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Sample records for autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility

  1. Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill dogs and cats.

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    Whitehead, KimMi; Cortes, Yonaira; Eirmann, Laura

    2016-01-01

    To review the human and veterinary literature regarding gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility disorders in respect to pathogenesis, patient risk factors, and treatment options in critically ill dogs and cats. GI dysmotility is a common sequela of critical illness in people and small animals. The most common GI motility disorders in critically ill people and small animals include esophageal dysmotility, delayed gastric emptying, functional intestinal obstruction (ie, ileus), and colonic motility abnormalities. Medical conditions associated with the highest risk of GI dysmotility include mechanical ventilation, sepsis, shock, trauma, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and multiple organ failure. The incidence and pathophysiology of GI dysmotility in critically ill small animals is incompletely understood. A presumptive diagnosis of GI dysmotility is often made in high-risk patient populations following detection of persistent regurgitation, vomiting, lack of tolerance of enteral nutrition, abdominal pain, and constipation. Definitive diagnosis is established via radioscintigraphy; however, this diagnostic tool is not readily available and is difficult to perform on small animals. Other diagnostic modalities that have been evaluated include abdominal ultrasonography, radiographic contrast, and tracer studies. Therapy is centered at optimizing GI perfusion, enhancement of GI motility, and early enteral nutrition. Pharmacological interventions are instituted to promote gastric emptying and effective intestinal motility and prevention of complications. Promotility agents, including ranitidine/nizatidine, metoclopramide, erythromycin, and cisapride are the mainstays of therapy in small animals. The development of complications related to GI dysmotility (eg, gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration) have been associated with increased mortality risk. Institution of prophylaxic therapy is recommended in high-risk patients, however, no consensus exists regarding optimal

  2. Upper gastrointestinal dysmotility after spinal cord injury: Is diminished vagal sensory processing one culprit?

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    Gregory M Holmes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widely recognized prevalence of gastric, colonic and anorectal dysfunction after SCI, significant knowledge gaps persist regarding the mechanisms leading to post-SCI gastrointestinal (GI impairments. Briefly, the regulation of GI function is governed by a mix of parasympathetic, sympathetic and enteric neurocircuitry. Unlike the intestines, the stomach is dominated by parasympathetic (vagal control whereby gastric sensory information is transmitted via the afferent vagus nerve to neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS. The NTS integrates this sensory information with signals from throughout the CNS. Glutamatergic and GABAergic NTS neurons project to other nuclei, including the preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Finally, axons from the DMV project to gastric myenteric neurons, again, through the efferent vagus nerve. SCI interrupts descending input to the lumbosacral spinal cord neurons that modulate colonic motility and evacuation reflexes. In contrast, vagal neurocircuitry remains anatomically intact after injury. This review presents evidence that unlike the post-SCI loss of supraspinal control which leads to colonic and anorectal dysfunction, gastric dysmotility occurs as an indirect or secondary pathology following SCI. Specifically, emerging data points toward diminished sensitivity of vagal afferents to GI neuroactive peptides, neurotransmitters and, possibly, macronutrients. The neurophysiological properties of rat vagal afferent neurons are highly plastic and can be altered by injury or energy balance. A reduction of vagal afferent signaling to NTS neurons may ultimately bias NTS output toward unregulated GABAergic transmission onto gastric-projecting DMV neurons. The resulting gastroinhibitory signal may be one mechanism leading to upper GI dysmotility following SCI.

  3. Autoimmune Gastrointestinal Paralysis: Failure of Conventional Treatment without Immunomodulation

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    Craig Weinkauf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the rare enteric nervous system (ENS manifestations of paraneoplastic syndromes, which are most frequently associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC, is poorly understood and described. Patients with neuroendocrine-derived tumors can develop B-cell reactivity towards the tumor with cross-reactivity for neurons located in the submucosal and myenteric ganglia of the ENS. The ensuing autoimmune neuritis causes aperistalsis and severe gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction. Immune-directed therapy is not the standard of care but may be paramount for patient recovery. Our patient, a 63-year-old man with recent symptoms of esophageal dysmotility and newly diagnosed SCLC was hospitalized with nausea, emesis, and constipation. After an extensive work-up that included laparoscopy and celiotomy with bowel resection, we diagnosed what we refer to as Autoimmune Paraneoplastic Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction (AP-CIPO. Unlike the few clinically similar reports, SCLC and AP-CIPO were diagnosed in our patient within weeks of each other, which presented the dilemma of treating the two processes simultaneously. In this report, we review the relevant literature and describe our patient’s course. We believe standard chemotherapy is not effective treatment for AP-CIPO. Based on evidence discussed herein, we suggest initiating autoimmune-directed therapy before or simultaneous with cancer-directed therapy.

  4. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

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    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  5. High Prevalence of Esophageal Dysmotility in Asymptomatic Obese Patients

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    Justin Côté-Daigneault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is an important health problem affecting >500 million people worldwide. Esophageal dysmotility is a gastrointestinal pathology associated with obesity; however, its prevalence and characteristics remain unclear. Esophageal dysmotilities have a high prevalence among obese patients regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features.Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated.In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17-83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia.

  7. The protective effects of total phenols in magnolia officinalix rehd. et wils on gastrointestinal tract dysmotility is mainly based on its influence on interstitial cells of cajal

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    Tian, Hui; Huang, Dazhi; Li, Tao; Huang, Lihua; Zheng, Xingguang; Tang, Danxia; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils is a kind of herb which is widely used for gastrointestinal tract mobility disorder in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated whether the total phenols of Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils (TPM) treatment improves gastrointestinal tract dysmobility induced by intraperitoneal injection of atropine (5 mg/kg) in rats. Rats were randomly grouped into three units: TPM-pretreated/atropine-treated group, atropinetreated group and control group. TPM were administrated for 7 days. Gastric residual rate and intestinal transit were measured 20 min after atropine injected, and gastrointestinal hormones (including: gastrin (GAS), motilin (MTL), somatostatin (SS) and p substance (PS) levels in serum were also measured by ELISA kits. The number and distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in stomach were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis, while c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) expressions in stomach were also measured by western blotting. We found that TPM pretreatment significantly improved atropine-induced gastric residual rate increase, while had no significantly effects on intestinal transit; it also significantly normalized GAS, MTL and PS serum levels. Atropine-induced ICCs numbers decreased in both sinuses ventriculi and body of stomach, which is improved by TPM pretreatment. Western blotting results showed the expressions of c-kit and SCF were down-regulated after atropine injection, which can be reversed with TPM pretreatment. These results above indicates that TPM treatment can significantly protected atropine-induced gastric dysmoblility, which may owed to its regulation on c-kit/SCF signing pathway. PMID:26884941

  8. Association between esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophaeal reflux on barium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Craig; Levine, Marc S.; Rubesin, Stephen E.; Laufer, Igor; Redfern, Gina; Katzka, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between abnormal primary peristalsis in the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies. Methods: A computerized search of radiologic reports revealed 151 patients with esophageal dysmotility (characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis in the esophagus on upper gastrointestinal tract examinations) who fulfilled our study's entry criteria. These 151 patients were stratified into two groups depending on whether this dysmotility was associated with nonperistaltic contractions (NPCs): 92 patients had no NPCs (Dysmotility and No NPCs Group) and 59 had NPCs (Dysmotility and NPCs Group). An age-matched control group of 92 patients with normal motility was also generated from the radiologic reports. The reports were also reviewed for the presence and degree of GER and other complications of GER. The frequency and degree of GER were tabulated for each group, and the data were analyzed using a Pearson chi square test to determine if significant differences were present in the frequency and degree of GER or other findings among the groups. Results: The frequency of GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.02). When GER was stratified based on the degree of reflux, the frequency of moderate-to-marked GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in patients with abnormal peristalsis and NPCs (p = 0.01) or in controls (p = 0.0031). The frequency of reflux esophagitis also was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with esophageal dysmotility characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis without NPCs have a significantly higher frequency and degree of GER than patients with normal motility. The presence of this specific form of esophageal dysmotility on barium

  9. Association between esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophaeal reflux on barium studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Craig [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu; Rubesin, Stephen E. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Laufer, Igor [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Redfern, Gina [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Katzka, David A. [Department of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between abnormal primary peristalsis in the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on barium studies. Methods: A computerized search of radiologic reports revealed 151 patients with esophageal dysmotility (characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis in the esophagus on upper gastrointestinal tract examinations) who fulfilled our study's entry criteria. These 151 patients were stratified into two groups depending on whether this dysmotility was associated with nonperistaltic contractions (NPCs): 92 patients had no NPCs (Dysmotility and No NPCs Group) and 59 had NPCs (Dysmotility and NPCs Group). An age-matched control group of 92 patients with normal motility was also generated from the radiologic reports. The reports were also reviewed for the presence and degree of GER and other complications of GER. The frequency and degree of GER were tabulated for each group, and the data were analyzed using a Pearson chi square test to determine if significant differences were present in the frequency and degree of GER or other findings among the groups. Results: The frequency of GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.02). When GER was stratified based on the degree of reflux, the frequency of moderate-to-marked GER was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in patients with abnormal peristalsis and NPCs (p = 0.01) or in controls (p = 0.0031). The frequency of reflux esophagitis also was significantly higher in patients with abnormal peristalsis and no NPCs than in controls (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with esophageal dysmotility characterized by intermittently decreased or absent peristalsis without NPCs have a significantly higher frequency and degree of GER than patients with normal motility. The presence of this specific form of esophageal dysmotility on

  10. New insights into immune mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Recent progresses in the immune mechanisms implicated in chronic inflammatory disorders have led to a more in-depth knowledge of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including autoimmune atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune enteropathy and ulcerative colitis. While the pathogenic role of specific circulating autoantibodies, i.e., respectively anti-parietal cell, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-enterocyte and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic, is still controversial, some common T-cell mediated mechanisms for inflammation - increase in T helper cell type 1/type 17 pro-inflammatory cytokines- or losing self-tolerance-abnormal regulatory T cell function - are recognized as crucial mediators of the tissue damage causing atrophy of the stomach mucosa in autoimmune atrophic gastritis, villous flattening of the small bowel in celiac disease and autoimmune enteropathy, and mucosal ulceration of the colon in ulcerative colitis. This review deals with novel advances in the immunological bases of the aforementioned autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders, and it also highlights immune mechanisms of progression from chronic inflammation to cancer and implications for new therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Loss of enteroendocrine cells in autoimmune-polyendocrine-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) syndrome with gastrointestinal dysfunction.

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    Posovszky, C; Lahr, G; von Schnurbein, J; Buderus, S; Findeisen, A; Schröder, C; Schütz, C; Schulz, A; Debatin, K M; Wabitsch, M; Barth, T F

    2012-02-01

    Enteroendocrine (EE) cells are necessary for the regulation of gastrointestinal function. The lack of intestinal enteroendocrine cells in enteroendocrine cell dysgenesis causes severe malabsorptive diarrhea. Autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-dystrophy (APECED) is often accompanied by gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. We hypothesized that an autoimmune attack against the cells of the GI-associated diffuse endocrine system may be a specific feature of GI dysfunction in APECED disorders. Biopsies were obtained during routine diagnostic endoscopy from 35 pediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms as well as from five healthy controls; biopsies were immunostained for chromogranin A and serotonin. Four patients were classified as APECED syndrome on molecular and clinical grounds. Immunohistological analysis of biopsies along the GI tract (stomach, duodenum, colon) immunostained with chromogranin A and serotonin revealed a widespread reduction or complete loss of EE cells in all four patients with APECED syndrome suffering from severe diarrhea, vomiting, malabsorption, or constipation. In contrast, EE cells were present in pediatric patients with similar gastrointestinal symptoms caused by inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, lymphocytic colitis, and autoimmune disorders without endocrinopathy or graft vs. host disease of the gut. The reduction of EE cells is a specific and important early event in the pathogenesis of APECED with GI dysfunction. We propose a diagnostic algorithm integrating clinics, genetics and immunohistology.

  12. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

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    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of gluten immunogenicity in patients with celiac disease. We studied temporal associations between infections and the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, and examined effects of HLA alleles, rotavirus vaccination status, and infant feeding. We monitored 6327 children in the United States and Europe carrying HLA risk genotypes for celiac disease from 1 to 4 years of age for presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (the definition of celiac disease autoimmunity), until March 31, 2015. Parental reports of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were collected every third month from birth. We analyzed time-varying relationships among reported infections, rotavirus vaccination status, time to first introduction of gluten, breastfeeding, and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity using proportional hazard models. We identified 13,881 gastrointestinal infectious episodes (GIE) and 79,816 respiratory infectious episodes. During the follow-up period, 732 of 6327 (11.6%) children developed celiac disease autoimmunity. A GIE increased the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity within the following 3 months by 33% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.59). This risk increased 2-fold among children born in winter and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.46-2.98), and increased 10-fold among children without HLA-DQ2 alleles and breastfed for fewer than 4 months (HR, 9.76; 95% CI, 3.87-24.8). Risk of celiac disease autoimmunity was reduced in children vaccinated against rotavirus and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). Gastrointestinal infections increase the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with genetic susceptibility to this autoimmune disorder. The risk is modified by HLA genotype, infant gluten consumption, breastfeeding, and rotavirus vaccination, indicating complex interactions among infections, genetic factors

  13. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity.

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    Fischer, Henrike J; Witte, Ann-Kathrin; Walter, Lutz; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; van den Brandt, Jens; Reichardt, Holger M

    2016-05-01

    T-cell lymphopenia is a major risk factor for autoimmunity. Here we describe congenic Lewis (LEW) rats with a loss-of-function mutation in the Gimap5 gene, leading to a 92% reduction in peripheral T-cell numbers. Gimap5-deficient LEW rats developed eosinophilic autoimmune gastroenteritis accompanied by a 40-fold increase in IgE serum levels. This phenotype was ameliorated by antibiotic treatment, indicating a critical role of the microbial flora in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Interestingly, Gimap5-deficient LEW rats showed strongly aggravated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after immunization with guinea pig myelin basic protein. This phenotype, however, persisted after antibiosis, confirming that the enhanced CNS autoimmune response in T-cell lymphopenic Gimap5-deficient LEW rats was unrelated to the composition of the microbial flora. Rather, it seems that it was caused by the 7-fold increase in the percentage of activated T cells producing IL-17 and IFN-γ, and the skewed T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, both of which were the result of T-cell lymphopenia and not affected by antibiosis. This notion was supported by the observation that adoptive T-cell transfer corrected the TCR repertoire and improved EAE. Collectively, our findings confirm a critical albeit differential role of T-cell lymphopenia in the susceptibility to organ-specific autoimmune responses.-Fischer, H. J., Witte, A.-K., Walter, L., Gröne, H.-J., van den Brandt, J., Reichardt, H. M. Distinct roles of T-cell lymphopenia and the microbial flora for gastrointestinal and CNS autoimmunity. © FASEB.

  14. Gastroparesis is associated with oxytocin deficiency, oesophageal dysmotility with hyperCCKemia, and autonomic neuropathy with hypergastrinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Julia; Melander, Olle; Johansson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and autonomic neuropathy are common problems among diabetics with largely unknown aetiology. Many peptides are involved in the autonomic nervous system regulating the GI tract. The aim of this study was to examine if concentrations of oxytocin...... was increased in patients with oesophageal dysmotility, and gastrin secretion was increased in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The findings suggest that disturbed peptide secretion may be part of the pathophysiology of digestive complications in diabetics....

  15. Autoimmune and gastrointestinal dysfunctions: does a subset of children with autism reveal a broader connection?

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    Brown, Amy C; Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2011-08-01

    A large number of autoimmune disorders have a gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction component that may interplay with genetic, hormonal, environmental and/or stress factors. This narrarive review investigates possible links between autism, immune system abnormalities and GI symptoms in a subgroup of children with autism. A literature search on Medline (1950 to September 2010) was conducted to identify relevant articles by using the keywords 'autism and gastrointestinal' (71 publications) and 'autism and immune' (237 publications), cross-referencing and general searching to evaluate the available literature on the immunological and GI aspects of autism. Sufficient evidence exists to support that a subgroup of children with autism may suffer from concomitant immune-related GI symptoms.

  16. Staphylococcal enterotoxins in the Etiopathogenesis of Mucosal Autoimmunity within the Gastrointestinal Tract

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    MaryAnn Principato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs are the products of Staphylococcus aureus and are recognized as the causative agents of classical food poisoning in humans following the consumption of contaminated food. While illness evoked by ingestion of the SE or its producer organism in tainted food are often self-limited, our current understanding regarding the evolution of S. aureus provokes the utmost concern. The organism and its associated toxins, has been implicated in a wide variety of disease states including infections of the skin, heart, sinuses, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease, toxic shock, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The intricate relationship between the various subsets of immunocompetent T cells and accessory cells and the ingested material found within the gastrointestinal tract present daunting challenges to the maintenance of immunologic homeostasis. Dysregulation of the intricate balances within this environment has the potential for extreme consequences within the host, some of which are long-lived. The focus of this review is to evaluate the relevance of staphylococcal enterotoxin in the context of mucosal immunity, and the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune disease.

  17. Gastrointestinal Autoimmunity Associated With Loss of Central Tolerance to Enteric α-Defensins.

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    Dobeš, Jan; Neuwirth, Aleš; Dobešová, Martina; Vobořil, Matouš; Balounová, Jana; Ballek, Ondřej; Lebl, Jan; Meloni, Antonella; Krohn, Kai; Kluger, Nicolas; Ranki, Annamari; Filipp, Dominik

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenal insufficiency, but patients also develop intestinal disorders. APECED is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE, which regulates immune tolerance) that allow self-reactive T cells to enter the periphery. Enteric α-defensins are antimicrobial peptides secreted by Paneth cells. Patients with APECED frequently have gastrointestinal symptoms and seroreactivity against secretory granules of Paneth cells. We investigated whether enteric α-defensins are autoantigens in humans and mice with AIRE deficiency. We analyzed clinical data, along with serum and stool samples and available duodenal biopsies from 50 patients with APECED collected from multiple centers in Europe. Samples were assessed for expression of defensins and other molecules by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry; levels of antibodies and other proteins were measured by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. Histologic analyses were performed on biopsy samples. We used Aire(-/-) mice as a model of APECED, and studied the effects of transferring immune cells from these mice to athymic mice. Enteric defensins were detected in extraintestinal tissues of patients with APECED, especially in medullary thymic epithelial cells. Some patients with APECED lacked Paneth cells and were seropositive for defensin-specific autoantibodies; the presence of autoantibodies correlated with frequent diarrhea. Aire(-/-) mice developed defensin-specific T cells. Adoptive transfer of these T cells to athymic mice resulted in T-cell infiltration of the gut, loss of Paneth cells, microbial dysbiosis, and the induction of T-helper 17 cell-mediated autoimmune responses resembling those observed in patients with APECED. In patients with APECED, loss of AIRE

  18. Gastrointestinal Autoimmunity Associated With Loss of Central Tolerance to Enteric alpha-Defensins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Jan; Neuwirth, Aleš; Dobešová, Martina; Vobořil, Matouš; Balounová, Jana; Ballek, Ondřej; Lebl, J.; Meloni, A.; Krohn, K.; Kluger, N.; Ranki, A.; Filipp, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2015), s. 139-150 ISSN 0016-5085 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Enteric defensins * Intestinal autoimmunity * Mouse Model of APECED Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 18.187, year: 2015

  19. Dysmotility in Esophageal Atresia: Pathophysiology, Characterization, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Christophe; Righini Grunder, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal dysmotility is almost universal after esophageal atresia (EA) repair and is mainly related to the developmental anomaly of the esophagus. Esophageal dysmotility is involved in the pathophysiology of numerous symptoms and comorbidities associated with EA such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration and respiratory complications, and symptoms of dysphagia and feeding disorders. High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has facilitated the characterization of the dysmotility, but there is an incomplete correlation between symptoms and manometrical patterns. Impedance coupled to HREM should help to predict the clinical outcome and therefore personalize patient management. Nowadays, the management of esophageal dysmotility in patients with EA is essentially based on treatment of associated inflammation related to peptic or eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:28620599

  20. Idiopathic Oesophageal Dysmotility Disorder: Stridor Secondary to Megaesophagus

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    B. G. Natesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

  1. Idiopathic Oesophageal Dysmotility Disorder: Stridor Secondary to Megaesophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Natesh, B. G.; Caton, N.; Kim, D.; Shetty, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

  2. Scintigraphic assessment of gastrointestinal motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2014-01-01

    intestinal and colonic transit. This article reviews current imaging techniques, methods for data processing and principles for evaluating results when scintigraphy is used to assess gastrointestinal motility. Furthermore, clinical indications for performing scintigraphy are reviewed........ Dysmotility in the different major segments of the gastrointestinal tract may give rise to similar symptoms; hence, localizing transit abnormalities to a specific segment is a valuable element of diagnostic evaluation. Scintigraphy is an effective noninvasive tool to assess gastric emptying as well as small...

  3. High prevalence of esophageal dysmotility in asymptomatic obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Côté-Daigneault, Justin; Leclerc, Pierre; Joubert, Josette; Bouin, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as a major health problem in the developed world and has been found to be associated with several respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and digestive diseases. Few studies have investigated esophageal dysmotility in obese populations; however, they have reported conflicting results, primarily due to varying measures and classification systems. This prospective study aimed to determine the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a group of obese patients in Montreal...

  4. Voltage-gated potassium channel (K(v) 1) autoantibodies in patients with chagasic gut dysmotility and distribution of K(v) 1 channels in human enteric neuromusculature (autoantibodies in GI dysmotility).

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    Hubball, A W; Lang, B; Souza, M A N; Curran, O D; Martin, J E; Knowles, C H

    2012-08-01

    Autoantibodies directed against specific neuronal antigens are found in a significant number of patients with gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases (GINMDs) secondary to neoplasia. This study examined the presence of antineuronal antibodies in idiopathic GINMD and GINMD secondary to South American Trypanosomiasis. The GI distribution of voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) was also investigated. Seventy-three patients were included in the study with diagnoses of primary achalasia, enteric dysmotility, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, esophageal or colonic dysmotility secondary to Chagas' disease. Sera were screened for specific antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs; P/Q subtype), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; α3 subtype), and voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs, K(V) 1 subtype) using validated immunoprecipitation assays. The distribution of six VGKC subunits (K(V) 1.1-1.6), including those known to be antigenic targets of anti-VGKC antibodies was immunohistochemically investigated in all main human GI tract regions. Three patients (14%) with chagasic GI dysmotility were found to have positive anti-VGKC antibody titers. No antibodies were detected in patients with idiopathic GINMD. The VGKCs were found in enteric neurons at every level of the gut in unique yet overlapping distributions. The VGKC expression in GI smooth muscle was found to be limited to the esophagus. A small proportion of patients with GI dysfunction secondary to Chagas' disease have antibodies against VGKCs. The presence of these channels in the human enteric nervous system may have pathological relevance to the growing number of GINMDs with which anti-VGKC antibodies have been associated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Gastroparesis is associated with oxytocin deficiency, oesophageal dysmotility with hyperCCKemia, and autonomic neuropathy with hypergastrinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvnäs-Moberg Kerstin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal (GI dysmotility and autonomic neuropathy are common problems among diabetics with largely unknown aetiology. Many peptides are involved in the autonomic nervous system regulating the GI tract. The aim of this study was to examine if concentrations of oxytocin, cholecystokinin (CCK, gastrin and vasopressin in plasma differ between diabetics with normal function and dysfunction in GI motility. Methods Nineteen patients with symptoms from the GI tract who had been examined with gastric emptying scintigraphy, oesophageal manometry, and deep-breathing test were included. They further received a fat-rich meal, after which blood samples were collected and plasma frozen until analysed for hormonal concentrations. Results There was an increase in postprandial oxytocin plasma concentration in the group with normal gastric emptying (p = 0.015 whereas subjects with delayed gastric emptying had no increased oxytocin secretion (p = 0.114. Both CCK and gastrin levels increased after the meal, with no differences between subjects with normal respective delayed gastric emptying. The concentration of vasopressin did not increase after the meal. In patients with oesophageal dysmotility the basal level of CCK tended to be higher (p = 0.051 and those with autonomic neuropathy had a higher area under the curve (AUC of gastrin compared to normal subjects (p = 0.007. Conclusion Reduced postprandial secretion of oxytocin was found in patients with delayed gastric emptying, CCK secretion was increased in patients with oesophageal dysmotility, and gastrin secretion was increased in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The findings suggest that disturbed peptide secretion may be part of the pathophysiology of digestive complications in diabetics.

  6. A Case Study of Severe Esophageal Dysmotility following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E. Sheppard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following bariatric surgery, a proportion of patients have been observed to experience reflux, dysphagia, and/or odynophagia. The etiology of this constellation of symptoms has not been systematically studied to date. This case describes a 36-year-old female with severe esophageal dysmotility following LSG. Many treatments had been used over a course of 3 years, and while calcium channel blockers reversed the esophageal dysmotility seen on manometry, significant symptoms of dysphagia persisted. Subsequently, the patient underwent a gastric bypass, which seemed to partially relieve her symptoms. Her dysphagia was no longer considered to be associated with a structural cause but attributed to a “sleeve dysmotility syndrome.” Considering the difficulties with managing sleeve dysmotility syndrome, it is reasonable to consider the need for preoperative testing. The question is whether motility studies should be required for all patients planning to undergo a LSG to rule out preexisting esophageal dysmotility and whether conversion to gastric bypass is the preferred method for managing esophageal dysmotility after LSG.

  7. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  8. Gastrointestinal hypomotility with loss of enteric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: active immunization model in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Fryer, James P.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Xiao, Yingxian; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune gastrointestinal dysmotility (AGID) is a limited form of dysautonomia. The only proven effector to date is IgG specific for ganglionic nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors containing α3 subunits (α3*-nAChR). Rabbits immunized with recombinant α3-polypeptide produce α3*-nAChR autoantibodies, and profound AGID ensues. Human and rabbit α3*-nAChR-specific-IgGs induce transient hypomotility when injected into mice. Here we describe success and problems encountered inducing gastrointestinal hypomotility in mice by active immunization. Methods We repeatedly injected young adult mice of seven different strains susceptible to autoimmunity (spontaneous diabetes or neural antigen immunization-induced myasthenia gravis or encephalomyelitis) with: i) α3-polypeptide, intradermally, or ii) live α3*-nAChR-expressing xenogeneic cells, intraperitoneally. We measured serum α3*-nAChR-IgG twice monthly, and terminally assessed blue dye gastrointestinal transit, total small intestinal α3*-nAChR content (radiochemically) and myenteric plexus neuron numbers (immunohistochemically, ileal-jejunal whole-mount preparations). Key Results Standard cutaneous inoculation with α3-polypeptide was minimally immunogenic, regardless of dose. Intraperitoneally-injected live cells were potently immunogenic. Self-reactive α3*-nAChR-IgG was induced only by rodent immunogen; small intestinal transit slowing and enteric α3*-nAChR loss required high serum levels. Ganglionic neurons were not lost. Conclusions & Inferences AGID is inducible in mice by active immunization. Accompanying enteric α3*-nAChR reduction without neuronal death is consistent with an IgG-mediated rather than T cell-mediated pathogenesis, as is improvement of symptoms in patients receiving antibody-depleting therapies. PMID:23072523

  9. Blueberry Phenolics Reduce Gastrointestinal Infection of Patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis by Improving Depressant-Induced Autoimmune Disorder via miR-155-Mediated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Meng, Hao; Liu, Tianyi; Feng, Yingli; Qi, Yuan; Zhang, Donghuan; Wang, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) often causes human depression, whereas depression-induced low immunity makes the patients susceptible to gastrointestinal infection. Blueberry possesses antidepressant properties which may improve autoimmunity and reduce gastrointestinal infection. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) performs antidepressant function and can be regulated by miR-155, which may be affected by blueberry. To explore the possible molecular mechanism, blueberry compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Activity of compounds was tested by using HT22 cells. The present study tested 124 patients with CVT-induced mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale [CES-D] ≥16) and gastrointestinal infection. Patients were randomly assigned to blueberry extract group (BG, received 10 mg blueberry extract daily) and placebo group (PG, received 10 mg placebo daily). After 3 months, depression, gastrointestinal infection and lipid profiles were investigated. Serum miR-155 and BDNF were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and or Western Blot. Blueberry treatment improved depressive symptoms and lipid profiles, and also reduced gastrointestinal infection in the BG group (P blueberry extracts were the main phenolic acids with 0.18, 0.85, 0.26, 0.72, 0.66, 0.4,1, and 1.92 mg/g of gentisic acid, chlorogenic acid, [2]-epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, p-anisic acid, and quercetin in blueberry extracts, respectively. Phenolics in blueberry are possible causal agents in improving antidepressant activity and reducing gastrointestinal infection. Administration of blueberry increased BDNF expression and miR-155. Blueberry cannot affect BDNF level when miR-155 is overexpressed or inhibited. Phenolics from blueberry reduced gastrointestinal infection of patients with CVT by improving antidepressant activity via upregulation of miR-155-mediated BDNF. PMID:29230173

  10. A role for Pten in paediatric intestinal dysmotility disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The enteric nervous system (ENS) is a network of neurons and glia that lies within the gut wall. It is responsible for the normal regulation of gut motility and secretory activities. Hirschsprung\\'s disease (HD) is a congenital defect of the ENS, characterised by an absence of ganglia in the distal colon. Intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) is a condition that clinically resembles HD, characterised by hyperganglionosis, giant and ectopic ganglia, resulting in intestinal dysmotility. Intestinal ganglioneuromatosis is characterised by hyperplasia and hypertrophy of enteric neuronal cells and causes chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) is a phosphatase that is critical for controlling cell growth, proliferation and cell death. A recent study of Pten knockout mice showed evidence of ganglioneuromatosis in the ENS suggesting a role for this protein in ENS development. Ganglioneuromatosis patients have also been shown to have a decreased level of Pten expression in the colon. The aim of our study was to investigate Pten expression in the ENS of HD and IND patients compared to normal controls. METHODS: Resected tissue from 10 HD and 10 IND type B patients was fixed and embedded in paraffin wax. Normal control colon tissue was obtained from ten patients who underwent a colostomy closure for imperforate anus. Sections were cut and immunohistochemistry was carried out using a Pten antibody. Results were analysed by light microscopy. RESULTS: Staining showed that Pten was strongly expressed in ganglia of both the submucosal and myenteric plexus of normal and HD specimens from the ganglionic colon. Pten expression was significantly reduced in the giant ganglia in IND patients in both the myenteric and submucosal plexuses compared to the normal controls. Specimens from the aganglionic region of HD did not show Pten expression. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study

  11. Effect of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction on Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Dysmotility in Patients and in Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlei Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of intestinal motility and related infectious complications are the predominant clinical phenomenon in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. We aimed to investigate the effects of Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD on the gastrointestinal injury in SAP patients and the potential mechanism involved in rats. DCQD was enema administered to 70 patients for 7 days in West China Hospital. Mortality and organ failure during admission were observed and blood samples for laboratory analysis were collected. We also experimentally examined plasma inflammatory cytokines in rat serum and carried the morphometric studies of the gut. Intestinal propulsion index and serum and tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP were also detected. Though DCQD did not affect the overall incidence of organ failure, it shortened the average time of paralytic intestinal obstruction and decreased the morbidity of infectious complications in patients with SAP. Compared with untreated rats, the DCQD lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokine and decreased the mean pathological intestinal lesion scores. The VIP level in intestinal tissue or serum in DCQD group was obviously lowered and intestinal propulsion index was significantly improved. In conclusion, DCQD has good effect on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

  12. Effect of da-cheng-qi decoction on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianlei; Zhong, Cejun; He, Zhiyu; Chen, Guangyuan; Tang, Wenfu

    2015-01-01

    The impairment of intestinal motility and related infectious complications are the predominant clinical phenomenon in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). We aimed to investigate the effects of Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD) on the gastrointestinal injury in SAP patients and the potential mechanism involved in rats. DCQD was enema administered to 70 patients for 7 days in West China Hospital. Mortality and organ failure during admission were observed and blood samples for laboratory analysis were collected. We also experimentally examined plasma inflammatory cytokines in rat serum and carried the morphometric studies of the gut. Intestinal propulsion index and serum and tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were also detected. Though DCQD did not affect the overall incidence of organ failure, it shortened the average time of paralytic intestinal obstruction and decreased the morbidity of infectious complications in patients with SAP. Compared with untreated rats, the DCQD lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokine and decreased the mean pathological intestinal lesion scores. The VIP level in intestinal tissue or serum in DCQD group was obviously lowered and intestinal propulsion index was significantly improved. In conclusion, DCQD has good effect on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

  13. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders and Their Clinical Implications in Cirrhosis

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    Eleni Theocharidou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility is impaired in a substantial proportion of patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis-related autonomic neuropathy, increased nitric oxide production, and gut hormonal changes have been implicated. Oesophageal dysmotility has been associated with increased frequency of abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux. Impaired gastric emptying and accommodation may result in early satiety and may have an impact on the nutritional status of these patients. Small intestinal dysmotility might be implicated in small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation. The latter has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Enhanced colonic motility is usually associated with the use of lactulose. Pharmacological interventions aiming to alter gastrointestinal motility in cirrhosis could potentially have a beneficial effect reducing the risk of hepatic decompensation and improving prognosis.

  14. Colonic dysmotility and morphological abnormality frequently detected in Japanese patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Mizukami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Colonoscopy and computed tomography (CT are used primarily to exclude organic diseases in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, rather than to assess the pathophysiology of IBS. We aimed to evaluate colonic dysmotility and morphology in Japanese patients with IBS.Methods: One hundred eighty-four patients with IBS and 49 asymptomatic controls who underwent colonoscopy in combination with CT colonography or barium enema were retrospectively reviewed between 2008 and 2012. Water-aided colonoscopy was performed without sedation by a single endoscopist. The duration and pattern of colonic movement and cecal intubation time were recorded. To assess colonic morphology, barium enema or CT colonography were performed immediately after colonoscopy.Results: Colonic dysmotility was more frequent in the IBS group (28.8% vs. 2.0% in controls, P<0.001, especially in cases of IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D (IBS with constipation [IBS-C] 28.8% vs. IBS-D 60.0% vs. mixed IBS [IBS-M] 5.1%, P<0.001. Colonic morphological abnormality was more frequent in the IBS group than in the control group (77.7% vs. 24.5%, P<0.001, especially in IBS-M and IBS-C groups (IBS-C 77.5% vs. IBS-D 48.9% vs. IBS-M 100%, P<0.001. Most patients with IBS with colonic dysmotility had experienced stress related to their symptoms. Cecal intubation time was significantly longer in the IBS group than in the control group (12.1±6.9 minutes vs. 4.6±1.9 minutes, P<0.001.Conclusions: Unsedated colonoscopy, combined with radiographic findings, can detect colonic dysmotility and morphological abnormality. Technical difficulties observed during cecal intubation may partially explain the pathophysiology of IBS.

  15. Effect of Nasogastric Tube Feeding vs Nil per Os on Dysmotility in Acute Pancreatitis: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiemin; Pendharkar, Sayali A; O'Grady, Gregory; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that gastrointestinal motility is impaired in acute pancreatitis. Enteral nutrition, and more specifically nasogastric tube feeding, has emerged as a key treatment modality in patients with acute pancreatitis, but its effect on motility has not been investigated in this setting. The aim was to validate the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) in patients with acute pancreatitis and determine the effect of nasogastric tube feeding on GCSI. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Patients were allocated to nasogastric tube feeding or nil per os within 24 hours of hospital admission. GCSI data from before randomization to 72 hours after randomization were analyzed. The test-retest reliability analysis was used to calculate Cronbach's α. Seventeen patients were randomized to nasogastric tube feeding and 18 to nil per os. Overall, the total GCSI score significantly decreased over the study (F = 8.537; P = .001) but was not significantly different between the 2 study groups during hospitalization (F = 1.159; P = .322). However, patients on nasogastric tube feeding did show improved appetite compared with nil per os (F = 3.526; P = .036). The GCSI was found to be a reliable tool in the setting of acute pancreatitis (Cronbach's α = 0.852). Nasogastric tube feeding does not appear to affect dysmotility symptoms in acute pancreatitis as measured by the GCSI, although appetite improved. Use of the simple, noninvasive, and inexpensive GCSI tool to evaluate motility is recommended in future clinical trials in pancreatology. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  17. Recalcitrant hypocalcaemia in autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Myfanwy; Fairchild, Jan; Moore, David; Moore, Lynette; Henning, Paul; Tham, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome is a monogenic disorder associated with autoimmune destruction of both endocrine and nonendocrine tissues. The classic triad includes candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Up to 25% of patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which can have an impact on the management of other aspects of the disease. The management of the case discussed was challenging because of the complex interplay between the manifestations and treatment of his hypoparathyroidism, Addison disease, and autoimmune enteropathy. Attempts at management of hypocalcemia were largely unsuccessful until the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune enteropathy. This case supports early consideration of immunosuppression in this condition. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Chronic Constipation in the Elderly: An Unusual Presentation of Colonic Dysmotility in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peravali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic constipation is common in the elderly, and often no underlying pathology is found. Primary colonic dysmotility has been described in children but is rare in the elderly. Case report. We present an 82-year-old female with long standing constipation presenting acutely with large bowel obstruction. Laparotomy and Hartman’s procedure was performed, and a grossly distended sigmoid colon was resected. Histology revealed a primary myopathic process. Conclusion. Primary colonic myopathy should be considered in elderly patients presenting with large bowel obstruction and a long preceding history of constipation, particularly when previous endoscopic examinations were normal.

  19. Gastrointestinal involvement in Fabry disease. So important, yet often neglected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politei, J; Thurberg, B L; Wallace, E; Warnock, D; Serebrinsky, G; Durand, C; Schenone, A B

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic storage disorder due to the deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A which causes accumulation of glycosphingolipids, primarily globotriaosylceramide, throughout the body. Gastrointestinal signs and symptoms-abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea and diverticular disease--are some of the most frequently reported complaints in patients with Fabry disease but are often neglected. Gastrointestinal symptoms are due to intestinal dysmotility as well as impaired autonomic function, vasculopathy and myopathy. Since 2001, enzyme replacement therapy has been a mainstay in treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease (FD), resulting in reduced gastrointestinal symptoms. Here, we report on four patients with Fabry disease (FD) who manifested early gastrointestinal involvement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  2. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  3. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  4. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  5. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  6. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT

  7. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (tTG...

  8. The possible role of gastrointestinal endocrine cells in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    The etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unknown, but several factors appear to play a role in its pathophysiology, including abnormalities of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. The present review illuminates the possible role of gastrointestinal hormones in the pathophysiology of IBS and the possibility of utilizing the current knowledge in treating the disease. Areas covered: Research into the intestinal endocrine cells and their possible role in the pathophysiology of IBS is discussed. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients are revealed. Expert commentary: The abnormalities observed in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients explains their visceral hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal intestinal secretion, as well as the interchangeability of symptoms over time. Clarifying the role of the intestinal stem cells in the pathophysiology of IBS may lead to new treatment methods for IBS.

  9. Pain Management in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vigano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a common feature in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID. An abnormally low visceral sensory threshold, as well as a number of central, spinal and peripheral pain-modulating abnormalities, have been proposed for this syndrome. Clinical aspects of pain associated with irritable esophagus, functional dyspepsia, biliary dysmotility, inflammatory bowel syndrome and proctalgia fugax are reviewed. Because of its unclear pathophysiology, pain expression is the main target for the successful assessment and management of symptomatic FGID. The sensory, cognitive and affective components of pain intensity expression need to be addressed in the context of a good physician-patient rapport. A multidisciplinary team approach is ideal for the smaller subset of patients with severe and disabling symptoms. Although pharmacotherapy may target specific functional disorders, the role of behavioural techniques and psychotherapy appears much more important for pain management in FGID. Functional performance and quality of life improvement, rather than pain intensity, are the main therapeutic goals in these patients.

  10. Gastrointestinal manifestations in APECED syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas; Jokinen, Martta; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari

    2013-02-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) (or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene. It causes a loss in central immune tolerance, failure to eliminate autoreactive T cells in the thymus, and their escape to the periphery. APECED patients are susceptible to mucocutaneous candidiasis and multiple endocrine and nonendocrine autoimmune diseases. Although it depends on the series, approximately 25% of APECED patients are affected by gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations, mainly autoimmune-related disorders like autoimmune hepatitis, atrophic gastritis with or without pernicious anemia (Biermer disease), intestinal infections, and malabsorption. In contrast to the major organ-specific autoimmune symptoms of APECED, the GI symptoms and their underlying pathogenesis are poorly understood. Yet isolated case reports and small series depict severe intestinal involvement in children, leading to malabsorption, multiple deficiencies, growth impairment, and possible death. Moreover, very few systematic studies of GI function with intestinal biopsies have been performed. GI symptoms may be the first manifestation of APECED, yet they may have various causes; effective treatment will therefore vary. We provide here an updated review of GI manifestations in APECED, including principles of diagnosis and therapy.

  11. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  13. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  14. Blood flow parameters of the superior mesenteric artery as an early predictor of intestinal dysmotility in preterm infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robel-Tillig, Eva; Knuepfer, Matthias; Pulzer, Ferdinand; Vogtmann, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Blood flow parameters in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) change with vasoconstriction or vasodilatation of the intestinal vascular bed. In cases of severe growth retardation as a result of haemodynamic disturbances, the blood flow changes persist into postnatal life. To assess early changes of Doppler sonographic blood flow parameters in the SMA for prediction of later intestinal motility disturbances in preterm infants and tolerance of enteral feeding during the first week of life. Doppler sonographic blood flow parameters in the SMA were measured on the first day of life and the following 5 days in 478 neonates with a birth weight below 1,500 g. According to the Doppler results, the neonates were divided into two groups - those with pathological parameters and those with normal blood flow parameters. Correlations between blood flow parameters, the development of intestinal dysmotility and the tolerated amount of enteral feeding were calculated. Pathological blood flow parameters were observed in 148 neonates (group 1) and normal blood flow parameters in 330 neonates (group 2). Intestinal motility disturbance occurred in 125 neonates (83%) of group 1 and 47 neonates (15%) of group 2. Neonates in group 2 tolerated significantly more feed by the fifth day of life than neonates in group 1. Postnatal adaptation did not differ between the two groups, although the majority of neonates with intestinal dysmotility were small for gestational age. The predictive value of blood flow parameters for prediction of intestinal motility revealed high sensitivity and specificity by the first postnatal day, 2 or 3 days before development of clinical signs of intestinal dysmotility. There was a strong negative correlation between pathological pulsatility index on day 1 and the quantity of tolerated enteral feeding on day 5. Pathological blood flow parameters in the SMA can predict problems of intestinal motility and tolerance of enteral feeding. With the early detection of these

  15. Blood flow parameters of the superior mesenteric artery as an early predictor of intestinal dysmotility in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robel-Tillig, Eva; Knuepfer, Matthias; Pulzer, Ferdinand; Vogtmann, Christoph [University of Leipzig, Department of Neonatology, Children' s Hospital, Leipzig (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Blood flow parameters in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) change with vasoconstriction or vasodilatation of the intestinal vascular bed. In cases of severe growth retardation as a result of haemodynamic disturbances, the blood flow changes persist into postnatal life. To assess early changes of Doppler sonographic blood flow parameters in the SMA for prediction of later intestinal motility disturbances in preterm infants and tolerance of enteral feeding during the first week of life. Doppler sonographic blood flow parameters in the SMA were measured on the first day of life and the following 5 days in 478 neonates with a birth weight below 1,500 g. According to the Doppler results, the neonates were divided into two groups - those with pathological parameters and those with normal blood flow parameters. Correlations between blood flow parameters, the development of intestinal dysmotility and the tolerated amount of enteral feeding were calculated. Pathological blood flow parameters were observed in 148 neonates (group 1) and normal blood flow parameters in 330 neonates (group 2). Intestinal motility disturbance occurred in 125 neonates (83%) of group 1 and 47 neonates (15%) of group 2. Neonates in group 2 tolerated significantly more feed by the fifth day of life than neonates in group 1. Postnatal adaptation did not differ between the two groups, although the majority of neonates with intestinal dysmotility were small for gestational age. The predictive value of blood flow parameters for prediction of intestinal motility revealed high sensitivity and specificity by the first postnatal day, 2 or 3 days before development of clinical signs of intestinal dysmotility. There was a strong negative correlation between pathological pulsatility index on day 1 and the quantity of tolerated enteral feeding on day 5. Pathological blood flow parameters in the SMA can predict problems of intestinal motility and tolerance of enteral feeding. With the early detection of these

  16. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  17. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  18. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  19. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  1. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  3. Postprandial symptoms in dysmotility-like functional dyspepsia are not related to disturbances of gastric myoelectrical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Oba-Kuniyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric dysrhythmias, such as tachy- or bradygastria, have been reported in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD, but their role in symptom production is uncertain. It is also not known whether gastric dysrhythmias in these patients can be elicited by physiological gastric distension with a meal. We investigated the relationships between symptoms after ingestion of different volumes of water following a test meal and gastric dysrhythmias in FD patients. Fourteen patients with dysmotility-like FD and 13 healthy volunteers underwent paired electrogastrography (EGG studies. Fasted subjects ingested 150 ml of yoghurt with either 150 ml (low volume or 300 ml (high volume water in random order. Fasting and fed EGGs with monitoring of symptoms were performed in both studies. Ten FD patients (71.4% reported upper abdominal discomfort and bloating after the low volume meal, but only one (7.1% presented an abnormal EGG (dominant frequency in the 2-4-cpm range: 58%. Following the high volume meal, 7 patients (50% had symptoms, but none had EGG abnormalities. No significant differences were found between FD patients and controls for any of the EGG variables, in any test. In FD patients with postprandial symptoms, the percentage of the EGG dominant frequency in the normal range (median, 84.6%; range, 76.0-100.0% was similar (P > 0.20 to that in those without symptoms (88.5%; 75.0-100.0%. We conclude that disturbances of gastric myoelectrical activity are unlikely to play a role in the origin of postprandial upper abdominal discomfort and bloating in dysmotility-like FD.

  4. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Cherag Daruwala; Giancarlo Mercogliano; Thomas P. Harder

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the effects of systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma on the gastrointestinal tract. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss these manifestations, the appropria...

  5. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherag Daruwala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we analyze the effects of systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma on the gastrointestinal tract. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss these manifestations, the appropriate diagnostic tests, and treatment.

  6. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  7. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  8. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Gastrointestinal symptoms and autism spectrum disorder: links and risks – a possible new overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasilewska J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jolanta Wasilewska, Mark Klukowski Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Allergology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental brain disorder presenting with restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, and activities, or persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction. ASD is characterized by many different clinical endophenotypes and is potentially linked with certain comorbidities. According to current recommendations, children with ASD are at risk of having alimentary tract disorders – mainly, they are at a greater risk of general gastrointestinal (GI concerns, constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. GI symptoms may overlap with ASD core symptoms through different mechanisms. These mechanisms include multilevel pathways in the gut–brain axis contributing to alterations in behavior and cognition. Shared pathogenetic factors and pathophysiological mechanisms possibly linking ASD and GI disturbances, as shown by most recent studies, include intestinal inflammation with or without autoimmunity, immunoglobulin E-mediated and/or cell-mediated GI food allergies as well as gluten-related disorders (celiac disease, wheat allergy, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, visceral hypersensitivity linked with functional abdominal pain, and dysautonomia linked with GI dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux. Dysregulation of the gut microbiome has also been shown to be involved in modulating GI functions with the ability to affect intestinal permeability, mucosal immune function, and intestinal motility and sensitivity. Metabolic activity of the microbiome and dietary components are currently suspected to be associated with alterations in behavior and cognition also in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. All the above-listed GI factors may contribute to brain dysfunction and neuroinflammation depending upon

  10. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bizzaro; Antonio Antico; Danilo Villalta

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastri...

  11. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical usefulness of serum antibodies as biomarkers of gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Biagi, Federico; Lenzi, Marco; Frulloni, Luca; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2017-09-01

    The progressively growing knowledge of the pathophysiology of a number of immune-mediated gastrointestinal and liver disorders, including autoimmune atrophic gastritis, coeliac disease, autoimmune enteropathy, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune pancreatitis, together with the improvement of their detection methods have increased the diagnostic power of serum antibodies. In some cases - coeliac disease and autoimmune atrophic gastritis - they have radically changed gastroenterologists' diagnostic ability, while in others - autoimmune hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune pancreatitis - their diagnostic performance is still inadequate. Of note, serum antibody misuse in clinical practice has raised a number of controversies, which may generate confusion in the diagnostic management of the aforementioned disorders. In this review, we critically re-evaluate the usefulness of serum antibodies as biomarkers of immune-mediated gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and discuss their pitfalls and merits. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic complications of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Brock, Birgitte; Pedersen, Anne Grave

    2016-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complications...... with the highest symptom burden, yet frequently under-diagnosed and sub-optimally treated, is diabetic autonomic neuropathy, itself potentially resulting in cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysmotility. The aims of this review are fourfold. Firstly to provide an overview...... of the pathophysiological processes that cause diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Secondly, to discuss both the established and emerging cardiometric methods for evaluating autonomic nervous system function in vivo. Thirdly, to examine the tools for assessing pan-GI and segmental motility and finally, we will provide...

  14. Prevalence and relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms among individuals of different body mass index: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Guy D; Talley, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been identified as a potential risk factor for gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, although the data from community samples remain sparse. We assess the associations between GI symptoms and obesity in a population-based sample of Australian adults. The prevalence of 26 GI symptoms was determined by a validated postal questionnaire which was sent to 5000 randomly selected residents. The response rate was 60%. GI symptoms were classified into six broader symptom groups based on the Rome II Criteria - abdominal pain, esophageal symptoms, dysmotility symptoms, diarrhea, vomiting, and constipation. Obesity was defined according to body mass index using self-reported height and weight. The prevalence of obesity (BMI≥30kg/m(2)) was 25.1%; 36.1% were overweight. There were significant and positive univariate associations between obesity and abdominal pain (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.39-2.21), esophageal symptoms (OR=1.74; 95% CI: 1.36-2.22), dysmotility symptoms (OR=1.43; 95% CI: 1.16-1.77) and diarrhea (OR=2.01; 95% CI: 1.65-2.45). The adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics and eating behaviors had minimal effect on the associations for abdominal pain (OR=1.34; 95% CI: 1.01-1.79), esophageal symptoms (OR=1.35; 95% CI: 1.03-1.78), and diarrhea (OR=1.86; 95% CI: 1.49-2.31); however, the association between obesity and dysmotility symptoms became non-significant. Obesity was not related to constipation. Obesity is an independent risk factor for abdominal pain, esophageal symptoms and diarrhea, but is not associated with dysmotility symptoms or constipation. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gastrointestinal System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jepson, Mark A.; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) acts as a barrier to uptake of potentially dangerous material while allowing absorption of processed food. The gut may be exposed to a diverse range of engineered nanomaterials due to their deliberate addition to food and consumer products

  16. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  17. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. A rare combination of type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) or multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Coco, Graziella; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) is defined by the presence of an autoimmune thyroid disease and another autoimmune illness, excluding Addison's disease; this is a frequent combination. We report the case of a 55 years old female patient with APS-3, with seven clinical or latent autoimmune manifestations. At 49 years of age she was admitted at the General Hospital for leukopenia, weight loss, tremors, anxiety and diarrhea. The personal history revealed ulcerative colitis and, during the last year, episodes of fever with migrant arthralgia and cutaneous lesions. The patient was evaluated for thyroid function and imaging, mielobiopsy, glycaemic control, gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders with specific biochemical tests, imaging and endoscopic procedures. We concluded that the patient was affected by APS-3, characterized by the association of Graves' disease, autoimmune leukopenia, latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), autoimmune gastritis, ulcerative colitis, Sjögren's and anti-phospholipid syndromes. The patient started low doses of corticosteroid drugs for leukopenia, underwent (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism and later started substitutive thyroid therapy with l-thyroxine, insulin therapy for LADA, mesalazine for ulcerative colitis and artificial tears for Sjögren's syndrome. In this article we report a complex case of APS-3, characterized by the association of seven different autoimmune diseases, which required a complex therapeutic strategy.

  19. Gastro-intestinal involvement in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kedia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract can be involved in up to 90% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc and is the leading cause of morbidity and third most common cause of mortality in these patients. The GI involvement can occur in the absence of cutaneous manifestations in 10% of patients. Vasculopathy, cellular and humoral immunity, and diffuse fibrosis are the principal pathogenetic mechanisms in SSc and begin with autoantibody-mediated neuronal damage followed by muscular damage and fibrosis. This leads to progressive dysmotility of the entire GI tract from mouth to anus and is responsible for the clinical manifestations including gastroesophageal reflux disease and dysphagia due to esophageal involvement, gastroparesis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation due to colonic and fecal incontinence due to anorectal involvement. The clinical features resulting from the involvement of these organs often overlap and multiple areas may be involved simultaneously. The treatment remains mostly symptomatic because effective disease-modifying therapies are lacking. These patients are at a risk of malnutrition and nutritional screening, and thus rehabilitation is very important. Refractory cases require nutritional support in the form of enteral nutrition and/or home parenteral nutrition. Future research is needed in the pathogenesis, development of biomarkers for early identification of GI involvement at the asymptomatic stage, and targeted disease-modifying therapies, which can alter/halt the disease progression.

  20. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  2. Gastrointestinal symptoms and motility disorders in patients with systemic scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palasciano Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on gastrointestinal symptoms, dysfunctions, and neurological disorders in systemic scleroderma are lacking so far. Methods Thirty-eight scleroderma patients (34 limited, 4 diffuse, 60 healthy controls and 68 dyspeptic controls were scored for upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms (dyspepsia, bowel habits, gastric and gallbladder emptying to liquid meal (functional ultrasonography and small bowel transit (H2-breath test. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by cardiovascular tests. Results The score for dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness was greater in scleroderma patients than healthy controls, but lower than dyspeptic controls who had multiple symptoms, instead. Scleroderma patients with dyspepsia had a longer disease duration. Fasting antral area and postprandial antral dilatation were smaller in scleroderma patients than dyspeptic and healthy controls. Gastric emptying was delayed in both scleroderma patients (particularly in those with abnormal dyspeptic score and dyspeptic controls, who also showed a larger residual area. Despite gallbladder fasting and postprandial volumes were comparable across the three groups, gallbladder refilling appeared delayed in dyspeptic controls and mainly dependent on delayed gastric emptying in scleroderma. Small intestinal transit was also delayed in 74% of scleroderma and 66% of dyspeptic controls. Bowel habits were similar among the three groups. Autonomic neuropathy was not associated with dyspepsia, gastric and gallbladder motility and small intestinal transit. Conclusion In scleroderma patients dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness, restricted distension of the gastric antrum and diffuse gastrointestinal dysmotility are frequent features. These defects are independent from the occurrence of autonomic neuropathy.

  3. The role of gut microbiota in immune homeostasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Keeping a delicate balance in the immune system by eliminating invading pathogens, while still maintaining self-tolerance to avoid autoimmunity, is critical for the body's health. The gut microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Moreover, it has recently become obvious that alterations of these gut microbial communities can cause immune dysregulation, leading to autoimmune disorders. Here we review the advances in our understanding of how the gut microbiota regulates innate and adaptive immune homeostasis, which in turn can affect the development of not only intestinal but also systemic autoimmune diseases. Exploring the interaction of gut microbes and the host immune system will not only allow us to understand the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases but will also provide us new foundations for the design of novel immuno- or microbe-based therapies.

  4. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  5. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  6. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  7. Induction of alpha-synuclein pathology in the enteric nervous system of the rat and non-human primate results in gastrointestinal dysmotility and transient CNS pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredsson, Fredric P; Luk, Kelvin C; Benskey, Matthew J; Gezer, Aysegul; Garcia, Joanna; Kuhn, Nathan C; Sandoval, Ivette M; Patterson, Joseph R; O'Mara, Alana; Yonkers, Reid; Kordower, Jeffrey H

    2018-04-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (α-syn) is by far the most highly vetted pathogenic and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease. Aggregated α-syn is present in sporadic Parkinson's disease, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The enteric division of the PNS is of particular interest because 1) gastric dysfunction is a key clinical manifestation of Parkinson's disease, and 2) Lewy pathology in myenteric and submucosal neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS) has been referred to as stage zero in the Braak pathological staging of Parkinson's disease. The presence of Lewy pathology in the ENS and the fact that patients often experience enteric dysfunction before the onset of motor symptoms has led to the hypothesis that α-syn pathology starts in the periphery, after which it spreads to the CNS via interconnected neural pathways. Here we sought to directly test this hypothesis in rodents and non-human primates (NHP) using two distinct models of α-syn pathology: the α-syn viral overexpression model and the preformed fibril (PFF) model. Subjects (rat and NHP) received targeted enteric injections of PFFs or adeno-associated virus overexpressing the Parkinson's disease associated A53T α-syn mutant. Rats were evaluated for colonic motility monthly and sacrificed at 1, 6, or 12 months, whereas NHPs were sacrificed 12 months following inoculation, after which the time course and spread of pathology was examined in all animals. Rats exhibited a transient GI phenotype that resolved after four months. Minor α-syn pathology was observed in the brainstem (dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and locus coeruleus) 1 month after PFF injections; however, no pathology was observed at later time points (nor in saline or monomer treated animals). Similarly, a histopathological analysis of the NHP brains revealed no pathology despite the presence of robust α-syn pathology throughout the ENS which persisted for the entirety of the study (12 months). Our study shows that induction of α-syn pathology in the ENS is sufficient to induce GI dysfunction. Moreover, our data suggest that sustained spread of α-syn pathology from the periphery to the CNS and subsequent propagation is a rare event, and that the presence of enteric α-syn pathology and dysfunction may represent an epiphenomenon. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Are patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune gastritis at risk of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms type 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandraki, Krystallenia I; Nikolaou, Argiro; Thomas, Dimitrios; Syriou, Vassiliki; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Kaltsas, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of autoimmune gastritis, enterochromaffin-like cell (ECL-cell) hyperplasia and gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms type 1 (GNEN1) in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Prospective observational study in a single institutional study. One hundred and twenty patients with autoimmune thyroid disease were consecutively recruited from the Endocrine Unit. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (UGE) and biochemical parameters for autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune gastritis were assessed at recruitment and annually thereafter in patients with a mean follow-up of 37·5 ± 14·4 months. Autoimmune gastritis was defined by the presence of antiparietal cell antibodies (APCA) and histological confirmation after UGE. Serum gastrin and chromogranin Α were also measured. One hundred and eleven patients had Hashimoto's thyroiditis and nine Graves' disease. Autoimmune gastritis was identified in 40 (38 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and two with Graves' disease) patients all of whom had increased levels of gastrin and chromogranin Α; Helicobacter pylori infection was histologically identified in 15 of 40 (37·5%) patients. Six patients had isolated nodular ECL-cell hyperplasia and one mixed nodular and linear ECL-cell hyperplasia [7 of 40 (17·5%)]. Only increased gastrin (P = 0·03) levels predicted the presence ECL-cell hyperplasia. A GNEN1 developed in one patient with nodular ECL-cell hyperplasia after 39 months of follow-up. Concomitant autoimmune gastritis was found in 33·3% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, 17·5% of whom had ECL-cell hyperplasia that evolved to GNEN1 in one (2·5%). Larger studies with longer follow-up are needed to define the incidence of GNEN1 in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and ECL-cell hyperplasia and potential implications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrointestinal malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the degree to which gestational age (GA) has been shortened due to prenatal diagnosis of gastrointestinal malformations (GIM). The data source for the study was 14 population-based registries of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). All liveborn infants with GIMs...... malformations, although not statistically significant for gastroschisis. There was little difference in median birthweight by GA for the pre- and postnatally diagnosed infants. The difference in GA at birth between prenatally and postnatally diagnosed infants with GIMs is enough to increase the risk...... of mortality for the prenatally diagnosed infants. Clinicians need to balance the risk of early delivery against the benefits of clinical convenience when making case management decisions after prenatal diagnosis. Very few studies have been able to show benefits of prenatal diagnosis of congenital...

  11. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  12. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastrointestinal manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Chalem, Philippe; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the history of the gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus since century XIX to our days, making a review of every organ and system involved, with special emphasis in gastropathy, enteritis, ileitis, malabsorption syndrome vasculitis bowel vasculopathy, mesenteric thrombosis, pancreatitis, ascites, peritonitis autoimmune hepatitis and more

  14. Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia) in an elderly woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Alice; McNeil, Julian

    2015-11-25

    CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome comprising calcinosis cutis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia and primary sclerosing cholangitis are both chronic fibrotic diseases but the association between them is extremely rare. While primary sclerosing cholangitis has been associated with diffuse cutaneous scleroderma, the association with limited cutaneous scleroderma or CREST has not been previously reported in the literature. This case report illustrates the association between CREST and primary sclerosing cholangitis. We report the case of an 84-year-old Asian woman with a long history of CREST who was admitted with abdominal pain, fatigue and progressive derangement of her liver enzymes. This was initially thought to be secondary to her bosentan therapy for pulmonary hypertension but it persisted despite bosentan being ceased. Primary sclerosing cholangitis was subsequently diagnosed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and she was referred to a hepatologist for treatment. This case highlights the need to consider primary sclerosing cholangitis in patients with CREST who present with abdominal symptoms and deranged liver enzymes when other causes have been excluded. Relevant differential diagnoses for this presentation, which can be difficult to exclude, include immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis and antimitochondrial antibody negative primary biliary cirrhosis. It is of particular significance to rheumatologists and gastroenterologists but has broader relevance to all medical specialists involved in the care of patients with CREST.

  15. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  16. Prolactin and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Vieira Borba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The great asymmetry of autoimmune diseases between genders represents one of the most enigmatic observations among the mosaic of autoimmunity. Sex hormones are believed to play a crucial role on this dimorphism. The higher prevalence of autoimmunity among women at childbearing ages, disease onset/relapses during pregnancy, and post-partum are some of the arguments that support this hypothesis. Certainly, motherhood represents one of the most remarkable challenges for the immune system, which not only has to allow for the conceptus, but also has to deal with complex endocrine alterations. Hormonal homeostasis is known to exert a crucial influence in achieving a competent and healthy immune system. Prolactin (PRL has a bioactive function acting as a hormone and a cytokine. It interferes with immune system modulation, mainly inhibiting the negative selection of autoreactive B lymphocytes. Likewise, hyperprolactinemia has been described in relation to the pathogenesis and activity of several autoimmune disorders. Dopamine is an effective inhibitor of PRL secretion due to either a direct influence on the hypophysis or stimulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus, arousing the release of the PRL inhibitory factor. Hence, dopamine agonists have proven to offer clinical benefits among autoimmune patients and represent a promising therapy to be explored. In this review, we attempt to provide a critical overview of the link between PRL, autoimmune diseases, and motherhood.

  17. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  18. Cutting-edge issues in autoimmunity and allergy of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmunity and allergy involving the digestive system may be considered as paradigmatic for numerous common themes of complex diseases secondary to tolerance breakdown. Among gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases, for example, we encounter diseases in which a clear environmental trigger is identified (i.e., celiac disease), serum autoantibodies are most specific (i.e., primary biliary cirrhosis), or in which the disease pathophysiology is clearly understood (i.e., autoimmune gastritis). Similarly, it is intriguing that the gastrointestinal tract and the liver circulation represent the crucial environment for the development of immune tolerance. This issue is dedicated to the discussion of recent concepts while identifying two major common issues, i.e., the need for serum biomarkers and the role of vitamin D. Other common themes characterize the etiology and effector mechanisms of these and other autoimmune diseases and are discussed in each cutting-edge overview.

  19. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  20. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  1. Nutrition, geoepidemiology, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    As well represented by the impaired immune function of malnourished individuals encountered in developing countries and the incidence of specific diseases following local nutrient deficiencies, nutrition and immunity have been linked to each other for centuries while the specific connection between dietary factors and autoimmunity onset or modulation is a more recent acquisition. Autoimmune diseases manifest limited prevalence rates in developing countries while numerous immunity-related claims have been proposed in the field of functional foods. Nevertheless, over the past years multiple lines of evidence have supported a major role for specific dietary factors (including vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanols) in determining the immune responses involved in infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the link between nutrition and autoimmunity may well contribute to the geoepidemiology observed for numerous conditions. In general terms, most data that will be discussed herein were obtained in experimental or animal models while human data from real-life clinical settings or randomized clinical trials remain largely unsatisfactory. Our current knowledge on the beneficial impact of nutrition on autoimmunity prompts us to encourage the search for evidence-based nutrition to support the everyday diet choices of patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  3. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  4. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  5. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  6. IgA deficiency and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karmtej; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-02-01

    IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin in the human body, and performs a very specialized role which involves mucosal immunity, development of tolerance and protection against infection. IgA is the key immunoglobulin in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, which provide the most intimate interface between the environment and self. Normal levels of IgA are based on early studies consisting of only small numbers of patients. The international consensus definition of IgA deficiency is a level of 0.07g/l after the age of four years in the absence of IgG and IgM deficiencies. The epidemiology of IgA deficiency reveals interesting variances between geographical regions - the incidence in Caucasians being much higher than that in Asians. IgA deficiency has also been found to co-exist with autoimmune diseases, allergies and malignancies. The association with autoimmunity is particularly interesting because it suggests a common genetic linkage that could potentially also explain the diversity in geoepidemiology. Both MHC and non-MHC associations have been described and the 8.1 haplotype has been significantly associated with autoimmunity in IgA deficiency patients over controls. Non-MHC genetic associations include IFIH1 and CLEC16A. The mutations leading to IgA deficiency have not been defined, but in some cases of IgA deficiency it has been suggested that the pathogenesis involves a failure in switched memory B cells that can lead to this cohort experiencing an increased incidence of recurrent bacterial infections or autoimmune diseases. Attempts to investigate the role of cytokines that can induce IgA synthesis in cells of patients with IgA deficiency, such as IL21 or the combination of CD40L/anti-CD40, IL-4 and IL10, are underway. © 2013.

  7. Management of pancreatic, gastrointestinal and liver complications in adult cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, A; Languepin, J; Debray, D; Lamireau, T; Abely, M; Huet, F; Maudinas, R; Michaud, L; Mas, E

    2015-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a major source of morbidity in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), with a wide range of complications, some of them being specific to the underlying disease. Abnormal CFTR function, with reduced bicarbonate and other ion transport levels through the apical surface of epithelial cells, affects the intestinal tract including the pancreas and the liver. Similarly to what is observed in the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal CFTR dysfunction leads to mucus accumulation, dysmotility, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and inflammation with alteration of innate immune responses, all of which being likely to be interrelated. In developed countries, almost half of patients with CF are adults followed in multidisciplinary CF care centres by pneumologists who often have to manage gastrointestinal complications. It therefore appears essential that adult gastroenterologists develop the expertise needed for managing CF gastrointestinal complications in close collaboration with multidisciplinary CF care centre teams to improve the quality of life of adults with CF. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A New Strategy Using Rikkunshito to Treat Anorexia and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Saegusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the clinical condition of gastrointestinal dysfunction, including functional dyspepsia, involves tangled combinations of pathologies, there are some cases of insufficient curative efficacy. Thus, traditional herbal medicines (Kampo medicines uniquely developed in Japan are thought to contribute to medical treatment for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Rikkunshito is a Kampo medicine often used to treat dyspeptic symptoms. Over the past few years, several studies have investigated the efficacy of rikkunshito for dysmotility, for example, upper abdominal complaints, in animals and humans. Rikkunshito ameliorated the decrease in gastric motility and anorexia in cisplatin-treated rats, stress-loaded mice, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-treated rats by enhancing plasma ghrelin levels via serotonin2B/2C receptor antagonism. In addition, rikkunshito ameliorated the decrease in food intake in aged mice and stress-loaded decreased gastric motility via enhanced ghrelin receptor signaling. Several clinical studies revealed that rikkunshito was effective in ameliorating upper gastrointestinal symptoms, including dyspepsia, epigastric pain, and postprandial fullness. In this review, we discuss these studies and propose additional evidence-based research that may promote the clinical use of Kampo medicines, particularly rikkunshito, for treating anorexia and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  9. Western diet induces colonic nitrergic myenteric neuropathy and dysmotility in mice via saturated fatty acid- and lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, François; Chassaing, Benoit; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Li, Ge; Tabatabavakili, Sahar; Mwangi, Simon; Uppal, Karan; Liang, Bill; Vijay-Kumar, Matam; Jones, Dean; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2017-03-01

    A high-fat diet (60% kcal from fat) is associated with motility disorders inducing constipation and loss of nitrergic myenteric neurons in the proximal colon. Gut microbiota dysbiosis, which occurs in response to HFD, contributes to endotoxaemia. High levels of lipopolysaccharide lead to apoptosis in cultured myenteric neurons that express Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Consumption of a Western diet (WD) (35% kcal from fat) for 6 weeks leads to gut microbiota dysbiosis associated with altered bacterial metabolites and increased levels of plasma free fatty acids. These disorders precede the nitrergic myenteric cell loss observed in the proximal colon. Mice lacking TLR4 did not exhibit WD-induced myenteric cell loss and dysmotility. Lipopolysaccharide-induced in vitro enteric neurodegeneration requires the presence of palmitate and may be a result of enhanced NO production. The present study highlights the critical role of plasma saturated free fatty acids that are abundant in the WD with respect to driving enteric neuropathy and colonic dysmotility. The consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with myenteric neurodegeneration, which in turn is associated with delayed colonic transit and constipation. We examined the hypothesis that an inherent increase in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) in the HFD together with an HFD-induced alteration in gut microbiota contributes to the pathophysiology of these disorders. C57BL/6 mice were fed a Western diet (WD) (35% kcal from fat enriched in palmitate) or a purified regular diet (16.9% kcal from fat) for 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. Gut microbiota dysbiosis was investigated by fecal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) measurement and metabolomics (linear trap quadrupole-Fourier transform mass spectrometer) analysis. Plasma FFA and LPS levels were assessed, in addition to colonic and ileal nitrergic myenteric neuron quantifications and motility. Compared to regular diet-fed control mice, WD-fed mice gained significantly more weight

  10. Proof of Concept: Design and Initial Evaluation of a Device to Measure Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert H; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Halama, James R; Venu, Mukund; Gabriel, Medhat S; Bova, Davide

    2017-09-01

    Chronic constipation and gastrointestinal motility disorders constitute a large part of a gastroenterology practice and have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and lifestyle. In most cases, medications are prescribed to alleviate symptoms without there being an objective measurement of response. Commonly used investigations of gastrointestinal transit times are currently limited to radiopaque markers or electronic capsules. Repeated use of these techniques is limited because of the radiation exposure and the significant cost of the devices. We present the proof of concept for a new device to measure gastrointestinal transit time using commonly available and inexpensive materials with only a small amount of radiotracer. Methods: We assembled gelatin capsules containing a 67 Ga-citrate-radiolabeled grain of rice embedded in paraffin for use as a point-source transit device. It was tested for stability in vitro and subsequently was given orally to 4 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with constipation or diarrhea. Imaging was performed at regular intervals until the device was excreted. Results: The device remained intact and visible as a point source in all subjects until excretion. When used along with a diary of bowel movement times and dates, the device could determine the total transit time. The device could be visualized either alone or in combination with a barium small-bowel follow-through study or a gastric emptying study. Conclusion: The use of a point-source transit device for the determination of gastrointestinal transit time is a feasible alternative to other methods. The device is inexpensive and easy to assemble, requires only a small amount of radiotracer, and remains inert throughout the gastrointestinal tract, allowing for accurate determination of gastrointestinal transit time. Further investigation of the device is required to establish optimum imaging parameters and reference values. Measurements of gastrointestinal transit time

  11. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gastrointestinal events with clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Würtz, Morten; Schwarz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events.......Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events....

  13. Assessment of Gastric Emptying in Patients with Autoimmune Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Soykan, Irfan; Soydal, Çiğdem; Özkan, Elgin; Kalkan, Emra

    2016-06-01

    Symptoms of patients with autoimmune gastritis are not specific, and some patients may present symptoms suggestive of delayed gastric emptying. This study aims to investigate whether any delay in gastric emptying of solid food exists in patients with autoimmune gastritis and, if so, to identify the factors that might affect delayed gastric emptying. A total of 165 patients (106 women) diagnosed as having autoimmune gastritis were analyzed by means of a gastric emptying test. All patients underwent a standardized scintigraphic gastric emptying study. Patients with delayed gastric emptying and normal gastric emptying tests were then compared by means of factors that might affect gastric emptying. Also 65 patients with functional dyspepsia who had a gastric emptying study constituted the control group. The median gastric emptying T ½ time was 127.43 min (min-max 50-953) for patients with AIG and 81 min (min-max 21-121.6) for functional dyspepsia patients (p gastritis, gastric emptying is generally delayed. Autoimmune gastritis is an important etiology to explain the finding of delayed gastric emptying on a radionuclide test. This new finding is likely to be relevant to clinicians when evaluating and initiating appropriate medical treatment for patients with autoimmune gastritis manifesting upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

  14. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  15. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  16. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  17. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  18. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific eviden...

  19. Regional gastrointestinal transit times in severe ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A M; Gregersen, T; Christensen, L A; Agnholt, J; Dahlerup, J F; Schlageter, V; Krogh, K

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility may present secondary to inflammatory bowel disease. The main aim of this study was to investigate GI motility in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients during severe disease activity. Twenty patients with severe UC were studied with a novel telemetric capsule system (3D-Transit) designed for minimally invasive, ambulatory assessment of total and regional GI transit times. Ten patients were available for follow-up during remission. Data were compared to those of 20 healthy subjects (HS). Total GI transit time was significantly longer in patients with severe UC (median 44.5 h [range 9.9-102.7 h]) than in HS (median 27.6 h [range 9.6-56.4 h]) (p = 0.032). Additionally, during severe UC, transit time was prolonged through the proximal colon (p = 0.003) and there were strong trends toward longer than normal small intestinal transit time (HS: median 4.9 h [range 3.4-8.3 h] vs severe UC patients: median 5.9 h [range 3.9-11.9 h]; p = 0.053) and colorectal transit times (HS: median 18.2 h [range 1.5-43.7] vs severe UC patients: median 34.9 h [range 0.4-90.9 h]; p = 0.056). Our data further indicate that total GI and colorectal transit times may be prolonged in UC during early remission. Total GI transit times are significantly prolonged during severe UC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  1. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  3. Type 1 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have pan-enteric prolongation of gastrointestinal transit times and an altered caecal pH profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, Adam D; Pedersen, Anne Grave; Brock, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesised that type 1 diabetic patients with established diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) would have segmental and/or pan-enteric dysmotility in comparison to healthy age-matched controls. We aimed to investigate the co-relationships between gastrointestinal...... function, degree of DSPN and clinical symptoms. METHODS: An observational comparison was made between 48 patients with DSPN (39 men, mean age 50 years, range 29-71 years), representing the baseline data of an ongoing clinical trial (representing a secondary analysis of baseline data collected from...... an ongoing double-blind randomised controlled trial investigating the neuroprotective effects of liraglutide) and 41 healthy participants (16 men, mean age 49 years, range 30-78) who underwent a standardised wireless motility capsule test to assess gastrointestinal transit. In patients, vibration thresholds...

  4. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  5. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  6. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric autoimmune enteropathy: an entity frequently associated with immunodeficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Goyal, Alka; Davison, Jon M; Regueiro, Miguel D; Roche, Robyn L; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2014-04-01

    The term pediatric autoimmune enteropathy was originally applied to a form of intractable diarrhea seen in children under the age of 6 months and characterized by male predominance, concurrent autoimmune-associated disorders, circulating gut autoantibodies, a lack of severe immunodeficiency and small bowel atrophy with prominent crypt apoptosis. However, recent studies have cast doubt over the specific clinicopathologic findings associated with this entity. We, therefore, collected 178 gastrointestinal biopsies from 14 patients and examined their clinical, serologic and pathologic findings. Patients at presentation ranged in age from birth to 15.9 years (median, 5.5 months; mean, 4.1 years) and included six males and eight females. All children suffered from chronic watery diarrhea and malnutrition. Concomitant-associated disorders were noted in 11 (79%) cases and included 10 (71%) with an immunodeficiency disorder and/or another autoimmune-related disease. Eleven patients (79%) were positive for anti-enterocyte antibodies. The salient findings of autoimmune enteropathy were most prominent in the small intestines and the majority (79%) of patients demonstrated villous blunting, crypt hyperplasia, mononuclear cell inflammatory expansion of the lamina propria and crypt apoptosis. The remaining (21%) patients showed marked intraepithelial lymphocytosis reminiscent of celiac disease. Further, acute cryptitis and crypt abscesses were seen in seven (50%) patients obscuring the presence of apoptosis. The absence of Paneth cells, goblet cells or both was noted in seven (50%) patients. Follow-up information was available for all patients with 13 (93%) receiving immunosuppressant therapy and demonstrating partial-to-complete response. In total, three patients died from continued diarrhea and sepsis with one decedent before treatment could be initiated. In summary, autoimmune enteropathy in children is a heterogenous disease with protean clinical and pathologic findings

  8. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Chun Wang; Hung-Chang Lee; Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chuen-Bin Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  10. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  13. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  15. Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Problems Occur Frequently Throughout Life in Girls and Women with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Kathleen J.; Caeg, Erwin; Barrish, Judy O.; Geerts, Suzanne; Lane, Jane B.; Percy, Alan K.; Annese, Fran; McNair, Lauren; Skinner, Steven A.; Lee, Hye-Seung; Neul, Jeffrey L.; Glaze, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We conducted a nationwide survey to determine the prevalence of common gastrointestinal and nutritional disorders in Rett syndrome (RTT) based on parental reporting and related the occurrence of these problems to age and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) status. Methods We designed a questionnaire that probed symptoms, diagnoses, diagnostic tests, and treatment interventions related to gastrointestinal and nutritional problems in RTT. The International Rett Syndrome Foundation distributed the questionnaire to 1666 family-based members and forwarded their responses for our review. We interrogated the Rare Disease Clinical Research Network database to supplement findings related to medications used to treat gastrointestinal problems in RTT. Results Parents of 983 RTT females (59%) responded and identified symptoms and diagnoses associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility (92%); chewing and swallowing difficulties (81%); weight deficits or excess (47%); growth deficits (45%); low bone mineral content or fractures (37%); biliary tract disorders (3%). Height, weight, and BMI z-scores decreased significantly with age; height and weight, but not BMI, z-scores were significantly lower in females with MECP2 mutations than those without. Vomiting, nighttime awakening, gastroesophageal reflux, chewing difficulty, and choking with feeding were significantly less likely to occur with increasing age. Short stature, low bone mineral content, fractures, and gastrostomy placement were significantly more likely to occur with increasing age. Chewing difficulty, choking with feeding, and nighttime awakening were significantly less likely to occur, whereas short stature was significantly more likely to occur, in females with MECP2 mutations than those without. Diagnostic evaluations and therapeutic interventions were utilized less frequently than the occurrence of symptoms or diagnoses in the RTT cohort. Conclusion Gastrointestinal and nutritional problems perceived by

  16. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. This review focuses on the clinical and immunological features of APECED, summarizes the current knowledge on the function of AIRE and discusses the importance of autoantibodies in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Additionally, we review the outcome of recent immunomodulatory treatments in APECED patients.

  17. Is Tolerance Broken in Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dama Laxminarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are classified into about 80 different types based on their specificity related to system, organ and/or tissue. About 5% of the western population is affected by this anomaly, but its worldwide incidence is unknown. Autoimmune diseases are heterogeneous in nature and clinical manifestations range from benign disorders to life-threatening conditions. Autoimmunity strikes at any stage of life, but age and/or gender also play role in onset of some of these anomalies. The autoimmune pathogenesis is initiated by the origination of autoantigens, which leads to the development of autoantibodies followed by auto-immunogenicity and the ultimate onset of autoimmunity. There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat autoimmune diseases, because mechanisms involved in the onset of these anomalies were poorly understood. Present therapies are limited to symptomatic treatment and come with severe side effects. Here, I described the molecular mechanisms and cellular events involved in the initiation of autoimmunity and proposed better strategies to modulate such molecular and cellular anomalies, which will help in preventing and/or controlling autoimmune pathogenesis and ultimately aid in enhancing the quality of life.

  18. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Autoimmune comorbidity in achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Fernanda; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Alejandro-Medrano, Edgar; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Azamar-Llamas, Daniel; Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Breña, Blanca; Palacios, Axel; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Ramos-Ávalos, Bárbara; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Hernández-Ávila, Axel A; Flores-Nájera, Athenea; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare esophageal motor disorder. The disease state manifests local and systemic inflammation, and it appears that an autoimmune component and specific autoantibodies participate in the pathogenesis. The study aims to determine the prevalence of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases in patients with achalasia and compare the results with those from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was a cross-sectional and included 114 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 114 age-matched and sex-matched control patients with GERD. Data on the presence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, the time of presentation, and any family history of autoimmune disease were obtained from the hospital's medical records. Seventy three (64%) were female patients (mean age: 42.3 ± 15.5; median disease duration: 12 months). We identified the presence of autoimmune disease in 19 patients with achalasia (16.7%), hypothyroidism was the main diagnosis, and it was present in 52.6% of patients compared with 4.2% in controls. Thirteen of the 19 achalasia patients (68.4%) with autoimmune disease had history of familial autoimmunity. We identified 11 achalasia (9.6%) and 5 GERD patients (4.16%) with an inflammatory condition. Compared with the GERD, the achalasia group was 3.8 times more likely to have an autoimmune disease (95% CI: 1.47-9.83), 3.0 times more likely to have thyroidopathies (95% CI: 1.00-9.03), and 3.02 times more likely to suffer from any chronic inflammatory disease (95% CI: 1.65-6.20). The non-negligible number of patients with autoimmune diseases identified among the patients with idiopathic achalasia supports the hypothesis that achalasia has an autoimmune component. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastrointestinal Polyps in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Wang

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  2. Gastrointestinal Manifestations in X-linked Agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmettler, Sara; Otani, Iris M; Minhas, Jasmit; Abraham, Roshini S; Chang, Yenhui; Dorsey, Morna J; Ballas, Zuhair K; Bonilla, Francisco A; Ochs, Hans D; Walter, Jolan E

    2017-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia is a primary humoral immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and increased susceptibility to infection. Although there is increased awareness of autoimmune and inflammatory complications in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), the spectrum of gastrointestinal manifestations has not previously been fully explored. We present a case report of a family with two affected patients with XLA. Given the gastrointestinal involvement of the grandfather in this family, we performed a retrospective descriptive analysis of XLA patients with reported diagnoses of GI manifestations and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or enteritis registered at the United States Immunodeficiency Network, a national registry of primary immunodeficiencies. In this cohort of patients with XLA, we found that up to 35% had concurrent gastrointestinal manifestations, and 10% had reported diagnoses of IBD or enteritis. The most commonly reported mutations were missense, which have been associated with a less severe XLA phenotype in the literature. The severity of symptoms were wide ranging, and management strategies were diverse and mainly experimental. Patients with XLA may require close monitoring with particular attention for GI manifestations including IBD and infectious enteritis. Further studies are needed to improve diagnosis and management of GI conditions in XLA patients.

  3. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  4. Gastrointestinal polyposis in Cowden disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullnig, P.; Steiner, H.; Porsch, G.; Smolle, J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of Cowden disease (multiple hamartoma syndrome) with marked gastrointestinal polyposis is presented. The differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes is discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  6. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rakeshkumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA. Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase. Those with a positive titer (but < 10 times the upper limit of normal underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6% turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%, 15 (8.24% females and 9 (9.18% males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD.

  7. Imaging of systemic lupus erythematosus. Part II: Gastrointestinal, renal, and musculoskeletal manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, Y.P.; Naidoo, P.; Ngian, G.-S.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that has a relapsing and remitting course. It has a wide range of presentations with various organ manifestations. In this review, we have compiled the radiological findings of gastrointestinal, renal, and musculoskeletal manifestations of SLE.

  8. Changes, functional disorders, and diseases in the gastrointestinal tract of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, M; Petraccia, L; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Scarno, A; Sabetta, S; Fraioli, A

    2011-01-01

    This article describes changes in the basic digestive functions (motility, secretion, intraluminal digestion, absorption) that occur during aging. Elderly individuals frequently have oropharyngeal muscle dysmotility and altered swallowing of food. Reductions in esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures are also more common in the aged and may cause gastroesophageal reflux. Gastric motility and emptying and small bowel motility are generally normal in elderly subjects, although delayed motility and gastric emptying have been reported in some cases. The propulsive motility of the colon is also decreased, and this alteration is associated with neurological and endocrine-paracrine changes in the colonic wall. Decreased gastric secretions (acid, pepsin) and impairment of the mucous-bicarbonate barrier are frequently described in the elderly and may lead to gastric ulcer. Exocrine pancreatic secretion is often decreased, as is the bile salt content of bile. These changes represent the underlying mechanisms of symptomatic gastrointestinal dysfunctions in the elderly, such as dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, primary dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, primary constipation, maldigestion, and reduced absorption of nutrients. Therapeutic management of these conditions is also described. The authors also review the gastrointestinal diseases that are more common in the elderly, such as atrophic gastritis, gastric ulcer, colon diverticulosis, malignant tumors, gallstones, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, Hepato Cellular Carcinoma (HCC), and chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Fatal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage in a Young Boy with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Medulloblastoma on High Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy with newly diagnosed metastatic medulloblastoma was placed on high dose dexamethasone and ranitidine prior to surgery. The child underwent subtotal resection and was discharged 5 days postoperatively with an uneventful hospital course on a tapering dose of dexamethasone and ranitidine. Over the next 2 days the patient complained of mild abdominal distension with flatulence, without pain, vomiting, or dysmotility. On follow-up in clinic 5 days after discharge, he had normal vital signs when he suddenly became pale and had loss of consciousness. Emergent computerized tomography of the head showed no acute hemorrhage and complete blood count revealed hemoglobin of 4.2 gm/dL. In spite of maximum resuscitation with copious blood products the patient died. Autopsy revealed evidence of duodenal perforation with intraluminal hemorrhage. This case demonstrates a rare fatal complication of high dose dexamethasone therapy even with concurrent gastrointestinal prophylactic therapy. We provide a review of the limited literature on steroid use in pediatric neurooncology with regard to gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  11. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  13. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Probiotics and Gastrointestinal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Robert A.; Versalovic, James

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The use of probiotics to prevent and treat a variety of diarrheal diseases has gained favor in recent years. Examples where probiotics have positively impacted gastroenteritis will be highlighted. However, the overall efficacy of these treatments and the mechanisms by which probiotics ameliorate gastrointestinal infections are mostly unknown. We will discuss possible m...

  15. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  16. Dystrophic calcification in muscles of legs in calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia syndrome: Accurate evaluation of the extent with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Karunanithi, Sellam; Dhull, Varun Singh; Kumar, Kunal; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 35-year-old man with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia variant scleroderma who presented with dysphagia, Raynaud's phenomenon and calf pain. (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy was performed to identify the extent of the calcification. It revealed extensive dystrophic calcification in the left thigh and bilateral legs which was involving the muscles and was well-delineated on single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. Calcinosis in scleroderma usually involves the skin but can be found in deeper periarticular tissues. Myopathy is associated with a poor prognosis.

  17. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  19. Gastrointestinal polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Lee, Hung-Chang; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chuen-Bin

    2009-10-01

    Gastrointestinal polyps are common in children. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, endoscopic findings, management, pathology, and recurrence of gastrointestinal polyps in children at Mackay Memorial Hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 50 children with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyps managed at Mackay Memorial Hospital between January 1984 and April 2007. Demographic data; clinical features; polyp size, number and location; endoscopic findings; management; pathology; and information on recurrences were extracted from the clinical records. The distribution of polyps in the 50 patients included gastric (4 patients), duodenal (2), ileocecal (4) and colorectal polyps (40). All patients with gastric polyps presented with vomiting, and three of the four patients with ileocecal polyps presented with intussusception. The mean age of the 40 patients with colorectal polyps was 6.8 years. The majority of those polyps were in the rectosigmoid colon; 36 patients presented with hematochezia. Solitary polyps were identified in 33 patients and multiple polyps were identified in seven patients. Most of the colorectal polyps were less than 2cm in diameter. Histologically, the most frequent type was juvenile polyp. Gastrointestinal polyps in children are usually benign. Pediatricians treating a child with a gastrointestinal polyp should pay attention to the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, the extraintestinal manifestations and long-term risk for malignancy.

  20. Gastrointestinal transit in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynne, Lotte; Worsøe, Jonas; Gregersen, Tine; Schlageter, Vincent; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis and collagen deposits. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SSc, including abdominal pain, bloating and discomfort, are common but diffuse and their pathophysiology remains obscure. To investigate the pathophysiology of abdominal pain and discomfort in individuals with SSc. A total of 15 individuals with SSc (13 women, median age 58 years), all suffering from diffuse abdominal symptoms, and 17 healthy volunteers (12 women, median age 52 years) were evaluated with the Motility Tracking System, MTS-1, measuring gastric emptying (GE) and velocity through the small intestine. SSc patients were also examined for bacterial overgrowth using the hydrogen breath test and with radiopaque markers to determine the total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). Assessed with the MTS-1, the velocity through the proximal small intestine was significantly reduced in SSc patients (median 0.525 m/h, range 0.11-1.15) when compared to healthy subjects (median 0.91 m/h, range 0.51-1.74) (p = 0.02). Prolonged GE was found in 4 SSc patients (27%) but in none of the healthy volunteers (p = 0.04). Only 3 SSc patients (21%) had positive breath tests for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. GITT was >3 days in 8 patients (53%). Slow small intestinal transit was associated with a prolonged GITT (p < 0.05). Velocity through the small intestine is significantly reduced in SSc patients with diffuse abdominal symptoms.

  1. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.; Austin, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effect of the oxidation state of plutonium on its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. For mice and rats that have been starved prior to gastrointestinal administration, there is no significant difference between the absorption factors for Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The value obtained for Pu(VI) is an order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The value obtained for Pu(IV) is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for nitrate solutions and the same as those reported for citrate solutions

  2. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  3. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  5. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy from the pediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, D; Improda, N; Esposito, A; De Martino, L; Barbieri, F; Betterle, C; Pignata, C; Salerno, M

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations of the AutoImmune REgulator gene. The clinical spectrum of the disease encompasses several autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine manifestations, which may lead to acute metabolic alterations and eventually life-threatening events. The clinical diagnosis is defined by the presence of at least two components of the classic triad including chronic mucocoutaneous candidiasis (CMC), chronic hypoparathyroidism (CH), Addison's disease (AD). Other common features of the disease are hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, alopecia, vitiligo, autoimmune hepatitis, Type 1 diabetes, gastrointestinal dysfunction. APECED usually begins in childhood. CMC is the first manifestation to appear, usually before the age of 5 yr, followed by CH and then by AD. The clinical phenotype may evolve over several years and many components of the disease may not appear until the 4th or 5th decade of life. The phenotypical expression of the syndrome shows a wide variability even between siblings with the same genotype. In view of this heterogeneity, an early diagnosis of APECED can be very challenging often leading to a considerable diagnostic delay. Therefore, clinicians should be aware that the presence of even a minor component of APECED in children should prompt a careful investigation for other signs and symptoms of the disease, thus allowing an early diagnosis and prevention of severe and life-threatening events. Aim of this review is to focus on clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of the major components of APECED in children particularly focusing on endocrine features of the disease.

  6. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  7. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  8. [Therapeutic options for autoimmune encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, N; Prüss, H; Paul, F

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies to neuronal tissue are becoming increasingly more important in the evaluation and classification of several neurological diseases, e.g. neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS), stiff person syndrome or autoimmune epilepsy. As these disorders are rare, no evidence-based recommendations for therapy are available. Currently, immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs are administered in most cases. In paraneoplastic syndromes treatment of the underlying cancer is of considerable importance. This overview summarizes current experiences and recommendations in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  9. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  10. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  11. Morphological classifications of gastrointestinal lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, Jasper L. A.; Hazewinkel, Yark; Dekker, Evelien

    2017-01-01

    In the era of spreading adoption of gastrointestinal endoscopy screening worldwide, endoscopists encounter an increasing number of complex lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. For decision-making on optimal treatment, precise lesion characterization is crucial. Especially the assessment of

  12. Pan-enteric dysmotility, impaired quality of life and alexithymia in a large group of patients meeting ROME II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Portincasa, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Baldassarre, Giuseppe; Altomare, Donato F.; Palasciano, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Psychological factors, altered motility and sensation disorders of the intestine can be variably associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Such aspects have not been investigated simultaneously. The aim of this paper was to evaluate gastrointestinal motility and symptoms, psychological spectrum and quality of life in a large group of IBS patients in southern Italy.

  13. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  14. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  15. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrom type 1 (PAS-1) or Autoimmune PolyEndocrinopathy Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive autosomal disease related to Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene mutations. AIRE is mainly implicated in central and peripheric immune tolerance. Diagnosis was classically based on presence of at least two out of three "majors" criterions of Whitaker's triad (candidiasis, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency). Presence of one criterion was sufficient when a sibling was previously diagnosed. However, some atypic or poorly symptomatic variants do not correspond to these criterions. As a matter of fact, digestive (malabsorption, pernicious anemia, hepatitis), cutaneous (alopecia, vitiligo, enamel dysplasia) or ophtalmological (keratitis) components could prevail. In these cases, diagnosis could be made by molecular genetics. Prognosis is influenced by genetic (AIRE mutations, HLA), hormonal and environmental (infections) factors. Potentially letal components (hepatitis and severe malabsorption) could be treated by immunosuppressors. Candidiasis and other infections should be carefully screened and treated before beginning those therapies, in order to avoid severe systemic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  17. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  18. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  19. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  2. [Probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-05-10

    Probiotics are preparations containing viable microorganisms that confer potential health benefits for the host. Alteration of bacterial flora both in terms of specific content and concentration may be beneficial in many gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics are widely used for the management of these conditions in many countries. However, mechanisms of probiotics are incompletely understood. Benefits observed clinically with one species or combinations of species can not be generalized. The optimal dose of treatment has to be determined. Although probiotics are generally regarded safe, caution is needed when using these supplements routinely. It has been proved, that severe adverse events can occur as a complication of probiotic treatment. This review summarizes the recent knowledge concerning the use of probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders.

  3. Upper Gastrointestinal Stent

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) stent has been developed for palliation of obstructive symptoms in various diseases causing obstruction of GI tract. Self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) has replaced old type of plastic stent, and endoscopic insertion of stent has replaced fluoroscopy-guided insertion. Nowadays, newly-designed SEMSs have been developed for prevention of complications such as stent migration and re-obstruction, and indications of stent recently have been widened into benign conditions as we...

  4. Gastrointestinal microphysiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blutt, Sarah E; Broughman, James R; Zou, Winnie; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Karandikar, Umesh C; In, Julie; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark; Estes, Mary K

    2017-10-01

    Gastrointestinal diseases are a significant health care and economic burden. Prevention and treatment of these diseases have been limited by the available human biologic models. Microphysiological systems comprise organ-specific human cultures that recapitulate many structural, biological, and functional properties of the organ in smaller scale including aspects of flow, shear stress and chemical gradients. The development of intestinal microphysiological system platforms represents a critical component in improving our understanding, prevention, and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. This minireview discusses: shortcomings of classical cell culture models of the gastrointestinal tract; human intestinal enteroids as a new model and their advantages compared to cell lines; why intestinal microphysiological systems are needed; potential functional uses of intestinal microphysiological systems in areas of drug development and modeling acute and chronic diseases; and current challenges in the development of intestinal microphysiological systems. Impact statement The development of a gastrointestinal MPS has the potential to facilitate the understanding of GI physiology. An ultimate goal is the integration of the intestinal MPS with other organ MPS. The development and characterization of nontransformed human intestinal cultures for use in MPS have progressed significantly since the inception of the MPS program in 2012, and these cultures are a key component of advancing MPS. Continued efforts are needed to optimize MPS to comprehensively and accurately recapitulate the complexity of the intestinal epithelium within intestinal tissue. These systems will need to include peristalsis, flow, and oxygen gradients, with incorporation of vascular, immune, and nerve cells. Regional cellular organization of crypt and villus areas will also be necessary to better model complete intestinal structure.

  5. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  7. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopies results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozdağ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endoscopic examinations have great potential in early diagnosis of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas with reducing to colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. We aimed to evaluate for diagnostic purposeful lower gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in the second step state hospital retrospectively Methods: Between June 2010 and June 2013, we evaluated 278 patients with rectal bleeding, constipation and abdominal pain detected by lower gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures retrospectively. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.8 ± 16.8 (15-90 year, respectively. 172 (61.9% of the patients were male and 106 (38.1% of the patients were female. 116 (41.7% of the patients was performed rectosigmoidoscopy and 162 (58.3% of the patients was performed colonoscopy. 51(18.3% of our patients were normal. 10 (3.6% of patients had colorectal cancer, 11(3.9% of patients had inflammatory bowel disease, 8 (2.9% of patients had parasitosis, 31(11.1% of patients had colorectal polyps, 12 (4.3% , in patients had diverticular disease, 2 (0.7% patients had rectal ulcer, 25 (9% patients had anal fissure and 159 (57.2% of the patients had hemorrhoidal disease. Conclusion: Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is a method been the gold standard with a low complication rate and that can be easily applied in the evaluation to pathology of colorectal and anal canal. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (4: 580-582

  8. Orexins and gastrointestinal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccari, M C

    2010-03-01

    Orexin A (OXA) and orexin B (OXB) are recently discovered neuropeptides that appear to play a role in various distinct functions such as arousal and the sleep-wake cycle as well as on appetite and regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Orexins were first described as neuropeptides expressed by a specific population of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, a region classically implicated in feeding behaviour. Orexin neurons project to numerous brain regions, where orexin receptors have been shown to be widely distributed: both OXA and OXB act through two subtypes of receptors (OX1R and OX2R) that belong to the G protein-coupled superfamily of receptors. Growing evidence indicates that orexins act in the central nervous system also to regulate gastrointestinal functions: animal studies have indeed demonstrated that centrally-injected orexins or endogenously released orexins in the brain stimulates gastric secretion and influence gastrointestinal motility. The subsequent identification of orexins and their receptors in the enteric nervous system (including the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses) as well as in mucosa and smooth muscles has suggested that these neuropeptides may also play a local action. In this view, emerging studies indicate that orexins also exert region-specific contractile or relaxant effects on isolated gut preparations. The aim of the proposed review is to summarize both centrally- and peripherally-mediated actions of orexins on gastrointestinal functions and to discuss the related physiological role on the basis of the most recent findings.

  9. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  10. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. METHODS: A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). RESULTS: We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological

  11. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  12. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Felipe; Vásquez, Tatiana

    2012-11-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is the term used to describe adults who have a slowly progressive form of diabetes mellitus (DM) of autoimmune etiology, but that may be treated initially without insulin. Although it shares some immunological and genetic aspects with type 1 DM, it affects an age group that is typically affected by type 2 DM. Therefore, it could be considered an intermediate type. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria: age of onset, initial response to oral hypoglycemic agents and the presence of specific antibodies for diabetes. Although the definitive treatment is insulin, glitazones may be useful in early stages of the disease. Currently, its management represents a challenge for the physician, including specialists, and it is a form of DM to keep in mind.

  13. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  14. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids. The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotolerance leads to formation of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes which recognize self-antigens and lead to their destruction in the target organ. Some features of immune mechanisms, observed in psoriasis, suggest its autoimmune background. In psoriasis the main role is played by the activation of the axis IL-12/Th1/IFN- and Th17/Il-23. Il-12 probably acts on naive T cells and the Th1 response is initiated. Il-23 maintains the Th1-mediated inflammatory reaction, stimulates maturation and effects of Th17, and maintains a certain amount of memory cells. We also observe dysfunction of Treg cells, which are responsible for the destruction of autoreactive lymphocytes. In addition, psoriatic keratinocytes have increased resistance to apoptosis, which eliminate damaged cells so that they cannot be recognized as a foreign antigen. However, researchers have suggested that initially the polyclonal activation of T lymphocytes is induced by superantigens (e.g. streptococcal M protein, peptidoglycan or skin trauma (Koebner phenomenon, whereas in the later phase self-antigens in the epidermis are recognized by autoreactive T cells (keratin K 17, HPV 5 proteins L1, Pso p27, leading to autoimmunity.

  16. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; Taylor B. Smallwood; Paul R. Giacomin; Alex Loukas; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Richard J. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models ...

  17. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of tes...

  18. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  19. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  20. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atquet, V; Lienart, F; Vaes, M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a woman aged 37  years, affected with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, detected since the age of 17, with gonadic insufficiency with anti-ovarian antibodies since the age of 22  years and Addison's disease since 24  years old. At that moment, the diagnosis of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) was made. Concomitant to this diagnosis, thrombocytosis was detected and aetiological assessment revealed an atrophy of the spleen. Differential diagnoses of APS and hyposplenism will be discussed. We will look at a possible association between these two pathologies. Indeed, asplenism is found in approximately 20% of adults affected by type 1 APS, also called auto-immune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome. The most likely aetiology for this atrophy of the spleen is a destruction of auto-immunological origin. However, in our patient, the search for a mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene proved negative. This mutation is commonly, but not systematically, present in type 1 APS. A type 2 APS should then be considered.

  1. Stochastic Effects in Autoimmune Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among various possible causes of autoimmune disease, an important role is played by infections that can result in a breakdown of immune tolerance, primarily through the mechanism of “molecular mimicry”. In this paper we propose and analyse a stochastic model of immune response to a viral infection and subsequent autoimmunity, with account for the populations of T cells with different activation thresholds, regulatory T cells, and cytokines. We show analytically and numerically how stochasticity can result in sustained oscillations around deterministically stable steady states, and we also investigate stochastic dynamics in the regime of bi-stability. These results provide a possible explanation for experimentally observed variations in the progression of autoimmune disease. Computations of the variance of stochastic fluctuations provide practically important insights into how the size of these fluctuations depends on various biological parameters, and this also gives a headway for comparison with experimental data on variation in the observed numbers of T cells and organ cells affected by infection.

  2. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  4. Epigenetics as biomarkers in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Liao, Jieyue; Li, Qianwen; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2018-03-21

    Autoimmune diseases are immune system disorders in which immune cells cannot distinguish self-antigens from foreign ones. The current criteria for autoimmune disease diagnosis are based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests. However, none of these markers shows both high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, some autoimmune diseases, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are highly heterogeneous and often exhibit various manifestations. On the other hand, certain autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome versus SLE, share similar symptoms and autoantibodies, which also causes difficulties in diagnosis. Therefore, biomarkers that have both high sensitivity and high specificity for diagnosis, reflect disease activity and predict drug response are necessary. An increasing number of publications have proposed the abnormal epigenetic modifications as biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review will comprehensively summarize the epigenetic progress in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and unearth potential biomarkers that might be appropriate for disease diagnosis and prediction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  6. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufliarsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract. Better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs led to the clinical development of imatinib for treating patients with this disease. New immuno markers and mechanisms of primary and secondary resistance were discovered. Adjuvant imatinib in intermediate or high risk GIST has improved the recurrence-free survival. Sunitinib in patients with intolerance or progression on imatinib demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival versus placebo. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sorafenib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, have shown activity in patients with imatinib- and sunitinib-resistant GIST. (author)

  8. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  9. Altered gastrointestinal motility in an animal model of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzo, Maria G; Frinchi, Monica; Nuzzo, Domenico; Jinnah, Hyder A; Mudò, Giuseppa; Condorelli, Daniele F; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Mulè, Flavia; Belluardo, Natale; Serio, Rosa

    2018-03-01

    Mutations in the HGPRT1 gene, which encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), housekeeping enzyme responsible for recycling purines, lead to Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND). Clinical expression of LND indicates that HGprt deficiency has adverse effects on gastrointestinal motility. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate intestinal motility in HGprt knockout mice (HGprt¯). Spontaneous and neurally evoked mechanical activity was recorded in vitro as changes in isometric tension in circular muscle strips of distal colon. HGprt¯ tissues showed a lower in amplitude spontaneous activity and atropine-sensitivity neural contraction compared to control mice. The responses to carbachol and to high KCl were reduced, demonstrating a widespread impairment of contractility. L-NAME was not able in the HGprt¯ tissues to restore the large amplitude contractile activity typical of control. In HGprt¯ colon, a reduced expression of dopaminergic D1 receptor was observed together with the loss of its tonic inhibitory activity present in control-mice. The analysis of inflammatory and oxidative stress in colonic tissue of HGprt¯ mice revealed a significant increase of lipid peroxidation associated with over production of oxygen free radicals. In conclusion, HGprt deficiency in mice is associated with a decrease in colon contractility, not dependent upon reduction of acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus or hyperactivity of inhibitory signalling. By contrast the increased levels of oxidative stress could partially explain the reduced colon motility in HGprt¯ mice. Colonic dysmotility observed in HGprt¯ mice may mimic the gastrointestinal dysfunctions symptoms of human syndrome, providing a useful animal model to elucidate the pathophysiology of this problem in the LND. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 supplementation reduces gastrointestinal dysfunction in an animal model of IBS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Brun

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 on intestinal neuromuscular anomalies in an IBS-type mouse model of gastrointestinal motor dysfunctions elicited by Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 exposure.Mice were inoculated intranasally with HSV-1 (102 PFU or vehicle at time 0 and 4 weeks later by the intragastric (IG route (108 PFU. Six weeks after IG inoculum, mice were randomly allocated to receive oral gavage with either S. boulardii (107 CFU/day or vehicle. After 4 weeks the following were determined: a intestinal motility using fluorescein-isothiocyanate dextran distribution in the gut, fecal pellet expulsion, stool water content, and distal colonic transit of glass beads; b integrity of the enteric nervous system (ENS by immunohistochemistry on ileal whole-mount preparations and western blot of protein lysates from ileal longitudinal muscle and myenteric plexus; c isometric muscle tension with electric field and pharmacological (carbachol stimulation of ileal segments; and d intestinal inflammation by levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin(IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-4.S. boulardii CNCM I-745 improved HSV-1 induced intestinal dysmotility and alteration of intestinal transit observed ten weeks after IG inoculum of the virus. Also, the probiotic yeast ameliorated the structural alterations of the ENS induced by HSV-1 (i.e., reduced peripherin immunoreactivity and expression, increased glial S100β protein immunoreactivity and neuronal nitric oxide synthase level, reduced substance P-positive fibers. Moreover, S. boulardii CNCM I-745 diminished the production of HSV-1 associated pro-inflammatory cytokines in the myenteric plexus and increased levels of anti-inflammatory interleukins.S. boulardii CNCM I-745 ameliorated gastrointestinal neuromuscular anomalies in a mouse model of gut dysfunctions typically observed with irritable bowel syndrome.

  11. Delay in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Patients Without Gastrointestinal Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Marco A; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Sinacore, James; Winterfield, Laura; Venu, Mukund

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the delay in diagnosis of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease in those who present with gastrointestinal complaints vs nongastrointestinal complaints at our tertiary care center. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Celiac disease can have variable clinical presentations; it can be characterized by predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, or it may present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 687 adult patients who carried the diagnosis of celiac disease. Patients included had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were categorized based on presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms prior to their diagnosis. There were 101 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease that met inclusion criteria. Fifty-two patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and 49 had nongastrointestinal complaints. Results from Mann-Whitney statistical analysis showed a median delay in diagnosis of 2.3 months for the gastrointestinal symptoms group and 42 months for the nongastrointestinal group (P symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Of patients with nongastrointestinal symptoms, 69.4% had anemia, compared with 11.5% of the gastrointestinal symptom group (P symptom group, 68%, were noted to have abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. No sex differences were noted on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups (P = .997). Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbiota and Autoimmunity: exploring new avenues

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkovetskiy, Leonid; Pickard, Joseph M.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Given the recognized role of the commensal microbiota in regulating host immunity to pathogens, it is not surprising that microbiota are also capable of regulating autoimmune responses. The underlying mechanisms of autoimmune regulation by the microbiota are just beginning to emerge. Here, we discuss possible pressure points towards the development of autoimmune diseases that can be influenced by the microbiota. Besides acting on the adaptive and innate arms of the immune response, the microb...

  13. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  14. Recurrent Oral Inflammation in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pac, Malgorzata; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Wolska-Kuśnierz, Beata; Piątosa, Barbara; Górska, Renata; Bernatowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract   Background and aim: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. In ALPS defective lymphocyte apoptosis manifests as a chronic, nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly/hepatosplenomegaly, expansion of double negative T cell (DNTC) – CD4-CD8-TCRαβ+ T cells, autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune diseases.  Patients demonstrate oral lesions which have not yet been repo...

  15. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  16. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  18. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  19. Neonatal gastrointestinal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Padma

    2006-01-01

    Radiological imaging is an important part of the evaluation and management of neonates with suspected anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical presentation is often non-specific, commonly with abdominal distension and vomiting for which the underlying cause may or may not be clinically apparent. In a proportion of patients, the clinical assessment alone may suffice in providing the diagnosis and no further imaging is necessary. The reader must have an understanding of the normal radiographic appearances of the gastrointestinal tract in neonates and appreciate normal variants and differences to adults. In certain cases, the abdominal radiograph alone is diagnostic. In others, sonography and contrast studies are useful adjunct investigations and the indications for CT and MRI are few, but specific. Appropriate radiological investigation will help to establish the diagnosis and guide surgical intervention whilst also avoiding unnecessary radiation. Some of the conditions require transfer to specialist paediatric institutions for care. Thus, in some circumstances it is appropriate for imaging to be delayed and performed at the specialist centre with early referral often essential for the continued well being of the child

  20. [DRG and gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardi, S; Altilia, F; Pietroletti, R; Risetti, A; Schietroma, M; Simi, M

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis-related-groups (DRG) is the cost-based system for hospital reimbursement. However, the proceeds does not coincide with the costs. Aim of the study was to identify the profit, which we could gained with 147, 155, 158, 162, 165, 198 gastrointestinal surgery DRG. 30 consecutive patients, undergone to surgery in Clinica Chirurgica of L'Aquila University, had been studied. We had calculated the daily costs of medical and nursing practice, diagnostic tests, drugs, hospitalization, surgical instruments for every patient's therapy. The DRG-proceeds had been correlated with the DRG-costs. The "major gastrointestinal surgery" had not profit (147 DRG: anterior resection of rectum = -354428 Pounds, Miles = -94020 Pounds; 155 DRG: total gastrectomy = -1920641 Pounds). On the contrary, "minimal surgery" had good profits (158 DRG: hemorroidectomy with local anestesia = 1469605 Pounds;162 DRG: sutureless groin hernioplasty = 1561200 Pounds; 198 DRG: videolaparochole-cystectomy: 1208807 Pounds). The study seems to demonstrate the disparity of the reimbursement system related to DRG. However, the surgeons, as managers, must employ warily the resources for producing DRG.

  1. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minalyan A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Artem Minalyan,1 Jihane N Benhammou,1 Aida Artashesyan,1 Michael S Lewis,2 Joseph R Pisegna1 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Parenteral Nutrition, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet and corpus-predominant (autoimmune. Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. Keywords: autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid

  2. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  3. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  4. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  5. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bingjun; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Yanqiang; Dai, Yongqiang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases ...

  7. Estrogen and gastrointestinal malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    The concept that E2 exerts an effect on the gastrointestinal tract is not new and its actions on intestinal mucosa have been investigated for at least three decades. An attempt to consolidate results of these investigations generates more questions than answers, thus suggesting that many unexplored avenues remain and that the full capabilities of this steroid hormone are far from understood. Evidence of its role in esophageal, gastric and gallbladder cancers is confusing and often equivocal. The most compelling evidence regards the protective role conferred by estrogen (or perhaps ERbeta) against the development and proliferation of colon cancer. Not only has the effect been described but also many mechanisms of action have been explored. It is likely that, along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal manipulation will play an integral role in colon cancer management in the very near future.

  8. [Gastrointestinal manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietkiewicz, Marcin; Smoleńska, Zaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory connective tissue disease with an autoimmune background, involving various organs and systems during its course. The most important and characteristic clinical manifestations have been included in the revised diagnostic criteria for the classification of SLE published by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) in 1987. One of them is oral ulceration which occurs in 50% of SLE patients. Oral ulcers and other gastrointestinal complaints such as dyspepsia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, usually attributed to the side-effects of medications, are among the most frequent symptoms in patients with lupus. We report the case of a 42-year-old female suffering from long-standing lupus with kidney and joint involvement, who developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema, and cachexia. Our case illustrates the difficulties encountered when searching for the cause of gastrointestinal symptoms. Attention during diagnosis should be given to rare gastrointestinal manifestations of SLE, such as intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) and protein-losing enteropathy (PLE).

  9. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  10. Lower gastrointestinal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This refresher course will review the current knowledge as well as ongoing and future research strategies in lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Radiation therapy has a significant role in the adjuvant treatment of lower gastrointestinal malignancies. Furthermore, there are data to suggest that radiation therapy is an integral component of the conservative management (organ preservation) of rectal and anal cancers. 1. Colon cancer. The standard adjuvant treatment for node positive or high risk transmural colon cancer is postoperative 5-FU and Levamisole. There are retrospective data to suggest that certain subsets of high risk patients may benefit from postoperative radiation therapy. 2. Rectal cancer. Randomized trials have revealed an advantage of postoperative radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer. In the adjuvant setting the use of continuous infusion 5-FU may be more beneficial compared with bolus 5-FU. Despite the improvement in survival, postoperative therapies are associated with an approximately 35% incidence of grade 3+ toxicity. Recent data suggest that the use of preoperative combined modality therapy may be associated with less toxicity as well as increase the chance of sphincter preservation. New Intergroup trials addressing these issues will be presented. In patients with locally advanced unresectable rectal cancer, the addition of intraoperative radiation therapy may further improve local control. 3. Anal cancer. The use of combined 5-FU/Mitomycin-C and pelvic radiation therapy is effective in the treatment of anal carcinoma. The RTOG has recently completed a randomized trial addressing the question of the effectiveness and toxicity of Mitomycin-C. The replacement Intergroup Phase III trial will be presented

  11. Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret H. Collins

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID are characterized pathologically by excess eosinophils in mucosal biopsies of one or multiple sites in the gastrointestinal (GI tract, simultaneously or sequentially. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is the best characterized EGID, and in most patients it is an abnormal immune-mediated response to food antigens. Current recommendations for diagnosis include signs and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction that do not respond to proton-pump inhibitor therapy, and esophageal biopsies that exhibit at least 15 intraepithelial eosinophils in at least one high power field (HPF. Therapy consists of swallowed glucocorticoids or dietary elimination. Eosinophilic gastritis (EG is the second most common form of EGID, but like all forms of EGID except EoE consensus recommendations for either clinical or pathological diagnosis do not exist. EG may be associated clinically with peripheral blood eosinophilia, hypoalbuminemia, and anemia, and pathologically with marked expansion of lamina propria by dense eosinophilic infiltrates. Eosinophilic enteritis (EE may be subdivided into eosinophilic duodenitis, eosinophilic jejunitis, and eosinophilic ileitis. Most investigators believe that EE rarely, if ever, exists as a solitary form of EGID and is encountered only in patients who have at least one other affected portion of the GI tract. Eosinophilic colitis (EC is perhaps the most enigmatic EGID. Distinction of EC from inflammatory bowel disease may be problematic especially in children. Multiple possible etiologies for EGID include hypereosinophilic syndrome, drug reactions, etc. Currently, the only etiology that can be identified histologically is parasitic infestation, if a portion of an invasive parasite is found in mucosal biopsies. This review will provide guidelines for the pathologic diagnosis of the various forms of EGID.

  12. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  13. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  14. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  15. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  16. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women with T...

  17. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  18. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  19. Autoimmunity, infectious immunity, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Matsunami, Yukana; Shen, Lianhua; Quan, Nanhu; Makarova, Marina; Suchkov, Sergey V; Ayada, Kiyoshi; Oguma, Keiji; Lopez, Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Vascular inflammation is common in certain systemic autoimmune diseases and contributes to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL/beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) complex formation. These complexes have been implicated as proatherogenic autoantigens that participate in the development of atherosclerotic disease. We have demonstrated that the in vitro macrophage uptake of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes increases in the presence of IgG anti-beta2GPI antibodies and that IgG immune complexes containing oxLDL/beta2GPI upregulate the expression of both scavenger and Fcgamma receptors to activate beta2GPI specific T cells. Some persistent infections may cause immune responses that promote atherogenesis. Cellular immunity (Th1) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) derived heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) cross-reacts with endogenous HSP60 to cause cardiovascular disease likely by molecular mimicry. Infectious cellular response may be proatherogenic,while the humoral response (antibody production) maybe protective. We review the recent progress in our understanding of autoimmunity and infectious immunity that promote atherosclerosis.

  20. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  1. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. GASTROINTESTINAL MANIFESTATIONS OF MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ziganshina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to highlight the current concepts of gastrointestinal manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction. The data available in Russian and foreign literature on the gastrointestinal manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction were analyzed. Functional digestive diseases are common in pediatric practice; however, their etiopathogenesis has not been adequately explored today. According to the literature, impaired cellular energy metabolism may underlie gastrointestinal motility disorders in cyclic vomiting syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux, gastric stasis, chronic diarrhea, constipation, intestinal pseudoobstruction, malabsorption syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, as well as diseases of the liver and pancreas.

  3. Current practice in laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. 
Survey of the Working group for laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Đerek, Lovorka; Kozmar, Ana; Drvar, Vedrana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the trend of increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, laboratories are faced with exponential growth of the requests for tests relating the diagnosis of these diseases. Unfortunately, the lack of laboratory personnel experienced in this specific discipline of laboratory diagnostic, as well as an unawareness of a method limitation often results in confusion for clinicians. The aim was to gain insight into number and type of Croatian laboratories that perform humoral diagnostics with the final goal to improve and harmonize laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. Materials and methods In order to get insight into current laboratory practice two questionnaires, consisting of 42 questions in total, were created. Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey application and were sent to 88 medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia for the first survey. Out of 33 laboratories that declared to perform diagnostic from the scope, 19 were selected for the second survey based on the tests they pleaded to perform. The survey comprised questions regarding autoantibody hallmarks of systemic autoimmune diseases while regarding organ-specific autoimmune diseases was limited to diseases of liver, gastrointestinal and nervous system. Results Response rate was high with 80 / 88 (91%) laboratories which answered the first questionnaire, and 19 / 19 (1.0) for the second questionnaire. Obtained results of surveys indicate high heterogeneity in the performance of autoantibody testing among laboratories in Croatia. Conclusions Results indicate the need of creating recommendations and algorithms in order to harmonize the approach to laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. PMID:27812306

  4. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  5. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  6. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  8. Gastrointestinal scanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    An easily prepared radiolabeled gastrointestinal scanning agent is described. Technetium-99m has ideal characteristics for imaging the upper and lower GI tract and determining stomach emptying and intestinal transit time when used with an insoluble particulate material. For example, crystalline and amorphous calcium phosphate particles can be effectively labeled in a one-step process using sup(99m)TcO 4 and SnCl 2 . These labeled particles have insignificant mass and when administered orally pass through the GI tract unchanged, without affecting the handling and density of the intestinal contents. Visualization of the esophageal entry into the stomach, the greater and lesser curvatures of the stomach, ejection into the duodenum, and rates of passage through the upper and lower GI tract are obtained. The slurry of sup(99m)TC particulate can be given rectally by enema. Good images of the cecum and the ascending, transverse, and descending colon are obtained. Mucosal folds and the splenic and hepatic flexures are visualized. The resilience of the large intestine is also readily visualized by pneumocolonographic techniques. (author)

  9. Myosin light chain kinase is central to smooth muscle contraction and required for gastrointestinal motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei-Qi; Peng, Ya-Jing; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Lv, Ning; Tang, Jing; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Gao, Song; Chen, Hua-Qun; Zhi, Gang; Feil, Robert; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T; Gao, Xiang; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    Smooth muscle is essential for maintaining homeostasis for many body functions and provides adaptive responses to stresses imposed by pathologic disorders. Identified cell signaling networks have defined many potential mechanisms for initiating smooth muscle contraction with or without myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). We generated tamoxifen-inducible and smooth muscle-specific MLCK knockout (KO) mice and provide direct loss-of-function evidence that shows the primary importance of MLCK in phasic smooth muscle contractions. We used the Cre-loxP system to establish Mlck floxed mice in which exons 23, 24, and 25 were flanked by 2 loxP sites. Smooth muscle-specific MLCK KO mice were generated by crossing Mlck floxed mice with SM-CreER(T2) (ki) mice followed by tamoxifen treatment. The phenotype was assessed by histologic, biochemical, molecular, cell biological, and physiologic analyses. Targeted deletion of MLCK in adult mouse smooth muscle resulted in severe gut dysmotility characterized by weak peristalsis, dilation of the digestive tract, and reduction of feces excretion and food intake. There was also abnormal urinary bladder function and lower blood pressure. Isolated muscles showed a loss of RLC phosphorylation and force development induced by K(+)-depolarization. The kinase knockout also markedly reduced RLC phosphorylation and force development with acetylcholine which activates Ca(2+)-sensitizing signaling pathways. MLCK and its phosphorylation of RLC are required physiologically for smooth muscle contraction and are essential for normal gastrointestinal motility.

  10. CT of acute gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenberg, J.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computerized tomography in gastrointestinal tract diseases are presented, including advantages in surgical belly that are: anatomic clarity, wide survey and rapid performance. (C.G.C.)

  11. Gastrointestinal perfusion in septic shock.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, E.M. van; Sleight, J.W.; Pickkers, P.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2007-01-01

    Septic shock is characterised by vasodilation, myocardial depression and impaired microcirculatory blood flow, resulting in redistribution of regional blood flow. Animal and human studies have shown that gastrointestinal mucosal blood flow is impaired in septic shock. This is consistent with

  12. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases.

  13. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  14. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  15. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  16. The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy or autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankisch, Tim O; Jaeckel, Elmar; Strassburg, Christian P

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rare autoimmune endocrinopathies that are associated with nonendocrine autoimmunopathies. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), also named autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), is distinguished from autoimmune polyglandular syndrome 2 (APS-2). Major disease components of APECED are adrenal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and candidiasis. The diagnosis is established by the presence of two out of the three components. Minor clinical features include autoimmune hepatitis, which occurs in up to 20% of APECED patients, and ranges from a mild to a fulminant course. The disease mostly affects juvenile patients from Sardegna, Italy, Finland, and Iran (Iranian Jews), but it also occurs in other ethnic groups. The AIRE gene responsible for APECED is expressed in cells involved in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. Genetic alterations of the single gene are associated with APECED. Because a specific therapy is not currently available, treatment consists of hormone replacement and caring for clinical symptoms. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  17. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  18. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Gastrointestinal bleeding Matthew R Banks, Peter D Fairclough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Inflammatory bowel...

  19. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  20. Probiotics and gastrointestinal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, S L

    2000-01-01

    Evidence for positive health benefits of Lactobacilli applies to only a few strains used for commercial applications. It is generally agreed that a probiotic must be capable of colonizing the intestinal tract to influence human health; this requirement disqualifies many of the strains currently used in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus GG, a variant of L. casei sps rhamnosus, has been studied extensively in adults and children. When consumed as a dairy product or as a lyophilized powder, LGG colonizes the gastrointestinal tract for 1-3 days in most individuals and up to 7 days in about 30% of subjects. Traveler's diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and relapsing Clostridium difficile colitis are improved with LGG. In infantile diarrhea, the severity and duration of the attack is reduced. LGG-fermented milk lessens the intestinal permeability defects caused by exposure to cows milk or rotavirus infection. LGG has proven beneficial effects on intestinal immunity. It increases the numbers of IgA and other immunoglobulin-secreting cells in the intestinal mucosa. LGG stimulates local release of interferon. It facilitates antigen transport to underlying lymphoid cells, which serves to increase antigen uptake in Peyer's patches. LGG also acts as an immunoadjuvant for oral vaccines. In an animal model of colon cancer, LGG reduced the incidence of chemically induced tumors in the large bowel of rodents. Extensive safety testing has shown no pathogenic potential in humans or animals. Probiotic cultures of Lactobacilli have the potential to bring substantial health benefits to the consumer. The purported benefits for any probiotic must pass the highest standards of scientific scrutiny before the claims can be accepted.

  1. Air pollution and gastrointestinal diseases in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Melissa May

    The valleys of northern Utah, where most of Utah's population resides, experience episodic air pollution events well in excess of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Most of the events are due to an accumulation of particulate matter during persistent cold air pools in winter from both direct emissions and secondary chemical reactions in the atmosphere. High wintertime ozone concentrations are occasionally observed in the Uintah Basin, in addition to particulate matter. At other times of the year, blowing dust, wildland fires, fireworks, and summertime ozone formation contribute to local air pollution. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate one facet of the health effects of Utah's air pollution on its residents: the acute impacts of air pollution on gastrointestinal (GI) disease. To study the health effects of these episodic pollution events, some measure of air pollution exposure must be matched to the health data. Time and place are used to link the health data for a person with the pollution data. This dissertation describes the method of kriging data from the sparse pollution monitoring network to estimate personal air pollution history based on the zip code of residence. This dissertation then describes the application of these exposure estimates to a health study on GI disease. The purpose of the GI study is to retrospectively look at two groups of patients during 2000-2014: those with autoimmune disease of the GI tract (inflammatory bowel disease, IBD) and those with allergic disease of the GI tract (eosinophilic esophagitis, EoE) to determine whether disease exacerbations occur more commonly during and following periods of poor air quality compared to periods of good air quality. The primary analysis method is case crossover design. In addition to using the kriged air pollution estimates, the analysis was repeated using simpler empirical estimation methods to assess whether the odds ratios are sensitive to the air pollution estimation

  2. Gastrointestinal manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, M; Edrees, A; Okasha, H; El Ashmaui, A; Ragab, G

    2016-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by multisystem involvement, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. There is a significant variation in the clinical presentation and severity of GI disorders. When GI symptoms present as the initial manifestation of SLE, there is likely to be a delay in the diagnosis. The cause of these GI manifestations in SLE may be the disease, or the side effects of medications, or infections. In this study we investigated the GI manifestations in a group of SLE patients. Our study was conducted on 40 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls to assess the prevalence of GI symptoms in SLE patients. The prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations in our study was 42.5%. GI manifestations in our SLE patients were: acute abdominal pain (due to pleurisy and peritonitis), 6%; diffuse abdominal pain, 23.5%; epigastric pain, 29%; epigastric pain with vomiting, 23.5%; epigastric pain with chronic constipation, 6%; chronic constipation, 6%; and diffuse abdominal pain with bleeding per rectum, 6%. In our study, we found a higher incidence of Giardia infestation in SLE patients than in healthy controls, and 10% of these patients were asymptomatic. There was more Giardia infestation in patients with GI symptoms as compared with patients with no GI symptoms, with a P value of 0.009. In our study SLE patients with GI symptoms had a peak systolic velocity (cm/s) with a mean of 108.4 ± 32.1 standard deviation (SD) in the celiac Doppler study. Patients without GI symptoms had a peak systolic velocity with a mean of 111.9 ± 37.7 SD, meaning that our patients mostly had no evidence of celiac trunk stenosis, but there was significant difference between SLE patients without GI symptoms and controls, as the mean was higher in SLE patients than in the controls. Also, the celiac end diastolic velocity was higher in both groups of SLE patients with GI symptoms and those without GI symptoms, compared to controls.

  3. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  5. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  6. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  7. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis: an uncommon presentation of thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendogni, Paolo; Rosso, Lorenzo; Tosi, Davide; Palleschi, Alessandro; Righi, Ilaria; Minonzio, Francesca; Fusco, Nicola; Nosotti, Mario

    2016-11-11

    In a substantial proportion of patients with thymoma, many different types of paraneoplastic syndromes are observed. The association between thymoma and autoimmune liver diseases, however, has been found in very few cases. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by autoimmune hepatitis associated with myasthenia gravis and thymoma, successfully treated with extended thymectomy. The patient is free from neoplastic and hepatic disease 4 years after surgery. Eighteen months after thymectomy, an exacerbation of hepatitis was successfully treated with steroids. To the authors' knowledge, only 7 cases of myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and autoimmune hepatitis have been reported in the English-language literature. The exact role of thymoma in immune-mediated hepatitis is unclear. It seems likely that thymoma-associated T-cell abnormalities, due to the presence of thymoma, may have a role in the development of this rare clinical triad of autoimmune hepatitis, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

  9. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  10. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  12. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  13. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  14. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzoli, Renato; D?Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, ...

  15. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    guinea - pig polyclonal anti-insulin (1:100 dilution, Abcam Ab7842-500, Cambridge, MA) and a secondary goat anti- guinea - pig Alexa-fluor 568 (1:100 dilu...which is reported to accelerate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model of multiple sclerosis). Our reasoning was that, as T cells...HL, Sobel RA, Kuchroo VK. IL-10 is critical in the regulation of autoimmune encephalomyelitis as demonstrated by studies of IL-10- and IL-4

  16. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  17. Gastrointestinal system manifestations in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Karhan, Asuman Nur; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Bilginer, Yelda; Gümüş, Ersin; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Özen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which may involve gastrointestinal system (GIS). The aim of this study was to present GIS manifestations of pediatric SLE patients. The medical files of 69 children with SLE followed between January 2011 and January 2016 were reviewed. All fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria. All patients (≤18 years of age) with GIS manifestations were included. GIS manifestations were observed in 19 (27.5%) out of 69 SLE patients and present at the time of SLE diagnosis in 13 (68.4%). The GIS manifestations due to SLE were autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) (n = 8) and lupus enteritis (n = 1). Manifestations associated with SLE were hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia due to macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (n = 3) and hepatic steatosis (n = 1). GIS manifestations as a result of the adverse events of drugs were as follows: toxic hepatitis (n = 3; associated with methotrexate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in one, methotrexate in another, and azathioprine in another patient), azathioprine-induced cholestatic hepatitis (n = 1), and gastritis associated with corticosteroid (n = 1). In one patient, acute appendicitis occurred as a coincidence. In this study, one of every five pediatric SLE patients had GIS-related manifestations. GIS involvement may occur as an initial manifestation of the disease.

  18. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Updates on GMSCs treatment for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Song Guo

    2018-02-20

    Autoimmune disease is a refractory disease. Accumulating Evidence has revealed that the manipulation of mesenchymal stem cells may have the potential to control or even treat autoimmune diseases. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) are emerging as a new line of mesenchymal stem cells that have displayed some potential advantages in controlling and treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly update the current understanding on the biology of GMSCs and their effects on preventing and treating autoimmune diseases. The availability of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs), together with their potent capacity of multi-directional differentiation and inflammatory modulation, making GMSCs an ideal subtype of MSCs in treating autoimmune disease. Our and other studies have launched the earliest appraisal on GMSCs and carried out a lot of biological researches. The clinical trial of GMSCs on patients with autoimmune diseases will further approve their therapeutic effects, as well as its cellular and molecular mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Więsik-Szewczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently Epsteinasensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  1. Autoimmune cytopenias related to common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Petric

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency disorders are characterised by defective antibody production leading to recurrent infections. Noninfective complications are a consequence of autoimmunity, granuloma and polyclonal lymphoid infiltration. We often detect autoimmune cytopenias before primary immunodefciency is confirmed. Patients and methods: We report a case of 39-year old man with recurrent respiratory infections, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anemia who had common varible immunodeficiency confirmed. He had a lack of serum IgG, IgA and IgM, bronchiectasis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatic granuloma, autoimmune gastritis with B12 deficiency and Evans syndrome. We treated autoimmune cytopenias with methylprednisolon and cyclosporine. After substitution therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin the frequency of espiratory infections decreased. Occurrence of diarrhea is suspected for enteropathy, however, hystologic identification is required. Because of patologically changed gastric mucosa and signs of polyclonal lymphoid infiltration, the patient is at high risk for malignancy and the outcome of the disease remains unpredictable. Conclusions: Generally, we discover common variable immunodeficiency at management of noninfective complications, in wich intravenous immunoglobulin are not effective. Autoimmune cytopenias and some other complications are successfully treated with glucocorticoids. Careful monitorig of these patients is important because of a high risk for malignancy.

  2. Clinical aspects of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Fiona; O'Neill, Sean G

    2013-08-31

    Multisystem autoimmune rheumatic diseases are heterogeneous rare disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Efforts to create international consensus within the past decade have resulted in the publication of new classification or nomenclature criteria for several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically for systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, and the systemic vasculitides. Substantial progress has been made in the formulation of new criteria in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic inflammatory myositis. Although the autoimmune rheumatic diseases share many common features and clinical presentations, differentiation between the diseases is crucial because of important distinctions in clinical course, appropriate drugs, and prognoses. We review some of the dilemmas in the diagnosis of these autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and focus on the importance of new classification criteria, clinical assessment, and interpretation of autoimmune serology. In this era of improvement of mortality rates for patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, we pay particular attention to the effect of leading complications, specifically cardiovascular manifestations and cancer, and we update epidemiology and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  4. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  5. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders in patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shradha; Mayer, Lloyd

    2013-09-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders such as chronic or acute diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, and inflammatory bowel diseases can indicate immune deficiency. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, so it is not surprising that intestinal diseases are common among immunodeficient patients. Gastroenterologists therefore must be able to diagnose and treat patients with primary immunodeficiency. Immune-related gastrointestinal diseases can be classified as those that develop primarily via autoimmunity, infection, an inflammatory response, or malignancy. Immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients with gastrointestinal diseases present with similar symptoms. However, intestinal biopsy specimens from immunodeficient patients often have distinct histologic features, and these patients often fail to respond to conventional therapies. Therefore, early recognition of symptoms and referral to an immunologist for a basic immune evaluation is required to select appropriate treatments. Therapies for primary immunodeficiency comprise immunoglobulin replacement, antibiotics, and, in severe cases, bone marrow transplantation. Treatment of immunodeficient patients with concomitant gastrointestinal disease can be challenging, and therapy with immunomodulators often is required for severe disease. This review aims to guide gastroenterologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary naringenin supplementation attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by modulating autoimmune inflammatory responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoimmune disease is prevalent in humans. Since conventional therapies have limited efficacy and often come with significant side effects, nutrition may provide an alternative and complementary approach to improving the autoimmune disorders. Naringenin, a flavonoid found in citrus fruits, has been ...

  9. Analysis of the autoimmune regulator gene in patients with autoimmune non-APECED polyendocrinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Alessia; Gianchecchi, Elena; Palombi, Melania; Luciano, Rosa; Di Carlo, Pierluigi; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmunity was derived from a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. AIRE gene variants and, in particular, heterozygous loss-of-function mutations were also discovered in organ-specific autoimmune disorders, possibly contributing to their etiopathogenesis. It was suggested that even predisposition to develop certain autoimmune conditions may be derived from AIRE gene polymorphisms including S278R and intronic IVS9+6 G>A. In this study we unravel the hypothesis on whether AIRE gene variants may predispose individuals to associated autoimmune conditions in 41 Italian patients affected by non-APECED autoimmune polyendocrinopathies. We could not detect any heterozygous mutations of the AIRE gene. Although a trend of association was observed, heterozygous polymorphisms S278R and IVS9+6 G>A were detected in patients without statistically significant prevalence than in controls. Their putative contribution to autoimmune polyendocrinopathies and their predictive value in clinical strategies of disease development could be unravelled by analysing a larger sample of diseased patients and healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoimmunity, Not a Developmental Defect, is the Cause for Subfertility of Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekäläinen, E; Pöntynen, N; Meri, S; Arstila, T P; Jarva, H

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune regulator's (AIRE) best characterized role is in the generation immunological tolerance, but it is also involved in many other processes such as spermatogenesis. Loss-of-function mutations in AIRE cause a disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED; also called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, APS-1) that is dominated by various autoimmune manifestations, mainly endocrinopathies. Both patients with APECED and Aire(-/-) mice suffer from varying levels of infertility, but it is not clear if it is a result of an autoimmune tissue damage or more of a developmental defect. In this study, we wanted to resolve whether or not the reduced fertility of Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on the adaptive immune system and therefore a manifestation of autoimmunity in these mice. We generated lymphopenic mice without Aire expression that were devoid of the autoimmune manifestations previously reported in immunocompetent Aire(-/-) mice. These Aire(-/-) Rag1(-/-) mice regained full fertility. This confirms that the development of infertility in Aire(-/-) mice requires a functional adaptive immune system. We also show that only the male Aire(-/-) mice are subfertile, whereas Aire(-/-) females produce litters normally. Moreover, the male subfertility can be adoptively transferred with lymphocytes from Aire(-/-) donor mice to previously fertile lymphopenic Aire(-/-) recipients. Our data show that subfertility in Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on a functional adaptive immune system thus confirming its autoimmune aetiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Computertomographie of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, H.W.; Roedl, W.

    1982-01-01

    Besides the demonstration of parenchymatous organs CT can be used also in the diagnosis of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract, e.g. the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and the small and large bowels, since the development of fast scanners with higher resolution. Conventional X-ray and endoscopy have to be primary diagnostics. CT, on the other hand, is capable of assessing of extraluminal and intramural tumor extension. In inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, CT can show the environmental reaction. In penetrating ulcers of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, the extension and direction of penetration can be figured by CT well. Extraenteral masses with secondary displacement, impression or infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract are often verified by CT only. One of the CT domains is the local relapse of rectum carcinoma following rectum amputation especially in differentiation from local scar formation. The importance of CT in radiotherapy treatment planning is not subject of this paper. (orig.) [de

  12. Effect of DSS on Bacterial Growth in Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinková, J; Svobodová, H; Brachtlová, T; Gardlík, R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an idiopathic autoimmune disorder that is mainly divided into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are known for their beneficial effect and used as a treatment option in different gastrointestinal problems. The aim of our study was to find suitable bacterial vectors for gene therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 were investigated as potential vectors. Our results show that the growth of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 was inhibited in the majority of samples collected from dextran sodium sulphate-treated animals compared with control growth in phosphate-buffered saline. The growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in all investigated samples was enhanced or unaffected in comparison with phosphate-buffered saline; however, it did not reach the growth rates of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Dextran sodium sulphate treatment had a stimulating effect on the growth of both strains in homogenates of distant small intestine and proximal colon samples. The gastrointestinal tract contents and tissue homogenates did not inhibit growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 in comparison with the negative control, and provided more suitable environment for growth compared to Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. We therefore conclude that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 is a more suitable candidate for a potential bacterial vector, even though it has no known probiotic properties.

  13. Coeliac disease: a unique model for investigating broken tolerance in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Melinda Y; Tye-Din, Jason A

    2016-11-01

    Coeliac disease, a prevalent immune-mediated enteropathy driven by dietary gluten, provides an exceptional human model to dissect the genetic, environmental and immunologic factors operating in autoimmunity. Despite the causative antigen being an exogenous food protein, coeliac disease has many features in common with autoimmune disease including a strong HLA class II association and the presence of pathogenic CD4 + T cells and autoantibodies. CD8 + intraepithelial lymphocytes specifically target and destroy intestinal epithelium in response to stress signals and not a specific antigen. A unique feature of coeliac disease is the ability to remove gluten to induce disease remission and reintroduce it to trigger a memory response. This provides an unparalleled opportunity to study disease-relevant CD4 + T cells that have been expanded in vivo. As a result, the causative peptides have been characterised at a level unprecedented for any autoimmune disease. Despite the complexity of the gluten proteome, resistance to gastrointestinal proteolysis and susceptibility to post-translational modification by transglutaminase help shape a restricted repertoire of immunogenic gluten peptides that have high affinity for disease-associated HLA. The critical steps in coeliac disease pathogenesis have been broadly elucidated and provide the basis for experimental therapies in pre-clinical or clinical development. However, little is known about how and why tolerance to gluten sometimes breaks or fails to develop. Understanding the interactions between genes, the environment, gluten immunity and the microbiome may provide novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of disease.

  14. A CASE OF SELECTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULIN A DEFICIENCY ASSOCIATED WITH AUTOIMMUNE GASTRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Moskalets

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective immunoglobulin A (IgA deficiency is considered to be the most common primary immune deficiency. Up to now, no specific genetic mutation causing this disorder has been found. True prevalence of selective IgA deficiency in the population is unknown, because in most cases it is asymptomatic and occurs as an incidental laboratory finding. In some patients, it can manifest by respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, as well as allergic and autoimmune disorders. According to the literature, autoimmune disorders in patients with selective IgA deficiency have a more aggressive course and a worse prognosis. This clinical case of a combination of selective IgA deficiency and autoimmune gastritis demonstrates that patients with primary immunodeficiency, especially adults, may not know about their disease for a long time. The paper may be of interest for practicing doctors of various specialties, first of all, for gastroenterologists, internists, general practitioners, and is intended to increase awareness about diagnosis of selective IgA deficiency. There is no specific treatment for this immunodeficiency, but one should bear in mind that blood transfusions and intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with high IgA content are contra-indicated in these patients due to a high risk of anaphylactic reactions.

  15. Motion management in gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hassan; Chang, Bryan; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2014-06-01

    The presence of tumor and organ motions complicates the planning and delivery of radiotherapy for gastrointestinal cancers. Without proper accounting of the movements, target volume could be under-dosed and the nearby normal critical organs could be over-dosed. This situation is further exacerbated by the close proximity of abdominal tumors to many normal organs at risk (OARs). A number of strategies have been developed to deal with tumor and organ motions in radiotherapy. This article presents a review of the techniques used in the evaluation, quantification, and management of tumor and organ motions for radiotherapy of gastrointestinal cancers.

  16. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  17. Autoimmune diseases and infections: controversial issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, P; Brucato, A; Buskila, D; Gershwin, M E; Giacomazzi, D; Lopez, L R; Luzzati, R; Matsuura, E; Selmi, C; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Atzeni, F

    2008-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of certain types of disease remain controversial and stand like a bridge that crosses infectious, autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathways. Infection, for example, may initiate a disease, although it is the genetic regulation in the host, the interplay between virus or bacteria persistence and autoimmunity that produces the later phases of disease, the antigenic determinants responsible for inducing autoimmune disease, and the pathogenetic effector mechanisms. Infections agents cause pericarditis, but in 85% of cases it is "idiopathic". It has also been shown that persistent Clamydia pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Helicobacter pylori infections cause host immunity and promote atherogenesis. A number of infectious agents have been suggested as potential triggers for primary biliary cirrhosis. Infections and vaccinations have also been linked to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome, a common, chronic syndrome of widespread pain. Many factors are also responsible for fever of unknown origin such as: infections, autoimmunity disease, etc. However, it is difficult to determine a direct correlation between the infections agents in such a large group of diseases. The aim of this review is to analyze some of the controversies about the role of infections in autoimmune diseases.

  18. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Autoimmune hepatitis in Italy: the Bologna experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Quarneti, Chiara; Ferri, Silvia; Menichella, Rita; Cassani, Fabio; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis affects mainly women. It is subdivided into type 1 and type 2 according to the autoantibody profile and without immunosuppression usually evolves to cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. We evaluated clinical, biochemical, immunological and genetic features and treatment response of 163 consecutive Italian patients with autoimmune hepatitis. At diagnosis, type 1 autoimmune hepatitis showed more inflamed liver histology and more pronounced cholestasis, whereas type 2 was more common in children. Male and female patients shared similar clinical, biochemical and immunological features. Of 89 patients with 5-year follow-up or longer, 23 patients irrespective of presenting clinical, biochemical and immunological features achieved complete remission (normal transaminases and gammaglobulin levels) which was maintained with minimal steroid dosage; attempt at treatment withdrawal led to disease exacerbation. Complete responders had more often HLA DRB1*0401 (p = 0.011) and their risk of disease progression was lower (p < 0.0001). Type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis is one and the same disease. Autoimmune hepatitis has similar features in male and female patients. HLA DRB1*0401 positive patients are more likely to achieve complete remission. Continuous low-dose steroids are necessary to maintain remission, significantly reducing the risk of disease progression.

  20. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  1. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves' disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid.

  2. Loss of zinc finger MYND-type containing 10 (zmynd10) affects cilia integrity and axonemal localization of dynein arms, resulting in ciliary dysmotility, polycystic kidney and scoliosis in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Asano-Hoshino, Anshin; Nakakura, Takashi; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Ansai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Masato; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Hagiwara, Haruo; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2017-10-01

    Cilia and flagella are hair-like organelles that project from the cell surface and play important roles in motility and sensory perception. Motility defects in cilia and flagella lead to primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a rare human disease. Recently zinc finger MYND-type containing 10 (ZMYND10) was identified in humans as a PCD-associated gene. In this study, we use medaka fish as a model to characterize the precise functions of zmynd10. In medaka, zmynd10 is exclusively expressed in cells with motile cilia. Embryos with zmynd10 Morpholino knockdown exhibited a left-right (LR) defect associated with loss of motility in Kupffer's vesicle (KV) cilia. This immotility was caused by loss of the outer dynein arms, which is a characteristic ultrastructural phenotype in PCD. In addition, KV cilia in zmynd10 knockdown embryos had a swollen and wavy morphology. Together, these results suggest that zmynd10 is a multi-functional protein that has independent roles in axonemal localization of dynein arms and in formation and/or maintenance of cilia. The C-terminal region of zmynd10 has a MYND-type zinc finger domain (zf-MYND) that is important for its function. Our rescue experiment showed that the zmynd10-ΔC truncated protein, which lacks zf-MYND, was still partially functional, suggesting that zmynd10 has another functional domain besides zf-MYND. To analyze the later stages of development, we generated a zmynd10 knockout mutant using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology. Adult mutants exhibited sperm dysmotility, scoliosis and progressive polycystic kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of drug correction options of postoperative motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract on inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Людмила Василівна Новицька-Усенко

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Postoperative dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract is a common complication after operations on the abdominal cavity. Intestinal inflammatory response plays an important role in the development of postoperative motility disorders.Materials and methods. After Local Ethics Committee approval and obtaining informed consent, 103 patients were prospectively divided into 4 groups depending on the characteristics of post-operative intensive care. In the 1 (control group (n=27, patients after operation received stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract with metoclopramidum and neostigminum. In group 2 (n=24, patients received L-arginine and metoclopramidum. In the group 3 (n=25 patients received metoclopramidum and simeticonum. In group 4 (n=27, patients received L-arginine, metoclopramidum and simeticonum. Markers of inflammation (leukocyte levels, fibrinogen, IL-1α, TNFα, IL-10, the calculation of leukocyte index of intoxication were studied preoperatively, after 1,3 and 7 days.Results and Conclusion. Pathological process in the abdomen accompanied by the development of postoperative gastrointestinal dysmotility, increase in the number of white blood cells to 58.8% (p <0.001 and fibrinogen to 55.5% (p<0.001, imbalance of the inflammatory response of the body in the form of increased pro-inflammatory IL-1α by 25.1% (p = 0.047 with a simultaneous decrease the level of TNF more than 400% (p <0,001, before surgery. Group 1 patients inflammatory response persisted for more than 7 days after the operation and leads to depletion of proinflammatory cytokine system, as indicated by the levels of pro-inflammatory IL-1α and TNFα, whose values were below normal at 503% (p <0.001 and 57.9% (p <0.001. When using metoclopramide and L-arginine manifestations of inflammatory response persisted throughout the observation period, but progressively, and at 7 days after operation were smaller than in the other groups. So, in group 2 at 7 days after

  4. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has a variety of causes (Table 1) and is the commonest complication of peptic ulceration and portal hypertension. Peptic ulceration in the duodenum or stomach and oesophageal varices are the conditions most often responsible for patients who have the potential to present.

  5. [Motility and functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at the 2014 Digestive Diseases Week conference that are of greatest interest to us. New data have been provided on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders, with recent prevalence data for irritable bowel syndrome and fecal incontinence. We know more about the pathophysiological mechanisms of the various functional disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, which has had the largest number of studies. Thus, we have gained new data on microinflammation, genetics, microbiota, psychological aspects, etc. Symptoms such as abdominal distension have gained interest in the scientific community, both in terms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and those with constipation. From the diagnostic point of view, the search continues for a biomarker for functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially for irritable bowel syndrome. In the therapeutic area, the importance of diet for these patients (FODMAP, fructans, etc.) is once again confirmed, and data is provided that backs the efficacy of already marketed drugs such as linaclotide, which rule out the use of other drugs such as mesalazine for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This year, new forms of drug administration have been presented, including metoclopramide nasal sprays and granisetron transdermal patches for patients with gastroparesis. Lastly, a curiosity that caught our attention was the use of a vibrating capsule to stimulate gastrointestinal transit in patients with constipation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  7. Nutritional management of gastrointestinal malignancies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutritional management of a patient with gastrointestinal cancer fi rst begins with an appropriate nutritional assessment, seeing that several factors could affect the patient's nutritional status. The most signifi cant dietary advice for cancer patients in general, is to consume a signifi cant amount of energy daily to maintain ...

  8. Gastrointestinal Histoplasmosis: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rashi; Lipi, Lipika; Gajendra, Smeeta; Mohapatra, Ishani; Goel, Ruchika K; Duggal, Rajan; Mishra, Smruti Ranjan; Gautam, Dheeraj

    2017-10-01

    Histoplasmosis is an invasive mycosis caused by inhalation of the spores of dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum. The disease manifests in the lung as acute or chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis and in severe cases gets disseminated in multiple organs like skin, adrenal gland, central nervous system, lymph node, liver, spleen, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract. It occurs most commonly in immunodeficient patients like HIV-positive patients and transplant recipients, while immunocompetent hosts are affected rarely. In cases of gastrointestinal histoplasmosis, the samples are collected for culture and biopsy should be sent for histopathological examination for definitive diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective study of colonic biopsies performed in the department of gastroenterology in a tertiary care hospital of north India from January 2014 to December 2015. Five cases of colonic histoplasmosis were diagnosed on histopathology out of which 4 patients were from north India while 1 patient was from Myanmar. The patients presented with various complaints, including loose stools, diarrhea, altered bowel habits, and gastrointestinal bleeding. The prognosis is very good after early and aggressive treatment while the disease is fatal if it remains untreated. In our study, 2 patients died within few days of diagnosis due to delay in the diagnosis, dissemination, and associated complications. Other patients were started on amphotericin B deoxycholate and are under follow-up. An early diagnosis of gastrointestinal histoplasmosis is important as appropriate treatment leads to long-term survival while untreated cases are almost fatal.

  9. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF CLARIAS GARIEPINUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    One hundred and fourteen (114) and one hundred and ninety nine (199) were infested fish samples from gills and gastrointestinal tract respectively. Parasites recovered during the survey include two species from gills identified as. Ergasilus sarsi ((24.60%) a crustacean (copepod), and one protozoan (myxosporean) named.

  10. Bullock on Rat Gastrointestinal Microflora

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    20, No.2 (May) 2017. Oloyede, Odedara Omenu disorders (GIT) which are very common. Traditionally, diagnoses of the different types of gastrointestinal diseases are sometimes ... bacteria genera and species in the human body, regardless of body sites .... vitamin C causes the purple indicator solution to lose its colour.

  11. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has a variety of causes (Table 1) and is the commonest complication of peptic ulceration and portal hypertension. Peptic ulceration in the duo- denum or stomach and oesophageal varices are the conditions most often responsible for patients who have the potential to present.

  12. GASTROINTESTINAL FOOD ALLERGY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Makarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the prevalence  of food allergies. Pathological conditions associated  with a food intolerance are becoming an increasingly urgent problem of pediatrics. According to different researchers, allergic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract occurs in 25–50% of patients with such common pathology as an allergy to cow's milk proteins. The severity of diseases  associated  with food allergies and their prognosis  depend largely on early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Difficulties and errors  in the diagnosis  of gastrointestinal  food allergies  are associated  with both subjective  and objective  reasons,  primarily due to the fact that gastrointestinal  reactions to food are often delayed and non-IgE-mediated. The article describes clinical forms of gastrointestinal food allergy according to the existing classification. Diagnostic algorithms and modern approaches  to differential diagnosis of disease based on evidence-based  medicine and corresponding to international consensus papers are given.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease : ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego; Baumann, Ulrich; Czubkowski, Piotr; Debray, Dominique; Dezsofi, Antal; Fischler, Björn; Gupte, Girish; Hierro, Loreto; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Jahnel, Jörg; Smets, Françoise; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hadžić, Nedim

    Paediatric autoimmune liver disease is characterised by inflammatory liver histology, circulating autoantibodies and increased levels of IgG, in the absence of a known etiology. Three conditions have a likely autoimmune pathogenesis: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis

  14. Antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Rogacka, Natalia; Rogacki, Michał; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are primarily significant in the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue diseases. The relationship between their occurrence in allergic diseases is poorly documented. However, the mechanism of allergic and autoimmune diseases has a common thread. In both cases, an increased production of IgE antibodies and presence of ANA in selected disease entities is observed. Equally important is the activation of basophils secreting proinflammatory factors and affecting the differentiation of TH17 lymphocytes. Both autoimmune and allergic diseases have complex multi-pathogenesis and often occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The presence of antinuclear antibodies was confirmed in many systemic connective tissue diseases and some allergic diseases. Examples include atopic dermatitis, non-allergic asthma, and pollen allergy. Co-occurring allergic and autoimmune disorders induce further search for mechanisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of both groups of diseases.

  15. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them......-morbidities in individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  16. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state of tolerance. By contrast, foreign antigens result in DC maturation and DC-induced T-cell activation. Inappropriate maturation of DCs due to infections or tissue injury may cause alterations in the balance between the tolerogenic and immunogenic functions of DCs and instigate the development of autoimmune diseases. This article provides an overview of the effects of advancing age on DC functions and their implications in autoimmunity.

  17. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before and during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy. PMID:27421217

  18. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  19. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  20. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez A S Quaresma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL. Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS. The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  1. The clinical extremes of autoimmune cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis (AIC was first described in 1987 as immunocholangitis in three women who presented with signs and symptoms of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, but who were antimitochondrial (AMA negative and antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive, and responded to immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and prednisolone (1. AIC is a rare chronic cholestatic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of high ANA or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA but AMA seronegativity. Histologically, AIC exhibits bile duct injury (2. In terms of therapeutics, in addition to response to ursodeoxycholic acid, a prompt response to corticosteroids has also been reported in earlier stages, distinguishing it from PBC. Herein the authors describe two cases with mixed signs of PBC and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. The diagnostic differentiation between these diseases (AIC, PBC and AIH is essential because of the different therapeutic strategies. Our cases highlight the importance of clinician awareness of the autoimmune spectrum of liver diseases.

  2. [Thymoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkane, A; Bellamy, J; Leroy-Terquem, E; Levy, R

    2003-09-01

    We report an association between a thymus tumor and autoimmune thyroiditis. This association is probably related to loss of immune control secondary to loss of thymus integrity. A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized for thoracic pain. Her past history included thyroiditis treated by L-thyroxin for two years. The chest x-ray demonstrated a mediastinal opacity which was confirmed by computed tomography. Surgical resection was performed and histological analysis of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of lympho-epithelial thymoma. Thyroid immunity tests demonstrated the presence of anti-peroxidase antibodies confirming the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Chest x-ray and CT-scan are indicated in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis to search for a thymic mass. Conversely, search for autoimmune thyroiditis is warranted in patients with an identified thymic mass.

  3. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Exercise and the gastro-intestinal tract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on perfonnance and me value of cardiovascular training in improving performance in aerobic sports is well recognised. The role of me gastro-intestinal tracr, bom as a limiting and sustaining facror in aerobic exercises, is less well appreciared. Gastro-intestinal symptoms. The spectrum of gastro-intestinal effecrs of exercise ...

  6. Diagnostic indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aim: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy now assumes a prominent role in the diagnosis and therapy of upper GI diseases. Some indications for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy include dyspepsia, dysphagia, peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study aimed to review the ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions APECED Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy ( APECED ) is an inherited condition that ...

  8. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  9. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  10. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable

  11. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer JM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Greer, Pamela A McCombeThe University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways.Keywords: twins, concordance, autoimmune disease, nongenetic factors, immune system, epigenetic modifications

  12. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  13. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  14. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Autoimmune Chronic Gastritis: New diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

    OpenAIRE

    VALDES SOCIN, Hernan Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for the clinician is to detect early gastric autoimmunity markers to avoid some of its complications such as micronutriments and drug malabsorption. Indeed autoimmune gastritis may be associated with the development of neuroendocrine tumors (NET), gastric adenocarcinomas or even MALT lymphomas. In this lecture we summarize recent diagnostic tools and new therapies taylored for autoimmune gastritis.

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palankezhe Sashidharan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report presents a case of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor operated recently in a 47-year-old female patient and the outcome, as well as literature review of the pathological identification, sites of origin, and factors predicting its behavior, prognosis and treatment.

  17. Premature atherosclerosis in systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, Karina de

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are associated with a significantly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Many risk factors are involved in the pathogenesis of

  18. Checks and Balances in Autoimmune Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadena, Rebeca Hid; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Wind, T. T.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Heeringa, Peter; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Age-associated changes in the immune system including alterations in surface protein expression are thought to contribute to an increased susceptibility for autoimmune diseases. The balance between the expression of coinhibitory and costimulatory surface protein molecules, also known as immune

  19. Immunosensors for Biomarker Detection in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zambrano, Amarayca; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Xing, Yikun; Rippy, Justin; Wu, Tianfu

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system generates proinflammatory molecules and autoantibodies that mistakenly attack their own body. Traditional diagnosis of autoimmune disease is primarily based on physician assessment combined with core laboratory tests. However, these tests are not sensitive enough to detect early molecular events, and quite often, it is too late to control these autoimmune diseases and reverse tissue damage when conventional tests show positivity for disease. It is fortunate that during the past decade, research in nanotechnology has provided enormous opportunities for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors in detecting early biomarkers with high sensitivity. Biosensors consist of a biorecognition element and a transducer which are able to facilitate an accurate detection of proinflammatory molecules, autoantibodies and other disease-causing molecules. Apparently, novel biosensors could be superior to traditional metrics in assessing the drug efficacy in clinical trials, especially when specific biomarkers are indicative of the pathogenesis of disease. Furthermore, the portability of a biosensor enables the development of point-of-care devices. In this review, various types of biomolecule sensing systems, including electrochemical, optical and mechanical sensors, and their applications and future potentials in autoimmune disease treatment were discussed.

  20. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  1. Autoimmune diseases: MIF as a therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Dorothee; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Areas covered in this review: Our aim is to discuss MIF-directed therapies as a novel therapeutic approach. The review covers literature from the past 10 years. What the reader will gain: MIF inhibition has been shown to be efficacious in many experimental and pre-clinical studies of autoimmune

  2. S2k Leitlinie Autoimmune Lebererkrankungen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassburg, Christian P.; Beckebaum, Susanne; Geier, Andreas; Gotthardt, Daniel; Klein, Reinhild; Melter, Michael; Schott, Eckart; Spengler, Ulrich; Tacke, Frank; Trauner, Michael; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Tannapfel, Andrea; Tischendorf, Jens J.; Schramm, Christoph; Albert, Jörg; Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Antoni, Christoph; Berg, Christoph; Bufler, Philip; Dannel, Frank; Dietrich, Christoph; Engelmann, Guido; Feist, Eugen; Fickert, Peter; Fischer, Lutz; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Giek, Angelika; Görtz, Rüdiger Stephan; Herzer, Kerstin; Hofer, Harald; Hohenester, Simon; Höhn, Mariele; Hüppe, Dietrich; In der Smitten, Susanne; Jahnel, Jörg; Keitel-Anselmino, Verena; Kirchner, Gabriele; Kremer, Andreas; Lauenstein, Andreas; Lenzen, Henrike; Mayerle, Julia; Müller, Tobias; Müllhaupt, Beat; Nashan, Björn; Rust, Christian; Schattenberg, Jörn M.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schreyer, Andreas; Sebode, Marcial; Siegmund, Britta; Terjung, Birgit; Teufel, Andreas; van Thiel, Ingo; Wirth, Stefan; Witte, Torsten; Beuers, Ulrich; Gerken, Guido; Graziadei, Ivo; Lohse, Ansgar; Manns, Michael P.; Tilg, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    The guideline was created under the leadership of the DGVS and with participation of neighbouring scientific societies and is intended as a practical aid for the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune liver diseases. The aim is to represent the current state of science, promote the recognition of the

  3. AIDBD: AUTOIMMUNE AND INFLAMMATORY DISEASES BIOMARKER DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwinder Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges facing the healthcare industry is how to personalize, or tailor healthcare products and services to individuals’ unique genetic and biomarker make-ups. Biomarkers provide information about normal or patho-physiological processes to detect or define disease progression or to predict or quantify therapeutic responses. Once these footprints have been identified and measured, they can then be used to personalize or tailor treatment plans, products and services to each individual’s unique makeup and background. Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases Biomarker Database (AIDBD is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering information on known autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, biomarkers and available medications. It allows users to link autoimmune and inflammatory diseases to protein or gene biomarkers through its user interface. Currently, AIDBD integrates 206 biomarkers for 21 autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and data on 516 launched drugs for the treatment these diseases. The database is freely accessible at http://www.aidbd.in/.

  4. Increased prevalence of autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K H; Cleemann, L; Hjerrild, B E

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to develop autoimmune conditions such as coeliac disease (CD), thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The objective of the present study was to examine TS of various karyotypes for autoantibodies and corresponding diseases. This was investigated...

  5. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  6. Costimulation and autoimmune diabetes in BB rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, BC; Whalen, B; Zipris, D; Yagita, H; Rozing, J; Groen, H; Benjamin, CD; Hunig, T; Drexhage, HA; Ansari, MJ; Leif, J; Mordes, JP; Greiner, DL; Sayegh, MH; Rossini, AA

    Costimulatory signals regulate T-cell activation. To investigate the role of costimulation in autoimmunity and transplantation, we studied the BB rat model of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes-prone BB (BBDP) rats spontaneously develop disease when 55-120 days of age. We observed that two anti-CD28

  7. Autoimmun hepatitis. Fremtroedelsesformer, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Tage-Jensen, U; Vyberg, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study concerning ten patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AiH), diagnosed during a 2 1/2-year period is presented. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 82 years and nine of the patients were women. Their symptoms included jaundice, pruritus, fever, anorexia and fatigue during...

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis : Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic necro-inflammatory disease of the liver. Early recognition is important in order to prevent the development of cirrosis. This review discusses recent developments in the fields of diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of AIH. Methods: Relevant

  9. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (AH...

  10. Study of cytokines microenvironment during autoimmune diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    22, IL-23, TNF-α and TGF-β) were determined. We used the immunoenzymatic technology to assess the titer of cytokines. We found that there was no significant variation of TNF-α level in normal controls and autoimmune diseases ...

  11. Autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis er en underdiagnosticeret sygdomsgruppe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) comprises encephalitides associated with autoantibodies against structures of the neuronal synapse. We review four types of ASE (anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, anti-α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor...

  12. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible

  13. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, P; Limburg, P; Kallenberg, C; Minderaa, R; Battistin, L

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of both multiple motor and vocal tics. While its pathogenesis at a molecular and cellular level remains unknown, recent research findings point to the possible involvement of autoimmunity in at least a

  14. Autoimmune hepatitis in children in Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitfell-Pedersen, Joanna; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Müller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in childhood is a progressive chronic inflammatory liver disease. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics of 33 paediatric patients diagnosed as having AIH with earlier described cohorts, and to examine the effect of early...

  15. Auto-immune Haemolytic Anaemia and Paroxys

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who presented with an acute auto-immune haemolytic anaemia. In addition to a persistently positive Coombs test, with specific red cell auto-antibodies, the acidified serum test and the sucrose haemolysis test were repeatedly positive. CASE REPORT. A 24-year-old Indian woman was admitted to hospital in. July 1969.

  16. The environment and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Strieder, Thea; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and it has been calculated that 80% of the susceptibility to develop Graves' disease is attributable to genes. The concordance rate for AITD among monozygotic twins is, however, well below I and

  17. Systemic autoimmune disease and Raynaud's phenomonen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cornelis

    1982-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (AID) are clinically characterized by the involvement of multiple organ systems in the desease process, and immunologically by immune responsiveness against "self". The constitute a heterogenous group of disorders wich are presented to the clinician in a wide variety of

  18. Alopecia areata and autoimmunity: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Emy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia areata (AA frequently occur in association with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disorders, anemias and other skin disorders with autoimmune etiology. Despite numerous studies related to individual disease associations in alopecia areata, there is paucity of literature regarding comprehensive studies on concomitant cutaneous and systemic diseases. The present study has been designed to determine if there is a significant association between alopecia areata and other autoimmune diseases. This study covers 71 patients with the diagnosis of alopecia areata as the case group and 71 patients with no evidence of alopecia areata as the control group. Among the cutaneous diseases associated with AA, atopic dermatitis (AD showed maximum frequency with an O/E ratio of 2.5, which indicates that it is two to three times more common in patients with alopecia areata. In our study, thyroid disorders showed the highest frequency with on O/E ratio of 3.2 and a P value of 0.01, which is statistically highly significant. Among the thyroid disorders, hypothyroidism was the most frequent association (14.1% in our study. Since systemic involvement is not infrequent in patients with alopecia areata, it is imperative to screen these patients for associated disorders, particularly atopy, thyroid diseases, anemias and other autoimmune disorders, especially if alopecia areata is chronic, recurrent and extensive.

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones and their targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes...... it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization......, or differentiated maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed in cells outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and neurons but others also in other...

  20. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Irene T.; Madura, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical proc...

  1. Tumor of the gastrointestinal stroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero Leon, Jorge Felipe; Silveira Pablos, Juan Mario; Figueroa, Alejandro Joan; Fuente Pelaez, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    The tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma, known in English language as GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors) are mesenchymal tumors appearing in any place throughout the intestinal tract. The objective of present paper is to present the case of a female patient aged 60 came to Gynecology consultation of the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology due pain in epigastrium irradiating to right flank with increase of volume in the right iliac fossa and by ultrasonography it is a tumor of right ovary projecting to epigastrium and the right hypochondrium. The surgical intervention is described as well as the findings noted in macro- and microscopic studies, as well ass in latter studies by immunohistochemistry of lesion. We conclude with a diagnosis of tumor of gastrointestinal stroma and the results of performed surgical and drugs interventions. It is recommended to assess the significance of a close relationship among general surgeons and gynecologists in face of unexpected diseases due to its difficult preoperative diagnosis leading to a appropriate surgical treatment due to its complexity it is necessary the competence of both surgical specialties

  2. Impact of Autoantibodies against Glycolytic Enzymes on Pathogenicity of Autoimmune Retinopathy and Other Autoimmune Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazyna Adamus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies (AAbs against glycolytic enzymes: aldolase, α-enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase are prevalent in sera of patients with blinding retinal diseases, such as paraneoplastic [cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR] and non-paraneoplastic autoimmune retinopathies, as well as in many other autoimmune diseases. CAR is a degenerative disease of the retina characterized by sudden vision loss in patients with cancer and serum anti-retinal AAbs. In this review, we discuss the widespread serum presence of anti-glycolytic enzyme AAbs and their significance in autoimmune diseases. There are multiple mechanisms responsible for antibody generation, including the innate anti-microbial response, anti-tumor response, or autoimmune response against released self-antigens from damaged, inflamed tissue. AAbs against enolase, GADPH, and aldolase exist in a single patient in elevated titers, suggesting their participation in pathogenicity. The lack of restriction of AAbs to one disease may be related to an increased expression of glycolytic enzymes in various metabolically active tissues that triggers an autoimmune response and generation of AAbs with the same specificity in several chronic and autoimmune conditions. In CAR, the importance of serum anti-glycolytic enzyme AAbs had been previously dismissed, but the retina may be without pathological consequence until a failure of the blood–retinal barrier function, which would then allow pathogenic AAbs access to their retinal targets, ultimately leading to damaging effects.

  3. Recent insights into the role and molecular mechanisms of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Since many years immunologists have being tried to answer the tantalizing enigma of immunological tolerance. Complex mechanisms in both thymus (central tolerance) and peripheral lymphoid organs (peripheral tolerance) underly lymphocyte tolerance and its maintenance. The genesis of autoimmunity involves environmental and genetic mechanisms, both contributing to the disruption and deregulation of central and peripheral tolerance, allowing autoreactive pathogenetic T and B-cell clones arising. Among genetic factors the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is one of the best candidates to understand the complex scenario of autoimmunity. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the AIRE gene. Therefore, the disorder has certainly been a powerful model to address the question concerning how a tolerant state is achieved or maintained and to explore how it has gone lost in the context of autoimmunity. AIRE has been proposed to function as a 'non classical' transcription factor, strongly implicated in the regulation of organ-specific antigen expression in thymic epithelial cells and in the imposition of T cell tolerance, thus regulating the negative selection of autoreactive T cell clones. A plethora of proposal have been suggested for AIRE's potential mechanism of action, thus regulating the negative selection of autoreactive T cells. In this review recent discoveries are presented into the role and molecular mechanisms of the AIRE protein in APECED and other autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  5. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte; Thornton, Laura M; Quaranta, Michela; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Pisetsky, David; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-12-01

    Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44). Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  7. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  8. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors....... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eerens, I.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Van Hoe, L. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Vansteenbergen, W. [Dept. of Hepatology, University Hospitals KU, Leuven (Belgium)

    2001-08-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare type of chronic pancreatitis that may be associated with other autoimmune disorders. The imaging features of this entity may be misleading and suggest the presence of a malignant tumour. We present a case in which MR imaging allowed us to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is another autoimmune-related disease. Typical MR characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis include focal or diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, the absence of parenchymal atrophy and significant dilation proximal to the site of stenosis, the absence of peripancreatic spread, the clear demarcation of the lesion and the presence of a peripancreatic rim. (orig.)

  10. Patient Health Communication Mediating Effects Between Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Gastrointestinal Worry in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varni, James W; Shulman, Robert J; Self, Mariella M; Saeed, Shehzad A; Patel, Ashish S; Nurko, Samuel; Neigut, Deborah A; Saps, Miguel; Zacur, George M; Dark, Chelsea V; Bendo, Cristiane B; Pohl, John F

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Gastrointestinal Worry, and Communication Scales, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales were completed in a 9-site study by 252 pediatric patients with IBD. Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales measuring stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea and patient communication were tested for bivariate and multivariate linear associations with Gastrointestinal Worry Scales specific to patient worry about stomach pain or bowel movements. Mediational analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized mediating effects of patient health communication as an intervening variable in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry. The predictive effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry were mediated in part by patient health communication with health care providers/significant others in their daily life. In predictive models using multiple regression analyses, the full conceptual model of demographic variables, gastrointestinal symptoms (stomach pain, constipation, or diarrhea), and patient communication significantly accounted for 46, 43, and 54 percent of the variance in gastrointestinal worry (all Ps health communication explains in part the effects of gastrointestinal symptoms on gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients with IBD. Supporting patient disease-specific communication to their health care providers and significant others may improve health-related quality of life for pediatric patients with IBD.

  11. Autoimmunity in patients with selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, H; Gharib, B; Shahinpour, S; Masoom, S N; Havaei, A; Mirminachi, B; Arandi, N; Torabi-Sagvand, B; Khazaei, H A; Mohammadi, J; Rezaei, N; Aghamohammadi, A

    2015-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common primary antibody deticiency. Patients with SIgAD have a greater risk of concomitant autoimmune disorders than healthy individuals. The exact mechanism underlying the relationship between autoimmunity and SIgAD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential associations between autoimmunity and specific clinical or immunological findings in patients with SIgAD. The study population comprised 57 symptomatic patients (65% males) with confirmed SIgAD who were referred to our center. Demographic data and history of autoimmunity were recorded both for patients and for their relatives. Comprehensive clinical and laboratory examinations were performed to investigate autoimmune complications in all the patients. Autoimmune disorders were documented in 17 cases (29.8%; 9 males and 8 females). The most common manifestations were thyroiditis, vitiligo, and hemolytic anemia (3 cases each). Ten patients (17.5%) had a family history of autoimmunity. Significant associations were detected between autoimmunity and increased duration of follow-up (P = .003), serum level of IgM (P = .01), regulatory T-cell count (P = .03), and class-switched memory B-cell count (P = .01). Four cases of autoimmune SIgAD (23.5%) progressed to common variable immunodeficiency during the follow-up period (P = .006). Autoimmune disorders, autoimmune cytopenia, and Ig subclass deficiency can lead to severe clinical manifestations in patients with SIgAD. Therefore, immunologists and pediatricians should be aware of these conditions.

  12. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-11-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  14. Type 1 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy have pan-enteric prolongation of gastrointestinal transit times and an altered caecal pH profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Pedersen, Anne Grave; Brock, Birgitte; Jakobsen, Poul Erik; Karmisholt, Jesper; Mohammed, Sahar D; Scott, S Mark; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Brock, Christina

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesised that type 1 diabetic patients with established diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) would have segmental and/or pan-enteric dysmotility in comparison to healthy age-matched controls. We aimed to investigate the co-relationships between gastrointestinal function, degree of DSPN and clinical symptoms. An observational comparison was made between 48 patients with DSPN (39 men, mean age 50 years, range 29-71 years), representing the baseline data of an ongoing clinical trial (representing a secondary analysis of baseline data collected from an ongoing double-blind randomised controlled trial investigating the neuroprotective effects of liraglutide) and 41 healthy participants (16 men, mean age 49 years, range 30-78) who underwent a standardised wireless motility capsule test to assess gastrointestinal transit. In patients, vibration thresholds, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom questionnaires were recorded. Compared with healthy controls, patients showed prolonged gastric emptying (299 ± 289 vs 179 ± 49 min; p = 0.01), small bowel transit (289 ± 107 vs 224 ± 63 min; p = 0.001), colonic transit (2140, interquartile range [IQR] 1149-2799 min vs 1087, IQR 882-1650 min; p = 0.0001) and whole-gut transit time (2721, IQR 1196-3541 min vs 1475 (IQR 1278-2214) min; p pH across the ileocaecal junction (-1.8 ± 0.4 vs -1.3 ± 0.4 pH; p gastrointestinal transit times and a more acidic caecal pH, which may represent heightened caecal fermentation, are present in patients with type 1 diabetes. The potential implication of delayed gastrointestinal transit on the bioavailability of nutrition and on pharmacotherapeutic and glycaemic control warrants further investigation. EUDRA CT: 2013-004375-12.

  15. Gastrointestinal helminths in migratory Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Rewatkar

    Full Text Available Survey of gastrointestinal helminth parasites in camel migrated from U.P., M.P., and Rajasthan at Nagpur region was carried out in early summer, 2008. Total 28 samples (12 males and 16 females were collected from different places of Nagpur region. They revealed parasites as Trichuris sp.(50%, Strongyloides sp.(32.14%, Trichostrongylus sp.(10.71%, Nematodirus sp.(10.71%, Haemonchus sp.(14.28%, Eurytrema sp.(21.42% ,Eimeria sp.(25%, Entamoeba sp.(17.85% and Balantidium sp.(7.14%.All were found positive for mixed helminthic infection. [Vet World 2009; 2(7.000: 258-258

  16. History of Polish gastrointestinal radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanik, A

    2003-12-01

    As early as several days after the publication of the information concerning Roentgen's discovery the first radiological examinations were performed in Poland. The new method was immediately introduced into medical practice, including gastroenterology. In that pioneer period the most important works were those by Walery Jaworski who was the first man in the world to perform an X-ray of gall stones as well as the stomach with the use of a contrast medium. In its more-than-a-hundred-year history Polish gastrointestinal radiology has attempted not only to catch up with the world science, but it also has made a considerable contribution to its development.

  17. Gastrointestinal manifestations of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Lynette A; Sokol, Ronald J

    2003-09-01

    Although non-specific gastrointestinal and hepatic symptoms are commonly found in most mitochondrial disorders, they are among the cardinal manifestations of several primary mitochondrial diseases, such as: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy; mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome; Alpers syndrome; and Pearson syndrome. Management of these heterogeneous disorders includes the empiric supplementation with various "mitochondrial cocktails," supportive therapies, and avoidance of drugs and conditions known to have a detrimental effect on the respiratory chain. There is a great need for improved methods of treatment and controlled clinical trials of existing therapies. Liver transplantation is successful in acquired cases; however neuromuscular involvement in primary mitochondrial disorders should be a contraindication for liver transplantation.

  18. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T; Madura, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.

  19. Fraccionando la microbiota gastrointestinal humana

    OpenAIRE

    Peris Bondia, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    La microbiota gastrointestinal humana es una de las comunidades microbianas más diversa y compleja que se puede encontrar en la naturaleza. Las nuevas tecnologías de secuenciación permiten obtener una amplia visión de la diversidad microbiana, lo que ha revelado una gran cantidad de bacterias no cultivables. A pesar del potencial de estas tecnologías de alto rendimiento la metagenómica no muestra la imagen completa. La citometría de flujo es una metodología que permite describir y/o separa...

  20. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  1. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  2. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahn, Benjamin; Bitton, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the evaluation and management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) in children. The common etiologies at different ages are reviewed. Conditions with endoscopic importance for diagnosis or therapy include solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, polyps, vascular lesions, and colonic inflammation and ulceration. Diagnostic modalities for identifying causes of LGIB in children include endoscopy and colonoscopy, cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging, video capsule endoscopy, and enteroscopy. Pre-endoscopic preparation and decision-making unique to pediatrics is highlighted. The authors conclude with a summary of current and emerging therapeutic hemostatic techniques that can be used in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  4. The mechanisms behind helminth's immunomodulation in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashi, Tomer; Bizzaro, Giorgia; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases has risen throughout the last half a century, mostly in the industrialized world. Helminths and their derivatives were found to have a protective role in autoimmunity and inflammatory conditions, as they manipulate the immune network, attenuating the host's cellular and humoral responses. Indeed, various helminth species used in several human and animal models were shown to limit inflammatory activity in a variety of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our review will focus on the main mechanisms by which helminths and their secreted molecules modulate the host's immune system. The main pathways induce a shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype, accelerate T regulatory and B regulatory phenotypes, and attenuate the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, leading to a tolerable scenario. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypertension as an autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Afsar, Baris; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Aslan, Gamze; Yalcin, Can Ege; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension that is considered idiopathic is called essential hypertension and accordingly has no clear culprit for its cause. However, basic research and clinical studies in recent years have expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of essential hypertension. Of these, increased oxidative stress, both in the kidney and arterial wall, closely coupled with inflammatory infiltration now appear to have a prominent role. Discovery of regulatory and interleukin-17-producing T cells has enabled us to better understand the mechanism by which inflammation and autoimmunity, or autoinflammation, lead to the development of hypertension. Despite achieving considerable progress, the intricate interactions between oxidative stress, the immune system and the development of hypertension remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the pathophysiology of hypertension with a focus on the oxidant stress-autoimmunity-inflammation interaction.

  6. Eating disorders, autoimmune, and autoinflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children...... and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all...... inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. RESULTS: We found significantly...

  7. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  9. Innate sensing of the gut microbiota: modulation of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline eIgnacio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse microbial community with which dynamic interactions have been established over millennia of co-evolution. Commensal bacteria and their products are sensed by innate receptors expressed in gut epithelia and in gut-associated immune cells thereby promoting the proper development of mucosal immune system and host homeostasis. Many studies have demonstrated that host-microbiota interactions play a key role during local and systemic immunity. Therefore, this review will focus on how innate sensing of the gut-microbiota and their metabolites through inflammasome and toll-like receptors impact the modulation of a distinct set of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We believe that a better understanding of the fine-tuning that governs host-microbiota interactions will further improve common prophylactic and therapeutic applications.

  10. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  11. Dominant Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator AIRE Are Associated with Common Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedal, Bergithe E; Hellesen, Alexander; Erichsen, Martina M; Bratland, Eirik; Vardi, Ayelet; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kemp, E Helen; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Viken, Marte K; Weetman, Anthony P; Fleishman, Sarel J; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Sewell, W A C; Sozaeva, Leila S; Zayats, Tetyana; Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Orlova, Elizaveta M; Haavik, Jan; Johansson, Stefan; Knappskog, Per M; Løvås, Kristian; Wolff, Anette S B; Abramson, Jakub; Husebye, Eystein S

    2015-06-16

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is crucial for establishing central immunological tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in AIRE cause a rare autosomal-recessive disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), distinguished by multi-organ autoimmunity. We have identified multiple cases and families with mono-allelic mutations in the first plant homeodomain (PHD1) zinc finger of AIRE that followed dominant inheritance, typically characterized by later onset, milder phenotypes, and reduced penetrance compared to classical APS-1. These missense PHD1 mutations suppressed gene expression driven by wild-type AIRE in a dominant-negative manner, unlike CARD or truncated AIRE mutants that lacked such dominant capacity. Exome array analysis revealed that the PHD1 dominant mutants were found with relatively high frequency (>0.0008) in mixed populations. Our results provide insight into the molecular action of AIRE and demonstrate that disease-causing mutations in the AIRE locus are more common than previously appreciated and cause more variable autoimmune phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotti, Pedro P; Aterido, Adrià; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Gomollón, Fernando; García-Planella, Esther; Fernández, Emilia; Sanmartí, Raimon; Gratacós, Jordi; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luís; Palau, Núria; Tortosa, Raül; Corbeto, Mireia L; Lasanta, María L; Marsal, Sara; Julià, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA) on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways). The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  13. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Perrotti

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways. The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  14. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  15. Conversion of autoimmune hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Furqan, Saira; Haque, Naeem-ul; Islam, Najmul

    2014-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are the two autoimmune spectrum of thyroid disease. Cases of conversion from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism have been reported but conversion from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism is very rare. Although such cases have been reported rarely in the past we are now seeing such conversions from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism more frequently in clinical practice. Case presentation We are reporting three cases of middle aged Asian female...

  16. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  17. The autoimmune concept of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Bryan; Salou, Marion; Laplaud, David-Axel; Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). With growing evidence for environmental and genetic factors, MS is now accepted as an autoimmune disease. This complex disease seems to implicate various cell types in both innate and adaptive compartments. Here, we discuss recent advances in the immunological field of MS research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The new era of autoimmune disease research

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have advanced our understanding of genetic factors that underlie systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by various clinical manifestations. SLE also has an environmental component, which can trigger or exacerbate the disease. Despite extensive efforts aimed at elucidating the cellular and biological abnormalities that arise in the immune system of patients with SLE, its pathology remains unclear. Lee and col...

  19. Fragile privileges: autoimmunity in brain and eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Hartmut; Sun, De-ming

    2010-09-01

    Brain and eye tissues are subject to a reduced version of immune surveillance, which has evolved to protect the particularly sensitive tissues from accidental bystander damage created by regular inflammatory responses. Yet, there are autoimmune diseases in both organs. This review discusses the nature of immune reactivity in the healthy eye and brain tissues, and mechanisms that can overcome the protective barriers to create tissue specific disease.

  20. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent

    2015-01-01

    IRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination). RESULTS: Of the 24,679 patients...

  1. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, reduction of handling steps, increase of productivity, decrease of turnaround time, improvement of safety), consolidation (combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments) and integration (linking analytical instruments or group of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices) opened a new era in immunodiagnostics. In this article, we review the most important changes that have occurred in autoimmune diagnostics and present some models related to the introduction of automation in the autoimmunology laboratory, such as automated indirect immunofluorescence and changes in the two-step strategy for detection of autoantibodies; automated monoplex immunoassays and reduction of turnaround time; and automated multiplex immunoassays for autoantibody profiling.

  2. Resilience in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Yhojan; Pacheco, Yovana; Zapata, Elizabeth; Monsalve, Diana M; Mantilla, Rubén D; Rodríguez-Jimenez, Monica; Ramírez-Santana, Carolina; Molano-González, Nicolás; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate the relationship between resilience and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Focus groups, individual interviews, and chart reviews were done to collect data on 188 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis (n=51), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=70), systemic sclerosis (n=35), and Sjögren's syndrome (n=32). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were assessed including disease activity by patient reported outcomes. Resilience was evaluated by using the Brief Resilience Scale. Bivariate, multiple linear regression, and classification and regression trees were used to analyse data. Resilience was influenced by age, duration of disease, and socioeconomic status. Lower resilience scores were observed in younger patients (50years) had higher resilience scores regardless of socioeconomic status. There was no influence of disease activity on resilience. A particular behaviour was observed in systemic sclerosis in which patients with high socioeconomic status and regular physical activity had higher resilience scores. Resilience in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is a continuum process influenced by age and socioeconomic status. The ways in which these variables along with exercise influence resilience deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  4. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  5. Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting presentations at Digestive Disease Week, held in San Diego, in the field of functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders. One of the most important contributions was undoubtedly the presentation of the new Rome IV diagnostic criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders. We therefore devote some space in this article to explaining these new criteria in the most common functional disorders. In fact, there has already been discussion of data comparing Rome IV and Rome III criteria in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, confirming that the new criteria are somewhat more restrictive. From the physiopathological point of view, several studies have shown that the aggregation of physiopathological alterations increases symptom severity in distinct functional disorders. From the therapeutic point of view, more data were presented on the efficacy of acotiamide and its mechanisms of action in functional dyspepsia, the safety and efficacy of domperidone in patients with gastroparesis, and the efficacy of linaclotide both in irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. In irritable bowel syndrome, more data have come to light on the favourable results of a low FODMAP diet, with emphasis on its role in modifying the microbiota. Finally, long-term efficacy data were presented on the distinct treatment options in achalasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Endocannabinoids in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunna; Jo, Jeongbin; Chung, Hae Young; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Im, Eunok

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system mainly consists of endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) and two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB 1 and CB 2 ). This system also includes enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids and molecules required for the uptake and transport of endocannabinoids. In addition, endocannabinoid-related lipid mediators and other putative endocannabinoid receptors, such as transient receptor potential channels and other GPCRs, have been identified. Accumulating evidence indicates that the endocannabinoid system is a key modulator of gastrointestinal physiology, influencing satiety, emesis, immune function, mucosal integrity, motility, secretion, and visceral sensation. In light of therapeutic benefits of herbal and synthetic cannabinoids, the vast potential of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has been demonstrated. This review focuses on the role of the endocannabinoid system in gut homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of intestinal disorders associated with intestinal motility, inflammation, and cancer. Finally, links between gut microorganisms and the endocannabinoid system are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, L E; Hardam, E E; Hertzke, D M; Flatland, B; Rohrbach, B W; Moore, R R

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective study of cases of a unique intramural inflammatory mass within the feline gastrointestinal tract was performed in order to describe and characterize the lesion. Twenty-five cases were identified from archival surgical and postmortem tissues. The lesion most often occurred as an ulcerated intramural mass at the pyloric sphincter (n = 12) or the ileocecocolic junction or colon (n = 9); the remaining cases were in the small intestine. Seven cases also had lymph node involvement. The lesions were characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, large reactive fibroblasts, and trabeculae of dense collagen. Intralesional bacteria were identified in 56% of the cases overall and all of the ileocecocolic junction and colon lesions. Fifty-eight percent of cats tested had peripheral eosinophilia. Cats treated with prednisone had a significantly longer survival time than those receiving other treatments. We propose that this is a unique fibroblastic response of the feline gastrointestinal tract to eosinophilic inflammation that in some cases is associated with bacteria. The lesion is often grossly and sometimes histologically mistaken for neoplasia.

  8. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  9. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  10. The MicroRNA-21 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-06-03

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR and significantly upregulated in a wide range of cancers. It is strongly involved in apoptosis and oncogenesis, since most of its reported targets are tumor suppressors. Recently, miR-21 was found to be correlated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and may play an essential role in regulating autoimmune responses. In particular, miR-21 promotes Th17 cell differentiation, which mediates the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the current research on the mechanisms that regulate miR-21 expression, the potential of miR-21 as a diagnostic biomarker for autoimmune disease and the mechanisms by which miR-21 promotes the development of autoimmune disease. We also discussed the therapeutic potential of targeting miR-21 in treating patients with autoimmune disease.

  11. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated...... with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  12. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Pedersen, Magnus; Svane, Inge Marie

    2017-01-01

    Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...... have generally been reluctant to offer cancer immunotherapy to this patient group. In this brief article, we review the most recent literature on the efficacy and safety of CTLA-4- and PD-1-blocking antibodies in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders....

  13. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  14. Sicilian family with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) and lethal lung disease in one of the affected brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Filippo; Valenzise, Mariella; Alaggio, Rita; Arrigo, Teresa; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Salzano, Giuseppina; Cervato, Sara; Mariniello, Barbara; Lazzarotto, Francesca; Betterle, Corrado

    2008-11-01

    We report the clinical and immunological features of the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE) in two Sicilian brothers with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). They were compound heterozygotes with R203X/R257X. Both had oral candidiasis since the first year of life and later developed hypoparathyroidism and Addison disease. The elder brother had experienced recurrent lower respiratory infections since 5 years of age and over the years developed severe obstructive lung disease with bronchiectasis, which led to death at 18 years of age. Both brothers had circulating autoantibodies against tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin-producing cells were absent in the duodenal mucosa. This was associated with intestinal dysfunction in only the elder brother. (1) In the first Sicilian family with APECED reported up to now we found a heterozygous mutation that had been previously reported only once. (2) In the older brother of this family we observed a severe and lethal lung disease; this case adds to a growing literature describing this association between APECED and respiratory illnesses. (3) Tryptophan hydroxylase antibodies might be hypothesized to be the marker of an autoimmune gastrointestinal illness possibly associated with APECED.

  15. The Biology of Autoimmune Response in the Scurfy Mice that Lack the CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shyr-Te; Sharma, Rahul; Gaskin, Felicia; Kung, John T; Fu, Shu Man

    2012-04-04

    Due to a mutation in the Foxp3 transcription factor, Scurfy mice lack regulatory T-cells that maintain self-tolerance of the immune system. They develop multi-organ inflammation (MOI) and die around four weeks old. The affected organs are skin, tail, lungs and liver. In humans, endocrine and gastrointestinal inflammation are also observed, hence the disease is termed IPEX (Immunodysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked) syndrome. The three week period of fatal MOI offers a useful autoimmune model in which the controls by genetics, T-cell subsets, cytokines, and effector mechanisms could be efficiently investigated. In this report, we will review published work, summarize our recent studies of Scurfy double mutants lacking specific autoimmune-related genes, discuss the cellular and cytokine controls by these genes on MOI, the organ-specificities of the MOI controlled by environments, and the effector mechanisms regulated by specific Th cytokines, including several newly identified control mechanisms for organ-specific autoimmune response.

  16. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  17. Mammalian gastrointestinal parasites in rainforest remnants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we studied the gastrointestinal parasites of nonhuman mammalian hosts living in 10 rainforest patches of the Anamalai Tiger Reserve, India. We examined 349 faecal samples of 17 mammalian species and successfully identified 24 gastroin-testinal parasite taxa including 1 protozoan, 2 trematode, 3 cestode and 18 ...

  18. Gastrointestinal symptoms and ethanol metabolism in alcoholics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R.J.F.; Verlaan, M.; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Doelder, M.S. de; Jong, C.A.J. de; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Excessive alcohol intake frequently results in gastrointestinal discomfort. It is an empirical fact that the severity of gastrointestinal discomfort induced by alcohol abuse is subject to interindividual variation. The aim of this study was to determine whether genetic polymorphism in alcohol

  19. Gastrointestinal symptoms and ethanol metabolism in alcoholics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, R. J. E.; Verlaan, M.; van Oijen, M. G. H.; de Doelder, M. S.; Dejong, C. A. J.; Jansen, J. B. M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Excessive alcohol intake frequently results in gastrointestinal discomfort. It is an empirical fact that the severity of gastrointestinal discomfort induced by alcohol abuse is subject to interindividual variation. The aim of this study was to determine whether genetic polymorphism in alcohol

  20. Appropriateness of Referrals for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Uncomplicated dyspepsia has a low predictive value in diagnosing upper gastrointestinal organic disease making early endoscopy essential. Objective: To assess the reliability of clinical information in the diagnosis of organic disease in patients referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods: Patients ...

  1. Unsedated Flexible Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Need for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To determine the incidence of oxygen desaturation and whether routine oxygen monitoring is necessary during unsedated diagnostic flexible upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods: A prospective study involving 54 consecutive in and out patients who had diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at ...

  2. Stress, Anxiety and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress has major role in functional gastrointestinal system disorders. The most typical example of this situation is Irritable bowel syndrome. Gastrointestinal system’s response to acute or short-term of stress is delay of gastric emptying and stimulation of colonic transition. While CRF2 receptors are mediate the upper section inhibition, CRF1 is responsible for the lower part colonic and anxiogenic response. Visceral hypersensitivity is managed by the emotional motor system, the amygdala plays a significant role and mucosal mast cells arise. But in people with symptoms of functional gastrointestinal, how is differ motility response in healthy individuals, this situation is due to lack of autonomous nervous system or an increased sensitivity of stress is not adequately understood. The brain-gastrointestinal axis frequency and severity of symptoms associated with negative emotions. American Gastroenterology Association is closely associated with the quality of life and is very difficult to treat the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders, re-interpreted under the heading of 'Gastrointestinal Distress'. This review is defined as gastrointestinal distresses, physical, emotional, and behavioral components as a disorder in which, almost like an anxiety disorder are discussed. Physical component is pain, gas, and defecation problems, cognitive component is external foci control, catastrophization and anticipatory anxiety, the emotional component is somatic anxiety, hypervigilance, and avoidance of gastrointestinal stimuli as defined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 122-133

  3. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one.

  4. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one. Images PMID:3712396

  5. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  6. Effects of ageing on gastrointestinal motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing data on the effect of ageing on gastrointestinal motility are few. In this study, we assessed the propulsive effect of all main segments of the gastrointestinal tract in a group of healthy older people. METHODS: 16 healthy volunteers (eight women, eight men) of mean age 81 ye...

  7. Autoimmune Disease in Children and Adolescents with Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blegvad, Christoffer; Egeberg, Alexander; Tind Nielsen, Tilde E.

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease, which, in studies among adults, have been shown to cluster with autoimmune disease. The aim of this cross-sectional register study was to examine possible associations between 9 pre-selected autoimmune diseases and psoriasis in children...... arthritis (adjusted OR 6.61; 2.75-15.87) and vitiligo (adjusted OR 4.76; 1.71-13.20) showed strong associations with psoriasis. In addition to increased risk of selected autoimmune diseases, the presence of psoriasis was associated with increased risk of multiple concurrent autoimmune diseases compared...

  8. Autoimmunity and primary immunodeficiency: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Reinhold E; Grimbacher, Bodo; Witte, Torsten

    2017-12-19

    Autoimmunity and immunodeficiency were previously considered to be mutually exclusive conditions; however, increased understanding of the complex immune regulatory and signalling mechanisms involved, coupled with the application of genetic analysis, is revealing the complex relationships between primary immunodeficiency syndromes and autoimmune diseases. Single-gene defects can cause rare diseases that predominantly present with autoimmune symptoms. Such genetic defects also predispose individuals to recurrent infections (a hallmark of immunodeficiency) and can cause primary immunodeficiencies, which can also lead to immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. Moreover, risk factors for polygenic rheumatic diseases often exist in the same genes as the mutations that give rise to primary immunodeficiency syndromes. In this Review, various primary immunodeficiency syndromes are presented, along with their pathogenetic mechanisms and relationship to autoimmune diseases, in an effort to increase awareness of immunodeficiencies that occur concurrently with autoimmune diseases and to highlight the need to initiate appropriate genetic tests. The growing knowledge of various genetically determined pathologic mechanisms in patients with immunodeficiencies who have autoimmune symptoms opens up new avenues for personalized molecular therapies that could potentially treat immunodeficiency and autoimmunity at the same time, and that could be further explored in the context of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  9. Disruption of immunological tolerance: role of AIRE gene in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, M; Ferrera, F; Filaci, G; Indiveri, F

    2006-02-01

    The mechanism underlying the generation of T and B autoreactive clones in autoimmune diseases is still unknown. Among genetic factors implicated in autoimmunity, Autoimmune Regulator gene (AIRE) is one of the candidates to better understand the complex scenario of autoimmune manifestations. AIRE mutations are responsible for the development of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance; it has been shown that AIRE regulates the negative selection of autoreactive T cells clones, driving the transcription of tissue-specific antigens in thymic epithelial cells. In various autoimmune manifestations correlated or not to APECED, AIRE variants act in a semidominant manner, leading to a reduction in AIRE protein amount per cell, and consequently to a marked decrease in ectopic proteins expression in the thymus. The co-occurrence of autoimmune diseases in the same individual has prompted several studies aimed to recognize shared patho-physiological mechanisms; in this scenario small reductions in function could explain the predisposition to autoimmunity in AIRE-heterozygous carriers of missense mutations; further studies to investigate whether the AIRE gene is involved in determining these autoimmune manifestations should be carried out.

  10. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  11. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G.; Nikolova, D.; Simonetti, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antioxidant supplements in preventing gastrointestinal...... Database from inception to October 2007. We scanned reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials comparing antioxidant supplements to placebo/no intervention examining occurrence of gastrointestinal cancers. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors (GB...... and DN) independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcome measures were gastrointestinal cancers, overall mortality, and adverse effects. Outcomes were reported as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) based on random-effects and fixed-effect model meta...

  12. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  13. Antidepressants and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general Dutch adult population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, B.; Tielemans, M.M.; Aaldering, B.R.; Eikendal, T.; Jaspers Focks, J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are frequently reported adverse effects of antidepressants, but antidepressants are also a treatment modality in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to assess the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general

  14. Gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makepeace, A.R.; Fermont, D.C.; Bennett, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Seventy-two patients with gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treated between 1952 and 1980 are reviewed. The small intestine was involved in 49% of cases and the stomach in 29%. Surgical resection of the tumour was performed whenever feasible. Radiotherapy was used either adjuvantly or for incompletely excised tumours and chemotherapy was more often reserved for advanced, unresected disease. The overall 5 year survival was 36% and the 5 year relapse free survival was 22%. Forty-one (57%) patients relapsed of whom 33 (80%) subsequently died of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The histology in each case was reviewed using the British National Lymphoma Investigation criteria and 94% of cases were reclassified as Grade 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (author)

  15. Radiologic evaluation of gastrointestinal leiomyosarcomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korman, U.; Ersavasti, G.; Kurugoglu, S.; Akman, C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, University of Istanbul, TR-34 300 Istanbul (Turkey); Uygun, N.T. [Department of Pathology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, University of Istanbul, TR-34 300 Istanbul (Turkey)

    1997-10-01

    A 68-year-old woman who had previously undergone small intestinal resection because of leiomyosarcoma was referred to our clinic with epigastric pain. A double-contrast barium study and the subsequent abdominopelvic CT and abdominal MRI examinations demonstrated multiple extraluminal growing tumors arising from the walls of stomach, small bowell, and colon. A CT-guided aspiration biopsy revealed malignant mesenchymal tumor. The presence of disseminated intra-abdominal masses without concomitant ascites and invasion of tissue planes on CT in a patient operated on prior because of a leiomyosarcoma led to the diagnosis of gastrointestinal leiomyosarcomatosis. In this report we discuss the radiological approach to this rare entity. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  16. [APPROACH TO PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, M; Hanževački, M; Jurčić, P; Budimir, I; Ljubičić, N

    2015-11-01

    In the developed Western countries, despite the accumulation of knowledge about the causes and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as the experience of gastroenterologists-endoscopists using sophisticated endoscopic devices, the number of hospitalizations and mortality rates has not declined as expected. The most likely explanations are the following: aging population, increased prevalence of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity, Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance, using dual anti-aggregation therapy, anticoagulants, and excessive use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The aim of this paper is to show the incidence and the most common signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim is also to present initial clinical evaluation, diagnostic methods, the main causes of gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic hemostatic modalities and treatment of bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Using the MEDLINE and Ovid databases, we searched the meta-analyses and systematic reviews published in English during the 2005-2015 period. Meta-analyses included results of randomized, double-blind studies on adults treated for gastrointestinal bleeding. Included were guidelines of the European and American Society of Gastroenterological Endoscopy, as well as recent expert work. In this review, we bring the state-of-the-art on gastrointestinal bleeding, new classification of gastrointestinal bleeding from the upper, mid and lower gut, controversy of nasogastric tube placement, use of prokinetic agents and inhibitor proton pumps in acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the upper tract, restrictive transfusion strategy, useful clinical stratification of the severity of bleeding, indications for hospitalization and outcome of using the clinical bleeding score, proper use of gastroprotection in patients at a high risk of peptic ulcer, the need of initial endoscopy, variceal assessment in newly diagnosed

  17. Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    The primary functions of the gastrointestinal tract have traditionally been perceived to be limited to the digestion and absorption of nutrients and to electrolytes and water homeostasis. A more attentive analysis of the anatomic and functional arrangement of the gastrointestinal tract, however, suggests that another extremely important function of this organ is its ability to regulate the trafficking of macromolecules between the environment and the host through a barrier mechanism. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiological modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the finely tuned zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, both intestinal and extraintestinal autoimmune, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by reestablishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. This review is timely given the increased interest in the role of a "leaky gut" in the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions targeting both the intestine and extraintestinal organs.

  18. Are individuals with an autoimmune disease at higher risk of a second autoimmune disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Emily C; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam; Hall, Andrew J

    2009-03-15

    Limited evidence suggests that autoimmune diseases tend to co-occur, although data are needed to determine whether individuals with an existing autoimmune disorder are at increased risk of a second disorder. The authors conducted a series of population-based cohort studies, utilizing the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database, to assess intraindividual risks of coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), multiple sclerosis (MS), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during 1990-1999. Sex-specific age- and calendar-period standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for development of a second autoimmune disease among index populations including 22,888 RA, 26,198 AIT, 4,332 MS, and 6,170 IDDM patients compared with the general population. Among those with IDDM, adjusted AIT rates were higher than expected for both males (SIR = 646.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 466, 873) and females (SIR = 409.6, 95% CI: 343, 485), as were RA rates for females (SIR = 181.6, 95% CI: 136, 238). Coexistence of AIT and RA was also shown for either disease sequence (sex-specific SIRs = 130.4-162.0). However, point estimates suggested an inverse relation between RA and MS, irrespective of diagnostic sequence. This study demonstrates coexistence of RA, AIT, and IDDM at higher than expected rates but reduced comorbidity between RA and MS.

  19. Airway Autoimmune Inflammatory Response (AAIR) Syndrome: An Asthma-Autoimmune Overlap Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Chantal Y; Millman, Jennifer; Veiga, Keila; Vicencio, Alfin G

    2018-02-15

    Asthma encompasses numerous phenotypes that may require alternate approaches to diagnosis and therapy, particularly for patients whose symptoms remain poorly controlled despite escalating treatment. We describe 3 patients with apparent asthma who demonstrated unusual findings on cryobiopsy by flexible bronchoscopy and responded to therapy directed against autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Autoimmune Neurology of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, W Oliver; Pittock, Sean J

    2017-06-01

    This article reviews the rapidly evolving spectrum of autoimmune neurologic disorders with a focus on those that involve the central nervous system, providing an understanding of how to approach the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with central nervous system symptoms or signs that could be immune mediated, either paraneoplastic or idiopathic, to guide therapeutic decision making. The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of novel neural antibodies and their targets. Many commercial laboratories can now test for these antibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers of diverse neurologic disorders that occur on an autoimmune basis. Some are highly specific for certain cancer types, and the neural antibody profiles may help direct the physician's cancer search. The diagnosis of an autoimmune neurologic disorder is aided by the detection of an objective neurologic deficit (usually subacute in onset with a fluctuating course), the presence of a neural autoantibody, and improvement in the neurologic status after a course of immunotherapy. Neural autoantibodies should raise concern for a paraneoplastic etiology and may inform a targeted oncologic evaluation (eg, N-methyl-D-aspartate [NMDA] receptor antibodies are associated with teratoma, antineuronal nuclear antibody type 1 [ANNA-1, or anti-Hu] are associated with small cell lung cancer). MRI, EEG, functional imaging, videotaped evaluations, and neuropsychological evaluations provide objective evidence of neurologic dysfunction by which the success of immunotherapy may be measured. Most treatment information emanates from retrospective case series and expert opinion. Nonetheless, early intervention may allow reversal of deficits in many patients and prevention of future disability.

  1. Dental amalgam implantation and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakol, G

    2014-01-01

    Mercury was heavily studied as a factor in the autoimmune processes. We aimed to observe whether mercury of amalgam is associated with Hashimoto disease. 363 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and 365 control subjects were included in to the study. Amalgam fillings were checked by the physician. 363 (49.9 %) patients and 365 (50.1 %) healthy controls were included into the study. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed with thyroid hormones, antithyroid antibody levels, and ultrasonographic findings. Control subjects were selected from patients with no known autoimmune diseases. They were controlled with ultrasonography, as well as antibody titers. None of them had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Sex distribution of the study population was following: 319 (87.9 %) female, 44 (12.1 %) male in the patient group and 277 (75.9 %) male and 88 (24.1 %) female in healthy control subjects, respectively. Mean free T4 values for Hashimoto's thyroiditis and healthy control group were 15.30±0.76, 17.30±0.96 pmol/L and mean TSH values for Hashimoto's thyroiditis and healthy control group were 9.29±20.79, 1.20±0.32 uIU/ml. Frequency of dental amalgam implantation in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was not statistically significantly different from healthy controls (p=186) (t=-1.324) CONCLUSIONS: Some studies identified mercury of amalgam as responsible for autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied whether amalgam fillings are more frequent in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and whether it is a causative factor for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Statistical analysis revealed that there is no relation of amalgam with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (Tab. 1, Ref. 34).

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan. Overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, id est (i.e.), association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjogren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjogren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called 'idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)' and AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)' and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease. (author)

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease.

  4. Post-Babesiosis Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ann E; Montgomery, Mary W; Savage, William J; Achebe, Maureen O; Dunford, Kathleen; Villeda, Sarah; Maguire, James H; Marty, Francisco M

    2017-03-09

    Background Babesiosis, a tickborne zoonotic disease caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus babesia, is characterized by nonimmune hemolytic anemia that resolves with antimicrobial treatment and clearance of parasitemia. The development of warm-antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (also known as warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia [WAHA]) in patients with babesiosis has not previously been well described. Methods After the observation of sporadic cases of WAHA that occurred after treatment of patients for babesiosis, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients with babesiosis who were cared for at our center from January 2009 through June 2016. Data on covariates of interest were extracted from the medical records, including any hematologic complications that occurred within 3 months after the diagnosis and treatment of babesiosis. Results A total of 86 patients received a diagnosis of babesiosis during the 7.5-year study period; 18 of these patients were asplenic. WAHA developed in 6 patients 2 to 4 weeks after the diagnosis of babesiosis, by which time all the patients had had clinical and laboratory responses to antimicrobial treatment of babesiosis, including clearance of Babesia microti parasitemia. All 6 patients were asplenic (P<0.001) and had positive direct antiglobulin tests for IgG and complement component 3; warm autoantibodies were identified in all these patients. No alternative explanation for clinical hemolysis was found. WAHA required immunosuppressive treatment in 4 of the 6 patients. Conclusions We documented post-babesiosis WAHA in patients who did not have a history of autoimmunity; asplenic patients appeared to be particularly at risk.

  5. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Autoimmune Regulator Deficiency Results in a Decrease in STAT1 Levels in Human Monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, O.; Rosen, L.B.; Swamydas, M.; Ferre, E.M.N.; Natarajan, M.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Holland, S.M.; Lionakis, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder typically caused by biallelic autoimmune regulator (AIRE) mutations that manifests with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) and autoimmunity. Patients with STAT1 gain-of-function

  7. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F.; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is

  8. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  10. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (A......) in 2007. This case story displays the importance of knowing AH, as it is an important differential diagnosis to pituitary gland adenomas and to diseases in the hypothalamus because it can be treated medically as opposed to surgically....

  11. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator–dependent autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I.; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Butte, Manish J.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J.; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E. Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J.; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. Objective We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Methods Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. Results We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti–calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Conclusion Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. PMID:25842288

  12. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator-dependent autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Butte, Manish J; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti-calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  14. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms...

  15. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. PMID:22454759

  16. Impaired hapten sensitization in patients with autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, N; Engkilde, K; Menné, T

    2011-01-01

    An inverse relation between contact allergy and autoimmune diseases is suggested from epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility and reactivity in patients with psoriasis, patients with diabetes and healthy controls in an experimental sensitization study. We...... in individuals with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis....

  17. Clinical implications of shared genetics and pathogenesis in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-01-01

    Many endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves disease, Addison disease and Hashimoto disease, originate as an autoimmune reaction that affects disease-specific target organs. These autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of specific autoantibodies and by the

  18. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when ...

  19. [AUTOIMMUNE REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF A THYROID GLAND].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidova, F Kh; Shakhsuvarov, O M; Guseynov, R G; Akhmedova, L M; Aslanova, Zh B

    2015-11-01

    A state of autoimmunity was studied in 25 patients, suffering diffuse toxic goiter (DTG), and in 20--in nodular euthyroid goiter (NEG) before and after the operation. The level of circulating immune complexes, quantity of cytotoxic lymphocytes, the subpopulation index, the apoptosis marker were determined. There was established, that in NEG autoimmune disorders have occurred rarer and were less severe, than in DTG.

  20. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, Knut E. A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity

  1. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  2. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, A.; Passweg, J.R.; Bocelli-Tyndall, C.; Fassas, A.; Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Andolina, M.; Arnold, R.; Carreras, E.; Finke, J.; Kotter, I.; Kozak, T.; Lisukov, I.; Lowenberg, B.; Marmont, A.; Moore, J.; Saccardi, R.; Snowden, J.A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Wulffraat, N.M.; Zhao, X.; Tyndall, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data and early phase I/II studies suggest that high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can arrest progression of severe autoimmune diseases. We have evaluated the toxicity and disease response in 473 patients with severe autoimmune

  3. Dapsone in the management of autoimmune bullous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Evan W; Werth, Victoria P

    2012-05-01

    Dapsone is used in the treatment of autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD), a group of disorders resulting from autoimmunity directed against basement membrane and/or intercellular adhesion molecules on cutaneous and mucosal surfaces. This review summarizes the limited published data evaluating dapsone as a therapy for AIBD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dapsone in the management of the autoimmune bullous diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Evan W.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Dapsone is occasionally used in the treatment of the autoimmune bullous diseases, a group of disorders resulting from autoimmunity directed against basement membrane and/or intercellular adhesion molecules on cutaneous and mucosal surfaces. This review will summarize the limited published data evaluating dapsone as a therapy for the AIBD. PMID:22560144

  5. ELISA for the Diagnosis of Autoimmune Bullous Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Akman Karakaş

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ELISA has been phrased as Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. The ELISA provide to detect autoantigens in autoimmune bullous disorders. Therefore, it is assited understanding of the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. Recently, commercial test systems has been developed for the diagnosis and course. The aim of this paper is to review applying investigation of the ELISA for autoimmune bullous disorders.

  6. Auto-immune encefalitis in de psychiatrische praktijk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, L; Kromkamp, M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241613876; Schoenmaker, N; van Mierlo, H C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413967263; Martinez-Martínez, P; Palmen, S J M; Sommer, I E C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258791519

    BACKGROUND: Our knowledge about auto-immune limbic encephalitis is increasing rapidly and it is now evident that patients with this disease can present with psychiatric symptoms. AIM: To propose practical guidelines for the recognition and diagnosis of an underlying auto-immune limbic encephalitis

  7. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  8. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and fever of undetermined origin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and fever of undetermined origin as presenting manifestations of Hodgkin disease: A case report. ... Subjects and Methods: We report a 14 year-old male adolescent who presented with protracted recurrent fever, as well as clinical and laboratory findings suggestive of autoimmune ...

  9. Childhood Autoimmune Hepatitis in Bahrain: a Tertiary Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Eman; Isa, Hasan M; Al Nasef, Mohamed; Mohamed, Rawia; Jamsheer, Huda

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in childhood has variable modes of presentation, and the disease should be suspected and excluded in all children presenting with symptoms and signs of prolonged or severe acute liver disease. In AIH, the liver biopsy histopathology shows inflammation in addition to presence of serum autoimmune antibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG). To investigate the situation of childhood autoimmune hepatitis in Bahrain and to compare it with other studies worldwide. A retrospective study describing the AIH pediatric cases diagnosed during the period of Jan 2005 to Dec 2009. We report the clinical, biochemical, histopathological, and immunological findings, mainly autoimmune profile, in addition to response to treatment, of Bahraini children with autoimmune hepatitis. Five Bahraini children, three females and two males were diagnosed as autoimmune hepatitis during the study period. Their ages at presentation ranged from 9 to 15 (median 10.6) years. One of our patients had a fulminating type. Two had other autoimmune related conditions, namely autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. All were AIH type 1. Variable response to conventional immunosuppressive therapy was found, from an excellent response with good prognosis, to cirrhosis, hepatic failure and liver transplantation. Childhood AIH is a rare medical problem in Bahrain, with both sexes affected and a variable response to immunosuppressive therapy.

  10. Continuing the quest for autoimmunity due to oral metal exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmawati, D.; Muris, J.; Scheper, R.J.; Rustemeyer, T.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; von Blomberg, B.M.E.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The role of metal exposure in the development of autoimmune disease (AID) is still controversial. Here, we studied the relationship between oral metal exposure, metal allergy and autoimmunity. Methods: A mixed population (n = 78) of non-allergic volunteers, metal-allergic patients and patients

  11. Skin Manifestations Associated with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M Eric; Mainetti, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases, which include mainly autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and the variant syndromes, are often associated with extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. However, the association with cutaneous diseases is less well described. In the present article, we provide a systematic literature review on skin manifestations linked to each of these four autoimmune liver diseases, excluding skin manifestations of systemic diseases. The association of autoimmune hepatitis with vitiligo is well known, with a particular striking association with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, a condition occurring almost entirely in children and adolescents, much rarer and more aggressive than type 1 autoimmune hepatitis; probable associations are also identified with alopecia areata, psoriasis, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Primary biliary cholangitis is not linked to lichen planus as previously assumed, but to vitiligo, psoriasis and the very rare amicrobial pustulosis of the folds. The proposed diagnostic criteria for this latter condition include the presence of anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies, the serological hallmark of primary biliary cholangitis. The very strong association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with inflammatory bowel diseases hampers the search for an association with skin diseases, since inflammatory bowel diseases have a strong association with various dermatological condition, including neutrophilic dermatoses and erythema nodosum. Nevertheless, a probable association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with psoriasis is identified in this review. Variant syndromes, also called overlap syndromes, are likely associated with vitiligo as well, which is not surprising, since autoimmune hepatitis is a feature of these conditions and they may share regions of the MHC.

  12. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome in a 13-year old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, L.; Pedersen, P.; Peitersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is an entity, defined by autoimmunity towards two or more endocrine organs. APS is classified in 3 subgroups (type-1, type-2a, type-2b), according to the organs involved. A case is presented of a 13-year old girl referred to the Department of Paediatrics...

  13. Moving towards a molecular taxonomy of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barturen, Guillermo; Beretta, Lorenzo; Cervera, Ricard; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases pose many problems that have, in general, already been solved in the field of cancer. The heterogeneity of each disease, the clinical similarities and differences between different autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the large number of patients that remain without a

  14. Autoimmunity to desmocollin 3 in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Nagler, Arielle R; Farber, Sara A; Choi, Eun Jung; Jackson, Lauren H; Leiferman, Kristin M; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Amagai, Masayuki; Zone, John J; Payne, Aimee S

    2010-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the desmosomal adhesion protein, desmoglein 3. Genetic deficiency of desmoglein 3 in mice mimics autoimmunity to desmoglein 3 in pemphigus vulgaris, with mucosal-dominant blistering in the suprabasal layer of the epidermis. Mice with an epidermal-specific deletion of desmocollin 3, the other major desmosomal cadherin isoform expressed in the basal epidermis, develop suprabasal blisters in skin that are histologically identical to those observed in pemphigus vulgaris, suggesting that desmocollin 3 might be a target of autoantibodies in some pemphigus vulgaris patients. We now demonstrate that desmocollin 3 is an autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris, illustrated in a patient with mucosal-dominant blistering. Six of 38 pemphigus vulgaris and one of 85 normal serum samples immunoprecipitate desmocollin 3 (P = 0.003). Incubation of patient IgG with human keratinocytes causes loss of intercellular adhesion, and adsorption with recombinant desmocollin 3 specifically prevents this pathogenic effect. Additionally, anti-desmocollin 3 sera cause loss of keratinocyte cell surface desmocollin 3, but not desmoglein 3 by immunofluorescence, indicating distinct cellular pathogenic effects in anti-desmocollin and anti-desmoglein pemphigus, despite their identical clinical presentations. These data demonstrate that desmocollin 3 is a pathogenic autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris and suggest that pemphigus vulgaris is a histological reaction pattern that may result from autoimmunity to desmoglein 3, desmocollin 3, or both desmosomal cadherins.

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  16. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  17. The role of CR2 in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaák, Andrea; Prechl, József; Gergely, János; Erdei, Anna

    2006-08-01

    Complement activation is one of the most powerful mechanisms taking place during inflammation and immune responses. Over the last 30 years increasing evidence has proven the role of C3 and receptors for its activation fragments in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. Since complement also has a basic importance in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, abnormalities affecting complement proteins and their receptors may lead to pathological conditions. Autoimmune conditions develop as a result of a range of genetic and environmental factors. Findings obtained from animal models support the notion that malfunctioning of complement receptors, particularly CR2, might be involved in the breakdown of tolerance and excessive antibody production by auto reactive B-cell clones. In addition to B cells, activated, CR2-bearing T cells may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity as they can receive activating/survival signals in the inflamed tissue. Results obtained from mouse experiments however, should be extended to the human system with great care, since there are basic differences between the structure and function of human and murine CR1 and CR2.

  18. Imaging B lymphocytes in autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, V.; Lauri, C.; Capriotti, G.; Lagana', B.; Germano, V.; D’Amelio, R.; Picchianti Diamanti, A.

    2014-01-01

    B cells arise from stem cells precursor and develop through a tightly regulated and selective process that lead to the generation of different B cell populations such as transitional, mature, memory and plasma cells. These B cell subsets can be identified using flow cytometry by the expression of specific surface antigens. The growing knowledge of the pivotal role played by B cells in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases combined with the advances in monoclonal antibody technology, led in the last years to the generation of different biological agents targeting B cells. In this context, nuclear medicine can offer the possibility to use a panel of biologic radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of inflammatory diseases. Radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and have an excellent imaging diagnostic potential for the evaluation of disease activity, selection and monitoring of immune therapies. Several molecules have been radiolabelled for the imaging of T lymphocytes whereas, by now, the anti CD20 rituximab is the only biological therapy targeting B cells that demonstrated to be efficiently radiolabelled and used to detect inflammation in autoimmune patients

  19. [Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberg, J C

    1999-04-03

    AUTOANTIBODY PRODUCTION: The production of autoantibodies can only occur if immune tolerance is circumvented. Thus drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia requires that the drug have an effect on both autoantigens and on the immune system. AN EXAMPLE, METHYLDOPA: Methyldopa is a hypotensive agent which induces major production of anti-Rh IgG anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies, anti-nuclear antibodies and anti-actin antibodies. These autoantibodies generally appear 6 months after treatment onset and are observed in 20% of treated patients. Hemolysis is however exceptional and is only clinically or biologically perceptible in 1 to 2% of the patients who become immunized. Induced lupus has been reported as have been several dozen cases of drug-induced hepatitis with anti-actin autoantibodies. DRUGS INDUCING HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA: Besides methyldopa, other drugs known to induce hemolytic anemia include levodopa used for Parkinson's disease, mefenamic acid, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, interferon-alpha, used in chronic viral hepatitis, cyclosporin used for the prevention of graft rejection and the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases, and fludarabin, used in chronic lymphoid leukemia. If there is no clinical or biological expression, the drug can be continued, excepting fludarabin where regular controls are needed. If hemolytic anemia is patent, the drug must be discontinued, transfusion and corticosteroid therapy should be envisaged.

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  1. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  2. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

  4. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Assessment of endothelial function in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Y; Bellien, J; Armengol, G; Gomez, E; Richard, V; Lévesque, H; Joannidès, R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidence. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction is an important early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, contributing to plaque initiation and progression. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, a proinflammatory and a proadhesive state, and prothrombic properties. Therefore, assessment of endothelial dysfunction targets this vascular phenotype using several biological markers as indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Measurements of soluble adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin), pro-thrombotic factors (thrombomodulin, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammatory cytokines are most often performed. Regarding the functional assessment of the endothelium, the flow-mediated dilatation of conduit arteries is a non-invasive method widely used in pathophysiological and interventional studies. In this review, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction mechanisms and explorations. We will summarize the similarities and differences in the biological and functional assessments of the endothelium in different autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzmann Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  7. Endocrine autoimmune diseases and female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Aritro; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that immune-mediated processes affect female reproductive success at multiple levels. Crosstalk between endocrine and immune systems regulates a large number of biological processes that affect target tissues, and this crosstalk involves gene expression, cytokine and/or lymphokine release and hormone action. In addition, endocrine-immune interactions have a major role in the implantation process of the fetal (paternally derived) semi-allograft, which requires a reprogramming process of the maternal immune system from rejection to temporary tolerance for the length of gestation. Usually, the female immune system is supportive of all of these processes and, therefore, facilitates reproductive success. Abnormalities of the female immune system, including autoimmunity, potentially interfere at multiple levels. The relevance of the immune system to female infertility is increasingly recognized by investigators, but clinically is often not adequately considered and is, therefore, underestimated. This Review summarizes the effect of individual autoimmune endocrine diseases on female fertility, and points towards selected developments expected in the near future.

  8. Diagnostic evaluatuin of gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    Prior to surgery of gastrointestinal tumors exact information about tumor localization, extent and possible infiltration in adjacent structures are important. The task for radiological and scintigraphic methods is predominantly the preoperative tumor staging. The upper (esophagus, stomach, duodenum) and the lower (colon, rectum) gastrointestinal tract should be routinely investigated by endoscopy and endosonography. CT or MRI imaging may add information about tumor extent, infiltration in adjacent structures and pathologically enlarged lymph nodes. The latter may be detected with similar or higher sensitivity by PET as well. Furthermore, with PET it is possible to differentiate a tumor recurrence from postoperative scar tissue earlier than with conventional morphological imaging techniques, for example in colorectal cancer. Liver tumors should primarily be inspected sonographically followed by an MRI scan if dignity is uncertain. The receptor scintigraphy with radioactive ligands allows to further characterize a detected tumor. Benigne liver lesions can be distinguished from malignant tumors (metastasis, hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) by the neogalactoalbumin-(NGA-)scintigraphy, because NGA binds exclusively to the liver galactose receptors of normally functioning hepatocytes. For the differentiation between liver metastasis and HCC insulin scintigraphy can be used, since insulin binds significantly in HCC due to an overexpression of insulin receptors in these tumors. If a malignant process is suspected, additionally CT-arterioportography may be recommended, because this newer radiological technique is capable to visualize lesions smaller than 1 cm. In such cases PET is sensitive as well and due to increased glucose metabolism even small foci can be detected with comparably high sepcificity. The method of choice for the detection of a pancreatic tumor is endoscopic sonography. In most cases the dignity of the tumor can be verified by ERCP, but sometimes it is very

  9. Gastrointestinal Prophylaxis in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Akash R; Oheb, Daniel; Zaslow, Tracy L

    Because sports participation at all levels often requires international travel, coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians must effectively protect athletes from gastrointestinal infections. Traveler's diarrhea is the most common travel-related illness and can significantly interfere with training and performance. A review of relevant publications was completed using PubMed and Google Scholar. Clinical review. Level 5 Results: Enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli are the most common bacterial causes of traveler's diarrhea. Traveler's diarrhea generally occurs within 4 days of arrival, and symptoms tend to resolve within 5 days of onset. There are several prophylactic agents that physicians can recommend to athletes, including antibiotics, bismuth subsalicylate, and probiotics; however, each has its own unique limitations. Decision-making should be based on the athlete's destination, length of stay, and intent of travel. Prophylaxis with antibiotics is highly effective; however, physicians should be hesitant to prescribe medication due to the side effects and risks for creating antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Antibiotics may be indicated for high-risk groups, such as those with a baseline disease or travelers who have little flexible time. Since most cases of traveler's diarrhea are caused by food and/or water contamination, all athletes should be educated on the appropriate food and water consumption safety measures prior to travel.

  10. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-11-15

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract.

  11. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Probiotics: defenders of gastrointestinal habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desh D. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal microbiota play an important role in maintaining normal gastrointestinal (GI function and ensuring that changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota can promote GI function. The digestive tract is full of bacteria and many of these, including probiotics, are necessary for optimal digestive function. During bacterial gastroenteritis, harmful bacteria invade the digestive tract causing unpleasant symptoms and upsetting the balance between good and bad bacteria. Supplemental probiotics can help restore this balance. Studies have demonstrated that probiotics can often help reduce the severity of symptoms such as diarrhea and may help accelerate recovery. Probiotics are therapeutic preparations of live microorganisms administered in sufficient dosage to be beneficial to health. The therapeutic effects of these microorganisms appear to be strain specific. Primal Defense®, a unique, probiotic, bacterial compound, contains probiotics that support gut flora balance, promote consistent bowel function, control stomach acid levels to quickly eliminate burning sensation in the stomach and maintain immune system response. The probiotics in Primal Defense® maximize the benefits of a healthy diet by supporting normal absorption and assimilation of nutrients in the gut. Nearly 75% of our immune defenses are located in the digestive tract, so maintaining a favorable bacterial balance in the intestines (ideally 80% good or neutral bacteria to 20% bad or harmful bacteria is crucial to achieving and maintaining optimum health.

  13. Microrobotics for future gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menciassi, Arianna; Quirini, Marco; Dario, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The impulse given by robotic technologies and imaging techniques to the development of a new way to conceive and perform surgery is clearly visible. Nowadays, minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures are often performed with the assistance of robots, such as the Da Vinci master-slave system, the AESOP robot with voice control, etc. In addition, mechatronic technologies are becoming the elective technologies for designing advanced hand-held surgical tools. The introduction of robotic technologies in endoscopy has been slower than in MIS, since the development of miniaturized robotic components for entering the small orifices of the human body is difficult. On the other hand, the large contribution that robotic technologies could bring to endoluminal techniques has been evident since the first development of instrumented catheters. In the 1990s, there was an increasing activity in the application of robotic technologies to improve endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of robotic colonoscopy and gastroscopy was to obtain more effective diagnoses in terms of reduced pain for the patients, and to make uniform the diagnostic procedures, which too often depended on the manual abilities of the endoscopist. Currently, the availability of more reliable robotic technologies for miniaturization of size and integration of functions has allowed to conceive and develop robotic pills for the early screening of the digestive tract, with dramatic potential advantages for patients, endoscopists, and healthcare system.

  14. Streptococcus bovis bacteremia and underlying gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, H W; Roberts, R B

    1978-07-01

    Twenty-six adults with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and ten with bacteremia alone were studied to determine possible portals of entry. Of 36 patients (17 with endocarditis, eight with bacteremia alone), 25 had gastrointestinal lesions or manipulation. In 22, the gastrointestinal tract appeared to be the source of S bovis bacteremia. Four patients had either carcinoma of the colon (two) or potentially malignant villous adenomas (two) when first seen because of S bovis bacteremia. None of these, nor two other patients with benign colonic polyps, had bowel-related symptoms or signs prior to admission. Since S bovis is a normal intestinal tract inhabitant, bacteremia may frequently be associated with bowel lesions. Streptococcus bovis bacteremia may provide an early clue to the presence of serious and clinically unexpected gastrointestinal disease. Gastrointestinal tract evaluation should be part of S bovis bacteremia patient management, with or without endocarditis.

  15. Laparoscopic ultrasonography for staging of gastrointestinal malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; de Wit, L. T.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E.; van Delden, O.; Bemelman, W. A.; Rauws, E. A.; van Lanschot, J. J.; Obertop, H.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic laparoscopy has been used frequently as a preoperative staging procedure for different gastrointestinal malignancies. The assessment of solid abdominal organs and retroperitoneal ingrowth or detection of lymph-node metastasis is limited, however. A recent development,

  16. Drugs Approved for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  18. Unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, S; Rai, R R; Agarwal, S; Vijayvergiya, R

    1995-01-01

    We report management of unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract, namely beer bottle cap, raisins and pistachu, mango peel, betelnut and plum seed at a university hospital in Northern India.

  19. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract sensory-motor abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus with symptoms arising from the whole GI tract. Common complaints include dysphasia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of GI symptoms...

  20. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman E. Eskander

    2016-07-01

    CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13% may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy.