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  1. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes.

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    Pearson, James A; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mouse and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D.

  2. The dual role of scavenger receptor class A in development of diabetes in autoimmune NOD mice.

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    Mami Shimizu

    Full Text Available Human type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the autoreactive destruction of pancreatic β cells by T cells. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells and macrophages are required to activate and suppress antigen-specific T cells. It has been suggested that antigen uptake from live cells by dendritic cells via scavenger receptor class A (SR-A may be important. However, the role of SR-A in autoimmune disease is unknown. In this study, SR-A-/- nonobese diabetic (NOD mice showed significant attenuation of insulitis, lower levels of insulin autoantibodies, and suppression of diabetes development compared with NOD mice. We also found that diabetes progression in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with low-dose polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C was significantly accelerated compared with that in disease-resistant NOD mice treated with low-dose poly(I:C. In addition, injection of high-dose poly(I: C to mimic an acute RNA virus infection significantly accelerated diabetes development in young SR-A-/- NOD mice compared with untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. Pathogenic cells including CD4+CD25+ activated T cells were increased more in SR-A-/- NOD mice treated with poly(I:C than in untreated SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggested that viral infection might accelerate diabetes development even in diabetes-resistant subjects. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that diabetes progression was suppressed in SR-A-/- NOD mice and that acceleration of diabetes development could be induced in young mice by poly(I:C treatment even in SR-A-/- NOD mice. These results suggest that SR-A on antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells may play an unfavorable role in the steady state and a protective role in a mild infection. Our findings imply that SR-A may be an important target for improving therapeutic strategies for type 1 diabetes.

  3. Inhibition of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice by miRNA Therapy.

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    Duncheng Wang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islets in Type 1 diabetes is mediated by both increased proinflammatory (Teff and decreased regulatory (Treg T lymphocytes resulting in a significant decrease in the Treg:Teff ratio. The non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse is an excellent in vivo model for testing potential therapeutics for attenuating the decrease in the Treg:Teff ratio and inhibiting disease pathogenesis. Here we show for the first time that a bioreactor manufactured therapeutic consisting of a complex of miRNA species (denoted as TA1 can effectively reset the NOD immune system from a proinflammatory to a tolerogenic state thus preventing or delaying autoimmune diabetes. Treatment of NOD mice with TA1 resulted in a systemic broad-spectrum upregulation of tolerogenic T cell subsets with a parallel downregulation of Teff subsets yielding a dramatic increase in the Treg:Teff ratio. Moreover, the murine-derived TA1 was highly effective in the inhibition of allorecognition of HLA-disparate human PBMC. TA1 demonstrated dose-responsiveness and exhibited equivalent or better inhibition of allorecognition driven proliferation than etanercept (a soluble TNF receptor. These findings demonstrate that miRNA-based therapeutics can effectively attenuate or arrest autoimmune disease processes and may be of significant utility in a broad range of autoimmune diseases including Type 1 diabetes.

  4. Multifactorial Control of Autoimmune Insulin-Dependent Diabetes in NOD Mice: Lessons for IBD

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    Edward H Leiter

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD mice is an example of a complex multifactorial disease with strong genetic and environmental components. As such, this model may provide insight not only into mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease, but also may provide insight into how the environment may interact with the genome to initiate pathogenesis in humans. NOD mice are characterized by accumulation of unusually high percentages of T lymphocytes in lymphoid organs. Pancreatic beta cell destruction in NOD mice is T lymphocyte-mediated. Complex interactions between the inherently diabetogenic major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotype of this strain and non-MHC-associated insulin-dependent diabetes susceptibility genes (Idd are required for cytopathic activation of the leukocytic infiltrates in the pancreas (insulitis. Penetrance of the diabetogenic Idd genes is strongly influenced by both dietary and microbiological factors in the environment. Genetic susceptibility is transmitted by hemopoietic stem cells, and specific defects in T immunoregulation have been traced to defects in the development and function of marrow-derived antigen presenting cells. The spontaneous development of diabetes in NOD mice is different from experimentally induced forms of diabetes in mice in several important respects. In addition to the pathognomic development of pancreatic insulitis, the generalized loss of immunoregulatory control of autoreactive T lymphocytes in NOD mice is reflected by development of leukocytic infiltrates into a plethora of organ systems including the submandibular salivary glands, thyroid glands, kidneys and, occasionally, the colon.

  5. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

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    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. [Komipharm International Co. Ltd., 3188, Seongnam-dong, Jungwon-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 462-827 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.S. [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, H.S., E-mail: hsjun@gachon.ac.kr [Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, 1198 Guwol-Dong, Namdong-Gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  6. Systemic Toll-like receptor stimulation suppresses experimental allergic asthma and autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Aude Aumeunier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections may be associated with exacerbation of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, epidemiological and experimental data have shown that some microorganisms can also prevent these pathologies. This observation is at the origin of the hygiene hypothesis according to which the decline of infections in western countries is at the origin of the increased incidence of both Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and Th2-mediated allergic diseases over the last decades. We have tested whether Toll-like receptor (TLR stimulation can recapitulate the protective effect of infectious agents on allergy and autoimmunity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we performed a systematic study of the disease-modifying effects of a set of natural or synthetic TLR agonists using two experimental models, ovalbumin (OVA-induced asthma and spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, presenting the same genetic background of the non obese diabetic mouse (NOD that is highly susceptible to both pathologies. In the same models, we also investigated the effect of probiotics. Additionally, we examined the effect of the genetic invalidation of MyD88 on the development of allergic asthma and spontaneous diabetes. We demonstrate that multiple TLR agonists prevent from both allergy and autoimmunity when administered parenterally. Probiotics which stimulate TLRs also protect from these two diseases. The physiological relevance of these findings is further suggested by the major acceleration of OVA-induced asthma in MyD88 invalidated mice. Our results strongly indicate that the TLR-mediated effects involve immunoregulatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta and different subsets of regulatory T cells, notably CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells for TLR4 agonists and NKT cells for TLR3 agonists. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations demonstrate that systemic administration of TLR ligands can suppress both allergic and autoimmune responses

  7. Overexpression of thioredoxin in islets transduced by a lentiviral vector prolongs graft survival in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice

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    Sytwu Huey-Kang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic islet transplantation is considered an appropriate treatment to achieve insulin independence in type I diabetic patients. However, islet isolation and transplantation-induced oxidative stress and autoimmune-mediated destruction are still the major obstacles to the long-term survival of graft islets in this potential therapy. To protect islet grafts from inflammatory damage and prolong their survival, we transduced islets with an antioxidative gene thioredoxin (TRX using a lentiviral vector before transplantation. We hypothesized that the overexpression of TRX in islets would prolong islet graft survival when transplanted into diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Methods Islets were isolated from NOD mice and transduced with lentivirus carrying TRX (Lt-TRX or enhanced green fluorescence protein (Lt-eGFP, respectively. Transduced islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of female diabetic NOD mice, and blood glucose concentration was monitored daily after transplantation. The histology of the islet graft was assessed at the end of the study. The protective effect of TRX on islets was investigated. Results The lentiviral vector effectively transduced islets without altering the glucose-stimulating insulin-secretory function of islets. Overexpression of TRX in islets reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. After transplantation into diabetic NOD mice, euglycemia was maintained for significantly longer in Lt-TRX-transduced islets than in Lt-eGFP-transduced islets; the mean graft survival was 18 vs. 6.5 days (n = 9 and 10, respectively, p Conclusion We successfully transduced the TRX gene into islets and demonstrated that these genetically modified grafts are resistant to inflammatory insult and survived longer in diabetic recipients. Our results further support the concept that the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and antiapoptotic functions of TRX are critical to islet survival after

  8. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

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    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here, we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin-binding determinant sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x) ), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLe(x) display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL(+) MSCs showed threefold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL(-) ) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays; however, although engraftment was temporary for both HCELL(+) and HCELL(-) MSCs, administration of HCELL(+) MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL(-) MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44(-/-) mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLe(x) , but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. Stem Cells

  9. Prevention of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice by transferring in vitro antigen-pulsed syngeneic dendritic cells

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    Papaccio, G; Nicoletti, F; Pisanti, F A;

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) transfer on the development of diabetes, 5-week-old female NOD mice received a single iv injection of splenic syngeneic DC from euglycemic NOD mice pulsed in vitro with human y globulin (HGG). Eleven of 12 mice were protected from...

  10. Killer Treg restore immune homeostasis and suppress autoimmune diabetes in prediabetic NOD mice.

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    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2011-08-01

    We hypothesized that regulatory T cells (Treg) effectively target diabetogenic cells, and reinforcing their killing capacity will attenuate the course of disease. For proof of concept, Fas-ligand (FasL) protein was conjugated to CD25(+) Treg (killer Treg) to simulate the physiological mechanism of activation-induced cell death. Cytotoxic and suppressive activity of killer Treg was superior to naïve Treg in vitro. Administration of 3-4 × 10(6) Treg prevented hyperglycemia in 65% prediabetic NOD females, however only killer Treg postponed disease onset by 14 weeks. CD25(+) Treg homed to the pancreas and regional lymph nodes of prediabetic NOD females, proliferated and ectopic FasL protein induced apoptosis in CD25(-) T cells in situ. This mechanism of pathogenic cell debulking is specific to killer Treg, as FasL-coated splenocytes have no immunomodulatory effect, and only killer Treg prevent the disease in 80% of NOD.SCID recipients of effector:suppressor T cells (10:1 ratio). All immunomodulated mice displayed increased fractional expression of FoxP3 in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes, which was accompanied by CD25 only in recipients of killer Treg. A therapeutic intervention that uses the affinity of Treg to reduce the pathogenic load has long-term consequences: arrest of destructive insulitis in mice with established disease prior to β-cell extinction.

  11. Imaging dynamics of CD11c+ cells and Foxp3+ cells in progressive autoimmune insulitis in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes

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    Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Hansen, Lisbeth; Ilegems, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to visualise the dynamics and interactions of the cells involved in autoimmune-driven inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Methods We adopted the anterior chamber of the eye (ACE) transplantation model to perform non-invasive imaging of leucocytes infiltratin...

  12. Immunosuppressive therapy exacerbates autoimmunity in NOD mice and diminishes the protective activity of regulatory T cells.

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    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-09-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that immunosuppressive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation are relatively inefficient approaches to treat autoimmune diabetes. In this study we assessed the impact of immunosuppression on inflammatory insulitis in NOD mice, and the effect of radiation on immunomodulation mediated by adoptive transfer of various cell subsets. Sublethal radiation of NOD females at the age of 14 weeks (onset of hyperglycemia) delayed the onset of hyperglycemia, however two thirds of the mice became diabetic. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes into irradiated NON and NOD mice precipitated disease onset despite increased contents of CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells in the pancreas and regional lymphatics. Similar phenotypic changes were observed when CD25(+) T cells were infused after radiation, which also delayed disease onset without affecting its incidence. Importantly, irradiation increased the susceptibility to diabetes in NOD and NON mice (71-84%) as compared to immunomodulation with splenocytes and CD25(+) T cells in naïve recipients (44-50%). Although irradiation had significant and durable influence on pancreatic infiltrates and the fractions of functional CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cells were elevated by adoptive cell transfer, this approach conferred no protection from disease progression. Irradiation was ineffective both in debulking of pathogenic clones and in restoring immune homeostasis, and the consequent homeostatic expansion evolves as an unfavorable factor in attempts to restore self-tolerance and might even provoke uncontrolled proliferation of pathogenic clones. The obstacles imposed by immunosuppression on abrogation of autoimmune insulitis require replacement of non-specific immunosuppressive therapy by selective immunomodulation that does not cause lymphopenia.

  13. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes.

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    Reza B Jalili

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO, into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory/regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes.

  14. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes.

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    Jalili, Reza B; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory/regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes.

  15. Low levels of allogeneic but not syngeneic hematopoietic chimerism reverse autoimmune insulitis in prediabetic NOD mice.

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    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2009-09-01

    The relative efficiencies of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation and the threshold levels of donor chimerism required to control autoimmune insulitis were evaluated in prediabetic NOD mice. Male and female NOD mice were conditioned by radiation and grafted with bone marrow cells from allogeneic and syngeneic sex-mismatched donors. Establishment of full allogeneic chimerism in peripheral blood reversed insulitis and restored glucose tolerance despite persistence of residual host immune cells. By contrast, sublethal total body irradiation (with or without syngeneic transplant) reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes. The latter pattern was also seen in mice that rejected the bone marrow allografts. Low levels of stable allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism (>1%) were sufficient to prevent the evolution of diabetes following allogeneic transplantation. The data indicate that immunomodulation attained at low levels of allogeneic, but not syngeneic, hematopoietic chimerism is effective in resolution of islet inflammation at even relatively late stages in the evolution of the prediabetic state in a preclinical model. However, our data question the efficacy and rationale behind syngeneic (autologous-like) immuno-hematopoietic reconstitution in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Prevention and Reversal of Diabetes by All-Trans Retinoid Acid and Exendin-4 in NOD Mice

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    Jyuhn-Huarng Juang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that all-trans retinoid acid (ATRA hinders the development of autoimmune diabetes by inducing immune tolerance status. Meanwhile, exendin-4 increases beta-cell function and mass. Thus, we hypothesized that ATRA and exendin-4 combination therapy would prevent and reverse autoimmune diabetes. NOD/scid mice were intravenously transferred with splenocytes isolated from 12-week-old female NOD mice. After adoptive transfer, mice were treated with vehicle, ATRA (0.5 mg/mouse intraperitoneally every other day, exendin-4 (3 μg/kg subcutaneously twice daily, or combination for 6 weeks. Compared with vehicle, ATRA (P=0.022 and ATRA plus exendin-4 (P=0.013 treatment delayed the onset of diabetes. The pancreatic insulin content in mice treated with ATRA (P=0.013 and exendin-4 (P<0.02 was significantly higher than that of control mice. All but one spontaneous diabetic NOD mouse treated with ATRA and/or exendin-4 remained persistent hyperglycemic. ATRA and/or exendin-4 treatment did not alter their blood glucose levels and survival. Our results indicate that, before the onset of autoimmune diabetes, ATRA and exendin-4 treatment alone preserves pancreatic beta cells; ATRA and ATRA plus exendin-4 treatment delays the onset of autoimmune diabetes. However, after the onset of autoimmune diabetes, ATRA and/or exendin-4 treatment is unable to reverse hyperglycemia or improve survival.

  17. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

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    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  18. Apoptosis of Purified CD4+ T Cell Subsets Is Dominated by Cytokine Deprivation and Absence of Other Cells in New Onset Diabetic NOD Mice

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    Ayelet Kaminitz; Askenasy, Enosh M.; Isaac Yaniv; Jerry Stein; Nadir Askenasy

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a significant role in immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Excessive sensitivity of isolated Treg to apoptosis has been demonstrated in NOD mice and humans suffering of type 1 diabetes, suggesting a possible role in the immune dysfunction that underlies autoimmune insulitis. In this study the sensitivity to apoptosis was measured in T cells from new onset diabetic NOD females, comparing purified subsets to mixed cultures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apopto...

  19. Flow cytometric gating for spleen monocyte and DC subsets: differences in autoimmune NOD mice and with acute inflammation.

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    Dong, Matthew B; Rahman, M Jubayer; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-05-01

    The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases is now better understood due to advances in multicolor flow cytometry, gene expression analysis of APC populations, and functional correlation of mouse to human APC populations. A simple but informative nomenclature of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets (cDC1, cDC2, pDC) and monocyte-derived populations incorporates these advances, but accurate subset identification is critical. Ambiguous gating schemes and alterations of cell surface markers in inflammatory condition can make comparing results between studies difficult. Both acute inflammation, such as TLR-ligand stimulation, and chronic inflammation as found in mouse models of autoimmunity can alter DC subset gating. Here, we address these issues using in vivo CpG stimulation as an example of acute inflammation and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of chronic inflammation.We provide a flow cytometric antibody panel and gating scheme that differentiate 2 monocytic and 3DC subsets in the spleen both at steady state and after CpG stimulation. Using this method, we observed differences in the composition of NOD DCs that have been previously reported, and newly identified increases in the number of NOD monocyte-derived DCs. Finally, we established a protocol for DC phosphoflow to measure the phosphorylation state of intracellular proteins, and use it to confirm functional differences in the identified subsets. Therefore, we present optimized methods for distinguishing monocytic and DC populations with and without inflammation and/or autoimmunity associated with NOD mice.

  20. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

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    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease.

  1. Gene therapy with neurogenin3, betacellulin and SOCS1 reverses diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Li, R; Buras, E; Lee, J; Liu, R; Liu, V; Espiritu, C; Ozer, K; Thompson, B; Nally, L; Yuan, G; Oka, K; Chang, B; Samson, S; Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus carrying neurogenin3 (Ngn3), an islet lineage-defining transcription factor, and betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these 'neo-islets' from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with Ngn3 and Btc. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing 'neo-islets' in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent 'insulitis' with activated T cells, these 'neo-islets' persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  2. Exposure to bisphenol A, but not phthalates, increases spontaneous diabetes type 1 development in NOD mice

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    Johanna Bodin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells due to a genetic predisposition and can be triggered by environmental factors. We have previously shown that bisphenol A (BPA accelerates the spontaneous development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Here, we hypothesized that oral exposure to a mixture of the endocrine disruptors BPA and phthalates, relevant for human exposure, would accelerate diabetes development compared to BPA alone. NOD mice were exposed to BPA (1 mg/l, a mixture of phthalates (DEHP 1 mg/l, DBP 0.2 mg/l, BBP 10 mg/l and DiBP 20 mg/l or a combination of BPA and the phthalate mixture through drinking water from conception and throughout life. Previous observations that BPA exposure increased the prevalence of diabetes and insulitis and decreased the number of tissue resident macrophages in pancreas were confirmed, and extended by demonstrating that BPA exposure also impaired the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. None of these effects were observed after phthalate exposure alone. The phthalate exposure in combination with BPA seemed to dampen the BPA effects on macrophage number and function as well as diabetes development, but not insulitis development. Exposure to BPA alone or in combination with phthalates decreased cytokine release (TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, IL-4 from in vitro stimulated splenocytes and lymph node cells, indicating systemic changes in immune function. In conclusion, exposure to BPA, but not to phthalates or mixed exposure to BPA and phthalates, accelerated diabetes development in NOD mice, apparently in part via systemic immune alterations including decreased macrophage function.

  3. MicroRNA-26a Promotes Regulatory T cells and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Shoutao; Shi, Doufei; Mao, Yanhua; Cui, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    Type-1 diabetes (TID) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune cells attack islet β cells, the cells in the pancreas that produce and release the hormone insulin. Mir-26a has been reported to play functions in cellular differentiation, cell growth, cell apoptosis, and metastasis. However, the role of microRNA-26a (Mir-26a) in autoimmune TID has never been investigated. In our current study, we found that pre-Mir-26a (LV-26a)-treated mice had significantly longer normoglycemic time and lower frequency of autoreactive IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) cells compared with an empty lentiviral vector (LV-Con)-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Mir-26a suppresses autoreactive T cells and expands Tregs in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, in our adoptive transfer study, the groups receiving whole splenocytes and CD25-depleted splenocytes from LV-Con-treated diabetic NOD mice develop diabetes at 3 to 4 weeks of age. In comparison, mice injected with undepleted splenocytes obtained from LV-26a-treated reversal NOD mice develop diabetes after 6-8 weeks. And depletion of CD25(+) cells in the splenocytes of reversed mice abrogates the delay in diabetes onset. In conclusion, Mir-26a suppresses autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice in part through promoted regulatory T cells (Tregs) expression.

  4. Beyond HLA-A*0201: New HLA-transgenic NOD Mouse Models of Type 1 Diabetes Identify the Insulin C-peptide As a Rich Source of CD8+ T Cell Epitopes1

    OpenAIRE

    Antal, Zoltan; Baker, Jason C.; Smith, Carla; Jarchum, Irene; Babad, Jeffrey; Mukherjee, Gayatri; Yang, Yang; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Santamaria, Pere; DiLorenzo, Teresa P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell responses to beta cell antigens, including insulin. Investigations employing the NOD mouse model of the disease have revealed an essential role for beta cell-specific CD8+ T cells in the pathogenic process. As CD8+ T cells specific for beta cell antigens are also present in patients, these reactivities have the potential to serve as therapeutic targets or markers for autoimmune activity. NOD mice transgenic for human class I MHC...

  5. Bioluminescence imaging reveals dynamics of beta cell loss in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virostko, John; Radhika, Armandla; Poffenberger, Greg; Dula, Adrienne N; Moore, Daniel J; Powers, Alvin C

    2013-01-01

    We generated a mouse model (MIP-Luc-VU-NOD) that enables non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of beta cell loss during the progression of autoimmune diabetes and determined the relationship between BLI and disease progression. MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice displayed insulitis and a decline in bioluminescence with age which correlated with beta cell mass, plasma insulin, and pancreatic insulin content. Bioluminescence declined gradually in female MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice, reaching less than 50% of the initial BLI at 10 weeks of age, whereas hyperglycemia did not ensue until mice were at least 16 weeks old. Mice that did not become diabetic maintained insulin secretion and had less of a decline in bioluminescence than mice that became diabetic. Bioluminescence measurements predicted a decline in beta cell mass prior to the onset of hyperglycemia and tracked beta cell loss. This model should be useful for investigating the fundamental processes underlying autoimmune diabetes and developing new therapies targeting beta cell protection and regeneration.

  6. Autoimmunity and type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, J F

    1997-03-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. The effector mechanisms essentially involve cytokine-mediated inflammation ultimately leading to beta-cell destruction. Several candidate autoantigens have been delineated for both the pathogenic T-cell response and the nonpathogenic antibody response used for disease prediction. Because of antigen spreading, it is not yet clear which of these antigens are involved in the triggering of the autoimmune response. In any case, this TH1 autoimmune response is amplified and perpetuated by an immune dysregulation involving TH2 cells. Both effector and regulatory mechanisms are placed under the tight control of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC genes. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:71-74). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. Therapeutic use of a selective S1P1 receptor modulator ponesimod in autoimmune diabetes.

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    Sylvaine You

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, ponesimod, to protect and reverse autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Ponesimod was administered orally to NOD mice starting at 6, 10, 13 and 16 weeks of age up to 35 weeks of age or to NOD mice showing recent onset diabetes. Peripheral blood and spleen B and T cell counts were significantly reduced after ponesimod administration. In pancreatic lymph nodes, B lymphocytes were increased and expressed a transitional 1-like phenotype. Chronic oral ponesimod treatment efficiently prevented autoimmune diabetes in 6, 10 and 16 week-old pre-diabetic NOD mice. Treatment withdrawal led to synchronized disease relapse. Ponesimod did not inhibit the differentiation of autoreactive T cells as assessed by adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from treated disease-free NOD mice. In addition, it did not affect the migration, proliferation and activation of transgenic BDC2.5 cells into the target tissue. However, ponesimod inhibited spreading of the T cell responses to islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP. Treatment of diabetic NOD mice with ponesimod induced disease remission. However, here again, upon treatment cessation, the disease rapidly recurred. This recurrence was effectively prevented by combination treatment with a CD3 antibody leading to the restoration of self-tolerance. In conclusion, treatment with a selective S1P1 modulator in combination with CD3 antibody represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diabetes.

  8. Changes in expression of P2X7 receptors in NOD mouse pancreas during the development of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Robson, Tim; Beales, Philip E; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the expression of P2X7 receptors in pancreatic islets of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of human autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, to determine whether they are involved in islet cell destruction during early- and late-developing diabetes. Pancreatic cells containing glucagon (alpha-cells), insulin (beta-cells) and somatostatin (delta-cells) were co-localized with P2X7 receptors. We examined P2X7 receptor expression in normal and diabetic spleens using flow cytometry. In non-diabetic NOD controls, P2X7 receptors were expressed in glucagon-containing cells at the periphery of islets, being consistent with previous studies. In early NOD diabetes (12 weeks), there was migration of peripheral P2X7 receptor positive, glucagon-containing cells into the center of islets. In late NOD diabetes (34 weeks), P2X7 receptor- and glucagon-stained alpha-cells were gone from islets. Migration of macrophages and dendritic cells into islets took place, but they lacked P2X7 immunoreactivity. There was no significant difference in the percentage of splenic macrophages stained for P2X7 receptors from control and diabetic spleens. In conclusion, in the development of early to late diabetes, there is a down-regulation of P2X7 receptors on islet cells and a loss of alpha- and beta-cell populations. P2X7 receptor signalling might be involved in alpha-cell clearance from late diabetic islets.

  9. Pancreatic β-Cells Limit Autoimmune Diabetes via an Immunoregulatory Antimicrobial Peptide Expressed under the Influence of the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Furio, Laetitia; Mecheri, Ramine; van der Does, Anne M; Lundeberg, Erik; Saveanu, Loredana; Chen, Yongquan; van Endert, Peter; Agerberth, Birgitta; Diana, Julien

    2015-08-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed by epithelial and immune cells are largely described for the defense against invading microorganisms. Recently, their immunomodulatory functions have been highlighted in various contexts. However how AMPs expressed by non-immune cells might influence autoimmune responses in peripheral tissues, such as the pancreas, is unknown. Here, we found that insulin-secreting β-cells produced the cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) and that this production was defective in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. CRAMP administrated to prediabetic NOD mice induced regulatory immune cells in the pancreatic islets, dampening the incidence of autoimmune diabetes. Additional investigation revealed that the production of CRAMP by β-cells was controlled by short-chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota. Accordingly, gut microbiota manipulations in NOD mice modulated CRAMP production and inflammation in the pancreatic islets, revealing that the gut microbiota directly shape the pancreatic immune environment and autoimmune diabetes development.

  10. Postnatal hematopoiesis and gut microbiota in NOD mice deviate from C57BL/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate f...

  11. E2-2 Dependent Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Control Autoimmune Diabetes.

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    Lisbeth Hansen

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diabetes is a consequence of immune-cell infiltration and destruction of pancreatic β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. We analyzed the cellular composition of the insulitic lesions in the autoimmune-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse and observed a peak in recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs to NOD islets around 8-9 weeks of age. This peak coincides with increased spontaneous expression of type-1-IFN response genes and CpG1585 induced production of IFN-α from NOD islets. The transcription factor E2-2 is specifically required for the maturation of pDCs, and we show that knocking out E2-2 conditionally in CD11c+ cells leads to a reduced recruitment of pDCs to pancreatic islets and reduced CpG1585 induced production of IFN-α during insulitis. As a consequence, insulitis has a less aggressive expression profile of the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ and a markedly reduced diabetes incidence. Collectively, these observations demonstrate a disease-promoting role of E2-2 dependent pDCs in the pancreas during autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse.

  12. E2-2 Dependent Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Control Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Gupta, Shashank; Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Hannibal, Tine D.; Reizis, Boris; Santamaria, Pere; Holmberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diabetes is a consequence of immune-cell infiltration and destruction of pancreatic β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. We analyzed the cellular composition of the insulitic lesions in the autoimmune-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and observed a peak in recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to NOD islets around 8–9 weeks of age. This peak coincides with increased spontaneous expression of type-1-IFN response genes and CpG1585 induced production of IFN-α from NOD islets. The transcription factor E2-2 is specifically required for the maturation of pDCs, and we show that knocking out E2-2 conditionally in CD11c+ cells leads to a reduced recruitment of pDCs to pancreatic islets and reduced CpG1585 induced production of IFN-α during insulitis. As a consequence, insulitis has a less aggressive expression profile of the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ and a markedly reduced diabetes incidence. Collectively, these observations demonstrate a disease-promoting role of E2-2 dependent pDCs in the pancreas during autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse. PMID:26624013

  13. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachapati, Kritika; Adams, David; Bednar, Kyle; Ridgway, William M

    2012-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has thus served as a model for understanding the genetic and immunological basis, and treatment, of T1D. Since its initial description in 1980, however, the field has matured and recognized that prevention of diabetes in NOD mice (i.e., preventing the disease from occurring by an intervention prior to frank diabetes) is relatively easy to achieve and does not correlate well with curing the disease (after the onset of frank hyperglycemia). Hundreds of papers have described the prevention of diabetes in NOD mice but only a handful have described its actual reversal. The paradoxical conclusion is that preventing the disease in NOD mice does not necessarily tell us what caused the disease nor how to reverse it. The NOD mouse model is therefore best used now, with respect to human disease, as a way to understand the genetic and immunologic causes of and as a model for trying to reverse disease once hyperglycemia occurs. We describe how genetic approaches to identifying causative gene variants can be adapted to identify novel therapeutic agents for reversing new-onset T1D.

  14. B cell depletion inhibits spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiguang; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2008-06-01

    B cells are important for the development of most autoimmune diseases. B cell depletion immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for several human autoimmune diseases, although it is unclear whether B cells are necessary for disease induction, autoantibody production, or disease progression. To address the role of B cells in a murine model of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT), B cells were depleted from adult NOD.H-2h4 mice using anti-mouse CD20 mAb. Anti-CD20 depleted most B cells in peripheral blood and cervical lymph nodes and 50-80% of splenic B cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that marginal zone B cells in the spleen were relatively resistant to depletion by anti-CD20, whereas most follicular and transitional (T2) B cells were depleted after anti-CD20 treatment. When anti-CD20 was administered before development of SAT, development of SAT and anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses were reduced. Anti-CD20 also reduced SAT severity and inhibited further increases in anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibodies when administered to mice that already had autoantibodies and thyroid inflammation. The results suggest that B cells are necessary for initiation as well as progression or maintenance of SAT in NOD.H-2h4 mice.

  15. Induction of Chimerism Permits Low-Dose Islet Grafts in the Liver or Pancreas to Reverse Refractory Autoimmune Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Miao; Racine, Jeremy J.; Liu, Hongjun; Lin, Chia-Lei; Nair, Indu; Lau, Joyce; Cao, Yu-An; Todorov, Ivan; Atkinson, Mark; Zeng, Defu

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether induction of chimerism lowers the amount of donor islets required for reversal of diabetes and renders the pancreas a suitable site for islet grafts in autoimmune diabetic mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The required donor islet dose for reversal of diabetes in late-stage diabetic NOD mice after transplantation into the liver or pancreas was compared under immunosuppression or after induction of chimerism. Recipient mice were monitored for blood glucose levels and ...

  16. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0121 TITLE: Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald T Nepom, M.D., Ph.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0121 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...therapies. This research study entails using humanized mice manifesting type 1 diabetes (T1 D)-associated human HLA molecules to address the fate and

  17. Genetic Analysis of Substrain Divergence in Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simecek, Petr; Churchill, Gary A; Yang, Hyuna; Rowe, Lucy B; Herberg, Lieselotte; Serreze, David V; Leiter, Edward H

    2015-03-03

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a polygenic model for type 1 diabetes that is characterized by insulitis, a leukocytic infiltration of the pancreatic islets. During ~35 years since the original inbred strain was developed in Japan, NOD substrains have been established at different laboratories around the world. Although environmental differences among NOD colonies capable of impacting diabetes incidence have been recognized, differences arising from genetic divergence have not been analyzed previously. We use both mouse diversity array and whole-exome capture sequencing platforms to identify genetic differences distinguishing five NOD substrains. We describe 64 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and two short indels that differ in coding regions of the five NOD substrains. A 100-kb deletion on Chromosome 3 distinguishes NOD/ShiLtJ and NOD/ShiLtDvs from three other substrains, whereas a 111-kb deletion in the Icam2 gene on Chromosome 11 is unique to the NOD/ShiLtDvs genome. The extent of genetic divergence for NOD substrains is compared with similar studies for C57BL6 and BALB/c substrains. As mutations are fixed to homozygosity by continued inbreeding, significant differences in substrain phenotypes are to be expected. These results emphasize the importance of using embryo freezing methods to minimize genetic drift within substrains and of applying appropriate genetic nomenclature to permit substrain recognition when one is used.

  18. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  19. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1) accelerates type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan-Ying, E-mail: biozyy@163.com [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, Xin-Yuan [College of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan 432000 (China); Chen, Zheng-Wang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 is over-expressed in the blood of NOD mice suffering from insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 increases blood glucose levels and triggers type 1 diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 accelerates insulitis, while its antibody prevents insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 enhances the levels of nitric oxide in the pancreases of NOD mice. -- Abstract: A large body of experimental evidence suggests that cytokines trigger pancreatic {beta}-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1), a specific marker for activated macrophages, is accumulated in the pancreatic islets of pre-diabetic BB rats. In the present study, we demonstrate that daintain/AIF-1 is released into blood and the levels of daintain/AIF-1 in the blood of type 1 diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice suffering from insulitis are significantly higher than that in healthy NOD mice. When injected intravenously into NOD mice, daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation, increases the concentrations of blood glucose, impairs insulin expression, up-regulates nitric oxide (NO) production in pancreases and accelerates diabetes in NOD mice, while the antibody against daintain/AIF-1 delays or prevents insulitis in NOD mice. These results imply daintain/AIF-1 triggers type 1 diabetes probably via arousing immune cells activation and induction of NO production in pancreas of NOD mice.

  20. Identification of Candidate Tolerogenic CD8+ T Cell Epitopes for Therapy of Type 1 Diabetes in the NOD Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cailin Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-producing pancreatic islet β cells are the target of self-reactive B and T cells. T cells reactive with epitopes derived from insulin and/or IGRP are critical for the initiation and maintenance of disease, but T cells reactive with other islet antigens likely have an essential role in disease progression. We sought to identify candidate CD8+ T cell epitopes that are pathogenic in type 1 diabetes. Proteins that elicit autoantibodies in human type 1 diabetes were analyzed by predictive algorithms for candidate epitopes. Using several different tolerizing regimes using synthetic peptides, two new predicted tolerogenic CD8+ T cell epitopes were identified in the murine homolog of the major human islet autoantigen zinc transporter ZnT8 (aa 158–166 and 282–290 and one in a non-β cell protein, dopamine β-hydroxylase (aa 233–241. Tolerizing vaccination of NOD mice with a cDNA plasmid expressing full-length proinsulin prevented diabetes, whereas plasmids encoding ZnT8 and DβH did not. However, tolerizing vaccination of NOD mice with the proinsulin plasmid in combination with plasmids expressing ZnT8 and DβH decreased insulitis and enhanced prevention of disease compared to vaccination with the plasmid encoding proinsulin alone.

  1. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. PD-L1-driven tolerance protects neurogenin3-induced islet neogenesis to reverse established type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongying; Lee, Jeongkyung; Kim, Mi-sun; Liu, Victoria; Moulik, Mousumi; Li, Haiyan; Yi, Qing; Xie, Aini; Chen, Wenhao; Yang, Lina; Li, Yimin; Tsai, Tsung Huang; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Yechoor, Vijay

    2015-02-01

    A breakdown in self-tolerance underlies autoimmune destruction of β-cells and type 1 diabetes. A cure by restoring β-cell mass is limited by the availability of transplantable β-cells and the need for chronic immunosuppression. Evidence indicates that inhibiting costimulation through the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is central to immune tolerance. We therefore tested whether induction of islet neogenesis in the liver, protected by PD-L1-driven tolerance, reverses diabetes in NOD mice. We demonstrated a robust induction of neo-islets in the liver of diabetic NOD mice by gene transfer of Neurogenin3, the islet-defining factor, along with betacellulin, an islet growth factor. These neo-islets expressed all the major pancreatic hormones and transcription factors. However, an enduring restoration of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and euglycemia occurs only when tolerance is also induced by the targeted overexpression of PD-L1 in the neo-islets, which results in inhibition of proliferation and increased apoptosis of infiltrating CD4(+) T cells. Further analysis revealed an inhibition of cytokine production from lymphocytes isolated from the liver but not from the spleen of treated mice, indicating that treatment did not result in generalized immunosuppression. This treatment strategy leads to persistence of functional neo-islets that resist autoimmune destruction and consequently an enduring reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  3. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivell, Silvia; Gomis, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs and burden of the disease are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Two major groups of diabetes mellitus have been defined, type 1, or immune-based, and type 2. In recent years, other subgroups have been described in-between these major groups. Correct classification of the disease is crucial in order to ascribe the most efficient preventive, diagnostic and treatment strategies for each patient. In the present review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and clinical classification of what is currently known as autoimmune diabetes. In addition, the other groups of diabetes mellitus will be regarded in relation to their pathogenesis and potential autoimmunity features.

  4. Use of autoantigen-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes to arrest autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes.To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes.A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides.We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion.We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes constitutes a promising strategy for

  5. Prevention of Diabetes in NOD Mice by Repeated Exposures to a Contact Allergen Inducing a Sub-Clinical Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, while allergic contact dermatitis although immune mediated, is considered an exposure driven disease that develops due to epicutanous contact with reactive low-molecular chemicals. The objective of the present study was to experimentally study the effect of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two diseases. Method NOD mice 4 weeks of age were exposed, on the ears, to two allergens, p-phenylenediamine and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene respectively, to investigate the diabetes development. The mice were followed for a maximum of 32 weeks, and they were either repeatedly exposed to the allergens or only sensitized a week after arrival. The stimulation of NKT cells by the two allergens were additionally studied in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sensitized and two weeks later provocated with the allergens. The mice were subsequently euthanized at different time points after the provocation. Results It was found that repeated application of p-phenylenediamine reduced the incidence of diabetes compared to application with water (47% vs. 93%, P = 0.004). Moreover it was shown that in C57BL/6 mice both allergens resulted in a slight increment in the quantity of NKT cells in the liver. Application of the allergens at the same time resulted in an increased number of NKT cells in the draining auricular lymph node, and the increase appeared to be somewhat allergen specific as the accumulation was stronger for p-phenylenediamine. Conclusion The study showed that repeated topical application on the ears with a contact allergen could prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice. The contact allergens gave a non-visible, sub-clinical dermatitis on the application site. The

  6. Prevention of diabetes in NOD mice by repeated exposures to a contact allergen inducing a sub-clinical dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Engkilde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, while allergic contact dermatitis although immune mediated, is considered an exposure driven disease that develops due to epicutaneous contact with reactive low-molecular chemicals. The objective of the present study was to experimentally study the effect of contact allergens on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. As the link between contact allergy and diabetes is yet unexplained we also examined the effect of provocation with allergens on Natural Killer T (NKT cells, since involvement of NKT cells could suggest an innate connection between the two diseases. METHOD: NOD mice 4 weeks of age were exposed, on the ears, to two allergens, p-phenylenediamine and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene respectively, to investigate the diabetes development. The mice were followed for a maximum of 32 weeks, and they were either repeatedly exposed to the allergens or only sensitized a week after arrival. The stimulation of NKT cells by the two allergens were additionally studied in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sensitized and two weeks later provocated with the allergens. The mice were subsequently euthanized at different time points after the provocation. RESULTS: It was found that repeated application of p-phenylenediamine reduced the incidence of diabetes compared to application with water (47% vs. 93%, P = 0.004. Moreover it was shown that in C57BL/6 mice both allergens resulted in a slight increment in the quantity of NKT cells in the liver. Application of the allergens at the same time resulted in an increased number of NKT cells in the draining auricular lymph node, and the increase appeared to be somewhat allergen specific as the accumulation was stronger for p-phenylenediamine. CONCLUSION: The study showed that repeated topical application on the ears with a contact allergen could prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice. The contact allergens gave a non-visible, sub-clinical dermatitis on the

  7. The tyrphostin agent AG490 prevents and reverses type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoreza Davoodi-Semiromi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies in the NOD (non-obese diabetic mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D support the notion that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have the potential for modulating disease development. However, the therapeutic effects of AG490 on the development of T1D are unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Female NOD mice were treated with AG490 (i.p, 1 mg/mouse or DMSO starting at either 4 or 8 week of age, for five consecutive week, then once per week for 5 additional week. Analyses for the development and/or reversal of diabetes, insulitis, adoptive transfer, and other mechanistic studies were performed. RESULTS: AG490 significantly inhibited the development of T1D (p = 0.02, p = 0.005; at two different time points. Monotherapy of newly diagnosed diabetic NOD mice with AG490 markedly resulted in disease remission in treated animals (n = 23 in comparision to the absolute inability (0%; 0/10, p = 0.003, Log-rank test of DMSO and sustained eugluycemia was maintained for several months following drug withdrawal. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of splenocytes from AG490 treated NOD mice failed to transfer diabetes to recipient NOD.Scid mice. CD4 T-cells as well as bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs from AG490 treated mice, showed higher expression of Foxp3 (p<0.004 and lower expression of co-stimulatory molecules, respectively. Screening of the mouse immune response gene arrary indicates that expression of costimulaotry molecule Ctla4 was upregulated in CD4+ T-cell in NOD mice treated with AG490, suggesting that AG490 is not a negative regulator of the immune system. CONCLUSION: The use of such agents, given their extensive safety profiles, provides a strong foundation for their translation to humans with or at increased risk for the disease.

  8. Autoreactive effector/memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells infiltrating grafted and endogenous islets in diabetic NOD mice exhibit similar T cell receptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Diz

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation provides a "cure" for type 1 diabetes but is limited in part by recurrent autoimmunity mediated by β cell-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Insight into the T cell receptor (TCR repertoire of effector T cells driving recurrent autoimmunity would aid the development of immunotherapies to prevent islet graft rejection. Accordingly, we used a multi-parameter flow cytometry strategy to assess the TCR variable β (Vβ chain repertoires of T cell subsets involved in autoimmune-mediated rejection of islet grafts in diabetic NOD mouse recipients. Naïve CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells exhibited a diverse TCR repertoire, which was similar in all tissues examined in NOD recipients including the pancreas and islet grafts. On the other hand, the effector/memory CD8(+ T cell repertoire in the islet graft was dominated by one to four TCR Vβ chains, and specific TCR Vβ chain usage varied from recipient to recipient. Similarly, islet graft- infiltrating effector/memory CD4(+ T cells expressed a limited number of prevalent TCR Vβ chains, although generally TCR repertoire diversity was increased compared to effector/memory CD8(+ T cells. Strikingly, the majority of NOD recipients showed an increase in TCR Vβ12-bearing effector/memory CD4(+ T cells in the islet graft, most of which were proliferating, indicating clonal expansion. Importantly, TCR Vβ usage by effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells infiltrating the islet graft exhibited greater similarity to the repertoire found in the pancreas as opposed to the draining renal lymph node, pancreatic lymph node, or spleen. Together these results demonstrate that effector/memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells mediating autoimmune rejection of islet grafts are characterized by restricted TCR Vβ chain usage, and are similar to T cells that drive destruction of the endogenous islets.

  9. Prevention or early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, David; Fundova, Petra; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-01-01

    gluten-free diets prevent T1D in animal models. Herewith we investigated whether intranasal (i.n.) administration of gliadin or gluten may arrest the diabetogenic process. I.n. administration of gliadin to 4-week-old NOD mice significantly reduced the diabetes incidence. Similarly, the insulitis...

  10. Islet antigen-pulsed dendritic cells expressing ectopic IL-35Ig protect nonobese diabetic mice from autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanelli, Giada; Volpi, Claudia; Bianchi, Roberta; Allegrucci, Massimo; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola; Grohmann, Ursula; Belladonna, Maria Laura

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells capable of orchestrating either stimulatory or regulatory immune responses mediated by T cells. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is an immunosuppressive, heterodimeric cytokine belonging to the IL-12 family and known to be produced by regulatory T cells but not DCs. In this study, we explored the possible immunosuppressive effect of IL-35 ectopically expressed by splenic DCs from nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a prototypical model of autoimmune diabetes. After pulsing with the IGRP peptide (a dominant, diabetogenic autoantigen in NOD mice) and transfer in vivo, IL-35Ig- but not Ig-transfected DCs suppressed antigen specific, T cell-mediated responses in a skin test assay. More importantly, transfer of IL-35Ig-transfected, IGRP-pulsed DCs into prediabetic NOD mice induced a delayed and less severe form of diabetes, an effect accompanied by the increase of CD4(+)CD39(+) suppressive T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes. Our data therefore suggest that DCs overexpressing ectopic IL-35Ig might represent a powerful tool in negative vaccination strategies.

  11. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  12. Cooperation of invariant NKT cells and CD46+CD256+ T regulatory cells in prevention of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice treated with α-galactosylceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weipeng Li; Fang Ji; Yong Zhang; Ying Wang; Neng yang; Hailiang Ge; Fuqing Wang

    2008-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells and CD4+CD25+regulatory T (Treg) cells are two thymus-derived subsets of regulatory T cells that play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Yet the functional changes of the two subsets of regulatory T cells in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remain unclear, and how NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells cooperate functionally in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes is also uncertain.We provide evidence that in NOD mice, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, the functions of both NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells decrease in an age-dependent manner.We show that treatment with α-galactosylceramide increases the size of the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell compartment in NOD mice, and augments the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor and the potency of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to inhibit proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells. Our data indicate that NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells might cooperate in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice treated with α-galactosylceramide. Induced cooperation of NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells could serve as a strategy to treat human autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes.

  13. Prevention or early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, David; Fundova, Petra; Hansen, Axel Kornerup;

    2014-01-01

    gluten-free diets prevent T1D in animal models. Herewith we investigated whether intranasal (i.n.) administration of gliadin or gluten may arrest the diabetogenic process. I.n. administration of gliadin to 4-week-old NOD mice significantly reduced the diabetes incidence. Similarly, the insulitis......Induction of long-term tolerance to β-cell autoantigens has been investigated both in animal models and in human type 1 diabetes (T1D) in order to prevent the disease. As regards external compounds, the dietary plant protein fraction has been associated with high penetrance of the disease, whereas...... was lowered. Intranasal gliadin also rescued a fraction of prediabetic 13-week-old NOD mice from progressing to clinical onset of diabetes compared to OVA-treated controls. Vaccination with i.n. gliadin led to an induction of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells and even more significant induction of γδ T cells in mucosal...

  14. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  15. Autoimmunity and the highway to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P

    1997-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an immunopathological condition involving loss of beta cell function, but views of how this arises are confusing and contradictory. For example, studies with non-obese diabetic mice implicate abnormal cytokine production in disease pathogenesis, but give little insight into how this arises. Many genetic and environmental risk factors have been described, but no single factor predicts the development of disease. Moreover, the prevalence of auto-antibodies suggests an autoimmune aetiology, but no antigen is recognized by all individuals. As an aid to understanding how IDDM develops, this review considers the risk factors as distinct starting points on a journey, and reviews current literature in search of the point where the roads from each origin merge into a highway to diabetes.

  16. IFN-{gamma} gene expression in pancreatic islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells correlates with autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinovitch, A.; Suarez-Pinzon, W.L.; Sorensen, O. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice results from selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta}-cells following islet filtration by mononuclear leukocytes. Cytokines produced by islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells may be involved in {beta}-cell destruction. Therefore, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression, by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay, in mononuclear leukocytes isolated from pancreatic islets of four groups of mice: diabetes-prone female NOD mice; female NOD mice protected from diabetes by injection of CFA at an early age; male NOD mice with a low diabetes incidence; and female BALB/c mice that do not develop diabetes. We found that mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-{gamma} in mononuclear cells from islets of diabetes-prone female NOD mice increased progressively as these cells infiltrated the islets from age 5 wk to diabetes onset (>13 wk). However, only IFN-{gamma} mRNA levels were significantly higher in islet mononuclear cells from 12-wk-old diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from less diabetes-prone NOD mice (CFA-treated females, and males) and normal mice (BALB/c). In contrast, IL-4 mRNA levels were lower in islet mononuclear cells from diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from NOD mice with low diabetes incidence (CFA-treated females and males). Splenic cell mRNA levels of IFN-{gamma} and IL-4 were not different in the four groups of mice. These results suggest that islet {beta}-cell destruction and diabetes in female NOD mice are dependent upon intra-islet IFN-{gamma} production by mononuclear cells, and that CFA-treated female NOD mice and male NOD mice may be protected from diabetes development by down-regulation of IFN-{gamma} production in the islets. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Synergistic reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice with anti-CD3 and interleukin-1 blockade: evidence of improved immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablamunits, Vitaly; Henegariu, Octavian; Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Santamaria, Pere; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Herold, Kevan C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are involved in autoimmune diabetes: among the most prominent is interleukin (IL)-1β. We postulated that blockade of IL-1β would modulate the effects of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in treating diabetes in NOD mice. To test this, we treated hyperglycemic NOD mice with F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-CD3 mAb with or without IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), or anti-IL-1β mAb. We studied the reversal of diabetes and effects of treatment on the immune system. Mice that received a combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA showed a more rapid rate of remission of diabetes than mice treated with anti-CD3 mAb or IL-1RA alone. Combination-treated mice had increased IL-5, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ levels in circulation. There were reduced pathogenic NOD-relevant V7 peptide-V7(+) T cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Their splenocytes secreted more IL-10, had increased arginase expression in macrophages and dendritic cells, and had delayed adoptive transfer of diabetes. After 1 month, there were increased concentrations of IgG1 isotype antibodies and reduced intrapancreatic expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17 despite normal splenocyte cytokine secretion. These studies indicate that the combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA is synergistic in reversal of diabetes through a combination of mechanisms. The combination causes persistent remission from islet inflammation.

  18. A bispecific protein capable of engaging CTLA-4 and MHCII protects non-obese diabetic mice from autoimmune diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    Full Text Available Crosslinking ligand-engaged cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 to the T cell receptor (TCR with a bispecific fusion protein (BsB comprised of a mutant mouse CD80 and lymphocyte activation antigen-3 (LAG-3 has been shown to attenuate TCR signaling and to direct T-cell differentiation toward Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Here, we show that antigen-specific Tregs can also be induced in an antigen-specific setting in vitro. Treatment of non-obese diabetic (NOD female mice between 9-12 weeks of age with a short course of BsB elicited a transient increase of Tregs in the blood and moderately delayed the onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, a longer course of treatment (10 weeks of 4-13 weeks-old female NOD animals with BsB significantly delayed the onset of disease or protected animals from developing diabetes, with only 13% of treated animals developing diabetes by 35 weeks of age compared to 80% of the animals in the control group. Histopathological analysis of the pancreata of the BsB-treated mice that remained non-diabetic revealed the preservation of insulin-producing β-cells despite the presence of different degrees of insulitis. Thus, a bifunctional protein capable of engaging CTLA-4 and MHCII and indirectly co-ligating CTLA-4 to the TCR protected NOD mice from developing T1D.

  19. Gluten-Free Diet Only during Pregnancy Efficiently Prevents Diabetes in NOD Mouse Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antvorskov, Julie C; Josefsen, Knud; Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Studies have documented that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes is influenced by the intake of gluten. Aims. To investigate the importance of gluten exposure during pregnancy and the subsequent development of autoimmune diabetes in offspring. Methods. Nonobese diabetic mice were divided into 7...... groups to receive combinations of gluten-free and standard diet before, during, or after pregnancy. Diabetes incidence in offspring was followed in each group (n = 16-27) for 310 days. Insulitis score and intestinal expression of T-cell transcription factors (RT-QPCR) were evaluated in animals from...... the different diet groups. Results. If mothers were fed a gluten-free diet only during pregnancy, the development of autoimmune diabetes in offspring was almost completely prevented with an incidence reduction from 62.5% in gluten-consuming mice to 8.3% (p gluten-free group. The islets...

  20. Inhibition of diabetes in NOD mice by human pregnancy factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Khan, A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Benner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of Th1 mediated autoimmune diseases regress in many patients during pregnancy. A prominent feature of pregnancy is the presence of human chorionic gonadotrophin hormone (hCG) in blood and urine. In this report we tested the effect of clinical grade hCG (c-hCG) on the development of

  1. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Silke Malling Damlund

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice.

  2. Exposure to bisphenol A, but not phthalates, increases spontaneous diabetes type 1 development in NOD mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodin, J.; Kocbach Bølling, A.; Wendt, A.; Eliasson, L.; Becher, R.; Kuper, F.; Løvik, M.; Nygaard, U.C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells due to a genetic predisposition and can be triggered by environmental factors. We have previously shown that bisphenol A (BPA) accelerates the spontaneous development of diabetes in non-obese diab

  3. Short-term subcutaneous insulin treatment delays but does not prevent diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Despite encouraging results in the NOD mouse, type 1 diabetes prevention trials using subcutaneous insulin have been unsuccessful. To explain these discrepancies, 3-week-old NOD mice were treated for 7 weeks with subcutaneous insulin at two different doses: a high dose (0.5 U/mouse) used in previous mouse studies; and a low dose (0.005 U/mouse) equivalent to that used in human trials. Effects on insulitis and diabetes were monitored along with immune and metabolic modifications. Low-dose insulin did not have any effect on disease incidence. High-dose treatment delayed but did not prevent diabetes, with reduced insulitis reappearing once insulin discontinued. This effect was not associated with significant immune changes in islet infiltrates, either in terms of cell composition or frequency and IFN-γ secretion of islet-reactive CD8(+) T cells recognizing the immunodominant epitopes insulin B(15-23) and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214). Delayed diabetes and insulitis were associated with lower blood glucose and endogenous C-peptide levels, which rapidly returned to normal upon treatment discontinuation. In conclusion, high- but not low-dose prophylactic insulin treatment delays diabetes onset and is associated with metabolic changes suggestive of β-cell "rest" which do not persist beyond treatment. These findings have important implications for designing insulin-based prevention trials.

  4. Gluten-free but also gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet prevent diabetes in NOD mice; the gluten enigma in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funda, D.P.; Kaas, A.; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental factors such as nutrition or exposure to infections play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that gluten-free, non-purified diet largely prevented diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study we tested...... hypothesis that early introduction of gluten-enriched (gluten+) diet may increase diabetes incidence in NOD mice. METHODS: Standard, gluten-free, gluten+ modified Altromin diets and hydrolysed-casein-based Pregestimil diet were fed to NOD females and diabetes incidence was followed for 310 days. Insulitis...... score and numbers of gut mucosal lymphocytes were determined in non-diabetic animals. RESULTS: A significantly lower diabetes incidence (p gluten-free diet (5.9%, n = 34) and Pregestimil diet (10%, n = 30) compared to mice on the standard Altromin diet (60.6%, n...

  5. Altered Expression of Somatostatin Receptors in Pancreatic Islets from NOD Mice Cultured at Different Glucose Concentrations In Vitro and in Islets Transplanted to Diabetic NOD Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ludvigsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin acts via five receptors (sst1-5. We investigated if the changes in pancreatic islet sst expression in diabetic NOD mice compared to normoglycemic mice are a consequence of hyperglycemia or the ongoing immune reaction in the pancreas. Pancreatic islets were isolated from NOD mice precultured for 5 days and further cultured for 3 days at high or low glucose before examined. Islets were also isolated from NOD mice and transplanted to normal or diabetic mice in a number not sufficient to cure hyperglycemia. After three days, the transplants were removed and stained for sst1-5 and islet hormones. Overall, changes in sst islet cell expression were more common in islets cultured in high glucose concentration in vitro as compared to the islet transplantation in vivo to diabetic mice. The beta and PP cells exhibited more frequent changes in sst expression, while the alpha and delta cells were relatively unaffected by the high glucose condition. Our findings suggest that the glucose level may alter sst expressed in islets cells; however, immune mechanisms may counteract such changes in islet sst expression.

  6. The Kinetics of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Accumulation in the Pancreas of the NOD Mouse during the Early Phases of Insulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Welzen-Coppens (Jojanneke); C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; P.J. Leenen (Pieter); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) have a diabetes-promoting role through IFN-α production on one hand, while a diabetes-inhibiting role through indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) production on the other. Li

  7. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Hansen, Axel Kornerup;

    2015-01-01

    between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations...

  8. Gene expression analysis of dendritic cells that prevent diabetes in NOD mice: analysis of chemokines and costimulatory molecules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morel, P.A.; Srinivas, M.; Turner, M.S.; Fuschiotti, P.; Munshi, R.; Bahar, I.; Feili-Hariri, M.; Ahrens, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that BM-derived DCs can prevent diabetes development and halt progression of insulitis in NOD mice, the mouse model of type 1 diabetes. The DC population that was most effective in this therapy had a mature phenotype, expressed high levels of costimulatory molecules,

  9. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 ameliorates thyroid damage in autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H‑2h⁴ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Mao, Jinyuan; Han, Cheng; Peng, Shiqiao; Li, Chenyan; Jin, Ting; Fan, Chenling; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), are upregulated in mice with autoimmune thyroid diseases. However, whether this interaction is involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in an iodine‑induced autoimmune thyroiditis model were investigated. NOD.H‑2h4 mice were randomly separated into a control, AIT and AIT+AMD3100 groups. The mice were fed with 0.05% sodium iodide water for 8 weeks to induce AIT. The AMD3100‑treated mice were administered with the CXCR4 antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times a week during the experimental period. The percentages of CD19+interleukin (IL)10+ B cells and CD4+IL10+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IL10 in the splenocytes were reduced in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, they increased following AMD3100 treatment, compared with the untreated AIT group. The percentages of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD8+ interferon (IFN)γ+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IFNγ increased in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, these were reduced in the AMD3100 group, compared with the AIT group. The AMD3100‑treated mice also had lower serum thyroglobulin antibody titers and reduced lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid, compared with the untreated AIT mice. These results suggested that inhibition of this chemokine axis may offer potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AIT.

  10. The incidence of type-1 diabetes in NOD mice is modulated by restricted flora not germ-free conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile King

    Full Text Available In the NOD mouse, the incidence of type-1 diabetes is thought to be influenced by the degree of cleanliness of the mouse colony. Studies collectively demonstrate that exposure to bacterial antigen or infection in the neonatal period prevents diabetes [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9], [10], supporting the notion that immunostimulation can benefit the maturation of the postnatal immune system [11]. A widely accepted extrapolation from this data has been the notion that NOD mice maintained under germ-free conditions have an increased incidence of diabetes. However, evidence supporting this influential concept is surprisingly limited [12]. In this study, we demonstrate that the incidence of diabetes in female NOD mice remained unchanged under germ-free conditions. By contrast, a spontaneous monoculture with a gram-positive aerobic spore-forming rod delayed the onset and reduced the incidence of diabetes. These findings challenge the view that germ-free NOD mice have increased diabetes incidence and demonstrate that modulation of intestinal microbiota can prevent the development of type-1 diabetes.

  11. Early life treatment with vancomycin reduces diabetes incidence in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Vogensen, Finn Kvist;

    immune response and a fine-tuned balance between these immunological components is crucial for characteristics of the disease, such as severity, onset time and recovery. The balance between the regulatory and the adaptive immune response is heavily influenced by early life bacterial stimulation......Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from an uncontrolled T cell mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas. Causal factors include a combination of genetics, early life incidents and the food we eat. The involved adaptive immune response can be down regulated by a regulatory....... An interplay that is likely to represent a critical environmental component to diabetes induction. In a period after birth alterations of the early microbial colonization of the gut therefore can be expected to have an immense impact on diabetes progression later in life. In this study neonate NOD mice were...

  12. The defect in T-cell regulation in NOD mice is an effect on the T-cell effectors

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alise, Anna Morena; Auyeung, Vincent; Feuerer, Markus; Nishio, Junko; Fontenot, Jason; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2008-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect against autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes (T1D) in particular, prompting the hypothesis that a deficiency in Tregs is a critical determinant of diabetes susceptibility in NOD mice. However, tests of this hypothesis have yielded contradictory results. We confirmed that NOD mice, compared with reference strains, do not have a primary deficit in Treg numbers in the lymphoid organs, whether in prediabetic mice of any age or in animals with recent-onset diabet...

  13. Prevention or early cure of type 1 diabetes by intranasal administration of gliadin in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Funda

    Full Text Available Induction of long-term tolerance to β-cell autoantigens has been investigated both in animal models and in human type 1 diabetes (T1D in order to prevent the disease. As regards external compounds, the dietary plant protein fraction has been associated with high penetrance of the disease, whereas gluten-free diets prevent T1D in animal models. Herewith we investigated whether intranasal (i.n. administration of gliadin or gluten may arrest the diabetogenic process. I.n. administration of gliadin to 4-week-old NOD mice significantly reduced the diabetes incidence. Similarly, the insulitis was lowered. Intranasal gliadin also rescued a fraction of prediabetic 13-week-old NOD mice from progressing to clinical onset of diabetes compared to OVA-treated controls. Vaccination with i.n. gliadin led to an induction of CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells and even more significant induction of γδ T cells in mucosal, but not in non-mucosal lymphoid compartments. This prevention strategy was characterized by an increased proportion of IL-10 and a decreased proportion of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ-positive CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells, and IFN-γ-positive γδ T cells, preferentially in mucosal lymphoid organs. In conclusion, i.n. vaccination with gliadin, an environmental antigen with possible etiological influence in T1D, may represent a novel, safer strategy for prevention or even early cure of T1D.

  14. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment

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    Jayashree Dolpady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA, protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103+ DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D.

  15. Oral Probiotic VSL#3 Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Microbiota and Promoting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Enriched Tolerogenic Intestinal Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolpady, Jayashree; Sorini, Chiara; Di Pietro, Caterina; Cosorich, Ilaria; Ferrarese, Roberto; Saita, Diego; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Falcone, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota modulates the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via mechanisms that remain largely unknown. The inflammasome components are innate immune sensors that are highly influenced by the gut environment and play pivotal roles in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. In this study we show that modifications of the gut microbiota induced by oral treatment with Lactobacillaceae-enriched probiotic VSL#3, alone or in combination with retinoic acid (RA), protect NOD mice from T1D by affecting inflammasome at the intestinal level. In particular, we show that VSL#3 treatment inhibits IL-1β expression while enhancing release of protolerogenic components of the inflammasome, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and IL-33. Those modifications of the intestinal microenvironment in VSL#3-treated NOD mice modulate gut immunity by promoting differentiation of tolerogenic CD103(+) DCs and reducing differentiation/expansion of Th1 and Th17 cells in the intestinal mucosa and at the sites of autoimmunity, that is, within the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of VSL#3-treated NOD mice. Our data provide a link between dietary factors, microbiota composition, intestinal inflammation, and immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes and could pave the way for new therapeutic approaches aimed at changing the intestinal microenvironment with probiotics to counterregulate autoimmunity and prevent T1D.

  16. Genes and environment as predisposing factors in autoimmunity: acceleration of spontaneous thyroiditis by dietary iodide in NOD.H2(h4) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolypetri, Panayota; King, Justin; Larijani, Mani; Carayanniotis, George

    2015-01-01

    In the field of autoimmune thyroiditis, NOD.H2(h4) mice have attracted significant and increasing attention since they not only develop spontaneous disease but they present thyroiditis with accelerated incidence and severity if they ingest iodide through their drinking water. This animal model highlights the interplay between genetic and dietary factors in the triggering of autoimmune disease and offers new opportunities to study immunoregulatory parameters influenced by both genes and environment. Here, we review experimental findings with this mouse model of thyroiditis.

  17. Transmaternal bisphenol a exposure accelerates diabetes type 1 development in NOD mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodin, J.; Bølling, A.B.; Becher, R.; Kuper, F.; Løvik, M.; Nygaard, U.C.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 is an autoimmune disease with a genetic predisposition that is triggered by environmental factors during early life. Epidemiological studies show that bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, has been detected in about 90% of all analyzed human urine samples. In this study

  18. Chromatin remodeling resets the immune system to protect against autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas; Patel, Vasu; Singh, Rajvir; Jayaraman, Sundararajan

    2011-07-01

    Epigenetic alteration of the genome has been shown to provide palliative effects in mouse models of certain human autoimmune diseases. We have investigated whether chromatin remodeling could provide protection against autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Treatment of female mice during the transition from prediabetic to diabetic stage (18-24 weeks of age) with the well-characterized histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A effectively reduced the incidence of diabetes. However, similar treatment of overtly diabetic mice during the same time period failed to reverse the disease. Protection against diabetes was accompanied by histone hyperacetylation in pancreas and spleen, enhanced frequency of CD4(+) CD62L(+) cells in the spleen, reduction in cellular infiltration of islets, restoration of normoglycemia and glucose-induced insulin release by beta cells. Activation of splenic T lymphocytes derived from protected mice in vitro with pharmacological agents that bypass the antigen receptor or immobilized anti-CD3 antibody resulted in enhanced expression of Ifng mRNA and protein without altering the expression of Il4, Il17, Il18, Inos and Tnfa genes nor the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α proteins. Consistently, expression of the transcription factor involved in Ifng transcription, Tbet/Tbx21 but not Gata3 and Rorgt, respectively, required for the transcription of Il4 and Il17, was upregulated in activated splenocytes of protected mice. These results indicate that chromatin remodeling can lead to amelioration of diabetes by using multiple mechanisms including differential gene transcription. Thus, epigenetic modulation could be a novel therapeutic approach to block the transition from benign to frank diabetes.

  19. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gu-Jiun [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sytwu, Huey-Kang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Jyh-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yuan-Wu [School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Yu-Liang [Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Chiao-Chi [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shing-Hwa, E-mail: h610129@gmail.com [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  20. Apoptosis of purified CD4+ T cell subsets is dominated by cytokine deprivation and absence of other cells in new onset diabetic NOD mice.

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    Ayelet Kaminitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg play a significant role in immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. Excessive sensitivity of isolated Treg to apoptosis has been demonstrated in NOD mice and humans suffering of type 1 diabetes, suggesting a possible role in the immune dysfunction that underlies autoimmune insulitis. In this study the sensitivity to apoptosis was measured in T cells from new onset diabetic NOD females, comparing purified subsets to mixed cultures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apoptotic cells are short lived in vivo and death occurs primarily during isolation, manipulation and culture. Excessive susceptibility of CD25(+ T cells to spontaneous apoptosis is characteristic of isolated subsets, however disappears when death is measured in mixed splenocyte cultures. In variance, CD25(- T cells display balanced sensitivity to apoptosis under both conditions. The isolation procedure removes soluble factors, IL-2 playing a significant role in sustaining Treg viability. In addition, pro- and anti-apoptotic signals are transduced by cell-to-cell interactions: CD3 and CD28 protect CD25(+ T cells from apoptosis, and in parallel sensitize naïve effector cells to apoptosis. Treg viability is modulated both by other T cells and other subsets within mixed splenocyte cultures. Variations in sensitivity to apoptosis are often hindered by fast proliferation of viable cells, therefore cycling rates are mandatory to adequate interpretation of cell death assays. CONCLUSIONS: The sensitivity of purified Treg to apoptosis is dominated by cytokine deprivation and absence of cell-to-cell interactions, and deviate significantly from measurements in mixed populations. Balanced sensitivity of naïve/effector and regulatory T cells to apoptosis in NOD mice argues against the concept that differential susceptibility affects disease evolution and progression.

  1. Immune Depletion in Combination with Allogeneic Islets Permanently Restores Tolerance to Self-Antigens in Diabetic NOD Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gagliani

    Full Text Available The destruction of beta cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D results in loss of insulin production and glucose homeostasis. Treatment of non-obese diabetic (NOD mice with immune-depleting/modulating agents (e.g., anti-CD3, murine anti-thymocyte-globulin (mATG can lead to diabetes reversal. However, for preclinical studies with these and other agents seeking to reverse disease at onset, the necessity for exogenous insulin administration is debated. Spontaneously diabetic NOD mice were treated with a short-course of mATG and insulin provided as drug therapy or by way of allogeneic islet implants. Herein we demonstrate that exogenous insulin administration is required to achieve disease reversal with mATG in NOD mice. Unexpectedly, we also observed that provision of insulin by way of allogeneic islet implantation in combination with mATG leads to a pronounced reversal of diabetes as well as restoration of tolerance to self-islets. Expansion/induction of regulatory cells was observed in NOD mice stably cured with mATG and allogeneic islets. These data suggest that transient provision of allogeneic insulin-producing islets might provide a temporary window for immune depletion to be more effective and instilling stable tolerance to endogenous beta cells. These findings support the use of a never before explored approach for preserving beta cell function in patients with recent onset T1D.

  2. Contrasting Roles of Islet Resident Immunoregulatory Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes.

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    Thomas B Thornley

    Full Text Available The innate immune system critically shapes diabetogenic adaptive immunity during type 1 diabetes (T1D pathogenesis. While the role of tissue-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in T1D is well established, the role of their tissue-resident counterparts remains undefined. We now demonstrate that islet resident macrophages (IRMs from non-autoimmune mice have an immunoregulatory phenotype and powerfully induce FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. The immunoregulatory phenotype and function of IRMs is compromised by TLR4 activation in vitro. Moreover, as T1D approaches in NOD mice, the immunoregulatory phenotype of IRMs is diminished as is their relative abundance compared to immunostimulatory DCs. Our findings suggest that maintenance of IRM abundance and their immunoregulatory phenotype may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent and/or cure T1D.

  3. Distinct monocyte Gene-Expression profiles in autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Padmos (Roos); N.C. Schloot (Nanette); H. Beyan (Huriya); C. Ruwhof (Cindy); F.J.T. Staal (Frank); D. de Ridder (Dick); H-J. Aanstoot (Henk-Jan); W.K. Lam-Tse; H.J. de Wit (Harm); C. Herder (Christian); R.C. Drexhage (Roos); B. Menart (Barbara); R.D. Leslie

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE-There is evidence that monocytes of patients with type 1 diabetes show proinflammatory activation and disturbed migration/adhesion, but the evidence is inconsistent. Our hypothesis is that monocytes are distinctly activated/disturbed in different subforms of autoimmune diabetes

  4. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes.

  5. Combination treatment with anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 prevents and reverses autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changyun; Ding, Heyuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2013-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, although B cells also play an important role in T1D development. Both T cell- and B cell-directed immunotherapies have shown efficacy in the prevention and reversal of T1D. However, whether the combined strategy of targeting both T and B cells could further improve therapeutic efficacy remains to be explored. We show that combined treatment with intravenous antihuman CD20 (hCD20) and oral anti-CD3 significantly delays diabetes development in prediabetic hCD20 transgenic NOD mice. More importantly, the combined treatment reverses diabetes in >60% of mice newly diagnosed with diabetes. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the addition of oral anti-CD3 to the B-cell depletion therapy synergistically enhances the suppressive function of regulatory T cells. Of note, the oral anti-CD3 treatment induced a fraction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing CD4 T cells in the small intestine through IL-10- and IL-27-producing dendritic cells. Thus, the findings demonstrate that combining anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 is superior to anti-CD20 monotherapy for restoring normoglycemia in diabetic NOD mice, providing important preclinical evidence for the optimization of B cell-directed therapy for T1D.

  6. Preliminary study of alleviating new onset diabetic NOD mice by a DPP-Ⅳ inhibitor%二肽基肽酶Ⅳ抑制剂治疗NOD小鼠新发糖尿病初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田磊; 周燕; 覃新干; 顾永耀; 吴向华; 李杰华; 桂小龙

    2010-01-01

    观察二肽基肽酶Ⅳ(dipeptidyl peptidase Ⅳ,DPP-Ⅳ)抑制剂NVP-DPF728对雌性非肥胖性糖尿病(non-obese diabetic,NOD)小鼠发病早期治疗作用.结果 显示,给药组20只小鼠中15只血糖逆转,逆转率为75%;血糖逆转的NOD小鼠,血清中转化生长因子β1、胰升糖素样肽1浓度显著升高,胰岛炎的程度显著减轻,腹腔淋巴结、胸腺中Tregs占总T细胞百分比显著升高(P<0.05).NVP-DPP728能够缓解胰岛炎和调节自身免疫反应,有效治疗NOD小鼠新发糖尿病.%To investigate the effect of NVP-DPP728, a DPP-Ⅳ inhibitor on new-onset diabetes and the autoimmune response in non-obese diabetic ( NOD ) mice. Diabetes could be reversed in 75% of NVP-DPP728 treated 20 NOD mice. In these 15 mice with remission, insulitis scores were significantly lower than those of the control group. The percentage of Tregs was increased in the thymus and celiac lymph nodes, plasma TGF-β1 and GLP-1 were also significantly increased ( P<0. 01 ). NVP-DPP728 treatment may reverse new-onset diabetes in NOD mice by reducing insulitis and increasing Tregs.

  7. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  8. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal.

  9. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life.

  10. IL-2 immunotherapy reveals potential for innate beta cell regeneration in the non-obese diabetic mouse model of autoimmune diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Diaz-de-Durana

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes (T1D is an autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta cells, resulting in dependence on exogenous insulin. To date, significant efforts have been invested to develop immune-modulatory therapies for T1D treatment. Previously, IL-2 immunotherapy was demonstrated to prevent and reverse T1D at onset in the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse model, revealing potential as a therapy in early disease stage in humans. In the NOD model, IL-2 deficiency contributes to a loss of regulatory T cell function. This deficiency can be augmented with IL-2 or antibody bound to IL-2 (Ab/IL-2 therapy, resulting in regulatory T cell expansion and potentiation. However, an understanding of the mechanism by which reconstituted regulatory T cell function allows for reversal of diabetes after onset is not clearly understood. Here, we describe that Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy treatment, given at the time of diabetes onset in NOD mice, not only correlated with reversal of diabetes and expansion of Treg cells, but also demonstrated the ability to significantly increase beta cell proliferation. Proliferation appeared specific to Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy, as anti-CD3 therapy did not have a similar effect. Furthermore, to assess the effect of Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy well after the development of diabetes, we tested the effect of delaying treatment for 4 weeks after diabetes onset, when beta cells were virtually absent. At this late stage after diabetes onset, Ab/IL-2 treatment was not sufficient to reverse hyperglycemia. However, it did promote survival in the absence of exogenous insulin. Proliferation of beta cells could not account for this improvement as few beta cells remained. Rather, abnormal insulin and glucagon dual-expressing cells were the only insulin-expressing cells observed in islets from mice with established disease. Thus, these data suggest that in diabetic NOD mice, beta cells have an innate capacity for regeneration both early and late in disease

  11. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

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    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  12. Early life treatment with vancomycin propagates Akkermansia muciniphila and reduces diabetes incidence in the NOD mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Krych, Lukasz; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris;

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Increasing evidence suggests that environmental factors changing the normal colonisation pattern in the gut strongly influence the risk of developing autoimmune diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate, both during infancy and adulthood, whether treatment with vancomycin...... received vancomycin from 8 weeks of age until onset of diabetes. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of intestinal immune cells was used to investigate the effect of vancomycin treatment. Results: At the end of the study, the cumulative diabetes incidence was found to be significantly...... lower for the neonatally treated group compared with the untreated group, whereas the insulitis score and blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the mice treated as adults compared with the other groups. Mucosal inflammation was investigated by intracellular cytokine staining of the small...

  13. Reversal of autoimmune diabetes by restoration of antigen-specific tolerance using genetically modified Lactococcus lactis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Van Belle, Tom L; Robert, Sofie; Grieco, Fabio A; Caluwaerts, Silvia; Galleri, Letizia; Spagnuolo, Isabella; Steidler, Lothar; Van Huynegem, Karolien; Demetter, Pieter; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A; Dotta, Francesco; Rottiers, Pieter; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2012-05-01

    Current interventions for arresting autoimmune diabetes have yet to strike the balance between sufficient efficacy, minimal side effects, and lack of generalized immunosuppression. Introduction of antigen via the gut represents an appealing method for induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we developed a strategy for tolerance restoration using mucosal delivery in mice of biologically contained Lactococcus lactis genetically modified to secrete the whole proinsulin autoantigen along with the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. We show that combination therapy with low-dose systemic anti-CD3 stably reverted diabetes in NOD mice and increased frequencies of local Tregs, which not only accumulated in the pancreatic islets, but also suppressed immune response in an autoantigen-specific way. Cured mice remained responsive to disease-unrelated antigens, which argues against excessive immunosuppression. Application of this therapeutic tool achieved gut mucosal delivery of a diabetes-relevant autoantigen and a biologically active immunomodulatory cytokine, IL-10, and, when combined with a low dose of systemic anti-CD3, was well tolerated and induced autoantigen-specific long-term tolerance, allowing reversal of established autoimmune diabetes. Therefore, we believe this method could be an effective treatment strategy for type 1 diabetes in humans.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in autoimmune type 1 diabetes: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiguo; Chang, Christopher; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes is characterized by selective destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas of genetically susceptible individuals. The mechanisms underlying the development of type 1 diabetes are not fully understood. However, a widely accepted point is that type 1 diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Although most type 1 diabetes patients do not have a family history, genetic susceptibility does play a vital role in beta cell autoimmunity and destruction. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) regions are the strongest genetic determinants, which can contribute 40-50 % of the genetic risk to type 1 diabetes. Other genes, including INS also contribute to disease risk. The mechanisms of the susceptible genes in type 1 diabetes may relate to their respective roles in antigen presentation, beta cell autoimmunity, immune tolerance, and autoreactive T cell response. Environmental susceptibility factors also contribute to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. From an epigenetic standpoint, the pathologic mechanisms involved in the development of type 1 diabetes may include DNA methylation, histone modification, microRNA, and molecular mimicry. These mechanisms may act through regulating of gene expression, thereby affecting the immune system response toward islet beta cells. One of the characteristics of type 1 diabetes is the recognition of islet autoantigens by autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and autoantibodies. Autoantibodies against islet autoantigens are involved in autoantigen processing and presentation by HLA molecules. This review will mainly focus on the molecular mechanism by which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors contribute to the risk of type 1 diabetes.

  15. Long-term abrogation of autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by immunotherapy with anti-lymphocyte serum.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Maki; Ichikawa, T.; R. Blanco; Porter, J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effect of anti-lymphocyte serum (ALS) on clinically overt diabetes by using a nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes mellitus. ALS given within 14 days of disease onset gradually reversed hyperglycemia with a 76% cumulative incidence of remission. Combined use of anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies, but not anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 antibody alone, was also effective with overall 64% remission. Diabetic NOD mice that failed to respond to ALS ...

  16. Adult-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes in Europe Is Prevalent With a Broad Clinical Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawa, Mohammed I; Kolb, Hubert; Schloot, Nanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVESSpecific autoantibodies characterize type 1 diabetes in childhood but are also found in adult-onset diabetes, even when initially non-insulin requiring, e.g., with latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA). We aimed to characterize adult-onset autoimmune diabetes.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSWe c...

  17. Antibiotics in early life alter the gut microbiome and increase disease incidence in a spontaneous mouse model of autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes.

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    Sophie Candon

    Full Text Available Insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes is a prototypic autoimmune disease whose incidence steadily increased over the past decades in industrialized countries. Recent evidence suggests the importance of the gut microbiota to explain this trend. Here, non-obese diabetic (NOD mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune type 1 diabetes were treated with different antibiotics to explore the influence of a targeted intestinal dysbiosis in the progression of the disease. A mixture of wide spectrum antibiotics (i.e. streptomycin, colistin and ampicillin or vancomycin alone were administered orally from the moment of conception, treating breeding pairs, and during the postnatal and adult life until the end of follow-up at 40 weeks. Diabetes incidence significantly and similarly increased in male mice following treatment with these two antibiotic regimens. In NOD females a slight yet not significant trend towards an increase in disease incidence was observed. Changes in gut microbiota composition were assessed by sequencing the V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Administration of the antibiotic mixture resulted in near complete ablation of the gut microbiota. Vancomycin treatment led to increased Escherichia, Lactobacillus and Sutterella genera and decreased members of the Clostridiales order and Lachnospiraceae, Prevotellaceae and Rikenellaceae families, as compared to control mice. Massive elimination of IL-17-producing cells, both CD4+TCRαβ+ and TCRγδ+ T cells was observed in the lamina propria of the ileum and the colon of vancomycin-treated mice. These results show that a directed even partial ablation of the gut microbiota, as induced by vancomycin, significantly increases type 1 diabetes incidence in male NOD mice thus prompting for caution in the use of antibiotics in pregnant women and newborns.

  18. Reduced numbers of dendritic cells with a tolerogenic phenotype in the prediabetic pancreas of NOD mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Welzen-Coppens (Jojanneke); C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; P.J. Leenen (Pieter); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe NOD mouse is a widely used animal model of autoimmune diabetes. Prior to the onset of lymphocytic insulitis, DCs accumulate at the islet edges. Our recent work indicated that these DCs may derive from aberrantly proliferating local precursor cells. As CD8α DCs play a role in toleranc

  19. Alcohol facilitates CD1d loading, subsequent activation of NKT cells, and reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Karsten Buschard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethanol ('alcohol' is a partly hydrophobic detergent that may affect the accessibility of glycolipids thereby influencing immunological effects of these molecules. METHODS: The study included cellular in vitro tests using α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer, and in vivo NOD mice experiments detecting diabetes incidence and performing behavioural and bacterial analyses. RESULTS: Alcohol in concentrations from 0.6% to 2.5% increased IL-2 production from NKT cells stimulated with αGalCer by 60% (p<0.05. CD1d expressed on HeLa cells contained significantly increasing amounts of αGalCer with increasing concentrations of alcohol, suggesting that alcohol facilitated the passive loading of αGalCer to CD1d. NOD mice were found to tolerate 5% ethanol in their drinking water without signs of impairment in liver function. Giving this treatment, the diabetes incidence declined significantly. Higher numbers of CD3+CD49b+ NKT cells were found in spleen and liver of the alcohol treated compared to the control mice (p<0.05, whereas the amount of CD4+Foxp3+ regulator T cells did not differ. Increased concentrations of IFN-γ were detected in 24-hour blood samples of alcohol treated mice. Behavioural studies showed no change in attitude of the ethanol-consuming mice, and bacterial composition of caecum samples was not affected by alcohol, disqualifying these as protective mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Alcohol facilitates the uptake of glycolipids and the stimulation of NKT cells, which are known to counteract Type 1 diabetes development. We propose that this is the acting mechanism by which treatment with alcohol reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice. This is corroborated by epidemiology showing beneficial effect of alcohol to reduce the severity of atherosclerosis and related diseases.

  20. [Nozological Heterogeneity, Molecular Genetics and Immunology of Autoimmune Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, I I; Shestakova, M V; Kuraeva, T L; Titovich, E V; Nikonova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Article is devoted to the review of literature data, and also the analysis of results of own researches concerning genetics, molecular genetics and immunological violations at various forms of the autoimmune diabetes (DM) including classical T1DM, LADA type and an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome of 1 type (APS1). In case of T1DM more than 80% of patients are carriers of one or two strongest predisposing haplotypes: DRB1*04-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 and DRB1*03-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 designated as DQ2 and DQ8. HLA genes can model a clinical features of disease. In Russian population, the children with diabetes manifestation up to 5-year age has significantly often high risk genotypes (DQ2/ DQ8) and significantly less the low risk genotypes in comparison with children, who had manifestation of T1DMin 10 years and later. The long-term 16-yearsfamily studies showed the maximum frequency of TJDMin high risk group, constantly accruing in process of increase in term of supervision, and in groups of an average and low risk lower and invariable. The highest risk of T1DM manifestation, reaching 90% at 10 years of supervision is defined by existence of HLA high risk genotypes and many antibodies, revealedfrom early age. LADA - the hybridform of autoimmune DM having signs of T1DM and T2DM in the basis. The development of autoimmune process against β-cells can be caused by only gene mutation (APS1). The part of T1DM cases which doesn't have the contributing HLA genes and autoimmune markers in process of studying of the importance of various genes and their biological value can be attributed to new, yet unknown forms of DM.

  1. Should There be Concern About Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults? Current Evidence and Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Laugesen, Esben; Leslie, R David

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diabetes has a heterogeneous phenotype. Although often considered a condition starting in childhood, a substantial proportion of type 1 diabetes presents in adult life. This holds important implications for our understanding of the factors that modify the rate of progression through the disease prodrome to clinical diabetes and for our management of the disease. When autoimmune diabetes develops in adulthood, insulin treatment is often not required at the time of diagnosis, and this autoimmune non-insulin requiring diabetes is generally termed latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Patients with LADA are generally leaner, younger at diabetes onset; have a greater reduction in C-peptide; and have a greater likelihood of insulin treatment as compared with patients with type 2 diabetes. The LADA subset of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes has highlighted many shortcomings in the classification of diabetes and invokes the case for more personalized data analysis in line with the move towards precision medicine. Perhaps most importantly, the issues highlight our persistent failure to engage with the heterogeneity within the most common form of autoimmune diabetes, that is adult-onset type 1 diabetes, both insulin-dependent and initially non-insulin requiring (LADA). This review discusses characteristics of autoimmune diabetes and specifically aims to illustrate the heterogeneity of the disease.

  2. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin P Hansen; Nina Matheis; George J Kahaly

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder causedby inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. Theetiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologicprocess of pancreatic destruction are well described. Inaddition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as amonoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandularautoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been wellexplored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increasedin most parts of the world, especially in industrializednations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmuneendocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients withT1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandularautoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed,which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition.Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterialinducedpancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed,however a definitive delineation of the autoimmunepathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS,pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalizeon one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, whichfacilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The mostprevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant orPAS type Ⅲ, which encompasses T1D and autoimmunethyroid disease. This review discusses the findings ofrecent studies showing noticeable differences in thegenetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D eitheras an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within thescope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome.

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Haurogné

    Full Text Available In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis.

  4. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  5. Evaluation of impaired beta-cell function in nonobese-diabetic (NOD) mouse model using bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Dror; Eldor, Roy; Sadoun, Gadi; Amior, Livnat; Dubois, Daniele; Boitard, Christian; Aflalo, Claude; Melloul, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β cells are functionally impaired or destroyed in diabetes mellitus. The onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) represents the culmination of a prolonged prediabetic phase of immune-mediated β-cell destruction. To assess the in vivo metabolic status of these cells, we used the ATP-sensitive firefly luciferase bioluminescence imaging approach, as a noninvasive probe to monitor pathological alterations in β-cell function in the nonobese-diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D. Hence, we generated the ToIβ-NOD transgenic mice in which doxycycline-inducible luciferase gene is selectively expressed in β cells. A sharp reduction in bioluminescence emitted in vivo from β cells at the early stages, preceded by several weeks of a limited reduction in β-cell mass. Since this decline could be due to the ongoing inflammatory process occurring in vivo, we exposed control islets to inflammatory cytokines and observed a dramatic decrease in luciferase luminescence, which appears to be due in part to a decrease in protein levels and a drop in intracellular ATP levels. This is the first evidence that selective expression of the luciferase gene represents a sensitive method for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of early β-cell dysfunction, subtle metabolic changes, such as endogenous ATP levels, indicative of a pathological condition in a tissue at the cellular level.

  6. Addition of rapamycin to anti-CD3 antibody improves long-term glycaemia control in diabetic NOD mice.

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    Shira Perl

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Non-Fc-binding Anti CD3 antibody has proven successful in reverting diabetes in the non-obese diabetes mouse model of type 1 diabetes and limited efficacy has been observed in human clinical trials. We hypothesized that addition of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor capable of inducing operational tolerance in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, would result in improved diabetes reversal rates and overall glycemia. METHODS: Seventy hyperglycemic non-obese diabetic mice were randomized to either a single injection of anti CD3 alone or a single injection of anti CD3 followed by 14 days of intra-peritoneal rapamycin. Mice were monitored for hyperglycemia and metabolic control. RESULTS: Mice treated with the combination of anti CD3 and rapamycin had similar rates of diabetes reversal compared to anti CD3 alone (25/35 vs. 22/35. Mice treated with anti CD3 plus rapamycin had a significant improvement in glycemia control as exhibited by lower blood glucose levels in response to an intra-peritoneal glucose challenge; average peak blood glucose levels 30 min post intra-peritoneal injection of 2 gr/kg glucose were 6.9 mmol/L in the anti CD3 plus rapamycin group vs. 10 mmo/L in the anti CD3 alone (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The addition of rapamycin to anti CD3 results in significant improvement in glycaemia control in diabetic NOD mice.

  7. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Aparicio, Daniel; Colmenares, Carlos; Peñaranda, Lianny; Luti, Yettana; Gotera, Daniela; Rojas, Joselyn; Cabrera, Mayela; Reyna, Nadia; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H

    2010-01-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is an autoimmune endocrine disorder in which despite the presence of antipancreatic islets antibodies in the moment of diagnostics, the progression to beta-cell secretory insufficiency is slow. It is often confused with others types of diabetes and therefore the management is frequently inadequate. We report a clinical case of a 23-year-old man with diagnosis of type 2 diabetes since 6 months ago, poorly controlled with a sulfonylurea, who initially presented 2 months ago from polyuria, polydipsia, and asthenia and 6 kg weight loss. History of past illness was negative, however, his mother relates exclusive breastfeeding during the first 15 days of life and later (until the 6 months) he was fed with infant formula (S-26). Family history revealed a first-degree relative (father) with diabetes mellitus secondary to steroid administration due to diagnosis of bone marrow hypoplasia. Also presents second-degree family history (uncle and grandfather) of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There were no pathologic findings at the physical examination. Anthropometry and laboratory tests were as follows: body mass index (BMI) = 19.66 kg/m, basal and postprandial glycemia = 108, and 276 mg/dL respectively, glycated haemoglobin = 8.9%, basal and postprandial C-peptide (2 hours) = 1.9, and 3.2 ng/mL, homeostasis model assessment of beta cell function: 87.5%, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance: 1.6. LADA presumptive diagnosis was confirmed with presence of autoantibodies anti-tyrosin-phosphatase and GAD65. At the time of diagnosis, individuals with LADA present an onset age <50, BMI <25 kg/m2, low magnitude postprandial and basal hyperglycemia, normal or close to normal C-peptide values, and thus not occur with acute hyperglycemic crises. Insulin therapy preserves pancreatic b-cell function, at the point that eventually prescribed insulin doses need to be reduced.

  8. [Genetic and molecular background in autoimmune diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantárová, D; Prídavková, D; Ságová, I; Vrlík, M; Mikler, J; Buc, M

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1 DM) is caused by autoimmune-mediated and idiopathic beta-cell destruction of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans resulting in absolute insulin deficiency. Susceptibility to T1 DM is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. It is generally believed that in genetically susceptible individuals, the disease is triggered by environmental agents, such as viral infections, dietary factors in early infancy, or climatic influences. Many candidate genes for diabetes have been reported; those within the Major Histocompatibility Complex being among the most important. The most common autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insuloma-associated antigen 2, and zinc transporter ZnT8. The destruction of beta-cells is mediated mainly by cellular mechanisms; antibodies only seem to reflect the ongoing autoimmune processes and are not directly involved in the tissue damage. They, however, appear prior to the onset of insulin deficiency which makes them suitable for use in the prevention of the disease.

  9. Evaluation of antidiabetic activity of polysaccharide isolated from Phellinus linteus in non-obese diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Jee Youn; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Hyung Sook; Lee, Young June; Yun, Jieun; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PLP) isolated from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by enhancing immune functions of macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells. Here, we report that PLP can inhibit the development of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although 80% of the NOD mice had developed diabetes by 24 weeks of age, none of the PLP-treated NOD mice developed diabetes. The mean blood glucose levels were 110mg/dl in PLP-treated mice and 499mg/dl in control NOD mice. Histological examination of the pancreatic islets revealed that most of the islets isolated from PLP-treated mice were less infiltrated with lymphocytes compared with those of control mice. Spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice could adaptively transfer diabetes into NOD/SCID mice, but those from PLP-treated NOD mice showed delayed transfer of diabetes. PLP inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha by Th1 cells and macrophages, but up-regulated IL-4 expression by Th2 cells in NOD mice. PLP did not prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetic development in ICR mice. Taken together, these results suggest that PLP inhibits the development of autoimmune diabetes by regulating cytokine expression.

  10. Primary prevention of beta-cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes – The Global Platform for the Prevention of Autoimmune Diabetes (GPPAD perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Ziegler

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: It is timely and feasible to establish a platform for primary prevention trials for type 1 diabetes in Europe. This multi-site European infrastructure would perform RCTs, supply data coordination and biorepository, provide cohorts for mechanistic and observational studies, and increase awareness for autoimmune diabetes.

  11. Patients with chronic pancreatitis have islet progenitor cells in their ducts, but reversal of overt diabetes in NOD mice by anti-CD3 shows no evidence for islet regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jenny M; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Bland, Chris; Foulis, Alan K; Cooke, Anne

    2007-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to T-cell coreceptors have been shown to tolerise autoreactive T-cells and prevent or even reverse autoimmune pathology. In type 1 diabetes, there is a loss of insulin-secreting beta-cells, and a cure for type 1 diabetes would require not only tolerance induction but also recovery of the functional beta-cell mass. Although we have previously shown that diabetic mice have increased numbers of ductal progenitors in the pancreas, there is no evidence of any increase of insulin-secreting cells in the ducts. In contrast, in the adult human pancreas of patients with chronic pancreatitis, we can demonstrate, in the ducts, increased numbers of insulin-containing cells, as well as cells containing other endocrine and exocrine markers. There are also significantly increased numbers of cells expressing the homeodomain protein, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1. Anti-CD3 has been shown to reverse overt diabetes in NOD mice; thus, we have used this model to ask whether monoclonal antibody-mediated inhibition of ongoing beta-cell destruction enables islet regeneration to occur. We find no evidence that such monoclonal antibody therapy results in either regeneration of insulin-secreting beta-cells or of increased proliferation of islet beta-cells.

  12. Easily obtainable clinical features increase the diagnostic accuracy for later autoimmune diabetes in adults. An evidence based report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M.W.M.D.; Meijer, M.; Peeters, B.; Poulsen, M.N.F.; Rutten, M.J.; Bots, M.L.; Heijden, van der G.J.M.G.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) represents a subgroup of diabetes mellitus. LADA is characterised by adult-onset diabetes and circulating autoimmune antibodies. LADA patients may need a different therapeutic approach than the usual type 2 diabetes mellitus. When LADA is inadeq

  13. Reversal of type 1 diabetes by a new MHC II-peptide chimera: "Single-epitope-mediated suppression" to stabilize a polyclonal autoimmune T-cell process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Marvin; Stoica-Nazarov, Cristina; Surls, Jacqueline; Kehl, Margaret; Bona, Constantin; Olsen, Cara; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Casares, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    Polyclonality of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells is the hallmark of several autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. We have previously reported that a soluble dimeric MHC II-peptide chimera prevents and reverses type 1 diabetes induced by a monoclonal diabetogenic T-cell population in double Tg mice [Casares, S. et al., Nat. Immunol. 2002. 3: 383-391]. Since most of the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)-specific CD4(+) T cells in the NOD mouse are tolerogenic but unable to function in an autoimmune environment, we have activated a silent, monoclonal T-regulatory cell population (GAD65(217-230)-specific CD4(+) T cells) using a soluble I-A(αβ) (g7)/GAD65(217-230)/Fcγ2a dimer, and measured the effect on the ongoing polyclonal diabetogenic T-cell process. Activated GAD65(217-230)-specific T cells and a fraction of the diabetogenic (B(9-23)-specific) T cells were polarized toward the IL-10-secreting T-regulatory type 1-like function in the pancreas of diabetic NOD mice. More importantly, this led to the reversal of hyperglycemia for more than 2 months post-therapy in 80% of mice in the context of stabilization of pancreatic insulitis and improved insulin secretion by the β cells. These findings argue for the stabilization of a polyclonal self-reactive T-cell process by a single epitope-mediated bystander suppression. Dimeric MHC class II-peptide chimeras-like approach may provide rational grounds for the development of more efficient antigen-specific therapies in type 1 diabetes.

  14. Time to insulin initiation can not be used in defining Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults [LADA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brophy, S; Yderstræde, K; Mauricio, D;

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults [LADA] is type 1 diabetes presenting as non-insulin dependent diabetes. One feature of the selection criteria is time independent of insulin treatment. We examine the validity of this criterion. Methods: Patients were recruited in 9 European centres...

  15. Synergistic reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice with anti-CD3 and interleukin-1 blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ablamunits, Vitaly; Henegariu, Octavian; Hansen, Jakob Bondo

    2012-01-01

    (ab')(2) fragments of anti-CD3 mAb with or without IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), or anti-IL-1ß mAb. We studied the reversal of diabetes and effects of treatment on the immune system. Mice that received a combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA showed a more rapid rate of remission of diabetes than...... mice treated with anti-CD3 mAb or IL-1RA alone. Combination-treated mice had increased IL-5, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-¿ levels in circulation. There were reduced pathogenic NOD-relevant V7 peptide-V7(+) T cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Their splenocytes secreted more IL-10, had increased...... indicate that the combination of anti-CD3 mAb with IL-1RA is synergistic in reversal of diabetes through a combination of mechanisms. The combination causes persistent remission from islet inflammation....

  16. Nonobese Diabetic (NOD Mice Lack a Protective B-Cell Response against the “Nonlethal” Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL Malaria Protozoan

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    Mirian Mendoza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL is a nonlethal malaria strain in mice of different genetic backgrounds including the C57BL/6 mice (I-Ab/I-Enull used in this study as a control strain. We have compared the trends of blood stage infection with the nonlethal murine strain of P. yoelii 17XNL malaria protozoan in immunocompetent Nonobese Diabetic (NOD mice prone to type 1 diabetes (T1D and C57BL/6 mice (control mice that are not prone to T1D and self-cure the P. yoelii 17XNL infection. Prediabetic NOD mice could not mount a protective antibody response to the P. yoelii 17XNL-infected red blood cells (iRBCs, and they all succumbed shortly after infection. Our data suggest that the lack of anti-P. yoelii 17XNL-iRBCs protective antibodies in NOD mice is a result of parasite-induced, Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg cells able to suppress the parasite-specific antibody secretion. Conclusions. The NOD mouse model may help in identifying new mechanisms of B-cell evasion by malaria parasites. It may also serve as a more accurate tool for testing antimalaria therapeutics due to the lack of interference with a preexistent self-curing mechanism present in other mouse strains.

  17. GAD65 autoantibodies and its role as biomarker of Type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA)

    OpenAIRE

    Towns, Roberto; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of autoimmune diabetes is the presence of adaptive responses directed to neuroendocrine proteins. One of these proteins is glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). While GAD is widely distributed in neuroendocrine tissues, its specific significance in diabetes has paralleled the advances in understanding humoral and cellular immunity in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in a subset of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), going from the seminal discoveries of islet autoantibodies to the development a...

  18. The gene expression profile of CD11c+ CD8α- dendritic cells in the pre-diabetic pancreas of the NOD mouse.

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    Wouter Beumer

    Full Text Available Two major dendritic cell (DC subsets have been described in the pancreas of mice: The CD11c+ CD8α- DCs (strong CD4+ T cell proliferation inducers and the CD8α+ CD103+ DCs (T cell apoptosis inducers. Here we analyzed the larger subset of CD11c+ CD8α- DCs isolated from the pancreas of pre-diabetic NOD mice for genome-wide gene expression (validated by Q-PCR to elucidate abnormalities in underlying gene expression networks. CD11c+ CD8α- DCs were isolated from 5 week old NOD and control C57BL/6 pancreas. The steady state pancreatic NOD CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a reduced expression of several gene networks important for the prime functions of these cells, i.e. for cell renewal, immune tolerance induction, migration and for the provision of growth factors including those for beta cell regeneration. A functional in vivo BrdU incorporation test showed the reduced proliferation of steady state pancreatic DC. The reduced expression of tolerance induction genes (CD200R, CCR5 and CD24 was supported on the protein level by flow cytometry. Also previously published functional tests on maturation, immune stimulation and migration confirm the molecular deficits of NOD steady state DC. Despite these deficiencies NOD pancreas CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a hyperreactivity to LPS, which resulted in an enhanced pro-inflammatory state characterized by a gene profile of an enhanced expression of a number of classical inflammatory cytokines. The enhanced up-regulation of inflammatory genes was supported by the in vitro cytokine production profile of the DCs. In conclusion, our data show that NOD pancreatic CD11c+ CD8α- DCs show various deficiencies in steady state, while hyperreactive when encountering a danger signal such as LPS.

  19. Spectratyping analysis of the islet-reactive T cell repertoire in diabetic NOD Igμnull mice after polyclonal B cell reconstitution

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    Sercarz Eli E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non Obese Diabetic mice lacking B cells (NOD.Igμnull mice do not develop diabetes despite their susceptible background. Upon reconstitution of B cells using a chimera approach, animals start developing diabetes at 20 weeks of age. Methods We have used the spectratyping technique to follow the T cell receptor (TCR V beta repertoire of NOD.Igμnull mice following B cell reconstitution. This technique provides an unbiased approach to understand the kinetics of TCR expansion. We have also analyzed the TCR repertoire of reconstituted animals receiving cyclophosphamide treatment and following tissue transplants to identify common aggressive clonotypes. Results We found that B cell reconstitution of NOD.Igμnull mice induces a polyclonal TCR repertoire in the pancreas 10 weeks later, gradually diversifying to encompass most BV families. Interestingly, these clonotypic BV expansions are mainly confined to the pancreas and are absent from pancreatic lymph nodes or spleens. Cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes at 10 weeks post-B cell reconstitution reorganized the predominant TCR repertoires by removing potential regulatory clonotypes (BV1, BV8 and BV11 and increasing the frequency of others (BV4, BV5S2, BV9, BV16-20. These same clonotypes are more frequently present in neonatal pancreatic transplants under the kidney capsule of B-cell reconstituted diabetic NOD.Igμnull mice, suggesting their higher invasiveness. Phenotypic analysis of the pancreas-infiltrating lymphocytes during diabetes onset in B cell reconstituted animals show a predominance of CD19+ B cells with a B:T lymphocyte ratio of 4:1. In contrast, in other lymphoid organs (pancreatic lymph nodes and spleens analyzed by FACS, the B:T ratio was 1:1. Lymphocytes infiltrating the pancreas secrete large amounts of IL-6 and are of Th1 phenotype after CD3-CD28 stimulation in vitro. Conclusions Diabetes in NOD.Igμnull mice appears to be caused by a polyclonal repertoire of T cell

  20. Th1-Like ICOS+ Foxp3+ Treg Cells Preferentially Express CXCR3 and Home to β-Islets during Pre-Diabetes in BDC2.5 NOD Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Kornete

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D occurs through a breakdown of self-tolerance resulting in the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing β-islets of the pancreas. A numerical and functional waning of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells, prompted by a pancreatic IL-2 deficiency, accompanies Th1 autoimmunity and T1D progression in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Recently, we identified a dominant subset of intra-islet Treg cells that expresses the ICOS costimulatory receptor and promotes self-tolerance delaying the onset of T1D. ICOS co-stimulation potently enhances IL-2 induced survival and proliferation, and suppressive activity of Treg cells in situ. Here, we propose an ICOS-dependent mechanism of Treg cell homing to the β-islets during pre-diabetes in the NOD model via upregulation of the CXCR3 chemokine receptor. The islet-specific ICOS+ Treg cell subset preferentially expresses CXCR3 in the pancreatic lymph nodes (pLN in response to Teff cell-mediated pancreatic inflammation, an expression correlating with the onset and magnitude of IFN-γ production by Teff cells in pancreatic sites. We also reveal that intra-pancreatic APC populations and insulin-producing β, but not α nor δ, islet cells secrete the CXCR3 chemokines, CXCL9, 10 and 11, and selectively promote ICOS+ CXCR3+ Treg cell chemotaxis in vitro. Strikingly, islet-derived Treg cells also produce these chemokines suggesting an auto-regulation of homing by this subset. Unlike ICOS- cells, ICOS+ Treg cells adopt a Th1-like Treg phenotype while maintaining their suppressive capacity, characterized by expression of T-bet and CXCR3 and production of IFN-γ in the draining pLNs. Finally, in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ blocked Treg cell CXCR3 upregulation evincing its role in regulating expression of this chemokine receptor by Treg cells. Thus, CXCR3-mediated trafficking of Treg cells could represent a mechanism of homeostatic immunoregulation during diabetogeneesis.

  1. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); She, Jin-Xiong, E-mail: jshe@georgiahealth.edu [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4{sup +} T cells and especially CD8{sup +} T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha} and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells.

  2. Anterior Hypopituitarism is Rare and Autoimmune Disease is Common in Adults with Idiopathic Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, though many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data has suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Design and Patients: We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone MRI scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH\\/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. Results: One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. 33% had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Conclusions: Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not therefore be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology.

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders in Iranian Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zamanfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder that is yet the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Several genetic risk factors have been associated with T1DM, auto immune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune disorders, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most frequent disorder associated with T1DM. Its prevalence varies depending on age, sex and ethnic origin of the subjects and is considerably higher than the general population and increases with duration of T1DM. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of ATD in Iranian children with T1DM compared with other countries. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a review on all papers published on the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and T1DM, which was available on Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID, Magiran and Iran Medex databases up to June 2014. Both Persian and English articles were checked. The searched terms were: diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, prevalence, frequency, Iranian children and adolescents. All papers which were done on patients with age under 20 years old and have used Anti-TPO and Anti-TG to evaluate patients were included. Results: Six papers met all the criteria. A total of 736 participants were included in this review. After review of all the papers, the prevalence of Anti-TPO was reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG was reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran. Conclusions: Autoimmune thyroid disorders are the most prevalent immunological diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes. All these studies have shown a higher prevalence of the disorder in patients with T1DM compared to the Iranian healthy population. Anti-TPO reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran that was similar to the studies in other countries.

  4. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Valentina; Phillips, Brett; Engman, Carl; Harnaha, Jo; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  5. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Di Caro

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  6. Efeitos do diabetes espontaneo sobre a mucosa bucal de camundongos (NOD)

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Jose Caldeira

    2003-01-01

    : o Diabetes Mellitus é um distúrbio crônico que afeta o metabolismo de proteínas, carboidratos e gordura sendo a hiperglicemia a principal característica. A incidência mundial de indivíduos com diabetes vem aumentando nos últimos anos, cerca de 160 milhões de pessoas são diabéticos tendendo a dobrar nos próximos 25 anos (Ritz, 2002). Diversos estudos vem sendo realizados na tentativa de esclarecer os efeitos deletérios do diabetes sobre a mucosa bucal, além da reversão desses através de trat...

  7. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-11-23

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies.

  8. Efeitos do diabetes espontaneo sobre a mucosa bucal de camundongos (NOD)

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Jose Caldeira

    2003-01-01

    Resumo:: o Diabetes Mellitus é um distúrbio crônico que afeta o metabolismo de proteínas, carboidratos e gordura sendo a hiperglicemia a principal característica. A incidência mundial de indivíduos com diabetes vem aumentando nos últimos anos, cerca de 160 milhões de pessoas são diabéticos tendendo a dobrar nos próximos 25 anos (Ritz, 2002). Diversos estudos vem sendo realizados na tentativa de esclarecer os efeitos deletérios do diabetes sobre a mucosa bucal, além da reversão desses através ...

  9. Effector and Naturally Occurring Regulatory T Cells Display No Abnormalities in Activation Induced Cell Death in NOD Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ayelet Kaminitz; Esma S Yolcu; Askenasy, Enosh M.; Jerry Stein; Isaac Yaniv; Haval Shirwan; Nadir Askenasy

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disturbed peripheral negative regulation might contribute to evolution of autoimmune insulitis in type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the sensitivity of naïve/effector (Teff) and regulatory T cells (Treg) to activation-induced cell death mediated by Fas cross-linking in NOD and wild-type mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both effector (CD25(-), FoxP3(-)) and suppressor (CD25(+), FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) T cells are negatively regulated by Fas cross-linking in mixed splenocyte populations of NOD...

  10. Early life treatment with vancomycin reduces diabetes incidence in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

    treated with the antibiotic vancomycin in four weeks from birth. Diabetes incidence and onset time were compared with a control group and we found that neonate vancomycin treatment attenuates T1D. By changing the gut flora composition in the beginning of life we also demonstrated a disruption...... of the mechanisms regulating intestinal immune homeostasis toward a proinflammatory mucosal environment....

  11. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful. Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1–13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes. PMID:28291161

  12. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of the Adult (LADA in a Brazilian Indian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Botelho Vieira Filho

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA as originally described represents perhaps as many as 10 -- 20% of adult-onset patients with diabetes. DESIGN: case report. CASE REPORT: A 38-year-old Brazilian Xavante-Jê Indian with Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of the Adult (LADA is described, coming from the Sangradouro community in Poxoréu, Mato Grosso. The onset of diabetes after reaching 25 years of age, the evolution to insulin deficiency after a period of insulin-independence and the presence of auto-antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD characteristic of LADA were present. This patient may represent the first case of LADA in a Brazilian with full Indian heritage. Further studies are necessary to verify the prevalence of this new type of diabetes in this population that does not have Caucasoid admixture and has a particular environmental background.

  13. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  14. Beta cell function and BMI in ethnically diverse children with newly diagnosed autoimmune type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of our study was to examine the relationship between BMI and beta-cell function at diagnosis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a large group of ethnically diverse children. Cross-sectional analysis of 524 children (60.8% White, 19.5% Hispanic, 14.5% African-American, 5.2% other n...

  15. Childhood malignancy and maternal diabetes or other auto-immune disease during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbom, L; Aberg, A; Källén, B

    2002-04-08

    Among 4380 children born in 1987-1997 of women with a diagnosis of diabetes and alive at the age of one, 10 were registered in the Swedish Cancer Registry before the end of 1998. The odds ratio for having a childhood cancer after maternal diabetes, stratified for year of birth, maternal age, parity, multiple birth, and 500 g birth weight class was 2.25 (95%CI 1.22-4.15). Among 5842 children born during the period 1973-1997 whose mothers had other auto-immune diseases (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn, ulcerous colitis, multiple sclerosis or thyroiditis), the number of observed childhood cancers (9) was close to that expected (8.5). Maternal diabetes but not other auto-immune diseases may be a risk factor for childhood cancer.

  16. High-throughput sequencing of islet-infiltrating memory CD4+ T cells reveals a similar pattern of TCR Vβ usage in prediabetic and diabetic NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania Marrero

    Full Text Available Autoreactive memory CD4(+ T cells play a critical role in the development of type 1 diabetes, but it is not yet known how the clonotypic composition and TCRβ repertoire of the memory CD4(+ T cell compartment changes during the transition from prediabetes to diabetes. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze the TCRβ repertoire of sorted islet-infiltrating memory CD4(+CD44(high T cells in 10-week-old prediabetic and recently diabetic NOD mice. We show that most clonotypes of islet-infiltrating CD4(+CD44(high T cells were rare, but high-frequency clonotypes were significantly more common in diabetic than in prediabetic mice. Moreover, although the CD4(+CD44(high TCRβ repertoires were highly diverse at both stages of disease development, dominant use of TRBV1 (Vβ2, TRBV13-3 (Vβ8.1, and TRBV19 (Vβ6 was evident in both prediabetic and diabetic mice. Our findings strongly suggest that therapeutic targeting of cells specifically expressing the dominant TCRβ might reduce pancreatic infiltration in prediabetic mice and attenuate the progression to diabetes.

  17. Dysregulation of T lymphocyte proliferative responses in autoimmunity.

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    Sydney K Elizer

    Full Text Available T cells are critically dependent on cellular proliferation in order to carry out their effector functions. Autoimmune strains are commonly thought to have uncontrolled T cell proliferation; however, in the murine model of autoimmune diabetes, hypo-proliferation of T cells leading to defective AICD was previously uncovered. We now determine whether lupus prone murine strains are similarly hyporesponsive. Upon extensive characterization of T lymphocyte activation, we have observed a common feature of CD4 T cell activation shared among three autoimmune strains-NOD, MRL, and NZBxNZW F1s. When stimulated with a polyclonal mitogen, CD4 T cells demonstrate arrested cell division and diminished dose responsiveness as compared to the non-autoimmune strain C57BL/6, a phenotype we further traced to a reliance on B cell mediated costimulation, which underscores the success of B cell directed immune therapies in preventing T cell mediated tissue injury. In turn, the diminished proliferative capacity of these CD4 T cells lead to a decreased, but activation appropriate, susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A similar decrement in stimulation response was observed in the CD8 compartment of NOD mice; NOD CD8 T cells were distinguished from lupus prone strains by a diminished dose-responsiveness to anti-CD3 mediated stimulation. This distinction may explain the differential pathogenetic pathways activated in diabetes and lupus prone murine strains.

  18. Fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes through nasal immunization in NOD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shiping; Li, Guoliang; Liu, Kunfeng; Yang, Xue; Cao, Rongyue; Zong, Li; Long, Jun; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Human heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is an endogenous β-cells autoantigen, it could postpone the onset of insulitis and sooner type 1 diabetes mellitus. P277 is one of Hsp65 determinants at position 437-469 of amino acids cascaded. Meanwhile, it's already well-known that there were several better anti-diabetic B epitopes, such as insulinoma antigen-2 (IA-2). Currently, fusion protein IA2P2 has constructed in order to enhance its pharmacological efficacy. In addition, added homologous bacterial-derived Hsp65 and His tag were beneficial to protein immunogenicity and purification separately. So, finally we examined a fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could regulate Th2 immune response and reduce natural diabetic incidence in NOD mice. We constructed two express vector pET28a-His-Hsp65-6P277 and pET28a-His-Hsp65-6IA2P2. After purification, we observed that triple intranasal administration of these two fusion protein in 4-week-old NOD mice maintained normal blood glucose and weight, with a lower diabetic or insulitis incidence. Consistent with induced splenic T cells proliferation and tolerance, His-Hsp65-6IA2P2-treated mice performed reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-10 level. In conclusion, we suggested that fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could be reconstructed and purified successively. Furthermore, nasal administration of this fusion protein could rebalance T cells population and prevent T1DM.

  19. Immunology in the Clinic Review Series; focus on metabolic diseases: development of islet autoimmune disease in type 2 diabetes patients: potential sequelae of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Worrell, B; Palmer, J P

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the development of type 2 diabetes has been considered not to have an autoimmune component, in contrast to the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. In this review we will discuss the accumulating data supporting the concept that islet autoreactivity and inflammation is present in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and the islet autoimmunity appears to be one of the factors associated with the progressive nature of the type 2 diabetes disease process.

  20. "PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN TYPE I DIABETES MELLITUS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri A. Rabbani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes mellitus (DM is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. Association of ATD and type I DM has been described with varying frequencies but there is still debate about the situation in the Iranian population. We investigated the prevalence of anti thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies and ATD in children and adolescents with type I DM. A total of 145 patients with type I DM were participated in this study. They were screened for anti-TPO antibodies and TSH levels. Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were sought. A group of 50 healthy unrelated girls and boys aged 11-16 years served as controls. Anti-TPO antibodies were found in 34 (23.4% diabetic patients and 1 subject (2% in the control group (P<0.001. Frequency of anti TPO antibodies was significantly higher in girls than boys (P<0.05. We failed to show any significant correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and duration of DM. We found that younger patients at diagnosis are more likely to be anti-TPO negative (P<0.001. Out of 145 diabetic patients, 32 (22% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis occurred in 1, 9 and 1 patients, respectively. Visible goiter was found in 2 subjects (4% of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. In conclusion, the evaluation of thyroid autoimmunity in type I diabetic patients may improve the diagnosis of thyroid disease in early stages. Yearly examination of anti-TPO antibodies allows identifying diabetic patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

  1. Lack of evidence for a role of islet autoimmunity in the aetiology of canine diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin M Ahlgren

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and is commonly proposed to be of autoimmune origin. Although the clinical presentation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D and canine diabetes are similar, the aetiologies may differ. The aim of this study was to investigate if autoimmune aetiology resembling human T1D is as prevalent in dogs as previously reported. METHODS: Sera from 121 diabetic dogs representing 40 different breeds were tested for islet cell antibodies (ICA and GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA and compared with sera from 133 healthy dogs. ICA was detected by indirect immunofluorescence using both canine and human frozen sections. GADA was detected by in vitro transcription and translation (ITT of human and canine GAD65, followed by immune precipitation. Sections of pancreata from five diabetic dogs and two control dogs were examined histopathologically including immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreas polypeptide. RESULTS: None of the canine sera analysed tested positive for ICA on sections of frozen canine or human ICA pancreas. However, serum from one diabetic dog was weakly positive in the canine GADA assay and serum from one healthy dog was weakly positive in the human GADA assay. Histopathology showed marked degenerative changes in endocrine islets, including vacuolisation and variable loss of immune-staining for insulin. No sign of inflammation was noted. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: Contrary to previous observations, based on results from tests for humoral autoreactivity towards islet proteins using four different assays, and histopathological examinations, we do not find any support for an islet autoimmune aetiology in canine diabetes mellitus.

  2. Relationship between autoantibodies combination, metabolic syndrome components and diabetic complications in autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Knežević-Ćuća, Jadranka; Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to establish the possible association between double or triple antibody positivity and latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) phenotype in the context of metabolic syndrome (MS) prevalence and its individual components. This cross-sectional study population comprised 69 islet cell antibody-positive patients coming for their comprehensive annual review. They were divided into three groups according to antibody positivity. Twenty-five (36.2 %) were male, mean age of 51 years with disease duration of 8 years. Twenty-eight (40.58 %) were positive only for GAD Abs, 26 (37.68 %) were positive for ICA and GAD Abs and 15 (21.74 %) were positive for GAD, ICA, and IA2 Abs. The lowest value of waist circumference, MS, and artherial hypertension prevalence was found in the group positive for all three antibodies. In the multinomial multivariate logistic regression model, MS was negatively associated with triple Abs positivity compared to single Ab positivity and double Abs positivity. Our results highlight the importance of inverse association between simultaneous Abs positivity for ICA, GAD, and IA2 with the MS and its components present in LADA patients. This inverse relationship might implicate that LADA patients are phenotypically closer to T1DM. The contribution of IA2 Ab positivity merits is to be considered in the determination of LADA phenotypes, while its diagnostic value needs to be clarified in future follow-up studies.

  3. STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MITOCHONDRIAL GENE MUTATION AND LATENT AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES MELLITUS IN ADULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔璨; 李强; 张一娜; 张巾超

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To identify the A3243G mutation of mitochondrial(mt) DNA in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adults (LADA) of Han nationality in the northeast area of China. Methods.Seventy nine diabetics of Han nationality,whose families have resided in the northeast area of China for more than 3 generations,were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (22 cases of type 2 diabetes with maternal inheritance history),Group 2 (34 cases of LADA),Group 3 (23 cases of type 1 diabetes in adolescents).The A3243G of mt DNA was detected in these 79 subjects with the method of PCR RFLP. Results.None of the 79 diabetics studied was positively identified for the A3243G mutation of mt DNA. Conclusion.The A3243G mutation of mt DNA might not be related to the onset of LADA in diabetic population of Han nationality in northeast area of China and there might not be close relationship between A3243G mutation of mt DNA and autoimmunity.

  4. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: II--Is diabetes a central or peripheral disorder of effector and regulatory cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-02-01

    Two competing hypotheses aiming to explain the onset of autoimmune reactions are discussed in the context of genetic and environmental predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The first hypothesis has evolved along characterization of the mechanisms of self-discrimination and attributes diabetic autoimmunity to escape of reactive T cells from central regulation in the thymus. The second considers frequent occurrence of autoimmune reactions within the immune homunculus, which are adequately suppressed by regulatory T cells originating from the thymus, and occasionally, insufficient suppression results in autoimmunity. Besides thymic dysfunction, deregulation of both effector and suppressor cells can in fact result from homeostatic aberrations at the peripheral level during initial stages of evolution of adaptive immunity. Pathogenic cells sensitized in the islets are efficiently expanded in the target tissue and pancreatic lymph nodes of lymphopenic neonates. In parallel, the same mechanisms of peripheral sensitization contribute to tolerization through education of naïve/effector T cells and expansion of regulatory T cells. Experimental evidence presented for each individual mechanism implies that T1D may result from a primary effector or suppressor immune abnormality. Disturbed self-tolerance leading to T1D may well result from peripheral deregulation of innate and adaptive immunity, with variable contribution of central thymic dysfunction.

  5. The gut microbiota modulates glycaemic control and serum metabolite profiles in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Thomas U; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Knip, Mikael; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Orešič, Matej

    2014-01-01

    Islet autoimmunity in children who later progress to type 1 diabetes is preceded by dysregulated serum metabolite profiles, but the origin of these metabolic changes is unknown. The gut microbiota affects host metabolism and changes in its composition contribute to several immune-mediated diseases; however, it is not known whether the gut microbiota is involved in the early metabolic disturbances in progression to type 1 diabetes. We rederived non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice as germ free to explore the potential role of the gut microbiota in the development of diabetic autoimmunity and to directly investigate whether the metabolic profiles associated with the development of type 1 diabetes can be modulated by the gut microbiota. The absence of a gut microbiota in NOD mice did not affect the overall diabetes incidence but resulted in increased insulitis and levels of interferon gamma and interleukin 12; these changes were counterbalanced by improved peripheral glucose metabolism. Furthermore, we observed a markedly increased variation in blood glucose levels in the absence of a microbiota in NOD mice that did not progress to diabetes. Additionally, germ-free NOD mice had a metabolite profile similar to that of pre-diabetic children. Our data suggest that germ-free NOD mice have reduced glycaemic control and dysregulated immunologic and metabolic responses.

  6. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (Pdiabetes.

  7. Are obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes autoimmune diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sue; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Revelo, Xavier S; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and associated insulin resistance predispose individuals to develop chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these disorders affect a significant proportion of the global population, the underlying mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. The discovery of elevated tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue as an inducer of obesity-associated insulin resistance marked a new era of understanding that a subclinical inflammatory process underlies the insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction that precedes type 2 diabetes. Advances in the field identified components of both the innate and adaptive immune response as key players in regulating such inflammatory processes. As antigen specificity is a hallmark of an adaptive immune response, its role in modulating the chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes begs the question of whether insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes can have autoimmune components. In this Perspective, we summarize current data that pertain to the activation and perpetuation of adaptive immune responses during obesity and discuss key missing links and potential mechanisms for obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to be considered as potential autoimmune diseases.

  8. NOD2: Ethnic and geographic differences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juleen Cavanaugh

    2006-01-01

    Investigations into the inheritance of the three risk alleles R702W, G908R and 1007fsInsC in NOD2 associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease have demonstrated a remarkable amount of heterogeneity across ethnicities and populations, with regional variation across Europe for example, suggesting local founder effects. In nonCaucasian populations Crohn's disease continues to increase in incidence but this increase appears not to be a consequence of variation in NOD2, further advancing the accumulating evidence for other susceptibility loci.Frequencies of the known alleles are compared across populations in health and disease and evidence for additional alleles in NOD2 is reviewed. Based on its position on chromosome 16 coincident with some other autoimmune disease susceptibility localizations, research has targeted NOD2 variation as the potential cause of other autoimmune disorders. While these investigations have mostly returned negative findings, two diseases,Blau Syndrome and Graft versus Host Disease, have been shown to be caused by risk alleles in NOD2. As is frequent in complex disease investigations, some results await validation, but the identification of NOD2 and the differences within and across population raises intriguing questions about the population genetics of the variation at this locus.

  9. Decrease of FOXP3 mRNA in CD4~+ T cells in latent autoimmune diabetes in adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨治芳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the percentage of peripheral blood CD4+ CD25+ T cells and the expression of F0XP3 mRNA in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA). Methods Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 60 patients with LADA,30 patients with type 2 diabetes and 30 age- and sex-matched

  10. Effector and naturally occurring regulatory T cells display no abnormalities in activation induced cell death in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Kaminitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disturbed peripheral negative regulation might contribute to evolution of autoimmune insulitis in type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the sensitivity of naïve/effector (Teff and regulatory T cells (Treg to activation-induced cell death mediated by Fas cross-linking in NOD and wild-type mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both effector (CD25(-, FoxP3(- and suppressor (CD25(+, FoxP3(+ CD4(+ T cells are negatively regulated by Fas cross-linking in mixed splenocyte populations of NOD, wild type mice and FoxP3-GFP trangeneess. Proliferation rates and sensitivity to Fas cross-linking are dissociated in Treg cells: fast cycling induced by IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation improve Treg resistance to Fas-ligand (FasL in both strains. The effector and suppressor CD4(+ subsets display balanced sensitivity to negative regulation under baseline conditions, IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation, indicating that stimulation does not perturb immune homeostasis in NOD mice. Effective autocrine apoptosis of diabetogenic cells was evident from delayed onset and reduced incidence of adoptive disease transfer into NOD.SCID by CD4(+CD25(- T cells decorated with FasL protein. Treg resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis retain suppressive activity in vitro. The only detectable differential response was reduced Teff proliferation and upregulation of CD25 following CD3-activation in NOD mice. CONCLUSION: These data document negative regulation of effector and suppressor cells by Fas cross-linking and dissociation between sensitivity to apoptosis and proliferation in stimulated Treg. There is no evidence that perturbed AICD in NOD mice initiates or promotes autoimmune insulitis.

  11. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

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    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  12. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  13. Prolonged exclusive breastfeeding reduces autoimmune diabetes incidence and increases regulatory T-cell frequency in bio-breeding diabetes-prone rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, S.; Visser, J. T. J.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Bos, N. A.; Rozing, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previously, we reported that exclusive breastfeeding delayed and partially protected bio-breeding diabetes-prone (BBDP) rats from spontaneous autoimmune diabetes development. To investigate whether this protection results from modulation of the (mucosal) immune system, the present study w

  14. A Maternal Gluten-Free Diet Reduces Inflammation and Diabetes Incidence in the Offspring of NOD Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Krych, Lukasz; Buschard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early-life interventions in the intestinal environment have previously been shown to influence diabetes incidence. We therefore hypothesized that a gluten-free (GF) diet, known to decrease the incidence of type 1 diabetes, would protect against the development of diabetes when fed only during...

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiuying; Sun, Jing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Xu, Zhongliang; Murphy, Madonna; Jia, Junting; Wang, Jianhua; Xie, Yun; Xu, Weili

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Data on latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) from population-based studies are sparse. We sought to investigate the prevalence and correlates of LADA. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 8,109 participants, who were aged ≥15 years and living in Tianjin, China, were assessed to identify individuals with type 2 diabetes (American Diabetes Association Criteria, 1997) and further to detect patients with LADA. LADA was ascertained by 1) the presence of type 2 diabetes and age ≥35 years, 2) the lack of a requirement for insulin at least 6 months after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and 3) serum GAD antibody positivity. Data were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS Of all participants, 498 (6.1%) were patients with type 2 diabetes. Of them, 46 (9.2%) were found to have LADA. The prevalence of LADA was 0.6% (46 of 8,109), and tended to increase with age up to 50–59 years in all participants. The odds ratios (95% CI) of LADA related to hypertension, family history of diabetes, waist-to-hip ratio ≥0.85, and major stressful events were 1.93 (1.02–3.65), 17.59 (9.08–34.06), 5.37 (2.31–12.49), and 4.09 (1.75–9.52), respectively. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of LADA is ∼9% in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypertension, family history of diabetes, central obesity, and major stressful events may be associated with the occurrence of LADA. PMID:20876205

  16. Gut microbiota translocation to the pancreatic lymph nodes triggers NOD2 activation and contributes to T1D onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Frederico R.C.; Françozo, Marcela C.S.; de Oliveira, Gabriela G.; Ignacio, Aline; Castoldi, Angela; Zamboni, Dario S.; Ramos, Simone G.; Câmara, Niels O.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Palm, Noah W.; Flavell, Richard A.; Silva, João S.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is triggered by both genetic and environmental factors, resulting in the destruction of pancreatic β cells. The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier and consequent escape of microbial products may be one of these environmental triggers. However, the immune receptors that are activated in this context remain elusive. We show here that during streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1D, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2), but not NOD1, participates in the pathogenesis of the disease by inducing T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the pancreatic LNs (PLNs) and pancreas. Additionally, STZ-injected wild-type (WT) diabetic mice displayed an altered gut microbiota compared with vehicle-injected WT mice, together with the translocation of bacteria to the PLNs. Interestingly, WT mice treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) were fully protected from STZ-induced T1D, which correlated with the abrogation of bacterial translocation to the PLNs. Notably, when Abx-treated STZ-injected WT mice received the NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide, both hyperglycemia and the proinflammatory immune response were restored. Our results demonstrate that the recognition of bacterial products by NOD2 inside the PLNs contributes to T1D development, establishing a new putative target for intervention during the early stages of the disease. PMID:27325889

  17. Autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in a patient with ureaplasma urealyticum infection and review on new triggers of immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Spanò, Francesca; Ferone, Diego; Albertelli, Manuela; Schenone, Angelo; Contatore, Miriam; Guastalla, Andrea; De Bellis, Annamaria; Garibotto, Giacomo; Puppo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease in which large volumes of dilute urine (polyuria) are excreted due to vasopressin (AVP) deficiency [central diabetes insipidus (CDI)] or to AVP resistance (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). In the majority of patients, the occurrence of CDI is related to the destruction or degeneration of neurons of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. The most common and well recognized causes include local inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, vascular disorders, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), sarcoidosis, tumors such as germinoma/craniopharyngioma or metastases, traumatic brain injuries, intracranial surgery, and midline cerebral and cranial malformations. Here we have the opportunity to describe an unusual case of female patient who developed autoimmune CDI following ureaplasma urealyticum infection and to review the literature on this uncommon feature. Moreover, we also discussed the potential mechanisms by which ureaplasma urealyticum might favor the development of autoimmune CDI.

  18. Exposure to sequestered self-antigens in vivo is not sufficient for the induction of autoimmune diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Olivia; Hall, Håkan; Elford, Alisha R.; Yen, Patty; Calzascia, Thomas; Spencer, David M.; Ohashi, Pamela S.

    2017-01-01

    Although the role of T cells in autoimmunity has been explored for many years, the mechanisms leading to the initial priming of an autoimmune T cell response remain enigmatic. The ‘hit and run’ model suggests that self-antigens released upon cell death can provide the initial signal for a self-sustaining autoimmune response. Using a novel transgenic mouse model where we could induce the release of self-antigens via caspase-dependent apoptosis. We tracked the fate of CD8+ T cells specific for the self-antigen. Our studies demonstrated that antigens released from apoptotic cells were cross-presented by CD11c+ cells in the draining lymph node. This cross-presentation led to proliferation of self-antigen specific T cells, followed by a transient ability to produce IFN-γ, but did not lead to the development of autoimmune diabetes. Using this model we examined the consequences on T cell immunity when apoptosis was combined with dendritic cell maturation signals, an autoimmune susceptible genetic background, and the deletion of Tregs. The results of our study demonstrate that autoimmune diabetes cannot be initiated by the presentation of antigens released from apoptotic cells in vivo even in the presence of factors known to promote autoimmunity. PMID:28257518

  19. Effects of Non-HLA Gene Polymorphisms on Development of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes in a Population With High-Risk HLA-DR,DQ Genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steck, Andrea K.; Wong, Randall; Wagner, Brandie; Johnson, Kelly; Liu, Edwin; Romanos, Jihane; Wijmenga, Cisca; Norris, Jill M.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Rewers, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the effects of non-HLA gene polymorphisms on the risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) and progression to type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. A total of 1,743 non-Hispanic, white children were included: 861 first-degree relatives and 882 general population children

  20. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

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    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  1. Multiple endocrinopathies (growth hormone deficiency, autoimmune hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus in Kearns-Sayre syndrome

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    A. Berio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kearns-Sayre syndrome is characterized by onset before 20 years, chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration, and ataxia (and/or hearth block, and/or high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid in the presence of mtDNA rearrangements. Multiple endocrine dysfunction associated with this syndrome was rarely reported. In this paper, the Authors report on a female patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome with large heteroplasmic mtDNA deletion, absence of cytochrome c oxidase in many muscle fibers, partial GH deficiency, hypothyroidism and subsequently insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Anti-thyroid peroxidase and antithyreoglobulin antibodies were present in high titer in serum while anti-islet cell antibodies were absent. The patient developed thyroiditis with Hashimoto encephalopathy. The presence of GH deficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis with hypothyroidism and IDDM distinguishes this case from others and confirms the association of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with multiple endocrine dysfunction. Hashimoto encephalopathy and anti-thyroideal antibodies suggest that in this patient, predisposed by a genetic factor (a mitochondrial deletion anti-thyroideal antibodies may have contributed to the hypothyroidism and, by interfering with cerebral mitochondrial function, may have caused the encephalopathy. GH deficiency and IDDM can be attributed to oxidative phosphorylation deficiency but the autoimmunity may also have played a role in the production of glandular insufficiencies. It seems important to search for endocrine autoimmunity in every case of KSS.

  2. DIABETOGENIC T CELLS INDUCE AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES IN BALB/c MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lei Zou; Zeng-yu Zhao; Yun-yang Wang; Zhi-qiang Su; Ming Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of T cell and its subsets in the induction of insulitis and type 1 diabetes meilitus(T1DM) in BALB/c mice.Methods Autoimmune diabetes mellitus was developed by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin(STZ) daily for 5 consecutive days in BALB/c mice as sources of donor cells. Spleen cells from diabetic mice were then cultured for 7 days in the stimulation of interleukin-2 ( IL-2 ) to harvest diabetogenic T cells, which were subsequently transferred into normal BALB/c mice recipients. MTr, ELISA, and HE staining were used to analyze the lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine (IL-2, interferon-γ, IL-4, and IL-10) levels, and pathological changes in pancreatic islets.Results As few as 3 × 106 diabetogenic T cells successfully induced diabetes meilitus in recipients pretreated with STZ twice, whereas transfer of equal amount of normal splenocytes, T cell-depleted diabetogenie splenocytes, or diabetogenic CD4+ T cells alone in recipients receiving STZ twice pretreatment was proved not to induce diabetes mellitus either. A markedly increased lymphocyte proliferation, high levels of interferon-γ and IL-2 in the supematants of diabetogenie T cells were observed. In addition, a markedly enhanced lymphocyte proliferation, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in serum, and numerous lymphocytes infiltration in pancreatic islets were detected in the diabetic mice induced by diabetogenic T cells transfer.Conclusions A novel T1DM murine model is established in STZ-pretreated BALB/c mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells. CD4M+ T cells with interferon-γ may promote the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibody levels discriminate two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李霞; 杨琳; 周智广; 黄干; 颜湘

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical characteristics between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) with different titers of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADA) and to define the two distinct subtypes of LADA.Methods Sera of 750 patients with an initial diagnosis of T2DM from central south of China were screened for GADA using a radioligand assay. The distribution and frequency of GADA levels were described. Two hundred and ninety-five patients were divided into the T2DM group (n=233) and the LADA group (n=62) to compare the age of onset, body mass index, HbA1c, C-peptide, hypertension, dyslipidemia and chronic diabetic complications. Furthermore, LADA patients with different GADA titers were subdivided to analyze the same indexes as the above. Results The prevalence of LADA (defined as GADA≥0.05, namely GADA positive) was 9.7% in the 750 initially diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Compared with T2DM, LADA patients were younger at their ages of onset, had lower C-peptide and body mass index, and also had less cases with hypertension and with dyslipidemia. However, only patients with high titer of GADA had poorer beta cell functions and less diabetic complications compared to T2DM and low GADA titer of LADA patients. Patients with low GADA titer were similar to T2DM patients, except that they were prone to develop ketosis more frequently.Conclusions Two clinically distinct subtypes of LADA can be identified by GADA levels in patients initially-diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Patients with high titer of GADA (GADA≥0.5) subsequently develop more insulin dependency, which are classified as LADA-type 1; while those with lower GADA titer (0.05≤GADA<0.5) and having clinical and metabolic phenotypes of type 2 diabetes are classified as LADA-type 2.

  4. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  5. Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults: From oral hypoglycemic agents to early insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resham R Poudel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of phenotypic type 2 diabetics have islet autoantibodies and are referred to as having latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA, and they land on early sulfonylurea failure and require insulin. Diagnosing LADA has treatment implications because of high risk of progression to insulin dependency. But often there is delay in insulin therapy, as there are no recommendations for islet antibody testing in adult-onset diabetes currently. LADA clinical risk score can identify adults at high risk who may benefit from antibody testing. The optimal treatment of LADA is not established. Early insulin therapy helps to achieve good metabolic control and better long-term outcomes by preserving b-cells and endogenous C-peptide secretion. Sulfonylureas are better avoided as they exhaust b-cells; glitazones and exenatide have favorable outcomes, whereas metformin needs to be used with caution. Understanding LADA will also bring new windows in managing type 1 diabetes. Information acquisition was done by reviewing the medical literature published since 1987, with particular attention to the natural history, genetic factors, and treatment of LADA.

  6. Association of SUMO4 M55V polymorphism with autoimmune diabetes in Latvian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedimbi, Saikiran K; Shastry, Arun; Park, Yongsoo; Rumba, Ingrida; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2006-10-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO4), located in IDDM5, has been identified as a potential susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The novel polymorphism M55V, causing an amino acid change in the evolutionarily conserved met55 residue has been shown to activate the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), hence the suspected role of SUMO4 in the pathogenicity of T1DM. The M55V polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to T1DM in Asians, but not in Caucasians. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of T1DM and SUMO4 M55V has not been studied in LADA to date. The current study aims to test whether Latvians are similar to Caucasians in susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes (T1DM and LADA), with respect to SUMO4 M55V. We studied, age- and sex-matched, Latvian T1DM patients (n = 100) and healthy controls (n = 90) and LADA patients (n = 45) and healthy controls (n = 95). SUMO4 M55V polymorphism was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The allelic frequencies of the A and G alleles were compared with HLA DR3-DR4-positive and HLA DR3-DR4-negative patients to identify any potential relation between HLA DR3-DR4 and SUMO4 M55V. We found no significant association between SUMO4 M55V and T1DM susceptibility in Latvians, the results being in concurrence with the previous studies in Caucasians of British and Canadian origin. Comparison of the A and G alleles with HLA DR3-DR4 did not result in any significant P values. No significant association was found between SUMO4 M55V and LADA. SUMO4 M55V is not associated with susceptibility to T1DM and LADA in Latvians, and Latvians exhibit similarity to other Caucasians with respect to association of SUMO4 M55V with autoimmune diabetes.

  7. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches.

  8. Early infant feeding and risk of developing islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Ruth; Beyerlein, Andreas; Knopff, Annette; Hummel, Sandra; Ziegler, Anette-G; Winkler, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    We investigated whether food supplementation within the first year life or age at introduction of gluten-containing foods influenced the risk of developing islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. A total of 2,291 children with a family history of type 1 diabetes were prospectively followed from birth for 28,983 patient years (median 13.1 years). Dietary exposure data were collected by questionnaires, food records and by family interview. Exposure to gluten-containing foods before age 3 months, which occurred in 19 children, increased the risk of developing islet autoantibodies (n = 4), multiple islet autoantibodies (n = 4), and type 1 diabetes (n = 3) compared to exclusive breastfeeding within the first 3 months [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 3.97 (95 % confidence interval 1.41-11.17), 5.39 (1.89-15.35), and 3.45 (1.04-11.48), respectively] and also compared to first exposure to gluten between 3.1 and 6.0 months of age [adjusted HR 3.40 (1.19-9.70), 4.25 (1.47-12.26), and 3.43 (1.01-11.66), respectively]. Children who received infant formula or other solid food within the first 3 months and children who received gluten-containing foods after age 6 months did not have an increased risk of islet autoantibodies, multiple islet autoantibodies or type 1 diabetes. Our present data affirm that compliance to infant feeding guidelines is a possible way to reduce type 1 diabetes risk in genetically susceptible children.

  9. Thyroid Autoimmunity and Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafur Doğdu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To determine the seroprevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis and gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis. Patients and Methods: Fifty-five children and adolescents (age ranged 3-18 years with T1DM were included in the study. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, free T3 (fT3, free T4 (fT4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, anti-tiroglobulin (anti-TG, anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and anti-endomisyum IgA antibody (antiEMA were investigated. Results: Eight of our cases (14.5% were positive for anti-TPO, 9/55 (16.3% for anti-TG, 8/55 (14.5% for anti-EMA, 8/55 (14.5% for anti-gliadin IgA, and 5/55 (9.0% for anti-gliadin IgG. None of these antibodies were detected in healthy controls. In eight patients, who had positive anti-TPO and anti-TG, thyroid ultrasound results confirmed thyroiditis. Anti-EMA and anti-gliadin IgA were positive in five patients. Four of them were diagnosed with GSE. Conclusion: In patients with T1DM, the seroprevalences of autoimmune thyroiditis and GSE were higher than that in healthy controls. Therefore, regardless of the symptoms of patients, autoimmune thyroiditis and GSE should be investigated in all patients with T1DM. Thus, the most rapid and meaningful method is to investigate the presence of autoantibodies using serological tests. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 39-42

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection might be responsible for the interconnection between type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Eshmawy Mervat M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher serological prevalence rates of helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection have been reported in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. Patients with T1DM are at increased risk for developing other autoimmune diseases, most commonly AT. It is unknown whether H. pylori infection could explain the high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies and AT in T1DM. The aim of the current study was to evaluate anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg autoantibodies in correlation with anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA in young patients with T1DM. Methods Anti-H. Pylori IgG, IgA, anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies titers were measured in 162 euthyroid patients with T1DM and 80 healthy controls matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Results Seroprevalence of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with T1DM than in healthy controls; 79% vs. 51.2%, p Conclusion our results support the idea of a connection between H. pylori infection and the occurrence of anti-TPO, anti-Tg autoantibodies and AT in young patients with T1DM. So, H. pylori infection could be considered as an environmental trigger for development of AT in T1DM. Young patients with T1DM should be screened for H. pylori infection.

  11. Does physiological beta cell turnover initiate autoimmune diabetes in the regional lymph nodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Iskovich, Svetlana; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2006-05-01

    The initial immune process that triggers autoimmune beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes is not fully understood. In early infancy there is an increased beta cell turnover. Recurrent exposure of tissue-specific antigens could lead to primary sensitization of immune cells in the draining lymph nodes of the pancreas. An initial immune injury to the beta cells can be inflicted by several cell types, primarily macrophages and T cells. Subsequently, infiltrating macrophages transfer antigens exposed by apoptotic beta cells to the draining lymph nodes, where antigen presenting cells process and amplify a secondary immune reaction. Antigen presenting cells evolve as dual players in the activation and suppression of the autoimmune reaction in the draining lymph nodes. We propose a scenario where destructive insulitis is caused by recurrent exposure of specific antigens due to the physiological turnover of beta cells. This sensitization initiates the evolution of reactive clones that remain silent in the regional lymph nodes, where they succeed to evade regulatory clonal deletion.

  12. Prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Svensson, Jannet; Hansen, Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) diagnosed in Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: A total of 662 Swedish children with T1D were matched with 1080 Danish children with T1D and 309 healthy children from Sweden and 283...... was equally distributed among 89 children with T1D positive for both IgAG-DGP/tTG and IgG-tTG. CONCLUSION: The discrepancy in levels of IgAG-DGP/tTG and IgG-tTG between Swedish and Danish T1D cohorts was independent of HLA and suggests that regional variations in comorbidity of celiac disease in T1D is caused...

  13. Is autoimmune diabetes caused by aberrant immune activity or defective suppression of physiological self-reactivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Enosh M; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-03-01

    Two competing hypotheses are proposed to cause autoimmunity: evasion of a sporadic self-reactive clone from immune surveillance and ineffective suppression of autoreactive clones that arise physiologically. We question the relevance of these hypotheses to the study of type 1 diabetes, where autoreactivity may accompany the cycles of physiological adjustment of β-cell mass to body weight and nutrition. Experimental evidence presents variable and conflicting data concerning the activities of both effector and regulatory T cells, arguing in favor and against: quantitative dominance and deficit, aberrant reactivity and expansion, sensitivity to negative regulation and apoptosis. The presence of autoantibodies in umbilical cord blood of healthy subjects and low incidence of the disease following early induction suggest that suppression of self-reactivity is the major determinant factor.

  14. IMMUNOLOGICAL AND METABOLIC FACTORS INTERACTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF MICROVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN LATENT AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES OF ADULTS (LADA

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    T. V. Saprina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers found that the development of microvascular complications (nephropathy, retinopathy with latent autoimmune diabetes adults (LADA occurs much earlier than in type 1 diabetes mellitus. The research devoted to the study of the spectrum and the time of development of microangiopathy in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes of adults, compared to patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Also studied immunological factors (cytokine secretion of mononuclear leukocytes as one of the possible mechanisms of diabetic angiopathy progression. It has been shown that in LADA, as in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the development of microvascular complications (nephropathy, retinopathy occurs much earlier than in type 1 diabetes mellitus (after a 4-year course of the disease due to a sharp decline in the serum concentration of C peptide. Thus in patients with LADA, having microvascular complications in the supernatants of cell cultures of mononuclear leukocytes determined a significant increase in the concentrations of cytokines IL-2, IL-4, TNFα.

  15. Primary Dietary Intervention Study to Reduce the Risk of Islet Autoimmunity in Children at Increased Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, Sandra; Pflüger, Maren; Hummel, Michael; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether delaying the introduction of gluten in infants with a genetic risk of islet autoimmunity is feasible, safe, and may reduce the risk of type 1 diabetes–associated islet autoimmunity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 150 infants with a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and a risk HLA genotype were randomly assigned to a first gluten exposure at age 6 months (control group) or 12 months (late-exposure group) and were followed 3 monthly until the ...

  16. GIMAP GTPase family genes: potential modifiers in autoimmune diabetes, asthma, and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Mirkka T; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A; Kere, Juha; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2015-06-15

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype-driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene-gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded.

  17. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  18. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells enhance wound healing in diabetic NOD/SCID mice through high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

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    Sung-Whan Kim

    Full Text Available Although human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs have been recognised as a promising stem cell resource, their therapeutic potential for wound healing has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of AMMs using a diabetic mouse wound model. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA results revealed that the angiogenic factors, IGF-1, EGF and IL-8 were markedly upregulated in AMMs when compared with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMs and dermal fibroblasts. In vitro scratch wound assays also showed that AMM-derived conditioned media (CM significantly accelerated wound closure. Diabetic mice were generated using streptozotocin and wounds were created by skin excision, followed by AMM transplantation. AMM transplantation significantly promoted wound healing and increased re-epithelialization and cellularity. Notably, transplanted AMMs exhibited high engraftment rates and expressed keratinocyte-specific proteins and cytokeratin in the wound area, indicating a direct contribution to cutaneous closure. Taken together, these data suggest that AMMs possess considerable therapeutic potential for chronic wounds through the secretion of angiogenic factors and enhanced engraftment/differentiation capabilities.

  19. MicroRNAs: Novel Players in the Dialogue between Pancreatic Islets and Immune System in Autoimmune Diabetes

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    Giuliana Ventriglia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression in all cell types. Therefore, these tiny noncoding RNA molecules are involved in a wide range of biological processes, exerting functional effects at cellular, tissue, and organ level. In pancreatic islets of Langerhans, including beta-cells, microRNAs are involved in cell differentiation as well as in insulin secretion, while in immune cells they have been shown to play pivotal roles in development, activation, and response to antigens. Indeed, it is not surprising that microRNA alterations can lead to the development of several diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D. Type 1 diabetes is the result of a selective autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells, characterized by islet inflammation (insulitis, which leads to chronic hyperglycemia. Given the growing importance of microRNA in the pathophysiology of T1D, the aim of this review is to summarize the most recent data on the potential involvement of microRNAs in autoimmune diabetes. Specifically, we will focus on three different aspects: (i microRNAs as regulators of immune homeostasis in autoimmune diabetes; (ii microRNA expression in pancreatic islet inflammation; (iii microRNAs as players in the dialogue between the immune system and pancreatic endocrine cells.

  20. Dysregulation of lipid and amino acid metabolism precedes islet autoimmunity in children who later progress to type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orešič, Matej; Simell, Satu; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Näntö-Salonen, Kirsti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Parikka, Vilhelmiina; Katajamaa, Mikko; Hekkala, Anne; Mattila, Ismo; Keskinen, Päivi; Yetukuri, Laxman; Reinikainen, Arja; Lähde, Jyrki; Suortti, Tapani; Hakalax, Jari; Simell, Tuula; Hyöty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli

    2008-01-01

    The risk determinants of type 1 diabetes, initiators of autoimmune response, mechanisms regulating progress toward β cell failure, and factors determining time of presentation of clinical diabetes are poorly understood. We investigated changes in the serum metabolome prospectively in children who later progressed to type 1 diabetes. Serum metabolite profiles were compared between sample series drawn from 56 children who progressed to type 1 diabetes and 73 controls who remained nondiabetic and permanently autoantibody negative. Individuals who developed diabetes had reduced serum levels of succinic acid and phosphatidylcholine (PC) at birth, reduced levels of triglycerides and antioxidant ether phospholipids throughout the follow up, and increased levels of proinflammatory lysoPCs several months before seroconversion to autoantibody positivity. The lipid changes were not attributable to HLA-associated genetic risk. The appearance of insulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies was preceded by diminished ketoleucine and elevated glutamic acid. The metabolic profile was partially normalized after the seroconversion. Autoimmunity may thus be a relatively late response to the early metabolic disturbances. Recognition of these preautoimmune alterations may aid in studies of disease pathogenesis and may open a time window for novel type 1 diabetes prevention strategies. PMID:19075291

  1. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

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    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  2. Doubly Reactive INS-IGF2 Autoantibodies in Children with Newly Diagnosed Autoimmune (type 1) Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsuna, N; Delli, A; Andersson, C; Nilsson, A-L; Vaziri-Sani, F; Larsson, K; Carlsson, A; Cedervall, E; Jönsson, B; Neiderud, J; Elding Larsson, H; Ivarsson, S-A; Törn, C; Fex, M; Lernmark, Å

    2015-10-01

    The splice variant INS-IGF2 entails the preproinsulin signal peptide, the insulin B-chain, eight amino acids of the C-peptide and 138 unique amino acids from an ORF in the IGF2 gene. The aim of this study was to determine whether levels of specific INS-IGF2 autoantibodies (INS-IGF2A) were related to age at diagnosis, islet autoantibodies, HLA-DQ or both, in patients and controls with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Patients (n = 676), 0-18 years of age, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1996-2005 and controls (n = 363) were analysed for specific INS-IGF2A after displacement with both cold insulin and INS-IGF2 to correct for non-specific binding and identify double reactive sera. GADA, IA-2A, IAA, ICA, ZnT8RA, ZnT8WA, ZnT8QA and HLA-DQ genotypes were also determined. The median level of specific INS-IGF2A was higher in patients than in controls (P INS-IGF2A when the cut-off was the 95th percentile of the controls (P INS-IGF2A was increased among HLA-DQ2/8 (OR = 1.509; 95th CI 1.011, 2.252; P = 0.045) but not in 2/2, 2/X, 8/8, 8/X or X/X (X is neither 2 nor 8) patients. The association with HLA-DQ2/8 suggests that this autoantigen may be presented on HLA-DQ trans-heterodimers, rather than cis-heterodimers. Autoantibodies reactive with both insulin and INS-IGF2A at diagnosis support the notion that INS-IGF2 autoimmunity contributes to type 1 diabetes.

  3. Genotipificación del gen HLA DQB1 en diabetes autoinmune del adulto (lada HLA DQB1 genotyping in latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA

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    Mariela Caputo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available La diabetes autoinmune es una enfermedad multifactorial causada por factores genéticos predisponentes y ambientales desencadenantes. Se manifiesta en la edad infantojuvenil (diabetes tipo 1, DMID y en la edad adulta (diabetes autoinmune latente del adulto, LADA. La predisposición genética es de tipo poligénico, se ha establecido asociación con alelos polimórficos del gen DQB del sistema HLA, VNTR del gen de insulina y polimorfismos en el gen CTLA4. En el presente trabajo se analizaron las frecuencias de los alelos polimórficos del gen HLA DQB1 en 63 pacientes LADA, 70 pacientes DMID y 79 individuos normales. La tipificación de los alelos del gen DQB1 se llevó a cabo mediante el Kit SSP TM DQ Olerup. Se observó una mayor frecuencia del genotipo *0201-*0302 y *0201-*0201 en ambas poblaciones diabéticas con respecto a normales (pAutoimmune diabetes is a complex, multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. This autoimmune diabetes is commonly manifested in childhood and adolescence with a fast onset (type 1 diabetes, IDDM and it can occur in adult patients with a slow onset with delayed insulin requirement, (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, LADA . Autoimmune diabetes has strong class II HLA association mainly with DQB gene which constitutes the first susceptibility locus. However, association with the 5’INS- VNTR and CTLA-4 genes has been established. In this study, we analysed the polimorphic allele frequencies of DQB HLA gene in 63 LADA patients, 70 IDDM and 79 control subjects. The HLA DQB1 alleles typing was detected through Olerup SSP TM DQ kit using sequence specific primers. We observed a positive association of *0201-*0302 and *0201-*0201 genotypes in both types of diabetic patients compared to the control group (p<0.05. Moreover, *0201-*0302 genotype was higher in IDDM than in LADA (p<0.05. On the other hand, the *0602 protective allele analysis showed a high prevalence in the

  4. Type 1 diabetes: can exercise impair the autoimmune event? The L-arginine/glutamine coupling hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Maurício da Silva; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2008-06-01

    Prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) requires early intervention in the autoimmune process directed against beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, which is believed to result from a disorder of immunoregulation. According to this concept, a T-helper lymphocyte of type 1 (Th1) subset of T-lymphocytes and their cytokine products, the type 1 cytokines [e.g. interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta)] prevail over immunoregulatory (anti-inflammatory) Th2 subset and its cytokine products, i.e. type 2 cytokines (e.g. IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10). This allows type 1 cytokines to initiate a cascade of immune/inflammatory processes in the islet (insulitis), culminating in beta-cell destruction. Activation of sympathetic-corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) axis by psychological stress induces specifically Th1 cell overactivity that determines enhanced glutamine utilization and consequent poor L-arginine supply for nitric oxide (NO)-assisted insulin secretion. This determines the shift of intraislet glutamate metabolism from the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) to that of L-arginine, leading to a redox imbalance that activates nuclear factor kappaB exacerbating inflammation and NO-mediated cytotoxicity. Physical exercise is capable of inducing changes in the pattern of cytokine production and release towards type 2 class and to normalize the glutamine supply to the circulation, which reduces the need for glutamate, whose metabolic fate may be restored in the direction of GSH synthesis and antioxidant defence. Also, the 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70), which is immunoregulatory, may modulate exercise-induced anti-inflammation. In this work, we envisage how exercise can intervene in the mechanisms involved in the autoimmune process against beta-cells and how novel therapeutic approaches may be inferred from these observations.

  5. Association of type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune disorders in Brazilian children and adolescents

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    Crésio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is caused by an immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Other autoimmune diseases can be observed in association with T1DM. The screening for celiac disease (CD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis is necessary due to the increased prevalence of these pathologies in T1DM patients. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of autoimmune markers for pancreatitis, thyroiditis, and CD in racially admixtured children and adolescents with T1DM. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional clinic-based study. Methods: Seventy-one patients with T1DM (average: 11.6 ± 5.1 years. In all patients, the following antibodies were surveyed: Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD, immunoglobulin A (IgA anti-transglutaminase (anti-tTG, Antithyroglobulin (AAT, anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and IgA. Statistical Analysis Used: The quantitative variables were expressed as a mean and standard deviation and the qualitative variables in contingency tables. Student's t-test and χ2 tests were used to assess the differences between the groups. The level of significance was established as P < 0.05. Results: The prevalence of anti-GAD antibodies was 5.9%; anti-tTG IgA, 7.4%; anti-TPO, 11.8%; and AAT, 11.8%. Conclusions: Children and adolescents with T1DM have increased the prevalence of antithyroid and CD-related antibodies. The positivity for anti-GAD and antithyroid antibodies was less frequent than in other studies. The prevalence of anti-tTG antibodies was similar to the literature.

  6. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

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    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  7. NOD1 and NOD2 signalling links ER stress with inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keestra-Gounder, A Marijke; Byndloss, Mariana X; Seyffert, Núbia; Young, Briana M; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Tsai, April Y; Cevallos, Stephanie A; Winter, Maria G; Pham, Oanh H; Tiffany, Connor R; de Jong, Maarten F; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Ravindran, Resmi; Luciw, Paul A; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J; Tsolis, Renée M

    2016-04-21

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a major contributor to inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn disease and type 2 diabetes. ER stress induces the unfolded protein response, which involves activation of three transmembrane receptors, ATF6, PERK and IRE1α. Once activated, IRE1α recruits TRAF2 to the ER membrane to initiate inflammatory responses via the NF-κB pathway. Inflammation is commonly triggered when pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors or nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors, detect tissue damage or microbial infection. However, it is not clear which PRRs have a major role in inducing inflammation during ER stress. Here we show that NOD1 and NOD2, two members of the NOD-like receptor family of PRRs, are important mediators of ER-stress-induced inflammation in mouse and human cells. The ER stress inducers thapsigargin and dithiothreitol trigger production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in a NOD1/2-dependent fashion. Inflammation and IL-6 production triggered by infection with Brucella abortus, which induces ER stress by injecting the type IV secretion system effector protein VceC into host cells, is TRAF2, NOD1/2 and RIP2-dependent and can be reduced by treatment with the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholate or an IRE1α kinase inhibitor. The association of NOD1 and NOD2 with pro-inflammatory responses induced by the IRE1α/TRAF2 signalling pathway provides a novel link between innate immunity and ER-stress-induced inflammation.

  8. Neutralization Versus Reinforcement of Proinflammatory Cytokines to Arrest Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Ash, Shifra; Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-09-27

    As physiological pathways of intercellular communication produced by all cells, cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory insulitis as well as pivotal mediators of immune homeostasis. Proinflammatory cytokines including interleukins, interferons, transforming growth factor-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide promote destructive insulitis in type 1 diabetes through amplification of the autoimmune reaction, direct toxicity to β-cells, and sensitization of islets to apoptosis. The concept that neutralization of cytokines may be of therapeutic benefit has been tested in few clinical studies, which fell short of inducing sustained remission or achieving disease arrest. Therapeutic failure is explained by the redundant activities of individual cytokines and their combinations, which are rather dispensable in the process of destructive insulitis because other cytolytic pathways efficiently compensate their deficiency. Proinflammatory cytokines are less redundant in regulation of the inflammatory reaction, displaying protective effects through restriction of effector cell activity, reinforcement of suppressor cell function, and participation in islet recovery from injury. Our analysis suggests that the role of cytokines in immune homeostasis overrides their contribution to β-cell death and may be used as potent immunomodulatory agents for therapeutic purposes rather than neutralized.

  9. Lack of association of type 2 diabetes susceptibility genotypes and body weight on the development of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

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    Christiane Winkler

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate whether type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes and body weight influence the development of islet autoantibodies and the rate of progression to type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Genotyping for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of the type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, FTO, HHEX-IDE, HMGA2, IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, KCNQ1, MTNR1B, PPARG, SLC30A8 and TCF7L2 was obtained in 1350 children from parents with type 1 diabetes participating in the BABYDIAB study. Children were prospectively followed from birth for islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes. Data on weight and height were obtained at 9 months, 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 years of age. RESULTS: None of type 2 diabetes risk alleles at the CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, FTO, HHEX-IDE, HMGA2, IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, KCNQ1, MTNR1B, PPARG and SLC30A8 loci were associated with the development of islet autoantibodies or diabetes. The type 2 diabetes susceptible genotype of TCF7L2 was associated with a lower risk of islet autoantibodies (7% vs. 12% by age of 10 years, P = 0.015, P(corrected = 0.18. Overweight children at seroconversion did not progress to diabetes faster than non-overweight children (HR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.48-2.45, P>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not support an association of type 2 diabetes risk factors with islet autoimmunity or acceleration of diabetes in children with a family history of type 1 diabetes.

  10. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

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    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  11. Mechanisms of autoimmunity in the non-obese diabetic mouse: effector/regulatory cell equilibrium during peak inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    Immune imbalance in autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes may originate from aberrant activities of effector cells or dysfunction of suppressor cells. All possible defective mechanisms have been proposed for diabetes-prone species: (i) quantitative dominance of diabetogenic cells and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells, (ii) excessive aggression of effectors and defective function of suppressors, (iii) perturbed interaction between effector and suppressor cells, and (iv) variations in sensitivity to negative regulation. The experimental evidence available to date presents conflicting information on these mechanisms, with identification of perturbed equilibrium on the one hand and negation of critical role of each mechanism in propagation of diabetic autoimmunity on the other hand. In our analysis, there is no evidence that inherent abnormalities in numbers and function of effector and suppressor T cells are responsible for the immune imbalance responsible for propagation of type 1 diabetes as a chronic inflammatory process. Possibly, the experimental tools for investigation of these features of immune activity are still underdeveloped and lack sufficient resolution, in the presence of the extensive biological viability and functional versatility of effector and suppressor elements.

  12. A parasite-derived 68-mer peptide ameliorates autoimmune disease in murine models of Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Maria E.; Greer, Judith; Dixit, Aakanksha; Alvarado, Raquel; McCauley-Winter, Padraig; To, Joyce; Tanaka, Akane; Hutchinson, Andrew T.; Robinson, Mark W.; Simpson, Ann M.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Dalton, John P.; Donnelly, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites secrete molecules that potently modulate the immune responses of their hosts and, therefore, have potential for the treatment of immune-mediated human diseases. FhHDM-1, a 68-mer peptide secreted by the helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica, ameliorated disease in two different murine models of autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes and relapsing-remitting immune-mediated demyelination. Unexpectedly, FhHDM-1 treatment did not affect the proliferation of auto-antigen specific T cells or their production of cytokines. However, in both conditions, the reduction in clinical symptoms was associated with the absence of immune cell infiltrates in the target organ (islets and the brain tissue). Furthermore, after parenteral administration, the FhHDM-1 peptide interacted with macrophages and reduced their capacity to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-6. We propose this inhibition of innate pro-inflammatory immune responses, which are central to the initiation of autoimmunity in both diseases, prevented the trafficking of autoreactive lymphocytes from the periphery to the site of autoimmunity (as opposed to directly modulating their function per se), and thus prevented tissue destruction. The ability of FhHDM-1 to modulate macrophage function, combined with its efficacy in disease prevention in multiple models, suggests that FhHDM-1 has considerable potential as a treatment for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27883079

  13. Anti-PD-L1 atezolizumab-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes: a Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Laura; De La Peña, Hugo; Turner, Helen; Ahmed, Fathelrahman; Protheroe, Andrew; Grossman, Ashley; Gupta, Avinash

    2017-03-02

    Programmed cell death-1 and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) inhibitors trigger an immune-mediated anti-tumour response by promoting the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Although proven to be highly effective in the treatment of several malignancies they can induce significant immune-related adverse events (irAEs) including endocrinopathies, most commonly hypophysitis and thyroid dysfunction, and rarely autoimmune diabetes. Here we present the first case report of a patient with a primary diagnosis of urothelial cancer developing PD-L1 inhibitor-induced autoimmune diabetes. A euglycemic 57 year old male presented to clinic with dehydration after the fifth cycle of treatment with the novel PD-L1 inhibitor atezolizumab. Blood tests demonstrated rapid onset hyperglycaemia (BM 24 mmol/L), ketosis and a low C-peptide level (0.65 ng/mL) confirming the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. He responded well to insulin therapy and was discharged with stable blood glucose levels. Due to the widening use of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors in cancer treatment clinicians need to be aware of this rare yet treatable irAE. Given the morbidity and mortality associated with undiagnosed autoimmune diabetes we recommend routine HbA1c and plasma glucose testing in all patients prior to and during treatment with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors until more evidence has accumulated on identifying those patients with a pre-treatment risk of such irAEs.

  14. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cells derived pancreatic progenitors and islets corrects diabetes in NOD/SCID mice%人胚胎干细胞体外定向诱导分化胰腺前体细胞及胰岛细胞移植治疗NOD/SCID糖尿病小鼠

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华秀峰; 孙强; 李华峰; 孟晓梅; 王延伟; 于胜强; 丛晋; 刘芙君; 靳少华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pancreatic progenitors and islets differentiated from human embryonic stem cells(hESCs) could correct hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice.Methods We obtained pancreatic progenitors and islets derived from hES cells line YT1 according to the optimized four-stage differentiation protocol.Stage 1:definitive endoderm formation; Stage 2:pan creatic specialization; Stage 3:amplification of pancreatic progenitors,Stage 4:maturation of pancreatic islets.To observe the morphological changes of each stage and immunofluorescent expression of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene(PDX-1),glucagon,insulin,C-peptide,glucose transporter-2(Glut-2).The differentiated cells from stage 3 and stage 4 were then transplanted into one of the epididymal fat pads(EFP) of NOD/SCID mice.The survival and function of the graft were measured by immunohistochemistry and blood glucose monitor.Results The stage 4-differentiated pancreatic islets expressed mature β cell-specific markers such as glucagon,insulin and Glut 2,and even PDX-1 and C-peptide-double-positive.The stage 4-pancreatic islets had nearly 17.1% insulin-positive cells as assayed by flow cytometry analysis.Differentiated pancreatic islets released insulin/C-peptide in response to glucose stimulation.After implantation into EFP of NOD/SCID mice,hES cell-derived human pancreatic progenitors and islets corrected hyperglycemia for at least 12 weeks.Conclusions Pancreatic progenitors and islets differentiated from hESCs can correct hyperglycemia in NOD/SCID mice.%目的 探讨人胚胎干细胞(human embryonic stem cells,hESCs)体外定向诱导分化胰腺前体细胞及胰岛细胞移植治疗非肥胖糖尿病/严重联合免疫缺陷(non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient,NOD/SCID)小鼠的可行性.方法 体外分4阶段诱导hESCs定向分化为胰岛细胞:①诱导分化形成定型内胚层;②诱导胰腺细胞定向分化;③扩增

  15. Distinct clinical and laboratory characteristics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in relation to type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipi, Elena; Marketou, Marietta; Tsirogianni, Alexandra

    2014-08-15

    Ever since its first appearance among the multiple forms of diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), has been the focus of endless discussions concerning mainly its existence as a special type of diabetes. In this mini-review, through browsing important peer-reviewed publications, (original articles and reviews), we will attempt to refresh our knowledge regarding LADA hoping to enhance our understanding of this controversial diabetes entity. A unique combination of immunological, clinical and metabolic characteristics has been identified in this group of patients, namely persistent islet cell antibodies, high frequency of thyroid and gastric autoimmunity, DR3 and DR4 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes, progressive loss of beta cells, adult disease onset, normal weight, defective glycaemic control, and without tendency to ketoacidosis. Although anthropomorphic measurements are useful as a first line screening, the detection of C-peptide levels and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies is undoubtedly the sine qua non condition for a confirmatory LADA diagnosis. In point of fact, GAD autoantibodies are far from being solely a biomarker and the specific role of these autoantibodies in disease pathogenesis is still to be thoroughly studied. Nevertheless, the lack of diagnostic criteria and guidelines still puzzle the physicians, who struggle between early diagnosis and correct timing for insulin treatment.

  16. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Minoru [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisafumi, E-mail: yasuda@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Study of Tripterygium Associated with Nicotinamide in Treating Late-onset Autoimmune Diabetes Mellitus in Adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘江华; 段世芳; 刘志文; 刘宗汉; 曹仁贤; 文芳; 文格波

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of Tripterygium polyglycoside (TP) associated with nicotinamide on the islet cell function, immune parameters and lipoperoxide (LPO) in adult patients with late-onset autoimmune diabetes mellitus (LADA) Methods: Thirty-six cases of LADA were randomly divided into three groups: TP group (n= 12), treated with TP plus orally taken metformin; combined treatment group (n =12), treated with TP combined with nicotinamide and metformin, and control group (n = 12) treated with metformin alone. They were followed-up for 18 months. Results: (1) Compared with the control group after 9months of treatment, postprandial plasma glucose and LPO in combined treatment group were decreased (P <0.05), and the postprandial C-peptide was higher (P<0.05). At the 18th month, the value of postprandial C-peptide in the TP and combined treatment group was higher than that in the control group. The slL-2R level of both TP and combined treatment groups were lowered (P<0.01); (2) Islet cell antibody (ICA) positive of 5 cases in the TP group and 6 cases in the combined treatment group got converted to the negative respectively, while only one in the control group at the time (P<0.05) ; (3) The level of LPO in the combined treatment group was significantly lower than that in the TP group at the 18th month of treatment (P<0.05).Conclusion: TP combined with nicotinamide played a role in immunity regulation, decreasing the titer of islet cell antibody and slL-2R, which also reduced the production of LPO and had a tendency to improve islet cell function in early LADA patients.

  18. Islet autoantibodies in Latvian subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: slow-onset type 1 diabetes or polyendocrine autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Falorni, A; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    In Latvia diabetes mellitus is diagnosed using the WHO's clinical criteria; assays for the detection of autoantibodies are not available, and hence slowly progressive autoimmune diabetes is likely to be missed. Autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2) among patients with clinically diagnosed NIDDM identify group of patients with slow-onset type 1 diabetes or LADA. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of polyendocrine autoimmunity among clinically diagnosed NIDDM patients from Latvia. One hundred NIDDM patients and 100 healthy controls were tested for GAD65 and IA-2 autoantibodies as well as 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) and tissue transglutaminase (TTG) antibodies by RIA assay. Age at onset was >or= 30 years, and duration of disease less than 5 years. Of 100 patients, 85 were on oral hypoglycemic agents and 15 were on insulin. Body mass index (BMI) under 19 was recorded in 1% (1 of 100 cases), while overweight (BMI > 25.5 in females and 27 in males) was documented in 45% (45 of 100 cases). GAD65 antibodies were found in 30 of 100 (30%) and IA-2 antibodies in 40 of 100 (40%) patients. Either GAD65 or IA-2 antibodies were found in 55 of 100 (55%). None of the patients carried antibodies against 21-OH and only 1 of 100 (1%) carried antibodies against TTG. From the results obtained in our study we conclude that in Latvian adult NIDDM subjects, islet autoantibodies identify groups of slow-onset type 1 diabetes but not polyendocrine autoimmunity.

  19. Different KIRs confer susceptibility and protection to adults with latent autoimmune diabetes in Latvian and Asian Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Arun; Sedimbi, Saikiran K; Rajalingam, Raja; Rumba, Ingrida; Kanungo, Alok; Sanjeevi, C B

    2008-12-01

    KIRs (killer Ig-like receptors) expressed on natural killer (NK) cells are an important component of innate (and adaptive) immunity. They are either activatory or inhibitory, and certain KIRs are known to interact with specific motifs of HLA Class I molecules, which is very crucial in determining whether a cell is targeted to lysis or otherwise. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of autoimmune diabetes, with an adult onset (>30 years). Because autoantibodies and autoimmunity involved are involved in the etiology of LADA, KIRs might play an important role in conferring susceptibility to or protection against the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes, which are associated with susceptibility to and protection against type 1 diabetes in Latvian and Asian Indian patients with LADA. KIR and HLA-C ligand genotyping was performed using PCR-SSP in LADA patients from Latvia (n= 45) with age- and sex-matched controls (n= 92) and from India (n= 86) with controls (n= 98). Results showed that in Latvian patients with LADA, KIRs 2DL1, 2DS2, and 2DS4 were associated with susceptibility and KIR 2DS5 with protection. In Asian Indian LADA patients, KIRs 2DL5 and 3DL1 were associated with susceptibility and KIRs 2DS1 and 2DS3 with protection. Stratification analyses for KIRs that bind to HLA-C1 and C2 were performed. We concluded that KIRs are important in conferring susceptibility (or protection) to adult patients with LADA in both our study populations. However the KIR genes (and their HLA-C ligands) conferring susceptibility or protection in these two populations differ, showing a role of ethnicity in disease susceptibility.

  20. Glucose Driven Changes in Beta Cell Identity Are Important for Function and Possibly Autoimmune Vulnerability during the Progression of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This commentary explores the hypothesis that when autoimmunity leads to a fall of beta cell mass during the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D), rising glucose levels cause major changes in beta cell identity. This then leads to profound changes in secretory function and less well-understood changes in beta cell susceptibility to autoimmune destruction, which may influence of rate of progression of beta cell killing. PMID:28174593

  1. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  2. Role of Fas-FasL in insulitis in nonobese diabetic mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹峻洋; 王姮

    2004-01-01

    @@ Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune damage to βcells and insulitis typically characterizes its pathological presentation. Apoptosis could be a main mechanism.There are several pathways of apoptosis including FasFasL. 1 Fas is a type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein in the super family of TNF/NGF receptors and FasL (the specific ligand for Fas in vivo) is a type 2 transmembrane glycoprotein in the super family of TNF. 2 Their interaction for inducing apoptosis is important in many processes. 3 Their malfunction can lead to the overproliferation of the autoreactive immune cells in mice or humans. 4-5 In autoimmune diabetes, specific CDs + T cells may kill β cells by FasL and perforin-granuzyme.Moreover, Fas-FasL also mediates the elimination of autoreactive T cells. 6-11 Diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice is a result of autoimmune damage to βcells. 12 Our study aims at analyzing the significance of Fas-FasL in NOD insulitis, specifically discussing the mechanism of autoimmune diabetes.

  3. The role of dendritic cell subsets and innate immunity in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Price

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key antigen presenting cells that have an important role in autoimmune pathogenesis. DCs control both steady-state T cell tolerance and activation of pathogenic responses. The balance between these two outcomes depends on several factors, including genetic susceptibility, environmental signals that stimulate varied innate responses, and which DC subset is presenting antigen. Although the specific DC phenotype can diverge depending on the tissue location and context, there are 4 main subsets identified in both mouse and human: conventional cDC1 and cDC2, plasmacytoid DCs, and monocyte-derived DCs. In this review, we will discuss the role of these subsets in autoimmune pathogenesis and regulation, as well as the genetic and environmental signals that influence their function. Specific topics to be addressed include: impact of susceptibility loci on DC subsets, alterations in DC subset development, the role of infection- and host-derived innate inflammatory signals, and the role of the intestinal microbiota on DC phenotype. The effects of these various signals on disease progression and the relative effects of DC subset composition and maturation level of DCs will be examined. These areas will be explored using examples from several autoimmune diseases but will focus mainly on type 1 diabetes.

  4. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: I--the inductive interface between islets and the immune system at onset of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms of autoimmune reactivity onset in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remain elusive despite extensive experimentation and discussion. We reconsider several key aspects of the early stages of autoimmunity at four levels: islets, pancreatic lymph nodes, thymic function and peripheral immune homeostasis. Antigen presentation is the islets and has the capacity to provoke immune sensitization, either in the process of physiological neonatal β cell apoptosis or as a consequence of cytolytic activity of self-reactive thymocytes that escaped negative regulation. Diabetogenic effectors are efficiently expanded in both the islets and the lymph nodes under conditions of empty lymphoid niches during a period of time coinciding with a synchronized wave of β cell apoptosis surrounding weaning. A major drive of effector cell activation and expansion is inherent peripheral lymphopenia characteristic of neonates, though it remains unclear when is autoimmunity triggered in subjects displaying hyperglycemia in late adolescence. Our analysis suggests that T1D evolves through coordinated activity of multiple physiological mechanisms of stimulation within specific characteristics of the neonate immune system.

  5. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in the United Arab Emirates: Clinical Features and Factors Related to Insulin-Requirement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Maddaloni

    Full Text Available To describe and to characterize clinical features of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the UAE.In this cross-sectional study a dataset including 18,101 subjects with adult-onset (>30 years diabetes was accessed. 17,072 subjects fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data about anthropometrics, demographics, autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GADA and to Islet Antigen 2 (anti-IA2, HbA1c, cholesterol and blood pressure were extracted. LADA was diagnosed according to GADA and/or anti-IA2 positivity and time to insulin therapy.437 (2.6% patients were identified as LADA and 34 (0.2% as classical type 1 diabetes in adults. Mean age at diagnosis, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and HbA1c significantly differed between, LADA, type 2 and type 1 diabetes, LADA showing halfway features between type 2 and type 1 diabetes. A decreasing trend for age at diagnosis and waist circumference was found among LADA subjects when subdivided by positivity for anti-IA2, GADA or for both antibodies (p=0.013 and p=0.011 for trend, respectively. There was a gradual downward trend in autoantibody titre in LADA subjects requiring insulin within the first year from diagnosis to subjects not requiring insulin after 10 years of follow-up (p<0.001.This is the first study describing the clinical features of LADA in the UAE, which appear to be different from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we showed that the clinical phenotype of LADA is dependent on different patterns of antibody positivity, influencing the time to insulin requirement.

  6. Nel Noddings och omsorgsetiken

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    Gunnel Colnerud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available NEL NODDINGS AND THE ETHICS OF CARE. Nel Noddings is one of the premierphilosophers of the ethics of care. Her elaboration of this ethics has resul-ted in a complex relation-based theory. Noddings defines care as a conti-nuing, reciprocal relationship between the carer and the cared-for. Thecaring relation is complete only if the cared-for confirms the value of thecare. The ethics of care attaches no importance to principles, since thecarer looks for guidance to the needs of the cared-for, rather than toprinciples of justice. Local and particular ethical decisions are seen as morevalid than universal principles. In this article I discuss a number of pro-blems by applying the ethics of care to all levels and aspects of schooling,from policy to the teacher–student relationship. More recently, Noddingsand philosophers who defend an ethics of justice, e.g. Strike, have agreedthat these theories are complementary. Noddings still argues, though, thatcare is the most adequate ethical theory for moral events in schools. Theconclusion drawn here is that neither the ethics of care nor the ethics ofjustice may be enough to guide teachers in their ethically demanding andcomplex practice.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-FasL gene transfer prevents autoimmune diabetes in mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yongzhu; WANG Guangming; LI Ailing; HAO Jie; GAO Xiang; XIE Shusheng

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is the result of a selective destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoreactive T cells. Depletion of autoreactive T cell through apoptosis may be a potential strategy for the prevention of autoimmune diabetes. Simultaneous stimulation of Fas-mediated pathway and blockade of costimulation by a CTLA4-FasL fusion protein has been reported to lead to substantial inhibition of mixed lymphocyte reaction and enhanced in vitro apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes. To test the feasibility of CTLA4-FasL-based gene therapy to prevent autoimmune diabetes, we developed recombinant adenovirus containing human CTLA4-FasL gene (AdCTLA4-FasL). A single injection of 2 × 108 plaque forming units (PFU) of AdCTLA4-FasL via tail vein dramatically reduced the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin. AdCTLA4-FasL administration maintained islet insulin content, significantly increased apoptosis of pancreatic lymphocytes, quantitatively reduced IFN-γand Vβ8.2 TCR chain mRNA expression in pancreatic iymphocytes. These results indicate the therapeutic potential of simultaneous stimulation of Fas-mediated pathway and blockade of costimulation by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-FasL gene transfer in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes.

  8. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Gandhi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies. Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus. This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations.

  9. LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Erdei, Katalin; Kaszás, Nóra; Folyovich, András; Szücs, Anna; Barcs, Gábor; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Skaliczkis, József; Vadasdi, Károly; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-05-30

    Celiac disease--in its typical form--is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.

  10. Changes in the Submandibular Salivary Gland Epithelial Cell Subpopulations During Progression of Sjögren's Syndrome-Like Disease in the NOD/ShiLtJ Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Elise M; Desantis, Kara A; Pagendarm, Nicholas; Nelson, Deirdre A; Enger, Tone; Skarstein, Kathrine; Liaaen Jensen, Janicke; Larsen, Melinda

    2015-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS), an autoimmune exocrinopathy, is associated with dysfunction of the secretory salivary gland epithelium, leading to xerostomia. The etiology of SS disease progression is poorly understood as it is typically not diagnosed until late stage. Since mouse models allow the study of disease progression, we investigated the NOD/ShiLtJ mouse to explore temporal changes to the salivary epithelium. In the NOD/ShiLtJ model, SS presents secondary to autoimmune diabetes, and SS disease is reportedly fully established by 20 weeks. We compared epithelial morphology in the submandibular salivary glands (SMG) of NOD/ShiLtJ mice with SMGs from the parental strain at 12, 18, and 22 weeks of age and used immunofluorescence to detect epithelial proteins, including the acinar marker, aquaporin 5, ductal cell marker, cytokeratin 7, myoepithelial cell marker, smooth muscle α-actin, and the basal cell marker, cytokeratin 5, while confirming immune infiltrates with CD45R. We also compared these proteins in the labial salivary glands of human SS patients with control tissues. In the NOD/ShiLtJ SMG, regions of lymphocytic infiltrates were not associated with widespread epithelial tissue degradation; however, there was a decrease in the area of the gland occupied by secretory epithelial cells in favor of ductal epithelial cells. We observed an expansion of cells expressing cytokeratin 5 within the ducts and within the smooth muscle α-actin(+) basal myoepithelial population. The altered acinar/ductal ratio within the NOD/ShiLtJ SMG likely contributes to salivary hypofunction, while the expansion of cytokeratin 5 positive-basal cells may reflect loss of function or indicate a regenerative response.

  11. Diabetes mellitus tipo 1: multifatores que conferem suscetibilidade à patogenia auto-imune = Type 1 diabetes mellitus: multifactors that confer susceptibility to the autoimmune pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: revisar dados de literatura concernentes aos fatores que conferem suscetibilidade à patogenia auto-imune do diabetes mellitus tipo 1. Fonte de dados: revisão de artigos especializados no assunto publicados em bancos de dados nacionais e internacionais (SCIELO, LILACS e PUBMED. Síntese de dados: a etiopatogenia do diabetes mellitus tipo 1 está associada a fatores inflamatórios, genéticos e ambientais. Nesta revisão, abordamos o papel da auto-imunidade humoral e celular que culmina com a disfunção das células-beta produtoras de insulina. A precocidade da presença de alguns autoanticorpos como anti-ilhotas pancreáticas, antiinsulina e anti-ácido glutâmico descarboxilase é uma característica importante nesta patologia. Os diversos fatores genéticos associados ao deflagramento do diabetes mellitus tipo 1, sobretudo os associados ao sistema de antígenos leucocitários humanos, acabam por potencializar a apresentação de antígenos das ilhotas para o sistema imune. Por fim, fatores ambientais como exposição viral também contribuem para a quebra de tolerância imunológica observada nesses pacientes. Conclusões: o diabetes mellitus tipo 1 é uma entidade de etiopatogenia altamente complexa. Diversos fatores genéticos e ambientais potencializam os mecanismos de auto-imunidade humoral e celular que levam à insulite. O risco de hipoglicemia severa observada com o tratamento insulínico e as complicações crônicas do diabetes mellitus tipo 1 justificam pesquisas contínuas em relação à etiopatogenia desta entidade, o que contribuirá para abordagens terapêuticas mais eficazes. Aims: To review the literature data concerning the factors which confer susceptibilitiy to the autoimmune pathogenesis of type I diabetes mellitus. Source of data: Review of specific articles on the issue published in national and in-ternational databases (SCIELO, LILACS, PUBMED. Summary of the findings: The etiopathogenesis of type I diabetes

  12. 鼻粘膜免疫融合蛋白Hsp65-6×p277预防NOD小鼠1型糖尿病的发生%Intranasal vaccination with p277 tandem repeat sequences carried by Hsp65 prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金亮; 王宇; 朱爱华; 刘景晶

    2006-01-01

    目的:提高多肽p277的免疫原性,从而提高其对自身免疫性糖尿病的预防作用.方法:将p277 6次重复与Hsp 65融合置于pET28a中构建重组Hsp 65-6×p277表达质粒.该重组质粒在大肠杆菌BL21中以高效可溶形式表达.依次通过细胞裂解、硫酸铵沉淀、双蒸水透析、DEAE纤维素52柱层析纯化获得目的蛋白.用纯化后的融合蛋白Hsp 65-6×p277通过鼻腔给药方式,在不添加任何佐剂的情况下3次免疫4周龄雌性NOD小鼠.每月眼角取血,检测抗体和血糖浓度.结果:初步药效学实验表明融合蛋白Hsp 65-6×p277可抑制NOD小鼠中1型糖尿病的发生.结论:融合蛋白Hsp 65-6×p277有可能发展成为一种具有防治胰岛素依赖性糖尿病作用的疫苗.%AIM: To improve the prevent efficacy of peptide p277 in autoimmune diabetes. METHODS: The recombinant expression plasmid pET28-Hsp65-6×p277 was constructed by inserting 6×p277 which were amplified by PCR into the vector pET28-Hsp65. The plasmid pET28-Hsp65-6×p277 was transformed into E.coli BL21 (DE3) and the fusion protein (Hsp65-6×p277) was expressed effectively as soluble protein after inducing by lactose. The fusion protein was purified and then used to immunize 4-week old female NOD mice with three times of i.n. inoculations in the absence of adjuvants. Serum samples from the immunized mice were collected at monthly interval. The concentrations of blood glucose and antibodies were measured by automatic analyzer. RESULTS: Administration with the Hsp65-6×p277 to NOD mice could prevent the development of diabetes. CONCLUSION: The fusion protein Hsp65-6×p277 might be further developed to a vaccine against insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  13. A coding polymorphism in NALP1 confers risk for autoimmune Addison's disease and type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magitta, N. F.; Wolff, A. S. Boe; Johansson, S.; Skinningsrud, B.; Lie, B. A.; Myhr, K-M; Undlien, D. E.; Joner, G.; Njolstad, P. R.; Kvien, T. K.; Forre, O.; Knappskog, P. M.; Husebye, E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Variants in the gene encoding NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 1 (NALP1), an important molecule in innate immunity, have recently been shown to confer risk for vitiligo and associated autoimmunity. We hypothesized that sequence variants in this gene may be involved in susceptibility to a wider spec

  14. Hematopoietic transplants for disease suppression and cure in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-07-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated the capacity of immunosuppressive therapy to delay progression of inflammatory insulitis in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The procedure includes depletion of pathogenic cells by immunosuppressive therapy and support of recovery by reinfusion of autologous hematopoietic progenitors. The short-term outcome of these clinical transplants is similar to the predictions drawn from NOD mice: debulking of diabetogenic cells is ineffectively achieved by immunosuppressive therapy, and resetting of immune homeostasis does not restrain autoimmunity. Murine models indicate that allogeneic transplants are potentially curative, through restored mechanisms of negative regulation that are effective in continuous and indefinite suppression of autoimmunity.

  15. Long term effect of gut microbiota transfer on diabetes development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Marchesi, Julian R; Benson, Andrew; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2014-09-01

    The composition of the gut microbiome represents a very important environmental factor that influences the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have previously shown that MyD88-deficient non-obese diabetic (MyD88-/-NOD) mice, that were protected from T1D development, had a different composition of gut microbiota compared to wild type NOD mice. The aim of our study was to investigate whether this protection could be transferred. We demonstrate that transfer of gut microbiota from diabetes-protected MyD88-deficient NOD mice, reduced insulitis and significantly delayed the onset of diabetes. Gut bacteria from MyD88-deficient mice, administered over a 3-week period, starting at 4 weeks of age, stably altered the family composition of the gut microbiome, with principally Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae increased and Lactobacillaceae decreased. The transferred mice had a higher concentration of IgA and TGFβ in the lumen that was accompanied by an increase in CD8(+)CD103(+) and CD8αβ T cells in the lamina propria of the large intestine. These data indicate not only that gut bacterial composition can be altered after the neonatal/weaning period, but that the composition of the microbiome affects the mucosal immune system and can delay the development of autoimmune diabetes. This result has important implications for the development of probiotic treatment for T1D.

  16. Impaired SLAM-SLAM homotypic interaction between invariant NKT cells and dendritic cells affects differentiation of IL-4/IL-10-secreting NKT2 cells in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, Denis V; Caielli, Simone; Ronchi, Francesca; Coccia, Margherita; Facciotti, Federica; Nichols, Kim E; Falcone, Marika

    2008-07-15

    The regulatory function of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells for tolerance induction and prevention of autoimmunity is linked to a specific cytokine profile that comprises the secretion of type 2 cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 (NKT2 cytokine profile). The mechanism responsible for iNKT cell differentiation toward a type 2 phenotype is unknown. Herein we show that costimulatory signals provided by the surface receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) to iNKT cells is crucial for NKT2 orientation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the impaired acquisition of an NKT2 cytokine phenotype in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes is due to defective SLAM-induced signals generated by NOD mDC. Mature mDC of C57BL/6 mice express SLAM and induce C57BL/6 or NOD iNKT cells to acquire a predominant NKT2 cytokine phenotype in response to antigenic stimulation with the iNKT cell-specific Ag, the alpha-galactosylceramide. In contrast, mature NOD mDC express significantly lower levels of SLAM and are unable to promote GATA-3 (the SLAM-induced intracellular signal) up-regulation and IL-4/IL-10 production in iNKT cells from NOD or C57BL/6 mice. NOD mice carry a genetic defect of the Slamf1 gene that is associated with reduced SLAM expression on double-positive thymocytes and altered iNKT cell development in the thymus. Our data suggest that the genetic Slamf1 defect in NOD mice also affects SLAM expression on other immune cells such as the mDC, thus critically impairing the peripheral differentiation of iNKT cells toward a regulatory NKT2 type.

  17. Microangiopathic complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus: differences in severity when isolated or associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Teófilo Monteagudo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The development and evolution of different chronic diabetic complications may present variations among the different types and conditions of this disease. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the degree of microangiopathy in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathies (OSAD or isolated DM1 (iDM1. PATIENTS: OSAD (n=17 and iDM1 (n=13 were over 15 years old at diagnosis of DM and were matched for diabetes duration (13.9 ± 8.2 and 13.2 ± 5.9 years, respectively and metabolic control (HbA1c: 6.4 ± 1.9 and 6.8 ± 1.4%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Urinary albumin excretion (UAE; ELISA, the inversion of serum creatinine (1/C level and indirect ophthalmoscopy. RESULTS: Although the prevalence of hypertension was similar in both groups, the OSAD had inferior levels of UAE (7.4 ± 2.5 vs. 17.3 ± 9.2 µg/min; p< 0.05. Nephropathy was detected in 12% of the OSAD (none of them macroproteinuric and in 39% of the iDM1 . The UAE in the iDM1 correlated negatively with 1/C values (r= -0.7, p< 0.005, but the same did not occur in the OSAD (r= 0.2, ns. Among patients with retinopathy, the severe form was found in 29% of the OSAD and in 46% of the iDM1. CONCLUSIONS: OSAD was associated with a lower degree of microangiopathy, in spite of age at diagnosis, duration of diabetes and the metabolic control. In contrast with the iDM1 , the increase in UAE of OSAD was not associated with reductions in GFR.

  18. Circulating Ribonucleic Acids and Metabolic Stress Parameters May Reflect Progression of Autoimmune or Inflammatory Conditions in Juvenile Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Kocic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensing of ribonucleic acids (RNAs by the monocyte/macrophage system occurs through the TLR7/8 Toll-like receptor family, the retinoic acidi–nducible protein I (RIG-I, and the melanoma differentiation–associated protein-5 (MDA-5. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of circulating RNAs, isolated from juvenile type 1 diabetic patients and healthy control children, on the inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from a healthy donor. Obtained effects were compared to the effects of metabolic stress parameters (hyperglycemia, oxidative and nitrosative stress. Forty-eight patients with juvenile type 1 diabetes and control children were included in the study. By performing the chromatographic analysis of circulating RNAs, the peak at the retention time 0.645 min for diabetic and control RNA samples was identified. To determine whether circulating RNAs have an agonistic or antagonistic effect on the signaling pathways involved in inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral cascade, their effect on TLR8, RIG-I, MDA-5, MyD88, NF-κB, IRF-3, phosphoIRF-3, IRF-7, RIP, and p38 was evaluated. A significantly lower level was achieved by cultivating PBMCs with circulating RNAs isolated from type 1 diabetic children, compared to the intact PBMCs, in relation to TLR-8, MDA-5, NF-κB, phospho IRF-3, and RIP, while it was higher for Bax. All the metabolic stress conditions up-regulated NF-κB, Bcl-2, and Bax. The NF-κB, determination seems to be the most sensitive parameter that may reflect disease processes associated with the progression of autoimmune or inflammatory conditions, while the IRF3/phosphoIRF3 ratio may suggest an insufficient antiviral response.

  19. Circulating ribonucleic acids and metabolic stress parameters may reflect progression of autoimmune or inflammatory conditions in juvenile type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Gordana; Pavlovic, Radmila; Najman, Stevo; Nikolic, Goran; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Musovic, Dijana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Radivoj; Djindjic, Natasa

    2011-07-28

    The sensing of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) by the monocyte/macrophage system occurs through the TLR7/8 Toll-like receptor family, the retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I), and the melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of circulating RNAs, isolated from juvenile type 1 diabetic patients and healthy control children, on the inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from a healthy donor. Obtained effects were compared to the effects of metabolic stress parameters (hyperglycemia, oxidative and nitrosative stress). Forty-eight patients with juvenile type 1 diabetes and control children were included in the study. By performing the chromatographic analysis of circulating RNAs, the peak at the retention time 0.645 min for diabetic and control RNA samples was identified. To determine whether circulating RNAs have an agonistic or antagonistic effect on the signaling pathways involved in inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral cascade, their effect on TLR8, RIG-I, MDA-5, MyD88, NF-KB, IRF-3, phosphoIRF-3, IRF-7, RIP, and p38 was evaluated. A significantly lower level was achieved by cultivating PBMCs with circulating RNAs isolated from type 1 diabetic children, compared to the intact PBMCs, in relation to TLR-8, MDA-5, NF-KB, phospho IRF-3, and RIP, while it was higher for Bax. All the metabolic stress conditions up-regulated NF-KB, Bcl-2, and Bax. The NF-êB determination seems to be the most sensitive parameter that may reflect disease processes associated with the progression of autoimmune or inflammatory conditions, while the IRF3/phosphoIRF3 ratio may suggest an insufficient antiviral response.

  20. Bacteroides dorei dominates gut microbiome prior to autoimmunity in Finnish children at high risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin G Davis-Richardson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of the autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D, has increased dramatically over the last half century in many developed countries and is particularly high in Finland and other Nordic countries. Along with genetic predisposition, environmental factors are thought to play a critical role in this increase. As with other autoimmune diseases, the gut microbiome is thought to play a potential role in controlling progression to T1D in children with high genetic risk, but we know little about how the gut microbiome develops in children with high genetic risk for T1D. In this study, the early development of the gut microbiomes of 76 children at high genetic risk for T1D was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Stool samples from children born in the same hospital in Turku, Finland were collected at monthly intervals beginning at 4-6 months after birth until 2.2 years of age. Of those 76 children, 29 seroconverted to T1D-related autoimmunity (cases including 22 who later developed T1D, the remaining 47 subjects remained healthy (controls. While several significant compositional differences in low abundant species prior to seroconversion were found, one highly abundant group composed of two closely related species, Bacteroides dorei and Bacteroides vulgatus, was significantly higher in cases compared to controls prior to seroconversion. Metagenomic sequencing of samples high in the abundance of the B. dorei/vulgatus group before seroconversion, as well as longer 16S rRNA sequencing identified this group as Bacteroides dorei. The abundance of B. dorei peaked at 7.6 months in cases, over eight months prior to the appearance of the first islet autoantibody, suggesting that early changes in the microbiome may be useful for predicting T1D autoimmunity in genetically susceptible infants. The cause of increased B. dorei abundance in cases is not known but its timing appears to coincide with the introduction of solid food.

  1. WJD 5th Anniversary Special Issues(3): Type 1 diabetes Distinct clinical and laboratory characteristics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in relation to type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena; Pipi; Marietta; Marketou; Alexandra; Tsirogianni

    2014-01-01

    Ever since its first appearance among the multiple forms of diabetes,latent autoimmune diabetes in adults(LADA),has been the focus of endless discussions concerning mainly its existence as a special type of diabetes.In this mini-review,through browsing important peer-reviewed publications,(original articles and reviews),we will attempt to refresh our knowledge regarding LADA hoping to enhance our understanding of this controversial diabetes entity.A unique combination of immunological,clinical and metabolic characteristics has been identified in this group of patients,namely persistent islet cell antibodies,high frequency of thyroid and gastric autoimmunity,DR3 and DR4 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes,progressive loss of beta cells,adult disease onset,normal weight,defective glycaemic control,and without tendency to ketoacidosis.Although anthropomorphic measurements are useful as a first line screening,the detection of C-peptide levels and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase(GAD)autoantibodies is undoubtedly the sine qua non condi-tion for a confirmatory LADA diagnosis.In point of fact,GAD autoantibodies are far from being solely a biomarker and the specific role of these autoantibodies in disease pathogenesis is still to be thoroughly studied.Nevertheless,the lack of diagnostic criteria and guidelines still puzzle the physicians,who struggle between early diagnosis and correct timing for insulin treatment.

  2. 自发性1型糖尿病NOD小鼠胰腺微小RNA表达谱分析%Micro-RNA expression profile in insulitis of type 1 diabetes model NOD mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩蓓; 石星; 陆子鹏; 顾玉青; 高文涛

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the micro-RNA(miRNA) expression profile in pancreas of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) model of NOD mouse and elucidate the association between miRNA and type 1 diabetes.Methods Twenty NOD mice were raised,and 3 mice sacrificed on 18 weeks,remaining were killed on 25 weeks.Pancreas sample were collected for pathological analysis to classify the insulitis.MicroRNA array were used to analyze miRNA expression profile in 3 samples with different grade of insulitis (0 grade,2nd grade,and 3rd grade insulitis),results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in pancreas sample.Results 13/20 NOD mice developed diabetes by 25 weeks,there were 0-3 grades of insulitis.By microarray analysis,clustering analysis can distinguish insulitis with no insulitis; indicate a different miRNA profile in insulitis.Compared with no insulitis,2nd grade insulitis had 2 upregulated miRNA and 19 downregulated miRNA,while 3rd grade insulitis had 31 downregulated miRNA.For the 7 immune associated miRNA,miR-125b had significant downregulation,miR-125b-5p downregulated for 0.42 and 0.60 folds,miR-125b * and miR-125b-3p downregulated for 0.05 and 0.36 folds,which was validated by qRT-PCR.Conclusion Distinct miRNA expression profile is found during insulitis progression,indicating a potential role of miRNA in T1DM development.miR-125b has significant down-regulation effect in T1DM,which indicates its role for islet cell apoptosis.%目的 分析1型糖尿病(T1DM)小鼠胰腺中微小RNA表达谱,筛查T1DM相关微小RNA.方法 20只雌性6~8周龄T1 DM小鼠,体重(21 ±3)g,15周始测定血糖.于18、25周分期处死,18周处死的3只小鼠采用芯片方法分析T1DM小鼠胰腺中微小RNA表达谱;所有小鼠胰腺病苏木精-伊红染色和胰岛炎分级标准分级(胰岛炎0级;胰岛炎2级;胰岛炎3级+胰岛萎缩+显性糖尿病).胰腺提取RNA,经定量逆转录PCR(qRT-PCR)验证.结果 微小RNA芯片结果在聚类分析中,无胰岛炎归

  3. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  4. Exposure to perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA accelerates insulitis development in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Bodin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoralkylated substances (PFAS are classified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substances and are widespread environmental contaminants. Humans are exposed through food, drinking water and air. We have previously reported that bisphenol A accelerates spontaneous diabetes development in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and observed in the present study that perfluoroundecanoic acid, PFUnDA, increased insulitis development, a prerequisite for diabetes development in NOD mice. We exposed NOD mice to PFUnDA in drinking water (3, 30 and 300 μg/l at mating, during gestation and lactation and until 30 weeks of age. After 300 μg/l PFUnDA exposure, we report (i increased pancreatic insulitis, (ii increased number of apoptotic cells in pancreatic islets prior to insulitis and (iii decreased phagocytosis in peritoneal macrophages. There was also a trend of decreased number of tissue resident macrophages in pancreatic islets prior to insulitis after exposure to 300 μg/l, and altered cytokine secretion in activated splenocytes after exposure to 3 μg/l PFUnDA. Although insulitis is a prerequisite for autoimmune diabetes, the accelerated insulitis was not associated with accelerated diabetes development. Instead, the incidence of diabetes tended to be reduced in the animals exposed to 3 and 30 μg/l PFUnDA, suggesting a non-monotonic dose response. The effects of PFUnDA exposure on increased apoptosis in pancreas and reduced macrophage function as well as accelerated insulitis development in NOD mice, may also be relevant for human insulitis. Further observational autoimmune diabetes clinical cohort studies and animal experiments for PFUnDA as well as other PFASs are therefore encouraged.

  5. Linking chronic infection and autoimmune diseases: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, SLC11A1 polymorphisms and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Paccagnini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is still unknown; numerous studies are performed to unravel the environmental factors involved in triggering the disease. SLC11A1 is a membrane transporter that is expressed in late endosomes of antigen presenting cells involved in the immunopathogenic events leading to T1DM. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP has been reported to be a possible trigger in the development of T1DM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty nine T1DM patients and 79 healthy controls were genotyped for 9 polymorphisms of SLC11A1 gene, and screened for the presence of MAP by PCR. Differences in genotype frequency were evaluated for both T1DM patients and controls. We found a polymorphism in the SLC11A1 gene (274C/T associated to type 1 diabetic patients and not to controls. The presence of MAP DNA was also significantly associated with T1DM patients and not with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The 274C/T SCL11A1 polymorphism was found to be associated with T1DM as well as the presence of MAP DNA in blood. Since MAP persists within macrophages and it is also processed by dendritic cells, further studies are necessary to evaluate if mutant forms of SLC11A1 alter the processing or presentation of MAP antigens triggering thereby an autoimmune response in T1DM patients.

  6. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3(+) CD4(+) Treg cells that inhibit CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-07-11

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3(+) CD25(+) CD4(+) Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced K(b)/A12-21-monospecific CD8(+) T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical K(b)/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1(-/-) hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76-90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells in this diabetes model.

  7. Human immune system development and survival of non-obese diabetic (NOD)-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human thymus and autologous haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, L; Jangalwe, S; Jouvet, N; Laning, J; Burzenski, L; Shultz, L D; Brehm, M A

    2013-12-01

    Immunodeficient mice bearing targeted mutations in the IL2rg gene and engrafted with human immune systems are effective tools for the study of human haematopoiesis, immunity, infectious disease and transplantation biology. The most robust human immune model is generated by implantation of human fetal thymic and liver tissues in irradiated recipients followed by intravenous injection of autologous fetal liver haematopoietic stem cells [often referred to as the BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) model]. To evaluate the non-obese diabetic (NOD)-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG)-BLT model, we have assessed various engraftment parameters and how these parameters influence the longevity of NSG-BLT mice. We observed that irradiation and subrenal capsule implantation of thymus/liver fragments was optimal for generating human immune systems. However, after 4 months, a high number of NSG-BLT mice develop a fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-like syndrome, which correlates with the activation of human T cells and increased levels of human immunoglobulin (Ig). Onset of GVHD was not delayed in NSG mice lacking murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I or II and was not associated with a loss of human regulatory T cells or absence of intrathymic cells of mouse origin (mouse CD45(+) ). Our findings demonstrate that NSG-BLT mice develop robust human immune systems, but that the experimental window for these mice may be limited by the development of GVHD-like pathological changes.

  8. Long-term human immune system reconstitution in non-obese diabetic (NOD)-Rag (-)-γ chain (-) (NRG) mice is similar but not identical to the original stem cell donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D T; Badowski, M; Balamurugan, A; Yang, O O

    2013-12-01

    The murine immune system is not necessarily identical to it human counterpart, which has led to the construction of humanized mice. The current study analysed whether or not a human immune system contained within the non-obese diabetic (NOD)-Rag1(null) -γ chain(null) (NRG) mouse model was an accurate representation of the original stem cell donor and if multiple mice constructed from the same donor were similar to one another. To that end, lightly irradiated NRG mice were injected intrahepatically on day 1 of life with purified cord blood-derived CD34(+) stem and progenitor cells. Multiple mice were constructed from each cord blood donor. Mice were analysed quarterly for changes in the immune system, and followed for periods up to 12 months post-transplant. Mice from the same donor were compared directly with each other as well as with the original donor. Analyses were performed for immune reconstitution, including flow cytometry, T cell receptor (TCR) and B cell receptor (BCR) spectratyping. It was observed that NRG mice could be 'humanized' long-term using cord blood stem cells, and that animals constructed from the same cord blood donor were nearly identical to one another, but quite different from the original stem cell donor immune system.

  9. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor by TCDD prevents diabetes in NOD mice and increases Foxp3+ T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Linda B. Steppan; Vorachek, William; Oda, Shannon; Farrer, David; Wong, Carmen P.; Pham, Duy; Mourich, Dan V.

    2009-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), is a novel inducer of adaptive Tregs. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent AHR ligand, induces adaptive CD4+CD25+ Tregs during an acute graft-versus-host (GvH) response and prevents the generation of allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. TCDD also suppresses the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in association with an expanded population of Foxp3+ Tregs. In this study, we show th...

  10. Randomized, controlled, parallel-group prospective study to investigate the clinical effectiveness of early insulin treatment in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

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    Lloyd Janet

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults [LADA] is a type 1 diabetes that is slowly developing. This means many people are treated as having type 2 diabetes at diagnosis as they are adults who are not immediately insulin dependent. LADA can be distinguished from type 2 diabetes by antibody tests. Patients who are antibody positive have an autoimmune reaction which is similar to that of type 1 diabetes and is not found in type 2 diabetes. We would like to examine the best way of treating LADA in the early phase of the conditions, with tablets (similar to type 2 diabetes or with insulin (similar to type 1 diabetes. Methods/design This is an open parallel group prospective randomised trial. Participants need to have a GAD antibody test results of 101 WHO units or more and a diagnosis of diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis. Participants will need to have been diagnosed within 12 months and not treated with insulin at study entry. They will be randomised to receive either insulin (NovoMix 30 or tablets (diet treated followed by metformin followed by glitazone (with or without metformin followed by insulin. Primary outcome assessment will be for change in HbA1c and change in fasting C-peptide over 24 months. Secondary outcome measures will include Quality of life, GAD antibody levels, adverse events, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and markers of the metabolic syndrome. Discussion This study seeks the best treatment for early LADA in terms of maintaining glycaemic control and maintaining natural insulin production. Trial registration ISRCTN63815121

  11. Longitudinal three-dimensional visualisation of autoimmune diabetes by functional optical coherence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berclaz, Corinne; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Szlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    and vascularisation. The substantially increased backscattering of islets is dominated by the insulin-zinc nanocrystals in the beta cell granules. This translates into a high specificity for the functional beta cell volume of islets. Applying FOCI to a spontaneous mouse model of type 1 diabetes, we quantify......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: It is generally accepted that structural and functional quantitative imaging of individual islets would be beneficial to elucidate the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. We here introduce functional optical coherence imaging (FOCI) for fast, label-free monitoring of beta cell...... the modifications of the pancreatic microvasculature accompanying the progression of diabetes and reveal a strong correlation between increasing insulitis and density of the vascular network of the islet. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: FOCI provides a novel imaging technique for investigating functional and structural...

  12. Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W.; Josefsen, Knud; Tanassi, Julia T

    2016-01-01

    Gluten promotes type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and likely also in humans. In NOD mice and in non-diabetes-prone mice, it induces inflammation in the pancreatic lymph nodes, suggesting that gluten can initiate inflammation locally. Further, gliadin fragments stimulate insulin...... secretion from beta cells directly. We hypothesized that gluten fragments may cross the intestinal barrier to be distributed to organs other than the gut. If present in pancreas, gliadin could interact directly with the immune system and the beta cells to initiate diabetes development. We orally...

  13. Can the genetics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes shed light on the genetics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schwartz, Stanley

    2010-04-01

    The pathophysiology of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is considered less understood than its much better characterized counterparts of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), where its clinical presentation exhibits some features of each of these two main diseases, earning it a reputation as being "type 1.5 diabetes". The etiology of LADA remains unknown, but a genetic component has been implicated from recent reports of T1D and T2D genes playing a role in its pathogenesis. One way to shed much needed light on the classification of LADA is to determine the discrete genetic factors conferring risk to the pathogenesis of this specific phenotype and to determine to what extent LADA shares genetic similarities with T1D and T2D. For instance, no conclusive support for a role of the T1D-associated INS gene has been reported in T2D; conversely, but similarly, no evidence has been found for the role of the T2D-associated genes IDE/HHEX, SLC30A8, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, FTO, and TCF7L2 in T1D. However, and somewhat at odds with current thinking, TCF7L2, the most strongly associated gene with T2D to date, is strongly associated with LADA, a disorder considered by the World Health Organization to be a slowly progressing form of T1D. In this review, we address recent advances in the genetics of T1D and T2D and how such discoveries have in turn shed some light on the genetics of LADA as being potentially at the "genetic intersection" of these two major diseases.

  14. Targeted disruption of the IA-2beta gene causes glucose intolerance and impairs insulin secretion but does not prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubosaki, A.; Gross, S.; Miura, J.; Saeki, K.; Zhu, M.; Nakamura, S.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Notkins, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Insulinoma-associated protein (IA)-2beta, also known as phogrin, is an enzymatically inactive member of the transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase family and is located in dense-core secretory vesicles. In patients with type 1 diabetes, autoantibodies to IA-2beta appear years before the developm

  15. Genetic and Pharmacologic Models for Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Edward H; Schile, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by a partial or total insufficiency of insulin. The premiere animal model of autoimmune T cell-mediated T1D is the NOD mouse. A dominant negative mutation in the mouse insulin 2 gene (Ins2(Akita) ) produces a severe insulin deficiency syndrome without autoimmune involvement, as do a variety of transgenes overexpressed in beta cells. Pharmacologically-induced T1D (without autoimmunity) elicted by alloxan or streptozotocin at high doses can generate hyperglycemia in almost any strain of mouse by direct toxicity. Multiple low doses of streptozotocin combine direct beta cell toxicity with local inflammation to elicit T1D in a male sex-specific fashion. A summary of protocols relevant to the management of these different mouse models will be covered in this overview.

  16. Maternal Antibiotic Treatment Protects Offspring from Diabetes Development in Nonobese Diabetic Mice by Generation of Tolerogenic APCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youjia; Peng, Jian; Tai, Ningwen; Hu, Changyun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that involves the slow, progressive destruction of islet β cells and loss of insulin production, as a result of interaction with environmental factors, in genetically susceptible individuals. The gut microbiome is established very early in life. Commensal microbiota establish mutualism with the host and form an important part of the environment to which individuals are exposed in the gut, providing nutrients and shaping immune responses. In this study, we studied the impact of targeting most Gram-negative bacteria in the gut of NOD mice at different time points in their life, using a combination of three antibiotics--neomycin, polymyxin B, and streptomycin--on diabetes development. We found that the prenatal period is a critical time for shaping the immune tolerance in the progeny, influencing development of autoimmune diabetes. Prenatal neomycin, polymyxin B, and streptomycin treatment protected NOD mice from diabetes development through alterations in the gut microbiota, as well as induction of tolerogenic APCs, which led to reduced activation of diabetogenic CD8 T cells. Most importantly, we found that the protective effect was age dependent, and the most profound protection was found when the mice were treated before birth. This indicates the importance of the prenatal environment and early exposure to commensal bacteria in shaping the host immune system and health.

  17. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

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    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  18. Genetically Engineered Islets and Alternative Sources of Insulin-Producing Cells for Treating Autoimmune Diabetes: Quo Vadis?

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    Feng-Cheng Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation is a promising therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes that can provide moment-to-moment metabolic control of glucose and allow them to achieve insulin independence. However, two major problems need to be overcome: (1 detrimental immune responses, including inflammation induced by the islet isolation/transplantation procedure, recurrence autoimmunity, and allorejection, can cause graft loss and (2 inadequate numbers of organ donors. Several gene therapy approaches and pharmaceutical treatments have been demonstrated to prolong the survival of pancreatic islet grafts in animal models; however, the clinical applications need to be investigated further. In addition, for an alternative source of pancreatic β-cell replacement therapy, the ex vivo generation of insulin-secreting cells from diverse origins of stem/progenitor cells has become an attractive option in regenerative medicine. This paper focuses on the genetic manipulation of islets during transplantation therapy and summarizes current strategies to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells from stem/progenitor cells.

  19. Reduced Histone H3 Acetylation in CD4+ T Lymphocytes: Potential Mechanism of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

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    Xi-yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA is the result of gene-environment interactions. Histone acetylation regulates gene expression and maybe interpret how environmental factors modify LADA. Hence, we studied the histone acetylation patterns in CD4+ T lymphocytes from LADA patients. Methods. Blood CD4+ T lymphocytes from 28 patients with LADA and 28 healthy controls were obtained to detect histone H3 acetylation and H4 acetylation. The gene expression of histone acetyltransferases (P300 and CREBBP and histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC7 was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results. Compared to healthy controls, reduced global H3 acetylation was observed in LADA patients’ CD4+ T lymphocytes (P<0.05. Global level of H4 acetylation was not statistically different. Among LADA, CD4+ T lymphocytes H3 acetylation was associated with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and GADA titer. Compared to healthy controls, the expression of histone acetyltransferases CREBBP in LADA patients was downregulated, and the expression of histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC7 was upregulated. Conclusion. A concerted downregulation of histone H3 acetylation was found in CD4+ T lymphocytes of LADA patients, and this might provide evidence of a novel epigenetic explanation for the pathogenesis of LADA and its complications.

  20. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity.

  1. Serological evaluation of possible exposure to Ljungan virus and related parechovirus in autoimmune (type 1) diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A-L; Vaziri-Sani, F; Broberg, P; Elfaitouri, A; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J; Ivarsson, S-A; Elding Larsson, H; Lernmark, Å

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to Ljungan virus (LV) is implicated in the risk of autoimmune (type 1) diabetes but possible contribution by other parechoviruses is not ruled out. The aim was to compare children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2005-2011 (n = 69) with healthy controls (n = 294), all from the Jämtland County in Sweden, using an exploratory suspension multiplex immunoassay for IgM and IgG against 26 peptides of LV, human parechoviruses (HPeV), Aichi virus and poliovirus in relation to a radiobinding assay (RBA) for antibodies against LV and InfluenzaA/H1N1pdm09. Islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ genotypes were also determined. 1) All five LV-peptide antibodies correlated to each other (P < 0.001) in the suspension multiplex IgM- and IgG-antibody assay; 2) The LV-VP1_31-60-IgG correlated with insulin autoantibodies alone (P = 0.007) and in combination with HLA-DQ8 overall (P = 0.022) as well as with HLA-DQ 8/8 and 8/X subjects (P = 0.013); 3) RBA detected LV antibodies correlated with young age at diagnosis (P < 0.001) and with insulin autoantibodies (P < 0.001) especially in young HLA-DQ8 subjects (P = 0.004); 4) LV-peptide-VP1_31-60-IgG correlated to RBA LV antibodies (P = 0.009); 5) HPeV3-peptide-IgM and -IgG showed inter-peptide correlations (P < 0.001) but only HPeV3-VP1_1-30-IgG (P < 0.001) and VP1_95-124-IgG (P = 0.009) were related to RBA LV antibodies without relation to insulin autoantibody positivity (P = 0.072 and P = 0.486, respectively). Both exploratory suspension multiplex IgG to LV-peptide VP1_31-60 and RBA detected LV antibodies correlated with insulin autoantibodies and HLA-DQ8 suggesting possible role in type 1 diabetes. It remains to be determined if cross-reactivity or concomitant exposure to LV and HPeV3 contributes to the seroprevalence.

  2. Islet-specific CTL cloned from a type 1 diabetes patient cause beta-cell destruction after engraftment into HLA-A2 transgenic NOD/scid/IL2RG null mice.

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    Wendy W J Unger

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence that autoreactive CD8 T-cells are involved in both the initiation of type 1 diabetes (T1D and the destruction of beta-cells, direct evidence for their destructive role in-vivo is lacking. To address a destructive role for autoreactive CD8 T-cells in human disease, we assessed the pathogenicity of a CD8 T-cell clone derived from a T1D donor and specific for an HLA-A2-restricted epitope of islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic-subunit related protein (IGRP. HLA-A2/IGRP tetramer staining revealed a higher frequency of IGRP-specific CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood of recent onset human individuals than of healthy donors. IGRP(265-273-specific CD8 T-cells that were cloned from the peripheral blood of a recent onset T1D individual were shown to secrete IFNγ and Granzyme B after antigen-specific activation and lyse HLA-A2-expressing murine islets in-vitro. Lytic capacity was also demonstrated in-vivo by specific killing of peptide-pulsed target cells. Using the HLA-A2 NOD-scid IL2rγ(null mouse model, HLA-A2-restricted IGRP-specific CD8 T-cells induced a destructive insulitis. Together, this is the first evidence that human HLA-restricted autoreactive CD8 T-cells target HLA-expressing beta-cells in-vivo, demonstrating the translational value of humanized mice to study mechanisms of disease and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  3. Protean manifestations of vitamin D deficiency, part 2: deficiency and its association with autoimmune disease, cancer, infection, asthma, dermopathies, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David S H

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is epidemic and its manifestations are protean. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with autoimmune diseases (particularly multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes) and has been associated with infection, allergy, asthma, and dermopathies (particularly psoriasis). Asthma may be worsened by vitamin D deficiency and correction of the deficiency has been shown to improve the manifestations of asthma. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with multiple cancers, including those of the breast, colon, ovary, and prostate. Due mainly to increased insulin resistance but also to an impairment in insulin release, vitamin D deficiency is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. In addition, the complications of diabetes may be worsened by vitamin D deficiency.

  4. Evidence of Stage- and Age-Related Heterogeneity of Non-HLA SNPs and Risk of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittni N. Frederiksen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we examined 20 non-HLA SNPs for association with islet autoimmunity (IA and/or progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Our objective was to investigate fourteen additional non-HLA T1D candidate SNPs for stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D. Of 1634 non-Hispanic white DAISY children genotyped, 132 developed IA (positive for GAD, insulin, or IA-2 autoantibodies at two or more consecutive visits; 50 IA positive children progressed to T1D. Cox regression was used to analyze risk of IA and progression to T1D in IA positive children. Restricted cubic splines were used to model SNPs when there was evidence that risk was not constant with age. C1QTNF6 (rs229541 predicted increased IA risk (HR: 1.57, CI: 1.20–2.05 but not progression to T1D (HR: 1.13, CI: 0.75–1.71. SNP (rs10517086 appears to exhibit an age-related effect on risk of IA, with increased risk before age 2 years (age 2 HR: 1.67, CI: 1.08–2.56 but not older ages (age 4 HR: 0.84, CI: 0.43–1.62. C1QTNF6 (rs229541, SNP (rs10517086, and UBASH3A (rs3788013 were associated with development of T1D. This prospective investigation of non-HLA T1D candidate loci shows that some SNPs may exhibit stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D.

  5. B lymphocytes not required for progression from insulitis to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, B; Zhang, M D; Slattery, R M

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While it is clear that B lymphocytes are necessary, it has not been clear at which stage of disease they play a role; early, late or both. To clarify when B lymphocytes are needed, T lymphocytes were transferred from 5-week-old NOD female mice to age-matched NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) recipient mice. NOD/SCID mice, which lack functionally mature T and B lymphocytes, do not normally develop insulitis or insulin-dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM). The NOD/SCID mice that received purified T lymphocytes from 5-week-old NOD mice subsequently developed insulitis and diabetes even though they did not have detectable B lymphocytes. This suggests that while B lymphocytes may be essential for an initial priming event they are not requisite for disease progression in the NOD mouse.

  6. DMPD: Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031249 Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Le Bour...w Nod1 and Nod2 in innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. PubmedID 18031249 Title Nod1 and Nod2 i...n innate immunity and human inflammatory disorders. Authors Le Bourhis L, Benko S

  7. Diverse flavonoids stimulate NodD1 binding to nod gene promoters in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Melicent C; Fisher, Robert F; Long, Sharon R

    2006-08-01

    NodD1 is a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators that mediates the expression of nodulation (nod) genes in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Each species of rhizobia establishes a symbiosis with a limited set of leguminous plants. This host specificity results in part from a NodD-dependent upregulation of nod genes in response to a cocktail of flavonoids in the host plant's root exudates. To demonstrate that NodD is a key determinant of host specificity, we expressed nodD genes from different species of rhizobia in a strain of S. meliloti lacking endogenous NodD activity. We observed that nod gene expression was initiated in response to distinct sets of flavonoid inducers depending on the source of NodD. To better understand the effects of flavonoids on NodD, we assayed the DNA binding activity of S. meliloti NodD1 treated with the flavonoid inducer luteolin. In the presence of luteolin, NodD1 exhibited increased binding to nod gene promoters compared to binding in the absence of luteolin. Surprisingly, although they do not stimulate nod gene expression in S. meliloti, the flavonoids naringenin, eriodictyol, and daidzein also stimulated an increase in the DNA binding affinity of NodD1 to nod gene promoters. In vivo competition assays demonstrate that noninducing flavonoids act as competitive inhibitors of luteolin, suggesting that both inducing and noninducing flavonoids are able to directly bind to NodD1 and mediate conformational changes at nod gene promoters but that only luteolin is capable of promoting the downstream changes necessary for nod gene induction.

  8. Defective NOD2 peptidoglycan sensing promotes diet-induced inflammation, dysbiosis, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Lolmède, Karine; Garidou, Lucile; Pomie, Celine; Chabo, Chantal; Lau, Trevor C; Fullerton, Morgan D; Nigro, Giulia; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Luche, Elodie; Garret, Céline; Serino, Matteo; Amar, Jacques; Courtney, Michael; Cavallari, Joseph F; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Barra, Nicole G; Foley, Kevin P; McPhee, Joseph B; Duggan, Brittany M; O'Neill, Hayley M; Lee, Amanda J; Sansonetti, Philippe; Ashkar, Ali A; Khan, Waliul I; Surette, Michael G; Bouloumié, Anne; Steinberg, Gregory R; Burcelin, Rémy; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-02-09

    Pattern recognition receptors link metabolite and bacteria-derived inflammation to insulin resistance during obesity. We demonstrate that NOD2 detection of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PGN) regulates metabolic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. An obesity-promoting high-fat diet (HFD) increased NOD2 in hepatocytes and adipocytes, and NOD2(-/-) mice have increased adipose tissue and liver inflammation and exacerbated insulin resistance during a HFD. This effect is independent of altered adiposity or NOD2 in hematopoietic-derived immune cells. Instead, increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance in NOD2(-/-) mice is associated with increased commensal bacterial translocation from the gut into adipose tissue and liver. An intact PGN-NOD2 sensing system regulated gut mucosal bacterial colonization and a metabolic tissue dysbiosis that is a potential trigger for increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Gut dysbiosis in HFD-fed NOD2(-/-) mice is an independent and transmissible factor that contributes to metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance when transferred to WT, germ-free mice. These findings warrant scrutiny of bacterial component detection, dysbiosis, and protective immune responses in the links between inflammatory gut and metabolic diseases, including diabetes.

  9. Inhibition of c-Kit is not required for reversal of hyperglycemia by imatinib in NOD mice.

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    Janet Lau

    Full Text Available AIM/HYPOTHESIS: Recent studies indicate that tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including imatinib, can reverse hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice, a model of type 1 diabetes (T1D. Imatinib inhibits c-Abl, c-Kit, and PDGFRs. Next-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for T1D treatment should maintain activities required for efficacy while sparing inhibition of targets that might otherwise lead to adverse events. In this study, we investigated the contribution of c-Kit inhibition by imatinib in reversal of hyperglycemia in NOD mice. METHODS: The T670I mutation in c-Kit, which confers imatinib resistance, was engineered into the mouse genome and bred onto the NOD background. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from NOD.c-Kit(T670I mice and NOD.c-Kit(wt littermates were expanded in the presence or absence of imatinib to verify imatinib resistance of the c-Kit(T670I allele. Diabetic mice were treated with imatinib at the onset of hyperglycemia for three weeks, and blood glucose was monitored. RESULTS: In vitro expansion of HSCs from NOD.c-Kit(wt mice was sensitive to imatinib, while expansion of HSCs from NOD.c-Kit(T670I mice was insensitive to imatinib. However, in vivo treatment with imatinib lowered blood glucose levels in both strains of mice. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The HSC experiment confirmed that, in NOD.c-Kit(T670I mice, c-Kit is resistant to imatinib. As both NOD.c-Kit(T670I and NOD.c-Kit(wt mice responded comparably to imatinib, c-Kit inhibition does not substantially contribute to the efficacy of imatinib in T1D. Thus, we conclude that inhibition of c-Kit is not required in next-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors for T1D treatment, and may be selected against to improve the safety profile.

  10. Alterations of renal phenotype and gene expression profiles due to protein overload in NOD-related mouse strains

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    Agarwal Anupam

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple causes, Chronic Kidney Disease is commonly associated with proteinuria. A previous study on Non Obese Diabetic mice (NOD, which spontaneously develop type 1 diabetes, described histological and gene expression changes incurred by diabetes in the kidney. Because proteinuria is coincident to diabetes, the effects of proteinuria are difficult to distinguish from those of other factors such as hyperglycemia. Proteinuria can nevertheless be induced in mice by peritoneal injection of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA. To gain more information on the specific effects of proteinuria, this study addresses renal changes in diabetes resistant NOD-related mouse strains (NON and NOD.B10 that were made to develop proteinuria by BSA overload. Methods Proteinuria was induced by protein overload on NON and NOD.B10 mouse strains and histology and microarray technology were used to follow the kidney response. The effects of proteinuria were assessed and subsequently compared to changes that were observed in a prior study on NOD diabetic nephropathy. Results Overload treatment significantly modified the renal phenotype and out of 5760 clones screened, 21 and 7 kidney transcripts were respectively altered in the NON and NOD.B10. Upregulated transcripts encoded signal transduction genes, as well as markers for inflammation (Calmodulin kinase beta. Down-regulated transcripts included FKBP52 which was also down-regulated in diabetic NOD kidney. Comparison of transcripts altered by proteinuria to those altered by diabetes identified mannosidase 2 alpha 1 as being more specifically induced by proteinuria. Conclusion By simulating a component of diabetes, and looking at the global response on mice resistant to the disease, by virtue of a small genetic difference, we were able to identify key factors in disease progression. This suggests the power of this approach in unraveling multifactorial disease processes.

  11. In vivo islet protection by a nuclear import inhibitor in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes.

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    Daniel J Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-dependent Type 1 diabetes (T1D is a devastating autoimmune disease that destroys beta cells within the pancreatic islets and afflicts over 10 million people worldwide. These patients face life-long risks for blindness, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and complications of insulin treatment. New therapies that protect islets from autoimmune destruction and allow continuing insulin production are needed. Increasing evidence regarding the pathomechanism of T1D indicates that islets are destroyed by the relentless attack by autoreactive immune cells evolving from an aberrant action of the innate, in addition to adaptive, immune system that produces islet-toxic cytokines, chemokines, and other effectors of islet inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that targeting nuclear import of stress-responsive transcription factors evoked by agonist-stimulated innate and adaptive immunity receptors would protect islets from autoimmune destruction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that a first-in-class inhibitor of nuclear import, cSN50 peptide, affords in vivo islet protection following a 2-day course of intense treatment in NOD mice, which resulted in a diabetes-free state for one year without apparent toxicity. This nuclear import inhibitor precipitously reduces the accumulation of islet-destructive autoreactive lymphocytes while enhancing activation-induced cell death of T and B lymphocytes derived from autoimmune diabetes-prone, non-obese diabetic (NOD mice that develop T1D. Moreover, in this widely used model of human T1D we noted attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in immune cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that a novel form of immunotherapy that targets nuclear import can arrest inflammation-driven destruction of insulin-producing beta cells at the site of autoimmune attack within pancreatic islets during the progression of T1D.

  12. T-cell vaccination leads to suppression of intrapancreatic Th17 cells through Stat3-mediated RORγt inhibition in autoimmune diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Liu Yang; Xiaoyan Sheng; Weilei Chen; Haiqing Tang; Hongguang Sheng; Beili Xi

    2011-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells is an effective therapeutic approach to ameliorating autoimmune diseases,while the underlying mechanisms that regulate autoreactive T cells are not completely understood.This study tested the hypothesis that T-cell vaccination (TCV) inhibits autoimmune diabetes in mice through the suppression of Th17 cells.The results showed that TCV treatment decreased hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes (T1D) induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) as compared with the controls,preserved the number of healthy pancreatic islets and increased the production of insulin in the islets.Further study revealed that TCV significantly decreased the production of both interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 in intrapancreatic infiltrating lymphocytes (IPL) through marked inhibition of mRNA level of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) phosphorylation.The role of TCV-induced Th17 suppression was further validated in adoptive transfer experiments with polarized Th17 cells in subdiabetogenic mice,which was similar to the effect of anti-IL-17 antibody treatment.Collectively our study shows that intrapancreatic Th17 cell suppression and healthy islet preservation play an important role in the treatment of T1D by TCV.

  13. Pregnancy may favour the development of severe autoimmune central diabetes insipidus in women with vasopressin cell antibodies: description of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellastella, Giuseppe; Bizzarro, Antonio; Aitella, Ernesto; Barrasso, Mariluce; Cozzolino, Domenico; Di Martino, Sergio; Esposito, Katherine; De Bellis, Annamaria

    2015-03-01

    Recently, an increased incidence of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) in pregnancy, and less frequently in the post partum period, has been reported, most probably favoured by some conditions occurring in pregnancy. This study was aimed at investigating the influence of pregnancy on a pre-existing potential/subclinical hypothalamic autoimmunity. We studied the longitudinal behaviour of arginine-vasopressin cell antibodies (AVPcAbs) and post-pituitary function in two young women with a positive history of autoimmune disease and presence of AVPcAbs, but without clinical CDI, and who became pregnant 5 and 7 months after our first observation. The behaviour of post-pituitary function and AVPcAbs (by immunofluorescence) was evaluated at baseline, during pregnancy and for 2 years after delivery. AVPcAbs, present at low/middle titres at baseline in both patients, showed a titre increase during pregnancy in one patient and after delivery in the other patient, with development of clinically overt CDI. Therapy with 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) caused a prompt clinical remission. After a first unsuccessful attempt of withdrawal, the therapy was definitively stopped at the 6th and the 7th month of post partum period respectively, when AVPcAbs disappeared, accompanied by post-pituitary function recovery, persisting until the end of the follow-up. The determination of AVPcAbs is advisable in patients with autoimmune diseases planning their pregnancy, because they could be considered good predictive markers of gestational or post partum autoimmune CDI. The monitoring of AVPcAb titres and post-pituitary function during pregnancy in these patients may allow for an early diagnosis and an early replacement therapy, which could induce the disappearance of these antibodies with consequent complete remission of CDI.

  14. Diverse Flavonoids Stimulate NodD1 Binding to nod Gene Promoters in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    OpenAIRE

    Peck, Melicent C.; Fisher, Robert F.; Long, Sharon R.

    2006-01-01

    NodD1 is a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators that mediates the expression of nodulation (nod) genes in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Each species of rhizobia establishes a symbiosis with a limited set of leguminous plants. This host specificity results in part from a NodD-dependent upregulation of nod genes in response to a cocktail of flavonoids in the host plant's root exudates. To demonstrate that NodD is a key determinant of host specificity, w...

  15. Polyinosine-polycytidylic acid promotes excessive iodine intake induced thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice via Toll-like receptor 3 mediated inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ya-nan; LIU Feng-hua; YU Xiu-jie; LIU Ze-bing; LI Qing-xin; YUAN Ji-hong; ZANG Xiao-yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Excessive iodine intake and viral infection are recognized as both critical factors associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases.Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been reported to play an important role in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.In this study,we aimed to clarify the possible mechanism of TLR3 involved in polyinosinepolycytidylic acid (poly(l:C)) promoting excessive iodine intake induced thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.Methods Both NOD and BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to four groups:control group (n=5),high iodine intake (HI) group (n=7),poly(l:C) group (n=7) and combination of excessive iodine and poly(l:C) injection (HIP) group (n=7).After 8 weeks,mice were weighed and blood samples were collected.All the mice were sacrificed before dissection of spleen and thyroid gland.Then,thyroid histology,thyroid secreted hormone,expression of CD3+ cells and TLR3 as well as inflammatory mRNA level were evaluated.Results Both NOD and BALB/c mice from HI and HIP group represented goiter and increasing thyroid relative weight.Thyroid histology evidence indicated that only HIP group of NOD mice showed severe thyroiditis with lymphocytes infiltration in majority of thyroid tissue,severe damage of follicles and general fibrosis.Immunofluorescence staining results displayed a large number of CD3+ cells in HIP NOD mice.Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results suggested interferon (IFN)-αincreased over 30 folds and IFN-γ expression was doubled compared with control group,but interleukin (IL)-4 remained unchanged in HIP group of NOD mice thyroid.Meanwhile,over one third decrease of blood total thyroxine (TT4) and increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was observed in HIP group of NOD mice.Only HIP group of NOD mice represented significantly elevation of TLR3 expression.Conclusion Poly(l:C) enhanced excessive dietary iodine induced thyroiditis in NOD mice through increasing TLR3 mediated inflammation.

  16. Lack of CCR5 on dendritic cells promotes a proinflammatory environment in submandibular glands of the NOD mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Wildenberg; C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; J.P. van de Merwe (Joop); C. Moreno (Christophe); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the salivary glands. In the NOD mouse, a model for this disease, the development of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary glands is preceded by an accumulation of dendritic cells (DC). Given the ke

  17. Sialoadenitis progression in nonobese diabetic mice and its correlation with expression of apoptosis-associated proteins in salivary glands and serum IgG levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Ge; HUA Hong; GAO Yan; LIN Qin; YU Guang-yan

    2007-01-01

    Background Sj(o)gren syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic lymphocytic infiltration and decreased secretion in salivary glands. Apoptosis is one of the possible mechanisms involved in acinar epithelial destruction in SS. The role of apoptosis in the initiation and effect phase of sialoadenitis is still controversial. The aim of this study was to observe the roles of apoptosis-associated proteins and serum IgG levels in sialoadenitis progression in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.Methods 2-, 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-week female NOD and matched BALB/c control mice were selected. Saliva and tear flow rate were measured. Serum IgG level was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Number of lymphocyte foci (NLF) in submandibular glands (SMGs) was counted under routine hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections.Expression of Fas, Bcl-2 and procaspase3 proteins as well as apoptotic cells in the SMGs were detected by immunohistochemical staining and by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay respectively.Results Decreased stimulated total flow rate (STFR) and lymphocyte foci in SMGs were first observed in the 10-week NOD group. STFR was negatively correlated with NLF (P<0.05). Serum IgG in NOD mice was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05) and showed a positive correlation with NLF (P<0.05). Fas expression in SMGs acinar cells in NOD mice increased with age and was significantly higher compared with that in the control group. Bcl-2 expression and procaspase3 expression in SMG acinar cells in each NOD group were lower compared with those of the age-matched control mice.Conclusion Abnormal expression of Fas and Bcl-2 in the SMGs and higher level of serum IgG may contribute to the initiation of sialoadenitis and cause the glandular destruction in NOD mice.

  18. Similarity of HLA-DQ profiles in adult-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without extra-pancreatic auto-immune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X F; Larger, E; Clauser, E; Assan, R

    1992-01-01

    Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients present with auto-immune diseases involving extra pancreatic tissues (type 1b diabetes mellitus). The genetic specificity of this syndrome, as opposed to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) free of such associations (Type 1a IDDM) is not clearly established. We have analyzed the HLA-DQB1 and DQA1, loci, after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, in 44 Type 1b IDDM patients, 78 Type 1a IDDM patients and 105 control subjects. No essential difference in HLA-DQ profiles appeared between Type 1b and Type 1a IDDM patients. Both diabetic groups displayed a significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles negative for aspartate at position 57 (Type 1b: 83%; Type 1a: 89%; controls 48%; p < 0.001 vs both patient groups) and in DQB1 Asp 57 negative homozygosity: 71% of Type 1b; 80% of Type 1a; 25% of controls (p < 0.01). This enrichment in DQB1 Asp 57 negative alleles was accounted for by DQB1* 0201 in the Type 1b group, and by DQB1 % 0201 and 0302 in the Type 1a patients. Conversely, alleles DQB1* 0602 and 0301 (DQB1 Asp 57 positive) were protective. Both diabetic groups also displayed a significant enrichment in DQA1 alleles positives for arginine at position 52 (65% of Type 1b; 76% of Type 1a; 50% of control subjects; p < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, vs controls), and in DQA1 Arg 52 positive homozygotes (48% of Type 1b, 58% of Type 1a, 22% of control subjects; p < 0.01). All differences between diabetic groups and the control group were more pronounced in the case of Type 1a than of Type 1b patients. The HLA-DQ genes shared by Type 1a and Type 1b patients must therefore be closely associated with islet autoimmunity. Genetic differences between Type 1a and Type 1b syndromes, if any, must be investigated in other MHC and non-MHC regions of the genome.

  19. Insulin-independent reversal of type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice with brown adipose tissue transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Piston, David W

    2015-06-15

    Traditional therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or islet/pancreas transplantation and have numerous limitations. Our previous work demonstrated the ability of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) transplants to establish normoglycemia without insulin in chemically induced models of insulin-deficient diabetes. The current study sought to extend the technique to an autoimmune-mediated T1D model and document the underlying mechanisms. In nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, BAT transplants result in complete reversal of T1D associated with rapid and long-lasting euglycemia. In addition, BAT transplants placed prior to the onset of diabetes on NOD mice can prevent or significantly delay the onset of diabetes. As with streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic models, euglycemia is independent of insulin and strongly correlates with decrease of inflammation and increase of adipokines. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is the first hormone to increase following BAT transplants. Adipose tissue of transplant recipients consistently express IGF-I compared with little or no expression in controls, and plasma IGF-I levels show a direct negative correlation with glucose, glucagon, and inflammatory cytokines. Adipogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of IGF-I may stimulate regeneration of new healthy white adipose tissue, which in turn secretes hypoglycemic adipokines that substitute for insulin. IGF-I can also directly decrease blood glucose through activating insulin receptor. These data demonstrate the potential for insulin-independent reversal of autoimmune-induced T1D with BAT transplants and implicate IGF-I as a likely mediator in the resulting equilibrium.

  20. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA and IgG in both Crohn's disease and autoimmune diabetes Anticuerpos (IgA e IgG antitransglutaminasa tisular en la enfermedad de Crohn y diabetes autoinmune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Lúcia Ribeiro-Cabral

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: a strong association has been observed between celiac disease, generally its silent clinical form, and autoimmune disorders. A potential correlation with inflammatory bowel disease has also been suggested. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies have been detected in Crohn's disease. We investigated the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune diabetes and in Crohn's disease patients and also evaluated the correlation between anti-transglutaminase antibody positivity and the clinical status of these diseases. Methods: anti-tissue transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect immunofluorescence, respectively. Upper digestive endoscopy and duodenal biopsy were indicated for cases with positive serology. Results: anti-transglutaminase antibodies were detected in five diabetic patients (prevalence of 11.1%, only one serum sample was positive for IgG isotypes. Nine of thirty-three patients with Crohn's disease had low positive levels for IgA anti-transglutaminase. Anti-endomysium antibodies were detected only in celiac patients. Celiac disease was confirmed in all diabetic patients submitted to duodenal biopsies who presented both anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomisyum antibodies positivity. In Crohn's disease, its clinical status and the diagnosis of celiac disease were not associated with positive anti-transglutaminase result. Conclusions: the prevalence of celiac disease was high in diabetic patients. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies were sensitive and specific markers of celiac disease in this diabetic group, while these antibodies were of limited value for celiac disease screening in patients with Crohn's disease.

  1. HEPARANASE AND AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Charmaine Joy Simeonovic; Andrew eZiolkowski; Zuopeng eWu; Fui Jiun eChoong; Craig eFreeman; Christopher eParish

    2013-01-01

    Heparanase (Hpse) is the only known mammalian endo-β-D-glucuronidase that degrades the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), found attached to the core proteins of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Hpse plays a homeostatic role in regulating the turnover of cell-associated HS and also degrades extracellular HS in basement membranes (BMs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM), where HSPGs function as a barrier to cell migration. Secreted Hpse is harnessed by leukocytes to facilitate their ...

  2. Immunometabolism and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Jenny; Berod, Luciana; Kamradt, Thomas; Sparwasser, Tim

    2016-11-01

    A continuous increase in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases is to be expected in the aging societies worldwide. Autoimmune disorders not only cause severe disability and chronic pain, but also lead to considerable socio-economic costs. Given that the current treatment options are not curative, have substantial side effects and a high percentage of non-responders, innovative options to the existing therapeutic armament against autoimmune diseases are urgently required. Accumulating evidence suggests that changes in the metabolism of immune cells are associated with, and contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Additionally, some autoimmune diseases share alterations in metabolic pathways, key metabolites or metabolic byproducts such as reactive oxygen species. Other examples for metabolic changes in autoimmune settings include modifications in amino acid and cholesterol levels or glucose catabolism. Thus, the emerging field of immunometabolism may hold the potential to discover new therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss recent findings describing metabolic changes in autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis as well as type 1 diabetes, focusing on pathophysiological aspects.

  3. Microsatellite allele A5.1 of MHC class I chain-related gene A is associated with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, L; Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    NIDDM is one of the most common forms of diabetes. The diagnosis is based on WHO classification, which is a clinical classification and misses the autoimmune diabetes in adults. Therefore, among the clinically diagnosed NIDDM cases, there can be a certain number of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). The MICA gene is located in the MHC class I region and is expressed by monocytes, keratinocytes, and endothelial cells. Sequence determination of the MICA gene identifies trinucleotide repeat (GCT) microsatellite polymorphism, which identifies 5 alleles with 4, 5, 6, and 9 repetitions of GCT (A4, A5, A6, and A9) or 5 repetitions of GCT with 1 additional G insertion for allele A5.1. From our previous studies, we have shown that microsatellite allele A5 of MICA is associated with IDDM. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that certain MICA alleles are associated with LADA among clinically diagnosed NIDDM. Out of 100 clinically diagnosed NIDDM patients, 49 tested positive for GAD65 and IA-2 antibodies by use of 35S RIA. Samples from these 49 patients and 96 healthy controls were analyzed for MICA by PCR amplification, and fragment sizes were determined in an ABI prism DNA sequencer. Our results show that MICA allele A5.1 is significantly increased in antibody-positive (GAD65 or IA-2) NIDDM patients [35/49 (72%)] when compared to healthy controls [22/96 (23%)] (OR = 8.4; P < 0.0001). However, we do not see any association with each of the antibodies separately. From our study, we conclude that (a) MICA allele A5.1 is associated with LADA and (b) MICA may play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of LADA.

  4. GCN2 and FGF21 are likely mediators of the protection from cancer, autoimmunity, obesity, and diabetes afforded by vegan diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2014-09-01

    Third World quasi-vegan cultures have been characterized by low risks for "Western" cancers, autoimmune disorders, obesity, and diabetes. The relatively low essential amino acid contents of many vegan diets may play a role in this regard. It is proposed that such diets modestly activate the kinase GCN2 - a physiological detector of essential amino acid paucity - within the liver, resulting in up-regulated production of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). FGF21, by opposing the stimulatory effect of growth hormone on hepatic IGF-I production, may be responsible for the down-regulation of plasma IGF-I observed in vegans consuming diets of modest protein content. Decreased IGF-I bioactivity throughout life can be expected to have a favorable impact on cancer risk, as observed in rodents that are calorie restricted or genetically defective in IGF-I activity. Increased FGF21 in vegans might also contribute to their characteristic leanness and low LDL cholesterol by promoting hepatic lipid oxidation while inhibiting lipogenesis. Direct trophic effects of FGF21 on pancreatic beta-cells may help to explain the low risk for diabetes observed in vegans, and the utility of vegan diets in diabetes management. And up-regulation of GCN2 in immune cells, by boosting T regulatory activity, might play some role in the reduced risk for autoimmunity reported in some quasi-vegan cultures. The fact that bone density tends to be no greater in vegans than omnivores, despite consumption of a more "alkaline" diet, might be partially attributable to the fact that FGF21 opposes osteoblastogenesis and decreases IGF-I. If these speculations have merit, it should be possible to demonstrate that adoption of a vegan diet of modest protein content increases plasma FGF21 levels.

  5. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  6. Nod2: The intestinal gate keeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nabhani, Ziad; Dietrich, Gilles; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Barreau, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that senses bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN)-conserved motifs in cytosol and stimulates host immune response. The association of NOD2 mutations with a number of inflammatory pathologies, including Crohn disease (CD), Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and Blau syndrome, highlights its pivotal role in host–pathogen interactions and inflammatory response. Stimulation of NOD2 by its ligand (muramyl dipeptide) activates pro-inflammatory pathways such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Caspase-1. A loss of NOD2 function may result in a failure in the control of microbial infection, thereby initiating systemic responses and aberrant inflammation. Because the ligand of Nod2 is conserved in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, NOD2 detects a wide variety of microorganisms. Furthermore, current literature evidences that NOD2 is also able to control viruses’ and parasites’ infections. In this review, we present and discuss recent developments about the role of NOD2 in shaping the gut commensal microbiota and pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites, and the mechanisms by which Nod2 mutations participate in disease occurrence. PMID:28253332

  7. Exposure of drugs for hypertension, diabetes, and autoimmune disease during pregnancy and perinatal outcomes: an investigation of the regulator in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Takagi, Kazunori; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Asano, Junichi; Matsunaga, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of perinatal effects of drug exposure during pregnancy after approval is an important issue for regulatory agencies. The study aimed to explore associations between perinatal outcomes and maternal exposure to drugs for chronic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes, and autoimmune disease.We reviewed 521 cases of adverse reactions due to drug exposure during pregnancy who were reported to the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, a regulatory authority in Japan. The primary outcomes were fetal and neonatal death and malformation of infants. Associations between perinatal outcomes and exposure to each drug category for hypertension, diabetes, and autoimmune disease were evaluated using logistic regression analysis.Of the 521 cases (maternal age: 15-47 years; mean 32.3 ± 5.5), fetal and neonatal deaths were reported in 159 cases (130 miscarriage; 12 stillbirth; 4, neonatal death; and 13 abortion due to medical reasons), and malformations of infants were observed in 124 cases. In contrast to the trend of association between diabetes with or without medication and fetal and neonatal death (odds ratio [OR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-1.36), exposure to oral antidiabetics tended to be associated with fetal and neonatal death (OR, 4.86; 95% CI, 0.81-29.2). Malformation tended to be correlated with exposure to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (OR, 2.98; 95% CI, 0.76-11.7). This association showed trends opposite to that of the association with hypertension itself (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-1.02) or overall antihypertensives (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.15-1.13). Occurrence of multiple malformations was associated with exposure to biologics (OR, 8.46; 95% CI, 1.40-51.1), whereas there was no significant association between multiple malformations and autoimmune disease with or without medication (OR 1.07; 95% CI, 0.37-3.06).These findings suggest that drugs of different categories may have undesirable

  8. Biosynthesis of Rhizobium meliloti lipooligosaccharide Nod factors: NodA is required for an N-acyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, E.M.; Long, S.R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Palcic, M.M.; Hindsgaul, O. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1994-08-30

    Rhizobium bacteria synthesize N-acylated [beta]-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine lipooligosaccharides, called Nod factors, which act as morphogenic signal molecules to legume roots during development of nitrogen-fixing nodules. The biosynthesis of Nod factors is genetically dependent upon the nodulation (nod) genes, including the common nod genes nodABC. We used the Rhizobium meliloti NodH sulfotransferase to prepare [sup 35]S-labeled oligosaccharides which served as metabolic tracers for Nod enzyme activities. This approach provides a general method for following chitooligosaccharide modifications. We found nodAB-dependent conversion of N-acetylchitotetraose (chitotetraose) monosulfate into hydrophobic compounds which by chromatographic and chemical tests were equivalent to acylated Nod factors. Sequential incubation of labeled intermediates with Escherichia coli containing either NodA or NodB showed that NodB was required before NodA during Nod factor biosynthesis. The acylation activity was sensitive to oligosaccharide chain length, with chitotetraose serving as a better substrate than chitobiose or chitotriose. We constructed a putative Nod factor intermediate, GlcN-[beta]1,4-(GlcNac)[sub 3], by enzymatic synthesis and labeled it by NodH-mediated sulfation to create a specific metabolic probe. Acylation of this oligosaccharide required only NodA. These results confirm previous reports that NodB is an N-deacetylase and suggest that NodA is an N-acyltransferase. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael P; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S; Chervonsky, Alexander V

    2015-08-11

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria ("specific lineage hypothesis") or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling ("balanced signal hypothesis") in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family.

  10. E2f1-deficient NOD/SCID mice have dry mouth due to a change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Okabayashi, Ken; Ito, Tatsuro; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice have been used as a model for dry mouth. NOD mice lacking the gene encoding E2f1, a transcription factor, develop hyposalivation more rapidly progressively than control NOD mice. However, the model mice are associated with an underlying disease such as diabetes. We have now established E2f1-deficient NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-)) mice to avoid the development of diabetes (Matsui-Inohara et al., Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 234(12):1525-1536, 2009). In this study, we investigated the pathophysiological features of dry mouth using NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. In NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice, the volume of secreted saliva stimulated with pilocarpine is about one third that of control NOD/SCID mice. In behavioral analysis, NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice drank plenty of water when they ate dry food, and the frequency and time of water intake were almost double compared with control NOD/SCID mice. Histological analysis of submandibular glands with hematoxylin-eosin stain revealed that NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice have more ducts than NOD/SCID mice. In western blot analysis, the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5), a marker of acinar cells, in parotid and in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice was lower than in NOD/SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid and submandibular acini revealed that the localization of AQP5 in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice differs from that in NOD/SCID mice; AQP5 was leaky and diffusively localized from the apical membrane to the cytosol in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. The ubiquitination of AQP5 was detected in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that the change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland cause the pathogenesis of hyposalivation in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice.

  11. Is pancreas development abnormal in the non-obese diabetic mouse, a spontaneous model of type I diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Homo-Delarche

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive genetic and immunological research, the complex etiology and pathogenesis of type I diabetes remains unresolved. During the last few years, our attention has been focused on factors such as abnormalities of islet function and/or microenvironment, that could interact with immune partners in the spontaneous model of the disease, the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse. Intriguingly, the first anomalies that we noted in NOD mice, compared to control strains, are already present at birth and consist of 1 higher numbers of paradoxically hyperactive ß cells, assessed by in situ preproinsulin II expression; 2 high percentages of immature islets, representing islet neogenesis related to neonatal ß-cell hyperactivity and suggestive of in utero ß-cell stimulation; 3 elevated levels of some types of antigen-presenting cells and FasL+ cells, and 4 abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. However, the colocalization in all control mouse strains studied of fibroblast-like cells (anti-TR-7 labeling, some ECM proteins (particularly, fibronectin and collagen I, antigen-presenting cells and a few FasL+ cells at the periphery of islets undergoing neogenesis suggests that remodeling phenomena that normally take place during postnatal pancreas development could be disturbed in NOD mice. These data show that from birth onwards there is an intricate relationship between endocrine and immune events in the NOD mouse. They also suggest that tissue-specific autoimmune reactions could arise from developmental phenomena taking place during fetal life in which ECM-immune cell interaction(s may play a key role.

  12. The Pancreatic Macrophage Compartment in Health and autoimmune Diabetes: a study on Maturation, Mobility and Matrix interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.B. Geutskens (Sacha)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractType 1 diabetes is a disease that results from a disturbed glucose metabolism due to a deficiency in insulin production. This deficiency is the consequence of immune- mediated damage to the insulin-producing ß-cells. The cause of type 1 diabetes is presently unknown and probably multif

  13. Types of pediatric diabetes mellitus defined by anti-islet autoimmunity and random C-peptide at diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anti-islet autoantibody expression and random serum C-peptide obtained at diagnosis define phenotypes of pediatric diabetes with distinct clinical features. We analyzed 607 children aged <19 yr consecutively diagnosed with diabetes after ex...

  14. Caring and Competence: Nel Noddings' Curriculum Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen J.

    Nel Noddings makes the case that producing caring and competent people ought to be the principal goal of education, suggesting that educators establish the conditions in which students with differing interests, capacities, and needs can achieve things that are educationally worthwhile. This paper considers how Noddings approaches two questions…

  15. Achieving Consensus Through Professionalized Head Nods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    2014-01-01

    While the interactional functions of head nodding in everyday Japanese conversation have been frequently studied, a discourse on head nodding as a professional communicative practice has yet to be explored. With the method of multimodal conversation analysis, the current study examines the role o...

  16. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streng, A.; Camp, Op den R.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2011-01-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor.1 Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomy

  17. The role of dendritic cell subsets and innate immunity in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Jeffrey D; Tarbell, Kristin V.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells that have an important role in autoimmune pathogenesis. DCs control both steady-state T cell tolerance and activation of pathogenic responses. The balance between these two outcomes depends on several factors, including genetic susceptibility, environmental signals that stimulate varied innate responses, and which DC subset is presenting antigen. Although the specific DC phenotype can diverge depending on the tissue location and context, ...

  18. The Role of Dendritic Cell Subsets and Innate Immunity in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes and Other Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Jeffrey D; Tarbell, Kristin V.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen-presenting cells that have an important role in autoimmune pathogenesis. DCs control both steady-state T cell tolerance and activation of pathogenic responses. The balance between these two outcomes depends on several factors, including genetic susceptibility, environmental signals that stimulate varied innate responses, and which DC subset is presenting antigen. Although the specific DC phenotype can diverge depending on the tissue location and context, ...

  19. Thyroid autoimmunity and polyglandular endocrine syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Ryndak, Amélie; Vanhove, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Even though autoimmune thyroiditis is considered as the most emblematic type of organ-specific autoimmune disorder of autoimmunity, autoimmune thyroid diseases can be associated with other autoimmune endocrine failures or non-endocrine diseases (namely vitiligo, pernicious anemia, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune gastritis, celiac disease, hepatitis). Thyroid disorders, which are the most frequent expression of adult polyendocrine syndrome type 2, occur concomitantly with or secondarily to insulinodependent diabetes, premature ovarian failure, Addison's disease (Schmidt syndrome, or Carpenter syndrome if associated with diabetes). Testicular failure and hypoparathyroidism are unusual. The disease is polygenic and multifactorial. Disorders of thyroid autoimmunity are, surprisingly, very rare in polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (or APECED) beginning during childhood. They are related to mutations of the AIRE gene that encodes for a transcriptional factor implicated in central and peripheral immune tolerance. Hypothyroidism can also be observed in the very rare IPEX and POEMS syndromes.

  20. Differential expression analysis of nuclear oligomerization domain proteins NOD1 and NOD2 in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qing-Hua; Yi, Shi-Bai; Ding, Xu; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Dan-Qi; Lin, Hao-Ran

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins-1 and -2 (NOD1 and NOD2) are members of the NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family. They are both cytoplasmic receptors, and sense microbial infections/danger molecules to induce host innate immune response. In this study, the full-length ORF sequences of NOD1 and NOD2 were cloned, and the putative amino acid sequences were identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The complete open reading frame (ORF) of grouper NOD1 contained 2823 bp encoding a 940 amino acid protein. Grouper NOD2 cDNA contained a 2967 bp ORF, encoding a protein of 988 amino acid residues. Both grouper NOD1 and NOD2 had similar domains to human and fish counterparts. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that grouper NOD1 clustered with grass carp, zebrafish and channel catfish, while NOD2 was most closely related to fugu. Expression patterns of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 were next studied. NOD1 had the highest level of expression in skin while NOD2 in trunk kidney. Post Vibrio alginolyticus (strain EcGS020401), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PolyI:C challenges, gene expression of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 was stimulated to different extents. NOD1 showed a significant enhancement after LPS stimulation, but NOD2 increased more significantly after PolyI:C invasion, indicating that NOD1 and NOD2 may exert different effects on the eradication of bacteria and virus. The adaptor protein RIP-like-interacting CLARP kinase (RICK) and downstream molecule interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also induced at different levels after stimulation, which indicated that NOD1 and NOD2 signal transduction was involved in grouper innate immune protection against bacterial and viral infections.

  1. Multiple Autoimmune Syndromes Associated with Psoriasis: A Rare Clinical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Masood

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are known to have association with each other but it is very rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in one patient. The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as multiple autoimmune syndrome. The case we are reporting features multiple autoimmune syndrome with five different conditions. The patient had type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, and psoriasis. Psoriasis has rarely been reported previously under the spectrum of autoimmune syndrome. Although the relationship of autoimmune conditions with each other has been explored in the past, this case adds yet another dimension to the unique evolution of autoimmune pathologies. The patient presented with a combination of five autoimmune diseases, which makes it consistent type three multiple autoimmune syndromes with the addition of psoriasis. The current case is unique in this aspect that the combination of these five autoimmune disorders has never been reported in the past.

  2. Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne W. Bruun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluten promotes type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD mice and likely also in humans. In NOD mice and in non-diabetes-prone mice, it induces inflammation in the pancreatic lymph nodes, suggesting that gluten can initiate inflammation locally. Further, gliadin fragments stimulate insulin secretion from beta cells directly. We hypothesized that gluten fragments may cross the intestinal barrier to be distributed to organs other than the gut. If present in pancreas, gliadin could interact directly with the immune system and the beta cells to initiate diabetes development. We orally and intravenously administered 33-mer and 19-mer gliadin peptide to NOD, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice and found that the peptides readily crossed the intestinal barrier in all strains. Several degradation products were found in the pancreas by mass spectroscopy. Notably, the exocrine pancreas incorporated large amounts of radioactive label shortly after administration of the peptides. The study demonstrates that, even in normal animals, large gliadin fragments can reach the pancreas. If applicable to humans, the increased gut permeability in prediabetes and type 1 diabetes patients could expose beta cells directly to gliadin fragments. Here they could initiate inflammation and induce beta cell stress and thus contribute to the development of type 1 diabetes.

  3. Relationship between gestational diabetes and thyroid autoimmunity%妊娠糖尿病与甲状腺自身免疫的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔艳花; 张丹丹; 王倩

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究妊娠糖尿病与甲状腺功能异常及甲状腺自身抗体阳性的相关性.方法 选取妊娠糖尿病患者共80例作为妊娠糖尿病组,另外选择糖耐量正常孕妇36名作为正常对照组.同时选择产后18 ~ 120个月曾诊断为妊娠糖尿病者作为曾患妊娠糖尿病组(36例),并以产后18~96个月的正常妊娠者28名作为随访对照组.检测4组受试者空腹血糖、餐后2h血糖、游离T4、促甲状腺激素(TSH)、血脂水平,以及谷氨酸脱羧酶65(GAD65)抗体、甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPOAb)、甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TgAb).曾患妊娠糖尿病组根据甲状腺自身抗体情况分为甲状腺自身抗体阳性组与阴性组,统计两个亚组糖代谢异常的发生情况.结果 妊娠糖尿病组空腹血糖、餐后2h血糖高于其他组(P均’<0.05),4组间血脂水平差异没有统计学意义(P均>0.05).与正常对照组相比,妊娠糖尿病组游离T4、TSH水平差异均没有统计学意义(P均>0.05).妊娠糖尿病组GAD65抗体阳性者有4例,曾患妊娠糖尿病组有3例.分别与正常对照组及随访对照组相比,妊娠糖尿病组及曾患妊娠糖尿病组TPOAb、TgAb阳性发生率均增加(x2=7.459,P<0.05).曾患妊娠糖尿病组总体TSH水平异常的发生率、同时存在TSH水平异常及甲状腺自身抗体阳性的发生率显著高于其他3组(x2=5.925,8.766,P均<0.05).曾患妊娠糖尿病组47.2%(17/36)在随访时发生高血糖,甲状腺抗体阳性组60.0%(6/10)出现糖代谢异常,而甲状腺抗体阴性组42.3%(11/26)有糖代谢异常,但两组间差异没有统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 产后甲状腺自身免疫与糖代谢受损无关.妊娠糖尿病可能是发生甲状腺自身免疫异常的危险因素.%Objective To investigate the relationship between thyroid dysfunction,positive thyroid autoimmune antibodies and gestational diabetes.Methods Eighty patients with gestational diabetes were chosen as

  4. Relationship between Adult ̄onset Latent Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Autoimmunity%成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病与甲状腺自身免疫的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王筱菁; 朱翠颜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discusses the relationship between adult-onset latent autoimmune dia-betes (LADA)and thyroid autoimmunity. Methods 300 cases of diabetic patients including 94 cases of LADA patients, 100 T1DM patients, 106 T2DM patients, were compared with 100 cases of healthy people. They are detected thyroglobulin antibody (TG ̄Ab) and thyroid peroxidase anti-body detection (TPO ̄Ab), at the same time patients with diabetes accepted glutamic acid decar-boxylase (GAD ̄Ab) detection, compared the differences of test. Results (1)The positive detection rate of LADA group was higher than normal control group (P0.05). (2)For LADA patients, ab-normal thyroid function rate in patients with thyroid antibody detection positive rate was higher than the negative antibody detection, there was no significant difference between two groups (P>0.05).Conclusion By thyroid antibody detection, the risk of thyroid dysfunction in patients is big-ger, it's easy to merge their own immune thyroid disorders.%目的:对成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病(LADA)与甲状腺自身免疫之间的关系进行探讨。方法选取在我院就诊的300例糖尿病患者,其中包括94例LADA患者,100例1型糖尿病(T1DM)患者,106例2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者,并与100例健康人群相对照,对健康人群与患病人群均进行甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG ̄Ab)及甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体检测(TPO ̄Ab)检测,糖尿病患者还需进行谷氨酸脱羧酶检测(GAD ̄Ab),比较检查结果的差异性。结果(1)LADA组的阳性检出率均较正常对照组高(P<0.05),同时与T2DM组相比,LADA组与T1DM组的TPO-Ab检出率更高(P<0.05),而LADA组与T1DM组的检出率之间无显著性差异(P>0.05)。(2)对于LADA患者,甲状腺抗体检测阳性的患者其甲状腺功能异常发生率高于抗体检测阴性者,两组之间无显著性差异(P>0.05)。结论通过甲状腺抗体检测,发现LADA患者的

  5. Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, L; Zeira, M; Reich, S; Har-Noy, M; Mechoulam, R; Slavin, S; Gallily, R

    2006-03-01

    Cannabidinoids are components of the Cannabis sativa (marijuana) plant that have been shown capable of suppressing inflammation and various aspects of cell-mediated immunity. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabidinoid has been previously shown by us to suppress cell-mediated autoimmune joint destruction in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. We now report that CBD treatment significantly reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice from an incidence of 86% in non-treated control mice to an incidence of 30% in CBD-treated mice. CBD treatment also resulted in the significant reduction of plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Th1-associated cytokine production of in vitro activated T-cells and peritoneal macrophages was also significantly reduced in CBD-treated mice, whereas production of the Th2-associated cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, was increased when compared to untreated control mice. Histological examination of the pancreatic islets of CBD-treated mice revealed significantly reduced insulitis. Our results indicate that CBD can inhibit and delay destructive insulitis and inflammatory Th1-associated cytokine production in NOD mice resulting in a decreased incidence of diabetes possibly through an immunomodulatory mechanism shifting the immune response from Th1 to Th2 dominance.

  6. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient.

  7. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  8. Iodine and tri-iodo-thyronine reduce the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the autoimmune prone BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Rasmussen, Aase Krogh; Bock, Troels;

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate the immune system and metabolism, influence insulin secretion, and cause decreased glucose tolerance. Thyroid hormones have been described to change the incidence of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in Bio-Breeding/Worcester (BB) rats but it is unknown how these hormones...... iodine (NaI) or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) neonatally or with tri-iodo-thyronine (T3) during adolescence. At the age of 19 weeks the incidence of T1DM and the degree of insulitis were evaluated. The influence of T3 treatment on the beta cell mass was evaluated in Wistar rats by unbiased...

  9. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2011-10-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor. Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes. As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the fast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in plant kingdom. However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of Rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case. The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling.

  10. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 88. Read More Autoimmune disorders Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hemolytic anemia Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Mesenteric venous thrombosis Type ...

  12. Loss of immune tolerance to IL-2 in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérol, Louis; Lindner, John M.; Caudana, Pamela; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Baeyens, Audrey; Valle, Andrea; Sedlik, Christine; Loirat, Delphine; Boyer, Olivier; Créange, Alain; Cohen, José Laurent; Rogner, Ute Christine; Yamanouchi, Jun; Marchant, Martine; Leber, Xavier Charles; Scharenberg, Meike; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto; Battaglia, Manuela; Santamaria, Pere; Hartemann, Agnès; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by a chronic, progressive autoimmune attack against pancreas-specific antigens, effecting the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. Here we show interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a non-pancreatic autoimmune target in T1D. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies, as well as T cells specific for a single orthologous epitope of IL-2, are present in the peripheral blood of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and patients with T1D. In NOD mice, the generation of anti-IL-2 autoantibodies is genetically determined and their titre increases with age and disease onset. In T1D patients, circulating IgG memory B cells specific for IL-2 or insulin are present at similar frequencies. Anti-IL-2 autoantibodies cloned from T1D patients demonstrate clonality, a high degree of somatic hypermutation and nanomolar affinities, indicating a germinal centre origin and underscoring the synergy between cognate autoreactive T and B cells leading to defective immune tolerance. PMID:27708334

  13. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers.

  14. Autoimmune myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Eoin P

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated spinal cord disorders with a broad differential diagnosis. They encompass myelopathies with an immune attack on the spinal cord (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG (AQP4-IgG) seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and its spectrum disorders (NMOSD)), myelopathies occurring with systemic autoimmune disorders (which may also be due to coexisting NMO/NMOSD), paraneoplastic autoimmune myelopathies, postinfectious autoimmune myelopathies (e.g., acute disseminated encephalomyelitis), and myelopathies thought to be immune-related (e.g., multiple sclerosis and spinal cord sarcoidosis). Spine magnetic resonance imaging is extremely useful in the evaluation of autoimmune myelopathies as the location of signal change, length of the lesion, gadolinium enhancement pattern, and evolution over time narrow the differential diagnosis considerably. The recent discovery of multiple novel neural-specific autoantibodies accompanying autoimmune myelopathies has improved their classification. These autoantibodies may be pathogenic (e.g., AQP4-IgG) or nonpathogenic and more reflective of a cytotoxic T-cell-mediated autoimmune response (collapsin response mediator protein-5(CRMP5)-IgG). The presence of an autoantibody may help guide cancer search, assist treatment decisions, and predict outcome/relapse. With paraneoplastic myelopathies the initial goal is detection and treatment of the underlying cancer. The aim of immunotherapy in all autoimmune myelopathies is to maximize reversibility, maintain benefits (while preventing relapse), and minimize side effects.

  15. Fatal Attraction: Interactions between antigen-presenting cells and islets of Langerhans in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe onset of diabetes mellitus is characterized by various symptoms, all the result of a disturbed glucose metabolism. The main symptoms are thirst and an excessive production of urine. The disturbed glucose metabolism underlying these symptoms is due to an absolute deficiency of insulin

  16. Cholinergic Stimulation Prevents the Development of Autoimmune Diabetes: Evidence for the Modulation of Th17 Effector Cells via an IFNγ-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Junu A.; Bashir, Ghada; Qureshi, Mohammed M.; Mohamed, Yassir A.; Azzi, Jamil; al-Ramadi, Basel K.; Fernández-Cabezudo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) results from T cell-mediated damage of pancreatic β-cells and loss of insulin production. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway represents a physiological link connecting the central nervous and immune systems via vagus nerve, and functions to control the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Using the multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) model to induce experimental autoimmune diabetes, we investigated the potential of regulating the development of hyperglycemia through administration of paraoxon, a highly specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI). We demonstrate that pretreatment with paraoxon prevented hyperglycemia in STZ-treated C57BL/6 mice. This correlated with a reduction in T cell infiltration into pancreatic islets and preservation of the structure and functionality of β-cells. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed that increased peripheral cholinergic activity prevented STZ-mediated loss of insulin production, this being associated with a reduction in IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Intracellular cytokine analysis in splenic T cells demonstrated that inhibition of AChE led to a shift in STZ-induced immune response from a predominantly disease-causing IL-17-expressing Th17 cells to IFNγ-positive Th1 cells. Consistent with this conclusion, inhibition of AChE failed to prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia in IFNγ-deficient mice. Our results provide mechanistic evidence for the prevention of murine T1D by inhibition of AChE and suggest a promising strategy for modulating disease severity. PMID:27790217

  17. Potential mechanisms explaining why hydrolyzed casein-based diets outclass single amino acid-based diets in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in diabetes-prone BB rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J. T. J.; Bos, N. A.; Harthoorn, L. F.; Stellaard, F.; Beijer-Liefers, S.; Rozing, J.; van Tol, E. A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background It remains controversial whether avoidance of dietary diabetogenic triggers, such as cow's milk proteins, can prevent type 1 diabetes in genetically susceptible individuals. Here, different extensive casein hydrolysates (HC) and single amino acid (AA) formulations were tested for their ef

  18. The role of NOD1 and NOD2 in host defense against chlamydial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan; Lei, Wenbo; He, Zhansheng; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-09-01

    Chlamydial species are common intracellular parasites that cause various diseases, mainly characterized by persistent infection, which lead to inflammatory responses modulated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The best understood PRRs are the extracellular Toll-like receptors, but recent significant advances have focused on two important proteins, NOD1 and NOD2, which are members of the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor family and are capable of triggering the host innate immune signaling pathways. This results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which is vital for an adequate host defense against intracellular chlamydial infection. NOD1/2 ligands are known to derive from peptidoglycan, and the latest research has resolved the paradox of whether chlamydial species possess this bacterial cell wall component; this finding is likely to promote in-depth investigations into the interaction between the NOD proteins and chlamydial pathogens. In this review, we summarize the basic characteristics and signal transduction functions of NOD1 and NOD2 and highlight the new research on the roles of NOD1 and NOD2 in the host defense against chlamydial infection.

  19. Effect of dietary gluten on dendritic cells and innate immune subsets in BALB/c and NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Larsen

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is known to play an important role in oral tolerance to dietary antigens. This is important in development of celiac disease (CD but may also be important in type 1 diabetes (T1D, and could potentially explain the reduced incidence of T1D in mice receiving a gluten-free (GF diet. The direct in vivo effect of gluten on innate cells, and particularly dendritic cells (DC is not sufficiently clarified. Therefore, we wished to investigate the innate cell populations of spontaneous diabetic NOD mice and healthy BALB/c mice kept on a GF or a standard (STD gluten containing diet. We studied, by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, if dietary gluten induces changes in the activation of DCs and distribution of selected innate cells in lymphoid, pancreatic and intestinal tissues in BALB/c and NOD mice. We found that a GF diet increased the percentage of macrophages in BALB/c spleen and of CD11c+ DCs in BALB/c and NOD spleen. Strictly gluten-free (SGF diet increased the percentage of CD103+ DCs in BALB/c mice and decreased percentages of CD11b+ DCs in mesenteric and pancreatic lymph nodes in BALB/c mice. SGF diet in BALB/c mice also decreased DC expression of CD40, CCR7 and MHC-II in pancreatic lymph nodes. In conclusion, GF diet changes the composition of the innate immune system in BALB/c and NOD mice and increases expression of DC activation markers in NOD mice. These results contribute to the explanation of the low diabetes incidence in GF NOD mice. This mechanism may be important in development of type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  20. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate, sirolimus, or tacrolimus. Targeted drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TFN) blockers can be used for some diseases. Outlook (Prognosis) The outcome depends on the disease. Most autoimmune diseases are chronic , but many can be controlled ...

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  2. Autoimmune hypophysitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, S; Josse, R G

    1997-03-01

    Autoimmune (lymphocytic) hypophysitis has emerged as a distinct and specific clinical and pathological disease entity. Although relatively rare compared with other autoimmune endocrine diseases, nearly a hundred cases have been described. The condition is much more common in females (9:1) and appears to have a particular predilection for the pregnant and postpartum states. The anterior pituitary, and less often the neurohypophysis, appear to be the target for inflammatory autoimmune destruction. During the evolution of the disease process, pituitary hyperfunction (usually hyperprolactinemia) has been noted. This disease should now be included in the differential diagnosis of pituitary disorders, especially in females presenting with pituitary enlargement, particularly if symptoms occur in temporal relationship to pregnancy. The disease may form part of the spectrum of the polyglandular autoimmune endocrine disorders. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:74-80). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  3. Can CD44 Be a Mediator of Cell Destruction? The Challenge of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Assayag-Asherie

    Full Text Available CD44 is a multi-functional receptor with multiple of isoforms engaged in modulation of cell trafficking and transmission of apoptotic signals. We have previously shown that injection of anti-CD44 antibody into NOD mice induced resistance to type 1 diabetes (T1D. In this communication we describe our efforts to understand the mechanism underlying this effect. We found that CD44-deficient NOD mice develop stronger resistance to T1D than wild-type littermates. This effect is not explained by the involvement of CD44 in cell migration, because CD44-deficient inflammatory cells surprisingly had greater invasive potential than the corresponding wild type cells, probably owing to molecular redundancy. We have previously reported and we show here again that CD44 expression and hyaluronic acid (HA, the principal ligand for CD44 accumulation are detected in pancreatic islets of diabetic NOD mice, but not of non-diabetic DBA/1 mice. Expression of CD44 on insulin-secreting β cells renders them susceptible to the autoimmune attack, and is associated with a diminution in β-cells function (e.g., less insulin production and/or insulin secretion and possibly also with an enhanced apoptosis rate. The diabetes-supportive effect of CD44 expression on β cells was assessed by the TUNEL assay and further strengthened by functional assays exhibiting increased nitric oxide release, reduced insulin secretion after glucose stimulation and decreased insulin content in β cells. All these parameters could not be detected in CD44-deficient islets. We further suggest that HA-binding to CD44-expressing β cells is implicated in β-cell demise. Altogether, these data agree with the concept that CD44 is a receptor capable of modulating cell fate. This finding is important for other pathologies (e.g., cancer, neurodegenerative diseases in which CD44 and HA appear to be implicated.

  4. 活化T细胞核因子在吡格列酮预防非肥胖糖尿病小鼠糖尿病中作用机制的探讨%The mechanism study of NFAT in pioglitazone prevent diabetes of NOD mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗建华; 李占伟; 黄海; 杨冬花; 于瑞萍; 喻日成; 范元硕; 刘波

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of pioglitazone preventing diabetes and the role of nuclear factor of actived T cells (NFAT) on non-obese diabetic(NOD) mice .Methods (1)Female NOD mice at 4 weeks of age were randomly divided into pioglitazone group(n=21) and control group(n=21) .The accumulative diabetes incidence was followed-up to 30 weeks of age in each group of NOD mice .(2)Pancreas were removed from NOD mice at 12 weeks of age in each group(n=15) to score insulitis se-verity by routine HE staining .IL-4 ,IFN-γand peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ(PPARγ) mRNA levels in spleens were tested by RT-PCR .IL-4 and IFN-γlevels in sera ,the activity of PPARγand NFATc1 nuclear protein in spleens were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) .Results (1) At 15 weeks of age ,the diabetes incidence was 4 .76% in pioglitazone group ,and 33 .33% in control group(P0 .05) .(2) At 12 weeks of age ,the insulitis score in pioglitazone group was lower than that in control group[(1 .79 ± 0 .75) vs .(2 .38 ± 0 .66) ,P<0 .05] .(3) IFN-γ mRNA level in pioglitazone group was lower than that in control group[(0 .16 ± 0 .07) vs .(0 .53 ± 0 .26) ,P<0 .05] ,and PPARγmRNA level in pioglitazone group was higher than that in control group(0 .91 vs .0 .25 ,P<0 .05) .(4)IFN-γ level in pioglitazone group was lower than that in control group [(561 .05 ± 78 .61)pg/mL vs .(666 .43 ± 28 .42)pg/mL ,P<0 .05] .(5)At 12 weeks of age ,the spleen PPARγnuclear protein activity in pioglitazone group was higher than that in control group [(0 .05 ± 0 .01) vs .(0 .02 ± 0 .01) ,P<0 .05)] ,and NFATc1 nuclear protein activity was low-er than that in control group[(0 .23 ± 0 .04) vs .(0 .33 ± 0 .04) ,P<0 .05] .Conclusion Pioglitazone could activate PPARγ nuclear protein ,inhibit activity of NFATc1 nuclear protein ,downregulate IFN-γ,diminish Th cells deviating to Th1 ,and sequently prevents insulitis and diabetes onset in NOD mice .%目的:探讨吡格列酮

  5. Relationship between autoimmune hepatitis and hepatogenous diabetes%自身免疫性肝炎与肝源性糖尿病的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    弓艳霞; 王邦茂

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析自身免疫性肝炎(autoimmune hepatitis,AIH)的血糖变化,探讨肝源性糖尿病(hepatogenous diabetes,HD)的发病机制.方法 回顾性分析2000年1月-2008年4月在天津医科大学总医院确诊的Ⅰ型AIH患者的临床资料,并就空腹血糖水平与乙型病毒性肝炎(viral hepatitis type B,HBV)对比分析.结果 75例AIH患者中,38例出现高血糖(50.67%);在无肝硬化组及合并肝硬化肝功能Child-Pugh分级A级组中,AIH高血糖的发生率分别为33.33%和51.16%,高于HBV患者,二者差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).合并肝硬化肝功能Child-Pugh分级处于B级或C级时,二者高血糖的发生率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 AIH患者较易出现高血糖,临床AIH患者常规血糖检查具有重要意义.AIH免疫紊乱导致肝炎的同时,也可能引起自身免疫性胰腺炎,可能是HD的发生机制之一.%Objective To analyze the blood glucose of AIH patients,and furthermore investigate the pathogenesis of hepatogenous diabetes.Methods A retrospective study was made in patients with AIH in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from Jan.2000 to Apr.2008.Then the blood glucose was comparatively analyzed between AIH and HBV.Results Among 75 patients with AIH,38 patients (50.67%) emerged hyperglycemia.The incidence rates of hyperglycemia in the group without cirrhosis and the group complicated with cirrhosis (child-pugh A) were 33.33% and 51.16% respectively,both of them were higher than those in HBV respectively,and there was statistically different between them.There was no statistical significance in the group with cirrhosis (Child-Pugh B or C) (P > 0.05).Conclusion While hyperglycemia is frequently detected in patients with AIH,routine blood glucose test is important for these patients.Patients with AIH may further emerge autoimmune pancreatitis,which may be a pathogenesy of hepatogenous diabetes.

  6. Toxicogenomic analysis reveals profibrogenic effects of trichloroethylene in autoimmune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Anna K; Sullivan, Bradley P; Kassel, Karen M; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to environmental chemicals increases the risk of developing autoimmune liver disease. However, the identity of specific chemical perpetrators and the mechanisms whereby environmental chemicals modify liver disease is unclear. Previous studies link exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with the development of autoimmune liver disease and exacerbation of autoimmunity in lupus-prone MRL mice. In this study, we utilized NOD.c3c4 mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune cholangitis bearing resemblance to some features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Nine-week-old female NOD.c3c4 mice were given TCE (0.5 mg/ml) or its vehicle (1% Cremophor-EL) in drinking water for 4 weeks. TCE had little effect on clinical chemistry, biliary cyst formation, or hepatic CD3+ T-cell accumulation. Hepatic microarray profiling revealed a dramatic suppression of early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA in livers of TCE-treated mice, which was verified by qPCR and immunohistochemical staining. Consistent with a reported link between reduced EGR1 expression and liver fibrosis, TCE increased hepatic type I collagen (COL1A1) mRNA and protein levels in livers of NOD.c3c4 mice. In contrast, TCE did not increase COL1A1 expression in NOD.ShiLtJ mice, which do not develop autoimmune cholangitis. These results suggest that in the context of concurrent autoimmune liver disease with a genetic basis, modification of hepatic gene expression by TCE may increase profibrogenic signaling in the liver. Moreover, these studies suggest that NOD.c3c4 mice may be a novel model to study gene-environment interactions critical for the development of autoimmune liver disease.

  7. Postnatal events in intestinal gene expression and splenic cell composition is altered in NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov;

    2013-01-01

    free mice, certain chemokines, including Cxcl2 encoding macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and involved in attraction of neutrophils was downregulated in the gut epithelium. The non-obese diabetes (NOD) mouse is widely used as a model for studying the pathogenesis of T1D. The neonatal gut...... microbiota seems to play an important role in the development and control of T1D. We hypothesized that NOD mice in the perinatal period respond differently than mice not prone to develop T1D (C57/Bl6), and we investigated the differences in postnatal expression of genes in gut, spleen, liver and pancreas......Evidence suggests that colonisation pattern of the gut in the early postnatal period is highly correlated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have recently shown that colonization in SPF mice accelerates gut maturation and that at postnatal day (PND) 1, in comparison with germ...

  8. Prolactin as an Adjunct for Type 1 Diabetes Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, Colin M; Tsai, Sue; Shrivastava, Vipul; Santamaria, Pere; Huang, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Although immunotherapy can restore self-tolerance thereby halting continued immune-mediated β-cell loss, residual β-cell mass and function is often insufficient for normoglycemia. Using a growth factor to boost β-cell mass can potentially overcome this barrier and prolactin (PRL) may fill this role. Previous studies have shown that PRL can stimulate β-cell proliferation and up-regulate insulin synthesis and secretion while reducing lymphocytic infiltration of islets, suggesting that it may restore normoglycemia through complementary mechanisms. Here, we test the hypothesis that PRL can improve the efficacy of an immune modulator, the anticluster of differentiation 3 monoclonal antibody (aCD3), in inducing diabetes remission by up-regulating β-cell mass and function. Diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were treated with a 5-day course of aCD3 with or without a concurrent 3-week course of PRL. We found that a higher proportion of diabetic mice treated with the aCD3 and PRL combined therapy achieved diabetes reversal than those treated with aCD3 alone. The aCD3 and PRL combined group had a higher β-cell proliferation rate, an increased β-cell fraction, larger islets, higher pancreatic insulin content, and greater glucose-stimulated insulin release. Lineage-tracing analysis found minimal contribution of β-cell neogenesis to the formation of new β-cells. Although we did not detect a significant difference in the number or proliferative capacity of T cells, we observed a higher proportion of insulitis-free islets in the aCD3 and PRL group. These results suggest that combining a growth factor with an immunotherapy may be an effective treatment paradigm for autoimmune diabetes.

  9. Early Childhood Infections and the Risk of Islet Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Smith, Jennifer; Dong, Fran; Barón, Anna E.; Barriga, Kathy; Norris, Jill M.; Rewers, Marian

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is a common chronic childhood disease, and the incidence is increasing globally. Childhood infections are considered a potential environmental trigger of type 1 diabetes. Alternatively, improved hygiene and reduced childhood infections could explain the increase in type 1 diabetes in developed countries. The association of reported illnesses during infancy and later development of islet autoimmunity (IA) were examined in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. ...

  10. The Non-Obese Diabetic Mouse Strain as a Model to Study CD8(+) T Cell Function in Relapsing and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius Arokia Doss, Prenitha Mercy; Roy, Andrée-Pascale; Wang, AiLi; Anderson, Ana Carrizosa; Rangachari, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from an autoimmune attack on central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Although CD4(+) T cell function in MS pathology has been extensively studied, there is also strong evidence that CD8(+) T lymphocytes play a key role. Intriguingly, CD8(+) T cells accumulate in great numbers in the CNS in progressive MS, a form of the disease that is refractory to current disease-modifying therapies that target the CD4(+) T cell response. Here, we discuss the function of CD8(+) T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. In particular, we describe EAE in non-obese diabetic (NOD) background mice, which develop a pattern of disease characterized by multiple attacks and remissions followed by a progressively worsening phase. This is highly reminiscent of the pattern of disease observed in nearly half of MS patients. Particular attention is paid to a newly described transgenic mouse strain (1C6) on the NOD background whose CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are directed against the encephalitogenic peptide MOG[35-55]. Use of this model will give us a more complete picture of the role(s) played by distinct T cell subsets in CNS autoimmunity.

  11. The non-obese diabetic mouse strain as a model to study CD8+ T cell function in relapsing and progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prenitha Mercy eIgnatius Arokia Doss

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from an autoimmune attack on central nervous system myelin. While CD4+ T cell function in MS pathology has been extensively studied, there is also strong evidence that CD8+ T lymphocytes play a key role. Intriguingly, CD8+ T cells accumulate in great numbers in the CNS in progressive MS, a form of the disease that is refractory to current disease-modifying therapies which target the CD4+ T cell response. Here, we discuss the function of CD8+ T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. In particular, we describe EAE in non-obese diabetic (NOD background mice, which develop a pattern of disease characterized by multiple attacks and remissions followed by a progressively worsening phase. This is highly reminiscent of the pattern of disease observed in nearly half of MS patients. Particular attention is paid to a newly described transgenic mouse strain (1C6 on the NOD background whose CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are directed against the encephalitogenic peptide MOG[35-55]. Use of this model will give us a more complete picture of the role(s played by distinct T cell subsets in CNS autoimmunity.

  12. Rapidly evolving hypopituitarism in a boy with multiple autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevalikar, Ganesh; Wong, Sze Choong; Zacharin, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    A 10-year-old boy with acute onset cranial diabetes insipidus and multiple autoimmune disorders had evolving panhypopituitarism, thought to be due to autoimmune hypophysitis. Over 18 months, a dramatic clinical course with progressive hypopituitarism and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus was evident. Serial brain imaging showed changes suggestive of germinoma.

  13. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiao

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  14. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ban-Hock

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a silent and highly prevalent disease that only becomes clinically manifested with progression to corpus atrophy and development of iron deficient or B12-deficient (pernicious) anaemia. Autoimmune gastritis is associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Corpus atrophy may be complicated by gastric carcinoids and gastric cancer. Laboratory diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis rests on serum biomarkers of antibody to parietal cell H/K ATPase and intrinsic factor and corpus atrophy on serum biomarkers of gastrin and pepsinogen levels. Subjects with asymptomatic parietal cell antibody should be regularly assessed for serum biomarkers for progression to corpus atrophy, development of iron and B12 deficiency anaemia and for associated autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  15. α1-Antitrypsin modifies general NK cell interactions with dendritic cells and specific interactions with islet β-cells in favor of protection from autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Ofer; Yossef, Rami; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella; Rider, Peleg; Porgador, Angel; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-10-13

    The autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is the hallmark of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Failure of anti-CD3 antibodies to provide long-lasting reversal of T1D and the expression of an NK cell ligand on β-cells suggest that NK cells play a role in disease pathogenesis. Indeed, killing of β-cells by NK cells has been shown to occur, mediated by activation of the NK cell activating receptor, NKp46. α1-antitrypsin (AAT), an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory glycoprotein, protects β-cells from injurious immune responses and is currently evaluated as a therapeutic for recent onset T1D. While isolated T lymphocytes are not inhibited by AAT, dendritic cells (DCs) become tolerogenic in its presence and other innate immune cells become less inflammatory. Yet a comprehensive profile of NK cell responses in the presence of AAT has yet to be described. In the present study, we demonstrate that AAT significantly reduces NK cell degranulation against β-cells, albeit in the whole animal and not in isolated NK cell cultures. AAT-treated mice, and not isolated cultured β-cells, exhibited a marked reduction in NKp46 ligand levels on β-cells. In related experiments, AAT-treated DCs exhibited reduced inducible DC-expressed IL-15 levels and evoked a weaker NK cell response. NK cell depletion in a T1D mouse model resulted in improved β-cell function and survival, similar to the effects observed by AAT treatment alone; nonetheless, the two approaches were non-synergistic. Our data suggest that AAT is a selective immunomodulator that retains pivotal NK cell responses, while diverting their activities away from islet β-cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  17. The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan H. Oehlers

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis.

  18. Effect of prophylactic insulin treatment on the number of ER-MP23+ macrophages in the pancreas of NOD mice. Is the prevention of diabetes based on beta-cell rest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A; Rosmalen, J G; Homo-Delarche, F; Dardenne, M; Drexhage, H A

    1996-01-01

    Prophylactic insulin treatment has been shown to have beneficial effects in type 1 diabetes, both in humans and in various animal models of the disease. In experimental models, the protective effect of prophylactic insulin treatment was observed in two parameters: (1) progression of insulitis and (2

  19. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT lymphomas

  20. Comparison of vascular complications between adults latent autoimmune diabetes and type 2 diabetes%成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病与2型糖尿病的血管并发症比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓华; 周智广; 李霞; 黄红光; 李长罗; 林健; 杨琳

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of microvascular and macrovascular complications between adult latent autoimmune diabetes(LADA)and type 2 diabetic subjects.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 203 LADA(GADA positive)and 203 T2DM(GADA negative)subjects matched with age,gender and duration as well as family history of diabetes.Parameters of microvascular(albuminuria、eyeground microscopy or fundus fluorescence photography,electromyogram)and macrovascular complications(electrocardiogram,blood pressure,blood lipid,body mass index)as well as blood sugar were compared.Results ①Microvascular complications:Compared with T2DM,LADA cases showed higher prevalence of diabetic nephropathy(39.9%vs.28.6%,P<0.05)and similar prevalence in diabetic neuropathy and retinopathy(P>0.05).②Macrovascular complications:LADA cases presented lower prevalence of hypertension(38.9%vs.55.7%,P<0.01),lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (33.0%vs.45.3%,P<0.01=,but similar orevalence of coronarv heart disease (CHD) and erebral infarction(CVD)(P>0.05).Conclusion LADA patients present less metabolic syndrome,hypertension and more diabetic nephropathy compared with T2DM.%目的 探讨成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病(LADA)与2型糖尿病(T2DM)血管并发症(包括微血管病变及相关大血管疾病)的差异.方法 比较203例LADA患者与年龄、性别、糖尿病病程及糖尿病家族史匹配的T2DM患者24 h尿白蛋白、眼底检查或荧光造影、心电图、肌电图、血压、血脂、体质指数、空腹血糖、餐后2h血糖、糖化血红蛋白、C肽等方面的差异.结果 ①微血管病变:LADA患者较T2DM患者糖尿病肾病的患病率高(39.9%vs.28.6%,P<0.05),而2组间视网膜病变和周围神经病变的患病率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).②大血管病变:LADA患者较T2DM患者高血压、代谢综合征的患病率低(38.9%vs.55.7%,P<0.01;33.0%vs.45.3%,P<0.01),2组间冠心病及脑梗死的患病率

  1. Pre-autoimmune thyroid abnormalities in the biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rat: a possible relation with the intrathyroid accumulation of dendritic cells and the initiation of the thyroid autoimmune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Simons (Peter); F.G. Delemarre; P.H. Jeucken; H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThyroid autoimmune reactions start with an accumulation of mainly dendritic cells in the thyroid. There is increasing evidence that, apart from being antigen-presenting cells, they are also able to control the growth and hormone synthesis of neighbouring end

  2. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Smyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  3. Influence of a nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) polymorphism and NOD2 mutant alleles on Crohn's disease phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine genetic variation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2, their respective influences on Crohn's disease phenotype and gene-gene interactions.METHODS: (ND1+32656*1) NOD1 polymorphism and SNP8, SNP12 and SNP13 of NOD2 were analyzed in 97 patients and 50 controls. NOD2 variants were determined by reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. NOD1 genotyping and NOD2 variant confirmation were performed by specific amplification and sequencing.RESULTS: The distribution of NOD1 polymorphism in patients was different from controls (P = 0.045) and not altered by existence of NOD2 mutations. In this cohort, 30.92% patients and 6% controls carried at least one NOD2 variant (P < 0.001) with R702W being the most frequent variant. Presence of at least one NOD2 mutation was inversely associated with colon involvement (9.09% with colon vs 36.4% with ileal or ileocolonic involvement, P = 0.04) and indicative of risk of penetrating disease (52.63% with penetrating vs 25.64% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior,P = 0.02). L1007finsC and double NOD2 mutation conferred the highest risk for severity of disease (26.3% with penetrating disease vs 3.8% with non-penetrating or stricturing behavior presented L1007finsC, P = 0.01 and 21.0% with penetrating disease vs 2.5% with non-penentrating or stricturing behavior carried double NOD2 mutation, P = 0.007). Exclusion of patients with NOD2 mutations from phenotype/NOD1-genotype analysis revealed higher prevalence of *1*1 genotype in groups of younger age at onset and colonic location.CONCLUSION: This study suggests population differences in the inheritance of risk NOD1 polymorphism and NOD2 mutations. Although no interaction between NOD1-NOD2 was noticed, a relationship between disease location and Nod-like receptor molecules was established.

  4. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  5. Identification of a NodD repressible gene adjacent to nodM in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao'er Yang; Bihe Hou; Chenzhi Zong; Guofan Hong

    2012-01-01

    The nodFEL and nodMNT operons in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae are transcribed in the same orie-tation and induced by NodD in response to flavonoids secreted by legumes.In the narrow intergenic region between nodFEL and nodMNT,we identified a small gene divergently transcribed from nodM to the 3' end of nodL.Unlike the promoters upstream of nodF and nodM,the promoter of this gene is constitutively expressed.It appeared that its promoter might partially overlap with that of nodM and its expression was repressed by nodD.A deletion mutation was made and proteins produced by the mutant were compared with those by wild-type using 2D gel electrophoresis.Several protein differences were identified suggesting that this small gene influences the expression or stability of these proteins.However,the mutant nodulated its host plant (pea) normally.

  6. NOD-like Receptors: master regulators of inflammation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansi eSaxena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs have been associated with human diseases including infections, cancer, and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. These innate immune pattern recognition molecules are essential for controlling inflammatory mechanisms through induction of cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial genes. Upon activation, some NLRs form multi-protein complexes called inflammasomes, while others orchestrate caspase-independent Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling. Moreover, NLRs and their downstream signaling components engage in an intricate crosstalk with cell death and autophagy pathways, both critical processes for cancer development. Recently, increasing evidence has extended the concept that chronic inflammation caused by abberant NLR signaling is a powerful driver of carcinogenesis, where it abets genetic mutations, tumor growth and progression. In this review, we explore the rapidly expanding area of research regarding the expression and functions of NLRs in different types of cancers. Furthermore, we particularly focus on how maintaining tissue homeostasis and regulating tissue repair may provide a logical platform for understanding the liaisons between the NLR-driven inflammatory responses and cancer. Finally, we outline novel therapeutic approaches that target NLR signaling and speculate how these could be developed as potential pharmaceutical alternatives for cancer treatment.

  7. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  8. NOD2 Contributes to Porphyromonas gingivalis–induced Bone Resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, T.P.; Taira, T.M.; Holanda, M.C.; Bignardi, L.A.; Salvador, S.L.; Zamboni, D.S.; Cunha, F.Q.; Fukada, S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The NOD-like receptors are cytoplasmic proteins that sense microbial by-products released by invasive bacteria. Although NOD1 and NOD2 are functionally expressed in cells from oral tissues and play a role triggering immune responses, the role of NOD2 receptor in the bone resorption and in the modulation of osteoclastogenesis is still unclear. We show that in an experimental model of periodontitis with Porphyromonas gingivalis W83, NOD2-/- mice showed lower bone resorption when compared to wild type. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that wild-type infected mice showed an elevated RANKL/OPG ratio when compared to NOD2-/- infected mice. Moreover, the expression of 2 osteoclast activity markers—cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9—was significantly lower in gingival tissue from NOD2-/- infected mice compared to WT infected ones. The in vitro study reported an increase in the expression of the NOD2 receptor 24 hr after stimulation of hematopoietic bone marrow cells with M-CSF and RANKL. We also evaluated the effect of direct activation of NOD2 receptor on osteoclastogenesis, by the activation of this receptor in preosteoclasts culture, with different concentrations of muramyl dipeptide. The results show no difference in the number of TRAP-positive cells. Although it did not alter the osteoclasts differentiation, the activation of NOD2 receptor led to a significant increase of cathepsin K expression. We confirm that this enzyme was active, since the osteoclasts resorption capacity was enhanced by muramyl dipeptide stimulation, evaluated in osteoassay plate. These results show that the lack of NOD2 receptor impairs the bone resorption, suggesting that NOD2 receptor could contribute to the progression of bone resorption in experimental model of periodontitis. The stimulation of NOD2 by its agonist, muramyl dipeptide, did not affect osteoclastogenesis, but it does favor the bone resorption capacity identified by increased osteoclast

  9. The multiple autoimmune syndromes. A clue for the autoimmune tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Pineda-Tamayo, Ricardo; Levy, Roger A; Gómez-Puerta, José; Dias, Carlos; Mantilla, Ruben D; Gallo, Juan Esteban; Cervera, Ricard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2012-12-01

    The multiple autoimmune syndromes (MAS) consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases (ADs) in a single patient. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and genetic characteristics of a large series of patients with MAS. A cluster analysis and familial aggregation analysis of ADs was performed in 84 patients. A genome-wide microsatellite screen was performed in MAS families, and associated loci were investigated through the pedigree disequilibrium test. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and Sjögren's syndrome together were the most frequent ADs encountered. Three main clusters were established. Aggregation for type 1 diabetes, AITD, SLE, and all ADs as a trait was found. Eight loci associated with MAS were observed harboring autoimmunity genes. The MAS represent the best example of polyautoimmunity as well as the effect of a single genotype on diverse phenotypes. Its study provides important clues to elucidate the common mechanisms of ADs (i.e., autoimmune tautology).

  10. nodSU, two new nod genes of the broad host range Rhizobium strain NGR234 encode host-specific nodulation of the tropical tree Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, A; Cervantes, E; Chee-Hoong, W; Broughton, W J

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium species strain NGR234 nodulates at least 35 diverse genera of legumes as well as the nonlegume Parasponia andersonii. Most nodulation genes are located on the 500-kilobase pair symbiotic plasmid, pNGR234a. Previously, three plasmid-borne host range determinants (HsnI, HsnII, and HsnIII) were identified by their ability to extend the nodulation capacity of heterologous rhizobia to include Vigna unguiculata. In this study, we show that HsnII contains two new nod-box linked hsn genes, nodS and nodU.nodS controls nodulation of the tropical tree Leucaena leucocephala, while the nodSU genes regulate nodulation of the pasture legume Desmodium intortum and the grain legume V. unguiculata. Regulation of the nod-box upstream of nodSU by the flavonoid naringenin was shown using a fusion with a promoterless lacZ gene. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the nodS gene did not reveal homology with any gene in the EMBL library, although Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 contains both nodS and nodU (M. Göttfert, S. Hitz, and H. Hennecke, Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 3:308-316, 1990). We suggest that broad host range in NGR234 is controlled in part by a nodD gene which interacts with a wide range of flavonoids, and in part by host-specific nod genes such as nodS.

  11. Testing agents for prevention or reversal of type 1 diabetes in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian W Grant

    Full Text Available We report the results of an independent laboratory's tests of novel agents to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes (T1D in the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse, BioBreeding diabetes prone (BBDP rat, and multiple autoimmune disease prone (MAD rat models. Methods were developed to better mimic human clinical trials, including: prescreening, randomization, blinding, and improved glycemic care of the animals. Agents were suggested by the research community in an open call for proposals, and selected for testing by an NIDDK appointed independent review panel. Agents selected for testing to prevent diabetes at later stages of progression in a rodent model were a STAT4 antagonist (DT22669, alpha1 anti-trypsin (Aralast NP, celastrol (a natural product with anti-inflammatory properties, and a Macrophage Inflammatory Factor inhibitor (ISO-092. Agents tested for reversal of established T1D in rodent models were: alpha1 anti-trypsin (Aralast NP, tolerogenic peptides (Tregitopes, and a long-acting formulation of GLP-1 (PGC-GLP-1. None of these agents were seen to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes, while the positive control interventions were effective: anti-CD3 treatment provided disease reversal in the NOD mouse, dexamethasone prevented T1D induction in the MAD rat, and cyclosporin prevented T1D in the BBDP rat. For some tested agents, details of previous formulation, delivery, or dosing, as well as laboratory procedure, availability of reagents and experimental design, could have impacted our ability to confirm prior reports of efficacy in preclinical animal models. In addition, the testing protocols utilized here provided detection of effects in a range commonly used in placebo controlled clinical trials (for example, 50% effect size, and thus may have been underpowered to observe more limited effects. That said, we believe the results compiled here, showing good control and repeatability, confirm the feasibility of screening diverse test agents in an

  12. Testing agents for prevention or reversal of type 1 diabetes in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christian W; Moran-Paul, Catherine M; Duclos, Shane K; Guberski, Dennis L; Arreaza-Rubín, Guillermo; Spain, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an independent laboratory's tests of novel agents to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, BioBreeding diabetes prone (BBDP) rat, and multiple autoimmune disease prone (MAD) rat models. Methods were developed to better mimic human clinical trials, including: prescreening, randomization, blinding, and improved glycemic care of the animals. Agents were suggested by the research community in an open call for proposals, and selected for testing by an NIDDK appointed independent review panel. Agents selected for testing to prevent diabetes at later stages of progression in a rodent model were a STAT4 antagonist (DT22669), alpha1 anti-trypsin (Aralast NP), celastrol (a natural product with anti-inflammatory properties), and a Macrophage Inflammatory Factor inhibitor (ISO-092). Agents tested for reversal of established T1D in rodent models were: alpha1 anti-trypsin (Aralast NP), tolerogenic peptides (Tregitopes), and a long-acting formulation of GLP-1 (PGC-GLP-1). None of these agents were seen to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes, while the positive control interventions were effective: anti-CD3 treatment provided disease reversal in the NOD mouse, dexamethasone prevented T1D induction in the MAD rat, and cyclosporin prevented T1D in the BBDP rat. For some tested agents, details of previous formulation, delivery, or dosing, as well as laboratory procedure, availability of reagents and experimental design, could have impacted our ability to confirm prior reports of efficacy in preclinical animal models. In addition, the testing protocols utilized here provided detection of effects in a range commonly used in placebo controlled clinical trials (for example, 50% effect size), and thus may have been underpowered to observe more limited effects. That said, we believe the results compiled here, showing good control and repeatability, confirm the feasibility of screening diverse test agents in an independent

  13. Nod2 mediates susceptibility to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Meinzer

    Full Text Available Nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2 is a component of the innate immunity known to be involved in the homeostasis of Peyer patches (PPs in mice. However, little is known about its role during gut infection in vivo. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis, adenolymphitis and septicaemia which is able to invade its host through PPs. We investigated the role of Nod2 during Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Death was delayed in Nod2 deleted and Crohn's disease associated Nod2 mutated mice orogastrically inoculated with Y. pseudotuberculosis. In PPs, the local immune response was characterized by a higher KC level and a more intense infiltration by neutrophils and macrophages. The apoptotic and bacterial cell counts were decreased. Finally, Nod2 deleted mice had a lower systemic bacterial dissemination and less damage of the haematopoeitic organs. This resistance phenotype was lost in case of intraperitoneal infection. We concluded that Nod2 contributes to the susceptibility to Y. pseudotuberculosis in mice.

  14. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  15. Beyond HLA-A*0201: new HLA-transgenic nonobese diabetic mouse models of type 1 diabetes identify the insulin C-peptide as a rich source of CD8+ T cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Zoltan; Baker, Jason C; Smith, Carla; Jarchum, Irene; Babad, Jeffrey; Mukherjee, Gayatri; Yang, Yang; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Santamaria, Pere; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2012-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell responses to β cell Ags, including insulin. Investigations employing the NOD mouse model of the disease have revealed an essential role for β cell-specific CD8(+) T cells in the pathogenic process. As CD8(+) T cells specific for β cell Ags are also present in patients, these reactivities have the potential to serve as therapeutic targets or markers for autoimmune activity. NOD mice transgenic for human class I MHC molecules have previously been employed to identify T cell epitopes having important relevance to the human disease. However, most studies have focused exclusively on HLA-A*0201. To broaden the reach of epitope-based monitoring and therapeutic strategies, we have looked beyond this allele and developed NOD mice expressing human β(2)-microglobulin and HLA-A*1101 or HLA-B*0702, which are representative members of the A3 and B7 HLA supertypes, respectively. We have used islet-infiltrating T cells spontaneously arising in these strains to identify β cell peptides recognized in the context of the transgenic HLA molecules. This work has identified the insulin C-peptide as an abundant source of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Responses to these epitopes should be of considerable utility for immune monitoring, as they cannot reflect an immune reaction to exogenously administered insulin, which lacks the C-peptide. Because the peptides bound by one supertype member were found to bind certain other members also, the epitopes identified in this study have the potential to result in therapeutic and monitoring tools applicable to large numbers of patients and at-risk individuals.

  16. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome in pregnancy: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorino, Basilio; Teodoro, Maria Cristina; Scollo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome is a multiple endocrine disorders disease determined by autoimmunity; it can be diagnosed if a patient is affected by Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and another autoimmune disease, except Addison Disease, for example Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis or Celiac Disease. R.D., 34-year-old woman (gravida 2 para 1), was referred to the High Risk Pregnancy Outpatient Clinic at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania at 8 weeks' gestation. She was affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Disease (Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Celiac Disease). Pre-conception glycated hemoglobin and thyrotropin levels were normal. This pregnancy was characterized by glycemic instability and the need to increase the insulin units every month. The patient was hospitalized at 32+6 weeks for monitoring fetus and mother health because of inadequate glycemic control and the high insulin dosage required. She was delivered by caesarean section at 36+6 weeks because of uterine contractions, the previous cesarean section, glycemic instability and the gestational age. She delivered a baby boy, birth-weight 3300 g, Apgar 8-9. She was discharged in the fourth day after delivery with good maternal and child prognosis. Literature data and the experience derived by this case report suggest some recommendations to improve obstetrics and neonatologist outcome in the patients affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome: pre-conception counseling, thyrotropin assay every 4-6 weeks, gluten-free diet, fasting and post-prandial blood glucose level targets. PMID:27917035

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motamed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is (AIH is a chronic hepatitis that occurs in children and adults of all ages. It is characterized by immunologic and autoimmune features, including circulating auto antibodies and high serum globulin concentrations. It was first described in the 1950s by term of chronic active hepatitis. It has 2 types with different auto antibodies. Diagnosis is based upon serologic and histologic findings and exclusion of other forms of chronic liver disease.   A scoring system should be used in assessment based upon: 1 Auto anti bodie titer 2 Serum IgG level  3 Liver histology 4 Absence of viral and other causes of hepatitis. Clear indications for treatment: 1   rise of aminotrasferases 2   clinical symptoms of liver disease 3   histological features in liver biopsy 4   Children with AIH initial treatment involve glucocorticoid with or without azathioprine. For patients with fulminant hepatitis liver transplantation, should be kept in mind.   Remission is defined by: 1   Resolution of symptoms 2   Normalization of serum trasaminases 3   Normalization of serum bilirubin and gamma globuline levels. 4   Improvement in liver histology 5   Treatment is continued for at least 2-5 years, glucocorticoids are with drawn first, by tapering over six weeks. Azathioprine will be with drawn.  

  18. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, G; Menzel, J; Krüger, P-C; Ribback, S; Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare form of chronic pancreatitis which is characterized by a lymphoplasmatic infiltrate with a storiform fibrosis and often goes along with painless jaundice and discrete discomfort of the upper abdomen. Clinically we distinguish between two subtypes, which differ in terms of their histology, clinical picture and prognosis. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is the pancreatic manifestation of the IgG4-associated syndrome which also involves other organs. About one third of the patients can only be diagnosed after either histological prove or a successful steroid trail. Type 2 is IgG4-negative with the histological picture of an idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis and is to higher degree associated with inflammatory bowel disease. A definitive diagnosis can only be made using biopsy. Usually both forms show response to steroid treatment, but in type 1 up to 50 % of the patients might develop a relapse. The biggest challenge and most important differential diagnosis remains the discrimination of AIP from pancreatic cancer, because also AIP can cause mass of the pancreatic head, lymphadenopathy and ductal obstruction. This article summarizes recent advances on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, therapy and differential diagnosis in this relatively unknown disease.

  19. NOD1 and NOD2 receptors in mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala): Inductive expression and downstream signalling in ligand stimulation and bacterial infections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banikalyan Swain; Madhubanti Basu; Mrinal Samanta

    2013-09-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)1 and NOD2 are important cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and key members of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family. They sense a wide range of bacteria or their products and play a key role in inducing innate immunity. This report describes the role of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors signalling in innate immunity in the Indian major carp, mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala). Tissue-specific expression analysis of NOD1 and NOD2 genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed their wide distribution in various organs/tissues. In the untreated fish, the highest expression of NOD1 and NOD2 was detected in liver and blood, respectively. Stimulation with NOD1- and NOD2-specific ligands, i.e. iE-DAP and MDP, activated NOD1 and NOD2 receptor signalling in vivo and in vitro resulting in significant ( < 0.05) induction of downstream signalling molecule RICK, and the effector molecules IL-1, IL-8 and IFN- in the treated group as compared to their controls. In response to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infections, NOD1 and NOD2 receptors signalling were activated and IL-1, IL-8 and IFN- were induced. These findings highlight the important role of NOD receptors in eliciting innate immune response during the pathogenic invasion to the fish.

  20. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  1. Human platelets produced in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice upon transplantation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells are functionally active in an ex vivo flow model of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Isabelle I; Thijs, Tim; Brunaud, Christine; De Meyer, Simon F; Thys, Johan; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Deckmyn, Hans

    2009-12-01

    Xenotransplantation systems have been used with increasing success to better understand human hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. In this study, we demonstrate that production of human platelets in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice after transplantation of unexpanded cord-blood CD34(+) cells was detected within 10 days after transplantation, with the number of circulating human platelets peaking at 2 weeks (up to 87 x 10(3)/microL). This rapid human platelet production was followed by a second wave of platelet formation 5 weeks after transplantation, with a population of 5% still detected after 8 weeks, attesting for long-term engraftment. Platelets issued from human hematopoietic stem cell progenitors are functional, as assessed by increased CD62P expression and PAC1 binding in response to collagen-related peptide and thrombin receptor-activating peptide activation and their ability to incorporate into thrombi formed on a collagen-coated surface in an ex vivo flow model of thrombosis. This interaction was abrogated by addition of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies against human glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha) and GPIIb/IIIa. Thus, our mouse model with production of human platelets may be further explored to study the function of genetically modified platelets, but also to investigate the effect of stimulators or inhibitors of human thrombopoiesis in vivo.

  2. Effect of dietary gluten on dendritic cells and innate immune subsets in BALB/c and NOD mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Weile, Christian; Antvorskov, Julie Christine

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is known to play an important role in oral tolerance to dietary antigens. This is important in development of celiac disease (CD) but may also be important in type 1 diabetes (T1D), and could potentially explain the reduced incidence of T1D in mice receiving a gluten......-free (GF) diet. The direct in vivo effect of gluten on innate cells, and particularly dendritic cells (DC) is not sufficiently clarified. Therefore, we wished to investigate the innate cell populations of spontaneous diabetic NOD mice and healthy BALB/c mice kept on a GF or a standard (STD) gluten...... containing diet. We studied, by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), if dietary gluten induces changes in the activation of DCs and distribution of selected innate cells in lymphoid, pancreatic and intestinal tissues in BALB/c and NOD mice. We found...

  3. Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Derbyshire general practitioner Stuart Bootle has had diabetes for 20 years. He speaks to Paul Smith, who has type 1 diabetes himself, about the trials and tribulations of being on the receiving end of NHS care

  4. Reversal of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes With an Agonistic TLR4/MD-2 Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Kyle J; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Kachapati, Kritika; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wu, Yuehong; Katz, Jonathan D; Ascherman, Dana P; Ridgway, William M

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is currently an incurable disease, characterized by a silent prodromal phase followed by an acute clinical phase, reflecting progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Autoreactive T cells play a major role in β-cell destruction, but innate immune cell cytokines and costimulatory molecules critically affect T-cell functional status. We show that an agonistic monoclonal antibody to TLR4/MD-2 (TLR4-Ab) reverses new-onset diabetes in a high percentage of NOD mice. TLR4-Ab induces antigen-presenting cell (APC) tolerance in vitro and in vivo, resulting in an altered cytokine profile, decreased costimulatory molecule expression, and decreased T-cell proliferation in APC:T-cell assays. TLR4-Ab treatment increases T-regulatory cell (Treg) numbers in both the periphery and the pancreatic islet, predominantly expanding the Helios(+)Nrp-1(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset. TLR4-Ab treatment in the absence of B cells in NOD.scid mice prevents subsequent T cell-mediated disease, further suggesting a major role for APC tolerization in disease protection. Specific stimulation of the innate immune system through TLR4/MD-2, therefore, can restore tolerance in the aberrant adaptive immune system and reverse new-onset T1D, suggesting a novel immunological approach to treatment of T1D in humans.

  5. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  6. MicroRNA-29b modulates innate and antigen-specific immune responses in mouse models of autoimmunity.

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    Apolline Salama

    Full Text Available In addition to important regulatory roles in gene expression through RNA interference, it has recently been shown that microRNAs display immune stimulatory effects through direct interaction with receptors of innate immunity of the Toll-like receptor family, aggravating neuronal damage and tumour growth. Yet no evidence exists on consequences of microRNA immune stimulatory actions in the context of an autoimmune disease. Using microRNA analogues, we here show that pancreatic beta cell-derived microRNA sequences induce pro-inflammatory (TNFa, IFNa, IL-12, IL-6 or suppressive (IL-10 cytokine secretion by primary mouse dendritic cells in a sequence-dependent manner. For miR-29b, immune stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophages involved the endosomal Toll-like receptor-7, independently of the canonical RNA interference pathway. In vivo, the systemic delivery of miR-29b activates CD11b+B220- myeloid and CD11b-B220+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells and induces IFNa, TNFa and IL-6 production in the serum of recipient mice. Strikingly, in a murine model of adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes, miR-29b reduces the cytolytic activity of transferred effector CD8+ T-cells, insulitis and disease incidence in a single standalone intervention. Endogenous miR-29b, spontaneously released from beta-cells within exosomes, stimulates TNFa secretion from spleen cells isolated from diabetes-prone NOD mice in vitro. Hence, microRNA sequences modulate innate and ongoing adaptive immune responses raising the question of their potential role in the breakdown of tolerance and opening up new applications for microRNA-based immune therapy.

  7. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  8. 人免疫重建NOD/SCID小鼠模型的建立%Establishment of Human Immune Reconstitute NOD/SCID Mice Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜汝平; 李翀; 周海滨; 王剑松; 袁国红; 赵献

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the establishment method of human immune reconstitute animal model in NOD/SCID mice and the characteristics of immunologic reconstitution. Methods 16 NOD/SCID mice were randomly divided into experimental group (n = 8) and control group (n = 8). The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from fresh peripheral blood of healthy people using Ficoll lymphocyte separating medium, and then were transplanted into experimental mice by intraperitoneal injection. Mice in control group was injected PBS buffer. In the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks, human CD3 T and CD19 B lymphocytes in the blood of mice were detected by flow cytometry, human IgG protein content in the blood of mice was measured by ELISA method and the infiltration of human CD3 T and CD19 B lymphocytes in mice spleen and liver were detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results After 4 weeks, human CD3 T and CD19 B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of experimental mice were respectively 85.6% and 76.7% of the total monocytes, and were also detected in mice spleen. The amount of human IgG in serum of experimental mice after 4,8 and 12 weeks of transplantation were respectively(863 ± 12.5) μg/mL, (1217 ± 16.7) μg/mL and(958 ± 13.1) μg/mL. Conclusions Human immune reconstitute NOD/SCID mice model can be successfully established by intraperitoneal injection of human PBMC. The method is simple and reliable.%目的 探讨NOD/SCID(nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient)小鼠人免疫重建模型的建立方法和免疫特性.方法 16只NOD/SCID小鼠随机分成实验组和对照组,每组8只.Ficoll密度梯度离心法分离人外周血单个核细胞(peripheral blood mononuclear cell,PBMC),通过腹腔注射移植给实验组小鼠,空白对照组小鼠每只腹腔注射无菌PBS,第4、8和12周时,流式细胞术检测小鼠外周血中人的CD3T、CD19B淋巴细胞,ELISA法测定小鼠血清中人IgG含量,免疫组织化学染色检测

  9. Transcriptome-Based Identification of the Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 Regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Capela, Delphine; Carrere, Sébastien; Batut, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The NodD1 regulon of Sinorhizobium meliloti was determined through the analysis of the S. meliloti transcriptome in response to the plant flavone luteolin and the overexpression of nodD1. Nine new genes regulated by both NodD1 and luteolin were identified, demonstrating that NodD1 controls few functions behind nodulation in S. meliloti.

  10. Transcriptome-based identification of the Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Delphine; Carrere, Sébastien; Batut, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    The NodD1 regulon of Sinorhizobium meliloti was determined through the analysis of the S. meliloti transcriptome in response to the plant flavone luteolin and the overexpression of nodD1. Nine new genes regulated by both NodD1 and luteolin were identified, demonstrating that NodD1 controls few functions behind nodulation in S. meliloti.

  11. Quantitative analysis of protein and gene expression in salivary glands of Sjogren's-like disease NOD mice treated by bone marrow soup.

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    Kaori Misuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cell extract (termed as BM Soup has been demonstrated to repair irradiated salivary glands (SGs and restore saliva secretion in our previous study. In the present study, we aim to investigate if the function of damaged SGs in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice can be restored by BM Soup treatment and the molecular alterations associated with the treatment. METHODS: Whole BM cells were lysed and soluble intracellular contents ("BM Soup" were injected I.V. into NOD mice. Tandem mass tagging with 2-D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify proteins in the submandibular glands (SMGs between untreated and BM Soup-treated mice. Quantitative PCR was used to identify genes with altered expression in the treated mice. RESULTS BM SOUP: restored salivary flow rates to normal levels and significantly reduced the focus scores of SMGs in NOD mice. More than 1800 proteins in SMG cells were quantified by the proteomic approach. Many SMG proteins involved in inflammation and apoptosis were found to be down-regulated whereas those involved in salivary gland biology and development/regeneration were up-regulated in the BM Soup-treated mice. qPCR analysis also revealed expression changes of growth factors and cytokines in the SMGs of the treated NOD mice. CONCLUSION: BM Soup treatment is effective to restore the function of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Through gene/protein expression analysis, we have found that BM Soup treatment might effectuate via inhibiting apoptosis, focal adhesion and inflammation whereas promoting development, regeneration and differentiation of the SG cells in NOD mice. These findings provide important insights on the potential mechanisms underlying the BM Soup treatment for functional restoration of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Additional studies are needed to further confirm the identified target genes and their related signaling pathways that are responsible for the BM Soup treatment.

  12. Enhanced T cell lymphoma in NOD.Stat5b transgenic mice is caused by hyperactivation of Stat5b in CD8+ thymocytes.

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    Bo Chen

    Full Text Available Activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT proteins may be critical to their oncogenic functions as demonstrated by the development of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia in transgenic (TG mice overexpressing a constitutively activated form of Stat5b. However, low incidence of CD8(+ T cell lymphoma was observed in B6 transgenic mice overexpressing a wild-type Stat5b (B6.Stat5b(Tg despite of undetectable Stat5b phosphorylation and the rate of lymphomagenesis was markedly enhanced by immunization or the introduction of TCR transgenes [1]. Here, we report that the wild-type Stat5b transgene leads to the acceleration and high incidence (74% of CD8(+ T cell lymphoblastic lymphomas in the non-obese-diabetic (NOD background. In contrast to the B6.Stat5b(Tg mice, Stat5b in transgenic NOD (NOD.Stat5b(Tg mice is selectively and progressively phosphorylated in CD8(+ thymocytes. Stat5 phosphorylation also leads to up-regulation of many genes putatively relevant to tumorigenesis. Treatment of NOD.Stat5b(Tg mice with cancer chemopreventive agents Apigenin and Xanthohumol efficiently blocked lymphomagenesis through reduction of Stat5 phosphorylation and genes up-regulated in the NOD.Stat5b(Tg mice. These results suggest that NOD genetic background is critical to the Stat5b-mediated lymphomagenesis through regulation of Stat5 hyperactivation. NOD.Stat5b(Tg mouse is an excellent model for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphomagenesis and testing novel chemoprevention strategies.

  13. The autoimmune tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates that the pathologic mechanisms may be similar among autoimmune diseases. Lastly, genetic evidence shows that autoimmune phenotypes might represent pleiotropic outcomes of the interaction of non-specific disease genes.

  14. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE delays NOD2 expression and affects NOD2/RIPK2 interactions in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Marian C Aldhous

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD: NOD2 is the strongest individual genetic determinant and smoking the best-characterised environmental factor. Carriage of NOD2 mutations predispose to small-intestinal, stricturing CD, a phenotype also associated with smoking. We hypothesised that cigarette smoke extract (CSE altered NOD2 expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells.Intestinal epithelial cell-lines (SW480, HT29, HCT116 were stimulated with CSE and nicotine (to mimic smoking ±TNFα (to mimic inflammation. NOD2 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting; NOD2-RIPK2 interactions by co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP; nuclear NFκB-p65 by ELISA; NFκB activity by luciferase reporter assays and chemokines (CCL20, IL8 in culture supernatants by ELISA. In SW480 and HT29 cells the TNFα-induced NOD2 expression at 4 hours was reduced by CSE (p = 0.0226, a response that was dose-dependent (p = 0.003 and time-dependent (p = 0.0004. Similar effects of CSE on NOD2 expression were seen in cultured ileal biopsies from healthy individuals. In SW480 cells CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB-p65 translocation at 15 minutes post-stimulation, upstream of NOD2. Levels of the NOD2-RIPK2 complex were no different at 8 hours post-stimulation with combinations of CSE, nicotine and TNFα, but at 18 hours it was increased in cells stimulated with TNFα+CSE but decreased with TNFα alone (p = 0.0330; CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB activity (p = 0.0014 at the same time-point. At 24 hours, basal CCL20 and IL8 (p<0.001 for both and TNFα-induced CCL20 (p = 0.0330 production were decreased by CSE. CSE also reduced NOD2 expression, CCL20 and IL8 production seen with MDP-stimulation of SW480 cells pre-treated with combinations of TNFα and CSE.CSE delayed TNFα-induced NOD2 mRNA expression and was associated with abnormal NOD2/RIPK2 interaction, reduced NFκB activity and decreased chemokine

  15. Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity is Modified by Non-HLA Genetic Markers During the First Year of Clinical Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H.; Hansen, Dorthe; Mortensen, Henrik B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study plotted the prevalence of celiac disease associated antibodies in relation to demographic patterns, genetic and metabolic markers during the first year after diagnosis in a multinational cohort of children with T1D. Material and Methods: Sera from a total of 261 children (128 males...... measuring IgG-tTG. Children positive in both assays in two consecutive samples were defined as having celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). Associations between CDA and genotypes of HLA, IL18 rap, CCR 5, PTPN2 and correlations with islet autoantibodies (ICA, GADA, IA2 and IA) and HbA1C and C-peptide were...

  16. Phenotyping of Nod1/2 double deficient mice and characterization of Nod1/2 in systemic inflammation and associated renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Stroo

    2012-10-01

    It is indispensable to thoroughly characterize each animal model in order to distinguish between primary and secondary effects of genetic changes. The present study analyzed Nod1 and Nod2 double deficient (Nod1/2 DKO mice under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Nod1 and Nod2 are members of the Nucleotide-binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat containing Receptor (NLR family. Several inflammatory disorders, such as Crohn's disease and asthma, are linked to genetic changes in either Nod1 or Nod2. These associations suggest that Nod1 and Nod2 play important roles in regulating the immune system. Three-month-old wildtype (Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice were sacrificed, body and organ weight were determined, and blood was drawn. Except for lower liver weight in Nod1/2 DKO mice, no differences were found in body/organ weight between both strains. Leukocyte count and composition was comparable. No significant changes in analyzed plasma biochemical markers were found. Additionally, intestinal and vascular permeability was determined. Nod1/2 DKO mice show increased susceptibility for intestinal permeability while vascular permeability was not affected. Next we induced septic shock and organ damage by administering LPS+PGN intraperitoneally to Wt and Nod1/2 DKO mice and sacrificed animals after 2 and 24 hours. The systemic inflammatory and metabolic response was comparable between both strains. However, renal response was different as indicated by partly preserved kidney function and tubular epithelial cell damage in Nod1/2 DKO at 24 hours. Remarkably, renal inflammatory mediators Tnfα, KC and Il-10 were significantly increased in Nod1/2 DKO compared with Wt mice at 2 hours. Systematic analysis of Nod1/2 DKO mice revealed a possible role of Nod1/2 in the development of renal disease during systemic inflammation.

  17. Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  18. NOD-like receptors in lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eChaput

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The lung is a particularly vulnerable organ at the interface of the body and the exterior environment. It is constantly exposed to microbes and particles by inhalation. The innate immune system needs to react promptly and adequately to potential dangers posed by these microbes and particles, while at the same time avoiding extensive tissue damage. NOD-like receptors (NLRs represent a group of key sensors for microbes and damage in the lung. As such they are important players in various infectious as well as acute and chronic sterile inflammatory diseases, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD, acute lung injury/ARDS, pneumoconiosis and asthma. Activation of most known NLRs leads to the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and/or to the induction of cell death. We will review NLR functions in the lung during infection and sterile inflammation.

  19. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  20. Diagnostic value of carboxypeptidase-H autoantibodies in detecting latent autoimmune diabetes in adults%羧基肽酶-H自身抗体对LADA的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周智广; 杨琳; 黄干; 颜湘; 彭健; William Hagopian

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of carboxypeptidase-H (CPH) autoantibodies in Chinese patients with the latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Methods One hundred and fifty-four Type 1 diabetes,104 Type 2 diabetes, and 144 healthy people were enrolled. Recombinant human CPH (54 kD) was labeled by in vitro translation with 35S-methionine and used to evaluate autoantibodies to CPH (CPH-Ab). Radioimmunoassay was applied to detect antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-Ab), intracellular part of protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein (IA2ic-Ab), and autoantibodies to insulin (IAA). Results No differences in CPH-Ab prevalence were found among Type 1 diabetic patients (5/154, 3.2%), Type 2 diabetic subjects (6/104, 5.7%),and the healthy controls (3/144, 2.1%). The prevalences of GAD-Ab, IA2ic-Ab,and IAA were 15.4% (16/104), 2.9% (3/104), and 2.3% (1/43),respectively in Type 2 diabetes. All IA2ic-Ab or IAA-positive patients with Type 2 diabetes were GAD-Ab-positive. No GAD-Ab- or IAA-positive subjects were observed in CPH-Ab-positive patients with Type 2 diabetes. Conclusion CPH-Ab may provide some diagnostic value for LADA, and improve the sensitivity in diagnosing LADA in Chinese when combined with GAD-Ab test in Type 2 diabetes.%目的:探讨羧基肽酶H(carboxypeptidase H,CPH)自身抗体检测对成人隐匿性自身免疫性糖尿病(LADA)的诊断价值.方法:选择1型糖尿病患者154例,2型糖尿病患者104例,健康对照144例.重组人CPH在体外翻译时用35S-甲硫氨酸标记,采用免疫沉淀法检测血清CPH抗体滴度.谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GAD-Ab)、酪氨酸磷酸酶细胞内段抗体(IA2ic-Ab)和胰岛素自身抗体(IAA)均采用放射免疫分析法检测.结果:CPH抗体频率在1型糖尿病患者(5/154,3.2%),2型糖尿病患者(6/104,5.7%)和健康对照(3/144,2.1%)间差异无显著性(P>0.05).2型糖尿病患者GAD-Ab,IA2ic-Ab和IAA频率分别为15.4%(16/104),2.9%(3/104)和2.3%(1/43),且IA2ic-Ab

  1. Predominant Occupation of the Class I MHC Molecule H-2Kwm7 with a Single Self-peptide Suggests a Mechanism for its Diabetes-protective Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brims, D.; Qian, J; Jarchum, I; Mikesh, L; Palmieri, E; Ramagopal, U; Malashkevich, V; Chaparro, R; Lund, T; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic {beta} cells. In both humans and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D, class II MHC alleles are the primary determinant of disease susceptibility. However, class I MHC genes also influence risk. These findings are consistent with the requirement for both CD{sup 4+} and CD{sup 8+} T cells in the pathogenesis of T1D. Although a large body of work has permitted the identification of multiple mechanisms to explain the diabetes-protective effect of particular class II MHC alleles, studies examining the protective influence of class I alleles are lacking. Here, we explored this question by performing biochemical and structural analyses of the murine class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup wm7}, which exerts a diabetes-protective effect in NOD mice. We have found that H-2K{sup wm7} molecules are predominantly occupied by the single self-peptide VNDIFERI, derived from the ubiquitous protein histone H2B. This unexpected finding suggests that the inability of H-2K{sup wm7} to support T1D development could be due, at least in part, to the failure of peptides from critical {beta}-cell antigens to adequately compete for binding and be presented to T cells. Predominant presentation of a single peptide would also be expected to influence T-cell selection, potentially leading to a reduced ability to select a diabetogenic CD{sup 8+} T-cell repertoire. The report that one of the predominant peptides bound by T1D-protective HLA-A*31 is histone derived suggests the potential translation of our findings to human diabetes-protective class I MHC molecules.

  2. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  3. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  4. Limiting Behavior of Weighted Sums of NOD Random Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Hua QIU; Ping Yan CHEN

    2011-01-01

    The strong laws of large numbers and laws of the single logarithm for weighted sums of NOD random variables are established.The results presented generalize the corresponding results of Chen and Gan [5]in independent sequence case.

  5. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Cao, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Hongjie [Section of Neurobiology, Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Port Saint Lucie, FL (United States); Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Ming, E-mail: xiangming@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  6. Hydrolyzed infant formula and early β-cell autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knip, Mikael; Åkerblom, Hans K; Becker, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The disease process leading to clinical type 1 diabetes often starts during the first years of life. Early exposure to complex dietary proteins may increase the risk of β-cell autoimmunity in children at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. Extensively hydrolyzed formulas do not contain ...

  7. Caring to Care: Applying Noddings' Philosophy to Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Hirsh, David A; Monie, Daphne; Weil, Henry; Richards, Boyd F

    2016-04-26

    The authors argue that Nel Noddings' philosophy, "an ethic of caring," may illuminate how students learn to be caring physicians from their experience of being in a caring, reciprocal relationship with teaching faculty. In her philosophy, Noddings acknowledges two important contextual continuities: duration and space, which the authors speculate exist within longitudinal integrated clerkships. In this Perspective, the authors highlight core features of Noddings' philosophy and explore its applicability to medical education. They apply Noddings' philosophy to a subset of data from a previously published longitudinal case study to explore its "goodness of fit" with the experience of eight students in the 2012 cohort of the Columbia-Bassett longitudinal integrated clerkship. In line with Noddings' philosophy, the authors' supplementary analysis suggests that students (1) recognized caring when they talked about "being known" by teaching faculty who "cared for" and "trusted" them; (2) responded to caring by demonstrating enthusiasm, action, and responsibility toward patients; and (3) acknowledged that duration and space facilitated caring relations with teaching faculty. The authors discuss how Noddings' philosophy provides a useful conceptual framework to apply to medical education design and to future research on caring-oriented clinical training, such as longitudinal integrated clerkships.

  8. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  10. Transient B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 in combination with proinsulin DNA vaccine or oral insulin: immunologic effects and efficacy in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanashyam Sarikonda

    Full Text Available A recent type 1 diabetes (T1D clinical trial of rituximab (a B cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibody achieved some therapeutic benefit in preserving C-peptide for a period of approximately nine months in patients with recently diagnosed diabetes. Our previous data in the NOD mouse demonstrated that co-administration of antigen (insulin with anti-CD3 antibody (a T cell-directed immunomodulator offers better protection than either entity alone, indicating that novel combination therapies that include a T1D-related autoantigen are possible. To accelerate the identification and development of novel combination therapies that can be advanced into the clinic, we have evaluated the combination of a mouse anti-CD20 antibody with either oral insulin or a proinsulin-expressing DNA vaccine. Anti-CD20 alone, given once or on 4 consecutive days, produced transient B cell depletion but did not prevent or reverse T1D in the NOD mouse. Oral insulin alone (twice weekly for 6 weeks was also ineffective, while proinsulin DNA (weekly for up to 12 weeks showed a trend toward modest efficacy. Combination of anti-CD20 with oral insulin was ineffective in reversing diabetes in NOD mice whose glycemia was controlled with SC insulin pellets; these experiments were performed in three independent labs. Combination of anti-CD20 with proinsulin DNA was also ineffective in diabetes reversal, but did show modest efficacy in diabetes prevention (p = 0.04. In the prevention studies, anti-CD20 plus proinsulin resulted in modest increases in Tregs in pancreatic lymph nodes and elevated levels of proinsulin-specific CD4+ T-cells that produced IL-4. Thus, combination therapy with anti-CD20 and either oral insulin or proinsulin does not protect hyperglycemic NOD mice, but the combination with proinsulin offers limited efficacy in T1D prevention, potentially by augmentation of proinsulin-specific IL-4 production.

  11. Induction of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+regulatory T cell response by glatiramer acetate in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoliang Cui; Yuebo Zhang; Zhenwei Gong; Jingwu Z Zhang; Ying Qin Zang

    2009-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is an immunomodulatory peptide drug used to treat multiple sclerosis. Its treatment ef-fect has been expanded to other autoimmune conditions such as uveoretinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, graft re-jection and hepatic fibrosis. Here, we report that GA was effective in altering the clinical course of diabetes in cyclo-phosphamide (CY)-potentiated non-obese diabetic (CY-NOD) mice. Treatment with GA significantly reduced the dia-betic rate in the mice and ameliorated insulitis, which coincided with increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cell response in treated mice. GA treatment led to increased expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and elevated production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) both in vivo and in vitro. It was evident that the effect of GA on up-regulation of Foxp3 was me-diated partially through IL-4. IL-4 was found to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study provides new evidence that GA has treatment potential for type 1 diabetes through the induction of Tregs and that increased IL-4 production is partially responsible for the enhanced Treg's function in GA treatment.

  12. Association of Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Autoimmune Diabetes%感音神经性聋与自身免疫性糖尿病关系临床初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成君; 杜彩琳; 谭长强; 曹银成; 钟历勇

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the sensorineural hearing loss and autoimmune Diabetes mellitus insulin autoantibodies.Method 1.65 patients were divided into hearing loss(HL) group and hearing normal(HN) group according to whether accompany with hearing loss.2.By means of pure tone audiometry (PTA) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) we analyzed the characteristics of hearing loss in 65 diabetic cases.3.ELISA,radioimmunoassay and clinical biochemistry techniques were used to detect the insulin autoantibodies(GADA,ICA and IAA),islet B cell function and diabe~tic-related indices respectively.Result Group HL were sensorineural hearing loss,in which 92.85% were high frequency hearing loss; The positive rates of insulin autoantibodies such as GADA,ICA and IAA were 57.14%,17.14% and 8.57% respectively;The positive rates were 0,6.67% and 3.33% respectively in group HN;meanwhile the islet B cell function and diabetic-related indices were worsen in group HL than group HN.Conclusion The existence of islet autoantibodies in auto~immune diabetic patients might be one of the indirectly causes of hearing damage.It is not clear that whether insulin autoantibo~dies directly cause hearing damage by autoimmune reaction.%目的:探讨感音神经性聋与自身免疫性糖尿病患者胰岛自身抗体之间的关系。方法:(1)65例糖尿病患者按是否伴听力减退分为听力减退(hearing loss,HL)组和听力正常(hearing normal,HN)组。(2)应用纯音测听法和听性脑干反应(auditory brainstem response,ABR)检测65例糖尿病患者并进行听力学分析。(3)继以酶联免疫法、放射免疫法及临床生化等方法分别测定上述两组患者的胰岛自身抗体及其他相关项目:谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GADA )、胰岛细胞抗体(ICA)、胰岛素抗体(IAA)、胰岛B细胞功能及糖尿病相关指标。结果:HL组为感音神经性聋,以高频损害为主,占92.85%,ABR检

  13. The nodC, nodG, and glgX genes of Rhizobium tropici strain PRF 81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciana Ruano; Marcelino, Francismar Corrêa; Barcellos, Fernando Gomes; Rodrigues, Elisete Pains; Megías, Manuel; Hungria, Mariangela

    2010-08-01

    Rhizobium tropici is a diazotrophic microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that encompasses important but still poorly studied tropical strains, and a recent significant contribution to the knowledge of the species was the publication of a genomic draft of strain PRF 81, which revealed several novel genes [Pinto et al. Funct Int Gen 9:263-270, 2009]. In this study, we investigated the transcription of nodC, nodG, and glgX genes, located in the nod operon of PRF 81 strain, by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR. All three genes showed low levels of transcription when the cells were grown until exponential growth phase in the presence of common-bean-seed exudates or of the root nod-gene inducer naringenin. However, when cells at the exponential phase of growth were incubated with seed exudates, transcription occurred after only 5 min, and nodC, nodG, and glgX were transcribed 121.97-, 14.86-, and 50.29-fold more than the control, respectively, followed by a rapid decrease in gene transcription. Much lower levels of transcription were observed in the presence of naringenin; furthermore, maximum transcription required 8 h of incubation for all three genes. In light of these results, the mechanisms of induction of the nodulation genes by flavonoids are discussed.

  14. p62/SQSTM1 enhances NOD2-mediated signaling and cytokine production through stabilizing NOD2 oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwook Park

    Full Text Available NOD2 is a cytosolic pattern-recognition receptor that senses muramyl dipeptide of peptidoglycan that constitutes the bacterial cell wall, and plays an important role in maintaining immunological homeostasis in the intestine. To date, multiple molecules have shown to be involved in regulating NOD2 signaling cascades. p62 (sequestosome-1; SQSTM1 is a multifaceted scaffolding protein involved in trafficking molecules to autophagy, and regulating signal cascades activated by Toll-like receptors, inflammasomes and several cytokine receptors. Here, we show that p62 positively regulates NOD2-induced NF-κB activation and p38 MAPK, and subsequent production of cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α. p62 associated with the nucleotide binding domain of NOD2 through a bi-directional interaction mediated by either TRAF6-binding or ubiquitin-associated domains. NOD2 formed a large complex with p62 in an electron-dense area of the cytoplasm, which increased its signaling cascade likely through preventing its degradation. This study for the first time demonstrates a novel role of p62 in enhancing NOD2 signaling effects.

  15. The expression of the beta cell-derived autoimmune ligand for the killer receptor nkp46 is attenuated in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamutal Gur

    Full Text Available NK cells rapidly kill tumor cells, virus infected cells and even self cells. This is mediated via killer receptors, among which NKp46 (NCR1 in mice is prominent. We have recently demonstrated that in type 1 diabetes (T1D NK cells accumulate in the diseased pancreas and that they manifest a hyporesponsive phenotype. In addition, we found that NKp46 recognizes an unknown ligand expressed by beta cells derived from humans and mice and that blocking of NKp46 activity prevented diabetes development. Here we investigated the properties of the unknown NKp46 ligand. We show that the NKp46 ligand is mainly located in insulin granules and that it is constitutively secreted. Following glucose stimulation the NKp46 ligand translocates to the cell membrane and its secretion decreases. We further demonstrate by using several modalities that the unknown NKp46 ligand is not insulin. Finally, we studied the expression of the NKp46 ligand in type 2 diabetes (T2D using 3 different in vivo models and 2 species; mice and gerbils. We demonstrate that the expression of the NKp46 ligand is decreased in all models of T2D studied, suggesting that NKp46 is not involved in T2D.

  16. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  17. Association of NOD1 and NOD2 genes polymorphisms with Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer in a Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang; Chun-Jie Liu; Li Zhang; Jian-Ming Jiang; Dan Ma; Hao-Xia Tao; Sheng-Ling Yuan; Yan-Chun Wang; Ling-Chun Wang; Hao Liang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between the tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) of NOD1 and NOD2 and the risk of developing gastric cancer.METHODS:We conducted a hospital-based case-control study including 296 incident gastric cancer patients and 160 gastritis controls.Eight TagSNPs in the NOD1 and NOD2 genes were selected from the Hapmap database using the haploview software and genotyped by the Sequenom MassArray system.The serum levels of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to indicate H.pylori infection.The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression,including sex and age as confounding factors.RESULTS:The NOD1 rs2907749 GG genotype showed a decreased risk for gastric cancer (OR 0.50,95% CI:0.26-0.95,P =0.04) while the rs7789045 TT genotype showed an increased risk (OR 2.14,95% CI:1.20-3.82,P =0.01).An elevated susceptibility to gastric cancer was observed in the subjects with H.pylori infection and the NaOD1 rs7789045 TT genotype (OR 2.05,95% CI:1.07-3.94,P =0.03) or the NOD2 rs7205423 GC genotype (OR 2.52,95% CI:1.05-6.04,P =0.04).Haplotype analysis suggested that the distribution of AGT (rs2907749,rs2075820 and rs7789045) in NOD1 between the cases and control groups was significantly different (P corrected:0.04),and the diplotype AGT/AGT was associated with an elevated gastric cancer risk (OR 1.98,95%CI:1.04-3.79,P =0.04).The association of the NOD1 rs7789045 Tr genotype and the diplotype AGT/AGT was significant with H.pylori-related diffuse-type gastric cancer (OR 3.00,95% CI:1.38-6.53,P =0.01; OR 4.02,95% CI:1.61-10.05,P < 0.01,respectively).CONCLUSION:Genetic polymorphisms in NOD1 and NOD2 may interact with H.pylori infection and may play important roles in promoting the development of gastric cancer in the Chinese population.

  18. The protein ATG16L1 suppresses inflammatory cytokines induced by the intracellular sensors Nod1 and Nod2 in an autophagy-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbara, Matthew T; Ellison, Lisa K; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Travassos, Leonardo H; Jones, Nicola L; Girardin, Stephen E; Philpott, Dana J

    2013-11-14

    The peptidoglycan sensor Nod2 and the autophagy protein ATG16L1 have been linked to Crohn's disease (CD). Although Nod2 and the related sensor, Nod1, direct ATG16L1 to initiate anti-bacterial autophagy, whether ATG16L1 affects Nod-driven inflammation has not been examined. Here, we uncover an unanticipated autophagy-independent role for ATG16L1 in negatively regulating Nod-driven inflammatory responses. Knockdown of ATG16L1 expression, but not that of ATG5 or ATG9a, specifically enhanced Nod-driven cytokine production. In addition, autophagy-incompetent truncated forms of ATG16L1 regulated Nod-driven cytokine responses. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ATG16L1 interfered with poly-ubiquitination of the Rip2 adaptor and recruitment of Rip2 into large signaling complexes. The CD-associated allele of ATG16L1 was impaired in its ability to regulate Nod-driven inflammatory responses. Overall, these results suggest that ATG16L1 is critical for Nod-dependent regulation of cytokine responses and that disruption of this Nod1- or Nod2-ATG16L1 signaling axis could contribute to the chronic inflammation associated with CD.

  19. Ubiquitin regulates caspase recruitment domain-mediated signaling by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins NOD1 and NOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Heul, Aaron M; Fowler, C Andrew; Ramaswamy, S; Piper, Robert C

    2013-03-08

    NOD1 and NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammation and autophagy. These pathways rely on the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) within the receptors, which serve as protein interaction platforms that coordinately regulate immune signaling. We show that NOD1 CARD binds ubiquitin (Ub), in addition to directly binding its downstream targets receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2) and autophagy-related protein 16-1 (ATG16L1). NMR spectroscopy and structure-guided mutagenesis identified a small hydrophobic surface of NOD1 CARD that binds Ub. In vitro, Ub competes with RIP2 for association with NOD1 CARD. In vivo, we found that the ligand-stimulated activity of NOD1 with a mutant CARD lacking Ub binding but retaining ATG16L1 and RIP2 binding is increased relative to wild-type NOD1. Likewise, point mutations in the tandem NOD2 CARDs at positions analogous to the surface residues defining the Ub interface on NOD1 resulted in loss of Ub binding and increased ligand-stimulated NOD2 signaling. These data suggest that Ub binding provides a negative feedback loop upon NOD-dependent activation of RIP2.

  20. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Probiotics for the prevention of beta cell autoimmunity in children at genetic risk of type 1 diabetes--the PRODIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Martin; Korpela, Riita; Ilonen, Jorma; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Vaarala, Outi

    2006-10-01

    The final aim of the PRODIA study is to determine whether the use of probiotics during the first 6 months of life decreases the appearance of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)-associated autoantibodies in children with genetic risk for T1DM. A pilot study including 200 subjects was planned to show whether the use of probiotics during the first 6 months of life is safe and feasible. The prevalence of autoantibodies among the study subjects at 6, 12, and 24 months of age was at levels close to the expected and the clinical follow-up did not either indicate problems in the feasibility of the study.

  2. 输注胰岛抗原特异性Treg细胞延长同系NOD小鼠移植胰岛的存活时间%Prolonged islet isograft survival in NOD mice treated with islet antigen-specific regulatory T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永海; 张淦; 水丽君; 房爱芳; 郭峰; 向莹; 张伟杰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the survival of islet isograft in NOD mice treated with islet antigen-specific regulatory T cells.Methods GAD-65 antigen pulsed immature dendritic cells (imDC) were used to induce naive T cells into islet antigen-specific regulatory T cells.NOD mice which had progressed to type 1 diabetes (T1DM),as the recipients,received islet isografts (500 IEQ) under renal capsule from NOD mice without T1DM.In NOD mice in control group without transplantation,the changes in blood glucose (BG) were observed.NOD mice in simple islet transplantation group were given islet isograft without Treg infusion.In experiment group,NOD mice were infused with 1 × 106 islet antigen-specific regulatory T cells on the 1st day before transplantation,subsequently underwent islet isotransplantation.The survival of the islet isograft was evaluated by BG levels and the pathological changes were observed.Results BG levels were sustained above 11.1 mmol/L in control group.In simple islet transplantation group,BG level was decreased to the normal level in 1 ~2 days after transplantation,and began to rebound in 7~ 17 days posttransplantation and maintained at the preoperative level.The mean survival of the islet isograft in the NOD mice was (12.2 ± 2.6) day;In experiment group,BG level was decreased to the normal level in 1 ~2 days after transplantation,rebounded above 11.1 mmol/L in some mice on the 27th day after transplantation,and rebounded above 11.1 rnmol/L on the 43th day in all mice.The mean survival of the islet isograft in the NOD mice was (35.2 ± 4.3) days,which was significantly prolonged compared to simple islet transplantation group (P< 0.01).In simple islet transplantation group,the islet isograft was infiltrated by many lymph cells and damaged severely,and only few residual islet cells secreted insulin without complete islet existing in insulin staining.The islet isograft in experiment group was intact on the 15th day,with little lymph cell infiltration

  3. Functional Roles of NOD1 in Odontoblasts on Dental Pulp Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries-related pathogens are first recognized by odontoblasts and induce inflammatory events that develop to pulpitis. Generally, initial sensing of microbial pathogens is mediated by pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD; however, little is known about NODs in odontoblasts. In this study, the levels of NODs expressed in rat odontoblastic cell line, KN-3, were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of chemokines in NOD-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells were analyzed by real-time PCR and ELISA. The signal transduction pathway activated with NOD-specific ligand was assessed by blocking assay with specific inhibitors and reporter assay. In KN-3 cells, the expression level of NOD1 was stronger than that of NOD2 and the production of chemokines, such as CINC-1, CINC-2, CCL20, and MCP-1, was upregulated by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand, but not with NOD2-specific ligand. CINC-2 and CCL20 production by stimulation with NOD1-specific ligand was reduced by p38 MAPK and AP-1 signaling inhibitors. Furthermore, the reporter assay demonstrated AP-1 activation in NOD1-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells. These findings indicated that NOD1 expressed in odontoblasts functions to upregulate the chemokines expression via p38-AP-1 signaling pathway and suggested that NOD1 may play important roles in the initiation and progression of pulpitis.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis NOD1 and NOD2 receptors and their functional role in in-vitro cellular immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are innate immune receptors that recognize bacterial cell wall components and initiate host immune response. Structure and function of NLRs have been well studied in human and mice, but little information exists on genetic composition and role of these receptors in innate immune system of water buffalo--a species known for its exceptional disease resistance. Here, a comparative study on the functional domains of NOD1 and NOD2 was performed across different species. The NOD mediated in-vitro cellular responses were studied in buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells, resident macrophages, mammary epithelial, and fibroblast cells. Buffalo NOD1 (buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed conserved domain architectures as found in other mammals. The domains of buNOD1 and buNOD2 showed analogy in secondary and tertiary conformations. Constitutive expressions of NODs were ubiquitous in different tissues. Following treatment with NOD agonists, peripheral lymphocytes showed an IFN-γ response along-with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Alveolar macrophages and mammary epithelial cells showed NOD mediated in-vitro immune response through NF-κB dependent pathway. Fibroblasts showed pro-inflammatory cytokine response following agonist treatment. Our study demonstrates that both immune and non-immune cells could generate NOD-mediated responses to pathogens though the type and magnitude of response depend on the cell types. The structural basis of ligand recognition by buffalo NODs and knowledge of immune response by different cell types could be useful for development of non-infective innate immune modulators and next generation anti-inflammatory compounds.

  5. Construction and analysis of tag single nucleotide polymorphism maps for six human-mouse orthologous candidate genes in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Savage David A; Ionescu-Tîrgovişte Constantin; Guja Cristian; Rønningen Kjersti S; Undlien Dag E; Nutland Sarah; Walker Neil; Chamberlain Giselle; Hunter Kara M; Moule Carolyn; Fraser Heather; Smink Luc J; Hulme John; Lowe Christopher; Pask Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background One strategy to help identify susceptibility genes for complex, multifactorial diseases is to map disease loci in a representative animal model of the disorder. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model for human type 1 diabetes. Linkage and congenic strain analyses have identified several NOD mouse Idd (insulin dependent diabetes) loci, which have been mapped to small chromosome intervals, for which the orthologous regions in the human genome can be identified. Here, w...

  6. Progress of Research on Autoimmune Markers in Diabetes%糖尿病自身免疫标志物研究的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继贵

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes,the immune mediated form of diabetes is a relatively common disorder that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease is associated with a series of anti-islet autoantibodies and the autoantibodies can be present for years prior to the onset of hyperglycemia. This review will focus attention on several major autoantibodies of clinical and research interest which are islet-cell cytoplasmic autoantibodies,glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody,insulinoma 2-associated autoantibodies,insulin autoantibodies,and zinc transporter 8 protein autoantibodies…etc.%1型糖尿病,免疫介导形成的糖尿病,是相当普遍的一种疾病,它发生于遗传上易感的个体.此病同一系列抗胰岛自身抗体有关,此抗体可在高血糖发生前数年出现.该文将集中介绍临床和研究工作感兴趣的几种主要自身抗体,它们是:胰岛细胞胞浆自身抗体、谷氨酸脱羧酶自身抗体、胰岛素瘤2有关的自身抗体、胰岛素自身抗体以及锌转运蛋白8自身抗体等.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  8. 初诊成人自身免疫性糖尿病心血管疾病风险评估%Evaluation of the cardiovascular disease risk in newly diagnosed adult with latent autoimmune diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜玉茗; 陈艳华; 宋利华

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cardiovascular disease risk of the newly diagnosed adult latent autoimmune diabetes ( LADA) . Methods: After determination of diabetes autoantibodies ,132 cases newly diagnosed diabetes were divided into LADA group (n = 60) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) group (n =72) . At the same time,46 cases from physical examination center were selected in normal controls group (NC group) , whoes age and body mass index matched with LADA group. The high-sensitivity C-reac-tive protein ( hs-CRP) level and the carotid intima medial thickness ( CIMT) in three groups were compared. Results: 1. The concentration of hs-CRP and the levels of CIMT in the LADA group was significantly higher than NC group, (P0. 05) , also were between LADA without AS group and T2DM without AS group(P >0. 05) . There were no statistical significance between LADA group and T2DM group in the incidence of AS and carotid atherosclerosis plaque(P = 0. 489, P = 0. 920) , the proportion of moderate risk group and high risk group of cardiovascular disease between two group were also no significant difference ( P > 0.05, P>0.05). 3. In LAD A group, LDL-C, FPG, HbAlc, 2hPG, hs-CRP showed a significant linear correlation with CIMT(P = 0. 001-0. 044) . Conclusion: The elevated hs-CRP levels and CIMT levels in newly diagnosed LADA indicated that its risk of cardiovascular disease was increased. The hs-CRP and CIMT levels in newly diagnosed LADA and newly diagnosed T2DM was no significant difference .%目的:临床评估初诊成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病(Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults,LADA)心血管疾病风险.方法:初诊糖尿病(Diabetes mellitus,DM)患者,共132例,经糖尿病自身抗体检测后分为LADA组和2型糖尿病(Type 2 diabetes mellitus,T2DM)组(其中LADA组60例,T2DM组72例).同时从体检中心选取与LADA组年龄、体重指数相匹配的健康对照(Normal controls,NC)组46例.观察高敏C反应蛋白(High-sensitivity C-reactive protein

  9. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S; Kastrinsky, David B; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-02-19

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD.

  10. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Stokholm, Lonny Merete;

    2016-01-01

    children known to be immunologically immature. The long-term effect of palivizumab in terms of autoimmune diseases has not yet been investigated. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases in children. METHODS...... of autoimmune disease were diagnosed among palivizumab-exposed children during the period of observation. Among the children exposed to palivizumab, one child in Denmark developed inflammatory bowel disease; in Sweden, children developed juvenile arthritis (one child), diabetes mellitus (two children), celiac...... disease (four children), and inflammatory bowel disease (one child). The risk of autoimmune disease was not significantly increased after palivizumab exposure (hazard ratio adjusted for age and country: 1.54; 95 % confidence interval 0.80-2.95). CONCLUSION: The risk of autoimmune disease was not increased...

  11. DMPD: Intracellular NOD-like receptors in host defense and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17967410 Intracellular NOD-like receptors in host defense and disease. Kanneganti T...D-like receptors in host defense and disease. PubmedID 17967410 Title Intracellular NOD-like receptors in host defense and dise

  12. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  13. NOD2 mutations and colorectal cancer - Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Diogo; Freire, Paulo; Sofia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Due to the overwhelming burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), great effort has been placed on identifying genetic mutations that contribute to disease development and progression. One of the most studied polymorphisms that could potentially increase susceptibility to CRC involves the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) gene. There is growing evidence that the biological activity of NOD2 is far greater than previously thought and a link with intestinal microbiota and mucosal immunity is increasingly sought after. In fact, microbial composition may be an important contributor not only to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) but also to CRC. Recent studies have showed that deficient NOD2 function confers a communicable risk of colitis and CRC. Despite the evidence from experimental models, population-based studies that tried to link certain NOD2 polymorphisms and an increase in CRC risk have been described as conflicting. Significant geographic discrepancies in the frequency of such polymorphisms and different interpretations of the results may have limited the conclusions of those studies. Since being first associated to IBD and CRC, our understanding of the role of this gene has come a long way, and it is tempting to postulate that it may contribute to identify individuals with susceptible genetic background that may benefit from early CRC screening programs or in predicting response to current therapeutic tools. The aim of this review is to clarify the status quo of NOD2 mutations as genetic risk factors to chronic inflammation and ultimately to CRC. The use of NOD2 as a predictor of certain phenotypic characteristics of the disease will be analyzed as well. PMID:27152134

  14. NOD2 mutations and colorectal cancer - Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branquinho, Diogo; Freire, Paulo; Sofia, Carlos

    2016-04-27

    Due to the overwhelming burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), great effort has been placed on identifying genetic mutations that contribute to disease development and progression. One of the most studied polymorphisms that could potentially increase susceptibility to CRC involves the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) gene. There is growing evidence that the biological activity of NOD2 is far greater than previously thought and a link with intestinal microbiota and mucosal immunity is increasingly sought after. In fact, microbial composition may be an important contributor not only to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) but also to CRC. Recent studies have showed that deficient NOD2 function confers a communicable risk of colitis and CRC. Despite the evidence from experimental models, population-based studies that tried to link certain NOD2 polymorphisms and an increase in CRC risk have been described as conflicting. Significant geographic discrepancies in the frequency of such polymorphisms and different interpretations of the results may have limited the conclusions of those studies. Since being first associated to IBD and CRC, our understanding of the role of this gene has come a long way, and it is tempting to postulate that it may contribute to identify individuals with susceptible genetic background that may benefit from early CRC screening programs or in predicting response to current therapeutic tools. The aim of this review is to clarify the status quo of NOD2 mutations as genetic risk factors to chronic inflammation and ultimately to CRC. The use of NOD2 as a predictor of certain phenotypic characteristics of the disease will be analyzed as well.

  15. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  16. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in Medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  17. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It wa

  18. Role for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) in pericyte-mediated vascular inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Delgado-Wicke, Pablo; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    for C12-iE-DAP-dependent signaling. Finally, we could discriminate NOD1 and TLR4 pathways in pericytes by pharmacological targeting of RIPK2, a kinase involved in NOD1 but not in TLR4 signaling cascade. p38 MAPK, and NFκB at a lower extent, appear to be downstream mediators in the NOD1 pathway...

  19. Plant recognition of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nod factors. Final report, September 15, 1992--March 14, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, G.

    1998-01-01

    This grant had three objectives: (1) isolate and identify the unique nod factor metabolites made by different wild-type B. japonicum strains; (2) investigate the biological activity of these unique nod factors, especially as it relates to host range; and (3) initiate studies to define the mechanism of plant recognition of the nod factors. This report summarizes the results of this research.

  20. [Syndrome overlap: autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Alvarez, Félix; Marquez Teves, Maguin; Asato Higa, Carmen; Sumire Umeres, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune cholangitis are chronic autoimmune liver disease, usually present separate, the cases where characteristics of two of the above is observed liver disease is commonly referred to as Overlap Syndromes (OS). Although there is no consensus on specific criteria for the diagnosis of OS identification of this association is important for initiating appropriate treatment and prevent its progression to cirrhosis or at least the complications of cirrhosis and death. We report the case of awoman aged 22 cirrhotic which debuted are edematous ascites, severe asthenia and jaundice compliant diagnostics SS criteria and initially present any response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid and oral corticosteroids, but ultimately finished performing a transplant orthotopic liver.

  1. Drawing parts together: the philosophy of education of Nel Noddings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Stone

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay honors the career and writings of American philosopher ofEducation, Nel Noddings on her first visit to Sweden in Spring 2006. Thetitle is taken from a recent interview in which she discussed connectionsbetween her biography and scholarly contributions. The interview aug-ments analysis of major texts from Noddings out of which the essay’sauthor posits her ‘philosophy of education.’ Following an introductionand biographical situating, sections focus on education and schools, caretheory and teaching, and approaches and thematics within her philo-sophic writings. The essay closes with recognition of Noddings’s interna-tional significance in both philosophy and education.

  2. Fecal Microbiota Composition Differs Between Children With beta-Cell Autoimmunity and Those Without

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Luopajarvi, Kristiina; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Ruohtula, Terhi; Harkonen, Taina; Orivuori, Laura; Hakala, Saara; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J.; Vaarala, Outi

    2013-01-01

    The role of the intestinal microbiota as a regulator of autoimmune diabetes in animal models is well-established, but data on human type 1 diabetes are tentative and based on studies including only a few study subjects. To exclude secondary effects of diabetes and FILA risk genotype on gut microbiot

  3. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  4. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  5. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  6. PD-1/PD-L1抑制途径与自身免疫性糖尿病%PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory pathway and autoimmune diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宣; 施毕旻

    2011-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1,CD279),a member of CD28 superfamily,is inducibly expressed on activated T cells, B cells and natural killer T cells. PD-1 has two ligands: PD-L1 (B7-H1,CD274) and PD-L2 (B7-DC, CD273). The interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can provide autoreactive T cells with negative signals so as to inhibit the persistent immune reaction to self-antigens. Deficiency or blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory pathway may initiate excessive proliferation and activation of autoreactive T cells. This can lead to immunological injury of autologous tissue and further result in various clinical manifestations of autoimmune disease in the host. It has been noticed that PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitory pathway is involved in the occurrence and development of autoimmune diabetes. Islet-specific autoreactive T cells could be activated continuously and cause pancreatic tissue injury when the negative inhibitory signal of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway was blocked by the special monoclonal antibodies. This may impair the function of pancreatic β cells in insulin secretion and cause the abnormality in glucose metabolism and regulation in diabetic host.%PD-1(CD279)是一种负性协同刺激分子,属于CD28超家族成员,呈诱导性表达于活化的T、B和自然杀伤细胞表面.PD-L1(B7-H1,CD274)和PD-L2(B7-DC,CD273)是PD-1的两个配体.PD-1和PD-L1相互作用可以使活化的自身反应性T细胞获得负性信号,抑制其对自身抗原持续的免疫应答.若PD-1/PD-L1抑制途径缺失或被阻断,则导致自身反应性T细胞过度激活及增殖并引起自身组织的免疫损伤,进而引发多种自身免疫性疾病的临床表现.业已证明,自身免疫性糖尿病的发生、发展与PD-1/PD-LI抑制途径密切相关.阻断PD-1/PD-L1抑制途径,持续活化的胰岛自身反应性T细胞将损伤胰岛组织,致使胰岛β细胞分泌胰岛素功能受损,引起外周血糖显著升高,从面产生一系列病理变化.

  7. 胃转流手术对肥胖型成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病降糖效果的观察%Effects of gastric bypass on latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张野; 高连中; 闫四梅; 贾元利

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical therapeutic effects of gastric bypass (GBP) on obesity-latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA). Methods Eleven patients with obesity-LADFA underwent GBP. The blood glucose concentrations, Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-I), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAIc). Results The glucose concentrations of the 11 patients were dramatic decline, and their OGTT values were significantly higher one month after GBP (all P < 0.01). 4 cases had been followed up for one year, although they did not take any drugs their glucose concentrations returned to normal (all P<0.01). The levels of HOME-IR and HbAIc 6 months after GBP in 7 cases were significantly lower than those before GBP (all P<0.01). The symptoms of diabetes-related complications had been mitigated at different degrees. Three cases showed postoperative gastric emptying dysfunction, which was recovered after conservative treatment. Conclusion GBP is safe and effective in treating obesity-LADA.%目的 探讨胃转流术治疗肥胖型成人隐匿性自身免疫糖尿病(LADA)的临床疗效.方法 11例肥胖型LADA患者接受胃转流术治疗,观察手术前后血糖,口服葡萄糖耐量试验(OGTT)、稳态模型胰岛素抵抗(HOMA-IR)、糖化血红蛋白(HbAIc)、的改变.结果 11例患者术后1个月血糖均有明显下降,葡萄糖耐量试验明显增强(均P<0.01),4例术后随访1年,血糖在正常范围,不需药物控制,患者7例术后6月,HOMA-IR、HbAIc显著低于手术前(均P<0.01),糖尿病相关并发症均有不同程度缓解,3例手术后并发胃排空障碍,经保守治疗后痊愈.结论 胃转流术能有效治疗肥胖型LADA,手术安全可行.

  8. Surge in regulatory T cells does not prevent onset of hyperglycemia in NOD mice: immune profiles do not correlate with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-03-01

    Immune profiling of non-obese diabetic (NOD) is a widely employed tool to assess the mechanisms of inflammatory insulitis. Our analysis of the female NOD colony revealed similar distribution of lymphoid lineages to wild type mice, and at various ages of prediabetic and diabetic mice. The profiles of mesenteric and pancreatic lymph nodes differ and often change reciprocally due to directed migration of T cells towards the site of inflammation. Significant events in our colony include early decline in CD4(+)CD25(+)CD62L(+) Treg, accompanied by gradual increase in CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg in peripheral lymphoid organs and pancreatic infiltrates. Impressively, aged euglycemic mice display significant transient rise in CD4(+)CD25(-)FoxP3(+) Treg in the thymus, pancreas and draining lymph nodes. A significant difference was superior viability of effector and suppressor cells from new onset diabetics in the presence of high interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations in vitro as compared to cells of prediabetic mice. Overall, we found no correlation between FoxP3(+) Treg in the pancreatic lymph nodes and the inflammatory scores of individual NOD mice. CD25(-)FoxP3(+) Treg are markedly increased in the pancreatic infiltrates in late stages of inflammation, possibly an effort to counteract destructive insulitis. Considering extensive evidence that Treg in aged NOD mice are functionally sufficient, quantitative profiling evolves as an unreliable tool to assess mechanism and causes of inflammation under baseline conditions. Immune profiles are modulated by thymic output, cell migration, shedding of markers, proliferation, survival and in-situ evolution of regulatory cells.

  9. Autoimmune Cholangitis: A Variant Syndrome of Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Brij Sharma; Sujeet Raina; Rajesh Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune cholangitis (AIC) or autoimmune cholangiopathy is a chronic inflammation of liver and a variant syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We present a case of an adult female who had biochemical features of cholestasis and transaminasemia but aminotransferases were not in the hepatitis range and had histological evidence of bile duct injury which was subsequently diagnosed as autoimmune cholangitis.

  10. NOD1 and NOD2 Genetic Variants in Association with Risk of Gastric Cancer and Its Precursors in a Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe-Xuan Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD may influence the outcome of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis. To explore genetic variants of NOD1 and NOD2 in association with gastric cancer (GC and its precursors, a population-based study was conducted in Linqu County, China.TagSNPs of NOD1 and NOD2 were genotyped by Sequenom MASS array in 132 GCs, and 1,198 subjects with precancerous gastric lesions, and were correlated with evolution of gastric lesions in 766 subjects with follow-up data.Among seven tagSNPs, NOD1 rs2709800 and NOD2 rs718226 were associated with gastric lesions. NOD1 rs2709800 TG genotype carriers had a decreased risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM, OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.31-0.92, while NOD2 rs718226 G allele (AG/GG showed increased risks of dysplasia (DYS, OR: 2.96; 95% CI: 1.86-4.71 and GC (OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 1.24-4.46. Moreover, an additive interaction between rs718226 and H. pylori was found in DYS or GC with synergy index of 3.08 (95% CI: 1.38-6.87 or 3.99 (95% CI: 1.55-10.22, respectively. The follow-up data indicated that NOD2 rs2111235 C allele (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.32-0.83 and rs7205423 G allele (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35-0.89 were associated with decreased risk of progression in H. pylori-infected subjects.NOD1 rs2709800, NOD2 rs718226, rs2111235, rs7205423 and interaction between rs718226 and H. pylori infection may be related to risk of gastric lesions.

  11. NOD1和NOD2介导的信号通路及其抗病毒免疫应答研究进展%Research progress on the signal pathway and antiviral immune response mediated by NOD1 and NOD2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明发; 吴珺; 杨东亮

    2013-01-01

    NOD1 and NOD2 are two intracellular pattern recognition receptors.They sense the major component of bacterial cell walls and their degradated products,then mediate NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways to produce the effector molecules involved in the antipathogenic immune response.Furthermore,it has been found in the recent years that NOD1 induces the production of type I interferon through ISGF3 signaling pathways and that NOD2 could recognise virus RNA and activate the MAVs-IRF3 signaling pathways to produce type I interferon.Type Ⅰ interferon could also positively regulate NOD1 and NOD2 functional expression.There-fore,NOD1 and NOD2 induce to large amounts of interferon to mediate innate immune antiviral responses by the aforementioned signaling pathways.Collectively,further understanding the antiviral immune responses mediated by NOD1 and NOD2 may provide new opportunities and strategies for the prevention and treatment of viral infections.%NOD1和NOD 2蛋白为胞浆内模式识别受体,其识别进入胞内的细菌胞壁及其降解产物,介导NF-κB和MAPKs信号途径,产生相关效应分子,介导了抗病原微生物免疫应答.近年来的最新研究发现,NOD1受体还通过ISGF3信号途径诱导产生1型干扰素,NOD2受体能识别ssRNA和病毒基因组ssRNA,通过MAVs信号途径激活IRF3,诱导产生1型干扰素,1型干扰素又可正向调控NOD1和NOD2功能性表达.NOD1和NOD2通过介导新的信号途径诱导产生大量的1型干扰素,并参与抗病毒固有免疫应答.因而,对NOD1和NOD2介导的抗病毒免疫应答新认识,将为防治病毒感染性疾病的研究提供新策略.

  12. The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; Ariyananda, Lushanti De Zoysa; Melnyk, James E; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian Nod2 is an intracellular protein that is implicated in the innate immune response to the bacterial cell wall and is associated with the development of Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancers. Nod2 is required for an immune response to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an immunostimulatory fragment of bacterial cell wall, but it is not known whether MDP binds directly to Nod2. We report the expression and purification of human Nod2 from insect cells. Using novel MDP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we provide the first biochemical evidence for a direct, high-affinity interaction between Nod2 and MDP.

  13. Caring for the Ethical Ideal: Nel Noddings on Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Nel Noddings is arguably one of the premier philosophers of moral education in the English-speaking world today. Although she is outside the mainstream theory, research, and practice traditions of cognitive-developmentalism (the Kohlberg legacy) and of character education (which is in public ascendancy), her body of work is unrivalled for…

  14. Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Hanan

    2013-01-01

    In this short essay I express my own deep sympathy with Nel Noddings's ethic of care and applaud her stubborn resistance in "Happiness and Education" to what John Dewey would have called false dualisms, such as those between intelligence and emotion, theory and practice, or vocation and academic studies.However, I question whether…

  15. Nod factor signal transduction in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2008-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium bacteria and most legume plants is initiated by the perception of bacterial signal molecules, the nodulation (Nod) factors, at the root hairs of the plant. This induces responses both in the root hairs, leading to infection by the bacteria, as well as at a

  16. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities.

  17. Autoimmune autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune autonomic disorders occur because of an immune response directed against sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric ganglia, autonomic nerves, or central autonomic pathways. In general, peripheral autoimmune disorders manifest with either generalized or restricted autonomic failure, whereas central autoimmune disorders manifest primarily with autonomic hyperactivity. Some autonomic disorders are generalized, and others are limited in their anatomic extent, e.g., isolated gastrointestinal dysmotility. Historically, these disorders were poorly recognized, and thought to be neurodegenerative. Over the last 20 years a number of autoantibody biomarkers have been discovered that have enabled the identification of certain patients as having an autoimmune basis for either autonomic failure or hyperactivity. Peripheral autoimmune autonomic disorders include autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG), paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy, and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. AAG manifests with acute or subacute onset of generalized or selective autonomic failure. Antibody targeting the α3 subunit of the ganglionic-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α3gAChR) is detected in approximately 50% of cases of AAG. Some other disorders are characterized immunologically by paraneoplastic antibodies with a high positive predictive value for cancer, such as antineuronal nuclear antibody, type 1 (ANNA-1: anti-Hu); others still are seronegative. Recognition of an autoimmune basis for autonomic disorders is important, as their manifestations are disabling, may reflect an underlying neoplasm, and have the potential to improve with a combination of symptomatic and immune therapies.

  18. Further Studies on Structure of nodD3 Gene in Rhizobium meliloti——Analysis of 5’Non-Coding Region of nodD3 and Its Evolutionary Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞冠翘; 朱家璧; 高云峰; 沈善炯

    1994-01-01

    R.meliloti nodD3 gene is transcriptionally controlled by two promoters.Gel retardationexperiments show that SyrM and NodD3 are binding to the first promoter region of nodD3,while no proteinfactor is found to bind to the second promoter region of the gene.Comparison has been made between 5′ non-coding region of nodD3 and the corresponding region upstream of nodD1.The presence of nod-box andnodA-like sequences in the 5′ noncoding region of nodD3 supports the hypothesis that nodD3 evolves withthe duplication of the nodD1-nodA fragment during the speciation of R.meliloti.

  19. 成人晚发性自身免疫糖尿病与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的相关性研究%Correlation study of autoimmune thyroid disease and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄秉文; 方咏红; 卢颖瑜; 郭春花; 王运林

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨成人晚发性自身免疫糖尿病(LADA)与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的关系,并分析LADA患者发生AITD的危险因素.方法 对80例LADA患者、80例2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者和80例健康对照者进行游离三碘甲腺原氨酸(FT3)、血清游离甲状腺素(FT4)、血清超敏促甲状腺素(uTSH)、甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)、甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)检测.糖尿病患者还进行谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GADA)、胰岛素自身抗体(IAA)、胰岛细胞抗体(ICA)检测.采用放免法检测TPO-Ab、TG-Ab、FT3、FT4,直接化学发光法检测uTSH,放射配体法检测GADA、IAA、ICA.随访2年后对以上指标进行复查.结果 (1) LADA患者的基线TG-Ab及TPO-Ab阳性率分别为18.8%、21.3%,均高于T2DM患者的8.8%、13.8%和健康对照者的10.0%、12.5%,差异均有统计学意义(P0.05).(3)高滴度GADA的LADA患者与低滴度的LADA患者比较,随访前后TG-Ab阳性率均较高(25.0%vs 15.4%和32.1%vs 15.4%,P均0.05).(4) Logistic回归分析显示,女性、高滴度GADA、入组时甲状腺自身抗体(TPO-Ab、TG-Ab)阳性是LADA患者未来发生甲状腺功能异常的危险因素.结论 LADA患者,尤其是高滴度GADA者,发生甲状腺自身免疫紊乱的风险高于T2DM及健康对照者;女性、高滴度GADA、甲状腺自身抗体阳性是LADA患者将来发生甲状腺功能异常的危险因素;由于LADA有并发甲状腺功能异常的风险,推荐在LADA患者中常规筛查甲状腺自身抗体.%Objective To investigate the relationship between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LA-DA) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and to analyze the risk factors for AITD in patients with LADA. Methods Eighty patients of LADA, 80 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 80 healthy subjects were recruited. Physical examination was performed and sera were sampled for the measurement of thyroid peroxidase anti-body (TPO-Ab), thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab), glutamic acid

  20. Alteration of the thymic T cell repertoire by rotavirus infection is associated with delayed type 1 diabetes development in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Webster

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are implicated as a viral trigger for the acceleration of type 1 diabetes in children. Infection of adult non-obese diabetic (NOD mice with rotavirus strain RRV accelerates diabetes development, whereas RRV infection in infant NOD mice delays diabetes onset. In this study of infant mice, RRV titers and lymphocyte populations in the intestine, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN and thymus of NOD mice were compared with those in diabetes-resistant BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Enhanced intestinal RRV infection occurred in NOD mice compared with the other mouse strains. This was associated with increases in the frequency of CD8αβ TCRαβ intraepithelial lymphocytes, and their PD-L1 expression. Virus spread to the MLN and T cell numbers there also were greatest in NOD mice. Thymic RRV infection is shown here in all mouse strains, often in combination with alterations in T cell ontogeny. Infection lowered thymocyte numbers in infant NOD and C57BL/6 mice, whereas thymocyte production was unaltered overall in infant BALB/c mice. In the NOD mouse thymus, effector CD4(+ T cell numbers were reduced by infection, whereas regulatory T cell numbers were maintained. It is proposed that maintenance of thymic regulatory T cell numbers may contribute to the increased suppression of inflammatory T cells in response to a strong stimulus observed in pancreatic lymph nodes of adult mice infected as infants. These findings show that rotavirus replication is enhanced in diabetes-prone mice, and provide evidence that thymic T cell alterations may contribute to the delayed diabetes onset following RRV infection.

  1. Autoimmune-mediated peripheral neuropathies and autoimmune pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies have diverse acquired and inherited causes. The autoimmune neuropathies represent an important category where treatment is often available. There are overlapping signs and symptoms between autoimmune neuropathies and other forms. Making a diagnosis can be challenging and first assisted by electrophysiologic and sometimes pathologic sampling, with autoimmune biomarkers providing increased assistance. Here we provide a review of the autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathies, their available biomarkers, and approaches to treatment. Also discussed is new evidence to support a mechanism of autoimmune pain.

  2. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  3. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  4. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  5. [Expression of human insulin in lactic acid bacteria and its oral administration in non-obese diabetic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-Wei; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Lian-Dong

    2007-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an auto-immune disease while oral administrating its autoantigens could be a treatment of T1DM. To express human insulin gene (ins) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for oral vaccine, ins gene was replaced by LAB bias codon and an 8-amino-acid-residue linker peptide forming a beta-turn was designed to link insulin chain A and B. After synthesized by primer annealing method, the whole ins gene was fused with signal peptide sequence SP(Usp45), subcloned into a LAB secretory expressive vector pSW501 and then introduced to Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) MG1363 and Lactobacillus casei (Lb. casei ) ATCC27092 respectively. Western blot showed that the expression product (SP(Usp45)-INS protein) targeted mainly at the cell wall while little was found in cytoplasm or supernatant. The highest expression level emerged in exponential phase when the optical density at 600nm of the culture was 0.4. The culture of the recombinant strain Lb. casei/pSW501 was administered to non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice orally. ELISA and Western blot results showed that the recombinant strain could induce SP(Usp45)-INS-specific antibodies and raise IL-4 level (38.583 +/- 2.083 pg/mL, P < 0.05) in the mice' s sera. Expression of insulin in the food-grade vehicle LAB could induce oral immune tolerance in NOD mice and protect it from pancreas injury, suggesting it might be a new way to the treatment of T1DM.

  6. Higher susceptibility of NOD/LtSz-scid Il2rg-/- NSG mice to xenotransplanted lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaji N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nobuhiro Kanaji,1 Akira Tadokoro,1 Kentaro Susaki,1 Saki Yokokura,1 Kiyomi Ohmichi,2 Reiji Haba,2 Naoki Watanabe,1 Shuji Bandoh,1 Tomoya Ishii,1 Hiroaki Dobashi,1 Takuya Matsunaga11Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology, Rheumatology and Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan; 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, JapanPurpose: No lung cancer xenograft model using non-obese diabetic (NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice has been reported. The purpose of this study is to select a suitable mouse strain as a xenogenic host for testing tumorigenicity of lung cancer.Materials and methods: We directly compared the susceptibility of four immunodeficient mouse strains, c-nu, C.B-17 scid, NOD-scid, and NOD/LtSz-scid Il2rg-/- (NSG mice, for tumor formation from xenotransplanted lung cancer cell lines. Various numbers (101–105 cells/head of two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and EBC1, were subcutaneously inoculated and tumor sizes were measured every week up to 12 weeks.Results: When 104 EBC1 cells were inoculated, no tumor formation was observed in BALB/c-nu or C.B-17 scid mice. Tumors developed in two of the five NOD-scid mice (40% and in all the five NSG mice (100%. When 103 EBC1 cells were injected, no tumors developed in any strain other than NSG mice, while tumorigenesis was achieved in all the five NSG mice (100%, P=0.0079 within 9 weeks. NSG mice similarly showed higher susceptibility to xenotransplantation of A549 cells. Tumor formation was observed only in NSG mice after inoculation of 103 or fewer A549 cells (40% vs 0% in 15 NSG mice compared with others, respectively, P=0.0169. We confirmed that the engrafted tumors originated from inoculated human lung cancer cells by immunohistochemical staining with human cytokeratin and vimentin.Conclusion: NSG mice may be the most suitable strain for testing tumorigenicity of lung cancer, especially if only a few cells

  7. Healthy first-degree relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes exhibit significant differences in basal gene expression pattern of immunocompetent cells compared to controls: expression pattern as predeterminant of autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechova, K; Kolar, M; Blatny, R; Halbhuber, Z; Vcelakova, J; Hubackova, M; Petruzelkova, L; Sumnik, Z; Obermannova, B; Pithova, P; Stavikova, V; Krivjanska, M; Neuwirth, A; Kolouskova, S; Filipp, D

    2012-02-01

    Expression features of genetic landscape which predispose an individual to the type 1 diabetes are poorly understood. We addressed this question by comparing gene expression profile of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from either patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), or their first-degree relatives or healthy controls. Our aim was to establish whether a distinct type of 'prodiabetogenic' gene expression pattern in the group of relatives of patients with T1D could be identified. Whole-genome expression profile of nine patients with T1D, their ten first-degree relatives and ten healthy controls was analysed using the human high-density expression microarray chip. Functional aspects of candidate genes were assessed using the MetaCore software. The highest number of differentially expressed genes (547) was found between the autoantibody-negative healthy relatives and the healthy controls. Some of them represent genes critically involved in the regulation of innate immune responses such as TLR signalling and CCR3 signalling in eosinophiles, humoral immune reactions such as BCR pathway, costimulation and cytokine responses mediated by CD137, CD40 and CD28 signalling and IL-1 proinflammatory pathway. Our data demonstrate that expression profile of healthy relatives of patients with T1D is clearly distinct from the pattern found in the healthy controls. That especially concerns differential activation status of genes and signalling pathways involved in proinflammatory processes and those of innate immunity and humoral reactivity. Thus, we posit that the study of the healthy relative's gene expression pattern is instrumental for the identification of novel markers associated with the development of diabetes.

  8. Coupling of Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL: static case; Acoplamiento de Nod1D y HOTCHANNEL: caso estatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez T, A.M. [IPN-ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ovando C, R. [IIE-Gcia. de Energia Nuclear, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rovando@iie.org.mx

    2003-07-01

    In this work the joining of the programs Nod1D and HOTCHANNEL, developed in the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and in the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) respectively is described. The first one allows to study the neutronic of a nuclear reactor and the second one allows to carry out the analysis of hot channel of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Nod1 D is a program that it solves by nodal methods type finite element those diffusion equations in multigroup, and it is the static part of Nod Kin that it solves the diffusion equation in their time dependent part. For another side HOTCHANNEL is based on a mathematical model constituted by four conservation equations (two of mass conservation, one of motion quantity and one of energy), which are solved applying one discretization in implicit finite differences. Both programs have been verified in independent form using diverse test problems. In this work the modifications that were necessary to carry out to both for obtaining a coupled program that it provides the axial distribution of the neutron flux, the power, the burnup and the void fraction, among others parameters as much as neutronic as thermal hydraulics are described. Those are also mentioned limitations, advantages and disadvantages of the final product to which has been designated Nod1 D-HotChn. Diverse results for the Cycle 1 of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 reactor of the Nucleo electric central comparing them with those obtained directly with the CoreMasterPresto code are provided. (Author)

  9. AT-RvD1 Promotes Resolution of Inflammation in NOD/ShiLtJ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Maruyama, Christina L.; Easley, Justin T.; Trump, Bryan G.; Baker, Olga J.

    2017-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by diminished secretory function of the exocrine glands. Treatments for hyposalivation are limited to the use of saliva substitutes and medications that provide only temporary relief. In light of the high degree of need and the limitations of current therapies, development of alternative treatments to restore functioning is essential. Resolvins (Rv), which are highly potent lipid mediators, offer a viable alternative for better treating inflammatory diseases such as SS. The goal of this study was to determine whether systemic preventive treatment with Aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) reduces inflammation and preserves secretory functioning in NOD/ShiLtJ SS-like mice. Our results indicate that systemic treatment with AT-RvD1 diminishes the progression of the disease in salivary epithelium from female mice as follows: (a) improves secretory function, (b) reduces pro-inflammatory molecule gene expression, (c) increases anti-inflammatory molecule gene expression and (d) induces M2 macrophage polarization. Finally, AT-RvD1 decreases lymphocytic infiltration into the salivary glands when used with small doses of the steroid, dexamethasone, and promotes the tissue healing process. PMID:28361884

  10. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  11. Autoimmunity against laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Florina; Koch, Manuel; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2016-09-01

    Laminins are ubiquitous constituents of the basement membranes with major architectural and functional role as supported by the fact that absence or mutations of laminins lead to either lethal or severely impairing phenotypes. Besides genetic defects, laminins are involved in a wide range of human diseases including cancer, infections, and inflammatory diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders. A growing body of evidence implicates several laminin chains as autoantigens in blistering skin diseases, collagenoses, vasculitis, or post-infectious autoimmunity. The current paper reviews the existing knowledge on autoimmunity against laminins referring to both experimental and clinical data, and on therapeutic implications of anti-laminin antibodies. Further investigation of relevant laminin epitopes in pathogenic autoimmunity would facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic tools for thorough characterization of patients' antibody specificities and should decisively contribute to designing more specific therapeutic interventions.

  12. Autoimmunity in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Our PubMed search for peer-reviewed articles published in the 2014 solar year retrieved a significantly higher number of hits compared to 2013 with a net 28 % increase. Importantly, full articles related to autoimmunity constitute approximately 5 % of immunology articles. We confirm that our understanding of autoimmunity is becoming a translational paradigm with pathogenetic elements rapidly followed by new treatment options. Furthermore, numerous clinical and pathogenetic elements and features are shared among autoimmune diseases, and this is well illustrated in the recent literature. More specifically, the past year witnessed critical revisions of our understanding and management of antiphospholipid syndrome with new exciting data on the pathogenicity of the serum anti-beta2 glycoprotein autoantibody, a better understanding of the current and new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and new position papers on important clinical questions such as vaccinations in patients with autoimmune disease, comorbidities, or new classification criteria. Furthermore, data confirming the important connections between innate immunity and autoimmunity via toll-like receptors or the critical role of T regulatory cells in tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity perpetuation were also reported. Lastly, genetic and epigenetic data were provided to confirm that the mosaic of autoimmunity warrants a susceptible individual background which may be geographically determined and contribute to the geoepidemiology of diseases. The 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world should be cumulatively regarded as part of an annus mirabilis in which, on a different level, the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston was attended by over 16,000 participants with over selected 3000 abstracts.

  13. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  14. Lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, M; Hirokawa, M.; T. Manabe; Shimozuma, K; Sonoo, H; Harada, T.

    1997-01-01

    A case of autoimmune thyroiditis after long term treatment with lithium is described in a 29 year old Japanese woman with manic depression. Positive serum antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, diffuse goitre, and microscopic chronic thyroiditis, as well as the clinical history of long term lithium treatment were suggestive of lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis. Microscopically, there was a mild degree of interstitial fibrosis and a moderate degree of lymphocytic infiltration...

  15. The epigenetics of autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Francesca; Folci, Marco; Baccarelli, Andrea; Selmi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Concordance rates in monozygotic twins are lower than 50% while genome-wide association studies propose numerous significant associations representing only a minority of patients. These lines of evidence strongly support other complementary mechanisms involved in the regulation of genes expression ultimately causing overt autoimmunity. Alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation are the two major epigenetic mechanisms that may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoimmune diseases. In recent years, several studies both in clinical settings and experimental models proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. We herein discuss what we currently know and what we expect will come in the next future. Ultimately, epigenetic treatments already being used in oncology may soon prove beneficial also in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21278766

  16. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article.

  17. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  18. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years.

  19. The first nation-wide multicenter study for adult onset latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) in China : The outcome and significance of LADA China Study%关于中国成人自身免疫糖尿病的首项全国性多中心研究——LADA China研究的结果与意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向宇飞; 周智广

    2013-01-01

    LADA China研究是在中国新诊断2型糖尿病患者中首次开展的一项全国多中心调查.该项研究的最新研究成果已在Diabetes杂志(2013)发表.本文介绍LADA China研究的主要成果,并进一步讨论其重要的临床意义.%LADA China Study is the first nation-wide muliicenter study for adult onset latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) in Chinese.We have published the data on Diabetes in 2013.In this article,we briefly introduce the results and the significance to clinical practice.

  20. Reversal of new-onset diabetes through modulating inflammation and stimulating beta-cell replication in nonobese diabetic mice by a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Gao, Jie; Hao, Jianqiang; Zhang, Yu; Yi, Huimin; O'Brien, Timothy D; Sorenson, Robert; Luo, Jian; Guo, Zhiguang

    2010-07-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) activity by NVP-DPP728, a DPP-IV inhibitor, improves the therapeutic efficacy of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). CD26 is a membrane-associated glycoprotein with DPP-IV activity and is expressed on lymphocytes. We investigated the effect of NVP-DPP728 on reversing new-onset diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and modulating the inflammatory response and stimulating beta-cell regeneration. New-onset diabetic NOD mice were treated with NVP-DPP728 for 2, 4, and 6 wk. Blood glucose level was monitored. Regulatory T cells in thymus and secondary lymph nodes, TGF-beta1 and GLP-1 in plasma, and the insulin content in the pancreas were measured. Immunostaining for insulin and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) were performed. The correlation of beta-cell replication with inflammation was determined. In NVP-DPP728-treated NOD mice, diabetes could be reversed in 57, 74, and 73% of mice after 2, 4, and 6 wk treatment, respectively. Insulitis was reduced and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells was increased in treated NOD mice with remission. Plasma TGF-beta1 and GLP-1, the insulin content, and both insulin(+) and BrdU(+) beta-cells in pancreas were also significantly increased. No significant correlations were found between numbers of both insulin(+) and BrdU(+) beta-cells in islets and beta-cell area or islets with different insulitis score in NOD mice with remission of diabetes. In conclusion, NVP-DPP728 treatment can reverse new-onset diabetes in NOD mice by reducing insulitis, increasing CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and stimulating beta-cell replication. beta-Cell replication is not associated with the degree of inflammation in NVP-DPP728-treated NOD mice.

  1. Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 2: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Karamifar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "nAutoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS type 2 is characterized by the presence of Addison's disease, in association with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. APS type 2 occurs most often in middle aged females and is rare in children. Here an 11 year old boy is reported with Addison's disease who developed symptom's of diabetes mellitus, goiter, malabsorption, macrocytic anemia and keratitis. APS type 2 occurs most often in middle aged females and is quite rare in children but one should think to autoimmune poly glandular syndrome type II in patient at any age especially in patients with Addison's disease.

  2. Isolation and characterization of mutant Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 proteins with altered responses to luteolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Melicent C; Fisher, Robert F; Bliss, Robert; Long, Sharon R

    2013-08-01

    NodD1, a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs), mediates nodulation (nod) gene expression in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti in response to the plant-secreted flavonoid luteolin. We used genetic screens and targeted approaches to identify NodD1 residues that show altered responses to luteolin during the activation of nod gene transcription. Here we report four types of NodD1 mutants. Type I (NodD1 L69F, S104L, D134N, and M193I mutants) displays reduced or no activation of nod gene expression. Type II (NodD1 K205N) is constitutively active but repressed by luteolin. Type III (NodD1 L280F) demonstrates enhanced activity with luteolin compared to that of wild-type NodD1. Type IV (NodD1 D284N) shows moderate constitutive activity yet can still be induced by luteolin. In the absence of luteolin, many mutants display a low binding affinity for nod gene promoter DNA in vitro. Several mutants also show, as does wild-type NodD1, increased affinity for nod gene promoters with added luteolin. All of the NodD1 mutant proteins can homodimerize and heterodimerize with wild-type NodD1. Based on these data and the crystal structures of several LTTRs, we present a structural model of wild-type NodD1, identifying residues important for inducer binding, protein multimerization, and interaction with RNA polymerase at nod gene promoters.

  3. Roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Peng, Ling-Long; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Shu; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jia; Song, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bing

    2016-04-01

    A20 (TNFAIP3), known to inhibit NF-κB function by deubiquitinating-specific NF-κB signaling molecules, has been found in many cell types of the immune system. Recent findings suggest that A20 is essential for the development and functional performance of dendritic cell, B cell, T cell and macrophage. A number of studies further demonstrate that these cells are crucial in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, ankylosing arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic significance of these new findings.

  4. The autoimmune tautology: an in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Ricardo A; Restrepo-Montoya, Daniel; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    There is genetic evidence of similarities and differences among autoimmune diseases (AIDs) that warrants looking at a general panorama of what has been published. Thus, our aim was to determine the main shared genes and to what extent they contribute to building clusters of AIDs. We combined a text-mining approach to build clusters of genetic concept profiles (GCPs) from the literature in MedLine with knowledge of protein-protein interactions to confirm if genes in GCP encode proteins that truly interact. We found three clusters in which the genes with the highest contribution encoded proteins that showed strong and specific interactions. After projecting the AIDs on a plane, two clusters could be discerned: Sjögren's syndrome-systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune thyroid disease-type1 diabetes-rheumatoid arthritis. Our results support the common origin of AIDs and the role of genes involved in apoptosis such as CTLA4, FASLG, and IL10.

  5. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ non-specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Conclusions. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Other­wise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  6. Shock: A possible presenting manifestation of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Banzal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome Type II (APS II, also known as polyglandular autoimmune syndrome Type II or Schmidt syndrome, is constellations of multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies. It is a rare, but most common of the immunoendocrinopathy syndrome. It is characterized by the obligatory occurrence of autoimmune Addison′s disease in combination with thyroid autoimmune diseases and/or Type I diabetes, hypogonadism, hypophysitis, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo, alopecia, pernicious anemia, and celiac disease. Here, we report a case of 38-year-old female patient presented with shock, further diagnosed to have APS II.

  7. 人脐血CD34+细胞在NOD/SCID小鼠上有效重建造血系统%Transplanting human umbilical cord blood CD34 + cells reconstitutes hematopoieticsystem in NOD/SCID mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾新涛; 穆媛媛; 贾潇潇; 胡文华; 邓飞

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨人脐血CD34+造血干细胞在非肥胖糖尿病/重症联合免疫缺陷(no obese diabetic/severe combined Immunodeficiency,NOD/SCID)小鼠模型上造血重建的作用.方法 利用密度梯度离心法,从新鲜脐血中分离出单个核细胞,利用免疫磁珠分选法筛选CD34+造血干细胞,经尾静脉输注入经亚致死剂量照射后的NOD/SCID小鼠体内,移植后3、7、10、14 d分别用断尾法取小鼠外周血,血常规计数外周血动态变化情况;移植后4、6、8、10周,取其外周血,运用PCR法检测外周血中人特异性Alu基因的表达情况.结果 免疫磁珠分选得到的CD34+细胞浓度达91.2%,照射后小鼠骨髓腔内有核细胞和巨细胞数量明显减少或消失,达到清髓目的.移植后第3天移植组小鼠外周血各系细胞均明显低于正常组(P<0.01),移植后第7天,移植组小鼠外周血象开始恢复,明显高于阴性对照组[白细胞:(3.90±0.53)×109/L vs (1.30±0.18)×109/L,血红蛋:(139.8±5.0)g/L vs (79.8±11.0)g/L,白血小板:(253.0±17.5)×109/L vs (52.0±6.9)×109/L,(P<0.01)],移植后第10天,移植组小鼠外周血象恢复到辐照前水平,与正常组无差别.移植4周后,PCR方法 在小鼠外周血中可检测到人特异Alu基因序列,未移植组小鼠照射后2周内全部死亡.结论 经照射后的NOD/SCID小鼠通过人脐血CD34+细胞植入可建立起人鼠嵌合模型.NOD/SCID小鼠经照射后,不破坏骨髓造血微环境及造血基质,可用于异基因细胞移植模型.人脐血CD34+细胞移植入NOD/SCID小鼠,其造血系统能有效重建.%Objective To investigate the hematopoietic reconstitution by human umbilical cord bloodCD34 + cells in no obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. Methods Mono-nuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from human fresh cord blood by gradient centrifugation, and then CD34 +hematopoietic stem cells were selected by magnetic activated cell sorting. The selected cells were

  8. Prophylactic fenbendazole therapy does not affect the incidence and onset of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Deanna D H; Shirwan, Haval

    2006-03-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is a common, highly efficacious broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug used to treat and limit rodent pinworm infections. However, the effect of its prophylactic use on the immune response of rodents is largely undefined. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model commonly used to study type 1 diabetes (T1D). Parasitic infections will inhibit diabetes development in NOD mice; thus, in the presence of contamination, prophylactic treatment with anthelmintics must be considered to maintain experimental research. Herein, we investigated the prophylactic use of FBZ in NOD mice to determine its effect on the incidence and onset of diabetes, lymphocyte sub-populations and T cell proliferative responses. NOD mice were separated into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received a diet containing FBZ. Animals were monitored for the incidence and onset of T1D. At matched time points, diabetic and non-diabetic mice were killed and splenic lymphocytes analyzed for various cell sub-populations and mitogen-induced proliferative responses using flow cytometry. Treated and control mice were monitored >23 weeks with no detectable effects on the incidence or onset of diabetes. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in lymphocyte sub-populations and mitogen-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses between control and treatment groups. These results suggest that prophylactic FBZ treatment does not significantly alter the incidence or onset of diabetes in NOD mice. The prophylactic use of FBZ, therefore, presents a viable approach for the prevention of pinworm infection in precious experimental animals with substantial scientific and economic benefits.

  9. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  10. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  11. Complement and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  12. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  13. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  14. Pregnancy with autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, António Costa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with gestations in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Background: There are only limited data describing pregnancy in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of pregnancies with autoimmune hepatitis followed in Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Portugal in the last ten years. Results: We reported nine pregnancies in seven patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Two patients had documented liver cirrhosis prior to the pregnancy. In this study, 66.7% of patients were treated with azathioprine and 88.9% with prednisolone. Clinical improvements were observed in 11.1% of pregnancies and 22.2% exacerbations were diagnosed. There were six live births and two preterm deliveries (preterm delivery rate of 33%). We also report three first trimester miscarriages (early gestation miscarriage rate of 33%). There were no neonatal or maternal deaths. Conclusion: The favorable obstetric outcome is a realistic expectation in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Tight monitoring and control of asymptomatic and unpredictable exacerbations, which are unrelated to the severity of the underlying disease, are essential to the prognosis of the current pregnancy. PMID:27458515

  15. Clinical analysis on children with diabetes mellitus combined with autoimmune thyroid disease%儿童糖尿病合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨曙晖; 赵奕怀; 沈闲茹; 谢培文

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究儿童糖尿病(diabetes mellitus,DM)合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(autoimmune thyroid disease,AITD)患者的临床特征,为该类疾病的治疗提供临床依据.方法:选择37例DM合并AITD儿童,其中1型糖尿病(T1DM)患者27例,2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者10例,并以32例健康体检者为对照组进行比较,分别检测甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)、甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)、促甲状腺激素受体抗体(TR-Ab)的水平,同时检测糖尿病组患者的谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GAD-Ab);分析DM与AITD的并发情况.结果:T1DM合并AITD的患者中,桥本氏病占59.3%,Graves病占40.7%;T2DM合并AITD的患者中,桥本氏病占60.0%,Graves病占40.0%;T1DM组任一甲状腺抗体(包括TPO-Ab、TG-Ab和TR-Ab)阳性检出率为44.4%,明显高于T2DM组和对照组(P<0.05);GAD-Ab阳性的T1DM组患者任一甲状腺抗体阳性检测率为52.6%,明显高于GAD-Ab阴性的T1DM患者(P<0.05).结论:不同类型糖尿病对于AITD的分型无明显影响,与T2DM和健康人群比较,T1DM患者更容易并发AITD,其中GAD-Ab阳性的患者并发AITD的比例要高于GAD-Ab阴性的患者.%Objective:To research the clinical characteristics of children with diabetes mellitus (DM) combined with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), provide a clinical basis for treatment Methods: A total of 37 children with DM combined with AITD were selected, including 27 children with T1DM and 10 children with T2DM; 32 healthy children receiving physical examination were selected as control group, then the results in the two groups were compared. The levels of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO - Ab), thyroglobulin antibody (TG -Ab) ,and thyrotropin receptor antibody.(TR - Ab) were detected; the level of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD - Ab) was detected during the same period; the complications of DM and AITD were analyzed. Results: Among the children with Tl DM combined with AITD , the proportions of Hashimotos

  16. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  17. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Down-Regulates NOD Signaling and Inflammatory Response in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi Ping; Huang, Shungen; Zhou, Huiting; Xie, Yi; Pan, Jian; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Jiang Huai; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on expression and function of NOD1 and NOD2 in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), in an attempt to clarify whether NOD1 and NOD2 signaling is involved in the modulation of host innate immunity against postoperative infection in pediatric CHD patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected from pediatric CHD patients at five different time points: before CPB, immediately after CPB, and 1, 3, and 7 days after CPB. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to measure the expression of NOD1 and NOD2, their downstream signaling pathways, and inflammatory cytokines at various time points. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TNF-α levels in response to stimulation with either the NOD1 agonist Tri-DAP or the NOD2 agonist MDP were significantly reduced after CPB compared with those before CPB, which is consistent with a suppressed inflammatory response postoperatively. The expression of phosphorylated RIP2 and activation of the downstream signaling pathways NF-κB p65 and MAPK p38 upon Tri-DAP or MDP stimulation in PBMCs were substantially inhibited after CPB. The mRNA level of NOD1 and protein levels of NOD1 and NOD2 were also markedly decreased after CPB. Our results demonstrated that NOD-mediated signaling pathways were substantially inhibited after CPB, which correlates with the suppressed inflammatory response and may account, at least in part, for the increased risk of postoperative infection in pediatric CHD patients. PMID:27622570

  18. T cell intrinsic NOD2 is dispensable for CD8 T cell immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria H Y Lin

    Full Text Available NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that provides innate sensing of bacterial muramyl dipeptide by host cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages and epithelial cells. While NOD2's role as an innate pathogen sensor is well established, NOD2 is also expressed at low levels in T cells and there are conflicting data as to whether NOD2 plays an intrinsic role in T cell function. Here we show that following adoptive transfer into WT hosts, NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells show a small decrease in the number of OVA-specific CD8 T cells recovered at the peak of the response to respiratory influenza virus infection. On the other hand, no such defect was observed upon intranasal immunization with a replication defective adenovirus carrying the OVA epitope recognized by OT-I, or when OVA was delivered with LPS subcutaneously, or when influenza-OVA was delivered intraperitoneally. Thus we observed a selective defect in NOD2-deficient T cell responses only during a live viral infection. Moreover, there was no apparent defect when NOD2(-/- OT-I T cells were stimulated in vitro. Finally, this selective defect in recovery of NOD2-deficient CD8 T cells was not observed in a non-transgenic respiratory infection model in which mixed bone marrow chimeras were used such that the NOD2(-/- T cells were allowed to develop and respond in a NOD2-sufficient host. Taken together our data indicate that T cell intrinsic NOD2 is not required for CD8 T cell responses to antigen delivered under a variety of conditions in vitro and in vivo. However, CD8 T cells that have developed in the absence of NOD2 show a selective and modest impairment in their response to live respiratory influenza infection.

  19. Common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (the autoimmune tautology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The fact that autoimmune diseases share subphenotypes, physiopathological mechanisms and genetic factors has been called autoimmune tautology, and indicates that they have a common origin. The autoimmune phenotypes vary depending on the target cell and the affected organ, gender, ancestry, trigger factors and age at onset. Ten shared characteristics supporting this logical theory are herein reviewed.

  20. Reduced iNKT cells numbers in type 1 diabetes patients and their first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain-Covarrubias, Nonantzin; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Sanchez-Torres, Luvia E; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the specific destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been associated with development of T1D. Class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule (CRTAM) is expressed on activated iNKT, CD8(+), and CD4(+) T cells, and it is associated with the pro-inflammatory profiles of these cells. Crtam gene expression in CD3(+) lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is associated with T1D onset. However, expression of CRTAM on T cells from patients with T1D has not yet been evaluated. We compared iNKT cell (CD3(+)Vα24(+)Vβ11(+)) numbers and CRTAM expression in a Mexican population with recent-onset T1D and their first-degree relatives with control families. Remarkably, we found lower iNKT cell numbers in T1D families, and we identified two iNKT cell populations in some of the families. One iNKT cell population expressed high iTCR levels (iNKT(hi)), whereas another expressed low levels (iNKT(lo)) and also expressed CRTAM. These findings support a probable genetic determinant of iNKT cell numbers and a possible role for these cells in T1D development. This study also suggests that CRTAM identifies recently activated iNKT lymphocytes.

  1. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  2. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    guinea- pig polyclonal anti-insulin (1:100 dilution, Abcam Ab7842-500, Cambridge, MA) and a secondary goat anti-guinea- pig Alexa-fluor 568 (1:100 dilu...but did not become hyperglyce- mic ; potential reasons could be that other T-cell specificities (or B cells) are required for disease progression, or...restricted peptide ligands, including a gluta- mic acid decarboxylase 65 sequence, that stimulate diabetogenic T cells from transgenic BDC2.5 nonobese

  3. Evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in regulating colonic epithelial cell growth and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheena M Cruickshank; Louise Wakenshaw; John Cardone; Peter D Howdle; Peter J Murray; Simon R Carding

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of NOD2 in colonic epithelial cells (CEC).METHODS: A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses of epithelial cell turnover in the presence and absence of a functional NOD2 protein and, in response to enteric Salmonella typhimurium infection, were used. shRNA interference was also used to investigate the consequences of knocking down NOD2 gene expression on the growth and survival of colorectal carcinoma cell lines.RESULTS: In the colonic mucosa the highest levels of NOD2 expression were in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), that is recognized by NOD2, promoted CEC growth in vitro. By contrast, the growth of NOD2-deficient CECs was impaired. In vivo CEC proliferation was also reduced and apoptosis increased in Nod2-/- mice, which were also evident following enteric Salmonella infection. Furthermore, neutralization of NOD2 mRNA expression in human colonic carcinoma cells by shRNA interference resulted in decreased survival due to increased levels of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with the involvement of NOD2 protein in promoting CEC growth and survival. Defects in proliferation by CECs in cases of CD may contribute to the underlying pathology of disrupted intestinal homeostasis and excessive inflammation.

  4. Protective effect of berberine on serum glucose levels in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Wei-Han; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2012-03-01

    Among the active components in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, berberine which is an isoquinoline alkaloid exhibits promising potential for its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the berberine effect on serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects still remains unknown. This study investigated berberine's effects on serum glucose levels using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop T1D. The NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups, administered water with 50, 150, and 500 mg berberine/kg bw, respectively, through 14 weeks. ICR mice were also selected as a species control group to compare with the NOD mice. Changes in body weight, oral glucose challenge, and serum glucose levels were determined to identify the protective effect of berberine on T1D. After the 14-week oral supplementation, berberine decreased fasting serum glucose levels in NOD mice close to the levels in normal ICR mice in a dose dependent manner. Serum berberine levels showed a significantly (Pberberine-administered NOD mice. Our results suggested that berberine supplemented at appropriate doses for 14 weeks did not cause toxic side effects, but improved hyperglycemia in NOD mice.

  5. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  6. Should the negativity for islet cell autoantibodies be used in a prescreening for genetic testing in maturity-onset diabetes of the young? The case of autoimmunity-associated destruction of pancreatic β-cells in a family of HNF1A-MODY subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Jana; Rypáčková, Blanka; Kučera, Petr; Anděl, Michal; Heneberg, Petr

    2013-01-01

    It was recently suggested that routine islet cell autoantibody testing should be performed to discriminate maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) from type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This is the first report ever to describe the familial manifestation of T1DM autoimmunity in nonobese HNF1A-MODY subjects and the presence of islet antigen-2 (IA-2) antibodies in MODY subjects. Three nonobese subjects in an age range of 14-35 years were diagnosed with HNF1A-MODY (p. Arg159Gln mutation). All the tested subjects had detectable (but varying) levels of islet cell autoantibodies (i.e., antibodies against glutamate decarboxylase or IA-2) in the absence of other T1DM characteristics. They displayed long-term expression of intermediate fasting C-peptide levels, ketoacidosis was absent even in periods of spontaneous insulin withdrawal, and full dependence on externally administered insulin was not detected in any of them although better glycemic control was achieved when insulin was supplemented. The course of the disease was similar to that of the autoantibody-negative HNF1A-MODY subjects. The case questions the selectivity of autoantibodies as a marker of T1DM or late-onset autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) over MODY and challenges the use of autoantibodies as a universal negative marker of MODY in an effort to decrease the cost of health care, as it may eventually lead to the wrong diagnosis and thus to the incorrect treatment. Further research should involve examination of the autoantibody titers and prevalence in large and geographically diverse cohorts of MODY subjects selected for genetic testing (regardless of their autoantibody titers) as well as determination of the islet cell autoantibody kinetics in the course of MODY onset and progression.

  7. p21 is associated with the proliferation and apoptosis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Z; Jiang, J; Xia, Y; Yue, X; Yan, M; Tao, T; Cao, X; Da, Z; Liu, H; Liu, H; Miao, Y; Li, L; Wang, Z

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that autologous and allogeneic transplantation of the BM-MSCs had therapeutic effects on T1DM, whereas the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice itself did not have this therapeutic effect. We previously demonstrated that Bone Marrow (BM) -MSCs from the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice had the abnormal migration and adhesion. So we hypothesized that the proliferation and apoptosis of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice were dysregulated. Our team compared the proliferation and apoptosis between NOD mice and imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Then we assessed whether the NF-κB-p53/p21 pathway was involved in the process. The cell proliferation ability of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice were significantly decreased, while the percent of apoptotic cells was increased compared to those from the ICR mice. The p21 expression was significantly increased in the NOD-MSCs. The p65 level was enhanced in the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice when compared to the ICR mice, coincided with the expression of p21. Expressions of p65 and p21 were significantly decreased in the -BM-MSCs treated with p65 inhibitor. The knockdown p21 expression reversed the abnormal proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice. These data provide important preclinical references supporting the basis for further development of autologous MSC-based therapies for type1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

  8. Diabetes preventive gluten-free diet decreases the number of caecal bacteria in non-obese diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Ling, Fenjung; Anne, Kaas

    2006-01-01

    Background A gluten-free diet reduces the incidence of diabetes mellitus in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, but the mechanism is not known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible influence of the diet on the caecal bacterial flora, which may affect the intestinal physiology and mediate...... disease prevention. Methods Two groups of NOD mice from the age of 3 weeks were fed either a gluten-free diet or a standard diet. Each diabetic mouse, when diagnosed, along with a non-diabetic mouse from the same diet group and two nondiabetic mice from the alternate diet group were euthanized and sampled...... for classical bacteriological examination. Results Nine out of 19 (47%) standard-fed mice and 1 out of 19 (5%) gluten-free-fed mice developed diabetes (p gluten-free diet had significantly fewer aerobically (p

  9. PREVELANCE OF ANTI-TPO ANTIBODY IN TYPE-1 DIABETES AND THYROID DYSFUNCTION IN TPO ANTIBODY POSITIVE DIABET ICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan; Josephine Latha

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The appearance of TPO-Abs precedes thyroid dysfunction and increases in autoimmune diseases like type1diabetes. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are one of the major secondary antibodies associated wi th autoimmune thyroid disease and can be used as diagnostic marker. The prevalence of thyroid auto antibodies is increased when patients have non-thyroid autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and pernicious anemia. Thyroid dysfuncti...

  10. Implication of NOD1 and NOD2 for the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs are known to trigger an innate immune response against microbial infection. Although studies suggest that activation of TLRs modulate the function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, little is known about the role of NLRs on the MSC function. In this study, we investigated whether NOD1 and NOD2 regulate the functions of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs. The genes of TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 were expressed in hUCB-MSCs. Stimulation with each agonist (Pam(3CSK(4 for TLR2, LPS for TLR4, Tri-DAP for NOD1, and MDP for NOD2 led to IL-8 production in hUCB-MSC, suggesting the expressed receptors are functional in hUCB-MSC. CCK-8 assay revealed that none of agonist influenced proliferation of hUCB-MSCs. We next examined whether TLR and NLR agonists affect osteogenic-, adipogenic-, and chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs. Pam(3CSK(4 and Tri-DAP strongly enhanced osteogenic differentiation and ERK phosphorylation in hUCB-MSCs, and LPS and MDP also slightly did. Treatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor restored osteogenic differentiation enhanced by Pam(3CSK(4. Tri-DAP and MDP inhibited adipogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs, but Pam(3CSK(4 and LPS did not. On chondrogenic differentiation, all TLR and NLR agonists could promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs with difference in the ability. Our findings suggest that NOD1 and NOD2 as well as TLRs are involved in regulating the differentiation of MSCs.

  11. 成人隐匿性自身免疫性糖尿病早期血浆SERPING1的变化及意义%Clinical Significance of Plasma Protease C1 Inhibitor in Latent Auto