg/day of oral prednisolone during the disease course were obtained from the patients' medical records. Achievement of the treatment target (minimal manifestation status with prednisolone at ≤5 mg/day) was determined at 1, 2 and 4 years after starting treatment and at study entry. We found that 27.2% of the patients had experienced unemployment, 4.1% had been unwillingly transferred and 35.9% had experienced a decrease in income, 47.1% of whom reported that the decrease was ≥50% of their previous total income. In addition, 49.0% of the patients reported feeling reduced social positivity. Factors promoting social disadvantages were severity of illness, dose and duration of prednisolone, long-term treatment, and a depressive state and change in appearance after treatment with oral steroids. Early achievement of the treatment target was a major inhibiting factor. Patients with MG often experience unemployment, unwilling job transfers and a decrease in income. In addition, many patients report feeling reduced social positivity. To inhibit the social disadvantages associated with MG and its treatment, greater focus needs to be placed on helping patients with MG resume a normal lifestyle as soon as possible by achieving the treatment target. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  11. Myasthenia gravis and thymoma: evaluation of 41 patients Miastenia grave e timoma: avaliação de 41 pacientes

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    JOSÉ LAMARTINE DE ASSIS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and therapeutical aspects of 41 patients with thymomatous myasthenia gravis. Thirty five patients (85.36% were submitted to thymectomy. Follow-up ranged from two to 18 years. Diagnosis of thymoma was based upon clinical investigations and CT scan of the anterior mediastinum and in 11 patients supported by immunological tests of anti-striated muscle antibodies with a positive result in more than 80% of cases. Histopathologic examination of all thymomectomized patients confirmed the diagnosis of thymoma. There was a significant predominance of benign over malignant thymoma. Occurred higher prevalence of male patients and of patients over 40 years of age. The therapeutical strategy to control myasthenic clinical findings was the same as that for non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis. The corticosteroids associated to cytotoxic drugs were less often used. Radiotherapy of the anterior mediastinum was more often used in patients having invasive tumors submitted to surgery or not. With regard to survival and control of myasthenia gravis, especially in younger patients and in those submitted to early surgery, results of treatment were surprisingly favorable.Avaliamos 41 pacientes com miastenia grave timomatosa sob os aspectos epidemiológico, clínico e terapêutico. Trinta e cinco pacientes (85,36% foram timectomizados. O seguimento clínico variou de dois meses até 18 anos. O diagnóstico do timoma foi fundamentado no estudo de imagem do mediastino (tomografia axial computadorizada e, em 11 pacientes, complementado com a determinação sérica de anticorpos para músculo estriado com resultado positivo em mais de 80% dos casos e confirmado pelo exame anátomo-patológico do timo realizado em todos os pacientes operados. Ocorreu predomínio significante de timomas benignos sobre timomas malignos, forma clínica generalizada severa, frequente envolvimento do sexo masculino e, em pacientes com mais de

  12. POSSIBLE MYASTHENIA AND LEMS IN THE SAME PATIENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LEMS) in the same patient is rarely described. This is a case report of a patient who initially presented with myasthenia gravis and later complicated with presumably auto-immune LEMS. The patient was noted to be HIV positive. The interest lies in ...

  13. Inflammatory myopathy associated with myasthenia gravis with and without thymic pathology: Report of four cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ernestina; Coutinho, Ester; Martins da Silva, Ana; Marinho, António; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Taipa, Ricardo; Pires, Manuel Melo; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lopes, Carlos; Leite, Maria Isabel

    2017-06-01

    The association of myasthenia gravis (MG) and inflammatory myopathy is rare and often only one of the diseases is diagnosed. Thymus pathology may be in the origin of such disease association. We described four patients with both MG and inflammatory myopathy. These cases correspond to 2.3% of our MG cohort. Case 1: MG, polymyositis and thymolipoma; case 2: MG and necrotizing myopathy without thymic pathology on a background of scleroderma, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia (CREST); case 3: MG and dermatomyositis without thymic pathology; case 4: MG and dermatomyositis with type C thymoma. The recognition of these neuromuscular co-morbidities contributes to (i) understanding their pathogenic mechanisms, (ii) developing better management approaches and (iii) further improving disease outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Myasthenia gravis in adults of institutions pertaining to the Mexican public health system: an analysis of hospital discharges during 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa-Tort, Paulina; Chiquete, Erwin; Domínguez-Moreno, Rogelio; Vega-Boada, Felipe; Reyes-Melo, Isael; Flores-Silva, Fernando; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno; García-Ramos, Guillermo; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz-Sandoval, José L; Cantú-Brito, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on myasthenia gravis (MG) in Mexico is mainly derived from experiences in referral centers. To describe the epidemiological characteristics of hospital discharges during 2010 with the diagnosis of MG in adults hospitalized in the Mexican public health system. We consulted the database of hospital discharges during 2010 of the National Health Information System (Ministry of Health, IMSS, IMSS oportunidades, ISSSTE, PEMEX, and the Ministry of Defense). The MG records were identified by the code G70.0 of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision. During 2010 there were 5,314,132 hospital discharges (4,254,312 adults). Among them, 587 (0.01%) were adults with MG (median age: 47 years, 60% women). Women with MG were significantly younger than men (median age: 37 vs. 54 years, respectively; p Mexico is consistent with recent reports around the world.

  15. Correlation of single-breath count test and neck flexor muscle strength with spirometry in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Bakri; Arnold, W David; Gharibshahi, Shahram; Reynolds, Jerold; Freimer, Miriam; Kissel, John T

    2016-01-01

    Although formal spirometry is the gold standard for monitoring respiratory function in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), such testing is often delayed or unavailable. There is a need for a simple bedside test that can accurately measure respiratory function. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, single-blind study in adults with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive MG. Participants performed the single breath count test (SBCT) and underwent manual muscle strength testing, and a respiratory therapist performed spirometry blinded to SBCT and strength results. Thirty-one patients, aged 57 ± 19 years participated. SBCT showed significant correlations with forced vital capacity (FVC), negative inspiratory force, and neck flexor strength (P strength (P = 0.02) but no correlation with shoulder abductor strength. These data suggest that the SBCT and neck flexor strength testing are valuable tools for bedside assessment of respiratory function in MG patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Myasthenia gravis and thymus: long-term follow-up screening of thymectomized and non-thymectomized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Jose Lorenzoni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thymoma screening is recommended at the onset of myasthenia gravis (MG or when patients with MG present with clinical deterioration or a progressive increase of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody. However, it is unknown if it is necessary to repeat the screening of thymoma at fixed intervals, even in the absence of MG deterioration, when the initial screening is negative. We analyzed the recurrence rate and incidence of new thymoma in a series of patients with well-controlled MG. The sample consisted of 53 patients, aged 17 to 72 years, and the follow-up varied between 75 and 472 months. The chest computerized tomography detected thymus abnormalities in eight patients at the initial screening and no abnormalities in all patients at a second screening after five years. The findings of this study support the classical opinion that screening for thymoma should be recommended only if there is clinical deterioration due to the disease.

  17. Diversity in mental fatigue and social profile of patients with myasthenia gravis in two different Northern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabre, Liis; Westerberg, Elisabet; Liik, Maarika; Punga, Anna R

    2017-04-01

    Self-estimated health can be used for comparison of different diseases between countries. It is important to elaborate on whether disparities in self-estimated health are due to disease-specific parameters or socioeconomic differences. In this study, we aimed at evaluating clinical and social similarities and differences in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients between comparable regions in two Baltic Sea countries, Estonia and Sweden. This cross-sectional study included southern counties in Sweden and Estonia of comparable size. All patients with a confirmed MG diagnosis were asked to answer two questionnaires including demographic and disease-specific data, lifestyle issues, and mental fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale [FSS]). Clinical fatigue was assessed objectively through the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score (QMG). Thirty-six of 92 identified patients in Estonia and 40 of 70 identified MG patients in Sweden chose to participate in the study. The demographic characteristics and symptoms reported by the patients were similar. QMG score did not differ; however, the Estonian patients scored their current subjective disease severity significantly higher (5.6 ± 2.8) compared to the Swedish patients (3.4 ± 2.3, p  = .0005). Estonian patients also had significantly higher FSS scores (5.0 ± 1.7) than Swedish patients (3.5 ± 1.6; p  = .001). Swedish patients were more active and performed physical activity more regularly (29.1% in Estonia and 74.2% in Sweden, p  = .004). Although, the patients had comparable clinical fatigue, Estonian patients evaluated their health state as being more severe and reported more mental fatigue than Swedish patients. These data indicate large regional differences in disease perception of MG, which is important to consider in international studies.

  18. Thymoma in Patient with Myasthenia Gravis Has Significantly Fewer Forkhead Box P3 Positive Lymphocytes than that without One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Shintaro; Takamori, Shinzo; Matsuo, Toshihiro; Murakami, Daigo; Akagi, Yoshito; Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) is known as a pivotal and specific transcriptional factor of regulatory T cells, and are implicated in various immune diseases including myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between FoxP3 expression of lymphocytes in thymoma and clinicopathological characteristics, particularly MG status in thymoma patients. We reviewed 83 thymoma specimens, including 22 from MG patients, and evaluated the FoxP3 expression of lymphocytes in thymoma using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Statistical association was evaluated using chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Thirty-four cases (41.0%) were classified as FoxP3 positive. There were no statistical differences in sex (P=0.289), age (P=0.536), Masaoka stage (P=0.086), WHO histological classification (P=0.097), or Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) Clinical Classification (P=0.117) between FoxP3 positive and negative cases. In contrast, thymoma in cases with MG showed significantly fewer FoxP3 positive lymphocytes than those in cases without MG (P=0.037). Moreover, cases with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titer equal to or greater than the normal limit also showed significantly fewer FoxP3 positive lymphocytes than cases within the normal limit (Pthymoma may lead to the development of MG and to an increase in anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies. In addition, FoxP3 positive lymphocytes might be a useful biomarker for evaluation of the risk of MG onset, and could open the way to more effective therapeutic strategies in thymoma patients.

  19. [A comparative analysis of the informative value of anti-AChR-antibody radioimmunoassay and laser correlation spectroscopy in myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alchinova, I B; Yakovenko, E N; Sidnev, D V; Dedaev, S Yu; Sanadze, A G; Karganov, M Yu

    An aim of the study was to compare informative value of traditional approach (anti-AChR antibody radioimmunoassay) and evaluation of metabolic shifts by laser correlation spectroscopy in myasthenia gravis. The search for the relationship between the disease severity in 77 patients, 12-80 years and the distribution pattern of subfraction serum components revealed three informative zones: 6-15, 27-67, and 127-223 nm. In patients without disturbances of vital functions, the contribution of the first zone particles into light scatter increases and that of the third zone particles decreases. Considerable differences attaining the level of statistical significance in zones 6 and 20 nm were revealed in the spectra of serum from patients with myasthenia gravis of the same severity with and without thymoma. This opens prospects for dynamic monitoring of the efficiency of therapy.

  20. miR-20b Inhibits T Cell Proliferation and Activation via NFAT Signaling Pathway in Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Lu, Tianyu; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yue; Cui, Youbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose . We examined the role of miR-20b in development of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis, especially in T cell proliferation and activation. Materials and Methods . Using qRT-PCR, we assessed expression levels of miR-20b and its target genes in cultured cells and patient samples and examined the proliferation of cultured cells, using MTT cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis. Activation of T cells was determined by both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR of activation-specific marker genes. Results . Expression of miR-20b was downregulated in samples of thymoma tissues and serum from patients with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. In addition, T cell proliferation and activation were inhibited by ectopic overexpression of miR-20b, which led to increased T cell proliferation and activation. NFAT5 and CAMTA1 were identified as targets of miR-20b. Expression levels of NFAT5 and CAMTA1 were inhibited by miR-20b expression in cultured cells, and the expression levels of miR-20b and NFAT5/CAMTA1 were inversely correlated in patients with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Conclusion . miR-20b acts as a tumor suppressor in the development of thymoma and thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. The tumor suppressive function of miR-20b in thymoma could be due to its inhibition of NFAT signaling by repression of NFAT5 and CAMTA1 expression.

  1. Confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada Reliability of the six-minute walk test in patients with generalized myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Regiane Resqueti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou determinar a confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6M como um teste de capacidade funcional em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada (MG. Foram selecionados 11 pacientes com MG - 5 homens, 6 mulheres - com idade de 55±9 anos, avaliados inicialmente quanto à função fulmonar, que se submeteram a três TC6M em dias diferentes. Durante e/ou após cada teste foram medidas freqüência cardíaca e saturação de oxigênio (por oxímetro portátil, sensação de dispnéia (pela escala de Borg e distância percorrida. Nos três testes as distâncias percorridas foram 498 m, 517 m e 520 m (respectivamente 99%, 103% e 104% do valor predito. Em média, a freqüência cardíaca, dispnéia e saturação de oxigênio mostraram comportamento constante nos três testes. Foram encontradas alta confiabilidade relativa, com coeficiente de correlação interclasse maior que 0,90 entre os testes (TC6M1-TC6M2, 0,960; TC6M1-TC6M3, 0,945; e TC6M2-TC6M3, 0,970 e confiabilidade absoluta de 4%, 3,5% e 4,8%, com reprodutibilidade de 11%, 9,8% e 13,4%, respectivamente para o primeiro, segundo e terceiro testes. Os limites superiores e inferiores de concordância e o valor médio das médias das diferenças (bias calculados pelo teste de Bland-Altman mostraram-se clinicamente aceitáveis. Conclui-se que o TC6M se mostrou seguro, confiável e reprodutível, podendo ser aplicado para avaliação e seguimento da tolerância ao exercício em pacientes com MG generalizada.The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the six minutes walking test (6MWT as a functional capacity test for patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG. Eleven patients with generalized MG (5 men, six women, aged 55±9 years, were first assessed as to pulmonary function and then submitted to three 6MWT in different days. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured (by means of portable oxymeter during, and dyspnea (by the Borg scale and

  2. The association of HLA-DQA1*0401 and DQB1*0604 with thymomatous myasthenia gravis in northern Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongwei; Hao, Junwei; Peng, Xiaolin; Simard, Alain R; Zhang, Mingyi; Xie, Yanchen; Wang, Shuhui

    2012-01-15

    Genetic analyses indicate that HLA complex genes can be involved in susceptibility to autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG). Various HLA alleles serve as genetic elements that either predispose to or protect against MG. This study investigates the probable relationship between HLA-DQ allele polymorphisms and MG cases in northern China. The HLA-DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction/sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in 84 MG patients, and the results were compared to 293 healthy controls. Our findings indicate that DQ A1*0401(P=0.008, OR: 2.5, 95%CI: 1.24-3.07) and B1*0301(P=0.000, OR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.48-3.54) were the most frequent allele; the frequencies of DQA1*0103(P=0.000, OR:0.24, 95%CI 0.13-0.49) and DQB1*0601(P=0.001, OR:0.40, 95%CI 0.22-0.50) were significantly decreased in MG patients compared with healthy controls. Patients with thymomatous MG were positively associated with DQA1 *0401(P=0.011, OR:4.57, 95% CI 1.40-14.90) and DQB1 *0604 (P=0.001, OR:4.01, 95% CI 1.65-9.73) as compared to MG patients without thymoma. Different genetic mechanisms may exist between MG patients with thymoma and those without thymoma. The HLA-DQ associations in MG subgroups suggest that disease heterogeneity may be influenced by different genes or alleles. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Sensitive Method for Detecting Peptide-specific CD4+ T Cell Responses in Peripheral Blood from Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sapna; Malmeström, Clas; Lindberg, Christopher; Meisel, Sarah; Schön, Karin; Verolin, Martina; Lycke, Nils Yngve

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neurological disorder typified by skeletal muscle fatigue and most often production of autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The present study was undertaken to assess the extent of AChR-peptide recognition in MG patients using co-culturing (DC:TC) of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and highly enriched CD4+ T cells from the blood as compared to the traditional whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures. We found that the DC:TC cultures were highly superior to the PBMC cultures for detection of reactivity toward HLA-DQ/DR-restricted AChR-peptides. In fact, whereas DC:TC cultures identified recognition in all MG patients the PBMC cultures failed to detect responsiveness in around 40% of the patients. Furthermore, reactivity to multiple peptides was evident in DC:TC cultures, while PBMC cultures mostly exhibited reactivity to a single peptide. No healthy control (HC) CD4+ T cells responded to the peptides in either culture system. Interestingly, whereas spontaneous production of IFNγ and IL-17 was observed in the DC:TC cultures from MG patients, recall responses to peptides enhanced IL-10 production in 9/13 MG patients, while little increase in IFNγ and IL-17 was seen. HCs did not produce cytokines to peptide stimulations. We conclude that the DC: TC culture system is significantly more sensitive and better identifies the extent of responsiveness in MG patients to AChR-peptides than traditional PBMC cultures. PMID:29114250

  4. Increased expression of Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 in myasthenia gravis thymus characterized by active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Paola; Galbardi, Barbara; Franzi, Sara; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Barzago, Claudia; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Maggi, Lorenzo; Kapetis, Dimos; Andreetta, Francesca; Biasiucci, Amelia; Motta, Teresio; Giardina, Carmelo; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2016-04-01

    Considerable data implicate the thymus as the main site of autosensitization to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis (MG), a B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction. We recently demonstrated an active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the thymus of MG patients, suggesting that EBV might contribute to the onset or maintenance of the autoimmune response within MG thymus, because of its ability to activate and immortalize autoreactive B cells. EBV has been reported to elicit and modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune responses, which are known to favor B-cell dysfunction and autoimmunity. Aim of this study was to investigate whether EBV infection is associated with altered expression of TLR7 and TLR9 in MG thymus. By real-time PCR, we found that TLR7 and TLR9 mRNA levels were significantly higher in EBV-positive MG compared to EBV-negative normal thymuses. By confocal microscopy, high expression levels of TLR7 and TLR9 proteins were observed in B cells and plasma cells of MG thymic germinal centers (GCs) and lymphoid infiltrates, where the two receptors co-localized with EBV antigens. An increased frequency of Ki67-positive proliferating B cells was found in MG thymuses, where we also detected proliferating cells expressing TLR7, TLR9 and EBV antigens, thus supporting the idea that EBV-associated TLR7/9 signaling may promote abnormal B-cell activation and proliferation. Along with B cells and plasma cells, thymic epithelium, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages exhibited enhanced TLR7 and TLR9 expression in MG thymus; TLR7 was also increased in thymic myeloid dendritic cells and its transcriptional levels positively correlated with those of interferon (IFN)-β. We suggested that TLR7/9 signaling may be involved in antiviral type I IFN production and long-term inflammation in EBV-infected MG thymuses. Our overall findings indicate that EBV-driven TLR7- and TLR9-mediated innate immune

  5. Resultado da timectomia ampliada no tratamento de pacientes com Miastenia gravis Extended thymectomy for treating patients with Myasthenia gravis (MG

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    Raul Lopes Ruiz Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Diversas variações da timectomia podem ser realizadas, dentre elas a transesternal ampliada. A literatura sugere que, quanto mais extenso o procedimento para ressecção da glândula e tecidos do mediastino anterior, melhores os resultados e prognóstico. OBJETIVO: Avaliar retrospectivamente a resposta à timectomia ampliada em portadores de Miastenia gravis. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 46 portadores de Miastenia gravis, submetidos à plasmaferese pré-operatória e à timectomia ampliada, entre agosto de 1992 e janeiro de 2003, divididos em três grupos, segundo o tempo decorrido desde o início dos sintomas: menor que 12 meses, 13 a 24 meses e maior que 25 meses. RESULTADOS: Trinta e um pacientes eram do sexo feminino e 15 do masculino. A média de idade foi de 30 anos. O tempo médio de evolução da doença foi de 26,3 meses. O acompanhamento ambulatorial pós-operatório foi em média de 26,6 meses. Quanto ao grau de resposta à timectomia, 89% dos pacientes tiveram boa resposta, sendo que 50% apresentaram remissão completa. Ocorreu um óbito nesta série. O exame anatomopatológico demonstrou que a hiperplasia tímica foi o achado mais freqüente. Apenas 3 pacientes (6,5% apresentaram timomas benignos. Em 5 pacientes (10,8% encontramos tecido tímico extraglandular: na gordura peritímica em 2 deles, na gordura pericárdica em 1, junto ao nervo frênico esquerdo em outro e na janela aorto-pulmonar em outro. CONCLUSÃO: A timectomia ampliada para tratamento da Miastenia gravis mostrou-se segura, eficiente, e apresentou alta porcentagem de remissão completa. Houve a detecção de tecido tímico extraglandular em alguns pacientes. Tão logo seja feito o diagnóstico, está indicada como terapêutica associada à plasmaferese pré-operatória e à medicamentosa, independentemente da idade, patologia tímica, e início dos sintomas.BACKGROUND: Extended thymectomy is one of several types of thymectomy. Literature suggests that the

  6. Dandy-Walker syndrome in adult mimicking myasthenia gravis Síndrome de Dandy-Walker em adulto simulando miastenia gravis

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    Juliana Cardoso

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. The DWS can occur associated with other brain or systemic malformations, but ocular abnormalities in this disease are rare and clinical findings mimicking myasthenia gravis have not been described to date. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented mild limitation of the ocular movements with progressive palpebral ptosis, which changed in intensity during the day. The investigation showed negative anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, repetitive nerve stimulation and "Tensilon test", but the brain magnetic resonance image reveals DWS with hydrocephalus associated with calosal dysgenesis. The characteristic of disease, clinical manifestations and pathologic features, specially the clinical evaluation of ocular abnormalities in suspicion of DWS, including the MG in differential diagnosis are discussed.A síndrome de Dandy-Walker (DWS é uma rara malformação da fossa posterior que pode ocorrer associada com outras malformações cerebrais ou sistêmicas. As alterações oculares são raras e as manifestações clínicas, simulando miastenia gravis (MG, não foram descritas até o momento. Descrevemos uma mulher de 23 anos apresentando discreta limitação da movimentação ocular com progressiva ptose palpebral que mudava de intensidade durante o dia. A investigação mostrou negativos o anticorpo anti-receptor de acetilcolina, a estimulação nervosa repetitiva e o "teste do Tensilon", porém a ressonância magnética de crânio revelou DWS com hidrocefalia associada à disgenesia de corpo caloso. As características da doença, manifestações clínicas e patológicas, especialmente a avaliação clínica de anormalidade ocular na suspeita de DWS serão discutidas, incluindo a MG no diagnóstico diferencial.

  7. Is there any relationship between quality of life and polysomnographically detected sleep parameters/disorders in stable myasthenia gravis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascilar, Nida Fatma; Saracli, Ozge; Kurcer, Mehmet Ali; Ankarali, Handan; Emre, Ufuk

    2018-03-01

    It is known that quality of life in myasthenia gravis is positively correlated with subjective sleep quality, still no data is available regarding the relationship between QOL and polysomnographically detected sleep parameters and disorders. In this study, we tried to highlighten this relationship, by performing polysomnography. Sleep-related complaints were evaluated in face-to-face interviews with 19 clinically stable MG patients and 26 healthy controls. During the interviews questionnaires assessing sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and Turkish version of the MG-QOL 15-item scale [(MG-QOL15(T)] were administered and then an overnight polysomnography was performed. Sleep disorders, especially obstructive sleep apnea and fatigue were higher, whereas subjective sleep duration was significantly lower, in patients than controls. Excessive daytime sleepiness and poor sleep quality were not different between patients and controls. Other than percentage of sleep stage III, which was negatively correlated with MG-QOL15(T) scores, neither other sleep parameters nor sleep disorders were correlated with MG-QOL15(T) scores. MG composite, subjective sleep duration, fatigue severity and Hamilton depression rating scale scores were found to be positively correlated with MG-QOL15(T) scores. It was shown that decreasing disease severity and enhancing psychological well-being will improve patients' quality of life. We recommend that our findings should be repeated in a large prospective cohort of MG patients.

  8. Clinical profile of patients with myasthenia gravis followed at the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais

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    Aline Mansueto Mourão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: to determine the clinical profile of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG; followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic of the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and to compare it with other Brazilian case series. Methods: sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from patients, and a systematic literature review performed, focusing on national studies on the clinical profile of MG patients. Results: sixty nine patients were enrolled in the study. Fifty five (91% subjects were female and the mean age (SD was 37.6 (±11.4 years. The mean disease duration was 14.1 years. Regarding treatment, prednisone was the most used strategy (64%, followed by the use of azathioprine (43%. There was no difference between thymectomized (42 and non-thymectomized (27 patients regarding disease severity and medication use. Conclusion: clinical and socio-demographic features of this MG sample from a University-based clinic resemble those reported in other Brazilian series and in the international literature.

  9. Weakness in the ICU: Guillain-Barré syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Deborah M

    2005-11-01

    Weakness in the ICU may be caused by a number of disorders. Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) are examples of conditions that might lead to an ICU admission. The most likely cause of weakness after ICU admission is critical illness polyneuropathy/myopathy (CIP/M). Studies have attempted to determine both clinical and pulmonary function criteria for the proper timing of intubation in severe GBS and MG. Optimizing medical management of patients with GBS, MG, and CIP/M is essential in reducing the high morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions. This includes measures to prevent deep venous thrombosis, gastric and decubitus ulcer prophylaxis, and chest physiotherapy. Both intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) are probably equal in efficacy for the treatment of GBS, although relapse rates may differ. Treatment of MG crisis with TPE or IVIG must be followed by long-term immunosuppression. Studies suggest possible preventative measures for CIP/M such as tighter glycemic control but there are still no definitive treatments. Research to advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis of GBS, MG, and CIP/M is clearly needed to develop more specific and more effective treatments in the future. In the meantime, measures that optimize medical management can be instituted to improve outcomes in patients with these conditions, preferably in a specialized neuroscience ICU setting.

  10. Risk for Myasthenia Gravis maps to 151Pro→ Ala change in TNIP1 and to HLA-B*08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Peter K.; Kosoy, Roman; Lee, Annette T.; Lamb, Janine; Sussman, Jon; McKee, David; Simpfendorfer, Kim R.; Pirskanen-Matell, Ritva; Piehl, Frederik; Pan-Hammarstrom, Qiang; Verschuuren, J.J.G.M.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Niks, Erik H.; Marx, Alexander; Ströbel, Philipp; Tackenberg, Björn; Pütz, Michael; Maniaol, Angelina; Elsais, Ahmed; Tallaksen, Chantal; Harbo, Hanne. F.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Melms, Arthur; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Willcox, Nicholas; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Seldin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to comprehensively define the genetic basis of Early Onset Myasthenia Gravis. Methods We have carried out a two-stage genome-wide association study on a total of 649 North European EOMG patients. Cases were matched 1:4 with controls of European ancestry. We performed imputation and conditional analyses across the major histocompatibility complex, as well as in the top regions of association outside the HLA region. Results We observed the strongest association in the HLA class I region at rs7750641 (p = 1.2 × 10−92, OR = 6.25). By imputation and conditional analyses, HLA-B*08 proves to be the major associated allele (p = 2.87 × 10−113, OR = 6.41). In addition to the expected association with PTPN22 (rs2476601, OR =1.71, p = 8.2 ×10−10), an imputed coding variant (rs2233290) at position 151 (Pro→Ala) in the TNFAIP3-interacting protein 1, TNIP1, confers even stronger risk than PTPN22 (OR = 1.91, p = 3.2 × 10−10). Interpretation The association at TNIP1 in EOMG implies disease mechanisms involving ubiquitin-dependent dysregulation of NF-κB signaling. The localization of the major HLA signal to the HLA-B*08 allele suggests that CD8+ T-cells may play a key role in disease initiation or pathogenesis. PMID:23055271

  11. 10-year-outcomes after rituximab for myasthenia gravis: Efficacy, safety, costs of inhospital care, and impact on childbearing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglbauer, Karl; Pichler, Robert; Topakian, Raffi

    2017-04-15

    Rituximab (RTX) has emerged as an attractive off-label treatment option for patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) refractory to other immune therapies. However, data on long-term outcome after RTX for MG are still scarce. Here we present the 10-year outcomes [median (range) 10.1 (6.7-11.2) years] with respect to efficacy, safety, costs of inhospital care, and impact on childbearing potential in all four MG patients treated by one of the authors with RTX. In all patients, RTX led to sustained clinical improvement and eventual tapering of other immune therapies. RTX was well tolerated, and complications were not observed. After the start of RTX, annual costs for hospital admissions were markedly reduced compared to costs in the year preceding RTX. Under close clinical observation, two patients had uncomplicated pregnancies giving birth to a healthy child. With regard to its efficacy, excellent tolerance, lack of complications, low frequency of repeat infusions and pending patent expiry in many countries, RTX appears to compare favourably with other immune therapies used for MG. Multicentre trials and registries are urgently needed to further address long-term safety issues and clarify the efficacy and role of RTX in managing MG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Disease specific enrichment of circulating let-7 family microRNA in MuSK+ myasthenia gravis.

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    Punga, Tanel; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Lewandowska, Marta; Damato, Valentina; Evoli, Amelia; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with antibodies against the muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK+) have predominantly involvement of cranio-bulbar muscles and do not display thymus pathology, as do acetylcholine receptor antibody seropositive (AChR+) MG patients. In search of novel biomarkers for MuSK+ MG, we evaluated circulating serum microRNAs. Four analyzed microRNAs were specifically elevated in MuSK+ MG patient serum samples: let-7a-5p, let-7f-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-423-5p. The circulating microRNA profile in MuSK+ MG differs from the profile previously observed in the serum of AChR+ MG, thus indicating the etiological difference between these two entities. We propose that the identified microRNAs could serve as potential serum biomarkers for MuSK+ MG. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling as a therapeutic target for myasthenia gravis and other neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kinji; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako

    2017-10-01

    Signal transduction at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is compromised in a diverse array of diseases including myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, Isaacs' syndrome, congenital myasthenic syndromes, Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and sarcopenia. Except for sarcopenia, all are orphan diseases. In addition, the NMJ signal transduction is impaired by tetanus, botulinum, curare, α-bungarotoxin, conotoxins, organophosphate, sarin, VX, and soman to name a few. Areas covered: This review covers the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling pathway, which drives clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and ensures efficient signal transduction at the NMJ. We also address diseases caused by autoantibodies against the NMJ molecules and by germline mutations in genes encoding the NMJ molecules. Expert opinion: Representative small compounds to treat the defective NMJ signal transduction are cholinesterase inhibitors, which exert their effects by increasing the amount of acetylcholine at the synaptic space. Another possible therapeutic strategy to enhance the NMJ signal transduction is to increase the number of AChRs, but no currently available drug has this functionality.

  14. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with myasthenia gravis and thymoma with immunodeficiency/Good's syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Sarah C; Davies, Sarah; Chan, Raymond; Davies, Leo; Garsia, Roger

    2016-08-30

    Patients with thymoma with immunodeficiency (TWI)/Good's syndrome characteristically have evidence of combined immunodeficiency including low or absent B-cells, hypogammaglobulinemia and defects in T-cell mediated immunity. These patients can present with common or opportunistic infections. A 54-year-old female was diagnosed with cerebral toxoplasmosis. This occurred on a background of metastatic thymoma previously treated with chemotherapy and myasthenia gravis (MG) treated with mycophenolate mofetil, monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and pyridostigmine. She reported recurrent herpes zoster infection. The patient had clinical and radiological progression of cerebral infection despite completing standard induction and maintenance therapy with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. Investigations found a complete absence of B-cells and evidence for hypogammaglobulinemia which, together with evidence of defects in T-cell mediated immunity and thymoma, lead to a diagnosis of TWI/Good's Syndrome. The patient has undergone prolonged high-dose therapy for toxoplasmosis and a reduction in immunosuppression with no evidence of recurrent toxoplasmosis or flare of MG. TWI/Good's Syndrome should be suspected in patients with thymoma and recurrent, persistent or unusual infections. If suspected serum immunoglobulins and lymphocyte subsets should be measured. These patients may need closer monitoring, higher dose and prolonged treatment of infections, and weaning of concurrent immunosuppression may be considered.

  15. Brazilian cross-cultural translation and adaptation of the "Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items"

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    Aline Mansueto Mourao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To translate and to perform the cross-cultural adaptation of the “Questionnaire of Life Quality Specific for Myasthenia Gravis - 15 items” (MG-QOL15. Method The original English version of the questionnaire was translated into Portuguese. This version was revised and translated back into English. Later, both English versions were compared and the divergences were corrected in the Portuguese text. At a second stage, ten patients with MG followed at the Neuromuscular Diseases Clinic from the University Hospital, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais answered the questionnaire. The authors analyzed the difficulties and misunderstandings in the application of the questionnaire. Results The questions 8, 13 and 15 were considered difficult to understand and were modified in the final Portuguese version. Most patients (70% had a total score above 25, and the statements 3, 8 and 9 showed the highest scores. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the questionnaire MG-QOL15 seems to be a promising tool for the assessment of Brazilian patients with MG.

  16. Ptosis linked to myasthenia: Case Report | Atipo-Tsiba | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ptosis is the consequence of a general or an ophthalmologic pathology, whose etiological diagnosis and treatment can be complex. Eliminating life-threatening emergencies or chronic and severe diseases remain an obsession for the neurologist or the ophthalmologist. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a leading to evoke, ...

  17. Treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin in a patient with myasthenia gravis Tratamento de distonia cervical com toxina botulínica em uma paciente com miastenia gravis

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    MARCIA RUBIA R. GONÇALVES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who has the rare combination of myasthenia gravis and cervical dystonia. She was treated with botulinum toxin type A with good response and no evidence of deterioration of the myasthenic symptoms. We therefore conclude that it is possible to use botulinum toxin in the presence of defective neuromuscular transmission.Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 49 anos com rara combinação de miastenia gravis e distonia cervical tratada com toxina botulínica tipo A, apresentando boa resposta e nenhuma evidência de piora do quadro miastênico. A partir dessas observações concluimos que é possível o uso de toxina botulínica na presença de doença da transmissão neuromuscular.

  18. Validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change of the myasthenia gravis activities of daily living profile in a sample of Italian myasthenic patients.

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    Raggi, Alberto; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Leonardi, Matilde; Maggi, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to report on the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of the myasthenia gravis activities of daily living profile (MG-ADL) in a sample of Italian patients. Patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) completed a protocol that included the MG-ADL, the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0), the Besta Neurological Institute rating scale for myasthenia gravis, and the MG-composite. Cronbach's alpha was used to test reliability, Spearman's correlation and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) to test short-term test-retest, Kruskal-Wallis test to assess differences in MG-ADL between patients with different disease severity, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test to assess sensitivity to change. In total, 58 patients were enrolled: 44 were females, mean MG duration 10.5 ± 10.4 years, mean MG-ADL 3.98 ± 3.07. The MG-ADL showed good internal consistency (alpha = .774), stability (test-retest correlation = .98, ICC = .97). It was superior to the WHODAS 2.0 in differentiating patients with different MG type and severity (P < .001), it showed higher sensitivity to change (P = .001 for improved and P = .007 for worsened patients) and higher correlation with the MG-composite (RHO = .625). Our analysis shows that the Italian version of the MG-ADL is valid, reliable, stable, and sensitive to change.

  19. Association of myasthenia gravis with polymorphisms in the gene of histamine N-methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellermayer, Blanka; Polgar, Noemi; Pal, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) is the main metabolizing enzyme of histamine. Histamine modulates immune responses and plays a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders.......Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) is the main metabolizing enzyme of histamine. Histamine modulates immune responses and plays a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders....

  20. [A case of myasthenia gravis accompanied by steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome and CD57+ lymphocytes expansion in peripheral blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Masaki, T; Nakamura, R; Motoyoshi, K; Kamakura, K

    1999-06-01

    A 38-year-old woman showed symptoms of myasthenia gravis (MG) three months after receiving thymectomy for malignant thymoma. She was treated with anti-acetylcholine esterase drugs and azathioprine over 10 years with two exacerbations, which were controlled by plasmapheresis and large amounts of steroid. Nephrotic syndrome developed suddenly at the age of 48, was progressive even after azathioprine withdrawal, and resistant to several immunosuppressive therapies such as steroids and cyclosporine A, and plasmapheresis. She died of systemic infection one-and-a-half years after the onset of nephrotic syndrome. Immunological studies revealed several abnormalities of cellular immunity. The expansion of gamma-delta T cells and CD57+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood was characteristic findings. These cells are thought to originate from the extrathymic process. Nephrotic syndrome has been thought to be sometimes complicated with thymoma. Although some pathogenetic possibilities about combination of nephrotic syndrome and thymoma were supposed, none has yet been clarified. As we noticed the remarkable increase in the number of CD57+ cells, we examined its proportion in the peripheral blood of patients with MG and/or thymoma, as well as in individuals without sickness. The study revealed the expansion of CD57+ cells in MG thymoma patients (32.3 +/- 15.9%), compared with healthy controls (15.2 +/- 5.4%), MG non-thymoma patients (20.3 +/- 11.5%), and thymoma non-MG patients (15.2 +/- 12.0%) statistically (Mann-Whitney's U test). Therefore, we supposed that the peripheral CD57+ cell expansion was associated with parathymic immunological abnormalities, such as MG, thymoma, and nephrotic syndrome.

  1. The thymidylate synthase enhancer region (TSER) polymorphism increases the risk of thymic lymphoid hyperplasia in patients with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Ricciardi, Roberta; De Rosa, Anna; Guida, Melania; Maestri, Michelangelo; Lucchi, Marco; Melfi, Franca; Mussi, Alfredo; Migliore, Lucia; Coppedè, Fabio

    2018-02-05

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is caused, in approximately 80% of the patients, by autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The disease is often associated with pathological changes of the thymus: thymic epithelial tumours are present in about 10-20% of the patients, while up to 80% of the patients with early disease onset have thymic hyperplasia. Folate metabolism is required for the production of DNA precursors and for proper DNA methylation reactions, and impaired folate metabolism has been often associated with cellular growth and cancer. We investigated if major polymorphisms of folate-related genes, namely MTHFR c.677C>T, MTR c.2756A>G, MTRR c.66A>G and TYMS TSER (a 28-bp tandem repeat in the 5' promoter enhancer region of TYMS) increase the risk of pathological changes of the thymus in AChR+ MG patients. A total of 526 AChR+ MG patients, including 132 patients with normal (involuted) thymus, 146 patients with thymic hyperplasia, and 248 patients with a thymoma were included in the study. Allele and genotype comparisons were performed among the three study groups, after correcting for multiple testing. The frequency of the TYMS TSER 3R allele was significantly higher in MG patients with thymic hyperplasia (P=0.004), and the TYMS TSER 3R3R genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of thymic hyperplasia [OR 2.71 (95% CI: 1.34-5.47)]. The 3R allele in the thymidylate synthase promoter enhancer region results in increased protein production, required for the synthesis of DNA precursors. The present study suggests that the TYMS TSER 3R allele increases the risk of thymic lymphoid hyperplasia in AChR+ MG patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Premature birth in patient with cervix incompetence and history of myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Maximiliano; Troncoso, Miguel; Vallejos, Joaquin; Ponce, Sebastian; Villablanca, Nelson; Melita, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    Cervical incompetence it's a dilatation of the cervix during the third trimester of pregnancy that ends with the interruption of it. The incidence in Chile is about 0.1-2% of the total pregnancies and it's one of the causes of preterm birth. A 34 years old pregnant patient. Timectomized at age 18 to treat her miastenia gravis, previously trated with medication, had 4 previous preterm labours all of them under 25 weeks and vaginal births. All fetuses died postpartum. A cerclage was made during the third, fourth and fifth pregnancies. She didn't present hypertension during the gestation and no cervical diameter under 15mm. Since the fourth gestation the following tests are taken: Antifosfolipidic antibodies, APTT,PT. All the results are either normal or negative. Microbial cultures were negative. No amniocentesis was made. A McDonald cervical cerclage was made during pregnancies number 3, 4 and 5 on the 16th week to delay the labor. Also oral micronized progesterone, on a 400mg/24 hours dosis, was administered to avoid preterm birth. On the 24th week the pharmacological treatment started including Intramuscular Betamethasone, 12 mg/24 hours (2 doses), to induce lung maturity on the fetus. It is thought that the administration of progesterone could have improved the situation of the patient, because it acts as a labour repressants. The use of cerclage could have helped, but the factors that may influence the effectiveness of this method are unknown. Perhaps there is some immunologic factor associated with the miastenia gravis that alters the normal course of pregnancy.

  3. Evaluation of repetitive stimulation test (RST in 30 patients with Myasthenia Gravis, who were previously confirmed by clinical sign and tensilon test 1996-99

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    "Ghabaee M

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available est (RST is the most commonly used electrodiagnostic test to asses the defect of neuromuscular transmission, which is reported to be positive in the diffuse and restricted ocular forms 60-95% and 14-50%, respectively. In a cross-sectional study, to determine the efficacy of repetitive stimulation test in myasthenia gravis, we evaluated the results in 30 cases who were hospitalized in Imam Khomeini Hospital during 1996-1999. Patients were first selected clinically and then confirmed by Tensilon test.Various clinical types including generalized and restricted ocular forms with different severity and duration were entered in this study. Considering the fact that the positiveness of the test is enhanced by assessment of more muscle groups, we evaluated decremental response in the facial, proximal and distal muscles of limbs. 90% of patients had the generalized form of the disease, whereas ocular myasthenia gravis was seen only in 10% of the cases. 74% of females and 73% of males showed positive response (overall: 73.3%. No significant association was found between the positive response, and age and sex. Peaks of incidences of the disease for the males were in fourth and sixth decades and for the females in thired decades

  4. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Resection of a Noninvasive Thymoma in a Cat with Myasthenia Gravis Using Low-Pressure Carbon Dioxide Insufflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Maureen A; Sutton, Jessie S; Hunt, Geraldine B; Pypendop, Bruno H; Mayhew, Philipp D

    2016-11-01

    To report the use of low-pressure carbon dioxide insufflation during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for resection of a noninvasive thymoma in a cat with secondary myasthenia gravis. Clinical case report. Client-owned cat. An 11-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was examined for generalized weakness, voice change, hypersalivation, hyporexia, vomiting, coughing, and gagging. Thoracic ultrasound revealed a cranial mediastinal mass for which cytology was consistent with a thymoma (or lymphoid tissue). Acetylcholine receptor antibody concentration was elevated at 3.16 mmol/L (reference interval thymoma with paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis was made and surgical resection of both mediastinal masses was recommended. Video-assisted thoracoscopic resection of the cranial mediastinal mass and sternal lymph node were performed with low-pressure carbon dioxide insufflation maintained at an intrathoracic pressure of 2-3 mmHg. The cat recovered from surgery without serious complications. Nineteen months after surgery, the cat developed hind limb stiffness. Thoracic radiographs ruled out a cranial mediastinal mass or megaesophagus. Acetylcholine receptor antibody concentration remained elevated at 2.72 mmol/L. Low-pressure thoracic insufflation facilitated video-assisted thoracoscopic resection of cranial mediastinal masses in this cat. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. Myastenia gravis following H1N1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Horta e; Nascimento, A.; Zwolinski, N.; André, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis is an auto-immune disease, resulting from the production of anti-Ach receptor antibodies at the neuromuscular junction. In spite of its unknown etiology, there seems to exist some factors which withstand its arise and/or the worsening of the patient's clinical condition.The mainstay of medical treatment relies on anticholinesterase drugs and immunosuppression. Thymectomy is considered the treatment of choice in selected cases.Influenza A (H1N1) viral infection ...

  6. The molecular anatomy of human Hsp60 and its similarity with that of bacterial orthologs and acetylcholine receptor reveal a potential pathogenetic role of anti-chaperonin immunity in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammazza, Antonella Marino; Bucchieri, Fabio; Grimaldi, Luigi M E; Benigno, Arcangelo; de Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L; Zummo, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) is ubiquitous and highly conserved being present in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, including pathogens. This chaperonin, although typically a mitochondrial protein, can also be found in other intracellular sites, extracellularly, and in circulation. Thus, it can signal the immune system and participate in the development of inflammation and immune reactions. Both phenomena can be elicited by human and foreign Hsp60 (e.g., bacterial GroEL), when released into the blood by infectious agents. Consequently, all these Hsp60 proteins become part of a complex autoimmune response characterized by multiple cross reactions because of their structural similarities. In this study, we demonstrate that Hsp60 proteins from humans and two common pathogens, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, share various sequence segments of potentially highly immunogenic epitopes with acetylcholine receptor α1 subunit (AChRα1). The structural data indicate that AChRα1 antibodies, implicated in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, could very well be elicited and/or maintained by self- and/or bacterial Hsp60.

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis: a right-sided or left-sided approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Hany Hasan; Gamal, Mahmoud; Raslan, Saleh; Abdel Hamid, Hossam

    2017-10-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was in [patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG)] is a [left-sided approach] superior to a [right-sided approach] in terms of [clinical outcome]? Two hundred and fifty-nine papers were found using the reported search. In looking at both procedures, we selected studies with a sizeable number of patients performing or studying both procedures and comparing their outcome. Hence, only 4 studies represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country, study type, patient group, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Two studies compared their clinical experience with a right-sided versus a left-sided video assisted thoracoscopic surgery thymectomy approach, while 1 study compared using a bilateral versus a unilateral right-sided approach in patients with non-thymomatous MG. The number of patients studied included 31, 107 and 103 patients, respectively. All 3 studies demonstrated no difference regarding surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, postoperative complications and therapeutic effects (the last study compared the 5-year complete stable remission rate). All 3 studies concluded that both approaches are feasible, effective and comparable in operative and long-term results for the treatment of non-thymomatous MG. One anatomical study compared both approaches in 10 cadavers, 5 in each group. They studied the size of the specimen resected and visualization of different anatomic sites via each approach. Visualization was superior using the left-sided approach, while a right-sided approach resulted in slightly higher chances of an incomplete resection. The study concluded that a left-sided approach achieves a better chance of radical thoracoscopic thymectomy due to anatomic considerations. In conclusion, despite 1

  8. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK.

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    Vuslat Yilmaz

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and Mu

  9. Corticosteroides no tratamento da miastenia grave. Estudo de 12 casos com revisão da literatura Corticosteroids in the management of myasthenia gravis

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    José Lamartine de Assis

    1975-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os resultados do tratamento da miastenia grave em 12 pacientes, sendo 10 com a forma generalizada severa, um com a forma generalizada moderada e um com miastenia acentuada associada a polimiosite. Sete pacientes foram previamente timectomizados e somente um apresentava timoma. Todos estavam em uso de doses elevadas de drogas anticolinesterásicas com resposta terapêutica pobre ou nula. Um paciente foi tratado com dexametaxona, outro com dexametazona seguida de prednisona e os restantes com prednisona, sempre em doses altas inicialmente (100 mg por dia ou em dias alternados e com redução gradativa ulterior até doses de manutenção. Os corticosteróides foram administrados sempre pela via oral, por períodos que variaram de duas semanas até dois anos e meio. Em conclusão, 75% de 12 pacientes com miastenia grave generalizada foram influenciados favoravelmente com este método terapêutico. Deste grupo apenas um apresentava timoma e não respondeu a qualquer tratamento. Outro paciente apresentava polimiosite associada e teve excelente resposta terapêutica. Dois miastênicos sem timoma tiveram a sintomatologia exacerbada durante o tratamento. Nenhum efeito colateral importante foi observado, mesmo nos pacientes tratados a longo prazo.The results of treatment of myasthenia gravis in 12 patients are reported. There were 10 cases with severe generalized form and two cases with moderate generalized form, one of which associated with polymyositis. Seven patients had prior thymectomy and one of them had a thymoma. All the patients were receiving anticholinesterase drugs with poor response or without any response. One patient received a short, intensive course of dexametazone, and other patient used prednisone after a more prolonged dexametazone course. The remaining patients received prednisone, always beginning with high (100 mg alternate day oral single-doses. This therapy has been maintained for a period thought to be sufficient

  10. Associação familiar de miastenia grave e síndrome miotônica Familial association of myasthenia gravis and myotonic syndrome

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    Sylvio Saraiva

    1969-12-01

    Full Text Available É relatada uma associação familiar incomum, incidindo em mãe e filha, a primeira com síndrome miotônica e, a segunda, com miastenia grave, forma ocular. Um terceiro membro da família, irmão da paciente com miotonia, teria também manifestações dessa síndrome. São comentados aspectos clínico-laboratoriais dos casos estudados.An uncommon association of myasthenia gravis in a child and a myotonic syndrome in her mother is reported. A brother of the second patient probably had myotonic symptomatology. Clinical and laboratorial aspects are discussed.

  11. Myasthenia Gravis With Thymoma, Manifesting as AChR-Ab-Positive, Distinct Bulbar Palsy Accompanied by Dysgeusia: A Case Series and Review of Literature

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    Kai Zhu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarized three cases of myasthenia gravis (MG with taste disorder and describe their clinical features in detail. Three MG patients presented with significant bulbar palsy symptoms, high AChR-Ab titers, and negative MuSK-Ab, were diagnosed with thymoma. Furthermore, we observed that dysgeusia could manifest earlier than the occurrence of typical MG symptoms, even predict a MG relapse or a myasthenic crisis in the course of MG. We believe that dysgeusia is a non-motor symptom of MG, which especially exists in MG patients with thymoma and serious bulbar palsy. Therefore, being alert to this symptom may facilitate the early diagnosis of MG and judge the progress of the disease.

  12. Effect of intravenous immunoglobulin in Guilain-Barre syndrome, myasthenia gravis and chronic idiopathic demyelinative polyneuropathy, A survey in Imam Khomeini Hospital

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    Qaffarpoor M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available With retrospective evaluation of 44 patients suffering from Guilan-Barre Syndrome (GBS, Chronic Idiopathic Demtyelinative Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP and Myasthenia Gravis (MG treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, we found following results: 1 Initial symptoms of improvement on forth or fifth days. 2 Maximum recovery for CIDP and MG were after 16-24 and 3-11 days, respectively. 3 No major complication, but mild side effects in 32% of patients. 4 In patients with GBS one grade improvement achieved after 8-30 days. 5 Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG plus plasmapheresis had no advantages over IVIG alone. 6 No reasonable conclusion about relapsing rate and duration of response due to follow up restrictions.

  13. Miastenia grave: avaliação clínica de 153 pacientes Myasthenia gravis: clinical evaluation of 153 patients

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    FRANCISCO MARCOS B. CUNHA

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available São analisados, retrospectivamente, os prontuários dos doentes miastênicos diagnosticados e seguidos no período de fevereiro de 1973 a março de l995. Os principais achados clínicos foram ptose palpebral, diplopia, disfagia, disfonia ou disatria, dificuldade de mastigação, dispnéia, astenia, paresia da musculutura cervical e das extremidades. A partir das informações coletadas, os pacientes foram classificados clinicamente pela escala de Osserman-Genkins modificada, mas considerando o aspecto não dinâmico dessa escala, adotou-se a escala funcional de Niakan modificada, na qual os doentes são colocados nas seguintes condições: remissão, controlado, compensado, controle parcial, controle precário, sem resposta. Na casuística foram estudados 153 pacientes: 104 (68,0% do sexo feminino e 49 (32,0% do sexo masculino, numa proporção de 2,1:1. O tempo de doença variou de sete dias a 27 anos, com média de 6,26 anos (± 5,44. A idade dos primeiros sintomas variou entre 24 horas a 80 anos, com média de idade de 32,13 anos (±19,48. Até os 15 anos foram observados 30 doentes; entre 15 e 50 anos, 91 doentes; com idade acima de 50 anos, 32 doentes; após os 60 anos, a doença tem nítido predomínio entre os homens (1,5:1. Na amostra estudada, a forma auto-imunoadquirida foi a mais frequente, com comprometimento muscular generalizado, porém o envolvimento da musculatura ocular com ptose e diplopia se constituiu nas manifestações clínicas mais frequentes.We have retrospectively analysed the records of patients diagnosed as having myasthenia gravis and followed up in our departament from February 1973 to March 1995. The main clinical findings were ptosis, diplopia, dysphagia, disphonia or dysarthria, mastigatory impairment, dyspnea, asthenia, weakness of the cervical muscles and of the extremities, as well as findings of the physical and neurological examination. Based on the information collected, the patients were classified

  14. Development of a Traumatic Brain Injury Assessment Score Using Novel Biomarkers Discovered Through Autoimmune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    autoimmune processes mediating neuropathology. These include multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Guillain Barre ...the hypothesis that immune-based therapies may have a place in treating injuries of the CNS, particularly in conjunction with stem cell repair (38; 46...followed by centrifugation (3000 x g, 5 min, room temp) (35). Delipidated proteins were physically recovered as a pad positioned at the aqueous

  15. Antibodies to autoantigen targets in myasthenia and their value in clinical practice

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    S. I. Dedaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a classic autoimmune disease, which clinical manifestations in the form of weakness and abnormal muscle fatigue, due to the damaging effect of polyclonal antibodies to different structures of the neuromuscular synapse and muscles. The study of autoimmune substrate with myasthenia is routine in many clinics dealing with the problems of neuromuscular pathology, and the identification of high concentration of serum antibodies to a number of antigenic structures is the gold standard in diagnosis.Determination of serum antibodies to various autoimmune targets is an important tool in clinical practice. The majority of patients shows the high concentration of antibodies to AchR that gives the opportunity to use it as an important diagnostic criterion. The specificity of changes in the concentration of AchR-antibodies due to pathogenetic treatment allows to objectify the suppression of autoimmune aggression and evaluate the reliability of remission. However, the absence of AchR-antibodies when there are clear clinical and electromyography signs of myasthenia gravis suggests an autoimmune attack against a number of other targets, the most studied of which is the MuSK. On the contrary, patients with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma, almost always have a higher level of AchR-antibodies. The presence of thymoma is accompanied by the generation of antibodies to titin and RyR, which is also observed in persons with late-onset myasthenia without thymoma. High concentration of antibodies to these structures can be interpreted as a reliable sign of thymoma in patients younger than 60 years.

  16. Myasthenia Gravis Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if the muscle action is weakened. Single fiber electromyography (EMG). In this test, single muscle fibers are ... myself if I have MG? To help ease fatigue: Get plenty of rest. Budget your energy. Rest ...

  17. Myasthenia Gravis Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Testing Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Tumor Marker AMAS Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Ammonia Amniocentesis Amylase ANCA/MPO/ ... Beta-2 Microglobulin Kidney Disease Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Bicarbonate (Total CO2) Bilirubin Blood Culture Blood Gases ...

  18. Employees with Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work-site Install automatic door openers Provide proper ergonomics Make sure materials and equipment at workstation are within reach range Move workstation close to other work areas, office equipment, and break rooms Situations and ...

  19. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

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    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  20. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoimmune disease and subsequent digestive tract cancer by histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, K; Liu, X; Ji, J; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2012-04-01

    Dysregulation of the immune function in autoimmune diseases could potentially lead to cancer development and there is definite evidence linking some autoimmune mechanisms with cancer. We analyzed systematically the occurrence of histology-specific digestive tract cancers in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases in order to address the question of shared susceptibility. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent digestive tract cancers up to the year 2008 and in patients hospitalized for autoimmune disease after the year 1964. Myasthenia gravis associated with five different cancers with SIRs ranging from 1.35 to 2.78. Pernicious anemia, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, systemic lupus erythematosis and psoriasis were also associated with cancers at multiple sites. Rheumatoid arthritis associated with no cancer and the standardized incidence ratio was decreased for colon adenocarcinoma, also in ankylosing spondylitis patients. Increased risks of cancer were observed in patients with several autoimmune diseases. Myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia were associated with many cancers; this is possibly related to immunosuppressant medication in myasthenia gravis. The decreased risks in colon and rectal adenocarcinomas in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis suggest underlying inflammatory mechanisms as the risks may have been suppressed by the use of anti-inflammatory medication.

  2. The effect of interleukin (IL)-21 and CD4+CD25++T cells on cytokine production of CD4+responder T cells in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahgholi-Hajibehzad, M; Durmuş, H; Aysal, F; Gülşen-Parman, Y; Oflazer, P; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G

    2017-11-01

    Impairment of the suppressive function of regulatory T (T reg ) cells has been reported in myasthenia gravis (MG). In this study, cytokine-related mechanisms that may lead to the defect of T reg were investigated in patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR + MG). Proliferation and cytokine production of responder T (T resp ) cells in response to polyclonal activation were measured in a suppression assay. The effect of interleukin (IL)-21 on suppression was evaluated in vitro in co-culture. IL-21 increased the proliferation of T resp cells in T resp /T reg co-cultures. T resp cells from patients with MG secreted significantly lower levels of IL-2. In patients with MG, IL-2 levels did not change with the addition of T reg to cultures, whereas it decreased significantly in controls. In T resp /T reg co-cultures, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 production increased in the presence of T reg in patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ was decreased, whereas IL-17A was increased in both patient and control groups. IL-21 inhibited the secretion of IL-4 in MG and healthy controls (HC), and IL-17A in HC only. The results demonstrated that IL-21 enhances the proliferation of T resp cells in the presence of T reg . An effect of IL-21 mainly on T resp cells through IL-2 is implicated. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  3. A case of anterior mediastinitis and bilateral multiple lung abscesses occurring after trans-subxiphoid video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy for thymoma with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanlu; Geng, Yingcai; Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yun

    2016-09-01

    A 68-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with an acute episode of chest pain, progressive cough and fever. She underwent trans-subxiphoid video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (TsVATET) for thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG) 9 days ago. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed anterior mediastinal oedema, and infiltrative findings involved bilateral lung. Physical examination revealed the subxiphoid wound suppuration. We diagnosed subxiphoid incision infection, anterior mediastinitis and concomitant bilateral pneumonia. Using antibiotics intravenously combined with anterior mediastinum irrigation and drainage, she felt well but bilateral multiple lung abscesses were discovered on the 12 th day of hospitalisation. After conservative treatment with antibiotics and wound care, the recovery was satisfactory and she discharged home. In our experience, because the subxiphoid incision, the anterior mediastinum and the bilateral thoracic cavity communicated directly after TsVATET, we should be aware of the risk of anterior mediastinitis, the infection of bilateral pleural cavity, pneumonia and multiple lung abscesses following subxiphoid incision infection.

  4. Plasmapheresis as preparatory method for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis Plasmaferese como método preparatório de timectomia em miastenia grave

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    José Carlos Brant Seggia

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of plasmapheresis in preparation for thymectomy, two groups of 40 patients were selected from a sample of 286 patients with myasthenia gravis examined by the first author Group 1 included patients (15 male and 25 female; age range 8-64 yrs who underwent thymectomy without previous plasmapheresis, whereas patients in group 2 (17 male and 23 female; age range 11-61 yrs were thymectomized after plasmapheresis. We required patients to have a minimum follow-up period of 12 months to be included in the study. A clinical evaluation protocol composed of 76 items was developed for the study. We found significant improvement in respiratory function and muscular strength in patients thymetomized after plasmapheresis. Furthermore, the combined treatment reduced cost and length of hospital stay. Therefore, we conclude that plasmapheresis should be considered as a coadjuvant to thymectomy in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.No intuito de estudar as repercussões de um curso de plasmaferese como método preparatório para a timectomia, tomamos duas amostras de 40 pacientes selecionados de um universo de 286 casos de miastenia gravis, em que a investigação clínica, eletrofisiológica, laboratorial, o seguimento e o protocolo foram completamente realizados. Consideramos como grupo 1 aquele em que a timectomia foi realizada sem preparação pre-operatória e grupo 2 aquele em que a plasmaferese foi executada como coadjuvante a timectomia. O grupo 1 era composto de 15 pacientes do sexo masculino e 25 do feminino; a idade variou de 8 a 64 anos com mediana de 30 anos. No segundo grupo, 17 eram masculinos e 23 femininos; a idade variou de 11 a 61 anos com mediana de 33 anos. Foi preenchida ficha de avaliação clínica sequencial de 76 itens e traçamos um curso de plasmaferese de 5 sessões seguido da timectomia, mantendo a mesma técnica operatória, realizada pela mesma equipe cirúrgica, tentando assim minimizar as distorções na an

  5. Safety and efficacy of eculizumab in anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis (REGAIN): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James F; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Benatar, Michael; Murai, Hiroyuki; Barohn, Richard J; Illa, Isabel; Jacob, Saiju; Vissing, John; Burns, Ted M; Kissel, John T; Muppidi, Srikanth; Nowak, Richard J; O'Brien, Fanny; Wang, Jing-Jing; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-12-01

    Complement is likely to have a role in refractory generalised myasthenia gravis, but no approved therapies specifically target this system. Results from a phase 2 study suggested that eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, produced clinically meaningful improvements in patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis. We further assessed the efficacy and safety of eculizumab in this patient population in a phase 3 trial. We did a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study (REGAIN) in 76 hospitals and specialised clinics in 17 countries across North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Eligible patients were aged at least 18 years, with a Myasthenia Gravis-Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) score of 6 or more, Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) class II-IV disease, vaccination against Neisseria meningitides, and previous treatment with at least two immunosuppressive therapies or one immunosuppressive therapy and chronic intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange for 12 months without symptom control. Patients with a history of thymoma or thymic neoplasms, thymectomy within 12 months before screening, or use of intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange within 4 weeks before randomisation, or rituximab within 6 months before screening, were excluded. We randomly assigned participants (1:1) to either intravenous eculizumab or intravenous matched placebo for 26 weeks. Dosing for eculizumab was 900 mg on day 1 and at weeks 1, 2, and 3; 1200 mg at week 4; and 1200 mg given every second week thereafter as maintenance dosing. Randomisation was done centrally with an interactive voice or web-response system with patients stratified to one of four groups based on MGFA disease classification. Where possible, patients were maintained on existing myasthenia gravis therapies and rescue medication was allowed at the study physician's discretion. Patients, investigators

  6. Autoimmune diseases in a Nigerian woman--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabi, O A; Owolabi, M O; Osotimehin, B O

    2003-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are conditions in which there is the development of antibodies against self cells/ organs. AD could either be organ-specific or non-organ specific (systemic) in clinical presentation. Commonly reported ADs includes: Myasthenia gravis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Guillian-Barre syndrome, vitiligo, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves diseases, Goodpastures syndrome, pemphigus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, Addisons disease, multiple sclerosis, pernicious anaemia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is paucity of locally documented information on the occurrence of AD in same patient in our environment. We therefore report the case of a 66 year old woman who presented at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, with a spectrum of the AD, Vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, impaired glucose tolerance.

  7. Aquaporin-4-autoimmunity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Jarius, Sven; Laustrup, Helle

    2018-01-01

    .7%) neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) patients both of whom had myelitis and antiphospholipid syndrome; one patient also had myasthenia gravis. None had MOG-IgG. PD-1.3A allele was not associated with SLE nor with NPSLE. CONCLUSION: AQP4-IgG autoimmune syndrome may rarely co-exist with SLE, and such patients have other...... NMOSD-typical syndromes such as myelitis....

  8. Comparison of CT and chemical-shift MRI for differentiating thymoma from non-thymomatous conditions in myasthenia gravis: value of qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, A M; Priola, S M; Gned, D; Giraudo, M T; Fornari, A; Veltri, A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) and chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) for differentiating thymoma (THY) from thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and normal thymus (NT), and to determine which technique is more accurate. Eighty-three patients with generalised MG who underwent surgery were divided into the TLH/NT group (A; 65 patients) and THY group (B; 24 patients). Differences in qualitative characteristics and quantitative data (CT: radiodensity in Hounsfield units; MRI: signal intensity index [SII]) between groups were tested using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. Logistic regression models were estimated for both qualitative and quantitative analyses. At quantitative analysis, discrimination abilities were determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUROC) with computation of optimal cut-off points. The diagnostic accuracies of CT and MRI were compared using McNemar's test. At qualitative assessment, MRI had higher accuracy than CT (96.4%, 80/83 and 86.7%, 72/83, respectively). At quantitative analysis, both the radiodensity and SII were significantly different between groups (pquantitative assessment, the AUROC of the radiodensity in discriminating between groups was 0.904 (optimal cut-off point, 20 HU) with an accuracy of 77.1% (64/83). For MRI, the AUROC of the SII was 0.989 (optimal cut-off point, 7.766%) with an accuracy of 96.4% (80/83), which was significantly higher than CT (pqualitative assessment, accuracy improved both for CT (89.2%, 74/83) and MRI (97.6%, 81/83). Quantitative analysis is useful in evaluating patients with MG and improves the diagnostic accuracy of CT and MRI based on qualitative assessment. Chemical-shift MRI is more reliable than CT in differentiating THYs from non-thymomatous conditions. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Does myasthenia gravis influence overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence in thymoma patients? A Retrospective clinicopathological multicentre analysis on 797 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filosso, Pier Luigi; Evangelista, Andrea; Ruffini, Enrico; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Margaritora, Stefano; Novellis, Pierluigi; Rena, Ottavio; Casadio, Caterina; Andreetti, Claudio; Guerrera, Francesco; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Diso, Daniele; Mussi, Alfredo; Venuta, Federico; Oliaro, Alberto; Lucchi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Aim of this study is to evaluate whether Myasthenia Gravis (MG) might influence Overall Survival (OS) and Cumulative Incidence of Recurrence (CIR) in thymoma patients. this is a multicenter retrospective study of patients operated in 6 high-volume Italian Institutions between 1990 and 2012. OS was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and CIR by considering death from any cause as a competing event. Crude and adjusted comparisons by MG for OS and CIR were performed using Cox and Fine&Gray models. Adjusted models included MG, age, gender, stage, histology, induction therapy, completeness of resection, adjuvant therapy. Seven hundred ninety-seven patients were included: 375 (47%) had MG. MG patients were younger and more frequently female, with a B2-B3 thymoma. At the end of the study, 129 patients (54 with MG) developed a recurrence and 165 (66 with MG) died. At univariate analysis, MG showed a slight protective effect on OS, not confirmed by the multivariate model. Age, incomplete resection, advanced stages and thymic carcinoma were negative prognostic variables. Univariate analyses showed no evidence of MG protective effect on CIR. Advanced stages and induction therapy were significant negative predictors. our study showed that MG was significantly associated with female, lower age and B2-B3 thymoma; it demonstrated a slight protective effect on OS at the univariate analysis which was not confirmed in multivariate as well as no impact on CIR. Advanced tumor stages and thymic carcinoma histology for OS and induction therapy and advanced stages for CIR were negative prognostic variables. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Labour market participation and sick leave among patients diagnosed with myasthenia gravis in Denmark 1997-2011: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Asger; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Rahbek, Jes; Stapelfeldt, Christina Malmose; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lund, Thomas

    2016-11-17

    To examine labour market participation and long-term sick leave following a diagnosis with myasthenia gravis (MG) compared with the general Danish population and for specific subgroups of MG patients. A nationwide matched cohort study from 1997 to 2011 using data from population-based medical and social registries. The study includes 330 MG patients aged 18 to 65 years old identified from hospital diagnoses and dispensed prescriptions, and twenty references from the Danish population matching each MG patient on age, gender, and profession. Main outcome measures are labour market participation (yes/no) and long-term sick leave ≥9 weeks (yes/no) with follow-up at 1- and 2 years after the time of MG diagnosis or match. Based on complete person-level information on all public transfer payments in Denmark, persons having no labour market participation are defined as individuals receiving social benefits for severely reduced workability, flexijob, and disability pension. MG is consistently associated with higher odds of having no labour market participation and long-term sick leave compared with the general Danish population (no labour market participation & ≥9 weeks sick leave at 2-year follow-up, adjusted OR (95% CI): 5.76 (4.13 to 8.04) & 8.60 (6.60 to 11.23)). Among MG patients, females and patients treated with both acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and immunosuppression have higher odds of lost labour market participation and long-term sick leave. This study suggests that MG patients have almost 6 times higher odds of no labour market participation and almost 9 times higher odds of long-term sick leave 2 years after diagnosis compared with the general Danish population. In particular female MG patients and patients treated with both acetylcholinesterase and immunosuppression have high odds of a negative labour market outcome. Future research should focus on predictors in workplace and labour market policy of labour market participation among MG patients.

  11. Comparison of CT and chemical-shift MRI for differentiating thymoma from non-thymomatous conditions in myasthenia gravis: value of qualitative and quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priola, A.M.; Priola, S.M.; Gned, D.; Giraudo, M.T.; Fornari, A.; Veltri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) and chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) for differentiating thymoma (THY) from thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and normal thymus (NT), and to determine which technique is more accurate. Materials and methods: Eighty-three patients with generalised MG who underwent surgery were divided into the TLH/NT group (A; 65 patients) and THY group (B; 24 patients). Differences in qualitative characteristics and quantitative data (CT: radiodensity in Hounsfield units; MRI: signal intensity index [SII]) between groups were tested using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. Logistic regression models were estimated for both qualitative and quantitative analyses. At quantitative analysis, discrimination abilities were determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUROC) with computation of optimal cut-off points. The diagnostic accuracies of CT and MRI were compared using McNemar's test. Results: At qualitative assessment, MRI had higher accuracy than CT (96.4%, 80/83 and 86.7%, 72/83, respectively). At quantitative analysis, both the radiodensity and SII were significantly different between groups (p<0.0001). For CT, at quantitative assessment, the AUROC of the radiodensity in discriminating between groups was 0.904 (optimal cut-off point, 20 HU) with an accuracy of 77.1% (64/83). For MRI, the AUROC of the SII was 0.989 (optimal cut-off point, 7.766%) with an accuracy of 96.4% (80/83), which was significantly higher than CT (p<0.0001). By using optimal cut-off points for cases with an erroneous diagnosis at qualitative assessment, accuracy improved both for CT (89.2%, 74/83) and MRI (97.6%, 81/83). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis is useful in evaluating patients with MG and improves the diagnostic accuracy of CT and MRI based on qualitative assessment. Chemical-shift MRI is more reliable than CT in

  12. Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) in thymus from myasthenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchikh, M; Zouaidia, F; Benhaddou, E H A; Mahassini, N; Achir, A; El Malki, H O

    2017-06-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a membranous immunoglobulin involved in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases and tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of RAGE in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. This prospective study included 41 cases of myasthenia gravis treated at our institution between 2010 and 2015. There were 18 men and 23 women, with an average age of 36.44±14.47 years. The majority of patients (24.4%) were classified as IIb, according to MGFA scoring, and 21 of them required corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressive treatment. Assessment of RAGE in thymus specimens was done by immunohistochemistry using RAGE antibody (C-term). RAGE expression was assessed according to various clinical, paraclinical and pathological parameters. Histopathological studies found 18 thymomas, 17 hyperplasias and six other types of pathology. Expression of RAGE was negative/weak in 19 cases and moderate/strong in 22 cases. It was more important in thymoma type B2 (P<0.001) and when the duration of myasthenia was short (P=0.04), and was not significantly related to either myasthenia clinical severity or preoperative treatment. Our results suggest that the RAGE pathway is involved in myasthenia gravis pathophysiology, especially at disease onset, and in forms with thymomas. Further studies would be indispensable to explore other aspects of this signaling pathway, especially the potential role of different ligands and soluble forms of RAGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Miastenia gravis diagnostic in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Patricia Suraniti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Miastenia Gravis is a neuromuscular disease caused by auto antibodies. Early Clinical and biochemical diagnosis and treatment is demanded in the assurementof quality and time of life in all dogs. In this study we describe the conventional diagnosis methods and therapy in 32 dogs with suspected myasthenia gravis and propose the administration of bromide of piridostigmin as another use full diagnosis method in dogs.

  14. Review on thymoma and thymoma-associated autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-min LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thymic carcinomas are tumors of the anterior mediastinum derived from the epithelial cells of the thymus gland. Malignancies linked to thymoma lead to the loss of self-tolerance leading to autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplastic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus etc. In recent years, three main mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate these interactions, such as immature T cell theory, tumor-gene theory and the combination mechanism of cellular and humoral immunity. In fact, the resection of the thymoma is beneficial to many patients of thymoma related autoimmune diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.16

  15. Plasmapheresis in the treatment of myasthenia gravis: retrospective study of 26 patients Plasmaférese no tratamento da miastenia grave: estudo retrospectivo de 26 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Carandina-Maffeis

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the experience of Unicamp Clinical Hospital with plasma exchange (PE therapy in myasthenia gravis (MG. About 17.8 % of a totality of MG patients had PE performed: 26 cases, 19 women and seven men. The mean age-onset of MG was 28 years, extremes 11 and 69. Minimum deficit observed in the group was graded IIb (O & G or IIIa (MGFA scale. One patient had prethymectomy PE. In seven the procedures were performed due to myasthenic crisis and in 18 patients due to severe myasthenic symptoms or exacerbation of previous motor deficit. Two patients were also submitted to chronic PE considering refractoriness to other treatments. Twenty-six patients had 44 cycles of PE and 171 sessions. The mean number of sessions was 3.9 (SD ± 1.4 each cycle; median 5, extremes 2 and 6. The mean time by session was 106,5 minutes (SD ± 35.2; median 100.5 (extremes of 55 and 215. The mean volume of plasma exchanged in each session was 2396 ml (SD ± 561; median 2225 (extremes 1512 and 4500. Side effects occurred: reversible hypotension (seven cases, mild tremor or paresthesias (seven cases. Infection and mortality rates due to PE were zero. All patients had immediate benefit of each PE cycle and usually they also received prednisone or other immunosuppressors. Good acceptance of the procedure was observed in 80.7% of patients.Analisamos a experiência do Hospital das Clínicas da Unicamp com plasmaferese: (PF na miastania grave (MG. 17,8 % do total dos casos de MG submeteu-se a PF, 26 casos, 19 mulheres e sete homens. A idade média de início da MG foi 28 anos (extremos 11 e 69. O menor déficit clínico foi IIb (O & G e IIIa (MGFA. A PF foi indicada no pré-operatório de timectomia em um caso e em sete devido a crise miastênica. Em 18 casos, com MG generalizada e sintomas bulbares ou com exacerbação de déficit prévio, a PF foi indicada como intervenção aguda. Em dois pacientes desse grupo ela foi indicada também em regime crônico de ciclos mensais

  16. Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us) comes from the Greek and Latin words meaning "grave muscular weakness." The most common form of ... a total redesign to coincide with our new brand. Introducing: Focus on MG, the Spring edition for ...

  17. Neurogenic Changes In Myasthenia Gravis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    generation, loss of myoflbrils. Dilated sarcoplasm reticulum. loss of myofibrils. streaming of Z-Iines. large areas of fibril destruction. Increased collagen formation with remnants of plasma membrana loss of myofibrils. folding of plasma membranes loss of myofibrils. streaming and loss of Z-lines largo number of membranous.

  18. Muscle strength in myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, S; Vissing, J

    2014-01-01

    is related to disease duration or gender. The aim of this study was to quantify the strength of patients with MG and investigate whether it is related to disease duration. METHODS: Eight muscle groups were tested by manual muscle testing and with a hand-held dynamometer in 38 patients with generalized MG...... and 37 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. The disease duration was recorded and compared with strength measures. RESULTS: On average, muscle strength was decreased by 28% compared with controls (Pstrength measures in individual patients did not differ, suggesting that the muscle...... force reported was not subject to fatigue, but reflected fixed weakness. The male patients showed a greater reduction in muscle force in all eight muscle groups than women with MG (60% vs 77% of normal, Pstrength in shoulder abductors was most affected (51% vs 62...

  19. Megaesophagus secondary to myasthenia gravis in a female German shepherd dog/ Megaesôfago secundário a miastenia grave em uma cadela da raça Pastor Alemão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osimar Sanches

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Megaesophagus is a common cause of regurgitation being one of the possible etiologies the myasthenia gravis characterized by a neuromuscular disorder that result in weakness of the skeletal muscles, of the esophagus, of the larynx and of the pharynx. The present report describes a case of a female German shepherd dog, with report of muscles weakness and frequent vomits, which was diagnosed as a megaesophagus secondary to myasthenia gravis. The radiograph of the animal presented an accentuated cervical and thoracic megaesophagus. After the institution of the recommended therapeutic protocol the animal presented visible improvement when walking, however the regurgitations worsened and it began to present cough. New radiograph was accomplished with presence, besides megaesophagus, of aspiration pneumonia. The owner opted for the euthanasia of the animal and the necropsy revealed severe pneumonia and an accentuated dilation of the posterior portion of the esophagus, collaborating with subsidies for an unfavorable prognostic of the case.Megaesôfago é uma causa comum de regurgitação sendo uma das possíveis etiologias a miastenia grave caracterizada por uma desordem neuromuscular que resulta em fraqueza dos músculos esqueléticos, do esôfago, da laringe e da faringe. O presente relato descreve um caso de uma cadela da raça Pastor Alemão, com histórico de fraqueza muscular e vômitos freqüentes, que foi diagnosticada como megaesôfago secundário à miastenia grave. A radiografia do animal apresentou um acentuado megaesôfago cervical e torácico. Após a instituição do protocolo terapêutico recomendado o animal apresentou melhora visível ao caminhar, porém as regurgitações pioraram e começou a apresentar tosse. Foi realizado novo exame radiográfico com presença, além de megaesôfago, de pneumonia aspirativa. A proprietária optou pela eutanásia do animal e a necropsia revelou severa pneumonia e dilatação acentuada da por

  20. Late-onset myasthenia not on the increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E G; Hallas, Jesper; Hansen, K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increase in late-onset myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported. There are few large population-based studies over longer periods of time reflecting recent developments in MG incidence. METHODS: We identified a nationwide cohort of patients with incident myasthenia in Denmark in 1996...

  1. HLA-DQA1*03:02/DQB1*03:03:02 is strongly associated with susceptibility to childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis in Southern Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Lu, Jia-Hong; Lin, Jie; Xi, Jian-Ying; Lu, Jun; Luo, Su-Shan; Qiao, Kai; Xiao, Bao-Guo; Lu, Chuan-Zhen; Zhao, Chong-Bo

    2012-06-15

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation between onset age, clinical features and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 genetic variability in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients in Southern Han Chinese. 205 MG patients and 100 controls were genotyped for HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 using sequence-based typing (SBT) and analyzed for haplotype frequencies. Anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) autoantibodies were measured in all, and muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies were tested in AChR antibody negative patients. HLA-DQA1/DQB1 haplotypes showed association only with childhood-onset MG. Haplotype DQA1*03:02/DQB1*03:03:02 (DQ9) was positively associated with the childhood-onset MG, while haplotype DQA1*02:01/DQB1*02:02 and DQA1*05:01:01/DQB1*02:01:01 (DQ2) were negatively associated with this group. Childhood-onset ocular MG patients had an extremely high phenotype frequency of DQ9 haplotype (90.1% of patients, 34.0% of controls, p≤0.0001, OR=17.8). The childhood-onset ocular MG in Southern Han Chinese may present a particular subgroup of distinct genetic background. Its correlation to the HLA haplotype DQA1*03:02/DQB1*03:03:02 might explain the phenotypic difference of MG between Han Chinese and Caucasians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Different Thymic Pathologies on the Clinical Course of Myasthenia Gravis: A Population Wide Study in Latvia / Aizkrūts Dziedzera Patoloģiju Ietekmeu uz Myasthenia Gravis Klīnisko Gaitu: Populācijas Pētījums Latvijā

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieda Anete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG ir autoimūna saslimšana, ko raksturo muskuļu vājums un pastiprināta nogurdināmība auto-antivielu izraisītu neiromuskulārās pārvades traucējumu dēļ. Šo auto-antivielu produkcijā ir iesaistīts aizkrūts dziedzeris. Šī pētījuma mērķis bija noskaidrot (1 dažādu aizkrūts dziedzera patoloģiju sastopamību MG pacientiem Latvijā; (2 dažādu aizkrūts dziedzera patoloģiju potenciālo ietekmi uz MG klīnisko gaitu un saistību ar pacientu demogrāfiskajiem rādītājiem; un (3 aizkrūts dziedzera patoloģiju ķirurģiskās ārstēšanas (timektomijas efektivitāti MG simptomu mazināšanā Latvijā. Pētījuma rezultāti liecina, ka visbiežāk sastopamā aizkrūts dziedzera patoloģija MG pacientiem Latvijā ir timoma. Salīdzinot ar citu starptautisku pētījumu datiem, Latvijā ievērojami retāk kā citās pasaules valstīs tiek diagnosticēta aizkrūts dziedzera hiperplāzija. Tā netika konstatēta nevienam pacientam pēc 60 gadu vecuma. Pacientiem ar konstatētu aizkrūts dziedzera hiperplāziju raksturīgs ievērojami agrāks MG pirmo simptomu parādīšanās vecums nekā pacientiem ar konstatētu timomu. Praktiski visiem pacientiem ar timomu vai hiperplāziju attīstās ģeneralizēta MG forma. Pētījumā neizdevās statistiski ticami pierādīt aizkrūts dziedzera patoloģiju ietekmi uz elektrofizioloģisko testu rezultātiem, klīnisko simptomu smagumu, hospitalizāciju biežumu, tostarp intensīvās terapijas nodaļā, sakarā ar MG paasinājumu vai krīzi, darba nespēju vai invaliditāti. Netika statistiski ticami pierādīta arī timektomijas efektivitāte MG simptomu mazināšanā.

  3. Evaluation of the respiratory function in myasthenia gravis: an important tool for clinical feature and diagnosis of the disease Avaliação da função respiratória na miastenia gravis: importância na caracterização clínica e no diagnóstico da doença

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. P. Saraiva

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenic gravis may affect both inspiratory and expiratory muscles. Respiratory involvement occurred in almost all patients with myasthenia gravis in all clinical forms of the disease: 332 lung function tests done in 324 myasthenic patients without respiratory symptoms (age 34.6 ± 18.3 years were examined. Lung volumes analysis showed that all the patients of both sexes with generalized or ocular myasthenia gravis showed "myasthenic pattern". Male patients with "ocular" form only presented the "myasthenic pattern" with lung impairment and had, from the lung function point of view, a more benign behaviour. Female patients with the "ocular" form exhibited a behaviour of respiratory variables similar to that of the generalized form. It was not observed modification of the variables that suggested obstruction of the higher airways. The "myasthenic pattern" was rarely observed in other neuromuscular diseases, except in patients with laryngeal stenosis.O comprometimento respiratório é fator limitante na evolução clinica da miastenia gravis (MG e as formas clínicas mais graves apresentavam acometimento bulbar e respiratório. Para avaliar a reserva respiratória foram examinados em 324 pacientes com MG (forma ocular 62, generalizada 246 e timomatosa 16 as seguintes variáveis da prova de função pulmonar (PFP: capacidade vital forçada (FVC; volume onde o fluxo expiratório é igual a 1 litro por segundo (VF=1; volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo (FEV1; fluxo expiratório forçado medido entre 0,2 e 1,2 litros (FEF; fluxo médio expiratório forçado, medido entre 25 e 75% da FVC (FMF; intervalo de tempo entre 25 e 75% da FVC (FMFT; tempo médio de trânsito na expiração forçada (MTT; capacidade pulmonar total (TLC; volume residual (RV; curva fluxo-volume para pesquisa do "padrão miastênico". A análise estatística realizada foi: "t pareado" entre paciente e seu padrão e "t não pareado" entre grupos. Conclusões: Todos os

  4. Myasthaenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali; Yasawy, Zakia M.

    2017-01-01

    Myasthaenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder which is twice as common among women, often presenting in the second and third decades of life. Typically, the first trimester of pregnancy and first month postpartum are considered high-risk periods for MG exacerbations. During pregnancy, treatment for MG is usually individualised, thus improving its management. Plasma exchange and immunoglobulin therapies can be safely used to treat severe manifestations of the disease or myasthaenic crises. However, thymectomies are not recommended because of the delayed beneficial effects and possible risks associated with the surgery. Assisted vaginal delivery—either vacuum-assisted or with forceps—may be required during labour, although a Caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia should be reserved only for standard obstetric indications. Myasthaenic women should not be discouraged from attempting to conceive, provided that they seek comprehensive counselling and ensure that the disease is under good control before the start of the pregnancy. PMID:29062547

  5. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  7. Increased expression of P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with clinical severity and serum levels of Th17-related cytokines in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Hao; Jia, Xiao; Zhang, Xiuying; Xia, Yan; Wang, YuZhong; Fu, Linlin; Xiao, Chenghua; Geng, Deqin

    2017-06-01

    P2X7R is a well-documented activator of innate and adaptive immune responses. We aimed to measure the expression levels of P2X7R in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and to investigate whether the expression of P2X7R is associated with pathogenesis of MG. A total of 32 patients with MG (12 generalized MG (GMG) and 20 Ocular MG (OMG) and 22 healthy donors were recruited in this study. The quantitative MG score was used to evaluate the clinical severity. Real-time PCR and western blot were used to measure the levels of P2X7R expressed in PBMCs. Serum Th17-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-21) were tested by ELISA. PBMCs from MG patients were purified and challenged by LPS with or without a selective P2X7R inhibitor (BBG). Our results showed that the expression of P2X7R mRNA and protein in PBMCs was increased in MG patients compared with healthy controls, with higher expression in generalized patients (GMG) than in ocular patients (OMG). In addition, P2X7R expression presents a significantly positive correlation with clinical severity and serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-21 in MG. In cultured MG PBMC, LPS challenge led to up-regulated P2X7R expression accompanied with increased production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-21. Importantly, P2X7R blockade with BBG significantly attenuates the LPS-induced production of cytokines. P2X7R expression was up-regulated in MG and LPS-P2X7R axis may be involved in the pathogenesis of MG by promoting Th17 immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Congenital Myasthenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms of congenital myasthenia usually appear in the first few years of childhood, but may not be noticeable until much later, ... Symptoms of congenital myasthenia usually appear in the first few years of childhood, but may not be noticeable until much later, ...

  9. Ophthalmological affectation: A way to mask Miastenia Gravis. A case purpose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor R. Sánchez Dacal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia Gravis MG is an autoimmune and chronic neuromuscular disease characterized by variable of weakness in the skeletal muscles that control the eye movements and it is confused with an ophthalmological disorder. With this presentation we pretend to systematize the Theoretical references about MG which allow making a correct diagnosis of the disease from the experience of a clinical case. The theory about MG regarding the presentation of the disease is discussed, emphasising on the significance of its differential diagnosis with an ophthalmopathy, which will contribute to apply a proper treatment and a satisfactory evolution of the patient, arriving to the conclusion that affectation of the III cranial pair is a way of frequent presentation of MG, being valuable the differential diagnosis of the ophthalmopaties in these entities.

  10. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidosis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED)--a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, J; Perheentupa, J

    2009-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy - candidosis - ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), also known as autoimmune polyendocrine/polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS1), is a rare disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene pair resulting in absence of active AIRE protein, which is essential for both central and peripheral self-tolerance. The phenotype is widely variable. Apart from the classical triad of mucocutaneous candidosis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal failure, several other components, some of which are potentially life-threatening, may develop. Due to the unpredictable clinical course, the patients need regular follow-up by a clinician familiar with the disease. Diagnosis is often possible by clinical diagnostic criteria, but in many cases the early clinical picture does not bring it to mind. A novel tool, search for autoantibodies against interferon-omega, enables proof or exclusion of APECED with more certainty than gene analysis. It is highly specific and sensitive for APECED if thymoma and myasthenia gravis are excluded.

  11. Anaesthetic Challenges in a High Risk Parturient with Myasthenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of myasthenia gravis is low. The management implications of this disease in pregnant women are very challenging for anaesthetists. The objective is to highlight some of the challenges, the management and the lessons learnt during the management of this patient. This is a case report of a 31-year old ...

  12. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of myasthenia in the Krasnoyarsk region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Gasymly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the epidemiological features of myasthenia gravis in the Krasnoyarsk region.Materials and methods. 314 cases of myasthenia gravis, registered by the Krasnoyarsk regional health information analytical center, 87 of these patients were under constant monitoring.Results. Mean age of the patients was 45.4 (SD 4.5 years. The number of women in the observed group – 66 (75.86 %, which was 3 times more than men – 21 (24.14 %. The prevalence was 10.98 per 100.000 population, the primary incidence – 0.01 by 1000.Conclusion. Clinical features of the disease in the region were established, the register of patients with myasthenia was formed. From September 2016 a department of the neuromuscular pathology on the basis of advice Regional Hospital was formed.

  13. Myasthenia Gravis: Drugs to be Avoided

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a “black box warning” (also known as boxed warning) is an alert that appears on the package insert for certain prescription drugs. A black box warning signifies that studies have shown the drug carries ...

  14. Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphisms in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alseth, Espen Homleid; Nakkestad, Hanne Linda; Aarseth, Jan; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Skeie, Geir Olve

    2009-05-29

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is secreted by several hemopoietic cells and suppresses the Th1 mediated immune response, while stimulating B cell differentiation and the humoral immune response. IL-10 expression in Con A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells is related to three polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene; G/A at position -1082, T/C at position -819 and A/C at position -592. We analyzed the distribution of these IL-10 polymorphisms in 64 MG patients and 87 healthy blood donors to determine any influence on MG susceptibility. MG patients had a significantly higher frequency of the ACC/ACC haplotype (12.5% vs 3.4% in controls), as had the subgroups with late onset MG and thymomatous MG (20.0% and 21.4%, respectively). Early onset MG patients had a high frequency of the ATA/ATA haplotype (19.2% vs 3.4% in controls). Titin Ab-positive MG patients had high ACC/ACC (20.0%). This study indicates a direct link between IL-10 and MG pathogenesis, although the complex role of this multi-faceted cytokine in vivo is as yet not fully elucidated.

  15. African Journal of Neurological Sciences - 2009 Vol. 28 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords : myasthenia, spondylarthropathy, autoimmune diseases, ankylosing spondylitis. RESUME. Propos ... We report the case of an association : myasthenia-spondylarthropathy which is an original observation because this .... myasthenia gravis: autoimmune diseases and their relation to thymectomy. Acta Neurol ...

  16. Estudio de apoptosis linfoide por esteroides en 1 caso con miastenia gravis: Seguimiento por ultrasonografía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia de la Caridad Christian López

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available La miastenia gravis es una entidad clínica de origen autoinmune, cuya terapia habitual se realiza con drogas anticolinérgicas, la timectomía o la terapia con esteroides. Fue el objetivo del trabajo el conocer los cambios que se producen en el tamaño del área tímica, con el uso de esteroides, en una paciente de 2 años de edad, que presentaba miastenia gravis juvenil, con una hiperplasia tímica. Esta glándula alcanzó un área máxima de 1 928 mm. Con el uso de la prednisona a 60 mg por semanas se produjo una timectomía medicamentosa, con la reducción del área tímica a 439 mm y remisión total de la sintomatología. Se realizaron las mediciones periódicamente durante un año de los cambios del área de este órgano. No se produjeron recaídas de la enfermedad de base. La ultrasonografía demostró ser un método útil, por ser rápido, barato y no invasiva y permite un ajuste adecuado de la dosis de esteroides que se administrará.Myasthenia gravis is a clinical agent of autoimmune origin, whose habitual therapy includes anticholinergic drugs, thymectomy, or therapy with steroids. The objective of this paper was to know the changes that occur in the size of the thymic area in a 2-year-old patient with juvenile myasthenia gravis and with thymic hyperplasia. This gland reached a maximum area of 1 928 mm and with the use of 60 mg of prednisone per week a medicamentosus thymectomy was performed with the reduction of the thymic area to 439 mm and total remission of the symptomatology. The changes of the area of this organ were periodically measured during a year. There were no relapses of the base disease. The ultrasonography proved to be a useful method, since it is fast, cheap and noninvasive and allows an adequate control of the steroids dose to be administered.

  17. Risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in myasthenia patients treated with azathioprine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E G; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J

    2014-01-01

    The association between use of azathioprine and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with myasthenia was evaluated in a nationwide setting. Treatment of autoimmune myasthenia frequently involves long-term exposure to immunosuppressants, including azathioprine. Use of azathioprine i...... increases the risk of NMSC in organ recipients and probably also in patients with other autoimmune disorders. No previous study has specifically investigated the risk of NMSC in myasthenia patients treated with azathioprine.......The association between use of azathioprine and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in patients with myasthenia was evaluated in a nationwide setting. Treatment of autoimmune myasthenia frequently involves long-term exposure to immunosuppressants, including azathioprine. Use of azathioprine...

  18. Cumulative childhood stress and autoimmune diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Shanta R; Fairweather, DeLisa; Pearson, William S; Felitti, Vincent J; Anda, Robert F; Croft, Janet B

    2009-02-01

    To examine whether childhood traumatic stress increased the risk of developing autoimmune diseases as an adult. Retrospective cohort study of 15,357 adult health maintenance organization members enrolled in the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study from 1995 to 1997 in San Diego, California, and eligible for follow-up through 2005. ACEs included childhood physical, emotional, or sexual abuse; witnessing domestic violence; growing up with household substance abuse, mental illness, parental divorce, and/or an incarcerated household member. The total number of ACEs (ACE Score range = 0-8) was used as a measure of cumulative childhood stress. The outcome was hospitalizations for any of 21 selected autoimmune diseases and 4 immunopathology groupings: T- helper 1 (Th1) (e.g., idiopathic myocarditis); T-helper 2 (Th2) (e.g., myasthenia gravis); Th2 rheumatic (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis); and mixed Th1/Th2 (e.g., autoimmune hemolytic anemia). Sixty-four percent reported at least one ACE. The event rate (per 10,000 person-years) for a first hospitalization with any autoimmune disease was 31.4 in women and 34.4 in men. First hospitalizations for any autoimmune disease increased with increasing number of ACEs (p or=2 ACEs were at a 70% increased risk for hospitalizations with Th1, 80% increased risk for Th2, and 100% increased risk for rheumatic diseases (p Childhood traumatic stress increased the likelihood of hospitalization with a diagnosed autoimmune disease decades into adulthood. These findings are consistent with recent biological studies on the impact of early life stress on subsequent inflammatory responses.

  19. Thymoma associated with autoimmune diseases: 85 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C; Frih, H; Pasquet, F; Kerever, S; Jamilloux, Y; Tronc, F; Guibert, B; Isaac, S; Devouassoux, M; Chalabreysse, L; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of autoimmune diseases (AD) in a cohort of patients with thymoma. Pathological records from three university hospitals, between 2005 and 2011, were reviewed to identify patients with thymoma. Patients with thymoma and AD were compared with patients with thymoma without AD. 47/85 (55%) cases of thymoma had AD, including myasthenia gravis (MG) (n=33), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (n=4), Isaac's syndrome (n=3), Morvan syndrome (n=2), pure red cell aplasia (n=2), systemic lupus (n=2), lichen planus (n=2), and one case of each following conditions: aplastic anemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Good's syndrome, pemphigus, autoimmune hepatitis, Graves' disease, limbic encephalitis, and inflammatory myopathy. Six patients (7%) presented at least 2 ADs. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 60 months (40-78 months). In 32 patients, the diagnosis of AD preceded the diagnosis of thymoma, in 9 patients, thymoma was diagnosed at the same time as the AD and 7 patients had been operated on when they developed an AD. We found a significative difference on the Masaoka stage between the MG patients and the patients who present another AD (p=0.028). No risk factor for developing an AD after thymectomy was identified. We describe here the long-term follow-up of a large series of AD related to thymoma. Our results confirm previous data concerning AD occurrence in patients with thymoma and suggest that preexisting autoimmunity is not a risk factor for developing autoimmune manifestations after thymectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, L. [Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States); McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R. [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Walker, G.R., E-mail: grwalker@ysu.edu [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  1. Selective IgA deficiency in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Shen, Nan; Vyse, Timothy J; Anand, Vidya; Gunnarson, Iva; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Elvin, Kerstin; Truedsson, Lennart; Andersson, Bengt A; Dahle, Charlotte; Ortqvist, Eva; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W; Hammarström, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. It has previously been suggested to be associated with a variety of concomitant autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data on the prevalence of IgAD in patients with Graves disease (GD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease (CD), myasthenia gravis (MG) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of both our own recent large-scale screening results and literature data. Genetic factors are important for the development of both IgAD and various autoimmune disorders, including GD, SLE, T1D, CD, MG and RA, and a strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been reported. In addition, non-MHC genes, such as interferon-induced helicase 1 (IFIH1) and c-type lectin domain family 16, member A (CLEC16A), are also associated with the development of IgAD and some of the above diseases. This indicates a possible common genetic background. In this review, we present suggestive evidence for a shared genetic predisposition between these disorders.

  2. Myasthenia Revealed Following Laparotomy - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelilah GHANNAM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia (muscle weakness is a rare neuromuscular disease of which respiratory failure is the main complication. The accidental discovery of such disease in the perioperative period is rare and potentially serious.We report a case of a woman who underwent emergency operation for appendiceal peritonitis, and failed repeatedly at weaning from postoperative mechanical ventilation. The usual etiologies such as postoperative respiratory complications, ventilator-associated pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating the septic shock or having no impact on it, and neuromyopathy’s resuscitation were considered, researched, examined or eliminated.Faced with the diagnostic impasse and the obvious weaning failure, another interview revealed signs of muscle fatigue which led to the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis decompensated perioperatively. Once the diagnosis was confirmed by means of a neostigmine test, the specific treatment began, particularly through plasma exchange sessions, and the process of weaning resumed. The result was complete weaning. A three-month follow-up showed a stable patient with no significant muscular disability.

  3. Avaliação clínica, endoscópica e manométrica da deglutição em pacientes com miastenia grave autoimune adquirida Clinical, endoscopical and manometric evaluation of swallowing in patients with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Leico Oda

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos 22 pacientes com diagnóstico de miastenia grave autoimune adquirida (MGAA, com queixa de disfagia orofaríngea, avaliados pela análise fonoaudiológica, nasofibrolaringoscópica e manométrica de esfíncter esofágico superior, com o objetivo de avaliar as fases do processo de deglutição e os aspectos anatômicos e funcionais do sistema estomatognático. A idade dos pacientes variou de 19 a 74 anos; 19 (86,4% eram do sexo feminino e 3 (13,6% do masculino. Os principais achados foram: (1 correlação entre avaliação fonoaudiológica e nasofibrolaringoscópica; (2 alterações do sistema estomatognático, em 100% dos casos; (3 desordens da mastigação / deglutição presentes em 100% dos pacientes, à avaliação fonoaudiológica e em 81,8%, à nasofibrolaringoscópica; (4 associação entre penetração/aspiração e episódios de pneumonia; (5 comprometimento muscular do sistema estomatognático, acúmulo de resíduos, escape precoce do bolo para a faringe e episódios de penetração/aspiração apresentaram correlação nítida com diminuição da contração faríngea. Estes achados justificam a necessidade de avaliar as fases do processo de deglutição em pacientes com MGAA, com o objetivo de propiciar uma orientação adequada e prevenir episódios de pneumonia aspirativa, desnutrição e desidratação, devido à administração inadequada de alimentação via oral.Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem following myasthenia gravis (MG and may lead to aspiration of saliva, food or liquids. We herein present 22 MG patients, with complaint of dysphagia, evaluated by phonoaudiological evaluation, nasofibrolaryngoscopical analysis and manometry of upper esophageal sphincter. The main objective was to evaluate the phases of the swallowing process and anatomical and functional aspects of oropharyngeal musculature. The age of patients varied from 19 to 74 years; being 19 female and 3 male. The main data were

  4. Effect of autoimmune diseases on mortality and survival in subsequent digestive tract cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, K; Liu, X; Ji, J; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2012-08-01

    Patients with some autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are at increased risk of cancer, possibly a result of an underlying dysregulation of the immune system, medication, treatment or, probably, surveillance bias. Data on cancer mortality and survival in patients previously diagnosed with AIDs would provide novel information on these comorbidities and their clinical implications. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent deaths from seven digestive tract cancers between 1964 and 2008 in patients hospitalized for any of 33 AIDs. There were 33 increased SMRs for specific cancers after a defined AID; similarly, 21 HRs were increased. Both the SMR and HR were increased after 10 autoimmune disorders, including pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis. Increased SMRs and unchanged HRs were noted for 23 cancers. Myasthenia gravis was associated with SMRs for five cancers but no increases in HRs. For nine cancers, including esophageal cancer after ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis, the SMR was unchanged but the HR increased. The increases in SMRs provide evidence that cancer risks were truly increased and largely unaffected by surveillance bias. The prognostic survival data should contribute to clinical evaluation and therapeutic planning.

  5. Problems in the optimal management of myasthenia gravis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study forms part of a clinical survey of problems in the optimal management of patients with inherited neuromuscular diseases seen at Kalafong Hospital in Pretoria. Our objectives were to determine the problems associated with providing patients with optimal management until true remission (cure), and to ...

  6. Myasthenia Gravis, Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome & Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are seronegative for antibodies to the ACh receptor, meaning the antibodies aren’t detectable in their blood ( ... up the head. Bulbar weakness tends to give speech a slurred, nasal quality. It can also lead ...

  7. Myasthenia gravis with motor neurone disease | Parvaiz | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56 year old male presented with features of easy f atiguability, episodic hoarseness and nasal quality of voice accompanied by nasal regurgitation of liquids for three years. Neurological examination revealed lingual atrophy with fasciculations, pyramidal tract signs and features of neuromuscular junction dysfunction.

  8. Development of Myasthenia Gravis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nano Kigawa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To perform a literature review and estimate MG incidence in an SLE cohort.  Materials and methods: We searched MEDLINE and PubMed for case reports of SLE and MG. We also calculated MG incidence within our clinical SLE cohort (females only. Results: Eleven articles met our criteria, providing 13 SLE patients who developed MG. The majority were female (84.6%, with the average ages of 25.6 and 33.5 years at diagnoses of SLE and MG, respectively. In 380 SLE female patients followed for 2,850 person-years, one MG case occurred. Conclusion: MG in SLE is a rare event.

  9. An Unusual Presentation of Myasthenia Gravis | Chijioke | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    West African Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 6 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  10. Selenomethionine Se 75 thymus scans in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toole, J.F.; Cowan, R.; Maynard, D.; Witcofski, R.L.; Janeway, R.

    1975-01-01

    In 1966, Toole and Witcofski introduced selenomethionine Se 75 mediastinal scanning as a diagnostic test for thymomas. Since then we have performed such scans on patients with myasthenic syndrome. Because the technique is atraumatic, safe, and accurate, it can be performed on critically ill myasthenics. Two hundred and fifty microcuries of selenomethionine Se 75 is injected intravenously. Within 1 hour the mediastinum from the suprasternal notch to the ziphoid process is scanned, using a 2 x 3 inch scanner. Delayed scans have been made in a few instances but they have not increased the number of positive cases. Selenomethionine Se 75 is incorporated into tissues undergoing rapid protein synthesis such as thyroid, pancreas, liver, and lymphomas. Of the 34 mediastinal scans performed on myasthenics between 1966 and December 31, 1974, 4 were positive for thymoma. In addition, there was a positive scan with uptake in an area of atelectasis of the lung adjacent to the mediastinum. Of interest is the fact that 1 patient with carcinoma of the lung had a positive scan over the lesion. In 13 patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia the mediastinal scans were negative. In another patient with a mediastinal mass noted on chest x-ray, a variety of differential diagnostic possibilities were considered, such as pericardial cyst, dermoid, and aneurysm. A selenomethionine scan was strongly positive, suggesting a thymoma which subsequent surgery confirmed

  11. CD8+ T-Cell Deficiency, Epstein-Barr Virus Infection, Vitamin D Deficiency, and Steps to Autoimmunity: A Unifying Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Pender

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T-cell deficiency is a feature of many chronic autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, vitiligo, bullous pemphigoid, alopecia areata, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, and pernicious anaemia. It also occurs in healthy blood relatives of patients with autoimmune diseases, suggesting it is genetically determined. Here it is proposed that this CD8+ T-cell deficiency underlies the development of chronic autoimmune diseases by impairing CD8+ T-cell control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection, with the result that EBV-infected autoreactive B cells accumulate in the target organ where they produce pathogenic autoantibodies and provide costimulatory survival signals to autoreactive T cells which would otherwise die in the target organ by activation-induced apoptosis. Autoimmunity is postulated to evolve in the following steps: (1 CD8+ T-cell deficiency, (2 primary EBV infection, (3 decreased CD8+ T-cell control of EBV, (4 increased EBV load and increased anti-EBV antibodies, (5 EBV infection in the target organ, (6 clonal expansion of EBV-infected autoreactive B cells in the target organ, (7 infiltration of autoreactive T cells into the target organ, and (8 development of ectopic lymphoid follicles in the target organ. It is also proposed that deprivation of sunlight and vitamin D at higher latitudes facilitates the development of autoimmune diseases by aggravating the CD8+ T-cell deficiency and thereby further impairing control of EBV. The hypothesis makes predictions which can be tested, including the prevention and successful treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases by controlling EBV infection.

  12. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study.

  13. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  14. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS): a rare autoimmune presynaptic disorder often associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoser, Benedikt; Eymard, Bruno; Datt, Joe; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder that is related to the loss of functional P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) on presynaptic nerve terminals. Up to 60% of cases occur as a paraneoplastic disorder (SCLC-LEMS), most commonly in association with small cell lung cancer. The remaining cases have an idiopathic non-tumor etiology but are associated with underlying autoimmune disease (NT-LEMS). Patients with LEMS invariably experience progressive proximal muscle weakness, often accompanied by general fatigue and autonomic symptoms. Some LEMS clinical symptoms overlap with those of other myasthenic syndromes, most commonly myasthenia gravis, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. Prognosis is related to the presence of cancer or autoimmune disease and the severity/distribution of muscle weakness. Cause of death in patients with SCLC-LEMS is typically tumor progression, whereas NT-LEMS does not reduce life expectancy. LEMS diagnosis is supported by a threefold approach: clinical features, electromyography, and anti-VGCC antibody serology. LEMS is a clinically important early indicator of possible cancer; therefore, a LEMS diagnosis should immediately prompt rigorous oncological screening and surveillance. Symptomatic treatment of LEMS typically involves medications that improve neurotransmission (e.g., the potassium channel blocker amifampridine [3,4-diaminopyridine]), with addition of immunosuppressants/modulators (e.g., prednisone plus azathioprine) in individuals with persistent symptoms. Where a tumor is identified, oncological treatment should take priority. It should be remembered, however, that LEMS has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities, and therefore warrants timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment in and of itself.

  15. Incidence of autoimmune diseases in patients with scabies: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jui-Ming; Chiu, Feng-Hsiang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Fung-Wei; Hsu, Ren-Jun

    2017-07-01

    Scabies is a commonly occurring infectious immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease. Immune-mediated inflammatory processes are also observed in autoimmune diseases. There have been very few previous studies; however, that have investigated the possible association between scabies and autoimmune diseases. To address this research gap, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study that included a total of 4481 scabies patients and 16,559 control subjects matched by gender, age, insured region, urbanization and income. We tracked both cohorts for a 7-year period to identify the incidence of autoimmune diseases in both groups during that follow-up period. Relatedly, a Cox regression analysis was performed to calculate and compare the hazard ratio (HR) for autoimmune diseases of both groups. An overall increased risk for 19 autoimmune diseases was observed in the scabies patients, with an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.14 (95% CI 1.04-1.25). Compared with the control group, the scabies patients exhibited increased risks of hypersensitivity vasculitis (aHR 5.44, 95% CI 1.64-18.07), dermatomyositis (aHR 4.91, 95% CI 1.80-13.38), polyarteritis nodosa (aHR 2.89, 95% CI 1.46-5.73), systemic lupus erythematosus (aHR 2.73, 95% CI 1.33-5.64), psoriasis (aHR 2.31, 95% CI 1.85-2.88), myasthenia gravis (aHR 2.01, 95% CI 1.31-3.12), type 1 diabetes mellitus (aHR 1.93, 95% CI 1.53-2.44), pernicious anemia (aHR 1.92, 95% CI 1.42-2.61), and rheumatoid arthritis (aHR 1.43, 95% CI 1.12-1.83). In conclusion, the associations between scabies and a variety of autoimmune diseases may exist. Further studies are needed to clarify the shared etiologies and relationships between scabies and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Dermatomyositis and myastenia gravis: An uncommon association with therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Méndez Perles, Clara; Barbadillo, Carmen; Godoy, Hildegarda; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The association of dermatomyositis with myasthenia gravis (MG) is uncommon, having been reported so far in only 26 cases. We report the case of a 69 year-old man diagnosed with MG two years ago and currently treated with piridostigmyne. The patient developed acute proximal weakness, shoulder pain and elevated creatine-kinase (CK). He also developed generalized facial erythema and Gottron's papules. Laboratory tests showed positive antinuclear and anti-Mi2 antibodies. Further analysis confirmed CK levels above 1000 U/l. The clinical management of the patient and the therapeutic implications derived from the coexistence of both entities are discusssed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. An Adult Patient with Ocular Myasthenia and Unusually Long Spontaneous Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Al-Hashel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient developed ocular myasthenia gravis (MG at the age of 33. He was anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR Ab negative. He received cholinesterase blocker for 5 months and went into a complete clinical remission that lasted untreated for 17 years. He relapsed recently with ocular symptoms only. He is now anti-AChR Ab positive and SFEMG is abnormal in a facial muscle. The patient is controlled with steroids. He had one of the longest spontaneous remissions reported in the natural history of MG, particularly unusual for an adult with the disease.

  18. Use of azathioprine for non-thymoma myasthenia and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E G; Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between the use of azathioprine and risk of cancer in patients with non-thymoma myasthenia gravis (MG) in a nationwide setting. METHODS: Case-control study based on population-based registries. Cases were patients with MG with a first time......; however, these risk estimates were based on small numbers. CONCLUSIONS: Use of azathioprine in patients with non-thymoma MG may be associated with a slightly increased risk of cancer overall. Larger studies are necessary to address the risk of site-specific cancers....

  19. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  20. Miastenia gravis na infância: estudo de 18 pacientes

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, Maria da Penha A.; Gabbai, Alberto A.; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Penn, Audrey S.

    2001-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) in childhood is rare comprising 10 to 20 % of all myasthenic patients. We studied 18 patients with MG whose first symptoms started from 1 to 12 years of age, followed at the Department of Neurology of the UNIFESP-EPM, from January 1983 to August 1997. There were 10 girls and 8 boys (1.2:1). Eleven patients (61%) presented moderate or severe generalized disease and 4 (22%) had at least one myasthenic crisis. EMG with supramaximal repetitive nerve stimulation was diagnost...

  1. Miastenia gravis seronegativa

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Morales, L. D.; Vallejos, P. A.; Cardozo, E. G.; Saracho, L. M.; Navarro, Carlos Ramón

    2016-01-01

    La Miastenia gravis (MG) es una enfermedad autoinmune neuromuscular que afecta la transmisión de los impulsos nerviosos hacia los músculos por medio de anticuerpos, principalmente contra los Receptores de Acetilcolina (AChR). La principal manifestación clínica es la debilidad del musculo estriado, que es más notoria con la actividad física y a lo largo del día. Síntomas como visión borrosa, diplopía y ptosis palpebral se presentan hasta en el 60% de los casos. Una forma de presentación atípic...

  2. ÿþM i c r o s o f t W o r d - a a m , 2 0 0 8 , v o l . 7 , N o . 2 , 8 8

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ÿþE m m a n u e l A m e h

    E-mail: otuchu2000@yahoo.com. Abstract. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an acquired autoimmune disorder causing skeletal muscle fatigue and weakness. This is a report of one woman and her daughter presenting with myasthenia and gravis and. Grave's disease. It highlights possible hereditary component of this condition ...

  3. ÿþM i c r o s o f t W o r d - a a m , 2 0 0 8 , v o l . 7 , N o . 2 , 8 8

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ÿþE m m a n u e l A m e h

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an acquired autoimmune disorder causing skeletal muscle fatigue and weakness. This is a report of one woman and her daughter presenting with myasthenia and gravis and. Grave's disease. It highlights possible hereditary component of this condition which has not been commonly reported in ...

  4. Use of Sugammadex in an octagenerian with Myaesthenia Gravis undergoing emergency laporotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Deep; Dharmarajah, Aynkaran

    2017-02-01

    Myaesthenia Gravis is an autoimmune disorder that results in increased sensitivity to neuromuscular blockers. Anaesthesia and surgery in patients with Myaesthenia Gravis is associated with an increased incidence of complications, including post operative ventilation. We report the successful use of intra-operative train of four ratio monitoring and Sugammadex to reverse rocuronium induced neuromuscular blockade in an elderly octagenarian with Myaesthenia Gravis undergoing an emergency laporotomy. An 87year old man with Myaesthenia Gravis underwent an emergency laporotomy for a perforated sigmoid diverticulum. Induction of anaesthesia was performed with 100μg of fentanyl, 120mg propofol and 25mg rocuronium. Intraoperative boluses of 5mg rocuronium were guided by train of four ratio of 50%. At the end of the procedure 4mg/kg of Sugammadex was given to reverse neuromuscular blockade as observed by return of four twitches on the train of four. He was then successfully extubated and did not require any post operative ventilation. We report the successful use of intra-operative neuromuscular monitoring and Sugammadex to reverse rocuronium induced neuromuscular blockade in an elderly octagenarian with Myaesthenia Gravis undergoing emergency laporotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-05-15

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft.

  6. Millora en el tractament contra la miastènia gravis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponseti, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    La miastènia gravis és una malaltia autoimmune i crónica, caracteritzada per una gran debilitat muscular. Un assaig clínic realitzat per la Unitat de Miastènia de l'Hospital General Universitari Vall d'Hebron durant cinc anys acaba de demostrar els beneficis d'incloure un fàrmac, el tacrolimus, per guarir aquesta malaltia.

  7. [Autoimmune diseases with the presence of anti-ku antibodies - analysis of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielosz, Ewa; Majdan, Maria; Jeleniewicz, Radosław; Mazurek, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    a-Ku are rare antibodies, which are reported in course of connective tissue diseases. Their prevalence ranges from 0 to 10% , 2%, on average. The main symptoms associated with the presence of a-Ku antibodies include: myositis, arthritis, Raynaud`s phenomenon and skin lesions. The above features are often defined as autoimmune clinical syndrome associated with a-Ku antibodies. In recent years, three cases with the presence of a-Ku antibodies were observed at the Department of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases. Case 1, a 77-year-old man, with the diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease according to Raynaud`s phenomenon, myositis, arthritis and presence of a-ribonucleoprotein antibodies. Moreover, secondary Sjögren syndrome (SS) and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed. Case 2, a 56-year-old woman with longstanding history of Raynaud`s phenomenon, sclerodactyly, myositis and arthritis. Based on clinical manifestations and additional tests, systemic sclerosis and myositis were diagnosed. Case 3, a 46-year-old woman with SS diagnosis, long-standing history of Raynaud`s phenomenon, arthralgia and polyneuropathy. Moreover, HCV infection with the presence of cryoglobulin was confirmed. The presence of a-Ku antibodies in high titers was found in all cases. The clinical conditions improved after steroid and immunosuppressive therapy. In conclusion, clinical syndromes with the presence of a-Ku antibodies are associated with a wide range of non-specific symptoms, regarding muscle, joint and skin involvement, in particular. The conditions are more often diagnosed in the elderly; in the majority of cases, they are characterized by mild courses, good response to steroid therapy and good prognosis.

  8. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1(∗)15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1(∗)04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1(∗)07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1(∗)08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1(∗)13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1(∗)13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection.

  9. Benefit of modified plasmapheresis in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease condition caused by the generation of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor sites at the neuromuscular junction. The treatment modalities include anticholinesterase drugs, corticosteroids, immunotherapy, thymectomy and plasmapheresis. However ...

  10. Computed tomography of the anterior mediastinum in myasthemia gravis: a radiologic-pathologic correlative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fon, G.T.; Bein, M.E.; Mancuso, A.A.; Keesey, J.C.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wong, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the mediastinum were correlated with pathologic findings of the thymus following thymectomy in 57 patients with myasthenia gravis. Based on the patient's age and the overall morphology of the anterior mediastinum, CT scans were assigned one of four grades in an attempt to predict thymus pathologic findings. Using this grading, 14 of 16 cases of thymoma were suspected or definitely diagnosed. One of the two cases not diagnosed on CT was a microscopic tumor. There were no false-positive diagnoses in 11 cases graded as definitely thymoma. We conclude that thymoma can be sensitively diagnosed in patients older than 40 years of age. However, thymoma cannot be predicted with a high level of confidence in patients younger than 40 because of the difficulty in differentiating normal thymus or hyperplasia from thymoma. Recommendations for the use of CT in the preoperative evaluation of myasthenic patients are presented

  11. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  12. Myasthaenia Gravis : Clinical management issues before, during and after pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hassan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Myasthaenia gravis (MG is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder which is twice as common among women, often presenting in the second and third decades of life. Typically, the first trimester of pregnancy and first month postpartum are considered high-risk periods for MG exacerbations. During pregnancy, treatment for MG is usually individualised, thus improving its management. Plasma exchange and immunoglobulin therapies can be safely used to treat severe manifestations of the disease or myasthaenic crises. However, thymectomies are not recommended because of the delayed beneficial effects and possible risks associated with the surgery. Assisted vaginal delivery—either vacuum-assisted or with forceps—may be required during labour, although a Caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia should be reserved only for standard obstetric indications. Myasthaenic women should not be discouraged from attempting to conceive, provided that they seek comprehensive counselling and ensure that the disease is under good control before the start of the pregnancy.

  13. Peculiarities of anesthetic aid in myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupriyanova E.D.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data on comparative analysis of two medical cases of myasthenia patients, analysis of general anesthetization and post-surgical process. The influence of previous therapy, overall condition and accompanied pathology is stated

  14. Anticholinesterase-Responsive Weakness in the Canine Similar to Myasthenia Gravis of Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Megaesophagus extending from the pronounced following a period of exercise and are thoracic inlet to the diap hragm was demonstrated related to...muscular fatigue generated by exercise hind limbs , a reluctance to exercise, and collapse if and the presence of megaesophagus , MG was forced to exercise...15 minutes. Six hours later, the dog repoFted.5’1 ’21 Megaesophagus has been demon- niarked increase in tolerance to exercise was ing , regurgitation

  15. VAV1 and BAFF, via NFκB pathway, are genetic risk factors for myasthenia gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Harbo, Hanne F

    2014-01-01

    confirmation loci were genotyped in 1177 EOMG patients and 814 controls, from nine European centres. RESULTS: ALLELE FREQUENCY DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND IN FOUR NOVEL LOCI: CD86, AKAP12, VAV1, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and these differences were consistent in all...... are novel and of interest as VAV1 is a key signal transducer essential for T- and B-cell activation, and BAFF is a cytokine that plays important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of B-cells. Moreover, we noted striking epistasis between the predisposing VAV1 and BAFF haplotypes; they conferred...

  16. Mortality in myasthenia gravis: A nationwide population-based follow-up study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie S; Danielsen, Ditte H; Somnier, Finn E

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: All AChR-Ab-seropositive MG patients, diagnosed between 1985 and 2005, were identified. Defined by age at diagnosis (≤ 50 or >50 years), patients were classified as having early- or late-onset MG. For comparison, 10 non-MG individuals from the general population were matched with each patient...

  17. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kaltsatou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  18. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    assessed. METHODS: Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. RESULTS......, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles...

  19. Value of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis after Extended Thymectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Feng Lu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Adjuvant radiation within 1 month after extended thymectomy may be helpful in controlling postoperative MG, such as decreasing the possibility of postoperative myasthenic crisis, and raising cumulative probabilities of reaching CSR.

  20. Identification and characterization of a new multigene family in the human MHC: A candidate autoimmune disease susceptibility element (3.8-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.M.; Venditti, C.P.; Chorney, M.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    An association between idiopathic hemochromatosis (HFE) and the HLA-A3 locus has been previously well-established. In an attempt to identify potential HFE candidate genes, a genomic DNA fragment distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint was used to screen a B cell cDNA library; a member (3.8-1) of a new multigene family, composed of five distinct genomic cross-reactive fragments, was identified. Clone 3.8-1 represents the 3{prime} end of 9.6 kb transcript which is expressed in multiple tissues including the spleen, thymus, lung and kidney. Sequencing and genome database analysis indicate that 3.8-1 is unique, with no homology to any known entries. The genomic residence of 3-8.1, defined by polymorphism analysis and physical mapping using YAC clones, appears to be absent from the genomes of higher primates, although four other cross-reactivities are maintained. The absence of this gene as well as other probes which map in the TNF to HLA-B interval, suggest that this portion of the human HMC, located between the Class I and Class III regions, arose in humans as the result of a post-speciation insertional event. The large size of the 3.8-1 gene and the possible categorization of 3.8-1 as a human-specific gene are significant given the genetic data that place an autoimmune susceptibility element for IDDM and myasthenia gravis in the precise region where this gene resides. In an attempt to isolate the 5{prime} end of this large transcript, we have constructed a cosmid contig which encompasses the genomic locus of this gene and are progressively isolating coding sequences by exon trapping.