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Sample records for autoimmune intestinal damage

  1. Dietary Fatty Acids Directly Impact Central Nervous System Autoimmunity via the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghikia, Aiden; Jörg, Stefanie; Duscha, Alexander; Berg, Johannes; Manzel, Arndt; Waschbisch, Anne; Hammer, Anna; Lee, De-Hyung; May, Caroline; Wilck, Nicola; Balogh, Andras; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge; Akkad, Denis A; Grohme, Diana A; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Kempa, Stefan; Thöne, Jan; Demir, Seray; Müller, Dominik N; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2015-10-20

    Growing empirical evidence suggests that nutrition and bacterial metabolites might impact the systemic immune response in the context of disease and autoimmunity. We report that long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) enhanced differentiation and proliferation of T helper 1 (Th1) and/or Th17 cells and impaired their intestinal sequestration via p38-MAPK pathway. Alternatively, dietary short-chain FAs (SCFAs) expanded gut T regulatory (Treg) cells by suppression of the JNK1 and p38 pathway. We used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of T cell-mediated autoimmunity to show that LCFAs consistently decreased SCFAs in the gut and exacerbated disease by expanding pathogenic Th1 and/or Th17 cell populations in the small intestine. Treatment with SCFAs ameliorated EAE and reduced axonal damage via long-lasting imprinting on lamina-propria-derived Treg cells. These data demonstrate a direct dietary impact on intestinal-specific, and subsequently central nervous system-specific, Th cell responses in autoimmunity, and thus might have therapeutic implications for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26488817

  2. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune p

  3. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (Pdiabetes.

  4. The hygiene hypothesis revisited: autoimmune diseases, intestinal microbiota and vitamin D's role

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that higher levels of hygiene and improper exposure to microorganisms early in childhood could disturb the intestinal microbiome functions resulting in abnormal immune responses that can later lead to allergies and autoimmune diseases. Additionally, vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and function might also trigger abnormal immune responses that can lead to an autoimmune disease. Therefore, this review explores the role Western li...

  5. Chemically induced intestinal damage models in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlers, Stefan H; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Christopher J; Okuda, Kazuhide S; Sison, John Oliver; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2013-06-01

    Several intestinal damage models have been developed using zebrafish, with the aim of recapitulating aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These experimentally induced inflammation models have utilized immersion exposure to an array of colitogenic agents (including live bacteria, bacterial products, and chemicals) to induce varying severity of inflammation. This technical report describes methods used to generate two chemically induced intestinal damage models using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods to monitor intestinal damage and inflammatory processes, and chemical-genetic methods to manipulate the host response to injury are also described.

  6. Curcumin Attenuates Gamma Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small Intestine exhibits numerous morphological and functional alterations during radiation exposure. Oxidative stress, a factor implicated in the intestinal injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present work was designed to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin, a yellow pigment of turmeric on y-radiation-induced oxidative damage in the small intestine by measuring alterations in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TSARS), serotonin metabolism, catecholamine levels, and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in parallel to changes in the architecture of intestinal tissues. In addition, monoamine level, MAO activity and TSARS level were determined in the serum. Curcumin was supplemented orally via gavages, to rats at a dose of (45 mg/ Kg body wt/ day) for 2 weeks pre-irradiation and the last supplementation was 30 min pre exposure to 6.5 Gy gamma radiations (applied as one shot dose). Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that, whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has induced oxidative damage in small intestine obvious by significant increases of TSARS content, MAO activity and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and by significant decreases of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels. In parallel histopathological studies of the small intestine of irradiated rats through light microscopic showed significant decrease in the number of villi, villus height, mixed sub mucosa layer with more fibres and fibroblasts. Intestinal damage was in parallel to significant alterations of serum MAO activity, TBARS, 5-HT, DA, NE and EPI levels. Administration of curcumin before irradiation has significantly improved the levels of monoamines in small intestine and serum of irradiated rats, which was associated with significant amelioration in MAO activity and TBARS contents

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  8. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  9. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  10. Intestinal barrier damage caused by trauma and lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-An Ding; Jie-Shou Li; You-Sheng Li; Nian-Ting Zhu; Fang-Nan Liu; Li Tan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal barrier function damage induced by trauma and infection in rats.METHODS: Experimental models of surgical trauma and infection were established in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control group (n = 8), EN group (n = 10), PN group (n = 9) and Sep group (n = 8).The rats in PN and Sep groups were made into PN models that received isonitrogenous, isocaloric and isovolumic TPN solution during the 7-d period. Rats in EN and Sep groups received laparotomy and cervical catheterization on day 1 and received lipopolysaccharide injection intraperitoneally on d 7. On the 7th day all the animals were gavaged with lactulose and mannitol to test the intestinal permeability.Twenty-four hours later samples were collected and examined.RESULTS: The inflammatory responses became gradually aggravated from EN group to Sep group. The mucosal structure of small intestine was markedly impaired in PN and Sep groups. There was a low response in IgA level in Sep group when compared with that of EN group.Lipopolysaccharide injection also increased the nitric oxide levels in the plasma of the rats. The intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation increased significantly in Sep group compared with that of control group.CONCLUSION: One wk of parenteral nutrition causes an atrophy of the intestinal mucosa and results in a moderate inflammatory reaction in the rats. Endotoxemia aggravats the inflammatory responses that caused by laparotomy plus TPN, increases the production of nitric oxide in the body, and damages the intestinal barrier function.

  11. Protection effect of Emodin pretreatment on intestinal I - RI damage of intestinal mucosa in ratsa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie Zhao; Shi-Ji Wang; Hong-Xiang Li; Li-Hua Dong; Huai-Jiang He; Zhong-Min Liu; Yu-Shan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To tinvestigate the protective effect and mechanism of emodin pretreatment on intestinal mucosa of rats with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.Methods:A total of50 SD rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, emodin groups of low, medium and high dose, with10 in each group.Ischemia-reperfusion injury(I-RI) mode was established by using noninvasive clamp on superior mesentericartery(SMA).Control group and model group were pretreated with0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution lavage2 h before operation, emodin groups of low, medium and high dose were given emodin lavage with20,40,60 mg/kg pretreatment, femoral venous blood before the lavage pretreatment(T0) and1 h ischemia(T1) , and inferior vena venous blood after1 h of reperfusion(T2) were extracted from each group of rats for detection of serum level of intestinal fatty acid binding protein(I-FABP), tumor necrosis factor(TNF-α), endotoxin, interleukin6(IL-6), and the content of diamine oxidase(DAO);After model establishment, the rats were sacrificed, intestine homogenate was prepared by using blind intestinal tissue to detect intestinal tissue myeloperoxidase(MPO), malondialdehyde(MDA) and superoxide dismutase(SOD) levels.And upper small intestine tissue was retrieved, followed by fixation and conventionalHE staining to observe intestinal tissue morphology under light microscopy.Results:In emodin groups of low, medium and high dose atT1 andT2,I -FABP, TNF-α, endotoxin,IL-6 andDAO level were significantly lower than that of model group(P<0.05); in emodin group of low,medium and high dose,MPO andMDA content in intestinal tissue homogenate was significantly lower than that in model group(P<0.05),SOD level was significantly higher than that of model group(P<0.05).Intestinal damage of emodin low, medium and high dose groups were significantly lighter than model group.Conclusions:Emodin pretreatment has certain protective effect on intestinal mucosa in ischemia reperfusion injury.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor Mediated Modulation of T Cell Response by Commensal Intestinal Microbiota as a Trigger for Autoimmune Arthritis

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    Rebecca Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In autoimmune diseases, a disturbance of the balance between T helper 17 (Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs is often observed. This disturbed balance is also the case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic predisposition to RA confers the presence of several polymorphisms mainly regulating activation of T lymphocytes. However, the presence of susceptibility factors is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain the disease development, emphasizing the importance of environmental factors. Multiple studies have shown that commensal gut microbiota is of great influence on immune homeostasis and can trigger the development of autoimmune diseases by favoring induction of Th17 cells over Tregs. However the mechanism by which intestinal microbiota influences the Th cell balance is not completely understood. Here we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of commensal intestinal microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis, along with a potential role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in modulating the relevant Th cell responses to trigger autoimmunity. A better understanding of TLR triggering by intestinal microbiota and subsequent T cell activation might offer new perspectives for manipulating the T cell response in RA patients and may lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets or even preventive measures.

  13. Selective accumulation of pro-inflammatory T cells in the intestine contributes to the resistance to autoimmune demyelinating disease.

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    Kerstin Berer

    Full Text Available Myelin-specific, pro-inflammatory TH17 cells are widely regarded as the drivers of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model for Multiple sclerosis (MS. The factors, responsible for the generation and maintenance of TH17 cells as well as their participation in the pathogenic cascade leading to the demyelinating disease, have been studied extensively. However, how these harmful autoreactive cells are controlled in vivo remains unclear. By comparing TCR transgenic mice on a disease susceptible and a disease resistant genetic background, we show here that pathogenic TH17 cells are sequestered within the intestine of spontaneous EAE resistant B10.S mice. Disease resistant B10.S mice harbored higher frequencies of TH17 cells in the intestine compared to EAE susceptible SJL/J mice. Moreover, transferred TH17 cells selectively migrated to intestinal lymphoid organs of B10.S mice. The sequestration of TH17 cells in the gut was partially dependent on the gut homing receptor α4β7-mediated adhesion to the intestine. Administration of α4β7 blocking-antibodies increased the peripheral availability of TH17 cells, resulting in increased EAE severity after immunization in B10.S mice. Together, these results support the concept that the intestine is a check-point for controlling pathogenic, organ-specific T cells.

  14. Differentially expressed genes in repairing irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the differentially expressed genes correlative to irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract and its repair by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA. Divide 90 mice into 4 groups randomly. For the experimental groups, each mouse was given 40μg foreign mouse small intestinal RNA, and for the control groups, 0.4 mL of 0.9% NaCl. The intestinal specimens were collected form each group 6h, 12h, 24h, 4d and 8d after 60Co γ-rays irradiation respectively. The differentially expressed genes in the tested and control groups were checked and cloned by long-distance PCR based on subtractive hybridization. 165 differential gene clones were obtained, of which 75 named as AXCZI-75 maybe were correlated with the irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract; and 90 named as XCZ1-90 maybe were correlated with repairing of the damaged mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

  15. Damage to the optic chiasm in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin-stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  16. Tinospora cordifolia inhibits autoimmune arthritis by regulating key immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannegowda, K M; Venkatesha, S H; Moudgil, K D

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints leading to tissue damage. Despite the availability of potent drugs including the biologics, many patients fail to respond to them, whereas others suffer adverse effects following long-term use of these drugs. Accordingly, the use of natural herbal products by RA patients has been increasing over the years. However, limited information about the mechanism of action of these natural products is a major shortcoming that prevents the widespread acceptance of herbal therapy by professionals and patients alike. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE) using the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human RA and elaborated the immune mechanisms underlying this effect. TCE treatment suppressed arthritic inflammation and bone and cartilage damage. The anti-inflammatory effect of TCE was mediated via reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as: IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17; the frequency of IL-17-producing T cells; and the production of chemokines such as RANTES. Furthermore, TCE treatment limited bone damage by shifting the balance of mediators of bone remodeling (e.g., receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand [RANKL] and MMP-9) in favor of anti-osteoclastic activity. Our results suggest that TCE and its bioactive components should be evaluated for their utility as therapeutic adjuncts to conventional drugs against RA. PMID:26467057

  17. Autoimmune gastritis and parietal cell reactivity in two children with abnormal intestinal permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenwood, Deanne L. V.; Crock, Patricia; Braye, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia; Sentry, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the gastric submucosa, with loss of parietal and chief cells and achlorhydria. Often, gastritis is expressed clinically as cobalamin deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia, which is generally described as a disease of the elderly. H

  18. The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad; Ehsani Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries. Infectious agents can also suppress autoimmune and allergic disorders. Some investigations show that various protozoa and helminthes are connected with the main immune-mediated intestinal conditions including celiac disease (CD), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Celiac disease is a digestive and autoimmune disorder that can damage the small intestin...

  19. [Radiogenic damage of the intestine--diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujath, P; Arbogast, R; Wünsch, P H; Eckert, P

    1986-09-01

    62 patients underwent surgery for intestinal radiation injuries during the past 15 years. 34 patients had previous abdominal surgery. Preoperative investigations must clarify if there is only the radiation lesion or a recurrent process of the originally radiated tumor. Rectovaginal fistulas occurred 28 times, 19 of which could only be treated by continent colostomy. 5 patients had been curatively resected with low anastomosis. A progressive stenosis leading to an ileus symptomatology appeared in 24 patients. The injured intestinal part was resected. As intestinal radiation injuries are combined with an ischemic enteropathy, anastomosis will be extremely problematic. Thus, second-look operations are recommendable for the third and seventh postoperative day. So lethality could be decreased. PMID:3780357

  20. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

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    Francisco Javier Guzmán-de la Garza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student’s t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion.

  1. Proteins derived from neutrophil extracellular traps may serve as self-antigens and mediate organ damage in autoimmune diseases.

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    Jason S. Knight

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in circulation and represent one of the first lines of defense against invading pathogens. Neutrophils possess a vast arsenal of antimicrobial proteins, which can be released from the cell by a death program termed NETosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs are web-like structures consisting of decondensed chromatin decorated with granular and cytosolic proteins. Both exuberant NETosis and impaired clearance of NETs have been implicated in the organ damage of autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, small vessel vasculitis (SVV, and psoriasis. NETs may represent a source of modified autoantigens in SLE and SVV. Here, we review the autoimmune diseases linked to NETosis, with a focus on how modified proteins externalized on the NETs may trigger loss of immune tolerance and promote organ damage.

  2. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  3. Role of damage control enterostomy in management of children with peritonitis from acute intestinal disease

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    Emmanuel A Ameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal anastomosis in severely ill children with peritonitis from intestinal perforation, intestinal gangrene or anastomotic dehiscence (acute intestinal disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Enterostomy as a damage control measure may be an option to minimize the high morbidity and mortality. This report evaluates the role of damage control enterostomy in the treatment of these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 52 children with acute intestinal disease who had enterostomy as a damage control measure in 12 years. Results: There were 34 (65.4% boys and 18 (34.6% girls aged 3 days-13 years (median 9 months, comprising 27 (51.9% neonates and infants and 25 (48.1% older children. The primary indication for enterostomy in neonates and infants was intestinal gangrene 25 (92.6% and perforated typhoid ileitis 22 (88% in older children. Enterostomy was performed as the initial surgery in 33 (63.5% patients and as a salvage procedure following anastomotic dehiscence in 19 (36.5% patients. Enterostomy-related complications occurred in 19 (36.5% patients, including 11 (21.2% patients with skin excoriations and eight (15.4% with hypokalaemia. There were four (7.7% deaths (aged 19 days, 3 months, 3½ years and 10 years, respectively directly related to the enterostomy, from hypokalaemia at 4, 12, 20 and 28 days postoperatively, respectively. Twenty other patients died shortly after surgery from their primary disease. Twenty of 28 surviving patients have had their enterostomy closed without complications, while eight are awaiting enterostomy closure. Conclusion: Damage-control enterostomy is useful in management of severely ill children with intestinal perforation or gangrene. Careful and meticulous attention to fluid and electrolyte balance, and stoma care, especially in the first several days following surgery, are important in preventing morbidity and mortality.

  4. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides Against Small Intestinal Damage Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inlfammatory Drugs in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong; PAN Xing-chang; WANG Shao-kang; YANG Li-gang; SUN Gui-ju

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were able to produce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of small intestinal damage. In this study, the putative protective effect of wheat peptides was evaluated in a NSAID-induced small intestinal damage model in rats, different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by intragastric administration for 30 d until small intestinal damage was caused. Before sacriifcing, NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) or physiological saline were infused into the digestive tract twice. Wheat peptides administration reduced edema and small intestinal damage, and signiifcantly decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mucous membrane of small intestine. Oxidative stress was signiifcantly increased after NSAID infusion and was reduced by wheat peptides. Wheat peptides increased glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activity in mucous membrane of small intestine. µ-Opioid receptor mRNA expression decreased more signiifcantly in wheat peptides treated rats than in the model control group. Overall, the results suggest that non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs induced small intestinal damage in rats and wheat peptides administration may be an effective tool for protecting small intestinal tissue against NSAID-induced small intestinal damage and oxidative stress.

  5. Lansoprazole ameliorates intestinal mucosal damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Ichikawa; Toshikazu Yoshikawa; Norimasa Yoshida; Tomohisa Takagi; Naoya Tomatsuri; Kazuhiro Katada; Yutaka Isozaki; Kazuhiko Uchiyama; Yuji Naito; Takeshi Okanoue

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of lansoprazole on ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat intestinal mucosal injury in vivo.METHODS: Intestinal damage was induced by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk for 30 min followed by reperfusion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lansoprazole was given to rats intraperitoneally 1 h before vascular clamping.RESULTS: Both the intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels, as indices of mucosal damage, significantly increased in I/R-groups comparion with those of shamoperation groups. These increases in intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels were significantly inhibited by the treatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Small intestine exposed to I/R resulted in mucosal inflammation that was characterized by significant increases in thiobarbituric acidreactive substances (TBARS), tissue-associated myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), and mucosal content of rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1).These increases in TBARS, MPO activities and CINC-1 content in the intestinal mucosa after I/R were all inhibited by pretreatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg.Furthermore, the CINC-1 mRNA expression was increased during intestinal I/R, and this increase in mRNA expression was inhibited by treatment with lansoprazole.CONCLUSION: Lansoprazole inhibits lipid peroxidation and reduces development of intestinal mucosal inflammation induced by I/R in rats, suggesting that lansoprazole may have a therapeutic potential for I/R injury.

  6. Protection of intestinal damage by pretreatment with cytarabine (cytosine arabinoside)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, T.A.; Blackett, N.M.

    1979-09-01

    The circumstances in which cytarabine (cytosine arabinoside) ''protects'' intestinal epithelial stem cells against radiation have been investigated. Special attention has been given to this protective effect with radiation doses in the clinically used range in order to determine whether the protective effect might be of use in radiotherapy. It has been shown that 12 hours after cytarabine the D/sub 0/ and extrapolation number are increased when large single doses of radiation are used. To determine the effect of cytarabine at lower doses, it is necessary to use a second irradiation as an ''assay'' dose. By this means it is shown that there is more protection than can be accounted for by the change in D/sub 0/ and extrapolation number at the time of the first dose. Evidence is presented indicating that the rate of stem cell regeneration is not increased by cytarabine pretreatment. Finally, the relation between intestinal protection, bone marrow stem cell enhanced recovery and improved animal survival as a result of cytarabine pretreatment is discussed.

  7. High beta-palmitate fat controls the intestinal inflammatory response and limits intestinal damage in mucin Muc2 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone (alpha, alpha'-palmitate, the predominant palmitate conformation in regular infant formula fat, is poorly absorbed and might cause abdominal discomfort. In contrast, palmitic-acid esterified to the sn-2 position (beta-palmitate, the main palmitate conformation in human milk fat, is well absorbed. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of high alpha, alpha'-palmitate fat (HAPF diet and high beta-palmitate fat (HBPF diet on colitis development in Muc2 deficient (Muc2(-/- mice, a well-described animal model for spontaneous enterocolitis due to the lack of a protective mucus layer. METHODS: Muc2(-/- mice received AIN-93G reference diet, HAPF diet or HBPF diet for 5 weeks after weaning. Clinical symptoms, intestinal morphology and inflammation in the distal colon were analyzed. RESULTS: Both HBPF diet and AIN-93G diet limited the extent of intestinal erosions and morphological damage in Muc2(-/- mice compared with HAPF diet. In addition, the immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cell response as demonstrated by the up-regulation of Foxp3, Tgfb1 and Ebi3 gene expression levels was enhanced by HBPF diet compared with AIN-93G and HAPF diets. HBPF diet also increased the gene expression of Pparg and enzymatic antioxidants (Sod1, Sod3 and Gpx1, genes all reported to be involved in promoting an immunosuppressive Treg cell response and to protect against colitis. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows for the first time that HBPF diet limits the intestinal mucosal damage and controls the inflammatory response in Muc2(-/- mice by inducing an immunosuppressive Treg cell response.

  8. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  9. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  10. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  11. Treatment with metallothionein prevents demyelination and axonal damage and increases oligodendrocyte precursors and tissue repair during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2003-01-01

    )beta, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), NT-4/5, and nerve growth factor (NGF). These beneficial effects of Zn-MT-II treatment could not be attributable to its zinc content per se. The present results support further the use of Zn-MT-II as a safe and successful therapy for multiple sclerosis.......Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE and MS are characterized by significant inflammation, demyelination, neuroglial damage, and cell death. Metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I + II) are antiinflammatory...... and neuroprotective proteins that are expressed during EAE and MS. We have shown recently that exogenous administration of Zn-MT-II to Lewis rats with EAE significantly reduced clinical symptoms and the inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the infiltrated central nervous system areas. We show...

  12. Axonal damage in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a C57BL/6 mouse model may be not secondary to inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boting Gao; Juan Chen; Qiong Wang; Wei Wang; Zhouping Tang

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model in C57BL/6 mice induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptides and complete Freund's adjuvant. Onset latency was 12 days, with an incidence rate of 100%. Neuropathological characteristics included perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, demyelination, neuronal degeneration, and axonal damage within cerebral and myelic white matter. Electron microscopy revealed swollen mitochondria, complete organ disappearance, and fused or broken myelin sheath structure, which were accompanied by myelin sheath reconstruction. Moreover, axonal damage was not consistent with demyelination distribution, and severity of axonal damage did not correlate with demyelination. Results suggested that axonal damage in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model is not secondary to inflammatory demyelination.

  13. The Relationship Between Intestinal Iron Absorption and Hepatic Parenchymal Cell Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the iron balance is maintained by regulated intestinal absorption rather than regulated excretion, there have been many reports concerning the factors which may influence the intestinal iron absorption. As the liver is the largest iron storage organ of the body, any hepatocellular damage may result in disturbances in iron metabolism, e,g., frequent co-existence of haemochromatosis and liver cirrhosis, or elevated serum iron level and increased iron absorption rate in patients with infectious hepatitis or cirrhosis. In one effort to demonstrate the influence of hepatocellular damage on intestinal iron absorption, the iron absorption rate was measured in the rabbits whose livers were injured by a single subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride (doses ranging from 0.15 to 0.5 cc per kg of body weight) or by a single irradiation of 2, 000 to 16, 000 rads with Co on the liver locally. A single oral dose of 1μCi of Fe-citrate with 0.5 mg of ferrous citrate was fed in the fasting state, 24 hours after hepatic damage had been induced, without any reducing or chelating agents, and stool was collected for one week thereafter. Serum iron levels, together with conventional liver function teats, were measured at 24, 48, 72, 120 and 168 hours after liver damage had been induced. All animals were sacrificed upon the completing of the one week's test period and tissue specimens were prepared for H-E and Gomori's iron stain. Following are the results. 1. Normal iron absorption rate of the rabbit was 41.72±3.61% when 0.5 mg of iron was given in the fasting state, as measured by subtracting the amount recovered in stool collected for 7 days from the amount given. The test period of 7 days is adequate, for only 1% of the iron given was excreted thereafter. 2. The intestinal iron absorption rate and serum iron level were significantly increased when the animal was poisoned by a single subcutaneous injection of 0.15 cc, per kg. of body weight of carbon tetrachloride or

  14. Consequences of PAI-1 specific deletion in endothelium on radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced injury to healthy tissues is a real public health problem, since they are one of the most limiting factors that restrict efficiency of radiation therapy. This problematic is also part of the French Cancer Plan 2014-2017, and involves clinical research. Concepts surrounding the development of radiation-induced damage have gradually evolved into a contemporary and integrated view of the pathogenesis, involving all compartments of target tissue. Among them, endothelium seems to be central in the sequence of interrelated events that lead to the development of radiation-induced damage, although there are rare concrete elements that support this concept. By using new transgenic mouse models, this PhD project provides a direct demonstration of an endothelium-dependent continuum in evolution of radiation-induced intestinal damage. Indeed, changes in the endothelial phenotype through targeted deletion of the gene SERPINE1, chosen because of its key role in the development of radiation enteritis, influences various parameters of the development of the disease. Thus, lack of PAI-1 secretion by endothelial cells significantly improves survival of the animals, and limits severity of early and late tissue damage after a localized small bowel irradiation. Furthermore, these mice partially KO for PAI-1 showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic intestinal stem cells in the hours following irradiation, a decrease in the macrophages infiltrate density one week after irradiation, and a change in the polarization of macrophages throughout the pathophysiological process. In an effort to protect healthy tissues from radiation therapy side effects, without hindering the cancer treatment, PAI-1 seems to be an obvious therapeutic target. Conceptually, this work represents the direct demonstration of the link between endothelium phenotype and radiation enteritis pathogenesis. (author)

  15. Targeted GAS6 delivery to the CNS protects axons from damage during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ross C; Ray, Alex K; Johndrow, Christopher T; Guzik, Hillary; Burek, Dominika; de Frutos, Pablo García; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2014-12-01

    Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6) is a soluble agonist of the TYRO3, AXL, MERTK (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases identified to have anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and promyelinating properties. During experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), wild-type (WT) mice demonstrate a significant induction of Gas6, Axl, and Mertk but not Pros1 or Tyro3 mRNA. We tested the hypothesis that intracerebroventricular delivery of GAS6 directly into the CNS of WT mice during myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE would improve the clinical course of disease relative to artificial CSF (ACSF)-treated mice. GAS6 did not delay disease onset, but significantly reduced the clinical scores during peak and chronic EAE. Mice receiving GAS6 for 28 d had preserved SMI31(+) neurofilament immunoreactivity, significantly fewer SMI32(+) axonal swellings and spheroids and less demyelination relative to ACSF-treated mice. Alternate-day subcutaneous IFNβ injection did not enhance GAS6 treatment effectiveness. Gas6(-/-) mice sensitized with MOG35-55 peptide exhibit higher clinical scores during late peak to early chronic disease, with significantly increased SMI32(+) axonal swellings and Iba1(+) microglia/macrophages, enhanced expression of several proinflammatory mRNA molecules, and decreased expression of early oligodendrocyte maturation markers relative to WT mouse spinal cords with scores for 8 consecutive days. During acute EAE, flow cytometry showed significantly more macrophages but not T-cell infiltrates in Gas6(-/-) spinal cords than WT spinal cords. Our data are consistent with GAS6 being protective during EAE by dampening the inflammatory response, thereby preserving axonal integrity and myelination. PMID:25471571

  16. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells, or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection.

  17. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Catanzaro

    elucidates the pharmacological mechanisms mediated by BSE, in protecting intestinal epithelial barrier from inflammatory damage and supports its use as safe adjuvant in patients affected by IBD.

  18. Increased demyelination and axonal damage in metallothionein I+II-deficient mice during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Espejo, C; Martínez-Cáceres, E M;

    2003-01-01

    , oxidative stress, and apoptotic cell death during EAE were increased by MT-I+II deficiency. We now show for the first time that demyelination and axonal damage are significantly increased in MT-I+II deficient mice during EAE. Furthermore, oligodendroglial regeneration, growth cone formation, and tissue...... repair including expression of trophic factors were significantly reduced in MT-I+II-deficient mice during EAE. Accordingly, MT-I+II have protective and regenerative roles in the brain....

  19. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa D Flora

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  20. Methotrexate-induced nitrosative stress may play a critical role in small intestinal damage in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolli, Viswa Kalyan; Abraham, Premila [Christian Medical College, Department of Biochemistry, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Rabi, Suganthy [Christian Medical College, Department of Anatomy, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2008-10-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), a structural analogue of folic acid, is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for leukemia and other malignancies. One of the major toxic effects of MTX is intestinal injury and enterocolitis.The mechanism of gastrointestinal toxicity of methotrexate has not been investigated completely. Therefore cancer chemotherapy has to be accompanied by symptomatic therapy such as antibiotics and anti-diarrheal drugs. It is important to investigate the mechanism by which methotrexate induces intestinal damage in order to perform cancer chemotherapy effectively by preventing the side effects. This study aimed at investigating whether nitrosative stress plays a role in methotrexate induced small intestinal damage using a rat model. Adult male rats were administered methotrexate at the dose of 7 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days and sacrificed 12 or 24 h after the final dose of methotrexate. Vehicle treated rats served as control. The intestinal tissue was used for light microscopic studies and markers of nitrosative stress including tissue nitrite level and nitrotyrosine. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration was also measured in intestinal homogenates. The villi were damaged at 12 h and the damage progressed and became severe at 24 h after the final dose of MTX. Biochemically, tissue nitrate was elevated fivefold at 12 h and fourfold at 24 h after the final dose of MTX as compared with control. Nitrotyrosine, measured immunohistochemically was detected in all the parts of the small intestine. Duodenum stained the most for nitrotyrosine, followed by ileum and then jejunum. The staining for nitrotyrosine was more intense at 24 h as compared with 12 h after the final dose of methotrexate. There was marked neutrophil infiltration as evidenced by increase in MPO activity in the small intestines. In conclusion, the results of the present study reveal that nitrosative stress may play a critical role in

  1. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  2. Gastrointestinal Disorder Associated with Olmesartan Mimics Autoimmune Enteropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Scialom

    Full Text Available Anti-hypertensive treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist olmesartan is a rare cause of severe Sprue-like enteropathy. To substantiate the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with gut immune homeostasis, clinical, histopathological and immune features were compared in olmesartan-induced-enteropathy (OIE and in autoimmune enteropathy (AIE.Medical files of seven patients with OIE and 4 patients with AIE enrolled during the same period were retrospectively reviewed. Intestinal biopsies were collected for central histopathological review, T cell Receptor clonality and flow cytometric analysis of isolated intestinal lymphocytes.Among seven olmesartan-treated patients who developed villous atrophy refractory to a gluten free diet, three had extra-intestinal autoimmune diseases, two had antibodies reacting with the 75 kilodalton antigen characteristic of AIE and one had serum anti-goblet cell antibodies. Small intestinal lesions and signs of intestinal lymphocyte activation were thus reminiscent of the four cases of AIE diagnosed during the same period. Before olmesartan discontinuation, remission was induced in all patients (7/7 by immunosuppressive drugs. After interruption of both olmesartan and immunosuppressive drugs in six patients, remission was maintained in 4 but anti-TNF-α therapy was needed in two.This case-series shows that olmesartan can induce intestinal damage mimicking AIE. OIE usually resolved after olmesartan interruption but immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary to achieve remission. Our data sustain the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with intestinal immuno regulation in predisposed individuals.

  3. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  4. Skimmed, sterilized, and concentrated bovine late colostrum promotes both prevention and recovery from intestinal tissue damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairangzhuoma; Yamamoto, M; Muranishi, H; Inagaki, M; Uchida, K; Yamashita, K; Saito, S; Yabe, T; Kanamaru, Y

    2013-03-01

    Bovine colostrum is a rich source of tissue repair and growth factors, and inhibits gastrointestinal injury induced by the side effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID), such as indomethacin. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are drugs with analgesic and antipyretic effects, but in higher doses they have inflammatory effects. The pathogenesis of small intestinal damage caused by NSAID is unclear. The present study was performed to investigate the antiinflammatory effects of skimmed, sterilized, and concentrated bovine late colostrum on intestinal injury induced by side effects of NSAID, and then to identify the active ingredient in the colostrum for intestinal tissue. In Japan, the sale of bovine colostrum within 5 d after parturition is prohibited by law. Therefore, we focused on bovine late colostrum obtained from healthy lactating cows 6 to 7 d after parturition. Proliferation of small intestine epithelial cells was stimulated in mice fed the colostrum for 1 wk. With regard to indomethacin-induced enteropathy, both prefeeding and postfeeding with colostrum facilitated growth of the intestinal villi, indicating preventive and healing effects. Furthermore, to identify the active ingredient in the colostrum responsible for this effect, the casein and whey fractions were prepared from the colostrum and fed to normal mice. Only the colostrum casein fraction stimulated intestinal villus elongation, whereas the whey fraction and mature milk casein showed no such effect. Taken together, these observations indicate that the skimmed, sterilized, and concentrated bovine late colostrum, especially the casein fraction, could be used to treat the injurious effects of NSAID in the intestine and could be effective for treatment of other ulcerative conditions in the bowel, suggesting that the colostrum has therapeutic potential for intestinal inflammation. PMID:23295115

  5. Effects of glycine betaine on bone marrow death and intestinal damage by gamma rays and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of glycine betaine (GB) on bone marrow death and intestinal damage by gamma rays or carbon ions. C3H/He female mice received an i.p.-injection of GB before or after whole-body irradiation with gamma rays or 50 keV μm-1 carbon ions. The irradiated mice were observed to determine the mortality for 30 days after exposure. Mice were also killed at 3.5 days after the exposure to determine the intestinal damage. The numbers of crypts per transverse circumference were counted using a microscope. For the bone marrow death, GB (93 mg GB per mouse) significantly (p < 0.05) increased the percentage survival for both radiations. For the intestinal damage, GB (93 mg GB per mouse) significantly (p < 0.05) increased the crypt survival for gamma rays, but not for carbon ions. GB might be a potential protector against normal tissue damage as a side effect in radiotherapy. (authors)

  6. Healing rate and autoimmune safety of full-thickness wounds treated with fish skin acellular dermal matrix versus porcine small-intestine submucosa: a noninferiority study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Konrádsdóttir, Fífa; Gudnason, Palmar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur F; Lund, Sigrún Helga

    2015-03-01

    A novel product, the fish skin acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has recently been introduced into the family of biological materials for the treatment of wounds. Hitherto, these products have been produced from the organs of livestock. A noninferiority test was used to compare the effect of fish skin ADM against porcine small-intestine submucosa extracellular matrix in the healing of 162 full-thickness 4-mm wounds on the forearm of 81 volunteers. The fish skin product was noninferior at the primary end point, healing at 28 days. Furthermore, the wounds treated with fish skin acellular matrix healed significantly faster. These results might give the fish skin ADM an advantage because of its environmental neutrality when compared with livestock-derived products. The study results on these acute full-thickness wounds might apply for diabetic foot ulcers and other chronic full-thickness wounds, and the shorter healing time for the fish skin-treated group could influence treatment decisions. To test the autoimmune reactivity of the fish skin, the participants were tested with the following ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) tests: RF, ANA, ENA, anti ds-DNA, ANCA, anti-CCP, and anticollagen I and II. These showed no reactivity. The results demonstrate the claims of safety and efficacy of fish skin ADM for wound care.

  7. Concurrent repletion of iron and zinc reduces intestinal oxidative damage in iron-and zinc-deficient rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the interactions between iron and zinc during absorption in iron- and zinc-deficient rats,and their consequences on intestinal oxidant-antioxidant balance.METHODS: Twenty-four weanling Wistar-Kyoto rats fed an iron- and zinc-deficient diet (< 6.5 mg Fe and 4.0 mg Zn/kg diet) for 4 wk were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8, each) and orally gavaged with 4 mg iron, 3.3 mg zinc, or 4 mg iron + 3.3 mg zinc for 2wk. At the last day of repletion, 3 h before the animals were sacrificed, they received either 37 mBq of 55Fe or 65Zn, to study their localization in the intestine, using microautoradiography. Hemoglobin, iron and zinc content in plasma and liver were measured as indicators of iron and zinc status. Duodenal sections were used for immunochemical staining of ferritin and metallothionein.Duodenal homogenates (mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions), were used to assess aconitase activity,oxidative stress, functional integrity and the response of antioxidant enzymes.RESULTS: Concurrent repletion of iron- and zinc-deficient rats showed reduced localization of these minerals compared to rats that were teated with iron or zinc alone;these data provide evidence for antagonistic interactions.This resulted in reduced formation of lipid and protein oxidation products and better functional integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Further, combined repletion lowered iron-associated aconitase activity and ferritin expression,but significantly elevated metallothionein and glutathione levels in the intestinal mucosa. The mechanism of interactions during combined supplementation and its subsequent effects appeared to be due to through modulation of cytosolic aconitase, which in turn influenced the labile iron pool and metallothionein levels, and hence reduced intestinal oxidative damage.CONCLUSION: Concurrent administration of iron and zinc corrects iron and zinc deficiency, and also reduces the intestinal oxidative damage associated with iron

  8. DNA damage and reactive nitrogen species are barriers to Vibrio cholerae colonization of the infant mouse intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan W Davies

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ingested Vibrio cholerae pass through the stomach and colonize the small intestines of its host. Here, we show that V. cholerae requires at least two types of DNA repair systems to efficiently compete for colonization of the infant mouse intestine. These results show that V. cholerae experiences increased DNA damage in the murine gastrointestinal tract. Agreeing with this, we show that passage through the murine gut increases the mutation frequency of V. cholerae compared to liquid culture passage. Our genetic analysis identifies known and novel defense enzymes required for detoxifying reactive nitrogen species (but not reactive oxygen species that are also required for V. cholerae to efficiently colonize the infant mouse intestine, pointing to reactive nitrogen species as the potential cause of DNA damage. We demonstrate that potential reactive nitrogen species deleterious for V. cholerae are not generated by host inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity and instead may be derived from acidified nitrite in the stomach. Agreeing with this hypothesis, we show that strains deficient in DNA repair or reactive nitrogen species defense that are defective in intestinal colonization have decreased growth or increased mutation frequency in acidified nitrite containing media. Moreover, we demonstrate that neutralizing stomach acid rescues the colonization defect of the DNA repair and reactive nitrogen species defense defective mutants suggesting a common defense pathway for these mutants.

  9. The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad; Ehsani Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries. Infectious agents can also suppress autoimmune and allergic disorders. Some investigations show that various protozoa and helminthes are connected with the main immune-mediated intestinal conditions including celiac disease (CD), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Celiac disease is a digestive and autoimmune disorder that can damage the small intestine and characterized by a multitude gastrointestinal (GI) and extra GI symptoms. IBD (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the small intestine and colon. The etiology of IBD is unknown, but it may be related to instability in the intestinal microflora that leading to an immoderate inflammatory response to commensal microbiota. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, long-term condition of the digestive system. Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS. Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host's immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD. The main objective of this review is to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasites and different inflammatory bowel disorders. PMID:25926937

  10. Protective effect of ellagic acid and pumpkin seed oil against methotrexate-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boghdady, Noha A

    2011-12-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is one of the most serious side effects in the methotrexate (MTX) treatment. This study was designed to investigate whether ellagic acid (EA) and/or pumpkin seed oil (PSO) had a protective effect on MTX-induced small intestine damage. Forty albino rats were randomized into five groups of 8 rats each. Group I served as a normal control group. In Group II, MTX was administered as a single dose (20 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Groups III, IV and V were pre-treated respectively with either PSO (40 mg/kg), EA (10 mg/kg) or 0.2% DMSO (vehicle control) orally every day by gavage for 5 days and then they received MTX. All animals were sacrificed 5 days after the intraperitoneal injection of MTX for histopathological examination, estimation of serum prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level, assay of tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) levels and myloperoxidase (MPO), xanthine oxidase (XO) and adenosine deaminase (AD) activities. Administration of EA and/or PSO decreased the intestinal damage, PGE2, MDA and NO levels and MPO, XO and AD activities and increased GSH level. These results suggest that EA and PSO protect the small intestine of rats from MTX-induced damage through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and thus have potential as a promising drug in the prevention of undesired side effects of MTX. PMID:22329239

  11. Contribution of intestinal barrier damage, microbial translocation and HIV-1 infection status to an inflammaging signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Steele

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a characteristic of both HIV-1 infection and aging ("inflammaging". Intestinal epithelial barrier damage (IEBD and microbial translocation (MT contribute to HIV-associated inflammation, but their impact on inflammaging remains unclear.Plasma biomarkers for IEBD (iFABP, MT (LPS, sCD14, T-cell activation (sCD27, and inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 were measured in 88 HIV-1 uninfected (HIV(neg and 83 treated, HIV-1-infected (HIV(pos adults from 20-100 years old.Age positively correlated with iFABP (r = 0.284, p = 0.008, sCD14 (r = 0.646, p = <0.0001 and LPS (r = 0.421, p = 0.0002 levels in HIV(neg but not HIV(pos subjects. Age also correlated with sCD27, hsCRP, and IL-6 levels regardless of HIV status. Middle-aged HIV(pos subjects had elevated plasma biomarker levels similar to or greater than those of elderly HIV(neg subjects with the exception of sCD14. Clustering analysis described an inflammaging phenotype (IP based on iFABP, sCD14, sCD27, and hsCRP levels in HIV(neg subjects over 60 years of age. The IP in HIV(neg subjects was used to develop a classification model that was applied to HIV(pos subjects to determine whether HIV(pos subjects under 60 years of age were IP+. HIV(pos IP+ subjects were similar in age to IP- subjects but had a greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD based on Framingham risk score (p =  0.01.We describe a novel IP that incorporates biomarkers of IEBD, MT, immune activation as well as inflammation. Application of this novel IP in HIV-infected subjects identified a group at higher risk of CVD.

  12. Goat milk with and without increased concentrations of lysozyme improves repair of intestinal cell damage induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Eunice B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC causes diarrhea, malnutrition and poor growth in children. Human breast milk decreases disease-causing bacteria by supplying nutrients and antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Goat milk with and without human lysozyme (HLZ may improve the repair of intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC. This work investigates the effect of the milks on intestinal barrier function repair, bacterial adherence in Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells, intestinal cell proliferation, migration, viability and apoptosis in IEC-6 cells in the absence or presence of EAEC. Methods Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, ATCC, Rockville, MD were used for proliferation, migration and viability assays and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD and human larynx carcinoma (HEp-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD cells were used for bacterial adhesion assays. Goats expressing HLZ in their milk were generated and express HLZ in milk at concentration of 270 μg/ml . Cells were incubated with pasteurized milk from either transgenic goats expressing HLZ or non-transgenic control goats in the presence and absence of EAEC strain 042 (O44:H18. Results Cellular proliferation was significantly greater in the presence of both HLZ transgenic and control goat milk compared to cells with no milk. Cellular migration was significantly decreased in the presence of EAEC alone but was restored in the presence of milk. Milk from HLZ transgenic goats had significantly more migration compared to control milk. Both milks significantly reduced EAEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells and transgenic milk resulted in less colonization than control milk using a HEp-2 assay. Both milks had significantly increased cellular viability as well as less apoptosis in both the absence and presence of EAEC. Conclusions These data demonstrated that goat milk is able to repair intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC and that goat milk with a higher

  13. Quantitative histo-morphometric analysis of heat-stress-related damage in the small intestines of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Regiane R; Awati, Ajay; Roubos-van den Hil, Petra J; Tersteeg-Zijderveld, Monique H G; Koolmees, Peter A; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current research was to present a methodological approach allowing reproducible morphometric and morphological (Chiu/Park scale) analyses of the alterations in the intestines of broilers exposed to heat stress. Ross broilers were exposed over four consecutive days to a high-temperature regime in controlled climate rooms, with a day temperature of 39°C (±1°C) and a night temperature of 25°C (±1°C), respectively. A control group was kept at an ambient temperature of 25°C (±1°C) during the entire experimental period. At the end of the exposure period, the birds were sacrificed and specimens were taken of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum for histology. Blood was collected for oxidative stress analysis. Histo-morphological and morphometric analyses of the intestines indicated that the duodenum and jejunum showed more damage than the ileum. The major alterations in the control intestines were limited to the villus tips, while heat stress led to villus denudation and crypt damage. When compared with morphologically normal villi, heat-stress-associated alterations were also observed in villus height (decreased), villus breadth at base (increased) and epithelial cell area (decreased). Birds exposed to heat stress presented with an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity and a decreased antioxidant capacity. It can be concluded that the chosen model allows a reproducible quantification of heat stress effects, which is suitable for the evaluation of dietary intervention strategies to combat heat stress conditions.

  14. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  15. Nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 as circulating protein in autoimmune diseases is a signal of damage that impairs endothelial cells through high-affinity membrane binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gugliesi

    Full Text Available IFI16, a nuclear pathogenic DNA sensor induced by several pro-inflammatory cytokines, is a multifaceted protein with various functions. It is also a target for autoantibodies as specific antibodies have been demonstrated in the sera of patients affected by systemic autoimmune diseases. Following transfection of virus-derived DNA, or treatment with UVB, IFI16 delocalizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and is then eventually released into the extracellular milieu. In this study, using an in-house capture enzyme-linked immunsorbent assay we demonstrate that significant levels of IFI16 protein can also exist as circulating form in the sera of autoimmune patients. We also show that the rIFI16 protein, when added in-vitro to endothelial cells, does not affect cell viability, but severely limits their tubulogenesis and transwell migration activities. These inhibitory effects are fully reversed in the presence of anti-IFI16 N-terminal antibodies, indicating that its extracellular activity resides within the N-terminus. It was further demonstrated that endogenous IFI16 released by apoptotic cells bind neighboring cells in a co-culture. Immunofluorescence assays revealed existence of high-affinity binding sites on the plasma membrane of endothelial cells. Free recombinant IFI16 binds these sites on HUVEC with dissociation constant of 2.7 nM, radioiodinated and unlabeled IFI16 compete for binding sites, with inhibition constant (Ki of 14.43 nM and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 67.88 nM; these data allow us to estimate the presence of 250,000 to 450,000 specific binding sites per cell. Corroborating the results from functional assays, this binding could be completely inhibited using anti-IFI16 N-terminal antibody, but not with an antibody raised against the IFI16 C-terminal. Altogether, these data demonstrate that IFI16 may exist as circulating protein in the sera of autoimmune patients which binds endothelial cells causing damage

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family members of people with autoimmune diseases. There may be a genetic cause. This disease is most common in young girls ...

  17. Acid fibroblast growth factor reduces rat intestinal mucosal damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion insult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Xiao-Bing Fu; Shi-Li Ge; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wen-Juan Li; Zhi-Yong Sheng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To detect the effects of acid fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) on apoptosis and proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells in differentiation or proliferation status to explore the protective mechanisms of aFGF.METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham-operated control group (C, n = 6), intestinal ischemia group (I,n = 6), aFGF treatment group (A,n =48) and intestinal ischemia-reperfusion group (R, n = 48). Apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL)technique. Proliferating cell nuclear. antigen (PCNA)protein expression and distribution were detected with immunohistochemical method. Plasma levels of D-lactate were determined with modified Brandts method.RESULTS: In A group, administration of exogenous aFGF could improve intestinal histological structure and decrease plasma D-lactate levels at 2-12 h after the reperfusion compared with R group. The apoptotic rates and PCNA protein expressions were not increased until 2 h after reperfusion and were maximal at 12 h. After reperfusion for 2-12 h, the apoptotic rates were gradually augmented along the length of jejunal crypt-villus units.Administration of aFGF could significantly reduce the apoptotic response at 2-12 h after reperfusion (P<0.05).Apoptosis rates in villus and crypt epithelial cells in A group at 12 h after reperfusion were (62.5±5.5)% and (73.2±18.6)% of those in R group, respectively.Treatment of aFGF could apparently induce protein expression of PCNA in intestinal mucosal cells of A group compared with R group during 2-12 h after reperfusion (P<0.05). There were approximately 1.3- and 1.5-times increments of PCNA expression levels in villus and crypt cells in A group at 12 h after reperfusion compared with R group, respectively.CONCLUSION: Intestinal I/R insult could lead to histological structure change and apoptotic rate increment. The protective effects of aFGF against ischemia

  18. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  19. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with γ-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage

  20. Relationship between plasma )-lactate and intestinal damage after severe injuries in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qing Sun; Xiao-Bing Fu; Rong-Zhang; Yi Lü; Qun Deng; Xiao-Guo Jiang; Zhi-Yong Sheng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To explore the kinetic changes in plasma D (-)lactate and lipopolysaccharide ( LPS ) levels, and investigate whether D (-)-lactate could be used as a marker of intestinal injury in rats following gut ischemia/reperfusion, burn, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS Three models were developed in rats:gut ischemia/reperfusion obtained by one hour of superior severe burn injury created by 30% of total body surface induced by continuous inverse infusion of sodium taurocholate and trypsin into main pancreatic duct.Plasma levels of D( - )-lactate in systemic circulation and LPS in portal circulation were measured by enzymaticspectrophotometric method and limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) test kit, respectively. Tissue samples of intestine were taken for histological analysis. RESULTS One hour gut ischemia followed by reperfusion injuries resulted in a significant elevation in plasma D( - )lactate and LPS levels, and there was a significant correlation between the plasma D( - )-lactate and LPS (r =0.719, P<0.05). The plasma concentrations of D(-)lactate and LPS increased significantly at 6 h postburn,and there was also a remarkable correlation between them (r = 0.877, P < 0.01). D ( - )-lactate and LPS levels elevated significantly at 2 h after ANP, with a similar significant correlation between the two levels (r-0.798,P < 0.01 ). The desquamation of intestine villi and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lamina propria were observed in all groups. CONCLUSION The changes of plasma D( - )-lactate levels in systemic blood paralleled with LPS levels in the portal vein blood. The measurement of plasma D (-)-lactate level may be a useful marker to assess the intestinal injury and to monitor an increase of intestinal permeability and endotoxemia following severe injuries in early stage.

  1. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation.

  2. Immunizing effect of irradiated homogenate of schistosomal cercariae against bilharzial ultrastructural damage in mice intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is a parasitological and electron microscopical investigation on the immunizing effect of normal and gamma irradiated homogenate cercariae of Schistosoma Mansoni against Bilharzial complications in the fine structure of the intestinal epithelium of mice. A group of mice was exposed, through tail immersion to live wild cercariae and was used as a control, (1st group), whereas the two other groups were injected with either unirradiated (400 Gy) (2nd group) or irradiated homogenate (3rd group) of schistosoma Mansoni cercariae and challenged with wild cercariae. All group were sacrificed 6 weeks post infection and the intestinal tissues were examined by the electron microscope. The Ist group showed considerable alterations in the different organelles of the cells. Abnormalities in epithelial cells appeared in goblet cells being deformed, shorter and adhering to microvilli, with degenerative cytoplasm and nuclei. In 2nd group, the intestinal epithelial cells were injured showing dark goblet cells. swollen mitochondria whereas microvilli and nuclei appeared normal. The 3rd group displayed epithelial cells with a relatively normal ultrastructure

  3. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. PMID:26626229

  4. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  5. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  6. Silica, Silicosis and Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Michael Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases SLE, SSc and RA. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However numerous questions remain unanswered.

  7. Effects of garlic oil and two of its major organosulfur compounds, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide, on intestinal damage in rats injected with endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlic and its active components are known to possess antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects. The present study investigated the effects of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds on endotoxin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. Wistar rats received by gavage 50 or 200 mg/kg body weight garlic oil (GO), 0.5 mmol/kg body weight diallyl disulfide or diallyl trisulfide, or the vehicle (corn oil; 2 ml/kg body weight) every other day for 2 weeks before being injected with endotoxin (i.p., 5 mg/kg body weight). Control rats were administered with corn oil and were injected with sterile saline. Samples for the measurement of proinflammatory cytokines were collected 3 h after injection, and all other samples were collected 18 h after injection. The low dose of GO suppressed endotoxin-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, ulceration, and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05). The high dose of GO significantly lowered the peripheral level of nitrate/nitrite and endotoxin-induced iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05) but worsened intestinal mucosal damage accompanied by elevated peripheral proinflammatory cytokines. Diallyl trisulfide but not diallyl disulfide showed similar toxic effect as that of high-dose GO. These results suggest the preventive effect and possible toxicity of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds in endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation and intestinal damage

  8. A Pilot Study on the Noninvasive Evaluation of Intestinal Damage in Celiac Disease Using I-FABP and L-FABP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; Vreugdenhil, Atita C. E.; Van den Neucker, Anita M.; Grootjans, Joep; van Bijnen, Annemarie A.; Damoiseaux, Jan G. M. C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Goals: In the clinical management of celiac disease, new noninvasive tools for evaluation of intestinal damage are needed for diagnosis and for follow-up of diet effects. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are potentially useful for this purpose as these arc small cytosolic proteins p

  9. Thrombin mutant W215A/E217A treatment improves neurological outcome and attenuates central nervous system damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbout, Norah G; Yu, Xiaolin; Healy, Laura D; Phillips, Kevin G; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T; Offner, Halina

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory disease characterized by demyelination and axonal damage of the central nervous system. The pathogenesis of MS has also been linked to vascular inflammation and local activation of the coagulation system, resulting in perivascular fibrin deposition. Treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, with antithrombotic and antiinflammatory activated protein C (APC) reduces disease severity. Since recombinant APC (Drotecogin alfa), originally approved for the treatment of severe sepsis, is not available for human MS studies, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacologic activation of endogenous protein C could likewise improve the outcome of EAE. Mice were immunized with murine myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptides and at the onset of EAE symptoms, were treated every other day with either WE thrombin (25 μg/kg; i.v.), a selective recombinant protein C activator thrombin analog, or saline control. Mice were monitored for changes in disease score until euthanized for ex vivo analysis of inflammation. Administration of WE thrombin significantly ameliorated clinical severity of EAE, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination, suppressed the activation of macrophages comprising the CD11b + population and reduced accumulation of fibrin (ogen) in the spinal cord. These data suggest that symptomatic MS may respond to a treatment strategy that involves temporal pharmacological enhancement of endogenous APC generation. PMID:24810631

  10. Intestinal trefoil factor activates the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to protect gastric mucosal epithelium from damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Yang, Zhizhou; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Yi; Sun, Baodi; Lin, Jinfeng; Xu, Min; Nie, Shinan

    2014-09-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF, also named as trefoil factor 3, TFF3) is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family, which plays an essential role in the regulation of cell survival, cell migration and maintains mucosal epithelial integrity in the gastrointestinal tract. However, the underlying mechanisms and associated molecules remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effects of ITF on gastric mucosal epithelium injury and its possible molecular mechanisms of action. In the present study, we show that ITF was able to promote the proliferation and migration of GES-1 cells via a mechanism that involves the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Western blot results indicated that ITF induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in the Akt signaling pathway. ITF also plays an essential role in the restitution of GES-1 cell damage induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced the apoptosis of GES-1 cells, decreased cell viability significantly (Pinhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ITF promotes the proliferation and migration of gastric mucosal epithelial cells and preserves gastric mucosal epithelial integrity after damage is mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study suggested that the PI3K/Akt pathway could act as a key intracellular pathway in the gastric mucosal epithelium that may serve as a therapeutic target to preserve epithelial integrity during injury.

  11. Sulfated polysaccharide from the marine algae Hypnea musciformis inhibits TNBS-induced intestinal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Brito, Tarcisio; Barros, Francisco C N; Silva, Renan O; Dias Júnior, Genilson J; C Júnior, José Simião; Franco, Álvaro X; Soares, Pedro M G; Chaves, Luciano S; Abreu, Clara M W S; de Paula, Regina C M; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; R Barbosa, André Luiz

    2016-10-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweed have important pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the sulfated polysaccharide (PLS) from the algae Hypnea musciformis and evaluate its protective effect in colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats. The sulfated polysaccharide possess a high molecular mass (1.24×10(5)gmol(-1)) and is composed of a κ-carrageenan, as depicted by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic data. PLS was administered orally (10, 30, and 60mg/kg, p.o.) for three days, starting before TNBS (trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) instillation (day 1). The rats were killed on day three, the portion of distal colon (5cm) was excised and evaluated macroscopic scores and wet weight. Then, samples of the intestinal were used for histological evaluation and quantification of glutathione, malonyldialdehyde acid, myeloperoxidase, nitrate/nitrite and cytokines. Our results demonstrate that PLS reduced the colitis and all analyzed biochemical parameters. Thus, we concluded that the PLS extracted from the marine algae H. musciformis reduced the colitis in animal model and may have an important promising application in the inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27474644

  12. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  13. Alpha1A-adrenergic receptor-directed autoimmunity induces left ventricular damage and diastolic dysfunction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies to the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor occur in nearly half of patients with refractory hypertension; however, their relevance is uncertain. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We immunized Lewis rats with the second extracellular-loop peptides of the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor and maintained them for one year. Alpha(1A-adrenergic antibodies (alpha(1A-AR-AB were monitored with a neonatal cardiomyocyte contraction assay by ELISA, and by ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rats were followed with radiotelemetric blood pressure measurements and echocardiography. At 12 months, the left ventricles of immunized rats had greater wall thickness than control rats. The fractional shortening and dp/dt(max demonstrated preserved systolic function. A decreased E/A ratio in immunized rats indicated a diastolic dysfunction. Invasive hemodynamics revealed increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and decreased dp/dt(min. Mean diameter of cardiomyocytes showed hypertrophy in immunized rats. Long-term blood pressure values and heart rates were not different. Genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, collagens, extracellular matrix proteins, calcium regulating proteins, and proteins of energy metabolism in immunized rat hearts were upregulated, compared to controls. Furthermore, fibrosis was present in immunized hearts, but not in control hearts. A subset of immunized and control rats was infused with angiotensin (Ang II. The stressor raised blood pressure to a greater degree and led to more cardiac fibrosis in immunized, than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that alpha(1A-AR-AB cause diastolic dysfunction independent of hypertension, and can increase the sensitivity to Ang II. We suggest that alpha(1A-AR-AB could contribute to cardiovascular endorgan damage.

  14. Complement and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  15. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Radiation Emergency Medicine Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujita, Mayumi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Meineke, Viktor [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  16. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  17. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  18. Effect of adiponectin deficiency on intestinal damage and hematopoietic responses of mice exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja; Gove, Melissa E.; Pini, Maria [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Fantuzzi, Giamila, E-mail: giamila@uic.edu [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-08-07

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-derived cytokine that regulates insulin sensitivity and inflammation. It is also involved in modulation of cell proliferation by binding to various growth factors. Based on its known effects in modulating cell proliferation and oxidative stress, APN may potentially be involved in regulating tissue damage and repair following irradiation. Adiponectin KO mice and their WT littermates were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 3 or 6 Gy gamma radiation. Radiation-induced alterations were studied in jejunum, blood, bone marrow and thymus at days 1 and 5 post-irradiation and compared with sham-irradiated groups. In WT mice, irradiation did not significantly alter serum APN levels while inducing a significant decrease in serum leptin. Irradiation caused a significant reduction in thymocyte cellularity, with concomitant decrease in CD4{sup +}, CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell populations, with no significant differences between WT and APN KO mice. Irradiation resulted in a significantly higher increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes in the blood of APN KO compared with WT mice, whereas frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow at day 5 was significantly higher in WT compared with APN KO mice. Finally, irradiation induced similar alterations in villus height and crypt cell proliferation in the jejunum of WT and APN KO mice. Jejunum explants from sham-irradiated APN KO mice produced higher levels of IL-6 compared with tissue from WT animals, but the difference was no longer apparent following irradiation. Our data indicate that APN deficiency does not play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice, while it may participate in regulation of damage to the hematopoietic system.

  19. Expression of innate immunity genes and damage of primary human pancreatic islets by epidemic strains of Echovirus: implication for post-virus islet autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sarmiento

    Full Text Available Three large-scale Echovirus (E epidemics (E4,E16,E30, each differently associated to the acute development of diabetes related autoantibodies, have been documented in Cuba. The prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies was moderate during the E4 epidemic but high in the E16 and E30 epidemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epidemic strains of echovirus on beta-cell lysis, beta-cell function and innate immunity gene expression in primary human pancreatic islets. Human islets from non-diabetic donors (n = 7 were infected with the virus strains E4, E16 and E30, all isolated from patients with aseptic meningitis who seroconverted to islet cell antibody positivity. Viral replication, degree of cytolysis, insulin release in response to high glucose as well as mRNA expression of innate immunity genes (IFN-b, RANTES, RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and OAS were measured. The strains of E16 and E30 did replicate well in all islets examined, resulting in marked cytotoxic effects. E4 did not cause any effects on cell lysis, however it was able to replicate in 2 out of 7 islet donors. Beta-cell function was hampered in all infected islets (P<0.05; however the effect of E16 and E30 on insulin secretion appeared to be higher than the strain of E4. TLR3 and IFN-beta mRNA expression increased significantly following infection with E16 and E30 (P<0.033 and P<0.039 respectively. In contrast, the expression of none of the innate immunity genes studied was altered in E4-infected islets. These findings suggest that the extent of the epidemic-associated islet autoimmunity may depend on the ability of the viral strains to damage islet cells and induce pro-inflammatory innate immune responses within the infected islets.

  20. Chemoprotective effect of taurine on potassium bromate-induced DNA damage, DNA-protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in rat intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Kaisar Ahmad

    Full Text Available Potassium bromate (KBrO3 is widely used as a food additive and is a major water disinfection by-product. It induces multiple organ toxicity in humans and experimental animals and is a probable human carcinogen. The present study reports the protective effect of dietary antioxidant taurine on KBrO3-induced damage to the rat intestine. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: control, KBrO3 alone, taurine alone and taurine+ KBrO3. Administration of KBrO3 alone led to decrease in the activities of intestinal brush border membrane enzymes while those of antioxidant defence and carbohydrate metabolism were also severely altered. There was increase in DNA damage and DNA-protein cross-linking. Treatment with taurine, prior to administration of KBrO3, resulted in significant attenuation in all these parameters but the administration of taurine alone had no effect. Histological studies supported these biochemical results showing extensive intestinal damage in KBrO3-treated animals and greatly reduced tissue injury in the taurine+ KBrO3 group. These results show that taurine ameliorates bromate induced tissue toxicity and oxidative damage by improving the antioxidant defence, tissue integrity and energy metabolism. Taurine can, therefore, be potentially used as a therapeutic/protective agent against toxicity of KBrO3 and related compounds.

  1. Autoimmune Hepatitis and PSC Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2008-02-01

    This article describes the connection between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The two conditions have chronicity, liver inflammation, and a positive autoimmune serology in common; they differ in terms of gender distribution and bile duct damage. There is evidence suggesting that AIH and PSC are immune-mediated diseases. PSC and AIH could lie within the spectrum of the same disease process. Future studies should determine how frequently AIH evolves to PSC.

  2. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  3. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  4. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  5. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...

  6. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  7. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  8. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the r...

  9. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  10. Histological damage and inflammatory response elicited by Monobothrium wageneri (Cestoda in the intestine of Tinca tinca (Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyaf Dezfuli Bahram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the European cyprinids, tench, Tinca tinca (L., and the pathological effects their cestodes may effect, have received very little or no attention. Most literature relating to Monobothrium wageneri Nybelin, 1922, a common intestinal cestode of tench, for example, has focused on aspects of its morphology rather than on aspects of the host-parasite interaction. Results Immunopathological and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of 28 tench, collected from Lake Piediluco, of which 16 specimens harboured tight clusters of numerous M. wageneri attached to the intestinal wall. The infection was associated with the degeneration of the mucosal layer and the formation of raised inflammatory swelling surrounding the worms. At the site of infection, the number of granulocytes in the intestine of T. tinca was significantly higher than the number determined 1 cm away from the site of infection or the number found in uninfected fish. Using transmission electron microscopy, mast cells and neutrophils were frequently observed in close proximity to, and inside, the intestinal capillaries; often these cells were in contact with the cestode tegument. At the host-parasite interface, no secretion from the parasite's tegument was observed. Intense degranulation of the mast cells was seen within the submucosa and lamina muscularis, most noticeably at sites close to the tegument of the scolex. In some instances, rodlet cells were encountered in the submucosa. In histological sections, hyperplasia of the mucous cells, notably those giving an alcian blue positive reaction, were evident in the intestinal tissues close to the swelling surrounding the worms. Enhanced mucus secretion was recorded in the intestines of infected tench. Conclusions The pathological changes and the inflammatory cellular response induced by the caryophyllidean monozoic tapeworm M. wageneri within the intestinal tract of an Italian population of wild

  11. Autoimmune Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Amy M. L.; Britton, Jeffrey W.; McKeon, Andrew; So, Elson; Lennon, Vanda A.; Shin, Cheolsu; Klein, Christopher J.; Watson, Robert E.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; Cascino, Gregory D.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Nickels, Katherine C.; Aksamit, Allen J.; Noe, Katherine H.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical characteristics and immunotherapy responses in patients with autoimmune epilepsy. Design Observational, retrospective case series. Setting Mayo Clinic Health System. Patients Thirty-two patients with an exclusive (n=11) or predominant (n = 21) seizure presentation in whom an autoimmune etiology was suspected (on the basis of neural autoantibody [91%], inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid [31%], or magnetic resonance imaging suggesting inflammation [63%]) were studied. All had partial seizures: 81% had failed treatment with 2 or more anti-epileptic drugs and had daily seizures and 38% had seizure semiologies that were multifocal or changed with time. Head magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 15 (47%) at onset. Electroencephalogram abnormalities included interictal epileptiform discharges in 20; electrographic seizures in 15; and focal slowing in 13. Neural autoantibodies included voltage-gated potassium channel complex in 56% (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 specific, 14; contactin-associated proteinlike 2 specific, 1); glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 in 22%; collapsin response-mediator protein 5 in 6%; and Ma2, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and ganglionic acetylcholine receptor in 1 patient each. Intervention Immunotherapy with intravenous methylprednisolone; intravenous immune globulin; and combinations of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immune globulin, plasmapheresis, or cyclo-phosphamide. Main Outcome Measure Seizure frequency. Results After a median interval of 17 months (range, 3–72 months), 22 of 27 (81%) reported improvement postimmunotherapy; 18 were seizure free. The median time from seizure onset to initiating immunotherapy was 4 months for responders and 22 months for nonresponders (P<.05). All voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patients reported initial or lasting benefit (P<.05). One voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patient was seizure free after

  12. [Autoimmune epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeck, M; Zacharia, A; Rossetti, A O

    2010-05-01

    There is increasing recognition of an autoimmune origin of pharmacoresistant epileptic disorders. Besides the paraneoplastic limbic encephalopathies (LE), reports of syndromes of non-paraneoplastic LE are increasingly reported in the last 5-10 years. Three antibodies are now relatively well described: Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-(NMDA) antibodies. We review clinical syndromes, associated imaging and laboratory findings. While most reports arise from adult populations, children and adolescents are also concerned as evidenced by increasing observations. Early recognition is mandatory, since early immunomodulatory treatment appears to be related to significantly better outcome. PMID:20499581

  13. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  14. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  15. Quantitative histo-morphometric analysis of heat-stress-related damage in the small intestines of broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Regiane R.; Awati, Ajay; Roubos-van den Hil, Petra J.; Tersteeg-Zijderveld, Monique H. G.; Koolmees, Peter A.; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current research was to present a methodological approach allowing reproducible morphometric and morphological (Chiu/Park scale) analyses of the alterations in the intestines of broilers exposed to heat stress. Ross broilers were exposed over four consecutive days to a high-temperatur

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  17. Inhibition of long myosin light-chain kinase activation alleviates intestinal damage after binge ethanol exposure and burn injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zahs, Anita; Bird, Melanie D.; Ramirez, Luis; Turner, Jerrold R; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that intestinal permeability is elevated following either binge ethanol exposure or burn injury alone, and this barrier dysfunction is further perturbed when these insults are combined. We and others have previously reported a rise in both systemic and local proinflammatory cytokine production in mice after the combined insult. Knowing that long myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) is important for epithelial barrier maintenance and can be activated by proinflammatory...

  18. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  19. Gut microbiome-derived metabolites modulate intestinal epithelial cell damage and mitigate graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Jenq, Robert; Mathew, Anna V; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Hanash, Alan; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Wu, Shin-Rong; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Byun, Jaeman; Shono, Yusuke; Lindemans, Caroline; Calafiore, Marco; Schmidt, Thomas C; Honda, Kenya; Young, Vincent B; Pennathur, Subramaniam; van den Brink, Marcel; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    The effect of alterations in intestinal microbiota on microbial metabolites and on disease processes such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is not known. Here we carried out an unbiased analysis to identify previously unidentified alterations in gastrointestinal microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (allo-BMT). Alterations in the amount of only one SCFA, butyrate, were observed only in the intestinal tissue. The reduced butyrate in CD326(+) intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) after allo-BMT resulted in decreased histone acetylation, which was restored after local administration of exogenous butyrate. Butyrate restoration improved IEC junctional integrity, decreased apoptosis and mitigated GVHD. Furthermore, alteration of the indigenous microbiota with 17 rationally selected strains of high butyrate-producing Clostridia also decreased GVHD. These data demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized role of microbial metabolites and suggest that local and specific alteration of microbial metabolites has direct salutary effects on GVHD target tissues and can mitigate disease severity.

  20. Gut microbiome-derived metabolites modulate intestinal epithelial cell damage and mitigate graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Jenq, Robert; Mathew, Anna V; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Hanash, Alan; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Wu, Shin-Rong; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Byun, Jaeman; Shono, Yusuke; Lindemans, Caroline; Calafiore, Marco; Schmidt, Thomas C; Honda, Kenya; Young, Vincent B; Pennathur, Subramaniam; van den Brink, Marcel; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    The effect of alterations in intestinal microbiota on microbial metabolites and on disease processes such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is not known. Here we carried out an unbiased analysis to identify previously unidentified alterations in gastrointestinal microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (allo-BMT). Alterations in the amount of only one SCFA, butyrate, were observed only in the intestinal tissue. The reduced butyrate in CD326(+) intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) after allo-BMT resulted in decreased histone acetylation, which was restored after local administration of exogenous butyrate. Butyrate restoration improved IEC junctional integrity, decreased apoptosis and mitigated GVHD. Furthermore, alteration of the indigenous microbiota with 17 rationally selected strains of high butyrate-producing Clostridia also decreased GVHD. These data demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized role of microbial metabolites and suggest that local and specific alteration of microbial metabolites has direct salutary effects on GVHD target tissues and can mitigate disease severity. PMID:26998764

  1. Cytotoxic damage of soybean agglutinin on intestinal epithelial cells of broiler chicks: in vitro protection by Bifidobacterium infantis CRL1395.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babot, Jaime D; Argañaraz-Martínez, Eloy; Lorenzo-Pisarello, María J; Apella, María C; Perez Chaia, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Plant lectins, which are proteins/glycoproteins present in a wide range of vegetables, fruits, cereals and beans, are resistant to digestive enzymes and food cooking temperatures. They bind reversibly to specific glycosidic residues expressed on the membrane of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and cause anti-nutritional effects in humans and animals. Soybean lectin (SBA) has been detected in poultry diets, and its ability to bind to the intestinal epithelium has been reported. The development of new methods for removing SBA from feeds or to prevent interaction with the intestinal mucosa is of interest. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity of SBA on IEC of chicks was demonstrated for the first time. The LD50, assessed after 2 h exposure of IEC to SBA, was 6.13 μg mL(-1) The ability of Bifidobacterium infantis CRL1395 to bind SBA on the bacterial envelope was confirmed, and prevention of IEC cytotoxicity by lectin removal was demonstrated. Safety of B. infantis CRL1395, resistance to gastrointestinal stress and adhesion were also determined. It was concluded that the early administration of B. infantis CRL1395 to chicks would effectively reduce the toxicity of SBA. Besides, it would favour the colonization of the gut with a beneficial microbiota. PMID:27190155

  2. The autoimmune tautology

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates th...

  3. Aetiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Vergani; Giorgina Mieli-Vergani

    2008-01-01

    The histological hallmark of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a dense portal mononuclear cell infiltrate that invades the surrounding parenchyma and comprises T and B lymphocytes,macrophages,and plasma cells.An unknown but powerful stimulus must be promoting the formation of this massive inflammatory cellular reaction that is likely to initiate and perpetuate liver damage.An autoimmune attack can follow different pathways to inflict damage on hepatocytes.Liver damage is likely to be orchestrated by CD4+T lymphocytes recognizing an autoantigenic liver peptide.To trigger an autoimmune response,the peptide must be embraced by an HLA class Ⅱ molecule and presented to naive CD4+T helper (Th0) cells by professional antigen presenting cells,with the co-stimulation of ligand-ligand fostering interaction between the two cells.Th0 cells become activated,differentiate into functional phenotypes according to the cytokines prevailing in the microenvironment and the nature of the antigen,and initiate a cascade of immune reactions determined by the cytokines produced by the activated T cells.Th1 cells,arising in the presence of the macrophage-derived interleukin (IL)-12,secrete mainly IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ),which activate macrophages,enhance expression of HLA class Ⅰ (increasing liver cell vulnerability to a CD8+T cell cytotoxic attack),and induce expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules on hepatocytes.Th2 cells,which differentiate from Th0 if the microenvironment is rich in IL-4,produce mainly IL-4,IL-10,and IL-13 which favour autoantibody production by B lymphocytes.Physiologically,Th1 and Th2 antagonize each other.Th17 cells,a recently described population,arise in the presence of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and IL-6 and appear to have an important effector role in inflammation and autoimmunity.The process of autoantigen recognition is strictly controlled by regulatory mechanisms,such as those exerted by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells,which derive from Th0

  4. Radioprotector WR-2721 and mitigating peptidoglycan synergistically promote mouse survival through the amelioration of intestinal and bone marrow damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of an agent effective for the treatment of intestinal and bone marrow injury following radiation exposure remains a major issue in radiological medicine. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic impact of single agent or combination treatments with 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylsulphanyl phosphonic acid (WR-2721) and peptidoglycan (PGN, a toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) agonist) on radiation-induced injury of the intestine and bone marrow in lethally irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. A dose of 3 mg of WR-2721 per mouse (167 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given 30 min before irradiation, and 30 μg of PGN per mouse (1.7 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 h after 10 Gy irradiation. Bone marrow cluster of differentiation (CD)45+ and CD34+ markers of multiple haematopoietic lineages, number of granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GEMM) progenitor colonies, bone marrow histopathology, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) expression in the intestines, xylose absorption and intestinal histopathology were all assessed at various time-points after irradiation. Furthermore, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein in the ileum was stained by immunofluorescent labelling. PGN-treated irradiated mice showed an increase in CD45+CD34+ cells compared with untreated mice 1.25 days after 10 Gy ionizing radiation (IR) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, combined PGN and WR-2721 treatment had an obviously synergistic radio-protective effect in nucleated cells in the bone marrow, including GEMM progenitors and CD45+CD34+ cells 4 days after 10 Gy IR. Single agent PGN or WR-2721 treatment after 10 Gy IR clearly increased Lgr5-positive pit cells (P < 0.05) and xylose absorption (P < 0.05). However only PGN and WR-2721 combination treatment markedly increased villus height (P < 0.05), number of crypts (P < 0.05) and whole-body weights after 10 Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI). The NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated to the nucleus, and

  5. Multitarget fatty acid amide hydrolase/cyclooxygenase blockade suppresses intestinal inflammation and protects against nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-dependent gastrointestinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Oscar; Migliore, Marco; Habrant, Damien; Armirotti, Andrea; Albani, Clara; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-06-01

    The ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to inhibit cyclooxygenase (Cox)-1 and Cox-2 underlies the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs, as well as their propensity to damage the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium. This toxic action greatly limits the use of NSAIDs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other chronic pathologies. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide, which attenuates inflammation and promotes GI healing. Here, we describe the first class of systemically active agents that simultaneously inhibit FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 with high potency and selectivity. The class prototype 4: (ARN2508) is potent at inhibiting FAAH, Cox-1, and Cox-2 (median inhibitory concentration: FAAH, 0.031 ± 0.002 µM; Cox-1, 0.012 ± 0.002 µM; and Cox-2, 0.43 ± 0.025 µM) but does not significantly interact with a panel of >100 off targets. After oral administration in mice, ARN2508 engages its intended targets and exerts profound therapeutic effects in models of intestinal inflammation. Unlike NSAIDs, ARN2508 causes no gastric damage and indeed protects the GI from NSAID-induced damage through a mechanism that requires FAAH inhibition. Multitarget FAAH/Cox blockade may provide a transformative approach to IBD and other pathologies in which FAAH and Cox are overactive.

  6. The autoimmune tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates that the pathologic mechanisms may be similar among autoimmune diseases. Lastly, genetic evidence shows that autoimmune phenotypes might represent pleiotropic outcomes of the interaction of non-specific disease genes.

  7. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  8. Monalysin, a novel ß-pore-forming toxin from the Drosophila pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila, contributes to host intestinal damage and lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onya Opota

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas entomophila is an entomopathogenic bacterium that infects and kills Drosophila. P. entomophila pathogenicity is linked to its ability to cause irreversible damages to the Drosophila gut, preventing epithelium renewal and repair. Here we report the identification of a novel pore-forming toxin (PFT, Monalysin, which contributes to the virulence of P. entomophila against Drosophila. Our data show that Monalysin requires N-terminal cleavage to become fully active, forms oligomers in vitro, and induces pore-formation in artificial lipid membranes. The prediction of the secondary structure of the membrane-spanning domain indicates that Monalysin is a PFT of the ß-type. The expression of Monalysin is regulated by both the GacS/GacA two-component system and the Pvf regulator, two signaling systems that control P. entomophila pathogenicity. In addition, AprA, a metallo-protease secreted by P. entomophila, can induce the rapid cleavage of pro-Monalysin into its active form. Reduced cell death is observed upon infection with a mutant deficient in Monalysin production showing that Monalysin plays a role in P. entomophila ability to induce intestinal cell damages, which is consistent with its activity as a PFT. Our study together with the well-established action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins suggests that production of PFTs is a common strategy of entomopathogens to disrupt insect gut homeostasis.

  9. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  10. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  11. Primary Sj(o)gren's Syndrome Accompanied by Intestinal Obstruction: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-ting Jia; Hua Wei; Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    SJ(O)GREN'S syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by the infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells in exocrine glands,especially salivary and lacrimal gland interstitium.The clinical manifestations of SS are complex.When the digestive system is involved,the patient always presents with liver damage,atrophic gastritis,and chronic diarrhea.Intestinal obstruction is rare and the specific pathogenesis remains unclear.1 Currently,there is no clear treatment guidelines for SS with intestinal obstruction.The general measures include gastrointestinal decompression,spasmolysis,and other symptomatic treatments and the use of glucocorticoid to control the progressing of disease.Here we describe a case of primary SS with intestinal obstruction who was treated with conservative treatment.

  12. IgA anti-Actin antibodies in children with celiac disease: comparison of immunofluorescence with Elisa assay in predicting severe intestinal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of serum IgA antibodies against actin filaments (AAA in patients with celiac disease (CD is strongly associated with mucosal damage and severe degrees of villous atrophy. The aims of the present study were (1 to verify the effectiveness of IgA-AAA in newly diagnosed CD patients in a clinical setting (2 to compare the immunofluorescence assay with ELISA assay; (3 to compare the correlation of our IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG-Ab class with mucosal intestinal lesions. Methods 90 patients underwent endoscopy and multiple biopsies for suspected CD on the basis of symptoms, in presence of positive tTG-Ab tests. Twenty biopsied and 25 not-biopsied subjects with negative tTG-Ab were tested as control groups. IgA-AAA assays were performed by indirect immunofluorescence using rat epithelial intestinal cells, and by ELISA with a commercial kit. tTG-Ab assay was a radio-binding assay. Intestinal specimens were collected by upper endoscopy and the histological study was done according to the Marsh's classification modified by Oberhuber (M/O. Auto-antibodies assays and histological evaluation have been performed blindly by skilled operators. Results CD diagnosis was confirmed in 82 patients (type I M/O in 2 patients, IIIA in 18 patients, IIIB in 29 patients and IIIC in 33 patients. Two patients with type 1 lesion in presence of positive tTG-Ab and abdominal complaints, started a gluten free diet. The rate of IgA-AAA positivity (sensitivity by IFI and ELISA in histologically proven celiac disease patients, were 5.5% and 25% patients in IIIA, 27.5% and 34.4% patients in IIIB, 78.8% and 75% in IIIC patients, respectively. Patients with normal or nearly normal mucosa, regardless of tTG-Ab status, presented negative IgA-AAA IFI assay. On the other hand, 1 patient with normal mucosa but positive tTG-Ab, also presented positive IgA-AAA ELISA. All healthy non biopsied

  13. Transgenic mice that overexpress the human trefoil peptide pS2 have an increased resistance to intestinal damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Playford, R J; Marchbank, T; Goodlad, R A; Chinery, R A; Poulsom, R.; Hanby, A M

    1996-01-01

    pS2 is a member of the trefoil peptide family, all of which are overexpressed at sites of gastrointestinal injury. We hypothesized that they are important in stimulating mucosal repair. To test this idea, we have produced a transgenic mice strain that expresses human pS2 (hpS2) specifically within the jejunum and examined the effect of this overexpression on proliferation and susceptibility to indomethacin-induced damage. A transgenic mouse was produced by microinjecting fertilized oocytes wi...

  14. Changes of Intestinal Permeability in Cholelithiasis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-long Sun; Shuo-dong Wu; Dong-xu Cui; Bao-lin Liu; Xian-wei Dai

    2009-01-01

    @@ In normal condition,intestine mucosa possesses barrier function.When the barrier function of intestine mucosa was damaged,intestinal bacteria,endotoxin,or other substances would enter blood.It is generally accepted that biliary bacteria origins from the intestine either via duodenal papilla or intestinal mucosa.In this study,we aimed to investigate the intestinal permeability changes of cholelithiasis patients to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of cholelithiasis.

  15. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  16. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with autoimmune hypothyroidism, vitiligo and alopecia universalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabán, J; Rodríguez-García, J L; Gil, J; País, J R; Medina, S

    1991-12-01

    The aetiology of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) has not been elucidated, but the possibility of an autoimmune mechanism has been proposed. We report a case of an unknown clinical combination of PCT with autoimmune hypothyroidism, alopecia universalis and vitiligo with thyroid and parietal cell circulating antibodies. This is highly suggestive of underlying autoimmune damage in this patient. PMID:1803247

  17. Immunomodulatory effects of dietary non-digestible oligosaccharides in T cell-mediated autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogier, R.; Ederveen, T.; Hartog, A.; Walgreen, B.; Van Den Bersselaar, L.; Helsen, M.; Vos, P.; Garssen, J.; Willemsen, L.; Van Den Berg, W.; Koenders, M.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates the relevance of intestinal microbiota in shaping the immune response and supports its contribution to the development of autoimmune diseases. Prebiotic non-digestible oligosaccharides are known to selectively support growth of commensal Bifidobacteria and

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  19. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  20. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  1. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  2. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  3. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  4. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  5. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  6. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  7. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. 从肠黏膜免疫系统损害探讨AIDS脾虚病机%Discuss the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春芳; 李真; 徐立然

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients with intestinal mucosal immune system damage promoting the immunodeficiency of body and the incidence of opportunistic infections, which is consistent with the evolution of spleen deficiency pathogenesis point of view of TCM. This paper discusses the spleen deficiency of AIDS pathogenesis from the point of view intestinal mucosal immune system damage, and proposed strengthening the spleen to improve immune function of intestinal mucosa of AIDS.%HIV/AIDS患者肠黏膜免疫系统损害促进了机体免疫功能的缺失和机会性感染的发生,AIDS以脾虚为主的中医病机演变过程,与HIV感染所致以肠黏膜损伤为重要表现的全身免疫损伤过程相符合.文章从肠黏膜免疫系统损害角度探讨AIDS脾虚病机,提出健脾扶正以改善肠黏膜免疫功能的中医药治疗AIDS思路.

  9. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  10. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity.

  11. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  12. Reactive oxygen species in organ-specific autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dalmazi, Giulia; Hirshberg, Jason; Lyle, Daniel; Freij, Joudeh B; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been extensively studied in the induction of inflammation and tissue damage, especially as it relates to aging. In more recent years, ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here, ROS accumulation leads to apoptosis and autoantigen structural changes that result in novel specificities. ROS have been implicated not only in the initiation of the autoimmune response but also in its amplification and spreading to novel epitopes, through the unmasking of cryptic determinants. This review will examine the contribution of ROS to the pathogenesis of four organ specific autoimmune diseases (Hashimoto thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and vitiligo), and compare it to that of a better characterized systemic autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis). It will also discuss tobacco smoking as an environmental factor endowed with both pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant properties, thus capable of differentially modulating the autoimmune response. PMID:27491295

  13. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology of autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M P; Fozdar, M

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between the immune system and psychological states are both intricate and intriguing. Research at a molecular level has thrown considerable light on the previously ill-defined area of psychoneuroimmunology. In this report, we explore the psychoneuroimmunology of autoimmune disorders, particularly rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus. Animal models of these diseases have provided a particularly useful window on complex psychoneuroimmunological interactions. Observations about the effect of stress on the onset and course of autoimmune disorders has added to our understanding of psychoneuroimmunological interactions. These interactions are bi-directional, as reflected in the autoimmune-mediated neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus. Exploring the role of various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators in the stress response may have important therapeutic implications for autoimmune disorders.

  15. Etiopathogenesis of insulin autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Lenmark; Moustakas, Antonis K; Papadopoulos, George K; Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (pro)insulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and ...

  16. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  17. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uni Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urticarial vasculitis (UV is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia.

  18. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  19. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications. PMID:22744631

  20. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  1. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ non-specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Conclusions. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Other­wise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  2. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  3. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  4. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  5. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  6. Anesthetic Effects on Damage of Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Function Caused by Cardiopulmonary Bypass%麻醉药物对体外循环致肠道屏障功能损害作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏日娜(综述); 于建设; 温再和(审校)

    2015-01-01

    肠道是全身应激反应的重要靶器官,又是全身炎症反应综合征、多器官功能障碍综合征的重要诱因。而临床患者当中手术创伤、应激反应、严重感染、休克、心血管外科手术中体外循环等均可导致肠黏膜屏障功能受损,这些过程最终导致肠屏障通透性增加,继而与脓毒症、全身炎症反应综合征、多器官功能障碍综合征发生有密切关系。在临床实践中证实许多常规麻醉药物预处理对体外循环引起的肠道缺血/再灌注损伤有保护作用,继而减轻肠黏膜损伤。%The gut is an important target organ of the systemic stress response ,and an important cause of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome ( SIRS ) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome ( MODS ) . Surgical trauma,stress,shock,infection,cardiopulmonary bypass all can lead to impaired intestinal mucosal barrier function.These processes eventually lead to intestinal mucosal permeability increase,which is closely associated with sepsis,SIRS and MODS.In clinical practice it′s confirmed that many conventional anesthetics preconditioning can protect the intestine from ischemia reperfusion injury due to cardiopulmonary bypass and decrease the damage of intestinal mucosa .

  7. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article. PMID:27422713

  8. Common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (the autoimmune tautology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The fact that autoimmune diseases share subphenotypes, physiopathological mechanisms and genetic factors has been called autoimmune tautology, and indicates that they have a common origin. The autoimmune phenotypes vary depending on the target cell and the affected organ, gender, ancestry, trigger factors and age at onset. Ten shared characteristics supporting this logical theory are herein reviewed.

  9. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  10. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    C.I. González; M. Cires; F. J. Jiménez; Rubio, T.

    2008-01-01

    La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada). En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuen...

  11. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  12. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  13. Autoimmune muscular pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    2005-05-01

    The T cell-mediated mechanism responsible for Polymyositis and inclusion Body Myositis and the complement-mediated microangiopathy associated with Dermatomyositis are reviewed. The management of autoimmune myopathies with the presently available immunotherapeutic agents as well as new therapies and ongoing trials are discussed.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niraj; Jani; James; Buxbaum

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4(Ig G4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreaticmanifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG 4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG 4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings.

  15. Autoimmunity and Turner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleo, Ana; Moroni, Luca; Caliari, Lisa; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder, affecting female individuals, resulting from the partial or complete absence of one sex chromosome, and occurring in approximately 50 per 100,000 liveborn girls. TS is associated with reduced adult height and with gonadal dysgenesis, leading to insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids and to infertility. Morbidity and mortality are increased in TS but average intellectual performance is within the normal range. TS is closely associated to the presence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases (AID), especially autoimmune thyroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the fact that the strong association between TS and AID is well known and has been widely studied, the underlying immunopathogenic mechanism remains partially unexplained. Recent studies have displayed how TS patients do not show an excess of immunogenic risk markers. This is evocative for a higher responsibility of X-chromosome abnormalities in the development of AID, and particularly of X-genes involved in immune response. For instance, the long arm of the X chromosome hosts a MHC-locus, so the loss of that region may lead to a deficiency in immune regulation. Currently no firm guidelines for diagnosis exist. In conclusion, TS is a condition associated with a number of autoimmune manifestations. Individuals with TS need life-long medical attention. As a consequence of these findings, early diagnosis and regular screening for potential associated autoimmune conditions are essential in the medical follow-up of TS patients. PMID:22154619

  16. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  17. The role of autoimmunity in premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is a heterogeneous syndrome with several causative factors. Autoimmune mechanisms are involved in pathogenesis of 4-30 % of POF cases. The present review focuses on the role of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of POF. The evidences for an autoimmune etiology are: demonstration of ovarian autoantibodies, the presence of lymphocytic oophoritis, and association with other autoimmune disorders. Several ovarian antigenic targets have been identified in POF patients. The oocyte seems to be the most often targeted cell. Lymphocytic oophoritis is widely present in POF associated adrenal insufficiency. Addisonۥs disease is one of the most common autoimmune disorders associated with POF. Early detection of this potentially life threatening disease was recommended in several studies. The gold standard for detecting autoimmune POF is ovarian biopsy. This procedure is not recommended due to unknown clinical value, expense, and risks. Several immunoassays have been proposed as substitute diagnostic tools. Nevertheless, there is no clinically proven sensitive and specific serum test to confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune POF or to anticipate the patient’s chance of developing POF or associated diseases. Some authors suggested the possible effects of immuno-modulating therapy on the resumption of ovarian function and fertility in a selected group of autoimmune POF patients. However, in most instances, this treatment fails to reverse the course of the disease. Numerous studies illustrated that standard treatment outcome for infertility is less effective in the presence of ovarian autoimmunity. The antibody-induced damage could be a pathogenic factor. Nevertheless, the precise cause remains obscure.

  18. 肝性脑病食醋灌肠导致肠黏膜屏障损伤及改进方法*%Damage of Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Caused by Vinegar Enema and Improvement for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤; 徐旭娟; 沈美云

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨肝性脑病食醋保留灌肠对肠黏膜屏障的损伤,并比较传统高渗食醋灌肠液与改进的等渗食醋灌肠液对兔肠黏膜屏障的损伤程度。方法选用成年家兔16只,随机分为2组,高渗组灌肠液为生理盐水和白醋混合成的高渗溶液;等渗组灌肠液为双蒸水和白醋混合的同等pH值和体积分数的等渗溶液。在相同灌肠条件下,使用不同渗透压食醋灌肠液给动物保留灌肠。通过肠黏膜病理切片,光镜下观察肠黏膜结构改变,电镜下观察细胞结构及紧密连接情况,比较2组肠黏膜屏障损伤程度。结果光镜下可见等渗组直肠部位与远端结肠肠黏膜损伤程度较高渗组轻。电镜下,等渗组细胞形态正常,微绒毛排列整齐,细胞连接紧密;高渗组微绒毛减少或消失,细胞连接增宽或开放,细胞核固缩,并可见凋亡、坏死细胞。结论等渗性食醋灌肠液对肠黏膜屏障损伤较传统高渗性食醋灌肠液轻。临床上肝性脑病患者可选用等渗性食醋灌肠液以减少渗透压对肠黏膜屏障的损伤。%Objective To explore the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier caused by vinegar retention enema, and compare the degree of injury in intestinal mucosal barrier between isotonic vinegar and traditional hypertonic vinegar treat-ment. Methods Sixteen adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. The solution of vinegar mixed with normal so-dium was given to hypertonic group. Isotonic group was administered with isosmotic solution made of vinegar and double dis-tilled water, with the same volume fraction and pH as hypertonic group. Then two different osmosis solutions were given as enema solution to rabbits under the same condition. Finally, damages of intestinal mucosa were observed by light microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM) in two groups. Results It was observed that injuries of rectum and distal part of colon were

  19. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Teufel; Peter R Galle; Stephan Kanzler

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes,suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil.

  20. Autoimmune Progesterone Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Bemanian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to anautoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused byexogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here in, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis (AIPA observed in an adolescent female.The patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and noprior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions with dyspnea, cough and respiratory distress. She noted that her symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cml of progesterone was performed. The patient developed a 15mm wheal after 15 minutes, confirming the diagnosis of AIPA.The patient was started on a continuous regimen of an oral conjugated estrogen (0.625mg. The skin eruptions and respiratory symptoms have not returned since the initiation of this therapy.Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions.Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of themenstrual cycle, if there are any other organ involvement in addition to skin (e.g. lung, GI thereaction should be called as autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis. Diagnosis of AIPA is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone.

  1. Etiopathogenesis of Insulin Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (proinsulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 is reviewed and illustrated by molecular modeling. The importance of the cellular immune reaction involving cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells to kill beta cells through Class I MHC is discussed along with speculations of the possible role of B lymphocytes in presenting the proinsulin autoantigen over and over again through insulin-carrying insulin autoantibodies. In contrast to autoantibodies against other islet autoantigens such as GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8 transporters, it has not been possible yet to standardize the insulin autoantibody test. As islet autoantibodies predict type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to clarify the mechanisms of insulin autoimmunity.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  3. Epilepsy in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmunity and inflammation have been implicated as causative factors of seizures and epilepsy. Autoimmune disorders can affect the central nervous system as an isolated syndrome or be part of a systemic disease. Examples of systemic autoimmune disorders include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatic arthritis, and Sjögren syndrome. Overall, there is a 5-fold increased risk of seizures and epilepsy in children with systemic autoimmune disorders. Various etiologic factors have been implicated in causing the seizures in these patients, including direct inflammation, effect on blood vessels (vasculitis), and production of autoantibodies. Potential treatments for this autoimmune injury include steroids, immunoglobulins, and other immune-modulatory therapies. A better understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases could lead to targeted treatments and better outcomes. PMID:25510945

  4. 慢性放射性肠损伤的营养支持治疗%Nutrition support trerapy in chronic intestinal radiation damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 龚剑峰

    2014-01-01

    慢性放射性肠损伤是放疗后常见的胃肠道并发症,其外科治疗是对外科医生手术技能和围手术期处理水平的挑战。合理的手术前期营养支持治疗能够降低围手术期并发症发生率和造口率,而术后的营养支持治疗可避免肠衰竭的发生。应尽可能以肠内营养(EN)作为慢性放射性肠损伤围手术期支持治疗的主要途径。针对肠道共生菌群及其代谢产物的特殊药理营养素在放射性肠损伤的营养支持治疗中可能起到一定作用。%Chronic radiation enteritis (CRE) is a common complication after pelvic radiotherapy, which severely affects patients′ quality of life. Surgical treatment of CRE is challenging both for surgical skills and perioperative treatment strategy. Proper preoperative nutrition support therapy can reduce the morbidity of postoperative complication and the use of stoma, while postoperative nutrition support therapy can avoid the intestinal failure. Enteral nutrition should be the primary route of perioperative nutrition support therapy in CRE as possible. Pharmaconutrients aiming at intestinal commensal microbiota and its metabolites may play a role in the management of radiation enteritis.

  5. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...

  6. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  7. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic β-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that β-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of β-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for β-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance β-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved β-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing β-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans

  8. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  9. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  10. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  11. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors.

  12. Intestinal Malrotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to maintain adequate nutrition (a condition known as short bowel syndrome). They may be dependent on intravenous nutrition for a time after surgery (or even permanently if too little intestine remains) ...

  13. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  14. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  15. Diet-Induced Dysbiosis of the Intestinal Microbiota and the Effects on Immunity and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna L. Gibson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI microbiota is the collection of microbes which reside in the GI tract and represents the largest source of non-self antigens in the human body. The GI tract functions as a major immunological organ as it must maintain tolerance to commensal and dietary antigens while remaining responsive to pathogenic stimuli. If this balance is disrupted, inappropriate inflammatory processes can result, leading to host cell damage and/or autoimmunity. Evidence suggests that the composition of the intestinal microbiota can influence susceptibility to chronic disease of the intestinal tract including ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome, as well as more systemic diseases such as obesity, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, a considerable shift in diet has coincided with increased incidence of many of these inflammatory diseases. It was originally believed that the composition of the intestinal microbiota was relatively stable from early childhood; however, recent evidence suggests that diet can cause dysbiosis, an alteration in the composition of the microbiota, which could lead to aberrant immune responses. The role of the microbiota and the potential for diet-induced dysbiosis in inflammatory conditions of the GI tract and systemic diseases will be discussed.

  16. Outer Membrane Vesicles from the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the Commensal ECOR12 Enter Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Elicit Differential Effects on DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Fábrega, María-José; Toloza, Lorena; Badia, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal microbiota and the human host are complex. The gut mucosal surface is covered by a mucin layer that prevents bacteria from accessing the epithelial cells. Thus, the crosstalk between microbiota and the host mainly rely on secreted factors that can go through the mucus layer and reach the epithelium. In this context, vesicles released by commensal strains are seen as key players in signaling processes in the intestinal mucosa. Studies with Gram-negative pathogens showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are internalized into the host cell by endocytosis, but the entry mechanism for microbiota-derived vesicles is unknown. Escherichia coli strains are found as part of normal human gut microbiota. In this work, we elucidate the pathway that mediate internalization of OMVs from the probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the commensal ECOR12 strains in several human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Time course measurement of fluorescence and microscopy analysis performed with rhodamine B-R18-labeled OMVs in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors showed that OMVs from these strains enter epithelial cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Vesicles use the same endocytosis pathway in polarized epithelial monolayers. Internalized OMVs are sorted to lysosomal compartments as shown by their colocalization with clathrin and specific markers of endosomes and lysosomes. OMVs from both strains did not affect cell viability, but reduce proliferation of HT-29 cells. Labeling of 8-oxo-dG adducts in DNA revealed that neither OMVs from EcN nor from ECOR12 promoted oxidative DNA damage. In contrast, flow cytometry analysis of phosphorylated γH2AX evidenced that OMVs from the probiotic EcN significantly produced more double strand breaks in DNA than ECOR12 OMVs. The EcN genotoxic effects have been attributed to the synthesis of colibactin. However, it is not known how colibactin is exported and delivered into host cells. Whether colibactin is secreted

  17. CREATION OF MODEL OF INTESTINAL MUCOSA STRUCTURE DAMAGE INDUCED BY ABDOMINAL RADIATION IN RATS%腹部辐射诱发大鼠肠黏膜损伤模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩磊; 单信芝; 刘芝军; 王娟娟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish a stable animal model that consistent with the requirements for research of radiation damage of intestinal mucosal barrier. Methods SD rats were randomly divided into control group (group A, 10 rats) and radiation groups B, C, D (20 in each group). The rats in groups B, C, and D were given single fraction irradiation on abdomen with linear accelerator, the dosage being 8. 5, 9.0, and 9.5 Gy, respectively, the radiation scope was from the xyphoid to anus. No radiation was given to the rats in group A. At day 4 after radiation, a segment of intestine, 10 cm from Treitz's ligament, was taken for making specimen. The length of crypt-villus axis (CVA) was measured light-microscopically, and intestinal mucous membrane structure observed electron-microscopically. Plasma endotoxin levels were detected by using tachypleus amebocyte lysate. Results At day 4 after radiation, death rates of the rats in groups B, C, and D were 10%, 30%, and 60%, respectively. A comparison of the length of CVA among the four groups showed: the difference between groups A and B was not significant (P>0.05) ; the length of CVA was shorter in group C than that in groups A and B; and that in group D was shorter than that in groups A, B, and C, the differences were all significant (F= 100.48,q=4.617-18.560,P<0.05). Plasma endotoxin concentration of group C was higher that that of groups A and B, that of group D was higher than that of groups A, B and C (F=50.468,q=5.380-15.898,P<0.05). Electron microscopically, intestinal epithelial cell shedding, ulcer formation, no normal cellular structure, exposure of basal lamina, and bacteria penetrating the stratum mucosum could be seen. Conclusion A model of radiation-induced damage of intestinal mucosal structure in the rat is created successfully. The model of radiation enterocolitis caused by total abdominal irradiation of a dose of 9. 0 Gy is applicable to research for radiation damage of mucosa barrier of intestine

  18. Protective effects of the fermented milk Kefir on X-ray irradiation-induced intestinal damage in B6C3F1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal damage associated with radiation therapy is currently an inevitable outcome. The protective effect of Kefir was assessed for its usefulness against radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. A Kefir supernatant was diluted by 2- or 10-fold and administered for 1 week prior to 8 Gray (Gy) X-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2 Gy/min, with an additional 15d of administration post-irradiation. The survival rate of control mice with normal drinking water dropped to 70% on days 4 through 9 post-irradiation. On the other hand, 100% of mice in the 10- and 2-fold-diluted Kefir groups survived up to day 9 post-irradiation (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Examinations for crypt regeneration against 8, 10 and 12 Gy irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy/min revealed that the crypt number was significantly increased in the mice administered both diluted Kefir solutions (p<0.01 for each). Histological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the diluted Kefir solutions protected the crypts from radiation, and promoted crypt regeneration. In addition, lyophilized Kefir powder was found to significantly recover the testis weights (p<0.05), but had no effects on the body and spleen weights, after 8 Gy irradiation. These findings suggest that Kefir could be a promising candidate as a radiation-protective agent. (author)

  19. Histological, Scanning And Transmission Electron Microscopic Studies On The Possible Protective Role Of Ginger Extract Against AcrylamideInduced Intestinal Damage In Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Galal El-Tantawi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of ginger Zingeber officinale extract (ZOE against the acrylamide (AC which is an industrial chemical used in water treatment and it is synthesized during cooking of starch food at high temperature. Method: Thirty adult male albino mice, each weighs 20-25 g were divided into three groups (10 mice/group: (Icontrol group. (IIacrylamide treated group. (III acrylamide & ginger group. Acrylamide was given to experimental animals in the drinking water at a non-lethal dose of 200 p.p.m for 10 weeks (3 days/week. Ginger extract was orally administrated at 50 mg/L (~5 ml/day for 10 weeks (3 days/week. The ileum samples were collected for light microscope study and for scanning and transmission electron microscope examination. Results: This study revealed that acrylamide induces pathological changes of the ileum of the treated mice specially the absorptive epithelial cells. The scanning electron microscopic study revealed damage of the ileal villi, some red blood corpuscles appeared at the site of damage. The transmission electron microscopic examination clearly demonstrated degeneration of most cell organelles as mitochondria, deterioration and degranulation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, dilatation of Golgi apparatus. Conclusion: The administration of ginger extract decreased the histological alterations and ensuring the anti-inflammatory, and antitoxic effects of ZOE at its chosen dosage level

  20. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Uni Wong; Harris Yfantis; Guofeng Xie

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a ca...

  1. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  2. SOCS, inflammation and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko eYoshimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play essential roles in innate and adaptive immunity. However, excess cytokines or dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergies, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Most cytokines utilize the so-called Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. This pathway is negatively regulated by various mechanisms including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins. SOCS proteins bind to JAK or cytokine receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Especially, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAK, because these two contain kinase inhibitory region (KIR at the N-terminus. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS proteins are key physiological as well as pathological regulators of immune homeostasis. Recent studies have also demonstrated that SOCS1 and SOCS3 are important regulators of helper T cell differentiation and functions.

  3. Adult autoimmune enteropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that autoimmune enteropathy involving the small bowel may occur in adults as well as in children. Apparently, the endoscopic and histological changes are similar to celiac disease before treatment, but these are not altered by any form of dietary restriction, including a gluten-free diet. As in celiac disease, histologic changes in gastric and colonic biopsies have also been recorded. Anti enterocyte antibodies detected with immunofluorescent methods have been reported by a few laboratories, but these antibodies appear not to be specific and may simply represent epiphenomena. A widely available, reproducible and quantitative anti-enterocyte antibody assay is needed that could be applied in small bowel disorders that have the histological appearance of celiac disease, but fail to respond to a gluten-free diet.

  4. Psychoneuroimmunology - psyche and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively young field of research that investigates interactions between central nervous and immune system. The brain modulates the immune system by the endocrine and autonomic nervous system. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and autoimmune disease. For several diseases, the relevance of psychoneuroimmunological findings has already been demonstrated.

  5. Cancer and autoimmunity: Harnessing longitudinal cohorts to probe the link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiziano, Giordano; Bernatsky, Sasha; Shah, Ami A

    2016-02-01

    In many autoimmune rheumatic diseases, there is an increased risk of cancer compared to the general population. While reasons for this increased risk have not been elucidated, it has been hypothesized that the link between cancer and autoimmunity may be bidirectional. For instance, chronic inflammation and damage from the rheumatic disease or its therapies may trigger malignant transformation; conversely, antitumor immune responses targeting cancers may become cross-reactive resulting in autoimmunity. In rare rheumatic diseases, longitudinal observational studies can play a critical role in studying these complex relationships, thereby enabling investigators to quantify the extent of cancer risk, identify unique clinical phenotypes associated with cancer, investigate the biological link between these conditions, and define optimal strategies for screening and treatment of the underlying cancer. In this review, we discuss recent data on cancer in the rheumatic diseases and suggest a research agenda to address several gaps in our current knowledge base. PMID:27421216

  6. Pathophysiology of autoimmune polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-06-01

    The most common autoimmune neuropathies include the acute inflammatory polyneuropathy [the Guillain-Barré Syndrome(s)]; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated paraproteinemic neuropathy. These neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to peripheral nerve components (myelin, Schwann cell, axon, and motor or ganglionic neurons) is lost. Based on the immunopathologic similarities with experimental allergic neuritis induced after immunization with nerve proteins, disease transfer experiments with the patients' serum or with intraneural injections, and immunocytochemical studies on the patients' nerves, it appears that both cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a role in the cause of these neuropathies. Although in some of them there is direct evidence for autoimmune reactivity mediated by specific antibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, in others the underlying immune-mediated mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, in spite of good response to immunotherapies. The review highlights the factors associated with breaking the T-cell tolerance, the T-cell activation and costimulatory molecules, the immunoregulatory T-cells and relevant cytokines and the antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins that seem to be of pathogenic relevance. Antigens in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions are discussed as potentially critical targets in explaining conduction failure and rapid recovery. Based on the immunopathologic network believed to play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of these neuropathies, future therapeutic directions are highlighted using new biological agents against T-cells, cytokines, B-cells, transmigration and transduction molecules.

  7. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease.

  8. State of the art. Four easy pieces: interconnections between tissue injury, intermediary metabolism, autoimmunity, and chronic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2006-08-01

    Four questions are posed: (1) Can tissue damage itself provoke autoimmunity? (2) Can genetic mutations of key structures produce tissue pathology and thus provoke autoimmunity? (3) Can acute immune damage produce tissue degeneration without further hallmarks of an immune response? (4) Can intermediary metabolism modulate immune damage to tissues? Four answers are given: (1) Tissue injury itself may lead to autoimmunity. Both innate and adaptive immunity may arise as a response to tissue injury, and the immune attack can further damage tissue. (2) Genetic mutations can lead to an immune response indistinguishable from autoimmunity, exemplified from Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. (3) Chronic immune damage may lead to tissue degeneration, with or without further hallmarks of an immune response. Variations on this theme, including inverse scenarios, are also possible: Inborn errors of metabolism may lead to tissue damage that may provoke an adaptive and or innate immune response. The immune response might further damage tissue. (4) Finally, perturbations of intermediary metabolism may modulate the immune response, controlling the extent of immune-mediated damage. Examples are taken from perturbations in the cholesterol pathway that influence the characteristics of the immune response, and with tryptophan metabolites that modulate autoimmunity and graft rejection. Inflammatory, degenerative, and autoimmune neurological disease will be discussed in terms of their implications for pathogenic mechanisms underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  9. Restoration of impaired intestinal barrier function by the hydrolysed casein diet contributes to the prevention of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BioBreeding rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J. T. J.; Lammers, K.; Hoogendijk, A.; Boer, M. W.; Brugman, S.; Beijer-Liefers, S.; Zandvoort, A.; Harmsen, H.; Welling, G.; Stellaard, F.; Bos, N. A.; Fasano, A.; Rozing, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Impaired intestinal barrier function is observed in type I diabetes patients and animal models of the disease. Exposure to diabetogenic antigens from the intestinal milieu due to a compromised intestinal barrier is considered essential for induction of the autoimmune process leading

  10. Effect of intestinal resection on hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and the damage of Cajal interstitial cells%肠道手术对肠道硫化氢生成及Cajal间质细胞破坏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄颖; 邵宇; 叶道雄; 黄胜辉; 徐宗斌; 池畔

    2015-01-01

    the expression of c-kit in order to calculate the area of ICC. Results The mRNA expression of CSE was detected in the small intestine tissue of mice , while no CBS mRNA was found. The mRNA expression of CSE in proximal anastomotic stoma increased in time-dependent manner in the model group. CSE mRNA expression began to increase 1 hour after operation , reached the peak at 6th hour, then decreased gradually, and was similar to the control group at postoperative 24th hour. Compared to the model group, in the intestinal tissues of proximal 3 cm to anastomotic stoma, the mRNA expression of CSE (1.16 ± 0.18 vs. 1.63±0.13, P<0.05), the activity of MPO [(0.54 ± 0.07) U/g vs. (0.83 ± 0.09) U/g, P<0.05], the H2S level [(36.1±6.1) nmol/mg vs. (5.3±5.6) nmol/mg, P<0.05] were significantly reduced in the PPG group. Meanwhile, average percentage of positive ICC area in the PPG groups was significantly higher[(2.26±0.19)%vs. (1.65±0.24)%, P<0.05]. Conclusions Inflammatory reaction in muscular layer induced by intestinal resection up-regulates the mRNA expression of CSE proximal to anastomotic stoma, generates excess H2S to damage ICC leading to intestinal motor dysfunction. Preoperative inhibition of endogenous H2S generation may protect the ICC.

  11. Small & Large Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the large intestine produces no digestive enzymes. Chemical digestion is completed in the small intestine before the chyme reaches the large intestine. Functions of the large intestine include the absorption of water and electrolytes and the elimination of ...

  12. Sensitivity of a hyperosmolar or "low"-osmolar test solution for sugar absorption in recognizing small intestinal mucosal damage in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uil, J J; van Elburg, R M; Janssens, P M; Mulder, C J; Heymans, H S

    2000-04-01

    Reliability of differential sugar absorption tests is hampered by a lack of standardization of the content and osmolarity of the test solutions. We evaluated the effect of osmolarity of the test solution of the sugar absorption test on the 5 hour urine excretion of orally administered lactulose and mannitol. A group of 28 controls and 14 coeliacs, with villous atrophy grade II to IV, ingested a hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution and a "low"-osmolar solution, respectively. After an overnight fast, each subject ingested hyperosmolar sugar absorption test solution (2 g mannitol, 5 g lactulose and 40 g sucrose/100 ml (around 1,560 mmol/l)). After two days, this procedure was repeated with low-osmolar solution (2 g mannitol and 5 g lactulose/100 ml (around 375 mmol/l). The influence of the sequence of the tests on the results had previously been excluded. All urine from the 5 h-period following ingestion of the test solution was collected. To calculate the low-osmolar solution ratio, samples were analysed for lactulose and mannitol concentrations by gas chromatography The sensitivity of hyperosmolar SAT solution and low-osmolar solution for the detection of mucosal abnormalities in coeliacs was 64% and 43%, respectively. In conclusion, a hyperosmolar solution discriminates better between normal and damaged mucosa of the small bowel such as villous atrophy due to a relative increase in permeability for lactulose. PMID:10975768

  13. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications.

  14. Intestinal failure:Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-An Ding; Jie-Shou Li

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract,digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption,whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians.

  15. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to order. Mention “VEDA” to receive a 15% discount. Paid Advertisement Disclaimer Information on this website is ... treatment of autoimmune inner ear disease. Although drug companies are not directly studying treatments for inner ear ...

  16. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Grossi, Armando; Crinò, Antonino; Luciano, Rosa; Lombardo, Antonietta; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and t...

  17. Psoriasis and autoimmune skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poljački Mirjana N.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Presuming that psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease, the aim of this study was to establish its association with other autoimmune skin diseases. The material was obtained at the Dermatovenereological Clinic Clinical Center Novi Sad. Material and methods This 10-year retrospective study (1990-1999 included 1743 psoriasis patients. The control group consisted of 7492 nonpsoriatic dermatological patients. Results Association of psoriasis with other dermatological diseases of autoimmune nature has been established in 13 (0.74 % patients. The most frequent association was with lichen ruber planus in five patients, with alopecia areata and vitiligo in three patients, and in one with bullous pemphigoid and herpetiform dermatitis. Using Fisher's test no significant association was established. Discussion and conclusion According to literature data association of psoriasis with other autoimmune diseases is well known, but rare, which is in accordance with our results. The question arises whether this association is the matter of poor coexistence or the matter of genetic mutations. However, once established, these associations can further highlight the autoimmune nature of psoriasis. The research of autoimmunity would lead us to epithelial cells in thymus, and their badly learnt cognitive function about what is own, and what is not.

  18. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  19. HEPARANASE AND AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Joy Simeonovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase (Hpse is the only known mammalian endo-β-D-glucuronidase that degrades the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS, found attached to the core proteins of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. Hpse plays a homeostatic role in regulating the turnover of cell-associated HS and also degrades extracellular HS in basement membranes (BMs and the extracellular matrix (ECM, where HSPGs function as a barrier to cell migration. Secreted Hpse is harnessed by leukocytes to facilitate their migration from the blood to sites of inflammation. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD model of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes (T1D, Hpse is also used by insulitis leukocytes to solubilize the islet BM to enable intra-islet entry of leukocytes and to degrade intracellular HS, an essential component for the survival of insulin-producing islet beta cells. Treatment of prediabetic adult NOD mice with the Hpse inhibitor PI-88 significantly reduced the incidence of T1D by ~50% and preserved islet HS. Hpse therefore acts as a novel immune effector mechanism in T1D. Our studies have identified T1D as a Hpse-dependent disease and Hpse inhibitors as novel therapeutics for preventing T1D progression and possibly the development of T1D vascular complications.

  20. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  1. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  2. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Is a Generalized Autoimmune Epithelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic progressive autoimmune cholestatic liver disease characterized by highly specific antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs and the specific immune-mediated injury of small intrahepatic bile ducts. Unique apoptotic feature of biliary epithelial cells (BECs may contribute to apotope presentation to the immune system, causing unique tissue damage in PBC. Perpetuation of inflammation may result in senescence of BECs, contributing to irreversible loss of bile duct. In addition to the classic liver manifestations, focal inflammation and tissue damage are also seen in salivary glands and urinary tract in a significant proportion of PBC patients. These findings provide potent support to the idea that molecular mimicry may be involved in the breakdown of autoimmune tolerance and mucosal immunity may lead to a systematic epithelitis in PBC patients. Thus, PBC is considered a generalized epithelitis in clinical practice.

  3. Severe autoimmune hepatitis triggered by varicella zoster infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Waleed K Al-Hamoudi

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of circulatory autoantibodies and inflammatory histological changes in the liver. Although the pathogenesis of AIH is not known, it is thought that,in a genetically predisposed individual, environmental factors such as viruses can trigger the autoimmune process. Herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus,measles virus, and hepatitis viruses are thought to play a role in the etiology of AIH. Proteins belonging to these viruses may be similar to the amino acid chains of different autoantigens in the liver, this causes immune cross reactions and liver tissue damage. We report a case of severe AIH following varicella zoster infection in a 23-year-old man, and speculate that,based on the molecular mimicry hypothesis, the liver damage was caused by an immune cross reaction to the viral proteins. Varicella-zoster-induced AIH has not been reported previously.

  4. A rare presentation of hypopituitarism in hepatic overlap syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta V; Singh H.; Talapatra P; Ray S

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune cholangitis is the antimitochondrial antibody-negative autoimmune hepatopathy with clinical and histological features similar to that of primary biliary cirrhosis. Autoimmune cholangitis has a predominant cholestatic phase. However, transaminasemia might be dominant in certain patients, indicating associated autoimmune hepatitis. Such an autoimmune hepatopathy has been termed as hepatic overlap syndrome. Due to the autoimmune nature of the disease, associated diseases of other orga...

  5. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development.

  6. The multiple autoimmune syndromes. A clue for the autoimmune tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Pineda-Tamayo, Ricardo; Levy, Roger A; Gómez-Puerta, José; Dias, Carlos; Mantilla, Ruben D; Gallo, Juan Esteban; Cervera, Ricard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2012-12-01

    The multiple autoimmune syndromes (MAS) consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases (ADs) in a single patient. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and genetic characteristics of a large series of patients with MAS. A cluster analysis and familial aggregation analysis of ADs was performed in 84 patients. A genome-wide microsatellite screen was performed in MAS families, and associated loci were investigated through the pedigree disequilibrium test. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and Sjögren's syndrome together were the most frequent ADs encountered. Three main clusters were established. Aggregation for type 1 diabetes, AITD, SLE, and all ADs as a trait was found. Eight loci associated with MAS were observed harboring autoimmunity genes. The MAS represent the best example of polyautoimmunity as well as the effect of a single genotype on diverse phenotypes. Its study provides important clues to elucidate the common mechanisms of ADs (i.e., autoimmune tautology).

  7. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  8. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  9. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  10. Intestinal steroidogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucoc...

  11. Characterizing intestinal strictures with acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hao; Xu, Guan; Liu, Shengchun; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease, which may cause obstructing intestinal strictures due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Identifying the different stages of the disease progression is still challenging. In this work, we indicated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI), utilizing the uniquely optical absorption of hemoglobin and collagen. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were investigated with a prototype PAI system. 2D PA images with acoustic resolution at wavelength 532, 1210 and 1310 nm were formulated, and furthermore, the PA histochemical components images which show the microscopic distributions of histochemical components were solved. Imaging experiments on surgically removed human intestinal specimens has demonstrated the solved PA images were significantly different associated with the presence of fibrosis, which could be applied to characterize the intestinal strictures for given specimens.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  13. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambauer R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rolf Bambauer,1 Reinhard Latza,2 Carolin Bambauer,3 Daniel Burgard,4 Ralf Schiel5 1Institute for Blood Purification, Homburg, 2Laboratorium of Medicine, St Ingbert, 3Main Hospital Darmstadt, Darmstadt, 4Herz Zentrum, Cardiology, Völklingen, 5Inselklinik Heringsdorf GmbH, Seeheilbad Heringsdorf, Germany Abstract: Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes. Keywords: therapeutic apheresis, autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory eye disease

  14. Alcohol, intestinal bacterial growth, intestinal permeability to endotoxin, and medical consequences: summary of a symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Bode, J Christian; Bode, Christiane; Brenner, David A; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Hamilton, Frank; Kang, Y James; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rao, Radhakrishna; Sartor, R Balfour; Swanson, Christine; Turner, Jerrold R

    2008-08-01

    This report is a summary of the symposium on Alcohol, Intestinal Bacterial Growth, Intestinal Permeability to Endotoxin, and Medical Consequences, organized by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Office of Dietary Supplements, and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of National Institutes of Health in Rockville, Maryland, October 11, 2006. Alcohol exposure can promote the growth of Gram-negative bacteria in the intestine, which may result in accumulation of endotoxin. In addition, alcohol metabolism by Gram-negative bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells can result in accumulation of acetaldehyde, which in turn can increase intestinal permeability to endotoxin by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of tight junction and adherens junction proteins. Alcohol-induced generation of nitric oxide may also contribute to increased permeability to endotoxin by reacting with tubulin, which may cause damage to microtubule cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of intestinal barrier function. Increased intestinal permeability can lead to increased transfer of endotoxin from the intestine to the liver and general circulation where endotoxin may trigger inflammatory changes in the liver and other organs. Alcohol may also increase intestinal permeability to peptidoglycan, which can initiate inflammatory response in liver and other organs. In addition, acute alcohol exposure may potentiate the effect of burn injury on intestinal bacterial growth and permeability. Decreasing the number of Gram-negative bacteria in the intestine can result in decreased production of endotoxin as well as acetaldehyde which is expected to decrease intestinal permeability to endotoxin. In addition, intestinal permeability may be preserved by administering epidermal growth factor, l-glutamine, oats supplementation, or zinc, thereby preventing the transfer of endotoxin to the general circulation. Thus reducing the number of intestinal Gram-negative bacteria

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  16. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  17. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  18. PD-1, gender, and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Ravi K.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Singh, Ram Pyare

    2010-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2) are responsible for inhibitory T cell signaling that helps mediate the mechanisms of tolerance and immune homeostasis. The PD-1:PD-L signaling pathway has been shown to play an important role in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune conditions, chronic infection, and cancer. Recently, investigators have explored the role of sex hormones in modulating the pathway in autoimmune conditions. Exploring the effects of sex hormones on the PD-1:PD-L pathway could shed light on the gender biased nature of many autoimmune conditions as well as aide in the development of therapeutics targeting the immune system. PMID:20433954

  19. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4+ T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8+ T cells did not. CD4+ T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4+ T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  1. Autoimmunity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, M; Prokocimer, M; Zolberg, A; Shaklai, M

    1988-08-01

    Seventy-nine patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were evaluated for the presence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies. One patient has polymyositis and two additional patients presented with features suggestive of pernicious anaemia and chronic active hepatitis. The Coombs' direct test was positive in 7% and immune thrombocytopenia was present in 8.1% of patients. Five (7%) patients had M-protein in the serum. No increased frequency of other autoantibodies was noted in our study group. We conclude that the propensity to develop antibodies is restricted only to the haematopoietic system and that there is no increased frequency of non-haematological autoimmune diseases in chronic lymphatic leukaemia. PMID:3249703

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis Downstream of Wnt/c-Myc Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated following intestinal regeneration, we investigated the functional importance of FAK following deletion of the Apc tumor suppressor protein withi...

  3. Coeliac disease with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients are described who have developed autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in association with their coeliac disease. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may represent an extension of immunological disorders linked with coeliac disease, centred on the histocompatibility antigen B8.

  4. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. (author)

  5. The role for neutrophil extracellular traps in cystic fibrosis autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopelja, Sladjana; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Jones, Jonathan D.; Yang, Mei-Ling; Mamula, Mark; Ashare, Alix; Gifford, Alex H.; Rigby, William F.C.

    2016-01-01

    While respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis (CF) frequently associates with chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, no single factor predicts the extent of lung damage in CF. To elucidate other causes, we studied the autoantibody profile in CF and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, given the similar association of airway inflammation and autoimmunity in RA. Even though we observed that bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), carbamylated proteins, and citrullinated proteins all localized to the neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are implicated in the development of autoimmunity, our study demonstrates striking autoantibody specificity in CF. Particularly, CF patients developed anti-BPI autoantibodies but hardly any anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies (ACPA). In contrast, ACPA-positive RA patients exhibited no reactivity with BPI. Interestingly, anti-carbamylated protein autoantibodies (ACarPA) were found in both cohorts but did not cross-react with BPI. Contrary to ACPA and ACarPA, anti-BPI autoantibodies recognized the BPI C-terminus in the absence of posttranslational modifications. In fact, we discovered that P. aeruginosa–mediated NET formation results in BPI cleavage by P. aeruginosa elastase, which suggests a novel mechanism in the development of autoimmunity to BPI. In accordance with this model, autoantibodies associated with presence of P. aeruginosa on sputum culture. Finally, our results provide a role for autoimmunity in CF disease severity, as autoantibody levels associate with diminished lung function. PMID:27777975

  6. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, G. (Kennedy Inst. of Rheumatology, London (UK). Div. of Experimental Pathology); Cramp, W.A.; Edwards, J.C.; George, A.M.; Sabovljev, S.A.; Hart, L.; Hughes, G.R.V. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Denman, A.M. (Northwich Park Hospital, Harrow (UK)); Yatvin, M.B. (Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center, Madison (USA))

    1985-06-01

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

  7. Intestinal Coccidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  8. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W M

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  9. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorde...

  10. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  11. Autoimmune Epilepsy Guidelines for Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Australia, and John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK, describe 13 children (11 female; mean age 6 years, range 1-13 years) seen over a period of 3.5 years with suspected autoimmune epilepsy.

  12. Autoimmune Epilepsy Guidelines for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, University of Sydney, Australia, and John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK, describe 13 children (11 female; mean age 6 years, range 1-13 years seen over a period of 3.5 years with suspected autoimmune epilepsy.

  13. Epilepsy as an Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap; John J Millichap

    2014-01-01

    Investigators at University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, and Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, conducted a retrospective population-level study of the relationship between epilepsy and 12 common autoimmune diseases: type 1 diabetes mellitus, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, Sjogren syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and celiac ...

  14. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to navigate the health-care system in the age of the Affordable Care Act. News in the world of AARDA’s Grassroots ... was the “Status of Autoimmune Disease in the Age of the Affordable Care Act. Watch the briefing video View the power ...

  15. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambauer, Rolf; Latza, Reinhard; Bambauer, Carolin; Burgard, Daniel; Schiel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes.

  16. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  17. Autoimmune congenital heart block: complex and unusual situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Zerón, P; Izmirly, P M; Ramos-Casals, M; Buyon, J P; Khamashta, M A

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (ACHB) is an immune-mediated cardiac disease included among the manifestations collectively referred to as neonatal lupus. The placental transference of maternal Ro/La autoantibodies may damage the conduction tissues during fetal development leading to blocking of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node in an otherwise structurally normal heart. Irreversible complete AV block is the main cardiac manifestation of ACHB, but some babies may develop endocardial fibroelastosis, valvular insufficiency, and/or frank cardiomyopathies with significantly reduced cardiac function requiring transplant. The severity of ACHB is illustrated by a global mortality rate of 20% and pacemaker rates of at least 64%, often within the first year of life. This review analyses the main complex and/or unusual clinical situations associated with ACHB, including unusual maternal immunological profiles, infrequent maternal autoimmune diseases, cardiac damage unrelated to AV block, fetal invasive management, late complications after birth, risk of congenital heart block (CHB) in ovodonation and in vitro fertilization techniques, the role of maternal features other than autoimmunity, the influence of the birth order or the risk of CHB in twins and triplets. PMID:26762645

  18. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  19. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Peggy P. Ho; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids bind to the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). This bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, drugs targeting FXR activation have been reported to treat both liver and intestinal inflammatory diseases in both animal models and human clinical trials. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and serves as an animal model for ...

  20. A Nonsecosteroidal Vitamin D Receptor Modulator Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis without Causing Hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songqing Na

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D receptor (VDR agonists are currently the agents of choice for the treatment of psoriasis, a skin inflammatory indication that is believed to involve an autoimmune component. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH2D3], the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, has shown efficacy in animal autoimmune disease models of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and type I diabetes. However, the side effect of 1,25-(OH2D3 and its synthetic secosteroidal analogs is hypercalcemia, which is a major impediment in their clinical development for autoimmune diseases. Hypercalcemia develops as a result of the action of VDR agonists on the intestine. Here, we describe the identification of a VDR modulator (VDRM compound A that was transcriptionally less active in intestinal cells and as a result exhibited less calcemic activity in vivo than 1,25-(OH2D3. Cytokine analysis indicated that the VDRM not only modulated the T-helper cell balance from Th1 to Th2 effector function but also inhibited Th17 differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that the oral administration of compound A inhibited the induction and progress of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice without causing hypercalcemia.

  1. Long-term observations of autoimmune-prone mice treated for autoimmune disease by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) across major histocompatibility complex barriers were studied in (NZB x NZW)F1 (B/W), BXSB, and MRL/Mr-lpr-lpr (MRL/lpr) mice with established autoimmune disease at the time of ABMT. In the BXSB or B/W mice, ABMT cured all aspects of autoimmune disease. Glomerular damage, revealed by histological study was dramatically improved. Serological abnormalities and immunologic functions also were normalized. Correction of autoimmune disease and advanced renal disease in BXSB and B/W mice regularly lasted greater than 5-6 mo and even 1 yr after ABMT. In the MRL/lpr mice, however, autoimmune and renal disease at first improved but then recurred after ABMT, apparently because of intolerance of mice for high doses of irradiation and a high degree of resistance of recipient stem cells to irradiation. In this model, H-2 typing revealed that by the time of relapse, immunocompetent cells of the chimeric mice had been replaced by host (MRL/lpr; H-2k) cells. B220+ Ly-1+ cells, present in increased numbers in untreated MRL/lpr mice, initially returned to normal levels after ABMT but then reappeared in the MRL/lpr mice that had received marrow from donors having few such lymphocytes. Thus, our results show that MRL/lpr mice possess abnormal radioresistant stem cells and provide impressive evidence that the origin of autoimmune diseases in this strain, as in the several other strains studied, resids in abnormalities present in stem cells

  2. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pa...

  3. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names),first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s.However,quite likely,chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver.An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E.cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisystem features and immunological aberrations.Young women featured prominently in early descriptions of CAH.AIH was first applied in 1965 as a descriptive term.Disease-characteristic autoantibodies were defined from the early 1960s,notably antinuclear antibody (ANA),smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver-kidney microsomal (LKM) antibody.These are still widely used diagnostically but their relationship to pathogenesis is still not evident.A liver and disease specific autoantigen has long been searched for but unsuccessfully.Prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with predisolone and azathioprine in the 1960s proved beneficial and remains standard therapy today.AIH like many other autoimmune diseases is associated with particular HLA alleles especially with the "ancestral" B8,DR3 haplotype,and also with DR4.Looking forwards,AIH is one of the several enigmatic autoimmune diseases that,despite being (relatively) organ specific,are marked by autoimmune reactivities with non-organ-specific autoantigens.New paradigms are needed to explain the occurrence,expressions and pathogenesis of such diseases.

  4. Autoimmunity: Experimental and clinical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, R.S.; Rose, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains five parts and a section of poster papers. Each part contains several papers. Some of the papers are: Molecular Genetics and T Cells in Autoimmunity; Gene Conversion: A Mechanism to Explain HLA-D Region and Disease Association; Genetics of the Complement System; Speculation on the Role of Somatic Mutation in the Generation of Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Monoclonal Anti-DNA Antibodies: The Targets and Origins of SLE.

  5. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered ...

  6. Autoimmunity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lischner, M.; Prokocimer, M.; Zolberg, A.; Shaklai, M.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-nine patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were evaluated for the presence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies. One patient has polymyositis and two additional patients presented with features suggestive of pernicious anaemia and chronic active hepatitis. The Coombs' direct test was positive in 7% and immune thrombocytopenia was present in 8.1% of patients. Five (7%) patients had M-protein in the serum. No increased frequency of other autoantibodies was noted in our study ...

  7. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names), first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s. However, quite likely, chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver. An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E. cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisy...

  8. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuoka, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the int...

  9. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  12. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH. PMID:23859515

  13. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  15. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  16. Restoring the balance: immunotherapeutic combinations for autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smilek, Dawn E.; Ehlers, Mario R.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity occurs when T cells, B cells or both are inappropriately activated, resulting in damage to one or more organ systems. Normally, high-affinity self-reactive T and B cells are eliminated in the thymus and bone marrow through a process known as central immune tolerance. However, low-affinity self-reactive T and B cells escape central tolerance and enter the blood and tissues, where they are kept in check by complex and non-redundant peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Dysfunction or im...

  17. The use of stem cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Rosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions commonly treated with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressant and immunomodulating drugs, with satisfactory results in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients become resistant to conventional therapy. The use of high doses of drugs in such cases results in the need for bone marrow reconstitution, a situation which has stimulated research into the use of hematopoietic stem cells in autoimmune disease therapy. Stem cell transplantation in such diseases aims to destroy the self-reacting immune cells and produce a new functional immune system, as well as substitute cells for tissue damaged in the course of the disease. Significant results, such as the reestablishment of tolerance and a decrease in the recurrence of autoimmune disease, have been reported following stem cell transplantation in patients with autoimmune disease in Brazil and throughout the world. These results suggest that stem cell transplantation has the potential to become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease, autoimmune blood cytopenias, and type I diabetes mellitus.

  18. Microbiota at the crossroads of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Oded; Mizrahi, Hila; Werbner, Michal; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Avni, Orly; Koren, Omry

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Recently, there has been increased appreciation of the critical involvement of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, although in many cases, the cause and the consequence are not easy to distinguish. Here, we suggest that many of the known cues affecting the function of the immune system, such as genetics, gender, pregnancy and diet, which are consequently involved in autoimmunity, exert their effects by influencing, at least in part, the microbiota composition and activity. This, in turn, modulates the immune response in a way that increases the risk for autoimmunity in predisposed individuals. We further discuss current microbiota-based therapies.

  19. Modulation of autoimmunity with artificial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The loss of immune tolerance to self antigens leads to the development of autoimmune responses. Since self antigens are often multiple and/or their sequences may not be known, one approach to restore immune tolerance uses synthetic artificial peptides that interfere or compete with self peptides in the networks of cellular interactions that drive the autoimmune process. This review describes the rationale behind the use of artificial peptides in autoimmunity and their mechanisms of action. Examples of use of artificial peptides in preclinical studies and in the management of human autoimmune diseases are provided. PMID:20807590

  20. Bushen Yisui Capsule ameliorates axonal injury in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Fang; Lei Wang; Qi Zheng; Tao Yang; Hui Zhao; Qiuxia Zhang; Kangning Li; Li Zhou; Haiyang Gong; Yongping Fan

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary clinical study by our group demonstrated Bushen Yisui Capsule (formerly cal ed Er-huang Formula) in combination with conventional therapy is an effective prescription for the treat-ment of multiple sclerosis. However, its effect on axonal injury during early multiple sclerosis re-mains unclear. In this study, a MOG 35-55-immunized C57BL/6 mouse model of experimental au-toimmune encephalomyelitis was intragastrical y administered Bushen Yisui Capsule. The results showed that Bushen Yisui Capsule effectively improved clinical symptoms and neurological function of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, amyloid precursor protein expression was down-regulated and microtubule-associated protein 2 was up-regulated. Experimental findings indicate that the disease-preventive mechanism of Bushen Yisui Capsule in experimental autoim-mune encephalomyelitis was mediated by amelioration of axonal damage and promotion of rege-neration. But the effects of the high-dose Bushen Yisui Capsule group was not better than that of the medium-dose and low-dose Bushen Yisui Capsule group in preventing neurological dysfunction.

  1. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  2. Systemic and neurologic autoimmune disorders associated with seizures or epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Angela; Crino, Peter B

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we review the incidence and significance of seizures in well-established autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, thyroid disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The five following presentations discuss the incidence and possible pathogenesis of epilepsies that are found in these well-known autoimmune conditions. There is a large body of evidence describing the clinical presentation of seizures with MS and SLE, and showing that refractory epilepsy can complicate these already challenging disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and generally not well understood. Neurologic syndromes, including seizure disorders, can also be a feature of celiac disease (CD) or subclinical CD, sometimes associated with cerebral calcification. The association between type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and epilepsy is unclear and requires more definitive epidemiologic analysis, despite the fact that antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase may provide a link between the two conditions. The association between thyroid disorders and encephalopathies, often termed Hashimoto's encephalopathy, is well known but the pathogenic significance of antithyroid antibodies in this condition is still debated. In general, the relationships between autoimmune mechanisms and seizures in these conditions are unclear; the seizures are likely to be caused by a variety of mechanisms, including ischemia, neuronal damage, and specific and nonspecific immunity. PMID:21542840

  3. The dendritic cell response to classic, emerging, and homeostatic danger signals. Implications for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; Gallucci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g., heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules). Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g., nucleic acids and lupus). For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g., nanomaterials) developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review "homeostatic danger signals," danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia, and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  4. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  5. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  6. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  7. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  8. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible residue of food. The ileocecal valve of the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the ...

  9. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  10. Application of comfeel ulcer powder and 3 M painless skin membrane in intestinal fistula patients around the stoma damaged skin care%康惠尔溃疡粉及3 M无痛保肤膜在肠造瘘患儿造口周围受损皮肤护理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁丽芬

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨康惠尔溃疡粉及3M无痛保肤膜在肠造瘘患儿造口周围受损皮肤护理中的应用效果.方法:选择2007年8月~2011年8月肠造瘘造口周围皮肤受损患儿60例,将患儿随机分为观察组和对照组各30例,观察组使用康惠尔溃疡粉及3M无痛保肤膜护理肠造瘘患儿造口周围受损皮肤,对照组采用常规氯锌油及保鲜膜护理肠造瘘患儿造口周围受损皮肤,观察两组患儿造口周围受损皮肤恢复情况.结果:观察组疗效优于对照组(P<0.05).结论:应用康惠尔溃疡粉及3M无痛保肤膜能使水蒸气和氧气透过皮肤,更有效地促进了造口周围受损皮肤的恢复,且操作方便、简单,值得临床推广应用.%Objective:To investigate the application effect of comfeel ulcer powder and 3 M painless skin membrane in intestinal fistula patients around the stoma damaged skin care. Methods:From August 2007 to August 2011,chose the intestinal fistula peristomal skin damage in children with 60 cases, were randomly divided into observation group and control group with 30 cases in each group, the observation group used comfeel ulcer powder and 3 M painless nursing of colostomy patients skin membrane damaged skin around the stoma, the control group used conventional zinc chloride oil and wrap around the stoma nursing colostomy patients damaged skin around the stoma, observed two groups of children with skin damage recovery. Results:The curative effect of observation group was better than control group (P <0. 05 ). Conclusion: The application of comfeel ulcer powder and 3 M painless skin membrane can be made of water vapor and oxygen permeability of the skin, to more effectively promote the recovery of damaged skin around the stoma, and the operation is convenient and simplest is worthy of clinical application.

  11. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bănică Diana; Frăţilă Ramona; Sima Alexandra; Vlad Adrian; Timar Romulus

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myast...

  12. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center reg...

  13. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  14. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  15. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  16. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Exhibiting Multiple Mass Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis exhibiting multiple mass lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  18. Epilepsy Associated with Systemic Autoimmune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Devinsky, Orrin; Schein, Adam; Najjar, Souhel

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems. Brain involvement commonly causes seizures, which may be the presenting symptom. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjorgren's syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidsosis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Behcet's, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms underlying CNS pathology in systemic autoimmune disorders—and specifically factors predisposing these patients—are discussed, including vascular disease (e.g., proth...

  19. Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sonal, Choudhary; Michael, McLeod; Daniele, Torchia; Paolo, Romanelli

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autoimmune disorder. The clinical spectrum of symptoms is diverse; the diagnosis relying on the presence of at least two out of the three main conditions defining the syndrome: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease.

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that simultaneousl

  1. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  2. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  3. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  4. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after livertransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatmentmodality for end stage liver disease caused by manyetiologies including autoimmune processes. That said,the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis(AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not forprimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreasedover the years due to the availability of effective medicaltreatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superiortransplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. WhileAIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limitedclinical significance in most, but not all cases. RecurrentPSC, however, often progresses over years to a stagerequiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence andthe predisposing factors of disease recurrence remaindebated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis andthe risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseasesis required to develop preventive measures. In thisreview, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence,diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatmentof recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC)following LT.

  5. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PA Berry; G Smith-Laing

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness,experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4). Anti-nuclear antibodies were detectable, and liver biopsy was compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The observation supports the role of HAV as a trigger of autoimmune hepatitis. Studies in helper T-cell activity and antibody expression against hepatic proteins in the context of hepatitis A infection are summarized, and the concept of molecular mimicry with regard to other forms of viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is briefly explored.

  6. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women...... with Turner's syndrome is characterized by diseases with a female or male predominance. METHODS: Using the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we estimated relative risk of 46 different autoimmune diseases in a cohort of 798...... Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...

  7. The Biological Significance of Evolution in Autoimmune Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Cañas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is an inherent part of living to be in constant modification, which are due to answers resulting from environmental changes. The different systems make adaptations based on natural selection. With respect to the immune system of mammals, these changes have a lot to do with the interactions that occur continuously with other living species, especially microorganisms. The immune system is primarily designed to defend from germs and this response triggers inflammatory reactions which must be regulated in order not to generate damage to healthy tissue. The regulatory processes were added over time to prevent such damage. Through evolution the species have stored “an immunological experience,” which provides information that is important for developing effective responses in the future. The human species, which is at a high level of evolutionary immunological accumulation, have multiple immune defense strategies which, in turn, are highly regulated. Imbalances in these can result in autoimmunity.

  8. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  9. Nutritional keys for intestinal barrier modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eDe Santis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response towards these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take places to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated to chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients is now growing. It has been recently used a fecal therapy approach for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy.In the present review we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from diet intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the epithelial barrier integrity.

  10. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  11. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  12. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions.

  13. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions. PMID:26477048

  14. Experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Lina; Guo Shuli; Wang Yutang; Yang Liming; Liu Siyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis.Data sources The literatures published in English about different kinds of experimental drugs based on different therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were obtained from PubMed from 2002 to 2013.Study selection Original articles regarding the experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were selected.Results This study summarized the effects of the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis,such as immunomodulators and immunosuppressants,antibiotics,Chinese medicinal herbs,cardiovascular diseases treatment drugs,etc.These drugs can significantly attenuate autoimmune myocarditis-induced inflammation and fibrosis,alleviate autoimmune myocarditis-triggered overt lymphocyte proliferation,and meanwhile reduce Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and increase Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10).Conclusion This study summarized recent advances in autoimmune myocarditis treatment and further proposes that traditional Chinese medicine and immune regulators will play important roles in the future.

  15. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  16. The Effect of CD3-Specific Monoclonal Antibody on Treating Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Guojiang Chen; Gencheng Han; Renxi Wang; Beffen Shen; Yan Li

    2005-01-01

    CD3-specific monoclonal antibody was the first one used for clinical practice in field of transplantation. Recently,renewed interests have elicited in its capacity to prevent autoimmune diabetes by inducing immune tolerance. In this study, we tested whether this antibody can also be used to treat another kind of autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG) and explored the possible mechanisms. MG is caused by an autoimmune damage mediated by antibody- and complement-mediated destruction of AChR at the neuromuscular junction. We found that administration of CD3-specific antibody (Fab)2 to an animal model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) (B6 mice received 3 times of AChR/CFA immunization) could not significantly improve the clinical signs and clinical score. When the possible mechanisms were tested, we found that CD3 antibody treatment slightly down-regulated the T-cell response to AChR, modestly up-regulation the muscle strength. And no significant difference in the titers of IgG2b was found between CD3 antibody treated and control groups. These data indicated that CD3-specific antibody was not suitable for treating MG, an antibody- and complementmediated autoimmune disease, after this disease has been established. The role of CD3-specific antibody in treating this kind of disease remains to be determined.

  17. WISP1 Is Increased in Intestinal Mucosa and Contributes to Inflammatory Cascades in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Xiaoyu; Yu, Yanan; Liang, Kun; Shan, Xinzhi; Zhao, Kun; Niu, Qinghui; Tian, Zibin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is mainly characterized by intestinal tissue damage, which is caused by excessive autoimmune responses poorly controlled by corresponding regulatory mechanisms. WISP1, which belongs to the CCN protein family, is a secreted matricellular protein regulating several inflammatory pathways, such as Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and has been reported in several diseases including cancer. Here we examined the expression, regulatory mechanisms, and functions of WISP1 in IBD. WISP1 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated in colonic biopsies and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of IBD patients compared with those of healthy controls. Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α induced WISP1 expression in LPMC from healthy controls. Consistently, WISP1 mRNA expression was downregulated in colonic biopsies from IBD patients who had achieved clinical remission with infliximab (IFX). Furthermore, WISP1 expression was also found to be increased in colons from 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced mice compared with those from control mice. Further studies confirmed that administration of rWISP1 could aggravate TNBS-induced colitis in vivo. Therefore, we concluded that WISP1 is increased in IBD and contributes to the proinflammatory cascades in the gut. PMID:27403031

  18. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  19. Phagocytosis of neuronal debris by microglia is associated with neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, Ruth; van der Star, Baukje J.; Kipp, Markus; Jong, Rosa; Gerritsen, Wouter; Clarner, Tim; Puentes, Fabiola; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van der Valk, Paul; Amor, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Neuroaxonal degeneration is a pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) contributing to irreversible neurological disability. Pathological mechanisms leading to axonal damage include autoimmunity to neuronal antigens. In actively demyelinating lesions, myelin is phagocytosed by microglia and

  20. Environmental factors affecting autoimmune thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, M.; Paul, T.L.; Roti, E.; Braverman, L.E.

    1987-06-01

    A number of environmental factors affect the incidence and progression of autoimmune thyroid disease. Exposure to excess iodine, certain drugs, infectious agents and pollutants, and stress have all been implicated.

  1. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  2. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  3. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  4. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable...

  5. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Albert; J; Czaja

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations,uncertainties about its natural history,evolving opinions regarding treatment end points,varied nature of refractory disease,and plethora of alternative immu-nosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in au-toimmune hepatitis were identif...

  6. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, PA; Smith-Laing, G

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness, experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4...

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  8. New mechanism revealed for regulation of autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A healthy human body is equipped with a powerful immune system for resisting the attack of invading microorganisms. Unfortunately, the system sometimes goes awry and attacks the body itself.Autoimmunity is the failure of an organism to recognize its own constituent parts as"self," resulting in an immune response against its own cells and tissues. A disorder that results from such an aberrant immune response is termed an autoimmune disease.

  9. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  10. IL-17 Contributes to Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海静; 黄加权; 刘阳; 艾国; 严伟明; 王晓晶; 宁琴

    2010-01-01

    The role of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was investigated. A mouse model of experimental autoimmune hepatitis was established, and the syngeneic S-100 antigen emulsified in complete Freud's adjuvant was injected intraperitoneally into adult male C57BL/6 mice. The IL-17 expression in serum and the livers of the mice models was detected by using ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. IL-17 neutralizing antibody was used to study the biological effect of IL-17 in the experimental...

  11. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  12. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic i...

  13. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  14. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    L. Massironi; R. Cossutta; Massarotti, M.; Marasini, B; A. Mantero

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hu...

  15. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying illness, stop the medication, or do both. Nutritional Support People with intestinal pseudo-obstruction often need nutritional support to prevent malnutrition and weight loss. Enteral nutrition ...

  16. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  17. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  18. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  19. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  20. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  1. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  3. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  4. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It c

  5. Intestinal Epithelium and Autophagy: Partners in Gut Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Chieppa, Marcello; Eri, Rajaraman

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges of cell biology is to understand how each type of cell copes with its specific workload without suffering damage. Among the most intriguing questions concerns intestinal epithelial cells in mammals; these cells act as a barrier between the internally protected region and the external environment that is exposed constantly to food and microbes. A major process involved in the processing of microbes is autophagy. In the intestine, through multiple, complex...

  6. Intestinal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: Friend of foe?

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Francesca; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises from disruption of immune tolerance to the gut commensal microbiota, leading to chronic intestinal inflammation and mucosal damage in genetically predisposed hosts. In healthy individuals the intestinal microbiota have a symbiotic relationship with the host organism and possess important and unique functions, including a metabolic function (i.e. digestion of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, fermentation of undigestible carbohydrates with production of...

  7. Intestinal tolerability of nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Somasundaram; Rafi, S; Jacob, M.; Sigthorsson, G; Mahmud, T; Sherwood, R; Price, A B; Macpherson, A.; Scott, D.; Wrigglesworth, J. M.; Bjarnason, I

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide derivatives of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are thought to be much less ulcerogenic than their parent compounds. AIM: To compare the effect and potency of flurbiprofen and nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen to uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (an early pathogenic event in NSAID enteropathy), increase intestinal permeability (transitional stage), and cause macroscopic small intestinal damage. METHODS: In vitro uncoupling potency was assessed us...

  8. Histamine and neuroinflammation: insights from mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatrice ePassani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and available therapies are rarely successful in reversing neurological deficits or stopping disease progression. Ongoing studies on MS and the widely used murine model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE are trying to dissect out the many components of this complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease in the hope of providing a mechanism-based characterization of MS that will afford successful strategies to limit and repair the neuronal damage. Recently, histamine has been postulated to have a key regulatory role in EAE and in MS pathogenesis. Histamine is a mediator of inflammation and immune responses, it explicates its many actions through four G protein-coupled receptors (H1,2,3,4R that signal through distinct intracellular pathways and have different therapeutic potentials as they vary in expression, distribution of isoforms, signaling properties and function. Immune cells involved in MS/EAE, including dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, express H1R, H2R and H4R, and histamine may have varying and counteracting effects on a particular cell type depending on the receptor subtypes being activated. Here, we review evidence of the complex and controversial role of histamine in MS/EAE pathogenesis and evaluate the therapeutic potential of histaminergic ligands to treat autoimmune diseases.

  9. Activation of blood coagulation in autoimmune skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Crosti, Carlo; Marzano, Angelo V

    2009-09-01

    The immune system and blood coagulation are simultaneously activated in several inflammatory systemic disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-alpha, induce the expression of tissue factor, the main initiator of blood coagulation. Activated proteases of coagulation in turn act on protease-activated receptors, inducing the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines. This cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation amplifies and maintains the activation of both systems. This review focuses on three skin disorders: chronic urticaria (CU), which is considered autoimmune in approximately 50% of cases, bullous pemphigoid (BP), which is the prototype of autoimmune blistering disease, and psoriasis, which is an immune-mediated dermatitis. In CU, the activation of coagulation, which is due to the involvement of eosinophils and tissue factor pathways with the generation of thrombin, has local implications by increasing dermal vascular permeability. Preliminary data indicate that anticoagulant treatment with heparin and warfarin may be effective in reducing the symptoms of this disorder. In BP, the activation of coagulation seems to have both local and systemic implications. Locally, eosinophils and thrombin participate in bulla formation and tissue damage; systemically, the activation of coagulation may explain the increased thrombotic risk observed in these patients. In psoriasis, the activation of coagulation seems to be mainly systemic, potentially contributing to the increased cardiovascular risk associated with this disease. PMID:20477646

  10. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  11. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of IFN-γ studied in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reveal neutrophils as a potential target in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nichole M. Miller; Wang, Jun; Tan, Yanping; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) mediated by T helper (h)1 and/or Th17 CD4 T cells that drive inflammatory lesion development along with demyelination and neuronal damage. Defects in immune regulatory mechanisms are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of MS. While an early clinical trial indicated that IFN-γ administration was detrimental to MS, studies in the mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), indicat...

  12. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  13.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  14. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  15. The Dendritic Cell Response to Classic, Emerging, and Homeostatic Danger Signals. Implications for Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Matthew Gallo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g. heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules. Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g. nucleic acids and lupus. For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g. nanomaterials developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review homeostatic danger signals, danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  16. 糖巨肽对新生大鼠坏死性小肠结肠炎肠组织损伤及肠上皮细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of glycomacropeptide on damage to intestinal tissue and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells in neonatal rats with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄龙光; 周伟; 荣箫; 陶莉; 卢伟能

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish an appropriate neonatal rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and to investigate the protective effects of glycomacropeptide (GMP) on the gut from injury in neonatal rats with NEC.Method A total of 36 neonatal SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups:NEC model group( Group M ),NEC + GMP group( Group G) and normal control group( Group N),each group had 12 rats.All the neonatal rats were fed with breast milk in the first 3 days after birth.During the second 3 days after birth,the rats of Group N were still maternal breast-fed,but the rats of Group M and Group G were separated from their mothers and lived in incubator and began to be formula fed,and were subjected to cold exposure shortly after hypoxic-reoxygenation treatment.After being fed in such means for 6 days,all the neonatal rats were placed into the incubator and fasted for 24 hours.Then all the rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Intestinal tissue located at the boundary of ileum and cecum was obtained for:① histological examination after HE staining,② TUNEL detection,③electron microscopic observation; and the tissue homogenate was obtained for checking TNF-α and IL-1β levels by ELISA and platelet activating factor (PAF) mRNA expression by quantitative fluorescence ( QF )-PCR.Result ( 1 ) The pathological scores of the 3 groups were 2.17 ± 0.83 ( Group M ),0.92 ± 0.79 ( Group G) and 0.17 ± 0.39 ( Group N) separately.There was significant difference between Group M and Group G (H=8.819,P=0.003).(2) TNF-α levels of 3 groups were (41.94 ± 13.51 ) pg/ml ( Group M ),(31.69 ± 11.68 ) pg/ml ( Group G) and ( 17.42 ± 7.18 ) pg/ml ( Group N) separately,and TNF-α level in Group G was significantly lower than that of Group M ( F =3.959,P =0.030). ( 3 ) 1L-1β levels of 3 groups were ( 150.33 ± 36.41 ) pg/ml ( Group M ),( 118.36 ± 33.00) pg/ml ( Group G ) and ( 28.44 ± 15.04 ) pg/ml ( Group N ) separately,and IL-1β level in Group G was lower than that of

  17. Intestinal invagination Invaginación intestinal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamnelys Aguilar Atanay

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusceptions are the most frequent cause of acute surgical occlusive syndrome in infants; it is idiopathic in more than 90% of cases. Their treatment can be conservative, with reduction by means of imaging and hydrostatic procedures, or surgical. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Intestinal intussusceptions, approved by consensus in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.
    La invaginación intestinal es la causa más frecuente del síndrome de abdomen agudo quirúrgico oclusivo en lactantes y es idiopática en más del 90 % de los casos. Su tratamiento puede ser conservador, con reducción mediante procedimientos hidrostáticos combinados con vigilancia imaginológica, o quirúrgico. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para invaginación intestinal, aprobada por consenso en el 3er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Camagüey, 23 al 26 de febrero de 2004.

  18. Worldwide Incidence of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variation that occurs in the incidence patterns of autoimmune liver diseases may provide insight into the risk factors causing the diseases. We systematically reviewed studies on the incidence of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing...... England. Most studies of PSC found incidence rates around 1 per 100,000 population per year, but there were no incident cases among 100,000 Alaska natives during the period 1984-2000. The incidence of IAC remains unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of the autoimmune liver diseases is around 1-2 per 100......,000 population per year for each disease. The variation in incidence over time and place suggests that there are differences in the prevalence of risk factors for the diseases, but the studies used different methods and so it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. We recommend that groups of investigators...

  19. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co-morbidities in...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...... individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  20. Prolonged acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rintaro Mikata; Osamu Yokosuka; Fumio Imazeki; Kenichi Fukai; Tatsuo Kanda; Hiromitsu Saisho

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We report a case with a prolonged course of hepatitisA, with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) higher than 500 IU/Lfor more than 2 mo.METHODS: A middle-aged woman had an elevated IgG level of more than 2 000 mg/dL, positive arti-nudear antibodies (ANA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), but no evidence of persistent hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Liver biopsy findings were compatible with prolonged acute hepatitis, although acute onset of autoimmune hepatitis could not be ruled out.RESULTS: It was assumed that she developed a course of hepatitis similar to autoimmune hepatitis triggered by HAV infection. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment was initiated and a favorable outcome was obtained. CONCLUSION: We describe a case of a middle-aged woman who showed a prolonged course of acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment with UDCAproved to be effective.

  1. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norberto C Chavez-Tapia; Julio Martinez-Salgado; Julio Granados; Misael Uribe; Felix I Tellez-Avila

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation.METHODS:A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Demographic,biochemical and severity indexes,and treatment and outcome were assessed.RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids.The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids.CONCLUSION:We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids.

  2. Understanding autoimmunity: The ion channel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamaKrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha

    2016-07-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that orchestrate the passage of ions across the cell membrane and thus regulate various key physiological processes of the living system. The stringently regulated expression and function of these channels hold a pivotal role in the development and execution of various cellular functions. Malfunction of these channels results in debilitating diseases collectively termed channelopathies. In this review, we highlight the role of these proteins in the immune system with special emphasis on the development of autoimmunity. The role of ion channels in various autoimmune diseases is also listed out. This comprehensive review summarizes the ion channels that could be used as molecular targets in the development of new therapeutics against autoimmune disorders.

  3. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  4. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  5. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... with alcohol-associated cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark. METHODS: We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population...... diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (a...

  6. The Effect of Intestinal Permeability and Endotoxemia on the Prognosis of Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Young Yool; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hong Joo; Chung, Won Gil; Chon, Chang Uk; Oh, Tae Yun; Shin, Jun Ho

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Early intestinal mucosal damage plays an important role in severe acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous studies have shown that intestinal permeability (IP), serum endotoxin and cytokines contribute to the early intestinal barrier dysfunction in AP. This study explored the predictive capacity of IP, endotoxemia and cytokines as prognostic indicators in AP patients. Methods Eighty-seven AP patients were included in the study. The patients were classified into three groups according...

  7. Lipopolysaccharide induces intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in a TNFalpha-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Tuffin, Gèrald; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Stringent control of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa is critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of tissue damage, such as observed during inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal epithelial cells, primarily thought to form a simple physical barrier, critically regulate intestinal immune cell functions by producing immunoregulatory glucocorticoids on T-cell activation. In this study we investigated whether stimulation of cells of the innate immune system resul...

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal injury and probiotic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria play a role in the development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury.Agents such as probiotics,able t omodify the gut ecology,might theoretically be useful in preventing small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs.The clinical studies available so far do suggest that some probiotic agents can be effective in this respect.

  9. 肠道菌群与肠道疾病的研究进展%Intestinal Flora and Intestinal Tract Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑鹏(综述); 嵇武(审校)

    2014-01-01

    人体消化道存在大量细菌,肠道菌群调节着人体肠道免疫系统的成熟,其功能状态的改变与人体多种免疫性疾病、代谢性疾病等的发生、发展、转归密不可分,在宿主健康和疾病的发生、发展中起着重要作用。该文总结肠道菌群的研究进展与现状,简介肠道菌群的构成以及生理功能,探讨肠道菌群与肠道疾病的之间的关系。%There are a lot of bacteria in the digestive tract of human, intestinal flora regulates the mature of human intestinal immune system, the functional status of the intestinal flora occur with a variety of human autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases, etc,it plays an important role in a host of health and disease de-velopment. This paper summarizes the research progress of intestinal flora and status, introduce the composi-tion and physiological functions of the intestinal flora,explore the mechanism of pathogenesis between intesti-nal microflora and intestinal disease.

  10. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  11. Autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Cecilia; Demarco, Paul; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    We report six cases of autoimmune thyroid disease associated with chronic urticaria and briefly review the literature, including the histopathological nature of such lesions, and their aetiology and pathogenesis. In view of the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with chronic urticaria, screening measurements of thyrotropin and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies are recommended, although negative antibodies do not exclude a relationship between urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity. After failure of conventional therapy for urticaria, patients who are apparently clinically euthyroid may be considered for a trial with levothyroxine. Improvement of urticaria was seen with levothyroxine treatment in three of four patients with only marginal abnormalities in thyroid function.

  12. Excreted/secreted Trichuris suis products reduce barrier function and suppress inflammatory cytokine production of intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiemstra, I. H.; Klaver, E. J.; Vrijland, K.;

    2014-01-01

    studies indicate that T. suis E/S glycans affect the function of the intestinal epithelium in order to modulate DC function. Identification of the T. suis E/S glycans that modulate IEC and DC function may lead to a strategy to reduce symptoms of autoimmune and allergic immune diseases by orally......The administration of helminths is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases due to their immunomodulatory properties. Currently, the application of the helminth Trichuris suis as a treatment for Crohn's disease is being studied in large multi-center clinical trials....... The intestinal epithelium forms an efficient barrier between the intestinal lumen containing the microbial flora and helminths, and dendritic cells (DCs) present in the lamina propria that determine the TH response. Here, we investigated how excreted/secreted (E/S) products of T. suis affect the barrier function...

  13. Therapeutic effect of recombinant lentiviral vector containing succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein on the treatment of experimental autoimmunity myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lina; Wang, Chunxi; Guo, Shuli; Liu, Siyu; Yang, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac autoimmune reaction takes part in myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Existing literature has confirmed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathy belongs to mitochondrial diseases and is related to the oxidative respiratory chain subunit. The special structure of iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is responsible for the oxidative stress in oxidative phosphorylation, which is also a target that is easily attacked by various damage factors. Using gene therapy technology to restore succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDISP) function- and thus resume myocardial mitochondria function and myocardial function is hypothesized to alleviate the experimental autoimmunity myocarditis (EAM). PMID:27372865

  14. Metallothionein treatment reduces proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha and apoptotic cell death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2001-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are considered important for induction and pathogenesis of EAE/MS disease......, which is characterized by significant inflammation and neuroglial damage. We have recently shown that the exogenous administration of the antioxidant protein zinc-metallothionein-II (Zn-MT-II) significantly decreased the clinical symptoms, mortality, and leukocyte infiltration of the CNS during EAE...

  15. Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease Do your own family medical history. Take an ... research points to a genetic component in most autoimmune diseases, you should know the health histories of your ...

  16. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  17. Genetic Association of PTPN22 Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Hepatitis and Primary Biliary Cholangitis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takeji; Joshita, Satoru; Yamazaki, Tomoo; Komatsu, Michiharu; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Tanaka, Eiji; Ota, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) are liver-specific autoimmune conditions that are characterized by chronic hepatic damage and often lead to cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Specifically, the protein tyrosine phosphatase N22 (PTPN22) gene encodes the lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase, which acts as a negative regulator of T-cell receptor signaling. A missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs2476601) in PTPN22 has been linked to numerous autoimmune diseases in Caucasians. In the present series, nine SNPs in the PTPN22 gene were analyzed in 166 patients with AIH, 262 patients with PBC, and 322 healthy controls in the Japanese population using TaqMan assays. Although the functional rs3996649 and rs2476601 were non-polymorphic in all subject groups, the frequencies of the minor alleles at rs1217412, rs1217388, rs1217407, and rs2488458 were significantly decreased in AIH patients as compared with controls (all Pc < 0.05). There were no significant relationships with PTPN22 SNPs in PBC patients. Interestingly, the AAGTCCC haplotype was significantly associated with resistance to both AIH (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58, P = 0.0067) and PBC (OR = 0.58, P = 0.0048). SNPs in the PTPN22 gene may therefore play key roles in the genetic resistance to autoimmune liver disease in the Japanese. PMID:27406031

  18. Small intestine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  19. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger;

    2004-01-01

    membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption......A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and....../or prodrugs to these carriers in order to increasing oral bioavailability and distribution. A number of absorptive intestinal transporters are described in terms of gene and protein classification, driving forces, substrate specificities and cellular localization. When targeting absorptive large capacity...

  20. Redefined clinical features and diagnostic criteria in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre, Elise M.N.; Rose, Stacey R.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Romito, Kimberly R.; Niemela, Julie E.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Break, Timothy J.; Gu, Wenjuan; Hunsberger, Sally; Browne, Sarah K.; Hsu, Amy P.; Rampertaap, Shakuntala; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Collar, Amanda L.; Kong, Heidi H.; Chascsa, David; Simcox, Thomas; Pham, Angela; Bondici, Anamaria; Natarajan, Mukil; Monsale, Joseph; Kleiner, David E.; Quezado, Martha; Alevizos, Ilias; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Yockey, Lynne; Frein, Cathleen; Soldatos, Ariane; Calvo, Katherine R.; Adjemian, Jennifer; Similuk, Morgan N.; Lang, David M.; Stone, Kelly D.; Uzel, Gulbu; Bishop, Rachel J.; Holland, Steven M.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Heller, Theo; Winer, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by homozygous AIRE mutations. It classically presents with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and autoimmunity that primarily targets endocrine tissues; hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency are most common. Developing any two of these classic triad manifestations establishes the diagnosis. Although widely recognized in Europe, where nonendocrine autoimmune manifestations are uncommon, APECED is less defined in patients from the Western Hemisphere. We enrolled 35 consecutive American APECED patients (33 from the US) in a prospective observational natural history study and systematically examined their genetic, clinical, autoantibody, and immunological characteristics. Most patients were compound heterozygous; the most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13. All but one patient had anti–IFN-ω autoantibodies, including 4 of 5 patients without biallelic AIRE mutations. Urticarial eruption, hepatitis, gastritis, intestinal dysfunction, pneumonitis, and Sjögren’s-like syndrome, uncommon entities in European APECED cohorts, affected 40%–80% of American cases. Development of a classic diagnostic dyad was delayed at mean 7.38 years. Eighty percent of patients developed a median of 3 non-triad manifestations before a diagnostic dyad. Only 20% of patients had their first two manifestations among the classic triad. Urticarial eruption, intestinal dysfunction, and enamel hypoplasia were prominent among early manifestations. Patients exhibited expanded peripheral CD4+ T cells and CD21loCD38lo B lymphocytes. In summary, American APECED patients develop a diverse syndrome, with dramatic enrichment in organ-specific nonendocrine manifestations starting early in life, compared with European patients. Incorporation of these new manifestations into American diagnostic criteria would accelerate diagnosis by approximately 4 years and

  1. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Amr, Bashar S.; Mamillapalli, Chaitanya

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor fo...

  2. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but i...

  3. The intestinal stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Nick; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to each of these events. While the intestinal epithelium represents the most vigorously renewing adult tissue in mammals, the stem cells that fuel this self-renewal process have been identified only rec...

  4. Immune enhancement by novel vaccine adjuvants in autoimmune-prone NZB/W F1 mice: relative efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Swapan K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccines have profoundly impacted global health although concerns persist about their potential role in autoimmune or other adverse reactions. To address these concerns, vaccine components like immunogens and adjuvants require critical evaluation not only in healthy subjects but also in those genetically averse to vaccine constituents. Evaluation in autoimmune-prone animal models of adjuvants is therefore important in vaccine development. The objective here was to assess the effectiveness of experimental adjuvants: two phytol-derived immunostimulants PHIS-01 (phytanol and PHIS-03 (phytanyl mannose, and a new commercial adjuvant from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS-H, relative to a standard adjuvant alum. Phytol derivatives are hydrophobic, oil-in water diterpenoids, while alum is hydrophilic, and SIS is essentially a biodegradable and collagenous protein cocktail derived from extracellular matrices. Results We studied phthalate -specific and cross-reactive anti-DNA antibody responses, and parameters associated with the onset of autoimmune disorders. We determined antibody isotype and cytokine/chemokine milieu induced by the above experimental adjuvants relative to alum. Our results indicated that the phytol-derived adjuvant PHIS-01 exceeded alum in enhancing anti-phthalate antibody without much cross reactivity with ds-DNA. Relatively, SIS and PHIS-03 proved less robust, but they were also less inflammatory. Interestingly, these adjuvants facilitated isotype switching of anti-hapten, but not of anti-DNA response. The current study reaffirms our earlier reports on adjuvanticity of phytol compounds and SIS-H in non autoimmune-prone BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. These adjuvants are as effective as alum also in autoimmune-prone NZB/WF1 mice, and they have little deleterious effects. Conclusion Although all adjuvants tested impacted cytokine/chemokine milieu in favor of Th1/Th2 balance, the phytol compounds fared better in

  5. Rituximab for autoimmune blistering diseases: recent studies, new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardon, Luisa; Payne, Aimee S.

    2012-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been successfully used off-label for treatment of autoimmune blistering diseases. We discuss rituximab mechanisms of action, host factors that may affect response to rituximab, and the efficacy and safety of rituximab in autoimmune blistering diseases, incorporating recent data on the use of rituximab in other autoimmune disease patients.

  6. Impact of autoimmune risk alleles on the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, John P.; Hacohen, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analyses of autoimmune diseases have revealed hundreds of disease-associated DNA variants, but the identity and function of the causal variants are understudied and warrant deeper mechanistic studies. Here, we highlight methods for deciphering how alleles that are associated with autoimmune disease alter the human immune system, and suggest strategies for future autoimmune genetic research.

  7. Helminth infections and intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian Wang; Yue Cao; Hai Ning Shi

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies indicates an inverse correlation between the incidence of certain immune-mediated diseases,including inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD),and exposure to helminths.Helminth parasites are the classic inducers of Th2 responses.The Th2-polarized T cell response driven by helminth infection has been linked to the attenuation of some damaging Th1 driven inflammatory responses,preventing some Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases in the host,including experimentally induced colitis.Helminth parasites(the porcine whipworm,Trichurissuis)have been tested for treating IBD patients,resulting in clinical amelioration of the disease.As a result,there is a great deal of interest in the research community in exploring the therapeutic use of helminth parasites for the control of immune-mediated diseases,including IBD.However,recent studies have provided evidence indicating the exacerbating effects of helminths on bacterial as well as non-infectious colitis in animal models.Therefore,a better understanding of mechanisms by which helminths modulate host immune responses in the gut may reveal novel,more effective and safer approaches to helminth-based therapy of IBD.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  8. Temporary intestinal ischemia for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important determinant of cellular radiosensivity is the tissue oxygen content at the time of irradiation. The purpose of the present experimental work was to assess a new iscemia-inducing method in order to reduce normal tissue radiation damage during radiotherapy. Temporary ischemia was induced in a cat small intestine by degraded starch microspheres. Regional arterial and tissue blod flow immediately fell by 85% with subsequent normalization within 26 minutes after microsphere injection. No tendency of small vessel thrombosis caused by starch sphere embolization in combination with previous or current intestinal irradiation was detected. Starch sphere remenants were rapidly engulfed by, and persisted within tissue macrophages for 14 days without causing intestinal inflammatory reactions. In vitro studies showed that human platelets neither adhered to nor were aggregated by starch microspheres. The new method, wich occlude arteriolar vessels distal to the mesentric arterial arcades and thus largely excludes collateral blood flow, seems suited to provide effictive and selective feline small intestinal hypoxic radiation protection. This conclusion may also be valid in man

  9. Warm Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia and autoimmune hepatitis in an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, a rare disease (0.2-1 per 100,000 populations), is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing their premature destruction. Here, we present a case report of a 10 year old girl who came with features of haemolytic anaemia and history of blood transfusion since 3 years. On admission, laboratory test revealed that she had autoimmune hepatitis type 1 and was also an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus with positive HBs Ag. Steroid therapy resulted in clinical and laboratory remission. Direct antiglobulin test was negative after anaemia resolution, hepatitis B virus antigenemia persisted. To our knowledge, warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anaemia has not previously been described in association with autoimmune hepatitis and asymptomatic carrier state of hepatitis B virus. (author)

  10. High-fat Diet Accelerates Intestinal Tumorigenesis Through Disrupting Intestinal Cell Membrane Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Min Young; Seo, Young Rok; Kim, Jong-Sang; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Methods: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. Results: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27390738

  11. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  12. IL-35 and Autoimmunity: a Comprehensive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinjung; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is the most recently identified member of the IL-12 family of cytokines and offers the potential to be a target for new therapies for autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Similar to other members of the IL-12 family including IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27, IL-35 is composed of a heterodimer of α and β chains, which in the case of IL-35 are the p35 and Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) proteins. However, unlike its proinflammatory relatives, IL-35 has immunosuppressive effects that are mediated through regulatory T and B cells. Although there are limited data available regarding the role of IL-35 in human autoimmunity, several murine models of autoimmunity suggest that IL-35 may have potent effects in regulating immunoreactivity via IL-10-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that similar effects are operational in human disease and IL-35-directed therapies hold significant promise. In particular, we emphasize that IL-35 has immunosuppressive ability that are mediated via regulatory T and B cells that are IL-10 dependent. Further, although deletion of IL-35 does not result in spontaneous breach of tolerance, recombinant IL-35 can improve autoimmune responses in several experimental models.

  13. Capillaroscopy in diagnostic of systemic autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases is carried out by combining clinical, paraclinical, imaging and anatomopathological data. However, in many cases is necessary to access other guiding parameters. The capillaroscopy is a technique that consists in the observation of capillary microcirculation in the proximal nail fold hands. The methods used are the videocapillaroscopy (microscopy, stereoscopic)

  14. Costimulation and autoimmune diabetes in BB rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, BC; Whalen, B; Zipris, D; Yagita, H; Rozing, J; Groen, H; Benjamin, CD; Hunig, T; Drexhage, HA; Ansari, MJ; Leif, J; Mordes, JP; Greiner, DL; Sayegh, MH; Rossini, AA

    2006-01-01

    Costimulatory signals regulate T-cell activation. To investigate the role of costimulation in autoimmunity and transplantation, we studied the BB rat model of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes-prone BB (BBDP) rats spontaneously develop disease when 55-120 days of age. We observed that two anti-CD28 monoclon

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham M Ittyachen; Mohan B Jose; Varghese Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  17. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible benef

  18. Therapeutic implications of autoimmune vitiligo T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Oyarbide-Valencia; J.G. van den Boorn; C.J. Denman; M. Li; J.M. Carlson; C. Hernandez; M.I. Nishimura; P.K. Das; R.M. Luiten; I.C. Le Poole

    2006-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease presenting with progressive loss of skin pigmentation. The disease strikes 1% of the world population, generally during teenage years. The progressive loss of melanocytes from depigmenting vitiligo skin is accompanied by cellular infiltrates containing both CD4+ and

  19. Epilepsy Associated with Systemic Autoimmune Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Schein, Adam; Najjar, Souhel

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems. Brain involvement commonly causes seizures, which may be the presenting symptom. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjorgren's syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidsosis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Behcet's, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms underlying CNS pathology in systemic autoimmune disorders—and specifically factors predisposing these patients—are discussed, including vascular disease (e.g., prothrombotic state, anticardiolipin antibody, emboli, vasculitis), antineuronal antibodies, immune complexes, cytokines, metabolic disorders, infection, and therapy. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be individualized for both the disorder and the patient. Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems and frequently involve the central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures are among the most common neurological manifestation and occasionally can be the presenting symptom. There are many causes of seizures in systemic autoimmune disorders (Table 1), and the first clinical challenge is to determine not only the cause but also the significance of seizures. In some cases, they are clues to metabolic or infectious disorders or medication toxicity; in other cases, seizures herald a life-threatening progression of the underlying illness. PMID:23646005

  20. Epilepsy associated with systemic autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Schein, Adam; Najjar, Souhel

    2013-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems. Brain involvement commonly causes seizures, which may be the presenting symptom. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjorgren's syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidsosis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Behcet's, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms underlying CNS pathology in systemic autoimmune disorders-and specifically factors predisposing these patients-are discussed, including vascular disease (e.g., prothrombotic state, anticardiolipin antibody, emboli, vasculitis), antineuronal antibodies, immune complexes, cytokines, metabolic disorders, infection, and therapy. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be individualized for both the disorder and the patient. Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems and frequently involve the central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures are among the most common neurological manifestation and occasionally can be the presenting symptom. There are many causes of seizures in systemic autoimmune disorders (Table 1), and the first clinical challenge is to determine not only the cause but also the significance of seizures. In some cases, they are clues to metabolic or infectious disorders or medication toxicity; in other cases, seizures herald a life-threatening progression of the underlying illness. PMID:23646005

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis in children in Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitfell-Pedersen, Joanna; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Müller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in childhood is a progressive chronic inflammatory liver disease. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics of 33 paediatric patients diagnosed as having AIH with earlier described cohorts, and to examine the effect of early...

  2. Autophagy and Autoimmunity CrossTalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek eBhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, initially viewed as a conserved bulk-degradation mechanism, has emerged as a central player in a multitude of immune functions. Autophagy is important in host defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, metabolic syndromes, immune cell homeostasis, antigen processing and presentation and maintenance of tolerance. The observation that the above processes are implicated in triggering or exacerbating autoimmunity raises the possibility that the autophagy pathway is involved in mediating autoimmune processes, either directly or as a consequence of innate or adaptive functions mediated by the pathway. Genome-wide association studies have shown association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in autophagy related gene 5 (Atg5, and Atg16l1 with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE and Crohn’s disease, respectively. Enhanced expression of Atg5 was also reported in blood of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS, and in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with active relapse of MS. This review explores the roles of autophagy pathway in the innate and adaptive immune systems on regulating or mediating the onset, progression or exacerbation of autoimmune processes.

  3. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (AH...

  4. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  5. Autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis er en underdiagnosticeret sygdomsgruppe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) comprises encephalitides associated with autoantibodies against structures of the neuronal synapse. We review four types of ASE (anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, anti-α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor...

  6. Budesonide in previously untreated autoimmune hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegand, J; Schuler, A; Kanzler, S; Lohse, A; Beuers, U; Kreisel, W; Spengler, U; Koletzko, S; Jansen, PLM; Hochhaus, G; Mollmann, HW; Prols, M; Manns, MP

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease that is effectively treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Predniso(lo)ne, often in combination with azathioprine, is the basic therapeutic option to induce remission. However, this regimen can cause numerous side effects. The aim of

  7. Increased prevalence of autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K H; Cleemann, L; Hjerrild, B E;

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to develop autoimmune conditions such as coeliac disease (CD), thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The objective of the present study was to examine TS of various karyotypes for autoantibodies and corresponding diseases. This was investigated...

  8. Follicular Helper T Cells in Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherm, Martin G; Ott, Verena B; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of multiple disease-relevant autoantibodies is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), a variable time frame of autoimmunity precedes the clinically overt disease. The relevance of T follicular helper (TFH) cells for the immune system is increasingly recognized. Their pivotal contribution to antibody production by providing help to germinal center (GC) B cells facilitates the development of a long-lived humoral immunity. Their complex differentiation process, involving various stages and factors like B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), is strictly controlled, as anomalous regulation of TFH cells is connected with immunopathologies. While the adverse effects of a TFH cell-related insufficient humoral immunity are obvious, the role of increased TFH frequencies in autoimmune diseases like T1D is currently highlighted. High levels of autoantigen trigger an excessive induction of TFH cells, consequently resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, TFH cells might provide promising approaches for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27324759

  9. PET Scan and Autoimmune Focal Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    The value of the PET scan in the diagnosis of autoimmune focal encephalitis is reported in a 22-month-old girl who presented with involuntary movements, hemiparesis, and behavioral changes at Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Japan.

  10. Peptide immunotherapy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Anderton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We now have potent drugs available to treat the inflammatory component of multiple sclerosis (MS. However, not all patients respond, the drugs are not curative, and the associated risks to beneficial immune surveillance are considerable. A more desirable approach is to specifically target those comparatively rare T lymphocytes that are orchestrating the autoimmune attack. Using the autoantigen itself to instill immune tolerance in those cells remains a holy grail of immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT is highly effective at silencing autoimmune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, and clinical trials of PIT are underway in MS. This review discusses the current paradigms for PIT-induced tolerance in naïve T cells. It highlights the need for better understanding of the mode of action of PIT upon memory and effector T cells that are responsible for driving/sustaining ongoing autoimmune pathology. Recent studies in EAEsuggest genetic and epigenetic changes in these pathogenic T-cell populations in response to PIT. Finally, future challenges to effective translation of PIT to the clinic are considered.

  11. A Physicians' Wish List for the Clinical Application of Intestinal Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Högenauer, Christoph; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Fricke, W. Florian; Steininger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Christoph Steininger and colleagues explore how multiple infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases have been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome, although a cause-effect relationship is often difficult to establish. Integration of metagenomics into clinical medicine is a challenge, and the authors highlight clinical approaches that are of high priority for the useful medical application of metagenomics. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  12. A Physicians' Wish List for the Clinical Application of Intestinal Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Ingeborg Klymiuk; Christoph Högenauer; Bettina Halwachs; Thallinger, Gerhard G; W Florian Fricke; Christoph Steininger

    2014-01-01

    Christoph Steininger and colleagues explore how multiple infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases have been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome, although a cause-effect relationship is often difficult to establish. Integration of metagenomics into clinical medicine is a challenge, and the authors highlight clinical approaches that are of high priority for the useful medical application of metagenomics. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. A physicians' wish list for the clinical application of intestinal metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Högenauer, Christoph; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Fricke, W Florian; Steininger, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Christoph Steininger and colleagues explore how multiple infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases have been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome, although a cause-effect relationship is often difficult to establish. Integration of metagenomics into clinical medicine is a challenge, and the authors highlight clinical approaches that are of high priority for the useful medical application of metagenomics. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  14. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  15. Rare Variants in the TREX1 Gene and Susceptibility to Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Barizzone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TREX1 (DNase III is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS. We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients and SS (58 patients, to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage. We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val. They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro. This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE.

  16. Rare variants in the TREX1 gene and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizzone, Nadia; Monti, Sara; Mellone, Simona; Godi, Michela; Marchini, Maurizio; Scorza, Raffaella; Danieli, Maria G; D'Alfonso, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    TREX1 (DNase III) is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients) and SS (58 patients), to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients) because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage). We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val). They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro). This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE. PMID:24224166

  17. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; pdiseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  18. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  19. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Associated with Retroperitoneal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohkawa M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Autoimmune pancreatitis is sometimes associated with other autoimmune diseases. We have presented two cases of autoimmune pancreatitis with retroperitoneal fibrosis and compared our findings with those found in the literature. CASE 1: A 71-year-old male developed anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography (US and computed tomography (CT showed diffuse swelling of the pancreas and the peritoneal soft tissue surrounding the aorta, associated with right hydronephrosis. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography showed narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. He was diagnosed as having autoimmune pancreatitis associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis and underwent steroid therapy. After 3 weeks, a follow-up CT showed a marked reduction in the size of both the pancreas and retroperitoneal mass. CASE 2: A 62-year-old male was admitted to another hospital complaining of obstructive jaundice. Abdominal CT and US showed swelling of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated stenosis of the lower bile duct and narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. With the diagnosis of pancreatic head carcinoma, a choledochojejunostomy and a gastrojejunostomy were performed. Histological examination of the biopsy of the pancreatic mass revealed marked fibrosis with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. One year later, a retroperitoneal mass was detected on follow-up CT. He was treated with prednisolone for two years. Recurrence of retroperitoneal mass with left hydronephrosis occurred 18 months later. There was no sign of recurrence of the autoimmune pancreatitis. He was again treated with prednisolone, and the retroperitoneal mass was gradually reduced. CONCLUSIONS: A total of 7 cases including the present cases have been reported. All were middle-aged males. Steroid therapy was effective for both the pancreatic and the retroperitoneal masses.

  20. The intestine is a blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  1. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  2. Imaging of intestinal fibrosis: current challenges and future methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidham, Ryan W; Higgins, Peter Dr

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) activity assessments are dominated by inflammatory changes without discrete measurement of the coexisting fibrotic contribution to total bowel damage. Intestinal fibrosis impacts the development of severe structural complications and the overall natural history of CD. Measuring intestinal fibrosis is challenging and existing methods of disease assessment are unable to reliably distinguish fibrosis from inflammation. Both the immediate clinical need to measure fibrosis for therapeutic decision-making and the near-future need for tools to assess pipeline anti-fibrotic medications highlight the demand for biomarkers of fibrosis in CD. Developing non-invasive technologies exploit changes in intestinal perfusion, mechanical properties, and macromolecular content to provide quantitative markers of fibrosis. In this review of existing and experimental technologies for imaging intestinal fibrosis, we discuss the expanding capabilities of quantitative MR and ultrasound imaging, encouraging developments in non-invasive elastography, and emerging novel methods including photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27536361

  3. Protective mechanisms of thymoquinone on methotrexate-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A El-Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal toxicity is a serious side effect in methotrexate (MTX chemotherapy. Objective: To investigate the mechanisms by which the anticancer drug MTX-induced intestinal damage could be prevented by thymoquinone (TQ, an active ingredient of Nigella sativa. Materials and Methods: TQ was given orally for 10 days, and MTX toxicity was induced at the end of day 3 of the experiment, with or without TQ pretreatment. Results: MTX caused intestinal damage, represented by distortion in normal intestinal histological structure, with significant oxidative stress, exhibited as decrease in reduced glutathione concentration and catalase activity, along with significant increase in malondialdehyde level compared to control group. MTX also caused nitrosative stress evident by increased intestinal nitric oxide (NO level, with up-regulation of inducible NO synthase expression shown in immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, MTX caused inflammatory effects as evident by up-regulation of intestinal necrosis factor-kappa beta and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions, which were confirmed by increased intestinal tumor necrosis factor-alpha level via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MTX caused apoptotic effect, as it up-regulated intestinal caspase 3 expression. Concomitant TQ significantly reversed the MTX-induced intestinal toxic effects by reversing intestinal microscopic damage, as well as significantly improving oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers tested compared to MTX alone. Conclusion: TQ may possess beneficial intestinal protective effects as an adjuvant co-drug against MTX intestinal toxicity during cancer chemotherapy. TQ protection is conferred via antioxidant, anti-nitrosative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.

  4. Sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Braga Rodrigues Cardoso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the experience of sexuality and other everyday life aspects for people with intestinal ostomy. Methods: qualitative, descriptive study with ten participants of the Specialized Reference Unit who gave interviews with inductive content analysis. Results: the established themes were Physical, emotional and socio-cultural changes, Changes in the exercise of sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy and Importance of the interdisciplinary support of the new sexuality. These changes are linked to body image, the self-esteem and interpersonal relationships with the partner, family and friends, going beyond the visible with the emergence of fear, rejection, difficulty with new relationships, body shame, embarrassment by the collector equipment, fear of the sexual act causes damage to the stoma and difficult to talk about the condition. Conclusion: the ostomy condition requires adaptation process, requiring trained interdisciplinary team in physiological and psychosocial problems resulting from surgical and therapeutic adjuvant treatment, which hinder the sexuality of these individuals.

  5. Dilemmas in autoimmune pancreatitis. Surgical resection or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanova, I; Gurlich, R; Janik, V; Szabo, A; Vernerova, Z

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment is not commonly recommended in the management of autoimmune pancreatitis. The article describes a dilemma in diagnostics and treatment of a 68-year old man with the mass in the head of the pancreas that mimicked pancreatic cancer and that was diagnosed as a type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (IgG4-related pancreatitis) after a surgical resection. Diagnosis of the autoimmune pancreatitis is a real clinical challenge, as in the current diagnostic criteria exists some degree of overlap in the findings between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (indicated by the similarity in radiologic findings, elevation of IgG4, sampling errors in pancreatic biopsy, and the possibility of synchronous autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Despite the generally accepted corticosteroids as the primary treatment modality in autoimmune pancreatitis, we believe that surgical resection remains necessary in a specific subgroup of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (Fig. 4, Ref. 37). PMID:27546699

  6. Intestinal Malrotation: A Rare Cause of Small Intestinal Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Sipahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation is established by the age of 1 year in most cases, and the condition is seldom seen in adults. In this paper, a patient with small intestinal malrotation-type intraperitoneal hernia who underwent surgery at an older age because of intestinal obstruction is presented. Case. A 73-year-old patient who presented with acute intestinal obstruction underwent surgery as treatment. Distended jejunum and ileum loops surrounded by a peritoneal sac and located between the stomach and transverse colon were determined. The terminal ileum had entered into the transverse mesocolon from the right lower part, resulting in kinking and subsequent segmentary obstruction. The obstruction was relieved, and the small intestines were placed into their normal position in the abdominal cavity. Conclusion. Small intestinal malrotations are rare causes of intestinal obstructions in adults. The appropriate treatment in these patients is placement of the intestines in their normal positions.

  7. Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Sun Damage A A A The sun has a profound effect over years of exposure ... changes. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun accounts for most premature skin aging. Many skin ...

  8. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 attenuates cyclophosphamide-induced intestinal mucosal injury, metabolism and intestinal microbiota disorders in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun-Hua; Fan, Song-Tao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yu, Qiang; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-16

    Anticancer drugs at high doses often damage the intestinal mucosa and metabolism. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 (NCU116) isolated from pickled vegetables was orally given to cyclophosphamide-treated mice to determine its effects on intestinal mucosal injury, nutrient metabolism and colon microbiota, and investigate the mechanisms accounting for its effects. Mice treated with the bacterium were found to favorably recover intestine morphology of villus height and crypt depth, and have improved mucins expression and quantity of goblet cells, as well as intestinal metabolism by increasing the level of short-chain fatty acids and reducing the concentration of ammonia in the colon feces. In addition, NCU116-treated mice showed a higher diversity of colonic microbiota than the group without bacterium supplementation. The number of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the mouse colon was increased after bacterium intake, which decreased the number of potentially pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas. These results indicated that NCU116 could be of significant advantage in reducing intestinal mucosal injury and improving the intestinal metabolism and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26906433

  9. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. PMID:25014874

  10. Protective Effect of Soy Isoflavone Genistein on Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Yuki; Itagaki, Shirou; Oikawa, Setsu; Ogura, Jiro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Hirano, Takeshi; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Iseki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the intestine is an important factor associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Intestinal I/R is a common clinical problem in the settings of severe burns, circulatory shock and strangulation ileus. Intestinal I/R damages remote organs and promotes multi-organ failure. It has been shown that enteral feeding before ischemic insults is beneficial for reducing organ injury and improving survival after intestinal I/R. In that study, the authors us...

  11. Damage Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Marie

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2.2 of the HARDER project is according to the work package description: For various structural configurations of the struck ship and using the results of Task 2.1, the probability distributions for the damage location and size will be derived. The format will be similar to the...... damage statistics and bow height statistics for vessels in the world fleet. The proposals for the p-, r-, and v-factors have been compared to factors from current regulation by examples.......The purpose of Task 2.2 of the HARDER project is according to the work package description: For various structural configurations of the struck ship and using the results of Task 2.1, the probability distributions for the damage location and size will be derived. The format will be similar to the p...... between the damage location, the damage sizes and the main particulars of the struck vessel. From the numerical simulation and the analyse of the damage statistics it is found that the current formulation from the IMO SLF 43/3/2 can be used as basis for determination of the p-, r-, and v...

  12. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Martin, Kayla A.; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+), and the (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  13. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  14. Expression of intestinal trefoil factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and histological changes in intestine of rats after intrauterine asphyxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Fen Xu; Jun Li; Mei Sun; Hong-Wei Sun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the expressions of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and histologic changes in intestine, to investigate the relationship between ITF and intestinal damage and repair after intrauterine hypoxia so as to understand the mechanism of intestinal injury and to find a new way to prevent and treat gastrointestinal diseases.METHODS: Wistar rats, pregnant for 21 d, were used to establish animal models of intrauterine asphyxia by clamping one side of vessels supplying blood to uterus for 20 min, another side was regarded as sham operation group. Intestinal tissues were taken away at 0, 24, 48and 72 h after birth and stored in different styles. ITF mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. PCNA expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Intestinal tissues were studied histologically by HE staining in order to observe the areas and degree of injury and to value the intestinal mucosa injury index (IMDI).RESULTS: ITF mRNA appeared in full-term rats and increased with age. After ischemia, ITF mRNA was decreased to the minimum (0.59±0.032) 24 h after birth, then began to increase higher after 72 h than it was in the control group (P<0.01). PCNA positive staining located in goblet cell nuclei. The PCNA level had a remarkable decline (53.29±1.97) 48 h after ischemia. Structure changes were obvious in 48-h group, IMDI (3.40±0.16) was significantly increased. Correlation analyses showed that IMDI had a negative correlation with ITF mRNA and PCNA (r = -0.543,P<0.05; r = -0.794, P<0.01, respectively).CONCLUSION: Intrauterine ischemia can result in an early decrease of ITF mRNA expression. ITF and PCNA may play an important role in the damage and repair of intestinal mucosa.

  15. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  16. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  17. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the area where the intestine was reconnected N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure treated? The diet needs to be adjusted according to the intestine’s ...

  18. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  19. When Insult Is Added to Injury: Cross Talk between ILCs and Intestinal Epithelium in IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmé van der Gracht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by an impairment of the integrity of the mucosal epithelial barrier, which causes exacerbated inflammation of the intestine. The intestinal barrier is formed by different specialized epithelial cells, which separate the intestinal lumen from the lamina propria. In addition to its crucial role in protecting the body from invading pathogens, the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal homeostasis by its biochemical properties and communication to underlying immune cells. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are a recently described population of lymphocytes that have been implicated in both mucosal homeostasis and inflammation. Recent findings indicate a critical feedback loop in which damaged epithelium activates these innate immune cells to restore epithelial barrier function. This review will focus on the signalling pathways between damaged epithelium and ILCs involved in repair of the epithelial barrier and tissue homeostasis and the relationship of these processes with the control of IBD.

  20. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Onal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF intraperitoneally (ip for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, malondyaldehide (MDA, and protein carbonyl (PCO were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy

  1. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  2. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  3. PANDAS: an autoimmune model of mental disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura del Pilar Cadena Afanador

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1998, the National Institute of Mental Health defined the criteria of diagnosis for the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS. Since then there has been investigating the genesis of the autoimmunity caused by this microorganism and its clinical implications, since it has been associated with the obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette’s disorder and Sydenham’s chorea and with minor evidence it has been related to of hyperactivity disorder with lack of attention, autistic disorder and anorexia nervosa. The present article is a review on the most important aspects that have been defined up to now in regards to the physiopatlogy, clinical presentation and management of the patients with PANDAS spectrum, since they are a group of diseases in which it will be possible to change the paradigm of treatment in Psychiatry, from being a symptomatic disease to an etiological one.

  4. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  5. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given.

  6. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  7. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  8. Defensins: Potential Effectors in Autoimmune Rheumatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Vordenbäumen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Defensins are small cationic peptides with antimicrobial properties. They constitute a highly conserved innate immune defense mechanism across species. Based on the arrangement of disulfide-bonds, α- and β-defensins are distinguished in humans. Both types of defensin comprise several distinct molecules that are preferentially expressed at epithelial surfaces and in blood cells. In the last decade, multiple immunomodulatory functions of defensins have been recognized, including chemotactic activity, the promotion of antigen presentation, and modulations of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. These findings suggested a role for defensins not only as a first line of defense, but also as connectors of innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, increasingly accumulating evidence has indicated that defensins may also be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. The current review summarizes the data connecting defensins to autoimmunity.

  9. The autoimmune tautology: an in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Ricardo A; Restrepo-Montoya, Daniel; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    There is genetic evidence of similarities and differences among autoimmune diseases (AIDs) that warrants looking at a general panorama of what has been published. Thus, our aim was to determine the main shared genes and to what extent they contribute to building clusters of AIDs. We combined a text-mining approach to build clusters of genetic concept profiles (GCPs) from the literature in MedLine with knowledge of protein-protein interactions to confirm if genes in GCP encode proteins that truly interact. We found three clusters in which the genes with the highest contribution encoded proteins that showed strong and specific interactions. After projecting the AIDs on a plane, two clusters could be discerned: Sjögren's syndrome-systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune thyroid disease-type1 diabetes-rheumatoid arthritis. Our results support the common origin of AIDs and the role of genes involved in apoptosis such as CTLA4, FASLG, and IL10.

  10. Binding Studies on Isolated Porcine Small Intestinal Mucosa and in vitro Toxicity Studies Reveal Lack of Effect of C. perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Porcine Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Roos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Beta-toxin (CPB is the essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C causing necrotizing enteritis (NE in different hosts. Using a pig infection model, we showed that CPB targets small intestinal endothelial cells. Its effect on the porcine intestinal epithelium, however, could not be adequately investigated by this approach. Using porcine neonatal jejunal explants and cryosections, we performed in situ binding studies with CPB. We confirmed binding of CPB to endothelial but could not detect binding to epithelial cells. In contrast, the intact epithelial layer inhibited CPB penetration into deeper intestinal layers. CPB failed to induce cytopathic effects in cultured polarized porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 and primary jejunal epithelial cells. C. perfringens type C culture supernatants were toxic for cell cultures. This, however, was not inhibited by CPB neutralization. Our results show that, in the porcine small intestine, CPB primarily targets endothelial cells and does not bind to epithelial cells. An intact intestinal epithelial layer prevents CPB diffusion into underlying tissue and CPB alone does not cause direct damage to intestinal epithelial cells. Additional factors might be involved in the early epithelial damage which is needed for CPB diffusion towards its endothelial targets in the small intestine.

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  12. Bone marrow transplantation rescues intestinal mucosa after whole body radiation via paracrine mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our previous study reveals bone marrow transplantation (BMT) recruits host marrow-derived myelomonocytic cells to radiation-injured intestine, enhancing stromal proliferation, leading secondarily to epithelial regeneration. In this study, we propose BMT ameliorates intestinal damage via paracrine mechanisms. Materials and methods: Angiogenic cytokines within the intestinal mucosa of mice after whole body irradiation (WBI) with or without BMT were measured by cytokine array and ELISA. BM conditioned medium (BMCM) with or without treatment with neutralizing antibodies to angiogenic cytokines were continuously infused into mice for three days after radiation. Carrageenan was used to deplete myelomonocytic cells of mice. Results: BMT increased VEGF, bFGF and other angiogenic and chemotactic cytokines in the intestinal mucosa within 24 h after WBI. Infusion of BMCM ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal damage with improved stromal activity and prolonged survival of mice. Neutralization of bFGF, PDGF and other angiogenic cytokines within BMCM abolished the mitigating effect to the intestine. Pretreatment of carrageenan to recipient mice reversed some of the cytokine levels, including VEGF, bFGF and IGF within the intestinal mucosa after BMT. Conclusions: Our result suggests BMT recruits host myelomonocytic cells and enhances intestinal stroma proliferation after radiation by secreting cytokines enhancing angiogenesis and chemotaxis. Host myelomonocytic cells further uplift the paracrine effect to enhance intestinal mucosal recovery.

  13. Autoimmune thyroiditis in girls of pubertal age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred twenty five girls with autoimmune thyroiditis aged 11-16 living in Belarus permanently have been examined in 8-10 years after Chernobyl accident. The disease at girls of pubertal age living on the contaminated territories is characterized by more frequent asthenoneurotic symptoms, more marked immunologic changes and higher levels of both antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyrocytes microsome antigens as compared to those from 'clean' regions

  14. Clinical features and management of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L Krawitt

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology which can progress to cirrhosis.Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and sometimes follow a fluctuating course.Diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic,clinical,biochemical and serological findings. Anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive treatment frequently induces remission but long-term maintenance therapy is often required. Liver transplantation is generally successful in patients with decompensated cirrhosis unresponsive to or intolerant of medical therapy.

  15. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state ...

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, R. K.; Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct ...

  17. THE AUTOIMMUNE CONSTELLATION IN LICHEN AMYLOIDOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrese, Elena; Vâţă, D; Ciobanu, Delia; Stătescu, Laura; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă

    2015-01-01

    Localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a rare disease among white people, being more common in South-Asia, China and South America. The disease is characterized by deposition of amyloid material in the papillary dermis without visceral involvement. Nevertheless, there is a growing list of immune-mediated disorders that have been linked to cutaneous amyloidosis. We present two cases of concomitant occurrence of lichen amyloidosis and autoimmune thyroiditis/atopic dermatitis in two Caucasian women. PMID:26793847

  18. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  19. Autoimmune hepatitis from the paediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eve A

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an important entity within the broad spectrum of autoimmune hepatobiliary disease comprised of AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Since the 1960s, AIH has been investigated with extensive clinical research aimed at effective therapeutic intervention. It was one of the first liver diseases where treatment was demonstrated to prolong survival. AIH occurs in children, as well as in adults. Its clinical manifestations in children may differ from classic adult AIH. These differences have elucidated certain aspects of AIH and hepatobiliary disease in general. There are two major patterns of AIH: type 1, with anti-smooth muscle antibodies and type 2, with anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibodies. The second type of AIH was first identified in children and is more common in younger patients. AIH often presents as acute disease in children and also in adults: the nomenclature has dropped the allusion to chronicity. Some children who have sclerosing cholangitis present with clinical disease closely resembling AIH; this AIH-like PSC, termed autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), is also found in adults. Children with AIH may have identifiable monogenic disorders of immune regulation such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). Like adults with AIH, children with AIH usually respond very favourably to immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids ± azathioprine. True cures seem to be rare, although many children achieve a stable remission. Nonetheless children with AIH may develop cirrhosis and some require liver transplantation. Early diagnosis and improved treatment strategies may further improve the outlook for children with AIH.

  20. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; SERRA, CARLA; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic ad...

  1. Chronic calorie restriction attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Piccio, Laura; Stark, Jennifer L.; Cross, Anne H.

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents many age-associated diseases and prolongs the lifespan. CR induces multiple metabolic and physiologic modifications, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). The present studies sought to determine whether CR or increased calorie intake alters the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the leading animal model for MS. SJL and C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 40% ...

  2. High Dose Cyclophosphamide Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was initially developed as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Recently, high-dose cyclophosphamide without bone marrow transplantation has been employed as a method to induce durable treatment-free remissions in severe aplastic anemia and a variety of other severe autoimmune disorders. The premise underlying this approach is that high-dose cyclophosphamide is maximally immunosuppressive, but not myeloablative. Early hemato...

  3. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed.

  4. Improving access to intestinal stem cells as a step toward intestinal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, J W; Lau, C; Jacomino, M; Finegold, M; Henning, S J

    1994-03-01

    In previous studies exploring the intestinal epithelium as a potential site for somatic gene therapy, we concluded that the mucus lining the intestine constitutes a significant barrier to any attempts at gene transfer via the lumenal route. The mucus problem is aggravated by the fact that the epithelial stem cells, which are the logical target for gene transfer, are located deep in the intestinal crypts. The goals of the current study were to develop procedures that would improve accessibility to the intestinal stem cells and which would effect in vivo mucus removal without damaging the underlying epithelium. Initial experiments involved evaluation of the use of distension to improve accessibility to the intestinal crypts and the use of the mucolytic agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) versus a control solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for mucus removal. Catheters were inserted in each end of 3-cm terminal ileal segments in anesthetized rats. Two milliliters of agent was instilled into the clamped segment for 2 min, removed, and repeated. Lumenal distension resulted in shortened villi with wider intervillus spacing, thereby improving crypt access. Both NAC and DTT washes removed significant mucus between the villi but failed to reach the crypt lumen. To enhance mucus release from the crypt lumen, pilocarpine was selected due to its cholinergic properties and preferential binding to muscarinic receptors on crypt goblet cells. Pilocarpine given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the mucolytic or PBS wash resulted in significant eradication of mucus down into the crypt lumen. This effect was still evident 3-4 hr later provided the intestine remained undisturbed. PMID:8018747

  5. The recognition and treatment of autoimmune epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Dale, Russell C

    2015-05-01

    There is emerging interest in autoimmune epilepsy, which represents a small but potentially treatable form of epilepsy. Most insights into autoimmune epilepsy derive from the recent descriptions of autoimmune encephalitis that takes two general forms: a focal encephalitis (such as limbic) or a diffuse encephalitis (such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor [NMDAR] encephalitis). The features of autoimmune epilepsy include acute or subacute onset of seizures, usually in the context of encephalopathy, and inflammation of the central nervous system on testing cerebrospinal fluid or magnetic resonance imaging. Neuronal antibodies associated with autoimmune encephalitis and seizures in children include NMDAR, voltage-gated potassium channel complex, glycine receptor, γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R), γ-Aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABA(B)R), and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. These antibodies support the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy, but are not essential for diagnosis. When autoimmune epilepsy is suspected, first-line immune therapy with corticosteroids in addition to intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange should be considered. Second-line therapy with rituximab or cyclophosphamide can be considered if the syndrome is severe. A response to immune therapy supports the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy. Neuronal antibodies are increasingly found in patients with focal epilepsy of unknown cause who do not have 'encephalitis'. Recent epidemiological studies support the link between epilepsy and autoimmune diseases. Future studies need to define the spectrum of autoimmune epilepsy and focus on early identification and treatment. PMID:25483277

  6. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  7. Pathophysiology of inflammatory and autoimmune myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2011-04-01

    The main subtypes of inflammatory myopathies include dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing autoimmune myositis (NAM) and sporadic inclusion-body myositis (sIBM). The review provides an update on the main clinical characteristics unique to each subset, including fundamental aspects on muscle pathology helpful to assure accurate diagnosis, underlying immunopathomechanisms and therapeutic strategies. DM is a complement-mediated microangiopathy leading to destruction of capillaries, distal hypoperfusion and inflammatory cell stress on the perifascicular regions. NAM is an increasingly recognized subacute myopathy triggered by statins, viral infections, cancer or autoimmunity with macrophages as the final effector cells mediating fiber injury. PM and IBM are characterized by cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells which clonally expand in situ and invade MHC-I-expressing muscle fibers. In IBM, in addition to autoimmunity, there is vacuolization and intrafiber accumulation of degenerative and stressor molecules. Pro-inflammatory mediators, such as gamma interferon and interleukin IL1-β, seem to enhance the accumulation of stressor and amyloid-related misfolded proteins. Current therapies using various immunosuppressive and immunomodulating drugs are discussed for PM, DM and NAM, and the principles for effective treatment strategies in IBM are outlined.

  8. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  9. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  10. Stem cell therapy for severe autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmont Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense immunosuppresion followed by alogenic or autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a relatively recent procedure which was used for the first time in severe, refractory cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. Currently three agressive procedures are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases: high dose chemotherapy without stem cell rescue, intense immunosuppression with subsequent infusion of the alogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with or without the selection of CD34+ cells, and the autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Proof of the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed define SCT as a form of immunotherapy, with additional evidence of an similar Graft-vs-Autoimmunity effect which is suggestive of a cure for autoimmune diseases in this type of therapy. The use of alogenic SCT improved due to its safety compared to autogenic transplantations. In this report, data of multiply sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus are reported, with the conclusion that Immunoablation followed by SCT is clearly indicated in such cases.

  11. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  12. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  13. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  14. Goblet Cells and Mucus Types in the Digestive Intestine and Respiratory Intestine in Bronze Corydoras (Callichthyidae: Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leknes, I L

    2015-10-01

    The structure and histochemical properties of the intestine in bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus), a stomach-containing teleost, are described, with emphasis on goblet cells and mucin types. The proximal intestine displayed a normal structure for teleosts, whereas the distal intestine was wide, translucent, thin-walled, richly vascularized and constantly filled with air, suggesting an important respiratory role. Goblet cells were common throughout the entire intestine and displayed a variable, but mainly faint metachromatic colour after toluidine blue. They were moderately coloured by alcian blue at both pH 2.5 and 0.2 and displayed no colour after periodic acid followed by Schiff's solution (PAS), but a distinct purple-brown colour after high iron diamine followed by alcian blue (pH 2.5). Together, these results suggest that the mucin in the intestine goblet cells consists mainly of sulphated proteoglycans. Further, the results from the present lectin and neuraminidase tests suggest that these mucins contain much N-acetylglucoseamines and some N-acetylgalactosamines and sialic acid, but seem to lack glucose and mannose. They also contain some galactose-N-acetylgalactosamines sequences, normally hidden by sialic acid. The distinct brush border and mucus layer on the epithelial cells in the respiratory intestine may indicate some digestive roles, such as absorption of water, ions and simple carbohydrates. As sulphated proteoglycans are tough and attract much water, this mucus may play important roles in the protection against mechanical and chemical damages and in the defence against micro-organisms throughout the entire intestine, but in the respiratory intestine it may impede significantly the oxygen uptake. However, as this part of the intestine usually contains no digesta, but is completely filled with air, frequently renewed by dry air from the atmosphere, and the main function of the mucus may be to protect the respiratory epithelium against a destroying and

  15. Congenital intestinal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, M; Bianchi, A

    1990-09-01

    Surgery for infants with intestinal atresia has evolved along with the development of specialized neonatal surgical units. This once fatal condition now carries a better than 85% chance of survival and an excellent long-term prognosis. Recent advances in bowel preservation techniques have reduced morbidity and improved gut function in both the long and the short term. PMID:2257399

  16. Intestinal volvulus in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeman, L; St Leger, J A; Blyde, D J; Jauniaux, T P; Lair, S; Lovewell, G; Raverty, S; Seibel, H; Siebert, U; Staggs, S L; Martelli, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-07-01

    Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findings were similar to those described in other animal species and humans, and consisted of intestinal volvulus and a well-demarcated segment of distended, congested, and edematous intestine with gas and bloody fluid contents. Associated lesions included congested and edematous mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and often serofibrinous or hemorrhagic abdominal effusion. The volvulus involved the cranial part of the intestines in 85% (11 of 13). Potential predisposing causes were recognized in most cases (13 of 18, 72%) but were variable. Further studies investigating predisposing factors are necessary to help prevent occurrence and enhance early clinical diagnosis and management of the condition. PMID:23150643

  17. The intestinal stem cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to ea

  18. Aging and the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the animal, there are many changes in the function of the body's organ systems. In the gastrointestinal tract there is a general modest decline in the function of the esophagus, stomach, colon,pancreas and liver. In the small intestine, there may be subtle alterations in the intestinal morphology, as well as a decline in the uptake of fatty acids and sugars.The malabsorption may be partially reversed by aging glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) or dexamethasone.Modifications in the type of lipids in the diet will influence the intestinal absorption of nutrients: for example, in mature rats a diet enriched with saturated as compared with polysaturated fatty acids will enhance lipid and sugar uptake, whereas in older animals the opposite effect is observed. Thus, the results of studies of the intestinal adaptation performed in mature rats does not necessarily apply in older animals. The age-associated malabsorption of nutrients that occurs with aging may be one of the several factors which contribute to the malnutrition that occurs with aging.

  19. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  20. Precision machining of pig intestine using ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer J.; Góra, Wojciech S.; Carter, Richard M.; Gunadi, Sonny; Jayne, David; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-01

    Endoluminal surgery for the treatment of early stage colorectal cancer is typically based on electrocautery tools which imply restrictions on precision and the risk of harm through collateral thermal damage to the healthy tissue. As a potential alternative to mitigate these drawbacks we present laser machining of pig intestine by means of picosecond laser pulses. The high intensities of an ultrafast laser enable nonlinear absorption processes and a predominantly nonthermal ablation regime. Laser ablation results of square cavities with comparable thickness to early stage colorectal cancers are presented for a wavelength of 1030 nm using an industrial picosecond laser. The corresponding histology sections exhibit only minimal collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. The depth of the ablation can be controlled precisely by means of the pulse energy. Overall, the application of ultrafast lasers to ablate pig intestine enables significantly improved precision and reduced thermal damage to the surrounding tissue compared to conventional techniques.

  1. Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa as a function of intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Sandt, H. van de

    2003-01-01

    Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa was studied as a function of intestinal health. A microbiota was found to be important for the onset and progression of inflammatory diseases. Studies revealed a prominent effect of micro-organisms on the gene expressio

  2. Differences in Radiation Dose Response between Small and Large Intestinal Crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Suzuki, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    The protection of intestinal epithelial cells from the lethal effects induced by high-dose radiation is an important issue in radiotherapy and in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome. However, the effects of middle- and low-dose radiation on intestinal epithelial cells remain unclear. Because the accumulation of DNA damage in intestinal stem cells may be crucial for the development of cancer-initiating cells, it is important to understand the kinetics of DNA repair and tissue response (which are involved in the elimination of damaged cells and tissue injury repair) to middle- to low-dose irradiation. In this study, mice were X-ray irradiated with 0.1, 1 or 4 Gy, after which the small intestine (duodenum and ileum) and colon were harvested from the animals. DNA damage repair and the elimination of damaged cells were quantified by measuring the number of foci of 53BP1, a surrogate marker for DNA double-strand breaks. Tissue-proliferative response was evaluated by determining the number of Ki-67(+) and mitotic cells. Intra-crypt response differed considerably between the small intestine and the colon. In the small intestine, 53BP1 foci were detected immediately after irradiation, but rapidly disappeared thereafter, especially noticeable in Lgr5(+) stem cells. Cellular growth was temporally arrested; however, cell numbers and mitotic cell numbers in the crypt did not change. The kinetics of DNA damage repair in Lgr5(+) stem cells were similar to those in the small intestines, while the colon was more susceptible to radiation-induced damage. Preferential cell loss in the lower crypt was clearly observed in the colon; and after low-dose X-ray irradiation, only the colon exhibited considerably reduced cell numbers and dramatic induction of mitosis. These results suggest that differences in radiation dose response between the small and the large intestine may depend on the growth activity of stem cells after DNA repair. PMID:27556352

  3. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  4. Autoimmune Diseases Co-Existing with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Jadali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity and viral infections are closely associated fields, and viruses have been proposed as a likely aetiological, contributory or triggering factors of systemic autoimmune diseases. Hepatitis C virus seems to be the virus usually associated with the appearance of autoimmune diseases, and the relationship between chronic hepatitis C virus infection and some autoimmune disease has been studied. For some of these disorders their association with hepatitis C virus infection is well recognized while for others it remains probable or weak. Examples of autoimmune phenomena observed in chronic hepatitis C virus infection include rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, cryoglobulinaemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus and sjogren syndrome. To date, the etiological role and the pathogenetic involvement of the hepatitis C infection remains unknown.The aim of this study is to assess the presence of different autoimmune manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection reported in literature.

  5. Fulminant hepatic failure in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, R; Chapman, A R; Reid, G T; Hayes, P C

    2015-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is liver disease that causes encephalopathy within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms or within 2 weeks of onset of jaundice in a patient without prior evidence of liver disease. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 is an autoimmune autosomal-recessive condition causing parathyroid and adrenal insufficiency, alopecia, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, ectodermal dystrophy and, rarely, hepatitis. Although the liver can be affected as a consequence of the autoimmune process, the spectrum of disease activity is varied. Autoimmune hepatitis develops in 10-20% of patients and successful liver transplantation has been reported in pediatric patients who failed immunosuppressive treatment. We report fulminant hepatic failure in an adult patient with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 who responded to medical treatment and did not require liver transplantation. We highlight the diagnostic scoring system for autoimmune hepatitis and the referral criteria for liver transplantation in fulminant hepatic failure.

  6. Identification of gene expression patterns crucially involved in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Herrmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After encounter with a central nervous system (CNS-derived autoantigen, lymphocytes leave the lymph nodes and enter the CNS. This event leads only rarely to subsequent tissue damage. Genes relevant to CNS pathology after cell infiltration are largely undefined. Myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in disability. To assess genes that are involved in encephalitogenicity and subsequent tissue damage mediated by CNS-infiltrating cells, we performed a DNA microarray analysis from cells derived from lymph nodes and eluted from CNS in LEW.1AV1 (RT1av1 rats immunized with MOG 91-108. The data was compared to immunizations with adjuvant alone or naive rats and to immunizations with the immunogenic but not encephalitogenic MOG 73-90 peptide. Here, we show involvement of Cd38, Cxcr4 and Akt and confirm these findings by the use of Cd38-knockout (B6.129P2-Cd38tm1Lnd/J mice, S1P-receptor modulation during EAE and quantitative expression analysis in individuals with MS. The hereby-defined underlying pathways indicate cellular activation and migration pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors as crucial events in CNS tissue damage. These pathways can be further explored for novel therapeutic interventions.

  7. Catalase eliminates reactive oxygen species and influences the intestinal microbiota of shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chong; Sun, Jie-Jie; Guo, Fang; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal innate immune response is an important defense mechanism of animals and humans against external pathogens. The mechanism of microbiota homeostasis in host intestines has been well studied in mammals and Drosophila. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides have been reported to play important roles in homeostasis. However, how to maintain the microbiota homeostasis in crustacean intestine needs to be elucidated. In this study, we identified a novel catalase (MjCAT) involved in ROS elimination in kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. MjCAT mRNA was widely distributed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. After the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic bacteria via oral infection, the expression level of MjCAT was upregulated, and the enzyme activity was increased in the intestine. ROS level was also increased in the intestine at early time after oral infection and recovered rapidly. When MjCAT was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), high ROS level maintained longer time, and the number of bacteria number was declined in the shrimp intestinal lumen than those in the control group, but the survival rate of the MjCAT-RNAi shrimp was declined. Further study demonstrated that the intestinal villi protruded from epithelial lining of the intestinal wall were damaged by the high ROS level in MjCAT-knockdown shrimp. These results suggested that MjCAT participated in the intestinal host-microbe homeostasis by regulating ROS level.

  8. The neuregulin, glial growth factor 2, diminishes autoimmune demyelination and enhances remyelination in a chronic relapsing model for multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cannella, Barbara; Hoban, Carolyn J; Gao, Yan-Ling; Garcia-Arenas, Renee; Lawson, Deborah; Marchionni, Mark; Gwynne, David; Raine, Cedric S.

    1998-01-01

    Glial growth factor 2 (GGF2) is a neuronal signal that promotes the proliferation and survival of the oligodendrocyte, the myelinating cell of the central nervous system (CNS). The present study examined whether recombinant human GGF2 (rhGGF2) could effect clinical recovery and repair to damaged myelin in chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the mouse, a major animal model for the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. Mice with EAE were treated with ...

  9. Antigenic Challenge in the Etiology of Autoimmune Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mary A M Rogers; Levine, Deborah A.; Blumberg, Neil; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Kabeto, Mohammed; Kenneth M. Langa

    2011-01-01

    Infection has long been implicated as a trigger for autoimmune disease. Other antigenic challenges include receipt of allogeneic tissue or blood resulting in immunomodulation. We investigated antigenic challenges as possible risk factors for autoimmune disease in women using the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study, linked to Medicare files, years 1991–2007. The prevalence of autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease,...

  10. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K.; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M.; Petroff, Brian K.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in associ...

  11. Autoimmune diseases and fungal infections: immunological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune disease represents a breakdown of natural tolerance to autoreactive antigens.Pemphigus and lupus erythematosus are common autoimmune diseases either skin-specific or with predominant skin involvement. During the past decades,much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of autoimmune diseases and the immunological mechanism in some infectious diseases such as fungal infections. Various novel approaches have been developed in the treatment of these diseases.

  12. Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult: current knowledge and uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Laugesen, E; Østergaard, J A; Leslie, R D G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes have less Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-associated genetic risk and fewer diabetes-associated autoantibodies compared with patients with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes. Metabolic changes at diagnosis reflect a broad clinical phenotype ranging from diabetic ketoacidosis to mild non-insulin-requiring diabetes, also known as latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). This latter phenotype is the most prevalent form of adult-onset autoimmune dia...

  13. Sex Differences in Autoimmune Disease from a Pathological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Frisancho-Kiss, Sylvia; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect ∼8% of the population, 78% of whom are women. The reason for the high prevalence in women is unclear. Women are known to respond to infection, vaccination, and trauma with increased antibody production and a more T helper (Th)2-predominant immune response, whereas a Th1 response and inflammation are usually more severe in men. This review discusses the distribution of autoimmune diseases based on sex and age, showing that autoimmune diseases progress from an acute p...

  14. Infections as a cause of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous and endogenous environmental exposures and particularly infections may participate in the breakage of tolerance and the induction of autoimmunity in rheumatic diseases. Response to infections apparently occurs years before clinical manifestations and features of autoimmunity, such as autoantibodies, are detected years before clinical manifestations in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for a potential causal link between infectious agents and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:27629582

  15. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis, immunotherapy and thymectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Tyson L; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a rare condition in children. Identifying antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor is helpful in making the diagnosis. However, seronegative cases do exist and need to be distinguished from congenital forms of myasthenia. There is little published experience to inform the judicious management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 12 cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children in the modern era of medical immunotherapy and thymectomy. PMID:21911294

  16. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis) has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis w...

  17. Targeting Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Lesions to a Predetermined Axonal Tract System Allows for Refined Behavioral Testing in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kerschensteiner, Martin; Stadelmann, Christine; Buddeberg, Bigna S.; Merkler, Doron; Bareyre, Florence M.; Anthony, Daniel C.; Linington, Christopher; Brück, Wolfgang; Schwab, Martin E.

    2004-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the structural damage to axons determines the persistent clinical deficit patients acquire during the course of the disease. It is therefore important to test therapeutic strategies that can prevent or reverse this structural damage. The conventional animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), typically shows disseminated inflammation in the central nervous system, which leads to a clinical deficit that cannot be directly attributed to a def...

  18. Combined LDI/SAT test to evaluate intestinal lactose digestion and mucosa permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, H. A.; Klaassen, D.; van der Molen, A. R. H.; Elzinga, H.; Bijsterveld, K.; Boverhof, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucosal damage causes impaired digestive capacity and increased mucosal permeability. Quantification of damage can be used to improve treatment options. Currently, the Lactose Digestion Index (LDI) and the Sugar Absorption Test (SAT) are used for evaluation. The investigation s

  19. Progress in Study of Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocytes%肠上皮内淋巴细胞研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕健

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) play important roles in immuno-surveillance of the intestinal mucosa. IEL are regulated by the interaction of microorganism-rich gut environment and food antigens with the mucosal epithelium, which can prevent the invasion of pathogenic microbes and avoid excessive or unnecessary immune responses to innocuous antigens. IEL are notably heterogeneous in phenotype and function, and encompass both conventional and unconventional subpopulations. The dysfunction of IEL may lead to intestinal disorders, and may have a close association with autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, autoimmune disease can also result in corresponding changes of IEL. This article reviewed the classification, origin and distribution of IEL in the intestine, as well as the progress in study of its relationship with autoimmune intestinal diseases, immunodeficiency intestinal diseases and small bowel malignant tumors.%肠上皮内淋巴细胞(IEL)是肠黏膜免疫系统的前沿守护者.肠黏膜上皮与肠腔大量微生物、食物抗原接触后,可通过调节IEL以预防肠腔致病微生物侵袭和对无害抗原产生耐受.IEL的表型和功能呈多样性,包括常规和非常规亚型,其功能失调不仅可引发肠道疾病,且与自身免疫病关系密切,而自身免疫病亦可致IEL发生相应变化.本文就IEL的分类、起源、在消化道中的分布情况及其与自身免疫性肠病、免疫缺陷性肠病、小肠恶性肿瘤的相关研究进展作一综述.

  20. Diagnosis and management of autoimmune cytopenias in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T; Lambert, Michele P

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis and management of children with autoimmune cytopenias can be challenging. Children can present with immune-mediated destruction of a single-cell lineage or multiple cell lineages, including platelets (immune thrombocytopenia [ITP]), erythrocytes (autoimmune hemolytic anemia), and neutrophils (autoimmune neutropenia). Immune-mediated destruction can be primary or secondary to a comorbid immunodeficiency, malignancy, rheumatologic condition, or lymphoproliferative disorder. Treatment options generally consist of nonspecific immune suppression or modulation. This nonspecific approach is changing as recent insights into disease biology have led to targeted therapies, including the use of thrombopoietin mimetics in ITP and sirolimus for cytopenias associated with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:24237984

  1. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  2. Immunomodulatory effects and mechanisms of plant alkaloid tetrandrine in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Jenn-Haung

    2002-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases characterized by activation of immune effector cells and damage of target organs are currently treated with a combination of several disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that preserve different immunomodulatory mechanisms. Such a combination treatment strategy not only provides synergistic effects but also reduces side effects from individual drug. Tetrandrine (Tet), purified from a creeper Stephania tetrandra S Moore, is a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid and has been used to treat patients with silicosis, autoimmune disorders, and hypertension in Mainland China for decades. The accumulated studies both in vitro and in vivo reveal that Tet preserves a wide variety of immunosuppressive effects. Importantly, the Tet-mediated immunosuppressive mechanisms are evidently different from some known DMARDs. The synergistic effects have also been demonstrated between Tet and other DMARDs like FK506 and cyclosporin. These results highlight Tet a very potential candidate to be considered as one of DMARDs in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes evidence-based in vivo and in vitro studies on this potential Chinese immunosuppressive herb.

  3. Intraperitoneal Infusion of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Youn Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness. We here investigated whether intraperitoneal administration of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs might prevent development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU in mice. Time course study showed that the number of IFN-γ- or IL-17-expressing CD4+ T cells was increased in draining lymph nodes (DLNs on the postimmunization day 7 and decreased thereafter. The retinal structure was severely disrupted on day 21. An intraperitoneal injection of hMSCs at the time of immunization protected the retina from damage and suppressed the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the eye. Analysis of DLNs on day 7 showed that hMSCs decreased the number of Th1 and Th17 cells. The hMSCs did not reduce the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-23 which are the cytokines that drive Th1/Th17 differentiation. Also, hMSCs did not induce CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. However, hMSCs increased the level of an immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 and the population of IL-10-expressing B220+CD19+ cells. Together, data demonstrate that hMSCs attenuate EAU by suppressing Th1/Th17 cells and induce IL-10-expressing B220+CD19+ cells. Our results support suggestions that hMSCs may offer a therapy for autoimmune diseases mediated by Th1/Th17 responses.

  4. Unimpaired Autoreactive T-Cell Traffic Within the Central Nervous System During Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Mediated inhibition of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, Heinrich; Goodsall, Anna L.; Lemckert, Frances A.; Scallon, Bernard J.; Ghrayeb, John; Ford, Andrew L.; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    1995-11-01

    The critical role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator in autoimmune inflammatory processes is evident from in vivo studies with TNF-blocking agents. However, the mechanisms by which TNF, and possibly also its homologue lymphotoxin α, contributes to development of pathology in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn disease and in animal models like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is unclear. Possibilities include regulation of vascular adhesion molecules enabling leukocyte movement into tissues or direct cytokine-mediated effector functions such as mediation of tissue damage. Here we show that administration of a TNF receptor (55 kDa)-IgG fusion protein prevented clinical signs of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Significantly, the total number of CD4^+ T lymphocytes isolated from the central nervous system of clinically healthy treated versus diseased control animals was comparable. By using a CD45 congenic model of passively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis to enable tracking of myelin basic protein-specific effector T lymphocytes, prevention of clinical signs of disease was again demonstrated in treated animals but without quantitative or qualitative impediment to the movement of autoreactive T lymphocytes to and within the central nervous system. Thus, despite the uninterrupted movement of specific T lymphocytes into the target tissue, subsequent disease development was blocked. This provides compelling evidence for a direct effector role of TNF/lymphotoxin α in autoimmune tissue damage.

  5. Ketamine anesthesia reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos Roddgo Cámara; Francisco Javier Guzmán; Ernesto Alexis Barrera; Andrés Jesús Cabello; Armando Garcia; Nancy Esthela Fernández; Eloy Caballero; Jesus Ancer

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of ketamine anesthesia on the motility alterations and tissue injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion in rats.METHODS:Thirty maIe Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were used.Ischemia was induced by obstructing blood flow in 25% of the total small intestinal length(ileum)with a vascular clamp for 45 min,after which either 60 min or 24 h of reperfusion was allowed.Rats were either anesthetized with pento-barbital sodium(50 mg/kg)or ketamine(100 mg/kg).Control groups received sham surgery,After 60 min of reperfusion,the intestine was examined for mor-phological alterations,and after 24 h intestinal basic electrical rhythm(BER)frequency was calculated,and intestinal transit determined in all groups.RESULTS:The intestinal mucosa in rats that were anesthetized with ketamine showed moderate alterations such as epithelial lifting,while ulceration and hemorrhage was observed in rats that received pento-barbital sodium after 60 min of reperfusion.Quantitative analysis of structural damage using the Chiu scale showed significantly Iess injury in rats that received ketamine than in rats that did not(2.35±1.14 vs 4.58 ±0.50,P<0.0001).The distance traveled by a marker,expressed as percentage of total intestinal length,in rats that received pentobarbital sodium was 20% ± 2% in comparison with 25.9% ±1.64% in rats that received ketamine(P=0.017).BER was not statistically different between groups.CONCLUSION:Our results show that ketamine anesthesia is associated with diminished intestinal iniury and abolishes the intestinal transit delay induced by ischemia/reperfusion.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal Malakoplakia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mahjoub

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disease, related to enterobacterial infection in the context of a disorder of cell-mediated immunity. Malakoplakia is exceptional in children and usually involves the gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis is exclusively based on histological analysis.Cases Presentation: In this paper we have reported 3 children with intestinal malakoplakia which were enrolled during a period of 6 years between 2001 to 2006 at Childrens Medical Center. Two were male, and one female. The main clinical manifestations were: chronic bloody and mucosal diarrhea, abdominal pain and polypoid masses detected by diagnostic colonoscopy. Histological diagnosis proved to be definite in these cases. The response to drug treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole in all three patients was good. Conclusion: The presence of intestinal malakoplakia must be ruled out in every child having chronic bloody mucosal diarrhea.

  7. Intestinal sugar transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie A Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrates are an important component of the diet.The carbohydrates that we ingest range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose) to disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) to complex polysaccharides. Most carbohydrates are digested by salivary and pancreatic amylases, and are further broken down into monosaccharides by enzymes in the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes. For example, lactase-phloridzin hydrolase and sucraseisomaltase are two disaccharidases involved in the hydrolysis of nutritionally important disaccharides. Once monosaccharides are presented to the BBM, mature enterocytes expressing nutrient transporters transport the sugars into the enterocytes. This paper reviews the early studies that contributed to the development of a working model of intestinal sugar transport, and details the recent advances made in understanding the process by which sugars are absorbed in the intestine.

  8. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  9. Intestinal sensing of nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Gwen; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2012-01-01

    Ingestion of a meal triggers a range of physiological responses both within and outside the gut, and results in the remote modulation of appetite and glucose homeostasis. Luminal contents are sensed by specialised chemosensitive cells scattered throughout the intestinal epithelium. These enteroendocrine and tuft cells make direct contact with the gut lumen and release a range of chemical mediators, which can either act in a paracrine fashion interacting with neighbouring cells and nerve endings or as classical circulating hormones. At the molecular level, the chemosensory machinery involves multiple and complex signalling pathways including activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and solute carrier transporters. This chapter will discuss our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal chemosensation with a particular focus on the relatively well-characterised nutrient-triggered secretion from the enteroendocrine system. PMID:22249821

  10. Prophylactic treatment with growth hormone improves intestinal barrier function and alleviates bacterial translocation in stressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁连安; 黎介寿; 李幼生; 刘放南; 谭力

    2004-01-01

    Background Damage to the gut barrier often occurs during critical illnesses. In such cases, it is very important to alleviate impairment of the intestinal barrier and protect intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the protective effect of growth hormone on intestinal barrier function in rats under stress.Methods This study consisted of prospective, randomized, and controlled animal experiments. Twenty-five Sprague-Dawley rats served as total parenteral nutrition (TPN) models and were divided into three groups: TPN group, sepsis (Sep) group, and growth hormone (GH) group. Another 8 rats served as normal controls. Each group received different stress stimuli. Rats were fed for 7 days, and samples were taken for examination 24 hours after garaging with dual saccharides. Results The architecture of the small intestinal mucosa in the Sep group showed the most severe damage among all groups. Nitric oxide levels in blood plasma and immunoglobulin A levels in the intestinal mucosa of the GH group were significantly lower than in the Sep group (P<0.02). There were no significant changes in CD3 counts and in the CD4/CD8 ratio between the four groups. Dual sugar tests and bacteriological examinations revealed that intestinal permeability and rate of bacterial translocation in the GH group were lower than in the Sep group (P<0.01, respectively).Conclusion Prophylactic treatment with growth hormone can alleviate damage to intestinal barrier function caused by trauma and endotoxemia in rats under stress.

  11. [Atopy and autoimmunity -- a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, M; Tapadinhas, F; Neves, Am; Costa Trindade, J

    2007-01-01

    Atopy, immunodeficiency and autoimmunity are manifestations of immune system dysfunction. Classically atopy and autoimmunity are referred as distinct immunological reactions. Recent studies suggest the existence of common pathogenic mechanisms. We report the case of a teenager with familial history of asthma and miasthenia gravis in her mother (HLA- B8+) and personal history of recurrent upper respiratory infections from two to four years old, and pneumonia since five years old (3 or 4 episodes/ year, in three consecutive years), with associated dyspnoea and hypoxemia, requiring frequently hospital admission. Investigation was initially negative for atopy markers, and excluded other hypothesis as tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, -1 antitrypsin deficiency, congenital heart disease, bronchopulmonary malformations or foreign body aspiration. Latter, further exams finally confirmed atopy with a raised IgE, positive RAST and cutaneous sensitivity tests (for house dust mites and pollen) and revealed circulating immune complexes and IgG 2, 3 e 4 deficit. Most frequent autoantibodies and precipitins study were negative, and histocompatibility antigens study revealed HLA- B8 (as her mother). Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy and respiratory function tests were normal. Antihistamines, topical corticoids and bronchodilators were done with an excellent clinical response. At 16 years- old she is admitted again with the diagnosis of erythema nodosum and the clinical suspicion of Sweet's syndrome, having a good evolution. The relation between atopy and autoimmunity is enfatized by the authors. This simultaneous occurrence does not correspond merely to a statistical association, but may represent a global immune system impairment, with the involvement of different types of hypersensibility. PMID:17962891

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan. Overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, id est (i.e.), association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjogren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjogren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called 'idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)' and AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)' and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease. (author)

  13. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway.

  14. Intestinal volvulus in cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Begeman, L.; St. Leger, J.; Blyde, D.; Jauniaux, Thierry; Lair, S; Lovewell, G.; Raverty, S; Seibel, H.; Siebert, U; Staggs, S.; Martelli, P.; Keesler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal volvulus was recognized as the cause of death in 18 cetaceans, including 8 species of toothed whales (suborder Odontoceti). Cases originated from 11 institutions from around the world and included both captive (n = 9) and free-ranging (n = 9) animals. When the clinical history was available (n = 9), animals consistently demonstrated acute dullness 1 to 5 days prior to death. In 3 of these animals (33%), there was a history of chronic gastrointestinal illness. The pathological findi...

  15. Intestinal Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbagh, Yves; Giral, Hector; Caldas, Yupanqui; Levi, Moshe; Schiavi, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate is absorbed in the small intestine by at least two distinct mechanisms: paracellular phosphate transport which is dependent on passive diffusion and active transport which occurs through the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporters. Despite evidence emerging for other ions, regulation of the phosphate specific paracellular pathways remains largely unexplored. In contrast, there is a growing body of evidence that active transport through the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporte...

  16. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PMID:26697508

  17. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  18. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity.

  19. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Castiblanco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology. This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity.

  20. Autoimmun hepatitis. Fremtroedelsesformer, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Tage-Jensen, U; Vyberg, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study concerning ten patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AiH), diagnosed during a 2 1/2-year period is presented. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 82 years and nine of the patients were women. Their symptoms included jaundice, pruritus, fever, anorexia and fatigue during a...... detected in nine patients, while none had increased levels of anti-nuclear antibody titer. Histological features of moderate or severe chronic active hepatitis were demonstrated in nine patients. One patient presented with clinical and histological features of acute hepatitis. Prednisolone therapy was...