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Sample records for autoimmune chronic pancreatitis

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  4. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

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    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis.

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    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Distinct pathophysiological cytokine profiles for discrimination between autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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    Ghassem-Zadeh, Sahar; Gaida, Matthias M; Szanyi, Szilard; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Hinz, Ulf; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Felix, Klaus

    2017-06-02

    Discriminating between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), chronic pancreatitis (CP), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can be challenging. In this retrospective study, levels of serum and tissue cytokines were analyzed as part of the clinical strategy for the preoperative differentiation between AIP and PDAC. The identification of differential cytokine profiles may help to prevent unnecessary surgical resection and allow optimal treatment of these pathologies. To compare the cytokine profiles of AIP, CP, and PDAC patients, serum and pancreatic tissue homogenates were subjected to multiplex analysis of 17 inflammatory mediators. In total, serum from 73 patients, composed of 29 AIP (14 AIP-1 and 15 AIP-2), 17 CP, and 27 PDAC, and pancreatic tissue from 36 patients, including 12 AIP (six AIP-1 and six AIP-2), 12 CP, and 12 PDAC, were analyzed. Comparing AIP and PDAC patients' serum, significantly higher concentrations were found in AIP for interleukins IL-1β, IL-7, IL-13, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). G-CSF also allowed discrimination of AIP from CP. Furthermore, once AIP was divided into subtypes, significantly higher serum levels for IL-7 and G-CSF were measured in both subtypes of AIP and in AIP-2 for IL-1β when compared to PDAC. G-CSF and TNF-α were also significantly differentially expressed in tissue homogenates between AIP-2 and PDAC. The cytokines IL-1β, IL-7, and G-CSF can be routinely measured in patients' serum, providing an elegant and non-invasive approach for differential diagnosis. G-CSF is a good candidate to supplement the currently known serum markers in predictive tests for AIP and represents a basis for a combined blood test to differentiate AIP and particularly AIP-2 from PDAC, enhancing the possibility of appropriate treatment.

  8. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform Into Chronic Features Similar to Advanced Chronic Pancreatitis With Functional Insufficiency Following Severe Calcification.

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    Kanai, Keita; Maruyama, Masahiro; Kameko, Fumiko; Kawasaki, Kenji; Asano, Junpei; Oguchi, Takaya; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2016-09-01

    Because several studies for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) have revealed pancreatic calcification resembling that in chronic pancreatitis (CP), we sought to clarify whether AIP could transform into chronic features similar to advanced CP with severe pancreatic dysfunction. Pancreatic functions of 92 AIP patients, 47 definite CP patients, and 30 healthy controls were assessed by fecal elastase-1 concentration (FEC), fasting immunoreactive insulin (IRI), and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-R. The 92 AIP patients included 17 (18%) with severe calcification (SC) and 75 without. The FEC levels in AIP and CP patients were significantly lower than that in controls. Exocrine insufficiency defined as FEC less than 200 μg/g was 39% in AIP without SC, 56% in AIP with SC, and 74% in CP. Fasting IRI and C-peptide reactivity values in CP were significantly lower than those in AIP, with no significant differences between AIP subgroups. The prevalence of endocrine insufficiency according to fasting IRI less than 5.0 μU/mL was 26% in AIP without SC, 31% in AIP with SC, and 59% in CP, respectively. HOMA-R values were significantly higher in all AIP groups than in CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis can transform into a state of pancreatic insufficiency after calcification that is less severe than that in definite CP.

  9. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  10. Morphological and immunohistochemical comparison of intrapancreatic nerves between chronic pancreatitis and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

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    Kato, Kota; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Yanagawa, Masato; Tomiyama, Takashi; Fukui, Toshiro; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Satoi, Sohei; Yamada, Hisao; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    The abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) may be related to the increased number and size of intrapancreatic nerves. On the other hand, patients with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) rarely suffer from the pain syndrome, and there are no previous studies concerning the histopathological findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with type 1 AIP. The current study is aimed at investigating the differences in the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with CP and type 1 AIP. Neuroanatomical differences between CP and type 1 AIP were assessed by immunostaining with a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5). The number (neural density) and area (neural hypertrophy) of PGP9.5-immunopositive nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Furthermore, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), and a high affinity receptor for NGF, tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Both neural density and hypertrophy were significantly greater in pancreatic tissue samples from patients with CP than those with normal pancreas or type 1 AIP. NGF expression was stronger in type 1 AIP than in CP, whereas TrkA expression in type 1 AIP was poorer than in CP. Although CP and type 1 AIP are both characterized by the presence of sustained pancreatic inflammation, they are different in terms of the density and hypertrophy of intrapancreatic nerve fibers. It is possible that this may be related to the difference in the activity of the NGF/TrkA-pathway between the two types of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

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    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  12. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  13. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  14. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

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    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  16. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  17. [Membranous nephropathy associated to autoimmune thyroiditis, chronic pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency].

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    Merino, J L; Fernández Lucas, M; Teruel, J L; Valer, P; Moreira, V; Arambarri, M; Ortuño, J

    2004-01-01

    A 33 year old female was admitted to the hospital to study aedema and bocio, A nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed and the renal biopsy demonstrated membranous glomerulonephritis, stage II. She was also diagnosed of Hashimoto's autoinmmune thyroiditis: TSH (41.5 uUl/ml), T4 (0.07 ng/dl), antithyroglobuline (1/2560) and antimicrosome (1/6400). Four year latter she was diagnosed of autoinmmune pancreatitis, without evidence of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Eight years latter she was diagnosed of primary autoimmune suprarrenal insufficiency: basal cortisol: 2.7 mcg/dl, post ACTH estimulated cortisol: 5.6 mcg/dl, antinuclear antibody (1/160) and antiparietal (1/320). We present a pluriglandular autoimmune syndrome with membranous glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency. To the best of our knowledge this complex syndrome has not been previously described.

  18. Review Article: Diagnosis and Management of Igg4 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Salem; Diaa Hamouda; Alyssa Parian

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis that has only recently been recognized as a separate type of pancreatitis in the last two decades. The histopathological features of this distinct form of pancreatitis was first described as early as 1961 when the French Henry Sarles.

  19. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

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    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  20. Progress in diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Tao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis that originates from an autoimmune-mediated mechanism. AIP has unique radiological, serological, and histopathological features, often accompanied by peripancreatic lesions. AIP may be easily confused with pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. It is necessary to diagnose AIP while integrating a variety of clinical indicators. Steroid therapy should be performed for patients diagnosed with AIP, and surgical treatment can be selected if necessary.

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancur, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    It is presented a case of a man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, whose marked dilatation of the ducts reasoned the issue. The severe untreatable pain was the surgery indication, which was practiced without complications either during or after the surgery. By the way, a shallow revision of the literature is made, by mentioning classification, physiopatholoy, clinical square, medical, surgical and endoscopic treatment

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  4. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

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    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Patient Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the most common symptom of pancreatitis. The ...

  5. Characteristic findings in images of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

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    Fujinaga, Yasunari, E-mail: fujinaga@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kadoya, Masumi [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kawa, Shigeyuki [Center of Health, Safety and Environmental Management, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Hamano, Hideaki [Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Ueda, Kazuhiko; Momose, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Sachie; Hatta, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yukiko [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a variety of extra-pancreatic involvements which are frequently misdiagnosed as lesions of corresponding organs. The purpose of this study was to clarify the diagnostic imaging features of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed diagnostic images of 90 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis who underwent computer-assisted tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or gallium-67 scintigraphy before steroid therapy was initiated. Results: AIP was frequently (92.2%) accompanied by a variety of extra-pancreatic lesions, including swelling of lachrymal and salivary gland lesions (47.5%), lung hilar lymphadenopathy (78.3%), a variety of lung lesions (51.2%), wall thickening of bile ducts (77.8%), peri-pancreatic or para-aortic lymphadenopathy (56.0%), retroperitoneal fibrosis (19.8%), a variety of renal lesions (14.4%), and mass lesions of the ligamentum teres (2.2%). Characteristic findings in CT and MRI included lymphadenopathies of the hilar, peri-pancreatic, and para-aortic regions; wall thickening of the bile duct; and soft tissue masses in the kidney, ureters, aorta, paravertebral region, ligamentum teres, and orbit. Conclusions: Recognition of the diagnostic features in the images of various involved organs will assist in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in differential diagnoses between autoimmune pancreatitis-associated extra-pancreatic lesions and lesions due to other pathologies.

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis - the story so far

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Learning objectives: to learn about the main imaging diagnostic findings of AIP and the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC); to understand the best strategies for distinguishing AIP from pancreatic cancer; to emphasise the central role of radiology in the era of “clinical decision making” Autoimmune Pancreatitis (AIP) was first described in 1961 and represents a rare form of immune mediated chronic pancreatitis which is characterised by a marked infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells into pancreatic tissue. Whilst the majority of cases present with diffuse gland involvement, approximately 30% of patient’s demonstrate either segmental or focal involvement of the pancreas. Clinical presentation is very variable with patients describing a range of symptoms. Imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis and management of AIP and knowledge of the radiological appearances, which can vary significantly due to the various degrees of fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrate, is critical. Cardinal features include focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement with the loss of normal lobular architecture. Post contrast enhancement features of the pancreas may also be useful. In addition, pancreatic duct involvement as demonstrated by single or multiple focal strictures with limited more proximal dilatation is common as well as infiltration of the common bile duct.Whilst multimodality appearances may suggest a diagnosis of AIP correlation with clinical history, serology and histopathology is mandatory in order to accurately diagnose atypical cases

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakov, Rada; DePasquale, Joseph R; Elfarra, Hossam; Spira, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AuP) is a chronic pancreatic inflammation secondary to an underlying autoimmune mechanism. After early reports of a particular type of pancreatitis associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, others asserted that there is an autoimmune mechanism involved in some patients with chronic pancreatitis. In 1995 AuP was first described as a distinct clinical entity. Since then, there have been many documented cases of AuP in Japan, and now, perhaps due to increased awareness, more cases are being reported in Europe and the United States. Herein we present our experience with 3 cases of AuP and we review the relevant literature. These 3 cases demonstrate the difficulties that exist in making the diagnosis of AuP and the impact that the diagnosis can have on patient management.

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan. Overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, id est (i.e.), association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjogren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjogren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called 'idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)' and AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)' and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease. (author)

  10. Chronic pancreatitis. Some important historical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Salvador

    2018-06-08

    Since ancient times the increase of size and hardness sometimes presented by the abdominal structure known as the pancreas has attracted attention. Portal was the first to describe the clinical signs of chronic pancreatitis in 1803. In 1815, Fleischman speculated about the potential role of excessive alcohol consumption. Comfort coined the term "chronic relapsing pancreatitis" in 1946 and described hereditary pancreatitis 6 years later. Zuidema defined tropical pancreatitis in 1959 and 2 years later Sarles described another form of pancreatitis to which Yoshida gave the name autoimmune pancreatitis in 1995. Groove pancreatitis was described by Potet in 1970. Obstructive pancreatitis was defined in 1984 and Ammann identified idiopathic pancreatitis 3 years later. This article gives a historical account of the pioneers who developed the knowledge of how to assess the characteristics that allowed the different forms of chronic pancreatitis to be defined. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a type of chronic pancreatitis characterized by an autoimmune inflammatory process. Treatment protocols for AIP are still evolving. According to the articles about AIP treatment in recent years, the indications for steroid therapy include specific clinical manifestations (jaundice, abdominal pain, etc., markedly abnormal imaging findings, and extrapancreatic organ involvement. The initial dose of steroid (prednisone is usually 0.6 mg·kg-1·d-1 or 30-40 mg/d; after 3 weeks to 1 month of treatment with the initial dose, the dose is decreased by 5-10 mg every 1-2 weeks until it drops to 2.5-5 mg/d; this dose is maintained for 6 months to 3 years. No consensus has been reached on the adverse effect of steroid on diabetes mellitus complicating AIP. Immunosuppressive agents should be used for the patients with disease relapses or with important extrapancreatic organs involved. Rituximab might become one of the therapies for refractory AIP. Although some patients achieved remission after surgical treatment, surgery is still not recommended as a routine treatment protocol due to the complications after surgery.

  12. [Chronic pancreatitis: new definition and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti Bellocchi, Maria Cristina; De Pretis, Nicolò; Amodio, Antonio; Zerbi, Alessandro; Frulloni, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has been considered over the past years as a single disease, alcohol-induced and different from acute pancreatitis, in terms of etiology and prognosis. Actually, the introduction of a new concept of chronic pancreatitis, now considered as a fibroinflammatory process caused by multiple factors (toxic-metabolic, genetic, immunologic, obstructive), allow to better understand the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Furthermore, the discover of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis (autoimmune, paraduodenal, associated to gene mutations), different in term of clinical aspects, findings at imaging, prognosis and therapy, radically changed the concept of the disease. In this brief review, we described the impact of this new concept in the comprehension of pathogenesis, in the definition of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis, and in the clinical and therapeutic approach of chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Enteric hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Nathalie; Issa, Zaina; Crott, Ralph; Morelle, Johann; Danse, Etienne; Wallemacq, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Deprez, Pierre H

    2017-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis may lead to steatorrhea, enteric hyperoxaluria, and kidney damage. However, the prevalence and determinants of hyperoxaluria in chronic pancreatitis patients as well as its association with renal function decline have not been investigated.We performed an observational study. Urine oxalate to creatinine ratio was assessed on 2 independent random urine samples in consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis followed at the outpatient clinic from March 1 to October 31, 2012. Baseline characteristics and annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change during follow-up were compared between patients with hyper- and normo-oxaluria.A total of 48 patients with chronic pancreatitis were included. The etiology of the disease was toxic (52%), idiopathic (27%), obstructive (11%), autoimmune (6%), or genetic (4%). Hyperoxaluria (defined as urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g) was found in 23% of patients. Multivariate regression analysis identified clinical steatorrhea, high fecal acid steatocrit, and pancreatic atrophy as independent predictors of hyperoxaluria. Taken together, a combination of clinical steatorrhea, steatocrit level >31%, and pancreatic atrophy was associated with a positive predictive value of 100% for hyperoxaluria. On the contrary, none of the patients with a fecal elastase-1 level >100 μg/g had hyperoxaluria. Longitudinal evolution of eGFR was available in 71% of the patients, with a mean follow-up of 904 days. After adjustment for established determinants of renal function decline (gender, diabetes, bicarbonate level, baseline eGFR, and proteinuria), a urine oxalate to creatinine ratio >32 mg/g was associated with a higher risk of eGFR decline.Hyperoxaluria is highly prevalent in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated with faster decline in renal function. A high urine oxalate to creatinine ratio in patients with chronic pancreatitis is best predicted by clinical steatorrhea, a high acid

  14. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis: An illustrated guide to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, R.D.; Rofe, C.J.; Bryant, T.J.C.; Hacking, C.N.; Stedman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of “IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease” has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaat, Rania; Harth, Marc; Proschek, Petra; Lindemayr, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy. Abdominal US and MRI showed a focal swelling of the pancreatic head, the latter also showing delayed contrast enhancement. There was diffuse irregular pancreatic duct narrowing, compression of the intrapancreatic common bile duct, and mild proximal biliary dilatation on MR cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory results revealed normal serum IgG and subclass 4 with negative autoimmune antibodies, and slightly elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9. This highlights the differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic head cancer and, to a lesser extent, other forms of pancreatitis in children. (orig.)

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refaat, Rania [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ain Shams University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cairo (Egypt); Harth, Marc; Proschek, Petra; Lindemayr, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    We report a case of histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy. Abdominal US and MRI showed a focal swelling of the pancreatic head, the latter also showing delayed contrast enhancement. There was diffuse irregular pancreatic duct narrowing, compression of the intrapancreatic common bile duct, and mild proximal biliary dilatation on MR cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory results revealed normal serum IgG and subclass 4 with negative autoimmune antibodies, and slightly elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9. This highlights the differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic head cancer and, to a lesser extent, other forms of pancreatitis in children. (orig.)

  18. Subclassification of autoimmune pancreatitis: a histologic classification with clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vikram; Gupta, Rajib; Sainani, Nisha; Sahani, Dushyant V; Virk, Renu; Ferrone, Cristina; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Stone, John H; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Examination of pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP has shown that there are 2 subclasses of this disease. However, there is no widely accepted pathologic classification scheme and the clinical significance of such a classification remains to be established. In this study, we revisited the subclassification of AIP and examine whether this provides clinically and prognostically meaningful information. We evaluated 29 pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP. Demographic, clinical, and imaging data were recorded, as was evidence of extrapancreatic manifestations. In addition to a detailed and semiquantitative histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry for IgG4 was performed on pancreatic and extrapancreatic tissues. We also evaluated 48 consecutive cases of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified. The resected specimens could readily be subclassified into 2 subtypes: type 1 (n=11) and type 2 (n=18). In comparison with patients with type 2 disease, patients with type 1 disease were significantly more likely to be males (P=0.09), older (P=0.02), and present with jaundice (P=0.01), and less likely to be associated with abdominal pain (P=0.04). On imaging, the pancreatic tail cut-off sign was exclusively seen in patients with type 2 disease (4 of 10 cases). Hypercellular inflamed interlobular stroma was unique to type 1 pattern (91%), whereas significant ductal injury in the form of microabscesses and ductal ulceration was almost exclusively seen in type 2 pattern (78%). Eight of 10 patients with a type 1 pattern had evidence of a systemic disease. Three patients with type 2 disease had recurrent episodes of pancreatitis after their pancreatic resection. In comparison with the cohort of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified, type 2 AIP cases were less likely to be associated with a history of alcohol abuse, and showed significantly more foci of

  19. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  20. Differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yayoi; Hamano, Hideaki; Oguchi, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been widely used for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Because autoimmune pancreatitis is easily misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer and can be tested for by FDG-PET analysis based on the presence of suspected pancreatic cancer, we attempted to clarify the differences in FDG-PET findings between the two conditions. We compared FDG-PET findings between 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and 26 patients with pancreatic cancer. The findings were evaluated visually or semiquantitatively using the maximum standardized uptake value and the accumulation pattern of FDG. FDG uptake was found in all 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas it was found in 19 of 26 patients (73.1%) with pancreatic cancer. An accumulation pattern characterized by nodular shapes was significantly more frequent in pancreatic cancer, whereas a longitudinal shape indicated autoimmune pancreatitis. Heterogeneous accumulation was found in almost all cases of autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas homogeneous accumulation was found in pancreatic cancer. Significantly more cases of pancreatic cancer showed solitary localization, whereas multiple localization in the pancreas favored the presence of autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG uptake by the hilar lymph node was significantly more frequent in autoimmune pancreatitis than in pancreatic cancer, and uptake by the lachrymal gland, salivary gland, biliary duct, retroperitoneal space, and prostate were seen only in autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG-PET is a useful tool for differentiating autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer, if the accumulation pattern and extrapancreatic involvement are considered. IgG4 measurement and other current image tests can further confirm the diagnosis. (author)

  1. Risk factors for pancreatic stone formation in autoimmune pancreatitis over a long-term course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has the potential to progress to a chronic state that forms pancreatic stones. The aim of this study was to clarify the risk factors underlying pancreatic stone formation in AIP. Sixty-nine patients with AIP who had been followed for at least 3 years were enrolled for evaluation of clinical and laboratory factors as well as computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography findings. During the course of this study, increased or de novo stone formation was seen in 28 patients, who were defined as the stone-forming group. No stones were observed in 32 patients, who were defined as the non-stone-forming group. Nine patients who had stones at diagnosis but showed no change during the course of this study were excluded from our cohort. Univariate analysis revealed no significant differences in clinical or laboratory factors associated with AIP-specific inflammation between the two groups. However, pancreatic head swelling (P = 0.006) and narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts in the pancreatic head region (P = 0.010) were significantly more frequent in the stone-forming group. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified Wirsung and Santorini duct narrowing at diagnosis as a significant independent risk factor for pancreatic stone formation (OR 4.4, P = 0.019). A primary risk factor for pancreatic stone formation in AIP was narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts, which most presumably led to pancreatic juice stasis and stone development.

  2. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Eva C; Salcedo, Maria T; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; De León, Hannah; Merino, Xavier; Navarro, Salvador; Ginès, Angels; Abu-Suboh, Monder; Balsells, Joaquim; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Molero, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Patient with Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1 with Previously Known Lymphadenopathy, Both in the Context of IgG4-related Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alidjan, Fazil M.; Karim, Faiz; Verdijk, Rob M.; van Esser, Joost W.; van Heerde, Marianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Auto-immune pancreatitis Symptoms: Jaundice ? lymfadenopathy Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Laboratory ? imaging Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an important clinical pathologic concept of IgG-4-related disease. AIP is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by a fibroinflammatory process by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, storiform fibrosis, obliterative...

  5. Etiology of chronic pancreatitis: Has it changed in the last decade?

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2009-01-01

    The evidence from recent surveys on chronic pancreatitis carried out around the world shows that alcohol remains the main factor associated with chronic pancreatitis, even if at a frequency lower than that reported previously. It has further confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. Autoimmune pancreatitis accounts for 2%-4% of all forms of chronic pancreatitis, but this frequency will probably increase over the next few years....

  6. The management of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Toskes, Phillip P

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatitis, which is most generally described as any inflammation of the pancreas, is a serious condition that manifests in either acute or chronic forms. Chronic pancreatitis results from irreversible scarring of the pancreas, resulting from prolonged inflammation. Six major etiologies for chronic pancreatitis have been identified: toxic/ metabolic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, and obstruction. The most common symptom associated with chronic pancreatitis is pain localized to the upper-to-middle abdomen, along with food malabsorption, and eventual development of diabetes. Treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis include fasting and short-term intravenous feeding, fluid therapy, and pain management with narcotics for severe pain or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for milder cases. Patients with chronic disease and symptoms require further care to address digestive issues and the possible development of diabetes. Dietary restrictions are recommended, along with enzyme replacement and vitamin supplementation. More definitive outcomes may be achieved with surgical or endoscopic methods, depending on the role of the pancreatic ducts in the manifestation of disease.

  7. Fifteen-Year-Old Male with Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis: An Argument for Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T. Kolasinski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, an increasingly recognized etiology of pancreatitis in patients less than 20 years old, has characteristically been diagnosed with the histological finding of duct-centric pancreatitis in a patient who lacks elevated serum immunoglobulin G4. We present the case of a nonobese 15-year-old male, without any chronic medical conditions, who presented with the chief complaint of abdominal pain. The laboratory study results were remarkable for a lipase level of 5,419 U/L and a γ-glutamyl transferase level of 373 U/L. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed delayed contrast enhancement of the pancreas, diffuse parenchymal enlargement, and lack of normal lobulation. The patient’s serum immunoglobulin G4 level was found to be 66 mg/dL, which was within normal limits and supportive of a diagnosis of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis. Despite the absence of intestinal complaints, the patient underwent subsequent endoscopy due to the correlation of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with inflammatory bowel disease that has been described in recent literature. Pan-colonic mild colitis was visualized, and the patient began treatment with steroids, to which he quickly responded. Performing endoscopy on this patient allowed for confident initiation of early therapy for both autoimmune pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease, and may have limited further surgical intervention and disease progression. For these reasons, this case highlights the utility of endoscopy in pediatric patients with suspected type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  8. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients.

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in autoimmune pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Takao; Kobayashi, Hisato; Nishikawa, Koji; Iida, Etsushi; Michigami, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Emiko; Yamashita, Rikiya; Miyagi, Ken; Okamoto, Motozumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A total of 4 consecutive patients with AIP, 5 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (CP), and 13 patients without pancreatic disease (controls) were studied. DWI was performed in the axial plane with spin-echo echo-planar imaging single-shot sequence. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured in circular regions of interest in the pancreas. In AIP patients, abdominal MRI was performed before, and 2-4 weeks after steroid treatment. Follow-up study was performed chronologically for up to 11 months in two patients. The correlation between ADCs of the pancreas and the immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) index (serum IgG4 value/serum IgG4 value before steroid treatment) was evaluated. In the AIP patients, DWI of the pancreas showed high signal intensity, and the ADCs of the pancreas (mean±standard deviation (SD): 0.97±0.18 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) were significantly lower than those in patients with CP (1.45±0.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) or the controls (1.45±0.16 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P s =-0.80, P<0.05). Autoimmune pancreatitis showed high signal intensity on DWI, which improved after steroid treatment. ADCs reflected disease activity. Thus, diffusion-weighted MRI might be useful for diagnosing AIP, determining the affected area, and evaluating the effect of treatment. (author)

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update; Autoimmunpankreatitis. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmberger, T. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Staedt. Klinikum, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Neuroradiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  11. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal ...

  12. Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis, classification, and new genetic developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, B; Whitcomb, D C

    2001-02-01

    The utilization of recent advances in molecular and genomic technologies and progress in pancreatic imaging techniques provided remarkable insight into genetic, environmental, immunologic, and pathobiological factors leading to chronic pancreatitis. Translation of these advances into clinical practice demands a reassessment of current approaches to diagnosis, classification, and staging. We conclude that an adequate pancreatic biopsy must be the gold standard against which all diagnostic approaches are judged. Although computed tomography remains the initial test of choice for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, the roles of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are considered. Once chronic pancreatitis is diagnosed, proper classification becomes important. Major predisposing risk factors to chronic pancreatitis may be categorized as either (1) toxic-metabolic, (2) idiopathic, (3) genetic, (4) autoimmune, (5) recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, or (6) obstructive (TIGAR-O system). After classification, staging of pancreatic function, injury, and fibrosis becomes the next major concern. Further research is needed to determine the clinical and natural history of chronic pancreatitis developing in the context of various risk factors. New methods are needed for early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, and new therapies are needed to determine whether interventions will delay or prevent the progression of the irreversible damage characterizing end-stage chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kojiro; Itoh, Shigeki; Takada, Akira; Mori, Yoshine; Naganawa, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the “enhanced duct sign”, for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Yuichi, E-mail: kawai.yuichi@a.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Suzuki, Kojiro, E-mail: kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Itoh, Shigeki, E-mail: shigeito@nagoya-1st.jrc.or.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Japan Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, 3-35 Michishita-cho, Nakamura-ku, Nagoya 453-8511 (Japan); Takada, Akira, E-mail: takadaa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mori, Yoshine, E-mail: yoshine@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naganawa, Shinji, E-mail: naganawa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the 'enhanced duct sign', for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  15. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  16. Chronic pancreatitis: a changing etiology or a gap in technological medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Bahajat Barakat

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol is considered the most important risk factor for the development of chronic pancreatitis. The possibility of evaluating CFTR mutations and the discovery of other gene mutations has led to a better evaluation of the familiar/hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis and the identification of autoimmune pancreatitis has further improved our knowledge of the disease. However, recent studies on chronic pancreatitis on a worldwide level reveal an increase in the idiopathic forms of the dise...

  17. Conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephen L; Lindgren, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Hedström, Aleksandra; Swahn, Fredrik; Segersvärd, Ralf; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease giving rise to several complications that need to be treated accordingly. Because pancreatic surgery has significant morbidity and mortality, less invasive therapy seems to be an attractive option. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art strategies to treat chronic pancreatitis without surgery and the current guidelines for the medical therapy of chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic therapy of complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pain, main pancreatic duct strictures and stones as well as pseudocysts is technically feasible and safe. The long-term outcome, however, is inferior to definitive surgical procedures such as resection or drainage. On the other hand, the medical therapy of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is well established and evidence based. Endoscopic therapy may be an option to bridge for surgery and in children/young adolescents and those unfit for surgery. Pain in chronic pancreatitis as well as treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency follows established guidelines. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Renal lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Maniatis, Petros; Siafas, Ioannis; Papailiou, John; Malachias, George; Anastopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by IgG4-positive plasma cells. Recent evidence suggests that it is a systemic disease affecting various organs. Tubulointerstitial nephritis has been reported in association with AIP. Purpose: To investigate the incidence and types of renal involvement in patients with AIP. Material and Methods: Eighteen patients with no history of renal disease and a diagnosis of AIP (on the basis of histopathologic findings or a combination of characteristic imaging features, increased serum IgG4 levels, and response to steroid treatment) were included. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging and follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years. CT images were reviewed for the presence of renal lesions. Results: Seven patients had renal involvement (38.8%). None of the lesions was visible on non-contrast-enhanced CT scan. Parenchymal lesions appeared as multiple nodules showing decreased enhancement (four cases). Pyelonephritis, lymphoma, and metastases were considered in the differential diagnosis. An ill-defined low-attenuation mass-like lesion was found in one patient, while diffuse thickening of the renal pelvis wall was evident in the last two cases. Renal lesions regressed in all patients after steroid treatment, the larger one leaving a fibrous cortical scar. Conclusion: Different types of renal lesions in patients with AIP are relatively common, appearing as multiple nodules with decreased enhancement. These findings support the proposed concept of an IgG4-related systemic disease. Autoimmune disease should be suspected in cases of renal involvement in association with pancreatic focal or diffuse enlargement.

  19. Renal lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Maniatis, Petros; Siafas, Ioannis; Papailiou, John (CT and Radiology Dept., ' Konstantopouleion' General Hospital, Athens (Greece)), e-mail: ctriantopoulou@gmail.com; Malachias, George; Anastopoulos, John (Radiology Dept., ' Sismanogleio' General Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by IgG4-positive plasma cells. Recent evidence suggests that it is a systemic disease affecting various organs. Tubulointerstitial nephritis has been reported in association with AIP. Purpose: To investigate the incidence and types of renal involvement in patients with AIP. Material and Methods: Eighteen patients with no history of renal disease and a diagnosis of AIP (on the basis of histopathologic findings or a combination of characteristic imaging features, increased serum IgG4 levels, and response to steroid treatment) were included. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging and follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years. CT images were reviewed for the presence of renal lesions. Results: Seven patients had renal involvement (38.8%). None of the lesions was visible on non-contrast-enhanced CT scan. Parenchymal lesions appeared as multiple nodules showing decreased enhancement (four cases). Pyelonephritis, lymphoma, and metastases were considered in the differential diagnosis. An ill-defined low-attenuation mass-like lesion was found in one patient, while diffuse thickening of the renal pelvis wall was evident in the last two cases. Renal lesions regressed in all patients after steroid treatment, the larger one leaving a fibrous cortical scar. Conclusion: Different types of renal lesions in patients with AIP are relatively common, appearing as multiple nodules with decreased enhancement. These findings support the proposed concept of an IgG4-related systemic disease. Autoimmune disease should be suspected in cases of renal involvement in association with pancreatic focal or diffuse enlargement.

  20. A Case of Pancreatic Cancer in the Setting of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Nondiagnostic Serum Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju D. Chandrasegaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP often mimics pancreatic cancer. The diagnosis of both conditions is difficult preoperatively let alone when they coexist. Several reports have been published describing pancreatic cancer in the setting of AIP. Case Report. The case of a 53-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and radiological features of autoimmune pancreatitis, with a “sausage-shaped” pancreas and bulky pancreatic head with portal vein impingement, is presented. He had a normal serum IgG4 and only mildly elevated Ca-19.9. Initial endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS- guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA of the pancreas revealed an inflammatory sclerosing process only. A repeat EUS guided biopsy following biliary decompression demonstrated both malignancy and features of autoimmune pancreatitis. At laparotomy, a uniformly hard, bulky pancreas was found with no sonographically definable mass. A total pancreatectomy with portal vein resection and reconstruction was performed. Histology revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreatic head and autoimmune pancreatitis and squamous metaplasia in the remaining pancreas. Conclusion. This case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties in a patient with pancreatic cancer in the setting of serum IgG4-negative, Type 2 AIP.

  1. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  2. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful.

  3. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  4. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...

  5. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion...

  6. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP, characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP, with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse.

  7. Successful treatment of pediatric IgG4 related systemic disease with mycophenolate mofetil: case report and a review of the pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cron Randy Q

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with elevated serum and tissue IgG4 levels in the adult population, but there are few reports of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis, and even fewer reports of IgG4 related systemic disease in a pediatric population. The standard of care treatment in adults is systemic corticosteroids with resolution of symptoms in most cases; however, multiple courses of corticosteroids are occasionally required and some patients require long term corticosteroids. In these instances, steroid sparing disease modify treatments are in demand. We describe a 13-year-old girl with IgG4 related systemic disease who presented with chronic recurrent autoimmune pancreatitis resulting in surgical intervention for obstructive hyperbilirubinemia and chronic corticosteroid treatment. In addition, she developed fibrosing medianstinitis as part of her IgG4 related systemic disease. She was eventually successfully treated with mycophenolate mofetil allowing for discontinuation of corticosteroids. This is the first reported use of mycophenolate mofetil for IgG4 related pancreatitis. Although autoimmune pancreatitis as part of IgG4 related systemic disease is rarely reported in pediatrics, autoimmune pancreatitis is also characterized as idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis. All pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis cases reported in the world medical literature were identified via a PUBMED search and are reviewed herein. Twelve reports of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis were identified, most of which were treated with corticosteroids or surgical approaches. Most case reports failed to report IgG4 levels, so it remains unclear how commonly IgG4 related autoimmune pancreatitis occurs during childhood. Increased evaluation of IgG4 levels in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis may shed further light on the association of IgG4 with pancreatitis and the underlying pathophysiology.

  8. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-11-14

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  9. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  10. [Chronic pancreatitis diagnosed after the first attack of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Uvírová, Magdalena; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Klvaňa, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    2016-02-01

    One of the diseases involving a potential risk of developing chronic pancreatitis is acute pancreatitis. Of the overall number of 231 individuals followed with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 56 patients were initially treated for acute pancreatitis (24.2 %). Within an interval of 12- 24 months from the first attack of acute pancreatitis, their condition gradually progressed to reached the picture of chronic pancreatitis. The individuals included in the study abstained (from alcohol) following the first attack of acute pancreatitis and no relapse of acute pancreatitis was proven during the period of their monitoring. The etiology of acute pancreatitis identified alcohol as the predominant cause (55.3 %), biliary etiology was proven in 35.7 %. According to the revised Atlanta classification, severe pancreatitis was established in 69.6 % of the patients, the others met the criterion for intermediate form, those with the light form were not included. Significant risk factors present among the patients were smoking, obesity and 18 %, resp. 25.8 % had pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus identified. 88.1 % of the patients with acute pancreatitis were smokers. The majority of individuals with chronic pancreatitis following an attack of acute pancreatitis were of a productive age from 25 to 50 years. It is not only acute alcoholic pancreatitis which evolves into chronic pancreatitis, we have also identified this transition for pancreatitis of biliary etiology.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis: a changing etiology or a gap in technological medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered the most important risk factor for the development of chronic pancreatitis. The possibility of evaluating CFTR mutations and the discovery of other gene mutations has led to a better evaluation of the familiar/hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis and the identification of autoimmune pancreatitis has further improved our knowledge of the disease. However, recent studies on chronic pancreatitis on a worldwide level reveal an increase in the idiopathic forms of the disease. Clinicians must pay greater attention to identifying the factors associated with chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Hybrid kappa\\lambda antibody is a new serological marker to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Mingju; Li, Wenli; Yi, Lang; Yu, Songlin; Fan, Gaowei; Lu, Tian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guojing; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Jiansheng; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-06-08

    The only generally accepted serological marker currently used for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is IgG4. Our aim was mainly to determine whether hybrid κ\\λ antibody can help to diagnose AIP and to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure the levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in human sera. Sera were obtained from 338 patients, including 61 with AIP, 74 with pancreatic cancer, 50 with acute pancreatitis, 40 with ordinary chronic pancreatitis, 15 with miscellaneous pancreatic diseases, and 98 with normal pancreas. Our study showed levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in the AIP group were significantly higher than in the non-AIP group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the diagnosis of AIP were 80.3%, 91%, 66.2% and 95.5% respectively. Furthermore, the combined measurement of serum hybrid κ\\λ antibody and IgG4 tended to increase the sensitivity although the difference was not statistically significant (90.2% vs. 78.7%, P = 0.08), compared to measurement of IgG4 alone. Our findings suggest that hybrid κ\\λ antibody could be a new serological marker to diagnose AIP and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer.

  13. [Update on chronic pancreatitis: review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czul, Frank; Coronel, Emmanuel; Donet, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by irreversible fibrosis of the gland with eventual failure of exocrine and endocrine functions and hallmark features of abdominal pain, malabsorption, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus and pancreatic calcifications. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals), genetic factors and a few patients with hereditary or autoimmune disease. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the epidemiology, etiology, physiopatology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatments of the disease.

  14. The long-term impact of autoimmune pancreatitis on pancreatic function, quality of life, and life expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Jorie; Cahen, Djuna L.; Van Heerde, Marianne J.; Rauws, Erik A.; De Buy Wenniger, Lucas J Maillette; Hansen, Bettina E.; Biermann, Katharina; Verheij, Joanne; Vleggaar, FP; Brink, Menno A.; Beuers, Ulrich H W; Van Buuren, Henk R.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-termoutcome of autoimmune pancreatitis. Methods: Patients with at least 2 years of follow-up were included. Information was collected regarding disease characteristics, treatment outcome, diagnosedmalignancies, andmortality. In addition, pancreatic function and

  15. Altered central pain processing after pancreatic surgery for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S. A.; Ahmed Ali, U.; ten Broek, R. P.; Issa, Y.; van Eijck, C. H.; Wilder-Smith, O. H.; van Goor, H.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is common in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may involve altered central pain processing. This study evaluated the relationship between pain processing and pain outcome after pancreatic duct decompression and/or pancreatic resection in patients with CP. Patients with CP

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis presenting as obstructive jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Amin Miah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 71 years cachexic male presented with sign symptoms of biliary tract obstruction. There was a large mass in the head of pancreases with raised CA 19.9. But elevated serum lipase raised the suspicion of paocreatitis. Elevated immunoglobu­lin IgG4 confmned this case as a auto immune aetiology. Initially there was much difficulty to differentiate auto immune pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma but after successful stenting and a course of corticosteroids, patient improved dramatically along with nonnalisation of all the radiological, bio-chemical and immunological parameters.

  17. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis: A Changing Etiology?

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Andrea Lioce; Luca Frulloni

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, Lankisch and Banks reported that the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis appeared to be in the range of 3-10 per 100,000 people in many parts of the world [1]. They also emphasized that the most important medical problems associated with the disease included abdominal pain, steatorrhea, diabetes mellitus and the possibility that chronic pancreatitis may be considered a premalignant condition [2, 3]. In 2002, in a well-written review, Banks pointed out that the two important forms were...

  19. Renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis: Ultrasound findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasiwimonphan, Kewalee; Gorman, Brian; Kawashima, Akira; Chari, Suresh T.; Takahashi, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the ultrasound findings of renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Methods: 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (15 male, 0 female, mean age 66 years old, range 44–85) who had renal involvement documented on CT or MR and had abdominal ultrasound within 1 month were included. Ultrasound images were retrospectively reviewed for presence or absence of renal involvement. Shape and echogenicity of the renal lesions were recorded. Results: In 8 out of 15 patients, at least one renal lesion was identified on ultrasound with a total of 9 kidneys. In 7 kidneys, lesions appeared as ill-defined, non-mass like areas of decreased echogenicity. Three lesions showed associated irregular lobular thickening of the renal parenchyma with bulging contour and 1 showed focal area of parenchymal loss. In 2 kidneys, the lesions were seen as solitary or multiple hypoechoic mass-like areas. Ill-defined, non-mass like lesions on ultrasound corresponded to well-circumscribed wedge-shaped lesions in all but one case on CT or MR. Mass-like lesions on ultrasound corresponded to well-circumscribed round lesions on CT or MR. Conclusion: Most common ultrasound findings of renal involvement in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis were ill-defined area of decreased echogenicity.

  20. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  1. Genetic aspects of chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disorder. A key characteristic of the condition is severe recurrent abdominal pain. The origin of CP is mixed, with about 70% of the cases being attributed to alcohol abuse even though 95% of all alcoholics never develop CP. Approximately half

  2. Diagnosis and management of chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V; Toskes, P

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis represents a condition that is challenging for clinicians secondary to the difficulty in making an accurate diagnosis and the less than satisfactory means of managing chronic pain. This review emphasises the various manifestations that patients with chronic pancreatitis may have and describes recent advances in medical and surgical therapy. It is probable that many patients with chronic abdominal pain are suffering from chronic pancreatitis that is not appreciated. As the...

  3. [Tropical chronic pancreatitis in a young patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J; Ginard, D; Barranco, L; Riera, J; Obrador, A

    2001-11-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis is a form of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis that has not previously been described in Spain. Typically it is related to dietary factors and malnutrition, although genetic factors may also play a significant role in the development of the disease. We report a case of chronic tropical pancreatitis in a 27-year-old woman from the Dominican Republic domiciled in Spain since 1992. The patient was admitted to our hospital for acute pancreatitis that fulfilled the diagnostic criteria (clinical and radiological) for chronic tropical pancreatitis. This case has led us to review this uncommon entity. Because of the increasing number of immigrants from tropical countries, chronic tropical pancreatitis will probably need to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis in our patients.

  4. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  5. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cahen, Djuna L.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Busch, Olivier R.; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Huibregtse, Kees; Bruno, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pancreatitis and a dilated pancreatic duct, ductal decompression is recommended. We conducted a randomized trial to compare endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct. METHODS: All symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis and a distal

  6. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  7. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  8. [New guidelines on chronic pancreatitis : interdisciplinary treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Bachmann, K A; Izbicki, J R

    2013-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Interdisciplinary consensus guidelines have recently updated the definitions and diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis and provide a critical assessment of therapeutic procedures. Diagnostic imaging relies on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) as the most sensitive technique, whereas computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) remain a frequent preoperative requirement. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is now used mostly as a therapeutic procedure except for the differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Complications of chronic pancreatitis, such as pseudocysts, duct stricture and intractable pain can be treated with endoscopic interventions as well as open surgery. In the treatment of pseudocysts endoscopic drainage procedures now prevail while pain treatment has greater long-term effectiveness following surgical procedures. Currently, endocopic as well as surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis require an ever increasing degree of technical and medical expertise and are provided increasingly more often by interdisciplinary centres. Surgical treatment is superior to interventional therapy regarding the outcome of pain control and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection is presently the surgical procedure of choice.

  9. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  10. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only

  11. MRI findings of pancreatic lymphoma and autoimmune pancreatitis: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigami, Kousei, E-mail: Ishigamikousei@aol.co [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Ushijima, Yasuhiro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Fujita, Nobuhiro [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Asayama, Yoshiki; Kakihara, Daisuke; Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Nakamura, Masafumi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify whether there are differences in MRI findings between pancreatic lymphomas and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Materials and methods: MRI of 8 patients with pancreatic lymphomas and 21 patients with AIP were retrospectively reviewed. For multifocal pancreatic lymphomas (n = 2) and AIP (n = 4), the largest 2 lesions were evaluated. Ten pancreatic lymphomas and 25 AIP were compared on three bases: the signal intensity on T2-weighted images, internal homogeneity, and presence or absence of capsule-like rim. In 8 lymphomas and 19 AIP, the enhancement pattern on dynamic MRI was compared, as well. Results: On T2-weighted images, pancreatic lymphomas comprised 5, 5 and 4 lesions with low (iso), slightly high, and moderately high intensity, respectively, while the numbers for AIP were 14, 10, and 1 (P < 0.01). Nine of 10 (90%) lymphomas appeared homogenous, and 11 of 25 (44%) AIP were homogenous (P < 0.05). A capsule-like rim was present in 9 of 25 (36%) AIP, but was not seen in lymphomas (P < 0.05). On dynamic MRI, 18 of 19 (94.7%) AIP showed persistent (n = 5) or delayed enhancement (n = 13), and 6 of 8 (75%) lymphomas showed low intensity without delayed enhancement (P < 0.001). Conclusion: MRI findings for pancreatic lymphomas and AIP were significantly different, which may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of these two diseases.

  12. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  13. Basophils activated via TLR signaling may contribute to pathophysiology of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Masato; Uchida, Kazushige; Ando, Yugo; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Fukui, Toshiro; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Miyara, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Satoi, Souhei; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2018-03-01

    Pathophysiology of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is still unclear. We previously reported that M2 macrophages might play an important role in type 1 AIP. Recently, it has been reported that basophils regulate differentiation to M2 macrophages. In this study, we investigated basophils from the pancreatic tissue and peripheral blood of individuals with type 1 AIP. By using immunohistochemistry, we investigated basophils in pancreatic tissue from 13 patients with type 1 AIP and examined expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) by these cells. Additionally, we obtained peripheral blood samples from 27 healthy subjects, 40 patients with type 1 AIP, 8 patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 10 patients with bronchial asthma, and 10 patients with atopic dermatitis, and analyzed activation of basophils by stimulating them with ligands of TLR1-9. We also compared TLR expression in basophils from the tissue and blood samples. Basophils were detected in pancreatic tissues from 10 of 13 patients with type 1 AIP. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the ratios of basophils activated by TLR4 stimulation in type 1 AIP (9.875 ± 1.148%) and atopic dermatitis (11.768 ± 1.899%) were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects (5.051 ± 0.730%; P pathophysiology of type 1 AIP.

  14. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Genetic Risk for Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flair José Carrilho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many studies have examined the genetic predisposition to pancreatic diseases. Pancreatic disease of an alcoholic etiology was determined to be a multi-factorial disease, where environmental factors interact with the genetic profile of the individual. In this review we discuss the main results from studies examining the frequency of genetic mutations in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Pregabalin for Pain Treatment in Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Bowense, S; Wilder-Smith, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  18. The Long-Term Impact of Autoimmune Pancreatitis on Pancreatic Function, Quality of Life, and Life Expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Buijs (Jan); D.L. Cahen (Djuna); M. van Heerde (Marianne); Rauws, EA; L.J.M. De Buy Wenniger (Lucas J. Maillette); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); K. Biermann (Katharina); J. Verheij (Joanne); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); M.A. Brink (Menno); U. Beuers (Ulrich); H.R. van Buuren (Henk); M.J. Bruno (Marco)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the long-term outcome of autoimmune pancreatitis. Methods Patients with at least 2 years of follow-up were included. Information was collected regarding disease characteristics, treatment outcome, diagnosed malignancies, and mortality. In addition, pancreatic

  19. The Long-Term Impact of Autoimmune Pancreatitis on Pancreatic Function, Quality of Life, and Life Expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Jorie; Cahen, Djuna L.; van Heerde, Marianne J.; Rauws, Erik A.; de Buy Wenniger, Lucas J. Maillette; Hansen, Bettina E.; Biermann, Katharina; Verheij, Joanne; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Brink, Menno A.; Beuers, Ulrich H. W.; van Buuren, Henk R.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term outcome of autoimmune pancreatitis. Patients with at least 2 years of follow-up were included. Information was collected regarding disease characteristics, treatment outcome, diagnosed malignancies, and mortality. In addition, pancreatic function and quality of life were

  20. Incidence of and risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yujin; Kamisawa, Terumi; Anjiki, Hajime; Takuma, Kensuke; Egawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer sometimes occurs during the course of chronic pancreatitis. This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer associated with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatic cancer developing in 218 patients with chronic pancreatitis and clinical features of the chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer were studied. Nine patients developed pancreatic cancer. Average period from the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was 9.6 years. All pancreatic cancers were diagnosed at an advanced stage. Only 2 patients had been followed-up periodically. There were no significant differences between chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer and those who did not in male/female ratio (3.5 vs. 8), average age on diagnosis (65.0 vs. 56.5), alcoholic/non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (1.6 vs. 2.6), smoking habits (62.5% vs. 70.7%), diabetes mellitus (77.8% vs. 54.4%), and continued alcohol drinking (37.5% vs. 53.1%). Over the period examined, 4% of chronic pancreatitis patients developed pancreatic cancer. Sex ratio, onset age, etiology, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and continued alcohol drinking were not significant risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis patients. Periodic follow-up due to the possibility of pancreatic cancer is necessary in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  1. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O' Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Abdominal ultrasonogram of autoimmune pancreatitis: Five cases of pancreatic lesions accompanied by Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, Hideo; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Okuda, Chikao; Honjyo, Hajime; Yamamoto, Takatugu; Kora, Tetuo; Takamori, Yoriyuki

    2002-09-01

    The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis has recently been established, and ultrasonographic findings we obtained from five cases consistent with autoimmune pancreatitis are reported here. Case 1, a 77-year-old man, was admitted complaining of loss of body weight. Serum hepatobiliary enzymes and γ-globulin levels were elevated, and antinuclear antibody was positive, Abdominal ultrasonography showed dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct, wall thickening of the common bile duct and hypoechoic swelling of the pancreatic head and body. ERCP revealed multiple stenosis of the intra-and extra-hepatic bile ducts, and diffuse irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. The patient complained of thirst, and the minor salivary gland was examined histologically. Our diagnosis was Sjögren syndrome accompanied by sclerosing cholangitis and a pancreatic lesion. Obstructive jaundice also developed, and PTCD was therefore performed. Both the pancreatic swelling and multiple stenosis of the bile duct improved after steroids were administered. Case 2, a 71-year-old man, was admitted with jaundice. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hypoechoic swelling of the pancreas. ERCP showed stenosis of the common bile duct in the pancreatic head region and diffuse irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. Histological examination of the minor salivary gland suggested Sjögren syndrome. Steroids were therefore administered because the presence of both hyper-γ-globulinemia and positive antinuclear antibody suggested involvement of the autoimmune mechanism. Steroid therapy improved the jaundice as well as the findings from the cholangiograms and pancreatograms. We also encountered three similar cases, all consistent with the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis. The ultrasonographic findings of the pancreatic lesion (1) showed them as homogeneous and markedly hypoechoic areas and, (2) visualized the main pancreatic duct in the lesion, which facilitated a differential diagnosis of the

  3. IgG4-Seronegative Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allon Kahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease is a relatively novel clinical entity whose gastrointestinal manifestations include type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP and IgG4-associated sclerosing cholangitis. The presence of elevated serum IgG4 is suggestive but not essential for the diagnosis of type 1 AIP and is a pervasive feature of the proposed diagnostic criteria. The differential diagnosis of type 1 AIP includes malignant conditions, emphasizing the importance of a deliberate, comprehensive evaluation. Management of patients with a suggestive clinical presentation, but without serum IgG4 elevation, is difficult. Here we present three cases of IgG4-seronegative AIP and sclerosing cholangitis that responded to empiric steroid therapy and discuss approach considerations. These cases demonstrate the value of meticulous application of existing diagnostic algorithms to achieve a clinical diagnosis and avoid surgical intervention.

  4. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Dionysios J Papachristou; David C Whitcomb; Ferga C Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  5. Endoscopic or surgical intervention for painful obstructive chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U. Ahmed; Pahlplatz, J.M.; Nealon, W.H.; Goor, H. van; Gooszen, H.G.; Boermeester, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopy and surgery are the treatment modalities of choice for patients with chronic pancreatitis and dilated pancreatic duct (obstructive chronic pancreatitis). Physicians face, without clear consensus, the choice between endoscopy or surgery for this group of patients. OBJECTIVES: To

  6. Diagnostic Dilemma in a Patient with Jaundice: How to Differentiate between Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Pancreas Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Buechter

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old male patient was referred to our institution in May 2011 for a suspected tumor in the pancreatic head with consecutive jaundice. Using magnetic resonance imaging, further differentiation between chronic inflammation and a malignant process was not possible with certainty. Apart from cholestasis, laboratory studies showed increased values for CA 19-9 to 532 U/ml (normal <37 U/ml and hypergammaglobulinemia (immunoglobulin G, IgG of 19.3% (normal 8.0–15.8% with an elevation of the IgG4 subtype to 2,350 mg/l (normal 52–1,250 mg/l. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a prominent stenosis of the distal ductus hepaticus communis caused by pancreatic head swelling and also a bihilar stenosis of the main hepatic bile ducts. Cytology demonstrated inflammatory cells without evidence of malignancy. Under suspicion of autoimmune pancreatitis with IgG4-associated cholangitis, immunosuppressive therapy with steroids and azathioprine was started. Follow-up endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 3 months displayed regressive development of the diverse stenoses. Jaundice had disappeared and blood values had returned to normal ranges. Moreover, no tumor of the pancreatic head was present in the magnetic resonance control images. Due to clinical and radiological similarities but a consecutive completely different prognosis and therapy, it is of fundamental importance to differentiate between pancreatic cancer and autoimmune pancreatitis. Especially, determination of serum IgG4 levels and associated bile duct lesions induced by inflammation should clarify the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and legitimate immunosuppressive therapy.

  7. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  8. Pancreatic duct stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis: surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Nan; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Liao, Quan; Dai, Meng-Hua; Zhan, Han-Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic duct stone (PDS) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis. Surgery is a common therapeutic option for PDS. In this study we assessed the surgical procedures for PDS in patients with chronic pancreatitis at our hospital. Between January 2004 and September 2009, medical records from 35 patients diagnosed with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were followed up for up to 67 months. The 35 patients underwent ultrasonography, computed tomography, or both, with an overall accuracy rate of 85.7%. Of these patients, 31 underwent the modified Puestow procedure, 2 underwent the Whipple procedure, 1 underwent simple stone removal by duct incision, and 1 underwent pancreatic abscess drainage. Of the 35 patients, 28 were followed up for 4-67 months. There was no postoperative death before discharge or during follow-up. After the modified Puestow procedure, abdominal pain was reduced in patients with complete or incomplete stone clearance (P>0.05). Steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus developed in several patients during a long-term follow-up. Surgery, especially the modified Puestow procedure, is effective and safe for patients with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis. Decompression of intraductal pressure rather than complete clearance of all stones predicts postoperative outcome.

  9. Pancreatic duct abnormalities in focal autoimmune pancreatitis: MR/MRCP imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrelli, Riccardo; Manfredi, Riccardo; Pedrinolla, Beatrice; Boninsegna, Enrico; Ventriglia, Anna; Mehrabi, Sara; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [G.B. Rossi University Hospital, University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Frulloni, Luca [Universita di Verona, Department of Gastroenterology, Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona (Italy)

    2014-08-09

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-MR cholangiopancreatographic (MRCP) findings of focal forms of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) to describe ductal involvement at diagnosis. MR examinations of 123 patients affected by AIP were analysed. We included 26 patients who satisfied International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria and were suffering from focal AIP. Image analysis included: site of parenchymal enlargement, main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter, MPD stenosis, stricture length, presence of upstream dilation within the stricture, signal intensity, and pancreatic enhancement. Signal intensity abnormalities were localized in the head in 10/26 (38.5 %) and in the body-tail in 16/26 (61.5 %) patients. MRCP showed a single MPD stenosis in 12/26 (46.1 %) and multiple MPD stenosis in 14/26 (53.8 %) patients, without a dilation of the upstream MPD (mean: 3.83 mm). Lesions showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images in all patients, and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images in 22/26 (84.6 %) patients. The affected parenchyma was hypovascular during the arterial phase in 25/26 (96.2 %) patients with contrast retention. MR-MRCP are effective techniques for the diagnosis of AIP showing the loss of the physiological lobulation and the typical contrastographic appearance. The presence of multiple, long stenoses without an upstream MPD dilation at MRCP suggests the diagnosis of AIP, and can be useful in differential diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  10. Differentiation between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Takayoshi; Oyama, Hiroyasu; Shiratori, Keiko; Toki, Fumitake

    2010-01-01

    We have reviewed the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) images of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and pancreatic carcinoma (Pca) in an attempt to identify findings that would facilitate making a differential diagnosis between AIP and Pca. The study cohort consisted of 39 patients diagnosed with AIP and 62 patients diagnosed with Pca. The ERCP findings in the pancreatic duct and biliary tract were compared between the two groups. The ERCP images revealed that AIP patients had a higher prevalence of narrowing of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) for ≥3 cm of its length and a higher prevalence for the presence of side branches in the narrowed portion of the MPD than Pca patients (p 5 cm of its length and the presence of side branches. Among our patient cohort, the ERCP findings in terms of the length of the narrowed portion of the MPD, the presence of side branches, and maximal diameter of the upstream MPD enabled differential diagnosis between AIP and Pca in most of the cases. However, it must be borne in mind that some Pca patients have ERCP findings similar to those of AIP patients. (author)

  11. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  12. MODERN VIEWS ON ETIOLOGY OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS AND CORRECTION OF FUNCTIONAL INSUFFICIENCY OF THE PANCREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. А. Kornienko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a multietiological disorder characterized by progressive structural changes of the pancreas and development of its eccrine and endocrine insufficiency. The potential causes of chronic pancreatitis in children include obstruction of the pancreas ducts due to cholelithiasis, chronic cholecystitis with biliary sludge, excretory ducts anomalies; obesity and hyperlipidemia; abdominal traumas and infectious pancreatic diseases. Recently new possible variants of chronic pancreatitisautoimmune and hereditary — have been diagnosed due to the widening of diagnostic potentials. Fifty children and adolescents with chronic pancreatitis were diagnosed. It was shown, that obstructive chronic pancreatitis was found in 50%, obesity-associated. According to the literature, more than 70% of children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis have genetic mutations in genes SFTR, PRSS1 and SPINK1, both single and associated. These lead to imbalance of the trypsinogen activation and inactivation in the pancreas tissue. Severe mutations can be an independent cause of chronic pancreatitis, mild ones manifest after the impact of some external factors. Regardless of the cause of the disease, the mandatory component of the treatment is enzyme replacement therapy with the preference to microspherical forms.

  13. Histological evaluation of obliterative phlebitis for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Notohara, Kenji; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kazuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Okumura, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Shuya; Yoshida, Michihiro; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Satoru; Ohara, Hirotaka; Joh, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Obliterative phlebitis is a useful pathological finding for the diagnosis of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), or type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis. The present study evaluated histological findings of obliterative phlebitis, including the significance of adding Elastica van Gieson stain (EVG) in comparison with other pancreatic conditions. Specimens of LPSP (n = 18), chronic pancreatitis (CP; n = 24), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA; n = 45) were enrolled. Obliterative venous lesions (OVLs), defined as the presence of inflammatory cells and/or fibrosis inside the tunica adventitia, were counted and compared between hematoxylin and eosin stain (H&E) and EVG. OVLs were classified into three types: OVL-1, lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis against a loose textured background; OVL-2, dense fibrosis with minimal or no lymphoplasmacytic infiltration; and OVL-3, densely packed lymphoplasmacytic infiltration without fibrosis. OVL type and OVL size were compared between disease groups. OVL counts in LPSP, CP, and PDA were significantly higher with EVG than with H&E (p < 0.001). OVL-1 was most common in LPSP (H&E 92.4 %, EVG 79.8 %), and was identified in almost all cases of LPSP, but was less common in CP and PDA. Maximum diameter and OVL count in 1 cm(2) of OVL-1 were high for LPSP. Maximum diameter of OVL-1 ≥150 μm was observed in 17 LPSP, 0 CP, and 1 PDA cases (sensitivity 94.4 %, specificity 98.6 %). Additional EVG is useful for excluding conditions mimicking OVL-1 or detecting OVL in small specimens. The presence of OVL-1 with diameter ≥150 μm is highly diagnostic for LPSP.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: review and update of etiology, risk factors, and management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pham

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving inflammation, fibrosis, and loss of acinar and islet cells which can manifest in unrelenting abdominal pain, malnutrition, and exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. The Toxic-Metabolic, Idiopathic, Genetic, Autoimmune, Recurrent and Severe Acute Pancreatitis, Obstructive (TIGAR-O classification system categorizes known causes and factors that contribute to chronic pancreatitis. Although determining disease etiology provides a framework for focused and specific treatments, chronic pancreatitis remains a challenging condition to treat owing to the often refractory, centrally mediated pain and the lack of consensus regarding when endoscopic therapy and surgery are indicated. Further complications incurred include both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pseudocyst formation, bile duct obstruction, and pancreatic cancer. Medical treatment of chronic pancreatitis involves controlling pain, addressing malnutrition via the treatment of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and recognizing the risk of osteoporosis, and administering appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation and diabetic agents. Cornerstones in treatment include the recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and administration of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, support to cease smoking and alcohol consumption, consultation with a dietitian, and a systematic follow-up to assure optimal treatment effect.

  15. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis decreases the risk for pancreatic cancer: a multicenter retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Junji; Tanaka, Masao; Ohtsuka, Takao; Tokunaga, Shoji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is suggested to be one of the risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the high incidence of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis in Japan and to determine the factors associated with the risk for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The working group of the Research Committee of Intractable Disease supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan carried out a nationwide survey to investigate the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This retrospective study included patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis who had had at least 2 years of follow-up. They were contacted through 22 Japanese referral centers experienced in the management of chronic pancreatitis. The standardized incidence ratio (95 CI) of pancreatic cancer was 11.8 (7.1-18.4). The incidence of pancreatic cancer was significantly lower in patients who had received surgery for chronic pancreatitis than in those who had not undergone surgery (hazard ratio estimated by Cox regression 0.11; 95% CI, 0.0014-0.80; P = .03). Patients who continued to drink alcohol after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis showed a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer than those who stopped drinking after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 5.07; 95% CI, 1.13-22.73; P = .03). This study confirmed that chronic pancreatitis is an important risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Patients who underwent surgery for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis had significantly lower incidences of pancreatic cancer. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis may inhibit the development of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  17. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  18. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Chronic pancreatitis, metabolic bone disease, osteomalacia, osteopenia ... with malabsorption, and endocrine dysfunction results in diabetes .... of insufficiency and deficiency were not assessed separately due ...

  19. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  20. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation. The predrain......The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation...

  1. Pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical or interventional drainage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, D.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudocyst formation is a well-known complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Many pseudocysts are asymptomatic and may resolve without intervention. For a symptomatic pseudocyst drainage is indicated. Although surgical cystoenterostomy has been the treatment of choice for many years,

  2. A Case of Chronic Calcific Nonalcoholic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Kangas-Dick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical Calcific Pancreatitis (TCP is a type of chronic calcific nonalcoholic pancreatitis. Similar to nonalcoholic chronic pancreatitis, it presents in the second and third decades of life; however this type is reported mostly in the developing tropical and subtropical countries. It is associated with the formation of pancreatic calculi and a high probability of developing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Epidemiologic studies have shown that these patients have an increased risk of developing pancreatic carcinoma. The etiology of TCP remains uncertain, with the current consensus suggesting genetics as well as possible toxicity from consuming large amounts of cassava, a tuber. Definite diagnosis of TCP requires younger age of onset, history of malnutrition, and presence of diabetes mellitus along with extensive pancreatic calcification and ductal calculi. When patients meet most but not all of these conditions the term Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis (ICP is used. This is a case of a 44-year-old man who presented with most features seen in TCP, and however, was diagnosed with ICP.

  3. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Yasuda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum, but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  4. [Pancreatic anastomosis in operative treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, E; Izbicki, J R; Bockhorn, M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process, which is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas and leads to abdominal pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Surgical therapy is indicated by the absence of pain relief and local complications. The target of the surgical approach is to relieve the pancreatic and bile ducts and resection of the fibrotic and calcified parenchyma. Drainage procedures, such as the Partington-Rochelle method, are used in patients with isolated congestion of the pancreatic duct without further organ complications, such as inflammatory processes of the pancreatic head; however, patients with CP often have an inflammatory swelling of the pancreatic head. In this case classical pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) or organ-sparing duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) with its various techniques (e.g. Beger, Frey, Bern and V‑shape) can be applied. Due to similar long-term results PD should be carried out in cases of suspicion or detection of malignancies and DPPHR for treatment of CP.

  5. Pancreatic HIF2α Stabilization Leads to Chronic Pancreatitis and Predisposes to Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather K. Schofield

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We show that pancreatic HIF2α stabilization disrupts pancreatic homeostasis, leading to chronic pancreatitis, and, in the context of oncogenic Kras, MCN formation. These findings provide new mouse models of both chronic pancreatitis and MCN, as well as illustrate the importance of hypoxia signaling in the pancreas.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis: from guidelines to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The paucity of specific standardized criteria leads to uncertainties in clinical practice regarding the management of chronic pancreatitis (CP.Objectives This paper reports some of the systematic guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of CP recently elaborated by an Italian multicenter study group. We review recommendations on clinical and nutritional aspects of the disease, assessment of pancreatic function, treatment of exocrine pancreatic failure and secondary diabetes, treatment of pain, and prevention of painful relapses. The review also looks at the role of endoscopy in the management of pancreatic pain, pancreatic stones, duct narrowing and dilation, and complications; the appropriate use of various imaging techniques, including endoscopic ultrasound; and the indications for and techniques used in surgical management of CP.

  7. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in 21 patients suffering from autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frulloni, Luca; Scattolini, Chiara; Katsotourchi, Anna Maria; Amodio, Antonio; Gabbrielli, Armando; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Benini, Luigi; Vantini, Italo

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) responds rapidly and dramatically to steroid therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function in patients suffering from AIP both before and after steroid therapy. Fecal elastase 1 and diabetes were evaluated before steroid therapy and within 1 month of its suspension in 21 patients (13 males and 8 females, mean age 43 +/- 16.5 years) diagnosed as having AIP between 2006 and 2008. At clinical onset, fecal elastase 1 was 107 +/- 126 microg/g stool. Thirteen patients (62%) showed severe pancreatic insufficiency (insufficiency (100-200 microg/g stool), while 4 (19%) had normal pancreatic function (>200 microg/g stool). Before steroids, diabetes was diagnosed in 5 patients (24%), all of whom had very low levels of fecal elastase 1 (endocrine pancreatic insufficiency at clinical onset. These insufficiencies improve after steroid therapy. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Andersen, Vibeke; Sonne, J

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...

  9. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  10. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  11. Congenital anomalies, hereditary diseases of the pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The most important congenital anomalies include pancreas divisum, annular pancreas and ectopic pancreas. Patients with pancreas divisum may be more susceptible to acute or chronic pancreatitis and patients with an annular pancreas may develop duodenal stenosis. In pancreas divisum the key finding is the visualization of the main duct draining into the duodenum via the small papilla, separated from the common bile duct. Annular pancreas may show as a well defined ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum. Ectopic pancreas is usually asymptomatic but may give rise to abdominal complaints and may be confused with submucosal tumors. Acute pancreatitis is classified as mild or severe. In mild forms ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice whereas in severe forms with extensive pancreatic and peripancreatic necroses computed tomography is the favored method. It is crucial to identify signs and criteria that come along with an increased risk of infection of the necroses. MRI plays an inferior role in the assessment of acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a longstanding inflammatory and fibrosing process causing pain and loss of function. Cross-section imaging is particularly in demand for the detection of complications and the differentiation from pancreatic cancer. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis, and favourable response to corticosteroid treatment. (orig.)

  12. Serum Immunoglobulin G4 in Discriminating Autoimmune Pancreatitis From Pancreatic Cancer: A Diagnostic Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Cao, Qin; Jiang, Min; Sun, Ming-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Differentiation between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and pancreatic cancer (PC) is a clinical challenge. Emerging published data on the accuracy of serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) for the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC are inconsistent. The objective of our study was to perform a meta-analysis evaluating the clinical utility of serum IgG4 in the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. We performed a systematic literature search of multiple electronic databases. The methodological quality of each study was assessed according to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist. Random-effects model was used to summarize the diagnostic odds ratio and other measures of accuracy. Eleven studies comprising 523 AIP patients and 771 PC patients were included in the meta-analysis. The summary estimates for serum IgG4 in distinguishing AIP from PC were as follows: diagnostic odds ratio, 57.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.17-141.67); sensitivity, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68-0.76); specificity, 0.93 (95% CI, 0.91-0.94). The area under the curve of serum IgG4 in distinguishing AIP from PC was 0.9200. Our meta-analysis found that serum IgG4 has high specificity and relatively low sensitivity in the differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. Therefore, serum IgG4 is useful in distinguishing AIP from PC.

  13. Combined Medical Treatment Of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umnova Larisa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the most effective medical treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, by using either pancreatin alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI or PPI and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, who did not require a surgical treatment, received medical treatment for a one–month period: 20 patients received pancreatin monotherapy; 48 patients were given a combination of pancreatin and PPI; 38 patients were treated with a combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID (PNP therapy group. In comparison with other groups, patients in the PNP therapy group showed improvement in body mass index, abdominal pain, bowel movements, chronic pancreatitis severity, as well as their quality of life assessment (p < 0.05. The combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID was the most effective among those applied in chronic pancreatitis patient treatment. A one–month long course of this therapy was safe and did not cause any significant adverse effects. The combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID for treatment of chronic pancreatitis can be recommended, as it is based on pathogenesis of the disease, effective, safe and economically advantageous.

  14. Pediatric chronic pancreatitis is associated with genetic risk factors and substantial disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Bellin, Melena; Husain, Sohail Z; Ahuja, Monika; Barth, Bradley; Davis, Heather; Durie, Peter R; Fishman, Douglas S; Freedman, Steven D; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Giefer, Matthew J; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Kumar, Soma; Morinville, Veronique D; Lowe, Mark E; Nuehring, Neil E; Ooi, Chee Y; Pohl, John F; Troendle, David; Werlin, Steven L; Wilschanski, Michael; Yen, Elizabeth; Uc, Aliye

    2015-04-01

    To determine the clinical presentation, diagnostic variables, risk factors, and disease burden in children with chronic pancreatitis. We performed a cross-sectional study of data from the International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a Cure, a registry of children with acute recurrent pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Between-group differences were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Among 170 subjects in the registry, 76 (45%) had chronic pancreatitis; 57% were female, 80% were white; median age at diagnosis was 9.9 years. Pancreatitis-predisposing genetic mutations were identified in 51 (67%) and obstructive risk factors in 25 (33%). Toxic/metabolic and autoimmune factors were uncommon. Imaging demonstrated ductal abnormalities and pancreatic atrophy more commonly than calcifications. Fifty-nine (77%) reported abdominal pain within the past year; pain was reported as constant and receiving narcotics in 28%. Children with chronic pancreatitis reported a median of 3 emergency department visits and 2 hospitalizations in the last year. Forty-seven subjects (70%) missed 1 day of school in the past month as the result of chronic pancreatitis; 26 (34%) missed 3 or more days. Children reporting constant pain were more likely to miss school (P = .002), visit the emergency department (P = .01), and experience hospitalizations (P = .03) compared with children with episodic pain. Thirty-three children (43%) underwent therapeutic endoscopic retrograde pancreatography; one or more pancreatic surgeries were performed in 30 (39%). Chronic pancreatitis occurs at a young age with distinct clinical features. Genetic and obstructive risk factors are common, and disease burden is substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic asymptomatic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic disease

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    Generoso Uomo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Almost all patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia undergo an expensive, long, difficult and often repeated diagnostic workup even if this occurrence is not associated with symptoms or with known pancreatotoxic factors. This is in relationship with the poor knowledge that, beside hyperenzymemia secondary to pancreatic diseases and systemic illnesses, various non-pathological forms of chronic hyperamylasemia can occur in clinical practice. AIM OF THE STUDY This study was addressed to assess the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic diseases (CHUPD. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data of all patients with CHUPD were retrospectively reviewed (June 1997-March 2007. Forty patients were included in the study; median follow- up was 33 months (range 3-84 months. CHUPD was secondary to: a chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia, 16 patients (40%; b macroamylasemia, 15 patients (37.5%; c salivary hyperamylasemia, 9 patients (22.5%. Gilbert’s syndrome was present in 13 patients (32.5%; 8 with macroamylasemia and hyperdyslipidemia in 8 patients (20%; 5 with chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia. Diagnostic exams (all in the normal range performed before our observation were: Ca19-9 serum level in 37/40 (92.5%, ultrasonography and computed tomography-scan in all patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 21/40 (52.5%, abdominal magnetic resonance in 14/40 (35%. Previous diagnosis in these asymptomatic subjects were: chronic pancreatitis in 26 cases (65%; recurrent pancreatitis in 10 cases (25%; the remaining 4 patients (10% were addressed without a specific diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS In clinical practice, the occurrence of an unexplained chronic hyperamylasemia very often allows to an unappropriate diagnostic workup due to the poor familiarity with CHUPD conditions.

  16. Idiopathic chronic calcific pancreatitis in a child: An uncommon entity

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Simmi; Garg, Ravinder; Bansal, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory disease of pancreas can be acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is a reversible process whereas chronic pancreatitis produces irreversible changes in the architecture and function of pancreas. Although pancreatitis is less common in children than in adults it still occurs with regularity and should be considered in any child with acute or chronic abdominal pain. The main difference between chronic pancreatitis in children and adults is in the etiology. We present a case of idiopa...

  17. High prevalence of autoimmune urticaria in children with chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Luigia; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Miniello, Vito L

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of chronic urticaria (CU) in childhood often remains unrecognized. Recently, in adults it has been shown that approximately 40% of patients with CU have autoimmune urticaria (AU); however, no data are available in children.......The etiology of chronic urticaria (CU) in childhood often remains unrecognized. Recently, in adults it has been shown that approximately 40% of patients with CU have autoimmune urticaria (AU); however, no data are available in children....

  18. IgG4-related disease: with emphasis on the biopsy diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Klöppel, Günter

    2018-04-01

    In 2011, chronic fibroinflammatory processes occurring simultaneously or metachronously in various organs and associated with elevated IgG4 serum levels and/or tissue infiltration with IgG4-positive plasma cells have been recognized as manifestations of a systemic disorder called IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The histologic key findings are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells combined with storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis. Among the organs mainly affected by IgG4-RD are the pancreas and the extrahepatic bile ducts. The pancreatic and biliary alterations have been described under the terms autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. These diseases are currently more precisely called IgG4-related pancreatitis (or type 1 AIP to distinguish it from type 2 AIP that is unrelated to IgG4-RD) and IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-related SC). Clinically and grossly, both diseases commonly imitate pancreatic and biliary adenocarcinoma, tumors that are well known for their dismal prognosis. As IgG4-RD responds to steroid treatment, making a resection of a suspected tumor unnecessary, a biopsy is often required to establish the preoperative diagnosis. This review discusses the morphologic spectrum of IgG4-related pancreatitis and IgG4-related SC and focuses on the biopsy relevant histologic features for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  19. Chronic pancreatitis: The case for surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis includes medical, endoscopic and surgical therapy. Medical treatment may involve the use of analgesics, pancreatic enzymes, antioxidants and removal of risk factors. However, a substantial number of patients do not experience pain relief with medical treatment, and those with local complications cannot be treated medically indefinitely. These require endoscopic or surgical therapy. Endoscopic therapy has involved the use of a pancreatic sphincterotomy, b stent placement, c nasopancreatic drainage, d pseudocyst drainage, e extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL, and f dilatation of strictures. The current options for surgical therapy include: a partial pancreatic resections, b extended pancreatic drainage procedures (which involve additional subtotal resection of the head or a deep coring out of the head, or c pure pancreatic drainage procedures. In effect surgical procedures provide a more thorough drainage of the ductal system than pancreatic stent placement. This is especially true in the complex ductal arrangement of the head of the pancreas, where simple drainage of the duct or stent placement by endoscopy is unlikely to provide thorough drainage and relief of symptoms.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound features of chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    As endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing pancreatic disorders, it can demonstrate subtle alterations in the pancreatic parenchymal and ductal structure even before traditional imaging and functional testing demonstrate any abnormality. In spite...... of this fact and abundant literature, the exact role of EUS in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is still not established. The EUS features to diagnose CP have evolved over a period from a pure qualitative approach to more advanced and complicated scoring systems incorporating multiple parenchymal...... to define the exact role of these criteria. The measurement of strain ratio using quantitative EUS elastography and thus allowing quantification of pancreatic fibrosis seems to be a promising new technique....

  1. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  2. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch hospitals from December 2003 through March 2007. We collected information on disease course, outpatient visits, and hospital readmissions, as well as results from imaging, laboratory, and histology studies. Standardized follow-up questionnaires were sent to all available patients to collect information on hospitalizations and interventions for pancreatic disease, abdominal pain, steatorrhea, diabetes mellitus, medications, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients were followed up for a median time period of 57 months. Primary end points were recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Risk factors were evaluated using regression analysis. The cumulative risk was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 117 patients (17%), and CP occurred in 51 patients (7.6%). Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 12% of patients with biliary disease, 24% of patients with alcoholic etiology, and 25% of patients with disease of idiopathic or other etiologies; CP occurred in 3%, 16%, and 10% of these patients, respectively. Etiology, smoking, and necrotizing pancreatitis were independent risk factors for recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores at admission also were associated independently with recurrent pancreatitis. The cumulative risk for recurrent pancreatitis over 5 years was highest among smokers at 40% (compared with 13% for nonsmokers). For alcohol abusers and current smokers, the cumulative risks for CP were similar-approximately 18%. In contrast, the cumulative risk of CP increased to 30% in patients who smoked and abused alcohol. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals, a first

  3. A Case of Autoimmune Pancreatitis Presenting as a Deterioration in Glycaemic Control in a Patient with Pre-Existing Type 2 Diabetes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, H

    2017-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first described in 1961 and accounts for 5-6% of cases of chronic pancreatitis, though the prevalence is increasing with increasing awareness of the disease1,2. There are two types of autoimmune pancreatitis with different clinical and pathological features. Type 1 AIP is an IgG4 related disease and tends to occur in elderly patients in the 7th decade, with a male preponderance3. Type 1 AIP is associated with other organ involvement and commonly affects the biliary system3. In contrast, Type 2 AIP occurs in patients in the 5th-6th decade of life and other organ involvement is uncommon3. Both types of AIP respond well to steroids with reported remission rates of 99% and 92% for Type 1 and Type 2 AIP respectively4.\\r\

  4. Proteomics portrait of archival lesions of chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Pan

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. The etiology is multi-fold, but all lead to progressive scarring and loss of pancreatic function. Early diagnosis is difficult; and the understanding of the molecular events that underlie this progressive disease is limited. In this study, we investigated differential proteins associated with mild and severe chronic pancreatitis in comparison with normal pancreas and pancreatic cancer. Paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues from five well-characterized specimens each of normal pancreas (NL, mild chronic pancreatitis (MCP, severe chronic pancreatitis (SCP and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC were subjected to proteomic analysis using a "label-free" comparative approach. Our results show that the numbers of differential proteins increase substantially with the disease severity, from mild to severe chronic pancreatitis, while the number of dysregulated proteins is highest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Important functional groups and biological processes associated with chronic pancreatitis and cancer include acinar cell secretory proteins, pancreatic fibrosis/stellate cell activation, glycoproteins, and inflammatory proteins. Three differential proteins were selected for verification by immunohistochemistry, including collagen 14A1, lumican and versican. Further canonical pathway analysis revealed that acute phase response signal, prothrombin activation pathway, and pancreatic fibrosis/pancreatic stellate cell activation pathway were the most significant pathways involved in chronic pancreatitis, while pathways relating to metabolism were the most significant pathways in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study reveals a group of differentially expressed proteins and the related pathways that may shed light on the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and the common molecular events associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  5. Pancreatitis autoinmune asociada a fibrosis retroperitoneal: evolución tras dos años de seguimiento Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis: outcome after 24 months of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Romero

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la pancreatitis autoinmune es un tipo de pancreatitis crónica caracterizado por un infiltrado linfoplasmocitario y una elevación de IgG e IgG4, que se ha descrito asociada a diversas manifestaciones extrapancreáticas y enfermedades autoinmunes, lo cual apoya la teoría de un mecanismo autoinmune fisiopatólogico de base. Caso clínico: presentamos el caso de un varón que debutó simultáneamente con una pancreatitis autoinmune asociada a fibrosis retroperitoneal y lesión de la vía biliar extrapancreática, con respuesta total tras tratamiento con corticoides durante 4 meses y ausencia de recurrencia tras 24 meses de seguimiento. Discusión: la pancreatitis autoinmune es un tipo de pancreatitis crónica que probablemente forme parte de un proceso sistémico autoinmune, cuyas manifestaciones extrapancreáticas más frecuentes son la fibrosis retroperitoneal y las lesiones de la vía biliar extrapancreática. Su correcto diagnóstico e inicio precoz del tratamiento puede favorecer la resolución completa de las lesiones, principalmente en los casos de bajo grado de actividad, con menor probabilidad de recurrencia.Introduction: autoimmune pancreatitis is a kind of chronic pancreatitis characterized by the presence of lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and severely elevated serum IgG and IgG4, which has been associated to many extrapancreatic lesions and other autoimmune disorders, leading to the theory of an autoimmune mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Case report: we report the case of a man who simultaneously presented with autoimmune pancreatitis associated with retroperitonal fibrosis, and a lesion of the extrapancreatic bile duct, with total response to corticosteroid treatment for 4 moths and absence of recurrence after 24 months of follow-up. Discussion: autoimmune pancreatitis is a kind of chronic pancreatitis that is probably a part of a systemic autoinmune disease, with retroperitoneal fibrosis and

  6. Novel and Experimental Therapies in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Soumya; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The currently available treatment of CP is aimed at controlling symptoms and managing complications. Unfortunately, no specific treatment is available to halt the progression of the disease process because the pathophysiological perturbations in CP are not well understood. In this review, we discuss various therapeutic targets and investigational agents acting on these targets. Among these, therapies modulating immune cells and those acting on pancreatic stellate cells appear promising and may translate into clinical benefit in near future. However, these experimental therapies are mostly in animal models and they do not recapitulate all aspects of human disease. Still they may be beneficial in developing effective therapeutic modalities to curb inflammation in chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis decreased when the lag period was increased to 5 years (EE: 7.90; 95% CI: 4.26-14.66) or a minimum of 9 years (EE: 3.53; 95% CI: 1.69-7.38). In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, but the association diminishes with long-term follow-up. Five years after diagnosis, chronic pancreatitis patients have a nearly eight-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that common practice on inducing a 2-year lag period in these studies may not be sufficient. We also recommend a close follow-up in the first years following a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to avoid overlooking a pancreatic cancer.

  8. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function and salivary gland function in autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Egawa, Naoto; Inokuma, Shigeko; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Kamata, Noriko; Nakamura, Teruo; Matsukawa, Masakatsu

    2003-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct clinical entity in which an autoimmune mechanism may be involved in pathogenesis. To investigate salivary gland function in addition to pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in patients with AIP, and to determine changes occurring after steroid therapy. Fasting serum glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests or glycosylated hemoglobin values were examined in 19 patients with AIP. N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid excretion test, sialochemistry and parotid gland scintigraphy were performed in 8 patients. Eight patients had evidence of DM. Steroid therapy subsequently improved insulin secretion and glycemic control in 3 of 5 patients treated. Pancreatic exocrine function was reduced in 88% of patients. Impaired pancreatic exocrine function improved after steroid therapy in 3 of 6 patients treated. The 3 patients also showed treatment-related improvement in endocrine function. Concentration of beta2-microglobulin in saliva was significantly raised in patients with AIP compared with controls (P gland dysfunction improved after steroid therapy in all 5 patients treated. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine and salivary gland function were frequently impaired in patients with AIP, and steroid therapy was occasionally effective for these dysfunctions.

  9. Review article: Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, N. A.; Gouma, D. J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Busch, O. R. C.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The therapeutic approach to patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) is complicated by the fact that patients are presented to the physician at different stages of disease and in the presence of varying clinical symptoms. Generally, an expectant approach is justified for patients with

  10. Possibilities of radiologic diagnosis of pancreatic calcinosis and chronic calculous pancreatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, A.S.; Sivash, Eh.S.; Kudryavtseva, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis of the pancreatic gland calculous damage as well as chronic pancreatitis have been studied in 23 patients. A methodologic approach to examination of this group of patients was defined. Posteroanterior radiography has been shown to be of decisive importance in diagnosis of the calcified pancreatic gland. Duodenography and choleduodenography both considerably promote recognition of chronic pancreatitis. The radiologic method also allows one to reveal a series of complications: the common bile duct compression, duodenal stenosis, pancreatic tumor in the presence of chronic pancreatitis, malabsorption syndrome

  11. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  12. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC CYSTIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Sled

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the number of patients with complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cysts observed in recent decades. Mostly people of working age are susceptible to disease. This makes the issue a social importance.The article presents a modern view of the choice of method of surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis and cystic optimal terms of therapy, depending on the degree of “maturity” of pancreatic cysts. A detailed analysis of both traditional surgery and advanced minimally invasive treatment for pancreatic cysts is performed in this review of the literature.Emphasis is placed on radical methods of treatment, particularly in the duodenum-preserving operations. Pathogenic study is carried out. The problem of choosing the most radical and at the same time the organ-preserving technique, helping to improve the immediate and long-term results, the quality of life and social and labor rehabilitation, has not lost its relevance. Studies carried out in this area are currently important.

  13. Variance in elective surgery for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nehal S; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2009-01-08

    Evidence to guide selection of optimal surgical treatment for patients with painful chronic pancreatitis is limited. Baseline assessment data are limited and thus patients in different centres may be presenting at different stages of their illness. This study undertakes a systematic overview of reports of elective surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis with particular reference to reporting of quality of life and baseline assessment and relation between disease and type of procedure. A computerised search of the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases was undertaken for the period January 1997 to March 2007 yielding 46 manuscripts providing data on 4,626 patients undergoing elective surgery for chronic pancreatitis. The median number of patients per study was 71 (range: 4-484). The median period for recruitment of patients was 10 years (range: 2-36 years). An externally validated quality of life questionnaire is reported in 8 (17.4%) of 46 manuscripts covering 441 (9.5%) of 4,626 patients. Formal comparison of pre-operative and post-operative pain scores was provided in 15 (32.6%) of manuscripts. Only seven (15.2%) reports provide a formal rationale or indication for selection of the type of elective surgical procedure for a stated disease variant and these papers cover 481 (10.4%) patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that there is a lack of standardization between units of the criteria for operative intervention in painful chronic pancreatitis. At a minimum, formal quality of life testing using a validated system should be undertaken in all patients prior to elective surgery for painful chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Endoscopic or surgical intervention for painful obstructive chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Pahlplatz, Johanna M.; Nealon, Wiliam H.; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy and surgery are the treatment modalities of choice for patients with chronic pancreatitis and dilated pancreatic duct (obstructive chronic pancreatitis). Physicians face, without clear consensus, the choice between endoscopy or surgery for this group of patients. To assess and compare the

  15. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Diagnostic value of computer tomography in chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Schrumpf, E.; Bergan, A.; Larsen, S.

    1981-01-01

    During a 3-year-period 39 patients with chronic pancreatitis were subjected to roentgen examinations and exocrine pancreatic function tests (EPFT). Computer tomography (CT) was carried out in 36 of these, and revealed pancreatic disease in 29, while characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis were demonstrated in 24 patients. CT was particularly valuable in diagnosing intra- and extrapancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic abscesses complicating chronic pancreatitis. At endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) pathologic alterations were demonstrated in 23 of 24 patients, and was diagnostic for chronic pancreatitis in 20 patients. The cannulation failed in 7 patients. The results indicate that ERP cannot be replaced by CT. ERP is still needed for detailed demonstration of the pancreatic duct system, especially preoperatively. Conventional films of the abdomen, EPFT and angiography were the least sensitive tests. (Auth.)

  17. Role of autoimmunity in nonviral chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarapurkar, D N; Amarapurkar, A D

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with chronic liver disease. Four hundred and thirty five consecutive patient with chronic liver disease seen in our department from January 1997 to December 1998 were studied with detailed history and clinical examination. All the patients underwent liver function tests, ultrasonography, isotope liver scanning, viral markers, autoimmune markers ANA, ASMA, LKM1 and AMA (by immunofluorescence technique) and liver histology whenever permissible. Appropriate work up for Wilson's disease was done whenever suspected clinically. Diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was made by the composite scoring system by international autoimmune hepatitis group. Twenty out of the 435 patients met the criteria of definite autoimmune hepatitis and seven patient had probable autoimmune hepatitis. Forty out of 408 patients showed markers of autoimmunity positive but did not qualify diagnosis of AIH on composite scores. Demographic profile of 27 patients with autoimmune hepatitis was as follows; male:female ratio 1:8, mean age 39.8 +/- 13 years (Range 4-65 years); mode of presentation as cirrhosis 11/27 (40.7%), chronic hepatitis 12/27 (44.4%) and acute hepatitis 4/27 (14.8%). Elevated serum bilirubin levels were seen in 12 (44.4%) patients while mean serum aminotransferases levels were 249 +/- 343 and 262 +/- 418 respectively. Other disease associations seen were as follows: diabetes in 4 (14.8%), rheumatoid arthritis in 3 (11%), hypothyroidism in 2 (7.4%) and ulcerative colitis in 1 (3.7%). The pattern of autoimmune markers was ANA +ve 23/27 (85%) (+ve titres of ANA > 1:80 in adults and 1:20 in children), ASMA +ve in 16/27 (59.2%) (+ve titres of ASMA > 1:40) and LKM1 in 3 patients. AMA in tires less than 1:80 was found in 3 patients. Liver histology changes seen were lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (100%), bridging necrosis (93%), liver cell rossetting (80%) and fibrosis with or without cirrhosis (50

  18. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis: Indications and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Monica M; Visser, Brendan C

    2017-07-01

    There are a number of surgical strategies for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. The optimal intervention should provide effective pain relief, improve/maintain quality of life, preserve exocrine and endocrine function, and manage local complications. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was once the standard operation for patients with chronic pancreatitis; however, other procedures such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections and its variants have been introduced with good long-term results. Pancreatic duct drainage via a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy continues to be effective in ameliorating symptoms and expediting return to normal lifestyle in many patients. This review summarizes operative indications and gives an overview of the different surgical strategies in treating chronic pancreatitis.

  19. Innate lymphoid cells in autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tingting; Turner, Jan-Eric

    2018-03-22

    Abnormal activation of the innate immune system is a common feature of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Since their identification as a separate family of leukocytes, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged as important effector cells of the innate immune system. Alterations in ILC function and subtype distribution have been observed in a variety of immune-mediated diseases in humans and evidence from experimental models suggests a subtype specific role of ILCs in the pathophysiology of autoimmune inflammation. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of ILC biology in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders, including multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, psoriasis, and rheumatic diseases, with a special focus on the potential of ILCs as therapeutic targets for the development of novel treatment strategies in humans.

  20. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  1. Etiology, pathology, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in Chinese population: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Ramdany, Sonam; Zhao, Gang; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Balde, Oumar Taibata; Barry, Ahmed Boubacar; Adji, Seid; Li, Xiang; Jin, Yan; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population. The clinical data of 142 patients with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. All patients were of Chinese nationality and hospitalized from January 2008 to December 2011. Their ages ranged from 14 to 76 years, with a mean of 43 years. Of 142 patients, there were 72 cases of obstructive chronic pancreatitis (50.70%), 19 cases of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (13.38%), 14 cases of autoimmune pancreatitis (9.86%) and 37 cases of undetermined etiology (26.06%). Pathologically, the average inflammatory mass diameter was 3.8 ± 3.3 cm, biliary obstruction occurred in 36 cases, gall stones in 70 cases, calcification in 88 cases, ductal dilatation in 61 cases, side branch dilatation in 32 cases, ductal irregularity in 10 cases, lymphocytic inflammation in 23 cases, obliterative phlebitis in 14 cases, extra pancreatic lesion in 19 cases and fibrosis in 142 cases. Location of pancreatic lesion in the region of head (n=97), neck (n=16), body (n=12), tail (n=15) and whole pancreas (n=2) influenced the choice of surgical procedures. Ninety-four patients (66.20%) received surgical treatment and 33.80% received other treatments. After operation, 80.85% of 94 patients experienced decreased pain, and 8.51% of 94 showed recovery of endocrine function but with a complication rate of 12.77%. All the operations were performed successfully. According to the pain scale of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (QLQ-C30) a decrease from 76 ± 22 to 14 ± 18 was observed. Etiology, pathological characteristics, management and prognosis of chronic pancreatitis in the Chinese population vary from others.

  2. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  3. The use of rhG-CSF in chronic autoimmune neutropenia: reversal of autoimmune phenomena, a case history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T. W.; de Haas, M.; de Groot, C. J.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Weening, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy had been suffering from chronic autoimmune neutropenia for more than 5 years. The neutropenia proved to be resistant to high-dose steroids and intravenous (either low-or high-dose) immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy. The chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenia and recurrent phases of

  4. Current surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimoto, Takayuki; Uchida, Eiji; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Cho, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a painful, yet benign inflammatory process of the pancreas. Surgical management should be individualized because the pain is multifactorial and its mechanisms vary from patient to patient. Two main pathogenetic theories for the mechanisms of pain in CP have been proposed: the neurogenic theory and the theory of increased intraductal/intraparenchymal pressures. The latter theory is strongly supported by the good results of drainage procedures in the surgical management of CP. Other possible contributing factors include pancreatic ischemia; a centrally sensitized pain state; and the development of complications, such as pseudocysts and stenosis of the duodenum or common bile duct. Common indications for surgery include intractable pain, suspicion of neoplasm, and complications that cannot be resolved with radiological or endoscopic treatments. Operative procedures have been historically classified into 4 categories: decompression procedures for diseased and obstructed pancreatic ducts; resection procedures for the proximal, distal, or total pancreas; denervation procedures of the pancreas; and hybrid procedures. Pancreaticoduodenectomy and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, once the standard operations for patients with CP, have been replaced by hybrid procedures, such as duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, the Frey procedure, and their variants. These procedures are safe and effective in providing long-term pain relief and in treating CP-related complications. Hybrid procedures should be the operations of choice for patients with CP.

  5. [Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gyula

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a benign inflammatory process, which can cause enlargement of the pancreatic head accompanied by severe pain and weight loss, and often leads to a significant reduction in quality of life (QoL). Basically, the disease is characterised by pain and functional disorders which are initially treated with conservative therapy, but in case of complications (uncontrollable pain or obstruction) surgical treatment is required. This article reviews the relevant literature of CP treatment, in particular randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses were involved with a comparison of different surgical treatment options for the management of CP complications. Recent studies have demonstrated that surgical procedures are superior to endoscopic therapy as regards long-term results of QoL and pain control. There was no significant difference found in postoperative pain relief and overall mortality when duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) of Beger and its modification (duodenum and organ-preserving pancreatic head resection [DOPPHR]) were compared with pancreatoduodenectomy (PD), but hospital stay, weight gain, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, and QoL were significantly better in the DPPHR and DOPPHR groups. DPPHR and PD seem to be equally effective in terms of postoperative pain relief and overall mortality. However, recent data suggest that DOPPHR is superior in the treatment of CP with regard to several peri- and postoperative outcome parameters and QoL. Therefore, this should be the preferable treatment option for CP complications.

  6. Retroperitoneal disorders associated with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Noboru; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Takeda, Keisuke; Zen, Yoh

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently accompanied by relevant lesions in the genitourinary tract and retroperitoneal organs, which cause various clinical problems, ranging from non-specific back pain or bladder outlet obstruction to renal failure. The diagnosis of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis requires a multidisciplinary approach, including serological tests, histological examination, imaging analysis, and susceptibility to steroid therapy. Radiological examinations are ...

  7. Time trends in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Panicker, Suprabha; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports indicate a decline in prevalence of classical tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP). We studied the etiologies and risk factors over a 14-year period at a tertiary care university hospital. We compared the etiology in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients presenting and followed-up in our Pancreas Clinic over two time periods (2000-06 and 2007-13). Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) was the predominant etiology seen over the two time periods. However an increase in prevalence of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) during the latter time period suggests that it may be emerging as a dominant etiology over recent years. Hypertriglyceridemia and hyperparathyroidism were uncommon causes of non-alcoholic CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis was noted only during 2007-13, but remains a rare cause of CP. There are multiple risk factors for CP in our population. The high prevalence of ICP indicates need closer examination of risk factors and ICP pathogenesis. ACP appears to be emerging as a dominant cause of CP which suggests a need to reorient preventive strategies.

  8. Clinical monitoring of 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, Bart van

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the outcome- survival of a large group of 186 consecutive patients with chronic active hepatitis of variouse tiologies, and describes in detail the progress of 21 patients from this group with 'autoimmunie' chronic active hepatitis maintained on standardized immunosuppressive

  9. Congenital anomalies, hereditary diseases of the pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis; Entwicklungsstoerungen, angeborene Erkrankungen des Pankreas, akute und chronische Pankreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-06-15

    The most important congenital anomalies include pancreas divisum, annular pancreas and ectopic pancreas. Patients with pancreas divisum may be more susceptible to acute or chronic pancreatitis and patients with an annular pancreas may develop duodenal stenosis. In pancreas divisum the key finding is the visualization of the main duct draining into the duodenum via the small papilla, separated from the common bile duct. Annular pancreas may show as a well defined ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum. Ectopic pancreas is usually asymptomatic but may give rise to abdominal complaints and may be confused with submucosal tumors. Acute pancreatitis is classified as mild or severe. In mild forms ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice whereas in severe forms with extensive pancreatic and peripancreatic necroses computed tomography is the favored method. It is crucial to identify signs and criteria that come along with an increased risk of infection of the necroses. MRI plays an inferior role in the assessment of acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a longstanding inflammatory and fibrosing process causing pain and loss of function. Cross-section imaging is particularly in demand for the detection of complications and the differentiation from pancreatic cancer. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis, and favourable response to corticosteroid treatment. (orig.)

  10. Bone mineral metabolism, bone mineral density, and body composition in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Anne Birgitte; Rosenfalck, A M; Hansen, B

    2000-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D homeostasis seem to be abnormal in patients with exocrine pancreatic dysfunction resulting from cystic fibrosis. Only a few studies have evaluated and described bone mineral metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic insufficiency....

  11. An overview of the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolyn C

    2016-11-23

    Chronic pancreatitis is a complex inflammatory condition characterised by irreversible damage to the pancreas. This article explores the pathophysiology of this condition and its effects on pancreatic function. It outlines the causes and presenting features of chronic pancreatitis, as well as its effect on patients' quality of life and the changes to their lifestyle that are likely to be required. Chronic pancreatitis cannot be cured; therefore, treatment aims to control pain, manage problems associated with malabsorption, and assess and manage long-term complications that may develop, such as insulin dependence.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so fa...

  13. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-10-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis may be at an increased risk of low bone density because of malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium, poor diet, pain, alcoholism, and smoking. We investigated the rates of osteoporosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis compared to matched controls.

  14. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahen, Djuna L; Gouma, Dirk J; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A J; Boermeester, Marja A; Busch, Olivier R; Stoker, Jaap; Laméris, Johan S; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Huibregtse, Kees; Bruno, Marco J

    2007-02-15

    For patients with chronic pancreatitis and a dilated pancreatic duct, ductal decompression is recommended. We conducted a randomized trial to compare endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct. All symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis and a distal obstruction of the pancreatic duct but without an inflammatory mass were eligible for the study. We randomly assigned patients to undergo endoscopic transampullary drainage of the pancreatic duct or operative pancreaticojejunostomy. The primary end point was the average Izbicki pain score during 2 years of follow-up. The secondary end points were pain relief at the end of follow-up, physical and mental health, morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay, number of procedures undergone, and changes in pancreatic function. Thirty-nine patients underwent randomization: 19 to endoscopic treatment (16 of whom underwent lithotripsy) and 20 to operative pancreaticojejunostomy. During the 24 months of follow-up, patients who underwent surgery, as compared with those who were treated endoscopically, had lower Izbicki pain scores (25 vs. 51, Psurgical drainage (P=0.007). Rates of complications, length of hospital stay, and changes in pancreatic function were similar in the two treatment groups, but patients receiving endoscopic treatment required more procedures than did patients in the surgery group (a median of eight vs. three, PSurgical drainage of the pancreatic duct was more effective than endoscopic treatment in patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct due to chronic pancreatitis. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN04572410 [controlled-trials.com].). Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  15. ERP in chronic pancreatitis - ductal morphology, relation to exocrine function and pain - clinical value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norup Lauridsen, K.; Raahede, J.; Kruse, A.; Thommesen, P.; Aarhus Univ.

    1985-01-01

    ERP was analyzed in 87 patients with chronic pancreatitis with special reference to its clinical value in management of pain, the dominating symptom in uncomplicated chronic pancreatitis. A significant correlation was found between ductal changes due to pancreatitis and decrease in pancreatic function. However, no association was found between severe pancreatic pain and pancreatic function or pancreatic morphology. The significance of ERP in management of patients with persistent severe pancreatic pain is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas that leads to loss of endocrine and exocrine function of pancreas. The most common symptom is intractable pain. Which adversely effects quality of life, remains the most common indication for surgery in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Case report: Three patients underwent operations for chronic pancreatitis at the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences Mashhad, Iran. Indication for operation in all cases were intractable abdominal pain. In all of the three patients complete relief of symptoms was obtained. There was no morbidity and mortality. In one patient exocrine function of pancreas and malabsorpation resolved after surgery. Conclusions: Although chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but in persistent abdominal pain surgery should be considered. Surgery for patients with chronic pancreatitis can be performed safely with minimal morbidity and effective in control of pain and malabsorption.  

  17. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  18. CT findings in autoimmune pancreatitis: assessment using multiphase contrast-enhanced multisection CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K., E-mail: Kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya Hirokoji Clinic, Nagoya (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Departments of Medical Technology, Nagoya University School of Health Science, Nagoya (Japan); Ogawa, H.; Ota, T.; Naganawa, S. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Aim: To assess the spectrum of findings using multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Materials and methods: Fifty patients (four female and 46 male, mean age 65 years) were retrospectively identified from consecutive patients with abnormal CT findings of the pancreas and negative work-up for known causes. These patients had at least one finding supporting the diagnosis of AIP: serological abnormality, histopathological abnormality, or response to steroid. Two radiologists evaluated multiphase contrast-enhanced CT images in consensus. Results: The pancreas showed diffuse enlargement (n = 16; 32%), focal enlargement (n = 18; 36%), or no enlargement (n = 16; 32%). Forty-nine (98%) patients showed abnormal contrast enhancement in the affected pancreatic parenchyma, including hypoattenuation during the pancreatic phase (n = 45; 90%) and hyperattenuation during the delayed phase (n = 39; 87%). The following findings were also seen in the pancreas: a capsule-like rim (n = 24; 48%); no visualization of the main pancreatic duct lumen (n = 48; 96%); ductal enhancement (n = 26; 52%); upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (n = 27; 54%); upstream atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma (n = 27; 54%); calcification (n = 7; 14%); and cysts (n = 5; 10%). Forty-two (84%) patients showed one or more of the following extrapancreatic findings: biliary duct or gallbladder abnormality (n = 40; 80%); peripancreatic (n = 8; 16%) or para-aortic (n = 10; 20%) soft-tissue proliferation; and renal involvement (n = 15; 30%). Conclusion: Patients with AIP presented with a variety of CT findings in the pancreas and the extrapancreatic organs. The present study highlights pancreatic ductal enhancement in a subset of patients with AIP.

  19. Advances in surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingqiang; Yun, Lin; Roy, Manish; Shang, Dong

    2015-02-08

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is between 2 and 200 per 100,000 persons and shows an increasing trend year by year. India has the highest incidence of CP in the world at approximately 114 to 200 per 100,000 persons. The incidence of CP in China is approximately 13 per 100,000 persons. The aim of this review is to assist surgeons in managing patients with CP in surgical treatment. We conducted a PubMed search for "chronic pancreatitis" and "surgical treatment" and reviewed relevant articles. On the basis of our review of the literature, we found that CP cannot be completely cured. The purpose of surgical therapy for CP is to relieve symptoms, especially pain; to improve the patient's quality of life; and to treat complications. Decompression (drainage), resection, neuroablation and decompression combined with resection are commonly used methods for the surgical treatment of CP. Before developing a surgical regimen, surgeons should comprehensively evaluate the patient's clinical manifestations, auxiliary examination results and medical history to develop an individualized surgical treatment regimen.

  20. Has central sensitization become independent of nociceptive input in chronic pancreatitis patients who fail thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.W.; Buscher, H.C.J.L.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: : Central sensitization due to visceral pancreatic nociceptive input may be important in chronic pancreatitis pain. We investigated whether bilateral thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy (BTS) to reduce nociceptive input in chronic pancreatitis patients (CPP) with poor pain

  1. IL-8 Expression in Granulocytic Epithelial Lesions of Idiopathic Duct-centric Pancreatitis (Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yuna; Hong, Seung-Mo; Fujikura, Kohei; Kim, Sung Joo; Akita, Masayuki; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Azuma, Takeshi; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Zen, Yoh

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis (type 2 AIP) develops in isolation or sometimes in association with ulcerative colitis. Its diagnosis requires the histologic confirmation of granulocytic epithelial lesions (GELs) with no diagnostic biomarker currently available. This study aimed to elucidate the tissue expression of cytokines and their diagnostic value in this condition. In quantitative polymerase chain reaction for multiple cytokines using tissue-derived mRNA, the expression level of interleukin (IL)-8 was markedly higher in type 2 AIP than in type 1 AIP (Ppancreatitis adjacent to pancreatic cancers (peritumoral pancreatitis) exhibited IL-8 expression in the epithelium (3/12; 25%) and inflammatory cells (10/12; 83%), expression levels were significantly lower than those in type 2 AIP (Ppancreatitis with 92% sensitivity and 92% to 100% specificity. Furthermore, CD3/IL-8-coexpressing lymphocytes were almost restricted to type 2 AIP. Interestingly, a similar pattern of IL-8 expression was also observed in colonic biopsies of ulcerative colitis. In conclusion, the overexpression of IL-8 may underlie the development of GELs in type 2 AIP, and IL-8 immunostaining or IL-8/CD3 double staining may become an ancillary method for its diagnosis. The similar expression pattern of IL-8 in ulcerative colitis also suggests a pathogenetic link between the 2 conditions.

  2. Differentiation of focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma: assessment by multiphase contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhashi, Naohiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Sakurai, Yusuke; Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings alone and in combination for differentiating focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis (f-AIP) from pancreatic carcinoma (PC). The study group comprised 22 f-AIP lesions and 61 PC lesions. Two radiologists independently evaluated CT findings. Frequencies of findings were compared between f-AIP and PC. Statistical, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Homogeneous enhancement during the portal phase (AIP, 59 % vs. PC, 3 %; P < 0.001), dotted enhancement during the pancreatic phase (50 % vs. 7 %; P < 0.001), duct-penetrating sign (46 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001), enhanced duct sign (36 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (46 % vs. 3 %; P < 0.001) were more frequently observed in AIP. Ring-like enhancement during the delayed phase (5 % vs. 46 %; P < 0.001) and peripancreatic strands with a length of at least 10 mm (5 % vs. 39 %; P = 0.001) were more frequently observed in PC. AIP was identified with 82 % sensitivity and 98 % specificity using four of these seven findings. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in dotted enhancement (P = 0.004), duct-penetrating sign (P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (P = 0.007). The combination of CT findings may allow improvements in differentiating f-AIP from PC. (orig.)

  3. Pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, Itaru; Ohara, Hirotaka; Okayama, Yasutaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Okumura, Fumihiro; Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Ueno, Koichiro; Joh, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi

    2008-09-01

    We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst.

  4. Pseudocyst in the Pancreatic Tail Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis Successfully Treated by Transpapillary Cyst Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Naitoh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 50-year-old male with pseudocysts in the pancreatic tail associated with chronic pancreatitis successfully treated by transpapillary cyst drainage. He had previously undergone ultrasonography-guided percutaneous cyst drainage for a pancreatic pseudocyst in our hospital. He was readmitted due to abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography showed recurrence of a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail measuring 5 cm in diameter. Since conservative treatment failed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography was performed. There was communication between the pseudocyst and the main pancreatic duct, and pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to the pseudocyst. First, transpapillary pancreatic duct drainage was performed using a plastic stent, but the pseudocyst did not decrease in size and became infected. After removal of the stent, a pigtail type nasocystic catheter was placed in the pseudocyst via the pancreatic duct. The pseudocyst infection immediately disappeared, and the pseudocyst gradually decreased and disappeared. After removal of the nasocystic catheter, no recurrence was observed. As transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst, cyst drainage and pancreatic duct drainage have been reported. In our patient with pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail, duct drainage was ineffective and the pseudocyst was infected, whereas cyst drainage was very effective. We considered that cyst drainage by a nasocystic catheter was the first-line therapy as the transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic pseudocyst.

  5. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Yasuda, Kaneki [Department of Urology and Andrology, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku [Department of the First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Kinashi, Tatsuo, E-mail: kinashi@takii.kmu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  6. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP

  7. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. PMID:28404095

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for chronic pancreatitis 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sakagami, Junichi; Sata, Naohiro; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Hirota, Morihisa; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Lee, Lingaku; Fujiyama, Takashi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Ueda, Keijiro; Tachibana, Yuichi; Sogame, Yoshio; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kato, Ryusuke; Kataoka, Keisho; Shiratori, Keiko; Sugiyama, Masanori; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Tando, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is considered to be an irreversible progressive chronic inflammatory disease. The etiology and pathology of chronic pancreatitis are complex; therefore, it is important to correctly understand the stage and pathology and provide appropriate treatment accordingly. The newly revised Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chronic Pancreatitis 2015 consist of four chapters, i.e., diagnosis, staging, treatment, and prognosis, and includes a total of 65 clinical questions. These guidelines have aimed at providing certain directions and clinically practical contents for the management of chronic pancreatitis, preferentially adopting clinically useful articles. These revised guidelines also refer to early chronic pancreatitis based on the Criteria for the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis 2009. They include such items as health insurance coverage of high-titer lipase preparations and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, new antidiabetic drugs, and the definition of and treatment approach to pancreatic pseudocyst. The accuracy of these guidelines has been improved by examining and adopting new evidence obtained after the publication of the first edition.

  9. The evolution of the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Dana K; Frey, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    To establish the current status of surgical therapy for chronic pancreatitis, recent published reports are examined in the context of the historical advances in the field. The basis for decompression (drainage), denervation, and resection strategies for the treatment of pain caused by chronic pancreatitis is reviewed. These divergent approaches have finally coalesced as the head of the pancreas has become apparent as the nidus of chronic inflammation. The recent developments in surgical methods to treat the complications of chronic pancreatitis and the results of recent prospective randomized trials of operative approaches were reviewed to establish the current best practices. Local resection of the pancreatic head, with or without duct drainage, and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection offer outcomes as effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy, with lowered morbidity and mortality. Local resection or excavation of the pancreatic head offers the advantage of lowest cost and morbidity and early prevention of postoperative diabetes. The late incidences of recurrent pain, diabetes, and exocrine insufficiency are equivalent for all 3 surgical approaches. Local resection of the pancreatic head appears to offer best outcomes and lowest risk for the management of the pain of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. [Choice of the method of surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobeĭ, A V; Shuleĭko, A Ch; Orlovskiĭ, Iu N; Vizhinis, Iu I; Butra, Iu V; Lagodich, N A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of surgical treatment of 187 patients with chronic pancreatitis was made during 3-year period in the department of surgery clinic of Byelorussian Medical Academy of Post-Graduate Education. Drainage operations were performed on 28 patients, resection-drainage operations were carried out on 130 patients and resection operations had 19 patients. The laser beam technologies were successfully applied during operations on the pancreas in 43 patients. Postoperative complications (14.8%) were analyzed and structured. Methods of corrections and ways of prophylaxis of complication development were provided. On the basis of the complication analysis and new conception concerning peripheral pancreatic hypertension the authors offered the rational approaches to choice of operations on the pancreas in case of chronic pancreatitis. The authors developed the classification of pancreatoductolitiasis, pancreatic hypertension and a new strategy of surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  12. [Weber-Christian syndrome and chronic pancreatitis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval-Jeantet, M; Puissant, A; Gombergh, R; Blanchet-Bardon, C; Delmas, P F; Sohier, J

    1982-04-22

    The authors describe a case of cytosteatonecrosis associated with chronic pancreatitis. Clinical, biological (amylasemia and amylasuria) and radiological (arteriography) signs of pancreatic disease are noticed as well as important radiological lesions of the limbs. The cutaneous lesions are hypodermic nodules located on the lower limbs with swelling of the right big toe and a cutaneous abrasion.

  13. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the circ...... the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP).......Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  14. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  15. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  16. A Rare Multifocal Pattern of Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Negative IgG4: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall That May Mimic Multifocal Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Hota

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is an increasingly recognized form of acute pancreatitis characterized by obstructive jaundice with a rapid and dramatic treatment response to steroid therapy. Recently, AIP has been divided into two distinct phenotypes: lymphoplasmocytic sclerosing pancreatitis AIP (type 1 and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis AIP (type 2; each of which have their own distinct demographics, diagnostic criteria, and histopathological features. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of a multifocal pattern of type 2 AIP characterized with both CT and MR imaging. This rare imaging pattern of AIP may mimic the appearance of more worrisome malignant etiologies such as multifocal pancreatic adenocarcinoma or lymphoma, with overlapping imaging characteristics potentially complicating or delaying diagnosis. Therefore, recognition of this atypical pattern of AIP and avoidance of this potential diagnostic pitfall is crucial.

  17. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  18. Glucose counterregulation in diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Hilsted, J; Philipsen, E K

    1990-01-01

    Glucose counterregulation and hormonal responses after insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in six patients with diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis, in seven with insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus, and in seven healthy subjects. Glucose counterregulation...... was identical in type I patients and in the patients with chronic pancreatitis, whereas both groups had impaired glucose recovery compared with the healthy subjects. The patients with chronic pancreatitis had no glucagon response to hypoglycemia, whereas epinephrine increased significantly. In an additional...... experiment, glucose recovery did not occur after hypoglycemia during concomitant beta-adrenoceptor blockade in these patients. In conclusion, glucose counterregulation is preserved but slightly impaired in patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and the combination of total glucagon...

  19. Endoscopic or surgical intervention for painful obstructive chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, U.; Pahlplatz, J.M.; Nealon, W.H.; Goor, H. van; Gooszen, H.G.; Boermeester, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopy and surgery are the treatment modalities of choice in patients with obstructive chronic pancreatitis. Physicians face the decision between endoscopy and surgery for this group of patients, without clear consensus. OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare the effectiveness and

  20. Endoscopic or surgical intervention for painful obstructive chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Pahlplatz, Johanna M.; Nealon, Wiliam H.; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Endoscopy and surgery are the treatment modalities of choice in patients with obstructive chronic pancreatitis. Physicians face the decision between endoscopy and surgery for this group of patients, without clear consensus. Objectives To assess and compare the effectiveness and

  1. [Better pain management in chronic pancreatitis through early surgery?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, U.; Bruno, M.J.; Issa, Y.; Gooszen, H.G.; Fockens, P.; Boermeester, M.A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Hesselink, E.J.; Goor, H. van; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    The most important symptom in patients with chronic pancreatitis is pain. This is often difficult to treat. The current treatment consists of, successively, optimal medical treatment, endoscopic intervention and finally surgical intervention. Previous research has indicated that early surgical

  2. The pain of chronic pancreatitis: a persistent clinical challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The pain of chronic pancreatitis represents a major challenge to those working in the field, including pain specialists, gastroenterologists and surgeons. This article describes the different aetiologies of chronic pancreatitis and lists the models for the pathogenesis of pain, including novel ideas such as the role of the immune system in the modulation of pain. The patient profile in chronic pancreatitis is discussed along with the social impact of the disease in relation to alcohol misuse. The range of treatment strategies including medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches are evaluated. Common analgesic regimes and their limitations are reviewed. The pain of chronic pancreatitis remains refractory to effective treatment in many cases and further study and understanding of the underlying pathophysiology are required. PMID:26516493

  3. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis have impaired health-related quality of life. The thyroid gland has a high selenium concentration, and specific selenoprotein enzyme families are crucial to immune function, and catalyze thyroid hormone metabolism and redox processes in thyroid cells......-enriched yeast or matching placebo tablets daily for 12 months. The experimental supplement will be SelenoPrecise(R). The primary outcome is thyroid-related quality of life assessed by the Thyroid Patient-Reported Outcome (ThyPRO) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include serum thyroid peroxidase antibody...

  4. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure in chronic pancreatitis. Relation to pain, morphology, and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain, morphology, and function was studied in a cross-sectional investigation. Pressure measurements were performed by percutaneous fine-needle puncture. Thirty-nine patients with chronic pancreatitis were included, 25 with pain and 14...... without (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively). The pressure was significantly related (inversely) to pancreatic duct diameter only in the group of 19 patients with earlier pancreatic surgery (R = -0.57, p = 0.02). The pressure was not related to functional factors or the presence of pancreatic...... without pain. The pressure was higher in patients with pain than in patients without pain (p = 0.000001), and this was significantly related to a pain score from a visual analogue scale (p less than 0.001). Patients with pancreatic pseudocysts had both higher pressure and higher pain score than patients...

  5. B cell depletion reduces T cell activation in pancreatic islets in a murine autoimmune diabetes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rosa, Larissa C; Boldison, Joanne; De Leenheer, Evy; Davies, Joanne; Wen, Li; Wong, F Susan

    2018-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans, resulting in deficient insulin production. B cell depletion therapy has proved successful in preventing diabetes and restoring euglycaemia in animal models of diabetes, as well as in preserving beta cell function in clinical trials in the short term. We aimed to report a full characterisation of B cell kinetics post B cell depletion, with a focus on pancreatic islets. Transgenic NOD mice with a human CD20 transgene expressed on B cells were injected with an anti-CD20 depleting antibody. B cells were analysed using multivariable flow cytometry. There was a 10 week delay in the onset of diabetes when comparing control and experimental groups, although the final difference in the diabetes incidence, following prolonged observation, was not statistically significant (p = 0.07). The co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were reduced on stimulation of B cells during B cell depletion and repopulation. IL-10-producing regulatory B cells were not induced in repopulated B cells in the periphery, post anti-CD20 depletion. However, the early depletion of B cells had a marked effect on T cells in the local islet infiltrate. We demonstrated a lack of T cell activation, specifically with reduced CD44 expression and effector function, including IFN-γ production from both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. These CD8 + T cells remained altered in the pancreatic islets long after B cell depletion and repopulation. Our findings suggest that B cell depletion can have an impact on T cell regulation, inducing a durable effect that is present long after repopulation. We suggest that this local effect of reducing autoimmune T cell activity contributes to delay in the onset of autoimmune diabetes.

  6. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: understanding the factors associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2017-04-28

    The prognosis of advanced chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poor with the mortality rate approximately two-fold higher than the general population according to a survey of the prognosis of CP. From this standpoint, the concept of early CP was propagated in Japan in 2009 to encourage the medical treatment for the earlier stages of CP. That is, picking up the patients suspicious for early CP and then providing medical treatment for them are very important not only for patients, but also for health care economics. In this review, we described some potential factors associated with the development of CP (alcohol, smoking, past history of acute pancreatitis, aging, gallstone, and gender) that are extremely important to discover patients with early-stage CP.

  7. Earlier surgery improves outcomes from painful chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Nengwen; Jia, Dan; Huang, Wei; Nunes, Quentin M.; Windsor, John A.; Liu, Xubao; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The timing of surgery for painful chronic pancreatitis (CP) may affect outcomes. Clinical course, Izbicki pain scores, and pancreatic function were retrospectively compared and analyzed between patients undergoing either early or late surgery (pancreatic mass +/− ductal dilatation (47% vs 27%, P insufficiency (60% vs 72%, P = .034); there were no other significant differences. The early group had longer hospital stay (14.4 vs 12.2 days, P = .009), but no difference in complications. Significantly greater pain relief followed early surgery (complete 69% vs 47%, partial 22% vs 37%, none 8% vs 16%, P = .01) with lower rates of exocrine (60% vs 80%, P = .005) and endocrine insufficiency (36% vs 53%, P = .033). Our data indicate that early surgery results in higher rates of pain relief and pancreatic sufficiency than late surgery for chronic pancreatitis patients. Frey and Berne procedures showed better results than other surgical procedures. PMID:29742705

  8. Pegylated interferon de novo-induce autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in chronic hepatitis C patient

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Ashraf; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Alfiomy, Mohamed; Abdellah, Mohamed; Shahat, Khaled; Salah, Mohamed; Mostafa, Sadek; Elwassief, Ahmed; Aboelfotoh, Attef; Abdelhafeez, Hafez; El-Sherif, Assem

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Egyptian woman with chronic hepatitis C undergoing treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) alfa-2a plus ribavirin was referred to our hospital on November 2010 with prolonged easy fatigability and an attack of syncope; she had no prior history of autoimmune disorders or allergy. Laboratory investigations documented the presence of Peg-IFN induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and autoimmune thyroiditis. Intravenous γ globulin (IVGG) failed to correct the autoimmune process...

  9. Management of a Dog with Poorly Regulated Diabetes Mellitus, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Suspected Atopy with Cyclosporine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg M. Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-and-9-months old male neutered Bichon Frise was presented for a second opinion for diabetes mellitus, weight loss, pruritus, and loss of hair. During further work-up, the dog was diagnosed with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and concurrent diagnoses of pancreatitis and atopy were also suspected. Multiple adjustments of insulin therapy did not improve control of diabetes mellitus. Also, a variety of different treatments failed to improve pruritus. The dog was seen by a veterinary dermatologist who further suspected atopy and started treatment with cyclosporine. Pruritus improved and coincidentally serum Spec cPL and fructosamine concentrations normalized after therapy, suggesting the possibility that cyclosporine may have controlled pancreatic inflammation and improved control of diabetes mellitus. This case report would suggest that further research into autoimmunity in dogs with chronic pancreatitis is warranted. Also, a controlled study is needed and in progress before the use of cyclosporine in dogs with chronic pancreatitis or a subgroup thereof can be advocated.

  10. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  11. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, Ruediger S.; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F.; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  12. Early-Onset Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis Is Associated with PRSS1 or CTRC Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giefer, Matthew J; Lowe, Mark E; Werlin, Steven L; Zimmerman, Bridget; Wilschanski, Michael; Troendle, David; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Pohl, John F; Palermo, Joseph; Ooi, Chee Y; Morinville, Veronique D; Lin, Tom K; Husain, Sohail Z; Himes, Ryan; Heyman, Melvin B; Gonska, Tanja; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Freedman, Steven D; Fishman, Douglas S; Bellin, Melena D; Barth, Bradley; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Uc, Aliye

    2017-07-01

    To assess whether the age of onset was associated with unique features or disease course in pediatric acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). Demographic and clinical information on children with ARP or CP was collected at INSPPIRE (INternational Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a CuRE) centers. The Cochran-Armitage trend test and Jonckheere-Terpstra test were used to examine for differences between pediatric age groups (pancreatitis, 111 (32%) were 6-11 years of age, and 102 (30%) were ≥12 years of age. Early-onset disease was associated with mutations in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) (P pancreatitis (P = .02), family history of CP (P chronic renal failure (P = .02). Later-onset disease was more commonly present with hypertriglyceridemia (P = .04), ulcerative colitis (P = .02), autoimmune diseases (P pancreatitis is associated strongly with PRSS1 or CTRC mutations and family history of pancreatitis. Children with later-onset disease are more likely to have nongenetic risk factors. Future studies are needed to investigate whether the disease course, response to therapy, or clinical outcomes differ relative to the timing of disease onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bile Duct Obstruction Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis in Seven Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Alastair E.; Burgener, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.

    1988-01-01

    Seven icteric dogs were determined to have bile duct obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. All dogs had histories of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities and total bilirubin concentrations were markedly elevated. Diagnosis was based on exploratory laparotomy and histological examination. Each dog had a 3 to 10 cm mass in the body of the pancreas and obstruction of the common bile duct. Three dogs treated with pancreatectomy, gastrojejunostomy, and cholecystojejunostomy died within five weeks. Three dogs treated with conservative surgical procedures were alive at 8, 16, and 26 months postoperatively. One dog was euthanized because of suspected neoplasia. Hepatic enzyme activity and bilirubin levels decreased markedly in the surviving dogs. Histological examination of the pancreatic masses indicated chronic pancreatitis. Hepatic biopsies revealed evidence of cholestasis. Chronic pancreatitis should be included in the differential diagnoses of icterus, bile duct obstruction, and masses in the pancreas. PMID:17423102

  14. Stenting and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M; Matzen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early observational studies of endoscopic treatment and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) reported considerable or complete relief of pain in 50%-80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. There is no consensus on the measurement of pain, making comparison of observational...... studies difficult, and little attention has been paid to the type and amount of analgesics used by patients before and after decompressive treatment. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of all patients with chronic pancreatitis and large-duct disease and receiving decompressing treatment between 1...... November 1994 and 31 July 1999. Primary parameters were type and amount of analgesics used. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients with chronic pancreatitis and large-duct disease received stenting of the pancreatic duct (28 patients), ESWL (6 patients) or both (15 patients). After a median follow-up of 21 months...

  15. A modern review of the operative management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan C; Abeywardina, Shannon; Farrell, James J; Reber, Howard A; Hines, O Joe

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting in pain, intestinal malabsorption, endocrine dysfunction, and poor quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to analyze surgical outcomes for patients with chronic pancreatitis. Data for patients undergoing operations for chronic pancreatitis between 1990 and 2009 were reviewed. Demographics, operative and perioperative data, and survival were catalogued. QoL was determined (Short Form 36 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire + PAN-26) and compared with historical controls. The mean age was 51 +/- 2 years, 38 patients were male (53%), the most common indication was pain (71%), the etiology of pancreatitis often was alcohol, and most patients underwent a Whipple procedure (56%). Operative time was 316 +/- 17 minutes and blood loss was 363 +/- 75 mL. There were 34 complications in 30 patients (42%) and one death. QoL surveys were administered for 25 of 55 (45%) surviving patients at a mean follow-up of 72 +/- 16 months. Mean survival was 99 +/- 9 months, whereas 5- and 10-year survival were 86 and 75 per cent. QoL scores were uniformly better than historical controls. Our data demonstrate that operations for chronic pancreatitis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Patients have excellent survival and improved QoL compared with historical controls. Surgery is an effective and durable treatment option for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  16. AAV-mediated pancreatic overexpression of Igf1 counteracts progression to autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallol, Cristina; Casana, Estefania; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Haurigot, Virginia; Jambrina, Claudia; Sacristan, Victor; Morró, Meritxell; Agudo, Judith; Vilà, Laia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β-cells leading to severe insulin deficiency. Although many improvements have been made in recent years, exogenous insulin therapy is still imperfect; new therapeutic approaches, focusing on preserving/expanding β-cell mass and/or blocking the autoimmune process that destroys islets, should be developed. The main objective of this work was to test in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, the effects of local expression of Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a potent mitogenic and pro-survival factor for β-cells with immunomodulatory properties. Transgenic NOD mice overexpressing IGF1 specifically in β-cells (NOD-IGF1) were generated and phenotyped. In addition, miRT-containing, IGF1-encoding adeno-associated viruses (AAV) of serotype 8 (AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT) were produced and administered to 4- or 11-week-old non-transgenic NOD females through intraductal delivery. Several histological, immunological, and metabolic parameters were measured to monitor disease over a period of 28-30 weeks. In transgenic mice, local IGF1 expression led to long-term suppression of diabetes onset and robust protection of β-cell mass from the autoimmune insult. AAV-mediated pancreatic-specific overexpression of IGF1 in adult animals also dramatically reduced diabetes incidence, both when vectors were delivered before pathology onset or once insulitis was established. Transgenic NOD-IGF1 and AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT-treated NOD animals had much less islet infiltration than controls, preserved β-cell mass, and normal insulinemia. Transgenic and AAV-treated islets showed less expression of antigen-presenting molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines important for tissue-specific homing of effector T cells, suggesting IGF1 modulated islet autoimmunity in NOD mice. Local expression of Igf1 by AAV-mediated gene transfer counteracts progression to diabetes in NOD mice. This study suggests a

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection can mimic type 1 (antinuclear antibody positive) autoimmune chronic active hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlotsky, J M; Deforges, L; Bretagne, S; André, C; Métreau, J M; Thiers, V; Zafrani, E S; Goossens, M; Duval, J; Mavier, J P

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to induce anti-liver-kidney microsomal-1 (LKM1) antibody positive chronic active hepatitis, simulating type 2 autoimmune chronic active hepatitis. The cases of five patients presenting with features of type 1 (antinuclear antibody positive) autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and extrahepatic autoimmune manifestations, in whom immunosuppressive treatment had no effect on liver disease are presented. In these patients, HCV infection could be shown by the presence in serum of anti-HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA detected by polymerase chain reaction. These cases suggest the following: (a) chronic HCV infection can mimic type 1, as well as type 2, autoimmune chronic active hepatitis; (b) HCV infection might be systematically sought in patients presenting with features of type 1 autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, with special care in patients who are unresponsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Images Figure PMID:7686122

  18. Staging chronic pancreatitis with exocrine function tests: Are we better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia

    2017-10-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas evolving in progressive fibrotic disruption of the gland with exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Although imaging features of CP are well known, their correlation with exocrine pancreatic function tests are not obvious, particularly in the early stage of the disease. There are many clinical classification of CP, all suggested for better distinguish and manage different forms based on etiological and clinical factors, and severity of the disease. Recently, a new classification of CP has been suggested: the M-ANNHEIM multiple risk factor classification that includes etiology, stage classification and degree of clinical severity. However, more accurate determination of clinical severity of CP requires a correct determination of exocrine function of the pancreas and fecal fat excretion. Recently, Kamath et al demonstrated that the evaluation of exocrine pancreatic function by acid steatocrit and fecal elastase-1 (EF-1) was helpful, but EF-1 was able to detect exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in more patients, upgrading some patients in higher stage of disease according to M-ANNHEIM classification. So, EF-1 is a more accurate test to determine exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and to stage chronic pancreatitis in the M-ANNHEIM classification. On the contrary, EF-1 determination shows low sensitivity in detecting exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in early stage of the disease.

  19. [Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome, retroperitoneal fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, F; Contardo, C; León, A; Navarrete, J; Figueroa, R; Attanasio, F

    1989-01-01

    Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) is an unusual chronic, cholestatic disease of unknown etiology, more frequently seen in young adults in close relationship with Chronic Ulcerative Colitis. We report the case of a 30 year old woman, coming from the peruvian amazon with PSC associated with Sjögren Syndrome, Chronic Pancreatitis and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis, without colonic involvement. She was treated with external biliary drainage and controlled for 12 months. In this paper, clinical, biochemical, radiological, histological and therapeutic features are reviewed as well as its possible immunologie autoimmune origin.

  20. Gene mutations in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, H

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, several genes have been identified as being associated with hereditary and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (CP), i.e. PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1. In this study, we investigated 164 unrelated children and adolescents with CP for mutations in disease-associated genes by direct DNA sequencing, SSCP, RFLP and melting curve analysis. In 15 patients, we detected a PRSS1 mutation (8 with A16V, 5 with R122H, 2 with N29I), and in 34 patients, a SPINK1 mutation (30 with N34S, 4 with others). SPINK1 mutations were predominantly found in patients without a family history (29/121). Ten patients were homozygous for N34S, SPINK1 mutations were most common in 'idiopathic' CP, whereas patients with 'hereditary' CP predominantly showed a PRSS1 mutation (R122H, N29I). In patients without a family history, the most common PRSS1 mutation was A16V (7/121). In conclusion, our data suggest that CP may be inherited in a dominant, recessive or multigenetic manner as a result of mutations in the above-mentioned or as yet unidentified genes. This challenges the concept of idiopathic CP as a nongenetic disorder and the differentiation between hereditary and idiopathic CP. Therefore, we propose to classify CP as either 'primary CP' (with or without a family history) or 'secondary CP' caused by toxic, metabolic or other factors.

  1. Pancreatitis autoinmune: pseudotumor inflamatorio, afectación multifocal, hipertensión portal y evolución a largo plazo Autoimmune pancreatitis: inflammatory pseudotumor, multifocal fibrosclerosis, portal hypertension, and long-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Beristain

    2008-10-01

    -year-old female presented with obstructive jaundice and abdominal tenderness, as well as a mass at the pancreatic head on a CT scan, suggestive of pancreatic neoplasia. Surgery showed an increase of the whole pancreas, malignancy was intraoperatively ruled out, and a cholecystectomy and choledochoduodenostomy were carried out. The diagnosis was chronic pancreatitis. Over the following years different autoimmune complications developed, including asthma, salivary gland swelling, and sclerosing cholangitis, as well as recurrent episodes of jaundice, and exocrine and endocrine pancreatic failure. The development of these complications combined with the demonstration of high serum levels of IgG4 and carbonic anhydrase II led to a re-evaluation of the initial histology of the pancreas, leading to a final diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis: IgG4+ lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. New complications developed during the last few years: retroperitoneal fibrosis with portal hypertension, esophageal varices, and splenomegaly.

  2. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-11-14

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so far. In contrast to the management of type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, the endocrinopathy in type 3c is very complex. The course of the disease is complicated by additional present comorbidities such as maldigestion and concomitant qualitative malnutrition. General awareness that patients with known and/or clinically overt chronic pancreatitis will develop type 3c diabetes mellitus (up to 90% of all cases) is rather good. However, in a patient first presenting with diabetes mellitus, chronic pancreatitis as a potential causative condition is seldom considered. Thus many patients are misdiagnosed. The failure to correctly diagnose type 3 diabetes mellitus leads to a failure to implement an appropriate medical therapy. In patients with type 3c diabetes mellitus treating exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, preventing or treating a lack of fat-soluble vitamins (especially vitamin D) and restoring impaired fat hydrolysis and incretin secretion are key-features of medical therapy.

  4. A Study of SPINK 1 Mutation and Other Clinical Correlates in Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shiran Shetty; Venkatakrishnan Leelakrishnan; Krishnaveni; S Ramalingam; Seethalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is labelled as idiopathic when no identifiable factors are found. The identifications of genetic mutations associated with pancreatitis have provided opportunities for identifying patients at risk for idiopathic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to study the demographic, clinical profile and assess the prevalence of genetic mutation (SPINK 1) in idiopathic chronic pancreatitis.

  5. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Anna Victoria; Pedroso, Martha Regina; Herman, Paulo; Montagnini, André Luis

    2016-01-01

    Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, Ptreatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  6. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphological and functional alterations of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubergrits, Natalya B; Linevskiy, Yuri V; Lukashevich, Galina M; Fomenko, Pavel G; Moroz, Tatyana V; Mishra, Tapan

    2012-09-10

    The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-l-leucine dipeptidase) promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosa samples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal digestion, decrease of absorption, accelerated desquamation of epithelium, fall in local immunity and

  8. Treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis with the anecdotes of the first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takeuchi, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The first case that led researchers to put forward a new concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was treated with steroids by gastroenterologists in Tokyo Women's Medical University. It is important to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer before treatment with steroids is started. Today, steroids are standard therapy for AIP worldwide. In the Japanese consensus guidelines, steroid therapy is indicated for symptomatic AIP. After management of glucose levels and obstructive jaundice, oral prednisolone is initiated at 0.6 mg/kg/day for 2-4 weeks and is gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5-5 mg/day over 2-3 months. To prevent relapse, maintenance therapy with low-dose prednisolone is used. For relapsed AIP, readministration or increased doses of steroids are effective. The presence of proximal bile duct stenosis and elevated serum IgG4 levels may be predictive of relapse of AIP. It is necessary to verify the validity of the Japanese regimen of steroid therapy for AIP. The necessity, drugs, and duration of maintenance therapy for AIP need to be clarified by prospective studies.

  9. Abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis: Radiological findings and changes after therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jeong-Hee [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Yoon, Seong Eon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eugene K. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Park, Seong Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate imaging findings of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and changes after steroid therapy. Methods and materials: This study included nine AIP patients with abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, which were determined by retrospective radiological review. CT (initial and follow-up, n = 9) and MR imaging (initial, n = 5) were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus to determine imaging characteristics (i.e., size, number, attenuation or signal intensity, and contrast enhancement of the lesions, and the presence of overlying capsule retraction) and evaluate changes with steroid therapy of abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP. Results: The most common abdominal extrapancreatic lesion associated with AIP was retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) in six patients. In five patients, CT and MR imaging revealed single or multiple, round- or wedge-shaped, hypoattenuating or hypointense, enhancing lesions in the renal cortex or pelvis. Other lesions included a geographic, ill-defined, hypoattenuating lesion with or without overlying capsule retraction in the liver in two and bile duct dilatation with or without bile duct wall thickening in four. Over a follow-up period of 6-81 months, CT exams of eight patients demonstrated partial or complete improvement of the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions, albeit their improvement in general lagged behind that of the pancreatic lesion. Conclusion: On CT or MR imaging, the abdominal extrapancreatic lesions associated with AIP are various in the retroperitoneum, liver, kidneys and bile ducts, and are reversible with steroid therapy.

  10. Treatment of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with the Anecdotes of the First Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terumi Kamisawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case that led researchers to put forward a new concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was treated with steroids by gastroenterologists in Tokyo Women’s Medical University. It is important to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer before treatment with steroids is started. Today, steroids are standard therapy for AIP worldwide. In the Japanese consensus guidelines, steroid therapy is indicated for symptomatic AIP. After management of glucose levels and obstructive jaundice, oral prednisolone is initiated at 0.6 mg/kg/day for 2–4 weeks and is gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over 2-3 months. To prevent relapse, maintenance therapy with low-dose prednisolone is used. For relapsed AIP, readministration or increased doses of steroids are effective. The presence of proximal bile duct stenosis and elevated serum IgG4 levels may be predictive of relapse of AIP. It is necessary to verify the validity of the Japanese regimen of steroid therapy for AIP. The necessity, drugs, and duration of maintenance therapy for AIP need to be clarified by prospective studies.

  11. Comparison of steroid pulse therapy and conventional oral steroid therapy as initial treatment for autoimmune pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Takashi; Uchida, Kazushige; Matsushita, Mitsunobu; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Fukui, Toshiro; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of oral steroid therapy for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is well known, and oral prednisolone treatment is most usually commenced at 30-40 mg/day, but there have been few reports about comparative studies of oral steroid therapy and steroid pulse therapy as the initial treatment for AIP. We studied the clinical course and image findings to estimate the utility of steroid pulse therapy for AIP, comparing it with oral steroid therapy. Laboratory and image findings were assessed retrospectively in 11 patients who received steroid pulse therapy, and the findings were compared to those in 10 patients who received conventional oral steroid therapy. Change in pancreatic size showed no significant difference between the therapies after 2 weeks of treatment. Significant improvement of lower bile duct strictures after 2 weeks of treatment and that of immunoglobulin values within 6 months were shown with both therapies. However, steroid pulse therapy showed significant improvement of γ-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) in 2 weeks and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in 2 and 8 weeks, compared with oral steroid therapy. Moreover, there was one patient in whom the lower bile duct stricture was not improved by oral steroid therapy, but it did show improvement with steroid pulse therapy. Initial steroid pulse therapy is a beneficial alternative to oral steroid therapy for the improvement of bile duct lesions. In future, the accumulation of a larger number of patients receiving steroid pulse therapy is needed, and prospective studies will be required. (author)

  12. [SURGICAL TACTICS IN CHRONIC PANCREATITIS WITH SIGNS OF BILIARY HYPERTENSION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, O Yu; Kopchak, V M; Pylypchuk, V I; Kopchak, K V; Andronik, S V

    2015-08-01

    The results of treatment of 84 patients for chronic pancreatitis with the biliary hypertension signs were depicted. In 83 patients operative interventions were performed, and in 1--positive results were achieved after pancreatic cyst puncture under ultrasonographic control. In 51 patients the conduction of Frey operation have permitted to achieve a lower pressure inside biliary system, in 25--the additional procedures were applied for a biliary hypertension elimination. In 20 patients a method of pressure measurement in biliary system was used.

  13. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You; Liu, Tao

    2014-10-01

    The main treatment strategies for chronic pancreatitis in young patients include therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) intervention and surgical intervention. Therapeutic ERCP intervention is performed much more extensively for its minimally invasive nature, but a part of patients are referred to surgery at last. Historical and follow-up data of 21 young patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection were analyzed to evaluate the outcomes of therapeutic ERCP intervention and surgical intervention in this study. The surgical complications of repeated therapeutic ERCP intervention and surgical intervention were 38% and 19% respectively. During the first therapeutic ERCP intervention to surgical intervention, 2 patients developed diabetes, 5 patients developed steatorrhea, and 5 patients developed pancreatic type B pain. During the follow-up of surgical intervention, 1 new case of diabetes occurred, 1 case of steatorrhea recovered, and 4 cases of pancreatic type B pain were completely relieved. In a part of young patients with chronic pancreatitis, surgical intervention was more effective than therapeutic ERCP intervention on delaying the progression of the disease and relieving the symptoms.

  14. Genetic susceptibility factors for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Ali A; Weiss, F Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Simon, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas and frequently associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. Since only a small proportion of alcoholics eventually develop chronic pancreatitis genetic susceptibility factors have long been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Smaller studies in ethnically defined populations have found that not only polymorphism in proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, such as Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, can confer a risk for developing chronic pancreatitis but also mutations that had previously been reported in association with idiopathic pancreatitis, such as SPINK1 mutations. In a much broader approach employing genome wide search strategies the NAPS study found that polymorphisms in the Trypsin locus (PRSS1 rs10273639), and the Claudin 2 locus (CLDN2-RIPPLY1-MORC4 locus rs7057398 and rs12688220) confer an increased risk of developing alcohol-induced pancreatitis. These results from North America have now been confirmed by a European consortium. In another genome wide approach polymorphisms in the genes encoding Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B were not only found in association with higher serum lipase levels in healthy volunteers but also to more than double the risk for developing alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis. These novel genetic associations will allow to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical basis of alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis on a cellular level and in much more detail than previously possible. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The significance of pancreatic juice trace-element concentration in chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persigehl, M.; Loeffler, A.; Hoeck, A.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnosis of exocrine pancreas insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is still not easy. The best-suited method to confirm the diagnosis seems to be the secretin pancreozymin test (SPT). As previous results have shown, the determination of trace elements in the pancreatic juice can improve the diagnostic value of the SPT. During the SPT, the concentrations of Zn, Fe, Rb, Co, Cr, Se, Sb, Cs, Sc and Ag were measured in the duodenal aspirate of 50 patients by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Of the 50 patients, 24 suffered from pancreatic insufficiency in chronic pancreatitis and 26 had no signs of pancreatic insufficiency. Only the concentration of zinc differed significantly in the two groups; the other elements showed a similar behaviour. In patients without disease of the exocrine pancreas the zinc content of the pancreatic juice during the SPT ws 0.46+-0.13μg/ml, whereas in patients with pancreatic insufficiency it was only 0.18+-0.07μg/ml. The corresponding output was 171+-49.3μg zinc in controls and 41+-17.4μg in patients. After stimulation with pancreozymin the concentrations of zinc increased in normal patients to 1.13+-0.14μg/ml and to 0.22+-0.12μg/ml in patients with pancreatic insufficiency. The data demonstrate that the measurement of zinc in the duodenal juice during the SPT improves the diagnostic value of the test and that zinc should also be determined in doubtful cases of pancreatic insufficiency. (author)

  16. Revision of anastomotic stenosis after pancreatic head resection for chronic pancreatitis: is it futile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Katherine A; Fontenot, Bennett B; Harvey, Norman R; Adams, David B

    2010-01-01

    is safe, but rarely effective, as a means of pain relief in patients with the pain syndrome associated with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:20590889

  17. Association between microRNA polymorphisms and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaozhi; Li, Diangeng; Jin, Jianjun; Wang, Qianshou; Zhao, Shuangqin; Bai, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in the development and progression of many human diseases. mir-146a could significantly suppress the induction of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NF-κB and chemokine MCP-1, which might play important roles in chronic pancreatitis. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between mir-146a rs2910164, a functional polymorphism in the pre-mir-146a, and chronic pancreatitis risk. The rs2910164 genotypes were determined in 165 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 200 healthy controls who were frequency matched for age and gender. One single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2910164) was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RLFP). The frequency of individuals who carried [G] allele was significantly higher in cases (62.7%) than in controls (53.7%, p = 0.015), which resulted in a statistically significant pathogenic effect associated with this variant allele (OR: 1.448, CI: 1.076-1.950; p = 0.015). The GC and GG genotypes showed strong and significant increased risk for complication of chronic pancreatitis (OR = 3.668, 95%CI = 1.233-10.916, p = 0.019; OR = 5.667, 95%CI = 1.852-17.336, p = 0.002). The individuals carrying G allele confer a lower expression level of mature mir-146a. These findings suggest that the mir-146a rs2910164 may contribute to genetic susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis, and that mir-146a might be involved in chronic pancreatitis development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  18. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoichi Deie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical pancreatic duct (PD drainage for chronic pancreatitis in children is relatively rare. It is indicated in cases of recurrent pancreatitis and PD dilatation that have not responded to medical therapy and therapeutic endoscopy. We performed laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy for two paediatric patients with chronic pancreatitis. The main PD was opened easily by electrocautery after locating the dilated PD by intraoperative ultrasonography. The dilated PD was split longitudinally from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head by laparoscopic coagulation shears or electrocautery after pancreatography. A laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy was performed by a one-layered technique using continuous 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS sutures from the pancreatic tail to the pancreatic head. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications or recurrences. This procedure has cosmetic advantages compared with open surgery for chronic pancreatitis. Laparoscopic side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy in children is feasible and effective for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  19. [Multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pancreatitis: an overview of current step-up approach and new options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempeneers, M.A.; Besselink, M.G.; Issa, Y.; Hooft, J.E. van; Goor, H. van; Bruno, M.J.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    - Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease, which leads to a severe decrease in quality of life and reduced life expectancy.- 85-90% of patients with chronic pancreatitis consult the doctor because of pain.- Pain in chronic pancreatitis has a multifactorial aetiology, with

  20. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI assessed pancreatic morphology and exocrine function are associated with disease burden in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Lykke Poulsen, Jakob; Bolvig Mark, Esben; Mohr Drewes, Asbjørn; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between morphological and functional secretin-stimulated MRI parameters with hospitalization, quality of life (QOL), and pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This prospective cohort study included 82 patients with CP. Data were obtained from clinical information, QOL, and pain as assessed by questionnaires (The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire and modified Brief Pain Inventory short form). Secretin-stimulated MRI morphological parameters included pancreatic gland volume, main pancreatic duct diameter, the modified Cambridge Classification of Duct Abnormality, apparent diffusion coefficient, fat signal fraction, and the pancreatic secretion volume as a functional parameter. The primary outcomes were time to first hospitalization related to the CP, as well as annual hospitalization frequency and duration. The secondary outcomes were pain severity, QOL, and pain interference scores. A main pancreatic duct diameter below 5 mm was associated with reduced time to first hospitalization (hazard ratio=2.06; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-4.17; P=0.043). Pancreatic secretion volume was correlated with QOL (r=0.31; P=0.0072) and pain interference score (r=-0.27; P=0.032), and fecal elastase was also correlated with QOL (r=0.28; P=0.017). However, functional and morphological findings were not related to pain intensity. Advanced pancreatic imaging techniques may be a highly sensitive tool for prognostication and monitoring of disease activity and its consequences.

  2. New developments in endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, P; Bruno, M; Poley, J W

    2012-12-01

    The aim of endoscopic therapy of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is to treat pain by draining the pancreatic duct or managing loco-regional complications. Recent decennia were characterized by continuous improvement of endoscopic techniques and devices, resulting in a better clinical outcome. Novel developments now also provide the opportunity to endoscopically treat refractory CP-related complications. Especially suboptimal surgical candidates could potentially benefit from these new developments, consequently avoiding invasive surgery. The use of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been explored in pancreatic and CP-related biliary duct strictures, resistant to conventional treatment with plastic endoprotheses. Furthermore, endosonography-guided transmural drainage of the main pancreatic duct via duct-gastrostomy is an alternative treatment option in selected cases. Pancreatic pseudocysts represent an excellent indication for endoscopic therapy with some recent case series demonstrating effective drainage with the use of a fully covered SEMS. Although results of these new endoscopic developments are promising, high quality randomized trials are required to determine their definite role in the management of chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Delayed release pancrelipase for treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Mukkai Krishnamurty

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Devi Mukkai Krishnamurty,1 Atoosa Rabiee,2 Sanjay B Jagannath,1 Dana K Andersen2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; 1Department of Medicine; 2Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Pancreatic enzyme supplements (PES are used in chronic pancreatitis (CP for correction of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI as well as pain and malnutrition. The use of porcine pancreatic enzymes for the correction of exocrine insufficiency is governed by the pathophysiology of the disease as well as pharmacologic properties of PES. Variability in bioequivalence of PES has been noted on in vitro and in vivo testing and has been attributed to the differences in enteric coating and the degree of micro-encapsulation. As a step towards standardizing pancreatic enzyme preparations, the Food and Drug Administration now requires the manufacturers of PES to obtain approval of marketed formulations by April 2010. In patients with treatment failure, apart from evaluating drug and dietary interactions and compliance, physicians should keep in mind that patients may benefit from switching to a different formulation. The choice of PES (enteric coated versus non-enteric coated and the need for acid suppression should be individualized. There is no current standard test for evaluating adequacy of therapy in CP patients and studies have shown that optimization of therapy based on symptoms may be inadequate. Goals of therapy based on overall patient presentation and specific laboratory tests rather than mere correction of steatorrhea are needed.Keywords: pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic enzyme supplement

  4. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a 14 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, C; Dima, S; Scarlat, A; Ivanov, B; Bouaru, O; Ionescu, M; Vasilescu, C; Popescu, I

    2010-01-01

    Operative treatment of chronic pancreatitis is indicated for patients with intractable pain after failed medical and endoscopic treatment, or in the presence of complications of the disease. This study evaluates a single-center experience with operative management of chronic pancreatitis over a period of time of 14 years, regarding indication, surgical technique, early and late results. The records of 265 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for chronic pancreatitis between 1995 and 2008 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Long-term outcomes were assessed by patient survey, with a median follow-up of 40 months. 265 patients underwent 275 operations for chronic pancreatitis with the main indication abdominal pain (46.8%), followed by suspected malignancy in 24.8% and recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in 18.6%. Resection procedures 54.5% (150), drainage procedures 1.09% (3), bypass and denervation procedures 44.36% (122) and exploratory laparotomy 3.27% (9) were performed with an overall morbidity of 22% and an in-hospital mortality rate of 2.64%. After a median follow-up of 40 months survival information was available for 137 patients (51.69%) with a 5-and actuarial survival rate of 74.7% and quality of life improvement in most patients, especially in the resected group. Our results suggest that in chronic pancreatitis the type of surgery has to be individualized in each patient (resection VS drainage) and organ preserving operations are safe and effective in providing long-term pain relief and in treating CP-related complications

  5. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage treatment of calcific chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ning, Deng; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2018-04-21

    Endoscopic therapy and surgery are both conventional treatments to remove pancreatic duct stones that developed during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis. However, few studies comparing the effect and safety between surgery drainage and endoscopic drainage (plus Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy, ESWL).The aim of this study was to compare the benefits between endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct for patients with calcified chronic pancreatitis. A total of 86 patients were classified into endoscopic/ESWL (n = 40) or surgical (n = 46) treatment groups. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. Pain recurrence and hospital stays were similar between the endoscopic/ESWL treatment and surgery group. However, endoscopic/ESWL treatment yielded significantly lower medical expense and less complications compared with the surgical treatment. In selective patients, endoscopic/ESWL treatment could achieve comparable efficacy to the surgical treatment. With lower medical expense and less complications, endoscopic/ESWL treatment would be much preferred to be the initial treatment of choice for patients with calcified chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gallbladder emptying in chronic pancreatitis a scintigraphic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchpiguel, C.A.; Pedroso, M.; Sapioenza, M.; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.; Yamashiba, C.; Melo, I.; Garcez, A.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Our purpose was to evaluate the gallbladder (GB) emptying in pts with chronic pancreatitis and to determine whether or not the use of pancreatic extract has an impact in improving that function. The GB emptying was evaluated in 11 patients (pts) with mild to moderate chronic pancreatitis, and in 10 normal volunteers. Pts and controls who presented any kind of condition that could interfere with the gastric or gallbladder emptying were excluded. The GB ejection fraction was calculated at 30, 45, and 60 minutes after a standardized fatty meal ingestion. In the pts group, this evaluation was obtained in two different periods of time, without and with the addition of pancreatic extract. The gastric emptying was previously determined in all patients and controls with Technetium-99m-sulfur colloid mixed in the same fatty meal used for the hepatobiliary scans. The results disclosed that the GB ejection fraction at 60 minutes was significantly lower in patients compared to controls ( 0,05). The gastric emptying was similar between the two groups (p>0,05). In conclusion, mild to moderate chronic pancreatitis is associated with GB function impairment. Our results suggest that the delay in GB emptying does not depend exclusively on the alteration in the intestinal phase of the GB stimulation, but may be a result of multiple other factors

  7. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    : Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between......INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis...

  8. Towards a neurobiological understanding of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren S; Krauss, Theresa; Demir, Ihsan Ekin

    2017-01-01

    a chronic pain syndrome. Objectives: We aimed to characterize the neurobiological signature of pain associated with CP and to discuss its implications for treatment strategies. Methods: Relevant basic and clinical articles were selected for review following an extensive search of the literature. Results......: Pathophysiological changes in the peripheral (pancreatic gland) and central nervous system characterize the pain syndrome associated with CP; involved mechanisms can be broken down to 3 main branches: (1) peripheral sensitization, (2) pancreatic neuropathy, and (3) neuroplastic changes in the central pain pathways...... with those observed in neuropathic pain disorders and have important implications for treatment; adjuvant analgesics are effective in a subset of patients, and neuromodulation and neuropsychological interventions may prove useful in the future. Conclusion: Chronic pancreatitis is associated with abnormal...

  9. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  10. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9{+-}6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42{+-}1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33{+-}0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0{+-}1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal

  11. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9±6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42±1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33±0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0±1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal enlargement and

  12. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, chronic pancreatitis, and MODY-8 diabetes: is bile salt-dependent lipase (or carboxyl ester lipase) at the crossroads of pancreatic pathologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Dominique; Silvy, Françoise; Crenon, Isabelle; Martinez, Emmanuelle; Collignon, Aurélie; Beraud, Evelyne; Mas, Eric

    2018-02-23

    Pancreatic adenocarcinomas and diabetes mellitus are responsible for the deaths of around two million people each year worldwide. Patients with chronic pancreatitis do not die directly of this disease, except where the pathology is hereditary. Much current literature supports the involvement of bile salt-dependent lipase (BSDL), also known as carboxyl ester lipase (CEL), in the pathophysiology of these pancreatic diseases. The purpose of this review is to shed light on connections between chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas by gaining an insight into BSDL and its variants. This enzyme is normally secreted by the exocrine pancreas, and is diverted within the intestinal lumen to participate in the hydrolysis of dietary lipids. However, BSDL is also expressed by other cells and tissues, where it participates in lipid homeostasis. Variants of BSDL resulting from germline and/or somatic mutations (nucleotide insertion/deletion or nonallelic homologous recombination) are expressed in the pancreas of patients with pancreatic pathologies such as chronic pancreatitis, MODY-8, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We discuss the possible link between the expression of BSDL variants and these dramatic pancreatic pathologies, putting forward the suggestion that BSDL and its variants are implicated in the cell lipid metabolism/reprogramming that leads to the dyslipidemia observed in chronic pancreatitis, MODY-8, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We also propose potential strategies for translation to therapeutic applications.

  13. Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis in Chronic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical course, etiology and complications of acute pancreatitis among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in a tertiary care renal center in Karachi. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical course of CKD patients who presented to our emergency room with ...

  14. Differential effect of opioids in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staahl, Camilla; Dimcevski, Georg; Andersen, Søren Due

    2007-01-01

    and morphine on experimental pain in patients with pain caused by chronic pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients took part in this blinded, cross-over study. The analgesic effects of morphine (30 mg, oral), oxycodone (15 mg, oral) and placebo were tested against multimodal (mechanical, thermal...

  15. Chronic pancreatitis : Novel concepts in diagnostics and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The most prominent symptom is abdominal pain, which often leads to recurrent hospitalizations, absence of work, multiple interventions, and opioid addiction. Ten years after onset of the disease, more than half of the patients are

  16. Diagnosing Chronic Pancreatitis Comparison and Evaluation of Different Diagnostic Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Yama; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; van Dieren, Susan; Besselink, Marc G.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Ahmed Ali, Usama

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to compare theM-ANNHEIM, Buchler, and Luneburg diagnostic tools for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of the development of CP was performed in a prospectively collected multicenter cohort including 669 patients after a first episode of acute

  17. Quantitative sensory testing predicts pregabalin efficacy in painful chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Graversen, C.; Bouwense, S.A.W.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major problem in pain medicine is the lack of knowledge about which treatment suits a specific patient. We tested the ability of quantitative sensory testing to predict the analgesic effect of pregabalin and placebo in patients with chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Sixty-four patients

  18. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis | Hari Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP. Materials and Methods: ...

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Peters, W.H.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: Alcohol misuse is now regarded as an important risk factor for development of chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, not every alcohol misuser develops CP and it therefore might be suggested that susceptibility could be further influenced by inter-individual variations in the activities of

  20. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  1. Retroperitoneal disorders associated with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Noboru; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Takeda, Keisuke; Zen, Yoh

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently accompanied by relevant lesions in the genitourinary tract and retroperitoneal organs, which cause various clinical problems, ranging from non-specific back pain or bladder outlet obstruction to renal failure. The diagnosis of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis requires a multidisciplinary approach, including serological tests, histological examination, imaging analysis, and susceptibility to steroid therapy. Radiological examinations are helpful to diagnose this condition, but surgical resection is occasionally unavoidable to exclude malignancy, particularly for patients with isolated retroperitoneal involvement. Steroid therapy is the treatment of choice for this condition, the same as for other manifestations of IgG4-related disease. For patients with severe ureteral obstruction, additional ureteral stenting needs to be considered prior to steroid therapy to preserve the renal function. Some papers have suggested that IgG4-related disease can affect male reproductive organs including the prostate and testis. IgG4-related prostatitis usually causes lower urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria and pollakisuria. Patients sometimes state that corticosteroids given for IgG4-related disease at other sites relieve their lower urinary tract symptoms, which leads us to suspect prostatic involvement in this condition. Because of the limited number of publications available, further studies are warranted to better characterize IgG4-related disease in male reproductive organs. PMID:25469023

  2. Critical Review of Diagnostic Methods Used in Chronic Pancreatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan T Beck

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a balanced assessment of the various pancreatic function tests and imaging techniques used in the differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatic disease. Function tests that study the digestive capacity of the pancreas (fat absorption of dietary lipids, fluorescein- or radiolabelled fats, bentiromide test, etc have high specificity, but very low sensitivity. This is because 90% of pancreas has to be destroyed before steatorrhea or creatorrhea occurs. Tests that directly measure pancreatic bicarbonate and protein secretion (secretin test, etc are more accurate and may detect pancreatic dysfunction even before anatomical changes occur. Measurement of pancreatic enzymes in serum or urine, or the decreased decline of serum amino acids during their incorporation into pancreatic enzymes, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to help diagnose pancreatic disease. Sensitive and specific tumour markers are not yet available. Thus screening tests are not cost-effective - if they are negative, they do not exclude pancreatic disease; and if positive, they have to be confirmed by more specific tests. Imaging techniques are the most commonly used methods of investigation. The usefulness of abdominal survey films, barium studies, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, ultrasonography, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography is critically reviewed. Most of the radiological methods can be combined with cytology or biopsy. Histology demonstrating malignancy establishes this diagnosis, but negative biopsies do not exclude malignant tumours. Presently only ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound can diagnose cancers sufficiently early to allow for possible `curative' surgery, and only endoscopic ultrasound is capable to stage tumours for the assessment of resectability.

  3. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  4. Assimilation of wheat starch in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Positive effect of enzyme replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, I; Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1992-01-01

    Pancreatic insufficiency due to chronic pancreatitis may lead to symptomatic malabsorption of both starch and fat. The absorption capacity of wheat starch has not been studied previously in patients with chronic pancreatitis, although this carbohydrate is a quantitatively important component of t...

  5. New developments in diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Miyoshi, Hironao; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is progressive and irreversible, leading to digestive and absorptive disorders by destruction of the exocrine pancreas and to diabetes mellitus by destruction of the endocrine pancreas. When complications such as pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst occur, elevated pancreatic ductal pressure exacerbates pain and induces other complications, worsening the patient's general condition. Combined treatment with extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and endoscopic lithotripsy is a useful, minimally invasive, first-line treatment approach that can preserve pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic duct stenosis elevates intraductal pressure and favor both pancreatolithiasis and pseudocyst formation, making effective treatment vitally important. Endoscopic treatment of benign pancreatic duct stenosis stenting frequently decreases pain in chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, stenosis of the main pancreatic duct increases risk of stone recurrence after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. Recently, good results were reported in treating pancreatic duct stricture with a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent, which shows promise for preventing stone recurrence after lithotripsy in patients with pancreatic stricture. Chronic pancreatitis has many complications including pancreatic carcinoma, pancreatic atrophy, and loss of exocrine and endocrine function, as well as frequent recurrence of stones after treatment of pancreatolithiasis. As early treatment of chronic pancreatitis is essential, the new concept of early chronic pancreatitis, including characteristics findings in endoscopic ultrasonograms, is presented. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The modified Puestow procedure for chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombleholme, T M; deLorimier, A A; Way, L W; Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T; Harrison, M R

    1990-07-01

    Chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children is an unusual condition that often goes undiagnosed and untreated for years. In light of recent reports in adults that endocrine and exocrine function may be preserved by early pancreaticojejunostomy, we reviewed our experience with this procedure (one Duval, 10 Puestows) in 10 children between 1969 and 1989. The underlying etiology was familial pancreatitis in four patients, one case of unknown etiology, congenital ductal anomalies in four (one pancreas divisum, one annular pancreas, one choledochal cyst, and one ductal stenosis), and posttraumatic in one. All 10 had intractable recurrent abdominal pain. Preoperatively, only three patients evidenced exocrine insufficiency and none had endocrine insufficiency. There was complete resolution of pain in eight patients and improvement in two during a mean observation period of 4 years (range, 7 months to 19.75 years). Exocrine insufficiency resolved in two patients but has persisted in the third patient now on Viokase. Endocrine insufficiency has developed during follow-up in one patient. Pancreaticojejunostomy provides excellent relief of recurrent pain in chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is indicated when the diagnosis of chronic relapsing pancreatitis is suspected to define the ductal anatomy. Pancreaticojejunostomy may prevent the progression of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency if performed early in the course of the disease.

  7. Endoscopic or surgical intervention for painful obstructive chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Pahlplatz, Johanna M; Nealon, Wiliam H; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G; Boermeester, Marja A

    2015-03-19

    Endoscopy and surgery are the treatment modalities of choice for patients with chronic pancreatitis and dilated pancreatic duct (obstructive chronic pancreatitis). Physicians face, without clear consensus, the choice between endoscopy or surgery for this group of patients. To assess and compare the effects and complications of surgical and endoscopic interventions in the management of pain for obstructive chronic pancreatitis. We searched the following databases in The Cochrane Library: CENTRAL (2014, Issue 2), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2014, Issue 2), and DARE (2014, Issue 2). We also searched the following databases up to 25 March 2014: MEDLINE (from 1950), Embase (from 1980), and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (from 1990). We performed a cross-reference search. Two review authors independently performed the selection of trials. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of endoscopic or surgical interventions in obstructive chronic pancreatitis. We included trials comparing endoscopic versus surgical interventions as well as trials comparing either endoscopic or surgical interventions to conservative treatment (i.e. non-invasive treatment modalities). We included relevant trials irrespective of blinding, the number of participants randomised, and the language of the article. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently extracted data from the articles. We evaluated the methodological quality of the included trials and requested additional information from study authors in the case of missing data. We identified three eligible trials. Two trials compared endoscopic intervention with surgical intervention and included a total of 111 participants: 55 in the endoscopic group and 56 in the surgical group. Compared with the endoscopic group, the surgical group had a higher proportion of participants with pain relief, both at middle/long-term follow-up (two to

  8. Pancreaticoduodenectomy versus duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenjiang; Xiang, Guangming; Tan, Chunlu; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Baowang; Gong, Jun; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xubao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis (CP). The 123 patients with CP who underwent pancreatic head resection between January 2004 and June 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. The preoperative variables, operative data, postoperative complications, and follow-up information were examined. There were no significant differences in clinical and morphological characteristics, pain relief, and jaundice status between the PD and DPPHR groups. The duration of operation was shorter (251.8 [SD, 43.1] vs 324.5 [SD, 41.4] minutes, P endocrine insufficiency was higher in PD group as compared with DPPHR group. Both procedures are equally effective in pain relief, but DPPHR is superior to PD in operative data, postoperative morbidity, improving quality of life, and preservation of exocrine and endocrine function.

  9. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency secondary to chronic herpesvirus pancreatitis in a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, David N; Falcon, Michelle; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K

    2007-06-01

    A cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) examined because of weight loss, polydipsia, and polyuria was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on the presence of glucosuria and marked hyperglycemia. Medical attempts to manage the diabetes mellitus were unsuccessful, and the bird was euthanatized. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed a chronic active pancreatitis with herpesviral inclusions in many of the pancreatic acinar and duct cells. Psittacid herpesvirus-1 (PsHV-1) DNA was amplified from the lesion by polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing of the amplicon showed it to be the genotype 1 variant, which is most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease, an acute rapidly fatal systemic infection. The findings in this case suggest that the PsHV-1 genotype may also cause a localized disease of the pancreas. Infection with this virus should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with pancreatitis with or without diabetes mellitus.

  10. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Victoria FRAGOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. Objective - The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Methods - Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results - The annual cost of the treatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. Conclusion - There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [de

  12. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  13. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  14. Diabetes mellitus in Tropical Chronic Pancreatitis Is Not Just a Secondary Type of Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, L.; Parvin, S.; Hassan, Z.; Hildebrand, P.; Keller, U.; Ali, L.; Beglinger, C.; Azad Khan, A. K.; Whitcomb, David C.; Gyr, N.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: In chronic calcific pancreatitis of the tropics, etiology and relationship to developing diabetes mellitus are unknown. Some consider these cases a straightforward secondary type of diabetes, while others suggest selective beta-cell impairment. Testing pancreatic function, we investigated whether selective beta-cell impairment triggers diabetes associated with tropical pancreatitis. METHODS: At a Bangladeshi research institute, 8 chronic tropical pancreatitis and no diabetes mellitus su...

  15. Clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis: an analysis of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MO Xue

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP, and to deepen the understanding of this disease, reduce false positive rate, and enhance people′s awareness of this disease. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 13 patients with type 1 AIP who were admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University from January 2012 to December 2016, including general status, clinical manifestations, laboratory serological examination, imaging findings, histopathological findings, treatment, and prognosis. ResultsOf all 13 patients, there were 9 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 60.08±9.47 years. Major clinical manifestations included jaundice (69.2%, abdominal pain (61.5%, and weight loss (61.5%. The most common organ involved was bile duct (462%, and 30.8% of the patients had sclerosing cholangitis. Of all patients, 23.1% had diabetes. As for serological markers, 92.30% patients had more than 2 times increase in IgG4, and 7.69% had 1-2 times increase in IgG4, 53.85% patients had an increase in CA19-9, 69.23% patients had an increase in total bilirubin, more than two thirds of the patients had an increase in aminotransferases or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. As for imaging findings, 53.8% patients had diffuse enlargement of the pancreas on CT, 46.2% had focal enlargement of the pancreas, and 46.2% patients had low-density cyst-like shadow in pancreatic lesions. Pathological examination showed fibrous connective tissue proliferation with infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells. All patients were given standard glucocorticoid therapy (initial dose of prednisone: 30-40 mg/d and the remission rate of glucocorticoid therapy was 100%. The follow-up time was 12 months, and one patient experienced multiple recurrences in the course of the disease. ConclusionType 1 AIP is the local manifestation of IgG4-associated disease in the pancreas, which often occurs in middle-aged and

  16. AUTOIMMUNE CYTOPENIAS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, FACTS AND MYTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Tandra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CLL has been defined as presence of more than 5000 small mature appearing monoclonal B lymphocytes with a specific immunophenotype in peripheral blood. It is a well-known fact that CLL is associated with autoimmune cytopenias. CLL cells are CD5+ B lymphocytes, and usually are not the “guilty” cells which produce autoantibodies. T cell defect is another characteristic of CLL and the total number of T cells is increased, and there is inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is the most common autoimmune complication of CLL and has been reported in 10-25% of CLL patients. However, the stage-adjusted estimated rate of AIHA in CLL is about 5%. Conversely, CLL is three times more common in patients who present with AIHA. Direct agglutinin test (DAT is positive in 7-14% of CLL patients but AIHA may also occur in DAT negative patients. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT is the second most common complication of CLL and has been reported in 2-3% of patients. DAT is positive in AIT but presence of antiplatelet antibodies is neither diagnostic nor reliable. Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA are very rare complications of CLL and like other autoimmune complications of CLL may occur at any clinical stage. It is believed that most case reports of AIN and PRCA in CLL actually belong to large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL. Non-hematologic autoimmune complications of CLL including cold agglutinin disease (CAD, paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP, acquired angioedema, and anti-myelin associated globulin are rare. Before starting any treatment, clinicians should distinguish between autoimmune cytopenias and massive bone marrow infiltration since autoimmune complications of CLL are not necessarily equal to advanced disease with poor prognosis. According to IWCLL guideline, steroids are the mainstay of treatment of simple autoimmunity. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, cyclosporine, and rituximab are used in

  17. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis One Century after Hashimoto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Hakaru Hashimoto described 4 patients with a hitherto unknown cause for goitre, struma lymphomatosa, a century ago. He was careful to distinguish this from Riedel thyroiditis but it has become clear that fibrosis and atrophy of the thyroid are indeed components of Hashimoto thyroiditis, and in rare cases IgG4-related sclerosing disease may be an outcome. Although the cause of the lymphocytic infiltration was unknown to Hashimoto, we now know through the pioneering studies of N.R. Rose and E. Witebsky [J Immunol 1956;76:417–427] that this condition is the archetype for autoimmune destruction as a disease mechanism. In the last two decades in particular, there has been huge interest in unravelling the genetic basis for this and related autoimmune disorders. The list of polymorphisms associated with autoimmune thyroid disease grows each year, and in the case of vitiligo, which is frequently found in association with thyroid autoimmunity, we know that 27 separate susceptibility loci account for less than 20% of the heritability of this condition. Environmental and existential factors may turn out to be just as complex in number and in interactions. We can thus imagine a ‘Swiss cheese’ model for the causation of autoimmune thyroid disease, in which the effects of cumulative weaknesses line up – like the holes in slices of cheese – to allow the catastrophic event of autoimmune destruction to occur. PMID:24783026

  20. Radiological evaluation about the effects of acute and chronic pancreatitis on the stomach patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, Woo Ki; Han, Chang Yul; Park, Soo Sung

    1983-01-01

    The present study was intended to examine the spectrum of radiographic patterns of the stomach associated with acute and chronic pancreatitis and their complications. Subjects served for the study consisted of 70 cases of pancreatitis (36 cases in acute stage and 34 cases in chronic stage). Intramural and perigastric permeation of extravasated pancreatic enzymes and secondary inflammatory reaction that follows are responsible for the radiographic change observed. 1. Generalized rugal thickening and particularly selective mucosal prominences in greater curvature of body and antrum are characteristically seen in acute (14 of 36 cases- 39%) and chronic pancreatitis (11 of 34 cases- 32%) 2. The only finding of the chronic pancreatitis includes patterns mimicking limits plastica, indurated and nondistensible rugae induced by perigastric adhesion (11 of 34 cases- 32%) Familiarization with these patterns of involvement contributes to the radiographic diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and avoides serious diagnostic errors in case of chronic pancreatitis

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of autoimmune pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Yang Zhenghan; Qu Wanying; Yao Zhiming; Liu Fugeng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the image characteristics and clinical application of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Methods: The PET/CT images from six male patients (age ranging from 51 to 78(average 69) years) with AIP from 2005 to 2012 were studied retrospectively. Of the six patients,two had follow-up PET/CT images after steroid therapy. The morphologic abnormality was visually analyzed and SUV was calculated. Scores were obtained according to the SUV of pancreas compared with that of the liver (3=SUV higher than liver, 2=SUV similar to liver, 1=SUV lower than liver). The difference between the regular and delayed SUV was compared by paired t test using SPSS 17.0. Results: All of the 6 patients showed diffuse FDG uptake in the entire pancreas with SUV max of 3.2-6.0(5.2± 1.1). Five patients had score 3 and one had score 2. Five patients had delayed scan, of which 4 had increased uptake (SUV max 5.3-7.2), but the SUV max was not significantly different compared to that before delay scan (4.8-6.0, t=-2.424, P>0.05). Five patients showed extrapancreatic uptake, especially in the salivary glands. After the steroid therapy, the enlarged pancreas reduced and the intense uptake of the pancreas disappeared. The extrapancreatic uptake showed coinstantaneous remission. Conclusions: Increasing FDG uptake at entire pancreas was observed in patients with AIP. 18 F-FDG PET/CT may be useful for detecting AIP and the associated extrapancreatic uptake,and monitoring the change after therapy, yet it needs further evaluation. (authors)

  2. Pegylated interferon de novo-induce autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ashraf; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Alfiomy, Mohamed; Abdellah, Mohamed; Shahat, Khaled; Salah, Mohamed; Mostafa, Sadek; Elwassief, Ahmed; Aboelfotoh, Attef; Abdelhafeez, Hafez; El-Sherif, Assem

    2011-08-11

    A 55-year-old Egyptian woman with chronic hepatitis C undergoing treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) alfa-2a plus ribavirin was referred to our hospital on November 2010 with prolonged easy fatigability and an attack of syncope; she had no prior history of autoimmune disorders or allergy. Laboratory investigations documented the presence of Peg-IFN induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and autoimmune thyroiditis. Intravenous γ globulin (IVGG) failed to correct the autoimmune process; on the other hand steroid therapy dramatically corrected both haematological and thyroid values, and step down the immune process. Our report indicated that Peg-IFN de novo-induce autoimmune haemolysis, documenting a previous report. IVGG failed to step down the immune process in our case.

  3. Comparison of Fasting Human Pancreatic Polypeptide Levels Among Patients With Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Sajan Jiv Singh; Bamlet, William R; Kudva, Yogish C; Chari, Suresh T

    2018-05-17

    Human pancreatic polypeptide (HPP) is a hormone secreted by the ventral pancreas. While postprandial HPP levels have been studied in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), there are limited data on fasting HPP in these diseases. Fasting serum HPP was measured in the following groups of patients: CP with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n = 16), CP without DM (n = 34), PDAC with new-onset DM (n = 50), PDAC without DM (n = 49), new-onset type 2 DM (n = 50), and controls without DM (n = 49). Sixty-six had type 3c DM (CP with DM, n = 16; PDAC with new-onset DM, n = 50). Median fasting HPP levels (in picograms per milliliter) were similar among all groups. Median (interquartile range) HPP levels in new-onset type 2 DM (n = 50; 288.3 [80.1-1072.1]) were similar to those in type 3c DM (n = 66; 242.3 [64.9-890.9]) (P = 0.71). In PDAC (n = 99), HPP values were similar in pancreatic head (n = 75) versus body/tail (n = 24) tumors (245.3 [64.3-1091.3] vs 334.7 [136.1-841.5]; P = 0.95), regardless of DM. Fasting HPP levels are similar in CP, PDAC, and controls regardless of glycemic status.

  4. Bile Duct Obstruction Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis in Seven Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Cribb, Alastair E.; Burgener, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.

    1988-01-01

    Seven icteric dogs were determined to have bile duct obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. All dogs had histories of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities and total bilirubin concentrations were markedly elevated. Diagnosis was based on exploratory laparotomy and histological examination. Each dog had a 3 to 10 cm mass in the body of the pancreas and obstruction of the common bile duct. Three dogs treated with pancreatectomy,...

  5. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...

  6. Microscopic findings in EUS-guided fine needle (SharkCore) biopsies with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2017-01-01

    The International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC) for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) include the histological criterion that is based on either pancreatic core needle biopsies (CNBs) or surgical specimens. However, CNBs are difficult to obtain by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS......). EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology is usually not sufficient for the diagnosis of AIP, but may sometimes contain tissue microfragments. Another approach is EUS-guided histological fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB), using needles such as the SharkCore or ProCore needle. Published data regarding...... EUS-guided SharkCore FNB for the diagnosis of AIP are lacking. We aimed to describe our histological findings in one type 1 and two type 2 AIP patients who underwent EUS SharkCore FNB. The EUS-FNBs of two patients fulfilled the histological level 2 ICDC for type 1 AIP or type 2 AIP. The EUS-FNB of one...

  7. A Patient with Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1 with Previously Known Lymphadenopathy, Both in the Context of IgG4-related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidjan, Fazil M; Karim, Faiz; Verdijk, Rob M; van Esser, Joost W; van Heerde, Marianne J

    2015-11-05

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an important clinical pathologic concept of IgG-4-related disease. AIP is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by a fibroinflammatory process by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and increased IgG4+ plasma cells, leading to dysfunction of the pancreas. Affected patients with AIP frequently have disease affecting other organs or sites with similar histologic changes, elevated IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate, and good response to corticosteroid therapy. These diseases often are not limited to the pancreas and the pancreas may not be involved at all. We report a 62-year-old man with obstructive jaundice with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis of AIP was based on diagnostic criteria by the HISORT-criteria in combination with elevated IgG-4 serum levels. CT revealed a focal enlargement of the head of the pancreas, as well as mesenteric peripancreatic and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. He was treated with high-dose steroid in combination with azathioprine and showed good clinical response. We report a case with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy and obstructive jaundice based on AIP type 1, both in the context of IgG4-related disease.

  8. [Medico-social characteristics of patients with chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyura, S D; Fedorov, I G; Gavrilina, N S; Sedova, G A

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the health status of patients with chronic toxic-metabolic pancreatitis (CTMP) and chronic obstructive pancreatitis (COP). The gender and social factors was analysed. 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis examined. On based of the TIGAR-O classification, two groups of patients choosed: the 1-st group included 142 (56.8%) a patient with CTMP, the 2-nd group--108 (43.2%) patients COP. The social characteristics of patients had produced, including assessment of status social (gender, age, educational level, employment, marital status, bad habits). Quality of life was assessed by using the updated questionnaire SF-36. The average age of patients with CP is 53.2 years, male to female ratio is 3:2. At stake is 56.8% of all CTMP patients with CP, the median age is 42.3 years, the male to female ratio is 4:1. The average age of patients with COP is 54.6 years, male to female ratio is 1:4. Do not work, not married, engaged in an anti-social way of life 43% of people working age with CTMP, have a lower education in comparison with patients with COP. Patients with CTMP reduced social significance illustrate reduced social significance as personal (reduction in the level of education, an anti-social way of life), and social (lack of employment, deterioration of demographic indicators).

  9. Evidence-Based Surgical Treatments for Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jörg; Stöß, Christian; Mayerle, Julia; Stecher, Lynne; Maak, Matthias; Simon, Peter; Nitsche, Ulrich; Friess, Helmut

    2016-07-25

    If conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis is unsuccessful, surgery is an option. The choice of the most suitable surgical method can be difficult, as the indications, advantages, and disadvantages of the available methods have not yet been fully documented with scientific evidence. In April 2015, we carried out a temporally unlimited systematic search for publications on surgery for chronic pancreatitis. The target parameters were morbidity, mortality, pain, endocrine and exocrine insuffi - ciency, weight gain, quality of life, length of hospital stay, and duration of urgery. Differences between surgical methods were studied with network meta-analysis, and duodenum-preserving operations were compared with partial duodenopancreatectomy with standard meta-analysis. Among the 326 articles initially identified, 8 randomized controlled trials on a total of 423 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The trials were markedly heterogeneous in some respects. There was no significant difference among surgical methods with respect to perioperative morbidity, pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, or quality of life. Duodenumpreserving procedures, compared to duodenopancreatectomy, were associated with a long-term weight gain that was 3 kg higher (p chronic pancreatitis is superior to partial duodenopancreatectomy in multiple respects. Only limited recommendations can be given, however, on the basis of present data. The question of the best surgical method for the individual patient, in view of the clinical manifestations, anatomy, and diagnostic criteria, remains open.

  10. Surgical approaches to chronic pancreatitis: indications and imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Singh, Vikesh K; Johnson, Stephen I; Makary, Martin A; Hirose, Kenzo; Fishman, Elliot K; Zaheer, Atif

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas that can result in abdominal pain, exocrine insufficiency, and diabetes. Inadequate pain relief using medical and/or endoscopic therapies is an indication for surgery. The surgical management of CP is centered around three main operations including pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) and drainage procedures, and total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). PD is the method of choice when there is a high suspicion for malignancy. Combined drainage and resection procedures are associated with pain relief, higher quality of life, and superior short-term and long-term survival in comparison with the PD. TPIAT is a reemerging treatment that may be promising in subjects with intractable pain and impaired quality of life. Imaging examinations have an extensive role in pre-operative and post-operative evaluation of CP patients. Pre-operative advanced imaging examinations including CT and MRI can detect hallmarks of CP such as calcifications, pancreatic duct dilatation, chronic pseudocysts, focal pancreatic enlargement, and biliary ductal dilatation. Post-operative findings may include periportal hepatic edema, pneumobilia, perivascular cuffing and mild pancreatic duct dilation. Imaging can also be useful in the detection of post-operative complications including obstructions, anastomotic leaks, and vascular lesions. Imaging helps identify unique post-operative findings associated with TPIAT and may aid in predicting viability and function of the transplanted islet cells. In this review, we explore surgical indications as well as pre-operative and post-operative imaging findings associated with surgical options that are typically performed for CP patients.

  11. Zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and its relationship with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2009-11-05

    A major role of the pancreas in zinc homeostasis has been suggested. To assess erythrocyte zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and to correlate it with pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. One hundred and one patients with chronic pancreatitis (34 alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 67 tropical chronic pancreatitis) were prospectively studied. Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Erythrocyte zinc was estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Exocrine insufficiency was assessed using polyclonal antibody ELISA for pancreatic stool elastase1. Endocrine insufficiency was assessed by serum glucose levels and insulin requirement. Erythrocyte zinc was significantly lower in chronic pancreatitis patients than in the controls (26.5+/-9.5 microg/g Hb vs. 38.0+/-6.6 microg/g Hb; Ppancreatitis than in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (25.0+/-10.4 microg/g Hb vs. 29.6+/-6.5 microg/g Hb, P=0.001). In chronic pancreatitis patients who had exocrine insufficiency, erythrocyte zinc positively correlated with stool elastase1 (r=0.587, Ppancreatitis patients, and that zinc deficiency correlates with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Further studies may clarify the possible benefits of zinc supplementation in chronic pancreatitis.

  12. [Diagnostic utility of endoscopic ultrasonography elastography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in a patient with type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokode, Masataka; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Itai, Ryosuke; Mikami, Sakae; Yamashita, Yukimasa; Nakano, Ryota; Ezaki, Takeshi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Zen, Yoh

    2018-01-01

    A referring hospital diagnosed a 57-year-old man with a pancreatic head mass. The initial endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) was inconclusive because of the small sample size. Endoscopic ultrasonography elastography (EUS-EG) and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS), conducted at our institute, raised the possibility of mass-forming pancreatitis or autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A repeat EUS-FNA revealed inflammatory changes, including a neutrophilic duct injury suggestive of type 2 AIP. The pancreatic lesion responded well to the steroid therapy. The present case suggests that EUS-EG and CE-EUS may be useful for diagnostic exclusion of pancreatic cancers, and the combined use of EUS-EG and CE-EUS, with EUS-FNA, may help characterize inflammatory pancreatic lesions.

  13. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Functional significance of SPINK1 promoter variants in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Monique H M; Geisz, Andrea; Kereszturi, Éva; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disorder of the pancreas, which often develops as a result of genetic predisposition. Some of the most frequently identified risk factors affect the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene, which encodes a trypsin inhibitor responsible for protecting the pancreas from premature trypsinogen activation. Recent genetic and functional studies indicated that promoter variants in the SPINK1 gene might contribute to disease risk in carriers. Here, we investigated the functional effects of 17 SPINK1 promoter variants using luciferase reporter gene expression assay in four different cell lines, including three pancreatic acinar cell lines (rat AR42J with or without dexamethasone-induced differentiation and mouse 266-6) and human embryonic kidney 293T cells. We found that most variants caused relatively small changes in promoter activity. Surprisingly, however, we observed significant variations in the effects of the promoter variants in the different cell lines. Only four variants exhibited consistently reduced promoter activity in all acinar cell lines, confirming previous reports that variants c.-108G>T, c.-142T>C, and c.-147A>G are risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and identifying c.-52G>T as a novel risk variant. In contrast, variant c.-215G>A, which is linked with the disease-associated splice-site mutation c.194 + 2T>C, caused increased promoter activity, which may mitigate the overall effect of the pathogenic haplotype. Our study lends further support to the notion that sequence evaluation of the SPINK1 promoter region in patients with chronic pancreatitis is justified as part of the etiological investigation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Pain severity reduces life quality in chronic pancreatitis: Implications for design of future outcome trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Juel, J.; Nielsen, A.K.; Frokjaer, J.B.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a disabling disease characterised by abdominal pain, and various pancreatic and extra-pancreatic complications. We investigated the interactions between pain characteristics (i.e. pain severity and its pattern in time), complications, and quality

  16. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma presenting with acute and chronic pancreatitis as initial presentation: is prognosis better? A comparison study..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorat, Ashok; Huang, Wen-Hsuan; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Jan, Yi-Yan; Hwang, Tsann-Long

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may present with acute and /or chronic pancreatitis due to pancreatic ductal obstruction causing diagnostic dilemma. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the outcome and prognosis of the patients of PDAC presenting with pancreatitis. From 1991 to 2009, 298 patients with PDAC that underwent surgical treatment were retrospectively studied and divided in two groups depending upon initial symptomatic presentation. Group A (n=254) comprised patients without pancreatitis while group B (n=44) patients presented with acute and/or chronic pancreatitis initially. All the patients in studied cohort were surgically treated. Mean age of group A was 63.1 years & for group B it was 62.9 years. Location of tumor was in head of the pancreas in 66.14% of group A patients (n=168) and 61.36% of group B patients (n=27). Although statistically insignificant, the patients in group B had overall better 5-year survival than the patients in group A (20% vs 15.9%). This retrospective study highlights the overall better survival of PDAC patients presenting with acute and/or chronic pancreatitis than those without as contrary to previous reports which stated the poor prognosis of PDAC patients if associated with underlying pancreatitis.

  17. A Case of a Chronic Pancreatic Pseudocyst Causing Atraumatic Splenic Rupture without Evidence of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic splenic rupture is a rare complication of a pancreatic pseudocyst (PP, described in the setting of chronic pancreatitis. There is common understanding, within the literature, that an inflammatory process at the tail of the pancreas may disrupt the spleen and result in such splenic complications. The authors present a case report of a 29-year-old male with a PP, associated with chronic pancreatitis. The patient had a history of excessive alcohol intake and presented to the emergency department with a short history of abdominal pain and vomiting. He denied any significant history of trauma and serum amylase levels were normal. An admission computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen confirmed the presence of a PP in direct contact with the spleen. The CT also demonstrated a heterogenous hypodense area of the splenic hilum, along with perisplenic fluid. The patient was admitted for observation. His abdominal pain progressed, and he became haemodynamically unstable. An emergency ultrasound scan (USS at this time revealed intra-abdominal haemorrhage. A subsequent CT confirmed splenic rupture, which was managed surgically with a full recovery. Few such cases are documented within the literature and more understanding of preempting such events is needed.

  18. Autoimmune and Neoplastic Thyroid Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with “HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia” (MC + HCV, a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th1 (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients.

  19. Frey procedure combined with biliary diversion in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Rayar, Michel; Harnoy, Yann; Turner, Kathleen; Courtin-Tanguy, Laetitia; Boudjema, Karim; Meunier, Bernard; Sulpice, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The Frey procedure has become the standard operative treatment in chronic painful pancreatitis. Biliary diversion could be combined when associated with common bile duct obstruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the type of biliary diversion combined with the Frey procedure on late morbidity. The data from consecutive patients undergoing the Frey procedure and having a minimum follow-up of 2 years were extracted from a maintained prospective database. The mean endpoint was the rate of secondary biliary stricture after the Frey procedure combined with biliary diversion (bilioenteric anastomosis or common bile duct reinsertion in the resection cavity). Between 2006 and 2013, 55 consecutive patients underwent the Frey procedure. Twenty-nine patients had common bile duct obstruction (52.7%). The technique of biliary diversion resulted in bilioenteric anastomosis in 19 patients (65.5%) and common bile duct reinsertion in 10 patients (34.5%). Preoperative characteristics and early surgical outcomes were comparable. Pain control was similar. There was significantly more secondary biliary stricture after common bile duct reinsertion than after bilioenteric anastomosis (60% vs 11%, P = .008). Combined bilioenteric anastomosis during the Frey procedure is an efficient technique for treating common bile duct obstruction that complicates chronic painful pancreatitis. Bilioenteric anastomosis was associated with less secondary biliary stricture than common bile duct reinsertion in the pancreatic resection cavity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted Gene Next-Generation Sequencing in Chinese Children with Chronic Pancreatitis and Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Yuan, Wentao; Yu, Bo; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinqiong; Yu, Yi; Yu, Yi; Gong, Biao; Xu, Chundi

    2017-12-01

    To identify causal mutations in certain genes in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). After patients were enrolled (CP, 55; ARP, 14) and their clinical characteristics were investigated, we performed next-generation sequencing to detect nucleotide variations among the following 10 genes: cationic trypsinogen protease serine 1 (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cathepsin B (CTSB), keratin 8 (KRT8), CLAUDIN 2 (CLDN2), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and ATPase type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1). Mutations were searched against online databases to obtain information on the cause of the diseases. Certain novel mutations were analyzed using the SIFT2 and Polyphen-2 to predict the effect on protein function. There were 45 patients with CP and 10 patients with ARP who harbored 1 or more mutations in these genes; 45 patients had at least 1 mutation related to pancreatitis. Mutations were observed in the PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR genes in 17 patients, the CASR gene in 5 patients, and the CTSB, CTRC, and KRT8 genes in 1 patient. Mutations were not found in the CLDN, CPA1, or ATP8B1 genes. We found that mutations in SPINK1 may increase the risk of pancreatic duct stones (OR, 11.07; P = .003). The patients with CFTR mutations had a higher level of serum amylase (316.0 U/L vs 92.5 U/L; P = .026). Mutations, especially those in PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR, accounted for the major etiologies in Chinese children with CP or ARP. Children presenting mutations in the SPINK1 gene may have a higher risk of developing pancreatic duct stones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang [University of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic Radiology - Pediatric Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel [University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine II - Gastroenterology / Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Limbach, Anne [University of Leipzig, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  2. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel; Limbach, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balthazar, Emil J.; Megibow, Alec J. [NYU-Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto (eds.) [Policlinico ' ' GB Rossi' ' Verona Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2009-07-01

    With the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations, this volume explains the strengths and limitations of the different techniques employed in the imaging of pancreatitis. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and interventional imaging are each considered separately in the settings of acute and chronic pancreatitis. A further section is devoted to imaging of the complications of these conditions. Throughout, care has been taken to ensure that the reader will achieve a sound understanding of how the imaging findings derive from the pathophysiology of the disease processes. The significance of the imaging findings for clinical and therapeutic decision making is clearly explained, and protocols are provided that will assist in obtaining the best possible images. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthazar, Emil J.; Megibow, Alec J.; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    With the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations, this volume explains the strengths and limitations of the different techniques employed in the imaging of pancreatitis. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and interventional imaging are each considered separately in the settings of acute and chronic pancreatitis. A further section is devoted to imaging of the complications of these conditions. Throughout, care has been taken to ensure that the reader will achieve a sound understanding of how the imaging findings derive from the pathophysiology of the disease processes. The significance of the imaging findings for clinical and therapeutic decision making is clearly explained, and protocols are provided that will assist in obtaining the best possible images. (orig.)

  5. Mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 are strongly associated with chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J P H; te Morsche, R; Jansen, J B M J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Although chronic pancreatitis is associated with risk factors such as alcoholism, hyperparathyroidism, and hypertriglyceridaemia, little is known of the actual aetiology of the disease. It is thought that inappropriate activation of trypsinogen causes pancreatitis, and indeed in cases of hereditary pancreatitis mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) have been described. As serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) is a potent natural inhibitor of pancreatic trypsin activi...

  6. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Szücs

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life.Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions.Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%, CT scan (52%, MRI-MRCP (6%, ERCP (39%, and EUS (7,4%. A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2% than endoscopy (27%; however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002 than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004. The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012 than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical

  7. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szücs, Ákos; Marjai, Tamás; Szentesi, Andrea; Farkas, Nelli; Párniczky, Andrea; Nagy, György; Kui, Balázs; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Németh, Balázs Csaba; Vincze, Áron; Pár, Gabriella; Szabó, Imre; Sarlós, Patrícia; Illés, Anita; Gódi, Szilárd; Izbéki, Ferenc; Gervain, Judit; Halász, Adrienn; Farkas, Gyula; Leindler, László; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Szmola, Richárd; Varga, Márta; Hamvas, József; Novák, János; Bod, Barnabás; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions. Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female) were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%), CT scan (52%), MRI-MRCP (6%), ERCP (39%), and EUS (7,4%). A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2%) than endoscopy (27%); however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002) than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004). The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012) than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical

  8. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis in a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varalakshmi Muthukrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we present a young patient with type 1 diabetes who had hereditary chronic pancreatitis. We evaluated him for the cause of pancreatitis, but it was inconclusive and finally the genetic testing was done for him, which revealed heterozygous missense mutation in exon 3 of the PRSS1 gene (protease serine 1 gene on chromosome 7. Hence, we were able to make the diagnosis of hereditary chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis secondary to any cause can lead to permanent diabetes, which is typically difficult to control. However, in this case, the episodes of recurrent pancreatitis were present after the onset of type 1 diabetes as compared to the usual presentation of diabetes after the advancement of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Mortality, Cancer, and Comorbidities Associated With Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aimed to assess the risk of death, cancer, and comorbidities among patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study, collecting data from Danish registries from 1995 through 2010. We evaluated...... cases (10.2%) and controls (3.3%). Cancer (particularly pancreatic cancer) was a frequent cause of death among cases; the HR was 6.9 (95% CI, 7.5-11.8). Alcoholic CP did not produce a higher risk for cancer or death than nonalcoholic CP. Cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4), chronic...... pulmonary disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.8-2.1), ulcer disease (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 3.3-3.9), diabetes (HR, 5.2; 95% CI, 5.0-5.6), and chronic renal disease (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-1.9) occurred more frequently among patients with CP, but myocardial infarction did not (HR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.8-1.0). CONCLUSIONS: Based...

  10. Systematic mechanism-orientated approach to chronic pancreatitis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwense, Stefan A W; de Vries, Marjan; Schreuder, Luuk T W; Olesen, Søren S; Frøkjær, Jens B; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H G

    2015-01-07

    Pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) shows similarities with other visceral pain syndromes (i.e., inflammatory bowel disease and esophagitis), which should thus be managed in a similar fashion. Typical causes of CP pain include increased intrapancreatic pressure, pancreatic inflammation and pancreatic/extrapancreatic complications. Unfortunately, CP pain continues to be a major clinical challenge. It is recognized that ongoing pain may induce altered central pain processing, e.g., central sensitization or pro-nociceptive pain modulation. When this is present conventional pain treatment targeting the nociceptive focus, e.g., opioid analgesia or surgical/endoscopic intervention, often fails even if technically successful. If central nervous system pain processing is altered, specific treatment targeting these changes should be instituted (e.g., gabapentinoids, ketamine or tricyclic antidepressants). Suitable tools are now available to make altered central processing visible, including quantitative sensory testing, electroencephalograpy and (functional) magnetic resonance imaging. These techniques are potentially clinically useful diagnostic tools to analyze central pain processing and thus define optimum management approaches for pain in CP and other visceral pain syndromes. The present review proposes a systematic mechanism-orientated approach to pain management in CP based on a holistic view of the mechanisms involved. Future research should address the circumstances under which central nervous system pain processing changes in CP, and how this is influenced by ongoing nociceptive input and therapies. Thus we hope to predict which patients are at risk for developing chronic pain or not responding to therapy, leading to improved treatment of chronic pain in CP and other visceral pain disorders.

  11. Chronic relapsing pancreatitis in a child. Use of the Puestow procedure to achieve ductal drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, N D; McDonald, A; James, M; Brown, B; Mitchell, D I

    2000-09-01

    A case of chronic relapsing pancreatitis presenting in an 8-year-old African Jamaican girl is outlined. Aggressive supportive management failed to control pain and vomiting. The Puestow Procedure effectively procedure aborted these symptoms. The use of the Puestow procedure should not be inordinately delayed in chronic relapsing pancreatitis if symptoms persist, since it may not only control pain but also halt declining pancreatic function.

  12. A case control study of possible additional risk factors for chronic alcoholic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Vengadesh Gopal; Ashley Solomon; Jaahnavi Konidala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by irreversible damage to pancreas leading to endocrine and exocrine insufficiency with considerable morbidity. Etiopathogenesis is multifactorial with interplay between genetics and environmental toxins. Alcoholism is more commonly associated with chronic pancreatitis. But it is not very clear why only certain proportion of the alcoholics develop pancreatitis. So this study was conducted to find the possible additional risk factors inv...

  13. Efficacy of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in chronic pancreatitis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia-García, Daniel; Huang, Wei; Szatmary, Peter; Baston-Rey, Iria; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jaime; Prada-Ramallal, Guillermo; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Nunes, Quentin M; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique; Sutton, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in chronic pancreatitis (CP) are inadequately defined. We have undertaken a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of PERT to determine the efficacy of PERT in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) from CP. Major databases were searched from 1966 to 2015 inclusive. The primary outcome was coefficient of fat absorption (CFA). Effects of PERT versus baseline and versus placebo, and of different doses, formulations and schedules were determined. A total of 17 studies (511 patients with CP) were included and assessed qualitatively (Jadad score). Quantitative data were synthesised from 14 studies. PERT improved CFA compared with baseline (83.7±6.0 vs 63.1±15.0, pregression analyses revealed that sample size, CP diagnostic criteria, study design and enzyme dose contributed to heterogeneity; data on health inequalities were lacking. PERT is indicated to correct EPI and malnutrition in CP and may be improved by higher doses, enteric coating, administration during food and acid suppression. Further studies are required to determine optimal regimens, the impact of health inequalities and long-term effects on nutrition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Slowed EEG rhythmicity in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evidence of abnormal cerebral pain processing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Hansen, Tine Maria; Gravesen, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  15. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  16. Radiodiagnostics for carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagt, E.J. van der.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish which methods in radiodiagnosis are the most effective in demonstrating the presence of a pancreatic carcinoma or chronic pancreatitis. A second purpose is to evaluate which methods can be used to plan treatment of the patient. The different methods of radiodiagnosis that have been used and are being used to demonstrate disease of the pancreas are described, and their possible applications are reviewed. From this review a scheme is devised for the radiodiagnostic investigation of pancreatic disease. The results of each method of investigation are evaluated for those patients who were investigated in the University Hospital Groningen and compared with those published in the literature. On the basis of the results a final scheme for the diagnostic process is outlined. Ultrasonography and endoscopic pancreaticocholangiography are the prime methods of radiological investigation. Arteriography is an essential method in the assessment of the curative operability. It is established that computerized tomography is of little value after a good ultrasonogram, both for the primary diagnosis and the assessment of the possibility for operative treatment. (Auth.)

  17. Management of chronic pancreatitis: Role of endoscopic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Tandan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP, a disease of varied etiology can, from the endoscopists perspective present as ductal strictures, stones, ductal leaks and fluid collections, biliary strictures or duodenal narrowing. This article deals with role of ERCP in the management of CP associated strictures and calculi. ERCP has a limited role in the diagnosis CP, though we feel that it is better at identifying small ductal calculi or leaks as compared to MRCP. Major and minor papilla sphincterotomy gives relief from pain in patients with mild or moderate ductal changes. Pancreatic ductal strictures are best managed by stenting. Use of multiple plastic stents (8.5-11Fr diameter gives relief from pain in 84% and strictures resolution in 95% on follow up of over 3 years. CP associated CBD strictures are also managed by placement of multiple stents. Covered SEMS are increasingly being used in these strictures. Surgery is often the best option for CP associated CBD strictures which recur after adequate endotherapy. ESWL is the standard of therapy for pancreatic ductal calculi which are large, as seen in the tropics and the non alcoholic form of CP. Our experience has shown complete or partial clearance with ESWL in over 90% of patients with large PD calculi. Good pain relief was seen in both on short and long term follow up. In selected patients of CP, ERCP and endotherapy should be offered as first line of treatment, as the results are comparable to surgery. Prior endotherapy also does not interfere with subsequent surgical procedures.

  18. [Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis complicated by biliary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypchuk, V I

    2015-01-01

    The results of 29 patients treatment, suffering chronic pancreatitis, complicated by biliary hypertension, in whom operative interventions in Department of Surgery of Regional Ivano-Frankivsk clinical hospital in 2009 - 2014 yrs, were analyzed. The drainage, resectional and combined interventions were performed. Direct intervention on pancreatic gland was not applied in 5 (17.2%) patients. Operation to Frey was performed in 7 (24.1%) patients, in 4--it was added by choledochojejunoanastomosis formation, longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy--in 13 (44.8%). In 4 (14.8%) patients while functional disorders of adjacent organs present a pancreaticoduodenal resection to Whipple was done. For biliary hypertension diagnosis (including the occult one) the method of intraoperative pressure measurement in common biliary duct (CBD) was proposed. The operation was added by biliodigestive anastomosis formation, using choledochoenterostomy to Roux method if while operations to Frey or Beger after intervention on pancreatic head with the intrapancreatic CBD freeing the intraductal pressure witnessed the biliary hypertension presence. In all the patients good and satisfactory results of operative treatment were noted.

  19. Surgical and endoscopic treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis: a multidisciplinary update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Y.; van Santvoort, H. C.; van Goor, H.; Cahen, D. L.; Bruno, M. J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with abdominal pain as the most prominent symptom. Adequate treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis remains a major challenge, mainly because of the lack of evidence-based treatment protocols. The primary goal of treatment is to

  20. Surgical and Endoscopic Treatment of Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis : A Multidisciplinary Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Y.; van Santvoort, H. C.; van Goor, H.; Cahen, D. L.; Bruno, M. J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with abdominal pain as the most prominent symptom. Adequate treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis remains a major challenge, mainly because of the lack of evidence-based treatment protocols. The primary goal of treatment is to

  1. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.; Olesen, S.S.; Drewes, A.M.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs

  2. [Pathophysiology of hormonal, immune, metabolic changes in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Experimental and clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z; Tkachenko, E V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Vinokurova, L V; Varvanina, G G

    2008-01-01

    There is literature review of the acute and chronic pancreatitis experimental models. Patogenetic necrosis mechanisms with fibrosis progress in pancreas were revealed. The stimulation of the proteolytic enzymes synthesis and secretion, that was examined in experiments were compared with clinical examinations. The patients with chronic pancreatitis were investigated in the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology.

  3. Modified duval procedure for small-duct chronic pancreatitis without head dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatsugu; Aramaki, Osamu; Kano, Hisao; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kida, Kazutoshi; Amano, Sadao

    2011-01-01

    In the case of small-duct chronic pancreatitis, surgery for pain relief is broadly divided into resection and drainage procedures. These procedures should be selected according to the location of dominant lesion, diameter of the pancreatic duct and extent of the disease. The appropriate procedure for the treatment of small-duct chronic pancreatitis, especially small-duct chronic pancreatitis without head dominance, remains controversial. We developed the modified Duval procedure for the treatment of small-duct chronic pancreatitis without head dominance and determined the efficacy of this procedure. We retrospectively studied 14 patients who underwent surgical drainage with or without pancreatic resection for chronic pancreatitis with small pancreatic duct (Puestow procedure group and the modified Duval procedure group. No complications occurred in the modified Duval group. In the modified Puestow procedure group, complete and partial pain relief were observed in 62.5%, and 37.5% of patients respectively. In contrast, complete pain relief was observed in all the patients in the modified Duval procedure group. Our modified Duval procedure is useful and should be considered the appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of small-duct chronic pancreatitis without head dominance.

  4. Prevalence of chronic pancreatitis: Results of a primary care physician-based population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Pasquali, Piera; Aceti, Alessandro; Balducci, Paolo; Bianchi, Patrizia; Buono, Francesco; Camerucci, Stefano; Cantarini, Rosanna; Centofanti, Sergio; Colantonio, Patrizia; Cremaschi, Riccarda; Crescenzi, Sergio; Di Mauro, Caterina; Di Renzi, Davide; Filabozzi, Andrea; Fiorillo, Alfonso; Giancaspro, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Paola; Lanna, Giuseppe; Medori, Claudio; Merletti, Emilio; Nunnari, Enzo; Paris, Francesca; Pavone, Marco; Piacenti, Angela; Rossi, Almerindo; Scamuffa, Maria Cristina; Spinelli, Giovanni; Taborchi, Marco; Valente, Biagio; Villanova, Antonella; Chiriatti, Alberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Data on chronic pancreatitis prevalence are scanty and usually limited to hospital-based studies. Investigating chronic pancreatitis prevalence in primary care. Participating primary care physicians reported the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis among their registered patients, environmental factors and disease characteristics. The data were centrally reviewed and chronic pancreatitis cases defined according to M-ANNHEIM criteria for diagnosis and severity and TIGAR-O classification for etiology. Twenty-three primary care physicians participated in the study. According to their judgment, 51 of 36.401 patients had chronic pancreatitis. After reviewing each patient data, 11 turned out to have definite, 5 probable, 19 borderline and 16 uncertain disease. Prevalence was 30.2/100.000 for definite cases and 44.0/100.000 for definite plus probable cases. Of the 16 patients with definite/probable diagnosis, 8 were male, with mean age of 55.6 (±16.7). Four patients had alcoholic etiology, 5 post-acute/recurrent pancreatitis, 6 were deemed to be idiopathic. Four had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, 10 were receiving pancreatic enzymes, and six had pain. Most patients had initial stage and non-severe disease. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in primary care. Results suggest that the prevalence in this context is higher than in hospital-based studies, with specific features, possibly representing an earlier disease stage. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 gene and risk of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Harrison; Diergaarde, Brenda; O'Connell, Michael R; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 (GGT1) gene, which was recently reported associated with pancreatic cancer risk in a genome-wide association study, is also associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis. Associations between common polymorphisms in GGT1 and chronic pancreatitis were evaluated using data and samples from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2. Patients (n = 496) and control subjects (n = 465) were genotyped for 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms: rs4820599, rs2017869, rs8135987, and rs5751901. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for chronic pancreatitis risk were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were explored. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs8135987 and rs4820599 were both statistically significantly associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis; compared with common allele homozygotes, individuals with at least 1 minor allele were at increased risk (rs8135987: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.03-1.80 [P(trend) = 0.01]; rs4820599: OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.84 [P(trend) = 0.0]; adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking status, and alcohol use). No significant interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were observed. Our results suggest that common variation in the GGT1 gene may also affect risk of chronic pancreatitis.

  6. PEDIATRIC ACUTE RECURRENT AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS: LESSONS FROM INSPPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Soma; Ooi, Chee Y.; Werlin, Steven; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Barth, Bradley; Bellin, Melena D.; Durie, Peter R.; Fishman, Douglas S.; Freedman, Steven D.; Gariepy, Cheryl; Giefer, Matthew J.; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B.; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z.; Lin, Tom K.; Lowe, Mark E.; Morinville, Veronique; Palermo, Joseph J.; Pohl, John F.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Troendle, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Uc, Aliye

    2017-01-01

    Importance Pediatric acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are poorly understood. Objective To characterize and identify risk factors associated with ARP and CP in childhood. Design A multinational cross-sectional study of children with ARP or CP at the time of enrollment to INSPPIRE (International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a CuRE) study. Setting Participant institutions of the INSPPIRE Consortium. Participants From September 2012 to February 2015, 155 children with ARP and 146 with CP (≤ 19 years of age) were enrolled. Their demographic and clinical information were entered into the REDCap database at fifteen centers. Interventions None. Main Outcomes and Measures A cross-sectional study of the cohort was performed to assess demographics, risk factors, abdominal pain and disease burden. Differences were analyzed using two-sample t-test or Wilcoxon-rank sum test for the continuous variables, and Pearson Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables. Disease burden variables (pain variables, hospital/ER visits, missed school days) were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results The majority of children with CP reported prior recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis. Gender distribution was similar between the groups. ARP was more common in Hispanics, CP in non-Hispanics. Forty-eight percent of patients with ARP versus 73% of patients with CP had at least one gene mutation in pancreatitis-related genes (p=0.0002). Children with PRSS1 or SPINK1 mutations were more likely to present with CP compared with ARP (ptoxic/metabolic risk factors (~20% of patients) did not differ between children with ARP or CP. Pancreatitis-related abdominal pain was a major complaint in 81% of children with ARP or CP within the last year. The disease burden was higher in CP compared with ARP (more ER visits, hospitalizations, missed school days, medical, endoscopic and surgical interventions). Conclusions and

  7. CYSTIC DEGENERATION OF THE DUODENUM ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kriger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cystic lesion of the descending part of the duodenum, mainly in the field of small duodenal papilla in chronic pancreatitis (CP is described as “duodenal dystrophy” (DD. The pathogenesis of this condition has not been studied and treatment strategy is not defined.Purpose. Investigation of cystic inflammatory transformation of duodenal wall pathogenesis in patients with CP, described as a DD, and evaluate the clinical ef ficiency of surgical treatment.Material and methods. Eighty two patients with DD were retrospectively included over 12 years. The diagnosis of DD was established by transabdominal ultrasound, CT, MRI and endosonography. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively. 74 patients required surgical treatment subsequently after conservative treatment with a median duration of 2 years. 34 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, 21 patients underwent duodenum resection, 15 – duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection of (DPPHR. 4 patients underwent palliative operations. Diagnosis of CP and DD was verified by histological study of surgical specimens. Not operated patients (8 are under observation. Long-term results of surgical treatment were evaluated in 47 patients with a median follow-up was 49.9 months.Results. Histological examination resulted that in 69.9% of DD was related with groove pancreatitis, with ectopic pancreatic tissue – in 30.1%. DD was associated with CP in 92.6% of cases. Clinical presentation of DD was not related with etiology and showed typical symptoms of CP: abdominal pain occurred in 98.8% of patients, body weight loss – 61.7%, duodenal obstruction – 35.8%, biliary hypertension – 34.1%. The overall morbidity was 35.1%. Overall postoperative mortality was 1.37% (1 patient. 66% of patients had no clinical symptoms postoperatively, a significantimprovement – 32%, no effect – 2%.Conclusion. The most cases of DD is related with groove pancreatitis, less

  8. Elevated neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in patients with euthyroid chronic autoimmune thyreotidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Havva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, determined from peripheral blood, is accepted as an available and practical indicator of the systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the NLR was higher in euthyroid chronic autoimmune thyreotidis (CAT patients compared to a healthy control group.

  9. Modified Puestow procedure for the management of chronic pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laje, Pablo; Adzick, N Scott

    2013-11-01

    To present our experience with the modified Puestow procedure in the management of children with chronic pancreatitis. Retrospective chart review of patients treated between 2003 and 2012. Six patients underwent a modified Puestow procedure (lateral pancreaticojejunostomy) for the management of chronic pancreatitis, three females and three males. Four patients had hereditary pancreatitis (three with confirmed N34S mutation in the SPINK1 gene), one patient had chronic pancreatitis of unknown etiology, and one patient with annular pancreas developed obstructive chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic duct was dilated in all cases, with a maximum diameter of 5 to 10mm. Median time between onset of pain and surgery was 4 years (range: 1-9). Median age at surgery was 7.5 years (range: 5-15). Median hospital stay was 12 days (range: 9-28). Median follow up was 4.5 years (range: 5 months to 9 years). All patients had temporary postoperative improvement of their abdominal pain. In two patients the pain recurred at 6 months and 2 years postoperatively and eventually required total pancreatectomy to treat intractable pain, 3 and 8 years after surgery. Two patients were pain free for two years and subsequently developed occasional episodes of pain. The two most recent patients are pain free at 1 year (obstructive chronic pancreatitis) and 5 months (hereditary pancreatitis) follow-up. Two patients developed type I diabetes mellitus 10 and 12 months postoperatively (one with hereditary and one with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis). We conclude that the modified Puestow procedure in children is feasible and safe. It seems to provide definitive pain control and prevent further damage to the pancreas in patients with obstructive chronic pancreatitis. However, in patients with hereditary pancreatitis, pain control outcomes are variable and the operation may not abrogate the progression of disease to pancreatic insufficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. PMID:27418683

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-09-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in non-surgical patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Bashir, Yasir; Dobson, Mark; Ryan, Barbara M; Duggan, Sinead N; Conlon, Kevin C

    2018-02-24

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by symptoms similar to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) in chronic pancreatitis patients. SIBO is thought to complicate chronic pancreatitis in up to 92% of cases; however, studies are heterogeneous and protocols non-standardised. SIBO may be determined by measuring lung air-expiration of either hydrogen or methane which are by-products of small bowel bacterial fermentation of intraluminal substrates such as carbohydrates. We evaluated the prevalence of SIBO among a defined cohort of non-surgical chronic pancreatitics with mild to severe PEI compared with matched healthy controls. Thirty-five patients and 31 age-, gender- and smoking status-matched healthy controls were evaluated for SIBO by means of a fasting glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT). The relationship between SIBO and clinical symptoms in chronic pancreatitis was evaluated. SIBO was present in 15% of chronic pancreatitis patients, while no healthy controls tested positive (P = 0.029). SIBO was more prevalent in those taking pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) (P = 0.016), with proton pump inhibitor use (PPI) (P = 0.022) and in those with alcohol aetiology (P = 0.023). Patients with concurrent diabetes were more often SIBO-positive and this was statistically significant (P = 0.009). There were no statistically significant differences in reported symptoms between patients with and without SIBO, with the exception of 'weight loss', with patients reporting weight loss more likely to have SIBO (P = 0.047). The prevalence of SIBO in this study was almost 15% and consistent with other studies of SIBO in non-surgical chronic pancreatitis patients. These data support the testing of patients with clinically-relevant PEI unresolved by adequate doses of PERT, particularly in those patients with concurrent diabetes. SIBO can be easily diagnosed therefore allowing more specific and more targeted symptom

  13. Pancreatic Duct in Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Intraindividual Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Pancreatography at 1.5 T and 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Song Cheol; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to intraindividually compare magnetic resonance pancreatography (MRP) image quality at 1.5 T and 3.0 T when demonstrating main pancreatic duct (MPD) abnormalities in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Thirty prospectively enrolled patients with AIP underwent MRP at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T followed by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography before treatment. Two readers independently analyzed the MRP images and graded the visualization of MPD strictures and full-length MPD, using endoscopic retrograde pancreatography as the reference standard, as well as overall image artifacts on a 4-point scale. The contrast between the MPD and periductal area was calculated using a region-of-interest measurement. Visualization scores of MPD strictures and full-length MPD, and summed scores of each qualitative analysis, were significantly greater at 3.0-T MRP than at 1.5-T MRP for both readers (P ≤ 0.02). There were less image artifacts at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T (P ≤ 0.052). The contrast between the MPD and periductal area was significantly greater at 3.0-T MRP than at 1.5-T MRP (P 3.0 T was superior to 1.5-T MRP for demonstrating MPD abnormalities in AIP, with better image contrast and fewer image artifacts. Consequently, 3.0-T MRP may be useful for the diagnosis and management of patients with AIP.

  14. Neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain: cognitive decline in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijtje L A Jongsma

    Full Text Available Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance, use of opioids, and premorbid alcohol abuse. The cognitive profiles of 16 patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis were determined using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data from three cognitive domains (psychomotor performance, memory, executive functions were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. Multivariate multilevel analysis of the data showed decreased test scores in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain in different cognitive domains. Psychomotor performance and executive functions showed the most prominent decline. Interestingly, pain duration appeared to be the strongest predictor for observed cognitive decline. Depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, opioid use and history of alcohol abuse provided additional explanations for the observed cognitive decline in some of the tests, but to a lesser extent than pain duration. The negative effect of pain duration on cognitive performance is compatible with the theory of neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain. Therefore, early and effective therapeutic interventions might reduce or prevent decline in cognitive performance, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life in these patients.

  15. Laparoscopic Longitudinal Pancreaticojejunostomy Using Barbed Sutures: an Efficient and Secure Solution for Pancreatic Duct Obstructions in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Hong, Tae Ho

    2016-04-01

    We describe our laparoscopic longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) technique using barbed sutures to manage a pancreatic duct obstruction. We performed laparoscopic longitudinal anterior pancreaticojejunostomy using barbed sutures (3-0 absorbable wound closure device, V-Loc, Covidien, Minneapolis, MN, USA) in 11 patients who presented with signs of a pancreas ductal obstruction and chronic pancreatitis. The surgical outcomes and follow-up records at the outpatient department were reviewed, and the effectiveness and feasibility of this method were analyzed. Mean patient age was 54.4 ± 9.5 years, and pancreatic duct stones were removed from all patients without conversion to laparotomy. Overall operative time was 200.7 ± 56.4 min, and estimated blood loss was 42.2 ± 11.2 ml. No pancreatic anastomosis leakage or postoperative bleeding was detected. Mean length of hospital stay was 6.5 ± 0.8 days, and mean time to start a soft diet was 4.8 ± 0.7 days. No patient complained of postoperative abdominal pain, and all patients recovered without significant complications or relapse of pancreatitis. The follow-up period was 4-21 months. Our new laparoscopic longitudinal anterior pancreaticojejunostomy technique (Puestow procedure) using barbed sutures is a potentially efficient and minimally invasive procedure for patients who suffer from pancreatic duct obstruction and chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis by measurement of microRNA abundance in blood and tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Bauer

    Full Text Available A solid process for diagnosis could have a substantial impact on the successful treatment of pancreatic cancer, for which currently mortality is nearly identical to incidence. Variations in the abundance of all microRNA molecules from peripheral blood cells and pancreas tissues were analyzed on microarrays and in part validated by real-time PCR assays. In total, 245 samples from two clinical centers were studied that were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or chronic pancreatitis and from healthy donors. Utilizing the minimally invasive blood test, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and the corresponding area under the curve (AUC analysis demonstrated very high sensitivity and specificity of a distinction between healthy people and patients with either cancer or chronic pancreatitis; respective AUC values of 0.973 and 0.950 were obtained. Confirmative and partly even more discriminative diagnosis could be performed on tissue samples with AUC values of 1.0 and 0.937, respectively. In addition, discrimination between cancer and chronic pancreatitis was achieved (AUC = 0.875. Also, several miRNAs were identified that exhibited abundance variations in both tissue and blood samples. The results could have an immediate diagnostic value for the evaluation of tumor reoccurrence in patients, who have undergone curative surgical resection, and for people with a familial risk of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on pancreatic duck stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evaluation of therapeutic results with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Gyu [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Suk [Gunpo Medical Center, Gunpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To demonstrate by CT scanning the effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on pancreatic duct stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic duct stones in 11 patients with chronic pancreatitis were subject to ESWL using an electrohydraulic lithotripter. Endoscopic stone removal using a basket had failed in ten patients, and in one, endoscopy was impossible due to a previous Whipple's operation. CT scans obtained before and after ESWL were evaluated by two radiologists: the longest and shortest diameters of the target stone were measured, and according to the degree of fragmentation, determined by comparing the area of the stone before and after ESWL, a grade (1-5) was assigned. In each case, the pre- and post- treatment diameter of the main pancreatic duct, measured at the pancreatic body, was also compared. Disintegration of the target stone was achieved in all patients: grade 1 (over 75% of the area remained, compared with that of the initial stone) was assigned in two patients; grade 2 (51-75% of the original area) in one; grade 3 (26-50%) in four; grade 4 (under 25%) in two; and grade 5 (complete clearance of the target stone) in two. The mean area decreased from 175 mm{sup 2} to 69 mm{sup 2} after ESWL (p<0.05); a decrease of more than 50% was observed in eight patients (73%). The mean diameter of the main pancreatic duct decreased from 7.36 to 4.81 mm (p<0.05). No severe adverse effects or complications were noted, and all patients showed clinical improvement. Follow-up studies indicated that pancreatic duct stones recurred in three patients. ESWL can cause the fragmentation of pancreatic duct stones without significant complications, and should be considered where endoscopic stone removal has failed. CT is a suitable non-invasive and accurate tool for evaluating the therapeutic results of ESWL.

  18. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on pancreatic duck stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evaluation of therapeutic results with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Gyu; Lee, Yong Suk

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate by CT scanning the effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on pancreatic duct stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic duct stones in 11 patients with chronic pancreatitis were subject to ESWL using an electrohydraulic lithotripter. Endoscopic stone removal using a basket had failed in ten patients, and in one, endoscopy was impossible due to a previous Whipple's operation. CT scans obtained before and after ESWL were evaluated by two radiologists: the longest and shortest diameters of the target stone were measured, and according to the degree of fragmentation, determined by comparing the area of the stone before and after ESWL, a grade (1-5) was assigned. In each case, the pre- and post- treatment diameter of the main pancreatic duct, measured at the pancreatic body, was also compared. Disintegration of the target stone was achieved in all patients: grade 1 (over 75% of the area remained, compared with that of the initial stone) was assigned in two patients; grade 2 (51-75% of the original area) in one; grade 3 (26-50%) in four; grade 4 (under 25%) in two; and grade 5 (complete clearance of the target stone) in two. The mean area decreased from 175 mm 2 to 69 mm 2 after ESWL (p<0.05); a decrease of more than 50% was observed in eight patients (73%). The mean diameter of the main pancreatic duct decreased from 7.36 to 4.81 mm (p<0.05). No severe adverse effects or complications were noted, and all patients showed clinical improvement. Follow-up studies indicated that pancreatic duct stones recurred in three patients. ESWL can cause the fragmentation of pancreatic duct stones without significant complications, and should be considered where endoscopic stone removal has failed. CT is a suitable non-invasive and accurate tool for evaluating the therapeutic results of ESWL

  19. CT classification of chronic pancreatitis and the significance for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xueling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT characteristics of chronic pancreatitis and a classification based on the CT manifestations was established. Methods: In total 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 43 males and 16 females, with an average age of 40 years old were enrolled in the study. History of acute pancreatitis was positive in 36 patients. Non contrast enhanced and contrast enhanced CT scans were performed. The sizes of lesions, contour of pancreas, as well as the number, density and margin of lesions were investigated on the CT images. Results: Atrophy of the entire pancreas was revealed in 27 patients (46%), complicated with different degree of calcification. Solitary cyst with amorphous wall calcification was demonstrated in 13 patients (22%); multiple intra-pancreatic and peri-pancreatic pseudo-cysts were shown in 7 patients (12%); dilated pancreatic duct was seen in 7 patients (12%); and regional well demarcated bulging of pancreas was presented in 5 patients (8%). Conclusion: The CT findings of chronic pancreatitis in our study could be classified into 5 types: atrophy type, solitary cystic type, multicystic type, pure pancreatic duct dilatation type and mass type. The classification had certain significance for the differential diagnosis and the etiological analysis of chronic pancreatitis. (authors)

  20. Incidence and risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Liang-Hao; Ren, Hong-Bo; Zhao, An-Jing; Qian, Yang-Yang; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Su, Song; Zhu, Shu-Guang; Yu, Jin; Zou, Wen-Bin; Guo, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Lei; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2017-09-01

    Almost all studies on post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) have mainly involved patients with biliary diseases rather than chronic pancreatitis (CP), and the concept that CP seems to be a protective factor associated with PEP has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of PEP in patients with CP at different clinical stages and to identify the predictive and protective factors of PEP in a large cohort. In this observational cohort study, medical records of patients with CP (CP group) and biliary diseases (BD group) in a tertiary hospital from January 2011 to May 2015 were examined. The difference in the incidence of PEP between CP group and BD group and the risk of PEP at different clinical stages of CP were calculated by the χ 2 test or the Fisher exact test. The predictive and protective factors for PEP were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. In total, 2028 ERCP procedures were performed in 1301 patients with CP and 2000 procedures in 1655 patients with BD. The overall incidence of PEP in CP group (4.5%) was similar to that in the BD group (4.8%; P = .747). However, CP patients had significantly lower rates of moderate and severe attacks (0% vs 1.3%, P pancreatitis, and prior PEP were independent risk factors of PEP, whereas extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy was a protective factor. Compared with BD patients, CP patients had similar incidence of PEP overall but lower grades of severity. The incidence of PEP in CP patients decreased significantly with disease progression. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT02781987.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Contribution of defective PS recognition and efferocytosis to chronic inflammation and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Gititu Kimani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells results in elimination of auto-antigens and provides a strong anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive signal to prevent autoimmunity. While professional and non-professional phagocytes utilize a wide array of surface receptors to recognize apoptotic cells, recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS on apoptotic cells by PS receptors on phagocytes is emblematic signal for efferocytosis in metazoans. PS-dependent efferocytosis is associated with production of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-10 and TGF-β that function, in part, to maintain tolerance to auto-antigens. In contrast, when apoptotic cells fail to be recognized and processed for degradation, auto-antigens persist, which can trigger immune activation leading to autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Despite the fact that genetic mouse models clearly demonstrate that loss of PS receptors can lead to age-dependent autoimmune diseases reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, link between PS and defective clearance in chronic inflammation and human autoimmunity is not well delineated. In this hypothesis and theory, we review emerging questions developing in the field that may be of relevance to SLE and human autoimmunity.

  2. IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis. A recurrent case after a 5-year history of spontaneous remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideaki; Miyachi, Yasutaka

    2009-07-06

    A new clinicopathological concept of IgG4-related sclerosing disease affecting various organs has recently been proposed in relation to autoimmune pancreatitis. This report describes the case of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis independent of autoimmune pancreatitis, which recurred after a long period of spontaneous remission. An 80-year-old Japanese man presented with obstructive jaundice owing to a hepatic hilum bile duct stricture. Coincidentally, a soft tissue mass surrounding the abdominal aorta, suggesting retroperitoneal fibrosis, was identified. Unexpectedly, spontaneous regression of obstructive jaundice together with retroperitoneal fibrosis occurred. The presence of high serum IgG4 concentrations measured later led us to consider a possible association with autoimmune pancreatitis; however, there were no clinical features confirming autoimmune pancreatitis. After a 5-year history of spontaneous clinical remission, there was an elevation of serum IgG4 levels and renal dysfunction owing to bilateral hydronephrosis caused by a reemergence of the retroperitoneal mass. Evaluation by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a biliary stricture, suggesting sclerosing cholangitis which was observed without the presence of any pancreatic duct abnormality. The subsequent excellent results obtained using steroid therapy, namely the decrease in serum IgG4 levels and the regression of the retroperitoneal mass, strongly suggested that the present case was an IgG4-related sclerosing disease. Aside from high serum IgG4 concentrations, markedly elevated levels of serum IgE was found retrospectively, although the clinical significance remains unknown. When we encounter fibrotic diseases of unknown etiology, we should measure serum IgG4 concentrations and monitor the disease activity over long periods even after achieving clinical remission.

  3. Antioxidant therapy for patients with chronic pancreatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dongkai; Wang, Weilin; Cheng, Xiaofei; Wei, Jianfeng; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive, inflammatory disease of pancreas characterized by significant abdominal pain, malabsorption, and diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant therapy has been proposed as an effective treatment for painful chronic pancreatitis. We performed a meta-analysis of trials in which antioxidant therapy was compared with placebo in chronic pancreatitis. We searched six databases to identify relevant trials. Results are expressed as risk ratio (RR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) with accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CI). The meta-analysis was performed with the fixed-effects model or random-effects model according to heterogeneity. Eight studies including 573 patients met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of these studies revealed that the intervention of antioxidants was associated with a significant increase in patients with pain relief (RR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.72-2.69; P chronic pancreatitis patients (SMD: -0.41; 95% CI: -0.83 to -0.10; P = 0.0005). Additionally, antioxidants may cause some adverse reactions (RR, 4.22; 95% CI: 2.17-8.20; P pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis, and administration of antioxidants to patients with painful chronic pancreatitis is effective in relieving pain. Antioxidant supplements may be advocated as one medical therapy for chronic pancreatitis patients with low antioxidant capacity in their blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. The Impact of Risk Factors of Chronic Pancreatitis on Secretin Pancreatic Function Testing: Results of a 20-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Darshan; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Freedman, Steven D; Sheth, Sunil G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of established risk factors on the outcome of secretin pancreatic function testing (sPFT) in patients undergoing work-up for suspected chronic pancreatitis. We completed a retrospective review of patients who underwent sPFT for suspected chronic pancreatitis over 20 years. We compared peak bicarbonate concentrations between groups and completed univariate and multivariate analyses to determine associations between risk factors and positive sPFT results (peak bicarbonate pancreatitis (RAP) and with local complications from acute pancreatitis (AP) (P ≤ 0.05). The bicarbonate concentration in patients with and without other risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol use, and family history of pancreatitis was not significantly different. Female sex, a history of AP, and a history of RAP were associated with positive sPFT results on univariate analysis (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, sex and RAP remained significant. Our study demonstrates that female sex, history of AP and RAP, and AP with local complications are associated with positive sPFT results or lower peak bicarbonate concentration. However, other risk factors do not impact the results of sPFT.

  5. Autoimmune gastro-pancreatitis with anti-protein disulfide isomerase-associated 2 autoantibody in Aire-deficient BALB/cAnN mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Kurisaki

    Full Text Available Although the autoimmune regulator (Aire knockout (KO mouse model has been reported to present various organ-specific autoimmune diseases depending on genetic background, autoimmune pancreatitis in mice of BALB/c background has not yet been reported. Here, we report that Aire KO mice with BALB/cAnN background showed significant lymphoid cell infiltration in the pancreas and stomach. To examine whether the phenotype in the pancreas and stomach is due to autoimmune reaction associated with autoantibody production, indirect immunofluorescence staining followed by Western blot analysis was performed. Consequently, the autoantibody against pancreas and stomach was detected in the sera of Aire KO mice, and the target antigen of the autoantibody was identified as protein disulfide isomerase-associated 2 (Pdia2, which was reported to be expressed preferentially in the pancreas and stomach. Thus, Aire KO mice of BALB/cAnN background can serve as a useful animal model for autoimmune gastro-pancreatitis with anti-Pdia2 autoantibody production.

  6. Autoimmune gastro-pancreatitis with anti-protein disulfide isomerase-associated 2 autoantibody in Aire-deficient BALB/cAnN mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurisaki, Hironori; Nagao, Yukihiro; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Mitsuyama, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Although the autoimmune regulator (Aire) knockout (KO) mouse model has been reported to present various organ-specific autoimmune diseases depending on genetic background, autoimmune pancreatitis in mice of BALB/c background has not yet been reported. Here, we report that Aire KO mice with BALB/cAnN background showed significant lymphoid cell infiltration in the pancreas and stomach. To examine whether the phenotype in the pancreas and stomach is due to autoimmune reaction associated with autoantibody production, indirect immunofluorescence staining followed by Western blot analysis was performed. Consequently, the autoantibody against pancreas and stomach was detected in the sera of Aire KO mice, and the target antigen of the autoantibody was identified as protein disulfide isomerase-associated 2 (Pdia2), which was reported to be expressed preferentially in the pancreas and stomach. Thus, Aire KO mice of BALB/cAnN background can serve as a useful animal model for autoimmune gastro-pancreatitis with anti-Pdia2 autoantibody production.

  7. Smoking as a risk factor for complications in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luaces-Regueira, María; Iglesias-García, Julio; Lindkvist, Björn; Castiñeira-Alvariño, Margarita; Nieto-García, Laura; Lariño-Noia, José; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the association between smoking and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, less is known about the role of smoking in the development of CP-related complications. Our aim was to investigate the impact of smoking and alcohol consumption on age of onset and complications at CP diagnosis. A cross-sectional case-case study was performed within a prospectively collected cohort of patients with CP. Alcohol consumption and smoking habits were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Morphologic severity was defined based on endoscopic ultrasound criteria for CP and classified as mild (3-4 criteria), moderate (5-6 criteria), and severe (≥7 criteria or calcifications). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed using the C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CP-related complications were calculated using a case-case design. A total of 241 patients were included. Smoking was associated with PEI (OR [95% CI], 2.4 [1.17-5.16]), calcifications (OR [95% CI], 2.33 [1.10-4.95]), and severe morphologic changes (OR [95% CI], 3.41 [1.31-8.85]) but not with pseudocysts or diabetes. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption was associated with age of onset. Tobacco, but not alcohol, is associated with PEI, calcifications, and severe morphologic (≥7 criteria or calcifications) CP at diagnosis. Smoking cessation should be encouraged in patients with CP.

  8. Towards adoptive cellular therapy of chronic autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a relatively common disease that is characterized by chronic inflammation of joints. The research as described in this thesis focused on the question of whether adoptive cellular therapy is effective in a mouse model of RA. The most generally known type of adoptive

  9. Total pancreatectomy and autoislet transplant for chronic recurrent pancreatitis in a 5-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheed Merani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic pancreatitis is a rare disorder, which can lead to a chronically debilitating condition. The etiology of recurrent hereditary pancreatitis, which previously was classified as idiopathic, has now been attributed in certain cases to specific genetic mutations including abnormalities in the PRSS gene. We describe here the use of total pancreatectomy and autoislet transplant in a 5-year-old with chronic pancreatitis. This represents the youngest patient undergoing the procedure at our institution. The early successful outcomes for this patient, both of symptom relief and glycemic control are detailed.

  10. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  11. Total pancreatectomy for recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: a critical review of patient selection criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Mahya; Gonzalez, Francisco Garcia; Makary, Martin A.; Singh, Vikesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Critical review of the indications for total pancreatectomy and highlight limitations in current diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Recent findings The diagnosis of noncalcific chronic pancreatitis remains controversial because of an overreliance on nonspecific imaging and laboratories findings. Endoscopic ultrasound, s-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and/or endoscopic pancreatic function testing are often used to diagnose noncalcific chronic pancreatitis despite the fact that there is no gold standard for this condition. Abdominal pain is not specific for chronic pancreatitis and is more likely to be encountered in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the high incidence of these conditions. The duration of pain and opioid analgesic use results in central sensitization that adversely affects pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. An alcoholic cause is associated with poorer pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. Summary The lack of a gold standard for noncalcific chronic pancreatitis limits the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and laboratory tests. The pain of chronic pancreatitis is nonspecific and is affected by duration, preoperative opioid use, and cause. These factors will need to be considered in the development of future selection criteria for this morbid surgery. PMID:28700371

  12. CASE OF CHRONIC CALCULOSIS PANCREATITIS IN PATIENT WITH ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Yakushev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment of chronic calculouse pancreatitis (HCP with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (LC. Considered etiologic role of chronic alcohol  intoxication in the development of these diseases. There was long- term use of alcoholic beverages at hepatotoxic doses and smoking in anamnesis. Patient was examined before entering in our clinic.  Сhronic heart failure, nephrotic syndrome, paraneoplastic was  excluded as the cause of hydrops. Patient R. was hospitalized in the  gastroenterology department with ascites of unknown etiology. The  severity of the patient’s condition is caused by malabsorption  syndrome and hepatocellular insufficiency leading to the  development of edema-ascitic syndrome and trophological failure. In patient there was low of proteins (total protein — 38 g / l, low of  albumins (14 g / l. In carrying out endoscopy showed signs of portal hypertension: esophageal varices 1 degree, portal gastropathy; In addition, an increase in the size of the papilla of  Vater. To clarify the nature of the defeat of the pancreas held  endosonography, in which multiple calcifications are found in the  pancreas tissue. To resolve biliary hypertension performed stenting of the common bile duct. Drain the pancreatic duct failed due to the presence of calculus in it at the level of the isthmus. Treatment for  our patient should be considered the imposition Ru’s operation. This  observation demonstrates social importance of problems of  combination HCP with a LC, which lead to reduced quality of life,  early disability, reduced life expectancy, as well as to an increase in treatment costs.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Infections and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-01

    The consciousness-based (holistic) medical toolbox might be useful in general practice and in cases of recurrent infections and chronic infection or inflammation. From our clinical experiences, there is hope for improvement from a number of diseases caused by disorders affecting the regulation of the immune system when the physician includes the holistic medical approach.Our scientific understanding of the connection between consciousness and cellular order is still limited. Consciousness-bas...

  14. Evaluation of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency by cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse: Correlation with severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes of pancreatic duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Sato, Tomohiro; Tamada, Tsutomu

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the correlation between the pancreatic exocrine insufficiency estimated by cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially selective IR pulse and the severity stages (modified Cambridge classification) based on morphological changes of the pancreatic duct in patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. Thirty-nine patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis underwent cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse. The secretion grading score (5-point scale) based on the moving distance of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP was assessed, and compared with the stage of the severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes of pancreatic duct. The stage of the severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes had significant negative correlations with the secretion grade (r=-0.698, P0.70 in 2 (33%) of 6 patients showing normal pancreatic exocrine function. It should be noted that the degree of morphological changes of pancreatic duct does not necessarily reflect the severity of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency at cine-dynamic MRCP in stage 2-3 chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence and predictors of 30-day readmissions in patients hospitalized with chronic pancreatitis: A nationwide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rushikesh; Haydek, Christopher; Mulki, Ramzi; Qayed, Emad

    2018-04-23

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis are prone to frequent readmissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the rate and predictors of 30-day readmissions in patients with chronic pancreatitis using the Nationwide Readmission Database (NRD). We performed a retrospective analysis of all adult patients with the principal discharge diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2010 through 2014. We excluded patients who died during the hospitalization. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to identify demographic, clinical, and hospital factors that associated with 30-day unplanned readmissions. During the study period, 25,259 patients had the principal discharge diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and survived the index hospitalization. Of these, 6477 (26.7%) were readmitted within 30 days. Younger age group, males, length of stay >5 days, admission to a large, metropolitan hospital, and several comorbidities (renal failure, rheumatic disease, chronic anemia, heart failure, depression, drug abuse, psychosis, and diabetes) were independently associated with increased risk of 30-day readmission. ERCP, pancreatic surgery, and obesity were associated with lower risk. The most common reasons for readmissions were acute pancreatitis (30%), chronic pancreatitis (17%), pseudocyst (2%), and abdominal pain (6%). One in four patients with chronic pancreatitis is readmitted within 30 days (26.7%). Pancreatic disease accounts for at least half of all readmissions. Several baseline comorbidities and characteristics are associated with 30-day readmission risk after index admission. Knowledge of these predictors can help design interventions to target high-risk patients and reduce readmissions and costs of care. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lateral Pancreaticojejunostomy for Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Ductal Dilation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adil A; Petrosyan, Mikael; Kane, Timothy D

    2018-06-06

    Pancreatic ductal obstruction leading to ductal dilation and recurrent pancreatitis is uncommon in children. Treatment is dependent upon etiology but consists of decompression of the pancreatic duct (PD) proximally, if possible, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) intervention or surgical decompression with pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. After institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the records for 2 children who underwent lateral pancreaticojejunostomy for pancreatic ductal dilation. Data, including demographics, diagnostic studies, operative details, complications, outcomes, and follow-up, were analyzed. Case 1 was a 4-year-old female with pancreatic ductal obstruction with multiple episodes of recurrent pancreatitis and failure of ERCP to clear her PD of stones. She underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy with a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow procedure). She recovered well with no further episodes of pancreatitis and normal pancreatic function 4 years later. Case 2 was a 2-year-old female who developed recurrent pancreatitis and was found to have papillary stenosis and long common bile-PD channel. Despite multiple sphincterotomies, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and laparoscopic hepaticoduodenostomy, she continued to experience episodes of pancreatitis. She underwent a laparoscopy converted to open lateral pancreaticojejunostomy. Her recovery was also smooth having had no episodes of pancreatitis or hospital admissions for over 2 years following the Puestow. Indication for lateral pancreaticojejunostomy or Puestow procedure is rare in children and even less often performed using laparoscopy. In our small experience, both patients with pancreatic ductal obstruction managed with Puestow's procedure enjoy durable symptom and pain relief in the long term.

  17. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  18. [THE PLACE OF PANCREATICODUODENAL RESECTION IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED FORMS OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypchuk, V I; Shevchuk, I M; Yavorskiy, A M; Dyriv, O L

    2015-11-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 120 patients, suffering complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis, were analyzed. In 5 patients pancreaticoduodenal resection in accordance to Whipple method have constituted the operation of choice. The indications for operation were: impossibility to exclude completely the malignant process inside pancreatic head; enhancement of the pancreatic head, causing duodenal, common biliary duct and the pancreatoduodenal zone vessels compression; cystic changes of pancreatic head with several episodes of hemorrhage inside the cyst and duodenum. The immediate, short-term and intermediate results of the operation were estimated as good and satisfactory.

  19. Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: Recommendations from PancreasFest 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Michael R.; Bellin, Melena; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Robertson, R. Paul; Andersen, Dana K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Brand, Randall; Frulloni, Luca; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Description Diabetes and glucose intolerance are common complications of chronic pancreatitis, yet clinical guidance on their detection, classification, and management is lacking. Methods A working group reviewed the medical problems, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for chronic pancreatitis-associated diabetes for a consensus meeting at PancreasFest 2012. Results Guidance Statement 1.1 Diabetes mellitus is common in chronic pancreatitis. While any patient with chronic pancreatitis should be monitored for development of diabetes, those with long-standing duration of disease, prior partial pancreatectomy, and early onset of calcific disease may be at higher risk. Those patients developing diabetes mellitus are likely to have co-existing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Guidance Statement 1.2 Diabetes occurring secondary to chronic pancreatitis should be recognized as pancreatogenic diabetes (type 3c diabetes). Guidance Statement 2.1 The initial evaluation should include fasting glucose and HbA1c. These tests should be repeated annually. Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c requires further evaluation. Guidance Statement 2.2 Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c should be further evaluated by a standard 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Guidance Statement 2.3 An absent pancreatic polypeptide response to mixed-nutrient ingestion is a specific indicator of type 3c diabetes. Guidance Statement 2.4 Assessment of pancreatic endocrine reserve, and importantly that of functional beta-cell mass, should be performed as part of the evaluation and follow-up for total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). Guidance Statement 3 Patients with pancreatic diabetes shall be treated with specifically tailored medical nutrition and pharmacologic therapies. Conclusions Physicians should evaluate and treat glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatitis. PMID:23890130

  20. Differential diagnosis of pancreas cancer and chronic pancreatitis in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Saitou, Hiroya; Hiromura, Tadao; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Masahiro; Morita, Yutaka; Irie, Goro

    1987-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of pancreas cancer and chronic pancreatitis in Computed Tomography. CT pictures of 46 cases of pancreas cancer and 16 cases of chronic pancreatitis were reviewed to clarify a way of differential diagnosis of these two disorders. The conclusion obtained in this study is as below. 1) Well-defined cystic central low density is a sign of chronic pancreatitis, and in the other hand, the solid central low density is a sign of pancreas cancer. 2) Effect of contrast enhancement was greater in chronic pancreatitis than in pancreas cancer. 3) Possibility of pancreas cancer is high in a case which has a sign of vascular involvement but no definite sign of tumor. 4) Sensitivity, specificity, total accuracy is 76.7 %, 87.5 %, 75.8 % respectively. (author)

  1. Towards a neurobiological understanding of pain in chronic pancreatitis: mechanisms and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren S. Olesen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Chronic pancreatitis is associated with abnormal processing of pain at the peripheral and central level of the pain system. This neurobiological understanding of pain has important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of pain chronification.

  2. Conventional Versus Rosemont Endoscopic Ultrasound Criteria for Chronic Pancreatitis: Comparing Interobserver Reliability and Intertest Agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Kalmin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Rosemont criteria (RC were recently proposed by expert consensus to standardize endoscopic ultrasound (EUS features and thresholds for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis (CP; however, they are cumbersome and are not validated.

  3. Single-port videoscopic splanchnotomy for palliation of refractory chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Michiel; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Bouma, Wobbe; Beese, Ulrich; de Jongste, Mike J.; Mariani, Massimo A.

    OBJECTIVES: Interrupting the afferent signals that travel through the splanchnic nerves by multiportal thoracoscopic splanchnotomy can offer effective palliation in chronic pancreatitis. However, obtained results weaken after time, possibly necessitating repeat procedures. Given the palliative

  4. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumonceau, J.-M.; Delhaye, M.; Tringali, A.; Dominguez-Munoz, J. E.; Poley, J.-W.; Arvanitaki, M.; Costamagna, G.; Costea, F.; Devière, J.; Eisendrath, P.; Lakhtakia, S.; Reddy, N.; Fockens, P.; Ponchon, T.; Bruno, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Clarification of the position of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) regarding the interventional options available for treating patients with chronic pancreatitis. Methods: Systematic literature search to answer explicit key questions with levels of

  5. A wide variation in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in chronic pancreatitis: a dutch national survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, A.A.J. van; Ahmed Ali, U.; Goor, H. van; Bruno, M.J.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Optimal diagnostic and treatment modalities in chronic pancreatitis are controversial due to lack of evidence. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate current clinical practice, we conducted a survey with the primary objective to evaluate decisions regarding the diagnosis, management and screening in

  6. Altered brain microstructure assessed by diffusion tensor imaging in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Olesen, Søren Schou; Gram, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Objective In patients with painful chronic pancreatitis (CP) there is increasing evidence of abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system. Using magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging, brain microstructure in areas involved in processing of visceral pain was characterised...

  7. Changes of brain microstructure in patients with painful chronic pancreatitis assessed by diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Olesen, Søren Schou; Gram, Mikkel

    Objective In patients with painful chronic pancreatitis (CP) there is increasing evidence of abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system. Using magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging, brain microstructure in areas involved in processing of visceral pain was characterised...

  8. Embolization of gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Lan; Kim, Byong Geun; Kim, Jae Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm due to chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but it can cause recurrent and massive hemorrhage. Because of high morbidity and mortality associated with the pseudoaneurysm, early detection and treatment is essential. Surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm has a high mortality and therefore, transcatheter embolization is preferably carried out. We report a case in which gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis was successfully treated by transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and Gianturco spring coils

  9. Embolization of gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Jong; Ko, Kang Seok; Park, Byung Lan; Kim, Byong Geun [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyu [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univrsity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-15

    Pseudoaneurysm due to chronic pancreatitis is uncommon, but it can cause recurrent and massive hemorrhage. Because of high morbidity and mortality associated with the pseudoaneurysm, early detection and treatment is essential. Surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm has a high mortality and therefore, transcatheter embolization is preferably carried out. We report a case in which gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic pancreatitis was successfully treated by transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and Gianturco spring coils.

  10. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Miura, Kazuo; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gas...

  11. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    was to evaluate the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: Twelve male patients with severe CP and 11 matched controls ingested 40 g alcohol. Plasma cytokine concentrations were measured for 24 h and assessed by sandwich ELISA......BACKGROUND: Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study...... techniques. RESULTS: IL-6 was higher in CP at fasting and 1, 4 and 24 h after alcohol intake (P

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  13. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhenhua [Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China 230032 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  15. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Ke, Zun-ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  16. Efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, Thibaut; Boytchev, Isabelle; Antoni, Guillemette; Croix, Damien Sainte; Choury, André Daniel; Laurent, Valérie; Pelletier, Gilles; Buffet, Catherine; Bou-Farah, Rita; Carbonnel, Franck

    2016-11-01

    There is still uncertainty regarding the efficacy and optimal modalities of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. The aims of the present study were to assess the safety and the efficacy of ESWL, either alone or followed by therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (adjuvant ERCP) and to determine predictive factors of efficacy, in a real-life setting. This study included all consecutive patients who underwent an ESWL in a single University Hospital between 2001 and 2012. The indication for ESWL was obstructive stone(s) of the main pancreatic duct resulting in either painful chronic pancreatitis or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Success was defined by resolution of pain, no analgesic treatment, no acute pancreatitis and no surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis 6 months after the ESWL. One hundred and forty-six patients were studied; 6/146 (4%) had a complication of ESWL. Among the 132 patients in whom follow-up was completed, 91 (69%) had an adjuvant ERCP. After 6 months of follow-up, 100/132 (76%) patients achieved success. In multivariate analysis, the single significant predictive factor of the success of the ESWL treatment was chronic pain (p = 0.03). Patients who had chronic pain and needed opioid treatment had less chance of success than patients without chronic pain (OR 95%CI 0.31 [0.07-1.14]). We found no difference in the success rates between patients who underwent adjuvant ERCP and those who had ESWL only (p = 0.93). This study shows that the ESWL is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic pancreatitis and obstructive stones within the main pancreatic duct. Systematic association with therapeutic ERCP appears to provide no additional benefit and is therefore not recommended.

  17. Antecedent cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity in Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Lindholm; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2016-01-01

    leukemia (CLL) patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and p-values using Fischer's exact tests were calculated. The data was adjusted for confounding effects by logistic regression. Results: A significantly increased risk of MPNs compared to CLL was observed in subjects with a prior history of any autoimmune disease...... (OR = 1.86, 95%CI 1.16-2.98). A positive association between JAK2-V617F positive MPN and any autoimmune disease was observed at follow-up (OR = 2.62, 95% CI 1.21-5.67). A significantly increased risk of MPN compared to CLL was also observed in subjects with prior thromboembolic events (TE-events) (OR...... in the hematopoietic stem cell resulting in MPNs, or whether this association actually reflects a long-lasting pre-MPN-diagnosis phase, in which the MPN-disease per se contributes to a chronic inflammatory state and immune deregulation....

  18. [Pancreatic neuronal loss in chronic Chagas' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A; de Oliveira, L C; Alves, R S; Lopes, E R

    1998-01-01

    We have not found any anatomical studies about the intrapancreatic ganglia in the chronic Chagas' disease. The lesions in these structures could explain at least in part the functional disturbances in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas described in this form of the disease. Thus we decided to morphologically analyze these ganglia. For this analysis, we studied transversal segments of the head, body and tail of the pancreas of twelve chronic chagasics whose mean age were 46.5 +/- 9.1 years and fourteen controls, mean age 41.2 +/- 11.0 years. These segments were histologically processed and cut into sections in a serial form up to the end and one cut of each seven was analyzed. For statistical analysis we used the non-parametric test of Mann-Whitney. In the head of the pancreas, the mean count of neurons was 57.3 +/- 50.8 in the chagasic group and 117.5 +/- 99.0 for the control group (p < 0.05); in the body 25.9 +/- 19.4 for the chagasic group and 54.7 +/- 47.8 for the control group (p < 0.05); in the tail 23.4 +/- 16.3 for the chagasic group and 54.1 +/- 29.2 for the control group (p < 0.01), the total count being 106.6 +/- 71.1 for the chagasic group and 226.3 +/- 156.5 for the controls (p < 0.01). Our data permitted us to conclude that: a) there was a statistically significant neuronal depopulation in the chagasic group, as compared to the control group, in each pancreatic segment that was analyzed, as well as in the organ as a whole; b) 50% of the chagasics had the total number of neurons smaller than the lowest number observed in the controls (80); c) 75% and 91.6% of the chagasics had the number of neurons smaller than, respectively, the median (171) and the mean (226) of the control group; d) therefore, the pancreatic neuronal depopulation was common, but not constant; e) the variable age was apparently not responsible for the neuronal depopulation of the chagasics.

  19. Chronic pain as a manifestation of potassium channel-complex autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christopher J; Lennon, Vanda A; Aston, Paula A; McKeon, Andrew; Pittock, Sean J

    2012-09-11

    Autoantibodies targeting voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complexes cause a spectrum of neuronal hyperexcitability disorders. We investigated pain as a manifestation of VGKC-complex autoimmunity. We reviewed the prevalence and characteristics of pain in VGKC-complex-immunoglobulin G (IgG)-seropositive patients in 25 months of comprehensive service testing for neural autoantibodies, subtyped positive sera for LGI1-IgG and CASPR2-IgG specificities, and reviewed pain prevalence in autoimmune control patients. VGKC-complex-IgG was identified in 1,992 patients of 54,853 tested (4%). Of 316 evaluated neurologically at Mayo Clinic, 159 (50%) had pain, in isolation (28%) or with accompanying neurologic manifestations (72%), and not attributable to alternative cause. Pain was subacute in onset, chronic in course, neuropathic, nociceptive, regional, or diffuse and sometimes attributed to fibromyalgia (6%) or psychogenic cause (13%). Most patients had normal peripheral nervous system function, measured by neuropathy impairment scores and nerve conduction. Evidence of neuronal hyperexcitability (hyperhidrosis, quantitative heat-pain hyperalgesia, or electromyographic excitability) was 25-fold more common in pain patients. Pain management required multiple medications in 70% (narcotics, 30%); 13 of 16 patients reported pain relief with immunotherapy. Pain was significantly associated with CASPR2-IgG-positivity (16% positive with pain, 7% without pain; p = 0.014) but not with LGI1-IgG. Less than 10% of 167 patients with neural autoantibodies other than VGKC-complex-IgG reported pain. Chronic idiopathic pain is a syndromic manifestation of VGKC-complex autoimmunity. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways is implicated. CASPR2-IgG significantly associates with pain, but in most patients the antigenic VGKC-complex molecule remains to be determined. VGKC-complex autoimmunity represents an important new direction for pain research and therapy.

  20. [Current alternatives in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kat'uchová, Jana; Radonak, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized as an inflammatory process affecting the pancreas that causes progressive destruction of the gland and fibrosis, with subsequent endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is alcohol use in combination with nicotine. Manifestations are persistent or recurrent painful attacks. The only parameter of successful treatment of chronic pancreatitis is a relieve from long-lasting pain and improvement of the quality of life. Surgical treatment options include drainage operations on the pancreas, pancreatic resection or a combination of both. With optimal surgical treatment performed and good patient's compliance, operations for chronic pancreatitis have low number of post-operative complications and relatively good long-term results. The continued consumption of alcohol and drugs bring about worse outcomes, sometimes even a complete failure of therapy. Chronic pancreatitis also has considerable socio-economic consequences. Due to the persisting pain and frequent hospitalization it can lead to long-term disability and early retirement predominantly in young patients.

  1. Long-term outcomes of endoscopic vs surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahen, Djuna L; Gouma, Dirk J; Laramée, Philippe; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A J; Boermeester, Marja A; Busch, Olivier R; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Pereira, Stephen P; Wonderling, David; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Bruno, Marco J

    2011-11-01

    A randomized trial that compared endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in patients with advanced chronic pancreatitis reported a significant benefit of surgery after a 2-year follow-up period. We evaluated the long-term outcome of these patients after 5 years. Between 2000 and 2004, 39 symptomatic patients were randomly assigned to groups that underwent endoscopic drainage or operative pancreaticojejunostomy. In 2009, information was collected regarding pain, quality of life, morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay, number of procedures undergone, changes in pancreatic function, and costs. Analysis was performed according to an intention-to-treat principle. During the 79-month follow-up period, one patient was lost and 7 died from unrelated causes. Of the patients treated by endoscopy, 68% required additional drainage compared with 5% in the surgery group (P = .001). Hospital stay and costs were comparable, but overall, patients assigned to endoscopy underwent more procedures (median, 12 vs 4; P = .001). Moreover, 47% of the patients in the endoscopy group eventually underwent surgery. Although the mean difference in Izbicki pain scores was no longer significant (39 vs 22; P = .12), surgery was still superior in terms of pain relief (80% vs 38%; P = .042). Levels of quality of life and pancreatic function were comparable. In the long term, symptomatic patients with advanced chronic pancreatitis who underwent surgery as the initial treatment for pancreatic duct obstruction had more relief from pain, with fewer procedures, than patients who were treated endoscopically. Importantly, almost half of the patients who were treated with endoscopy eventually underwent surgery. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiology of Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis: Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Jorge D; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2017-07-01

    Emerging data in the past few years suggest that acute, recurrent acute (RAP), and chronic pancreatitis (CP) represent a disease continuum. This review discusses the similarities and differences in the epidemiology of RAP and CP. RAP is a high-risk group, comprised of individuals at varying risk of progression. The premise is that RAP is an intermediary stage in the pathogenesis of CP, and a subset of RAP patients during their natural course transition to CP. Although many clinical factors have been identified, accurately predicting the probability of disease course in individual patients remains difficult. Future studies should focus on providing more precise estimates of the risk of disease transition in a cohort of patients, quantification of clinical events during the natural course of disease, and discovery of biomarkers of the different stages of the disease continuum. Availability of clinically relevant endpoints and linked biomarkers will allow more accurate prediction of the natural course of disease over intermediate- or long-term-based characteristics of an individual patient. These endpoints will also provide objective measures for use in clinical trials of interventions that aim to alter the natural course of disease.

  3. Surgical treatment of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochorov, Alexandermiddle Victorovich; Oldhafer, Karl-Jurgen; Tretyak, Stanislaw Ivanovich; Rashchynski, Siarhei Markovich; Donati, Marcello; Rashchynskaya, Nina Timofeevna; Audzevich, Dzmitry Anatolyevich

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the research were to compare the outcomes of pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) (Kausch-Whipple or Traverso-Longmire) and resection with drainage operations (RDO) (Frey or Partingtone-Rochelle) in patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis (CP), in management of pain syndrome and quality of life provided by these kinds of surgical procedures. From 2002 to 2008 sixteen patients suffering from CP underwent PD and 16 underwent RDO. Treatment results for the two groups were analyzed with respect to postoperative complications and results of the questionnaire MOS SF-36 v.2(TM). In the immediate postoperative period more complications were observed in the PD group (a<0.05). In both groups a positive effect on removing the painful syndrome and improvement of the quality of life (p<0.01) were observed. In the PD group there were the best results of management by General Health difference criterion (a<0.01). A greater improvement of Physical Functiong value (a<0.01) was noticed in patients who underwent RDO. Both PD and RDO adequately remove pain syndrome and improve the quality of life in patients suffering from CP. Under equal conditions the preference should be given to RDO, as improvement in life quality of operated patients is greater.

  4. Nonoverlapping roles of PD-1 and FoxP3 in maintaining immune tolerance in a novel autoimmune pancreatitis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baihao; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hori, Shohei; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-07-26

    PD-1 (programmed-death 1), an immune-inhibitory receptor required for immune self-tolerance whose deficiency causes autoimmunity with variable severity and tissue specificity depending on other genetic factors, is expressed on activated T cells, including the transcription factor FoxP3(+) Treg cells known to play critical roles in maintaining immune tolerance. However, whether PD-1 expression by the Treg cells is required for their immune regulatory function, especially in autoimmune settings, is still unclear. We found that mice with partial FoxP3 insufficiency developed early-onset lympho-proliferation and lethal autoimmune pancreatitis only when PD-1 is absent. The autoimmune phenotype was rescued by the transfer of FoxP3-sufficient T cells, regardless of whether they were derived from WT or PD-1-deficient mice, indicating that Treg cells dominantly protect against development of spontaneous autoimmunity without intrinsic expression of PD-1. The absence of PD-1 combined with partial FoxP3 insufficiency, however, led to generation of ex-FoxP3 T cells with proinflammatory properties and expansion of effector/memory T cells that contributed to the autoimmune destruction of target tissues. Altogether, the results suggest that PD-1 and FoxP3 work collaboratively in maintaining immune tolerance mostly through nonoverlapping pathways. Thus, PD-1 is modulating the activation threshold and maintaining the balance between regulatory and effector T cells, whereas FoxP3 is sufficient for dominant regulation through maintaining the integrity of the Treg function. We suggest that genetic or environmental factors that even moderately affect the expression of both PD-1 and FoxP3 can cause life-threatening autoimmune diseases by disrupting the T-cell homeostasis.

  5. Splenic vein thrombosis with chronic pancreatitis: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri SH, Khorgami J, Donboli K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chronic pancreatitis and perivasculitis is the most common etiology of splenic vein thrombosis (SVT. Reported in up to 45% of patients with chronic pancreatitis, SVT may also be seen in patients with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. It causes a localized portal hypertension called sinistral portal hypertension. Unlike those with generalized portal hypertension, patients with sinistral portal hypertension are asymptomatic and have normal liver function. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric varices is a life threatening complication of SVT. In patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to esophageal or gastric varices, late-phase celiac angiography is used to determine the presence SVT. Splenectomy is effective in treating the collateral outflow for patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding."n"nCase report: a 23-year-old patient with SVT due to chronic pancreatitis with gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient came to the hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown etiology. Diagnostic workups revealed chronic pancreatitis and SVT with bleeding gastric fundal varices, after which the patient underwent splenectomy. A review of current literature on SVT, known etiologies, diagnosis and treatment is discussed

  6. Hypothyroidism being caused by chronic autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szwajkosz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of the endocrine system are extremely important problems in Poland and around the world. According to the data presented by the Central Statistical Office in Poland in 2006, 22 % of the population suffered from thyroid disorders.  Hypothyroidism is usually caused by chronic autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid gland. It is one of the most common disorders of the thyroid concerning approximately 2% of the adult population. This disorder is related to higher risk of overweight and obesity due to decreased total body metabolism. Furthermore, it predisposes to dyslipidaemia thus increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Surgical treatment of pancreas divisum causing chronic pancreatitis: the outcome benefits of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, W; Rau, B M; Poch, B; Beger, H G

    2005-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) represents a duct anomaly in the pancreatic head ducts, leading frequently leading to recurrent acute pancreatitis (rAP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). Based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, pancreas divisum can be found in 1% to 6% of patients with pancreatitis. The correlation of this abnormality with pancreatic disease is an issue of continuing controversy. Because of the underlying duct anomalies and major pathomorphological changes in the pancreatic head, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) offers an option for causal treatment. Thirty-six patients with pancreatitis caused by PD were treated surgically. Thirty patients suffered from CP, 6 from rAP. The mean duration of the disease was 47.5 and 49.8 months, respectively. The age at the time of surgery was 39.2 years in the CP group, and 27.6 years in the rAP group. Median hospitalization since diagnosis was 18.8 weeks for CP patients and 24.6 weeks for rAP patients. Previous procedures performed in these patients included endoscopic papillotomy (30%), duct stenting (14%), and surgical treatment (17%). The median preoperative pain score was 8 on a visual analog scale. According to the classification of pancreas divisum, 10 patients demonstrated a complete PD, 25 had a functionally incomplete PD, and 1 had a dorsal duct type. The pain status as well as the endocrine (oral glucose tolerance test) and exocrine (pancreolauryl test) function were evaluated preoperatively and early and late postoperatively with a median follow-up time of 39.3 months. There was no operative-related mortality. The follow-up was 100%; 4 patients died (1 from suicide, 1 from cardiac arrest, and 2 from cancer of the esophagus). Fifty percent of the patients were completely pain-free, 31% had a significant reduction of pain with a median pain score of 2 (P pancreatitis with a need for hospitalization. DPPHR reduced pain and preserved the endocrine function in the majority of patients

  8. Chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A variant of PRSS1 gene in a European patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Eszter; Cierna, Iveta; Vavrova, Ludmila; Ilencikova, Denisa; Konecny, Michal; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2014-01-10

    The major etiologic factor of chronic pancreatitis in adults is excessive alcohol consumption, whereas among children structural anomalies, systemic and metabolic disorders, and genetic factors are prevalent. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) cause hereditary pancreatitis, while mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes have been shown to associate with chronic pancreatitis as independent risk factors. We present a case of 13-year-old boy with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Given the unexplained attacks of pancreatitis since early childhood and despite the negative family history, molecular-genetic analysis of four pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR) was performed. The boy was found to carry the c.623G>C (p.G208A) mutation of the PRSS1 gene and the c.180C>T (p.G60G) mutation of the CTRC gene, both in heterozygous state. These mutations are considered as contributing risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. In children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis genetic causes should be considered, even in absence of positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a European patient with chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A mutation of PRSS1 gene. This mutation was previously reported only in Asian subjects and is thought to be a unique genetic cause of pancreatitis in Asia.

  9. Two cases of chronic pancreatitis associated with anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union and SPINK1 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sam Rho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting from repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis that impair exocrine function and eventually produce endocrine insufficiency. Some causes of chronic pancreatitis appear to be associated with alterations in the serine&#8211;protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 , cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 , and cystic fibrosis&#8211;transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR genes, or with structural disorders in the pancreaticobiliary ductal system, such as pancreatic divisum or anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union (APBDU. However, it is unusual to observe both genetic alteration and structural anomaly. Here, we report 2 cases with both APBDU and a mutation in the SPINK1 genes, and we discuss the implications of these findings in clinical practice.

  10. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients......SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... registries. Factors associated with mortality in AP patients were high age, alcohol and diabetes, whereas female gender, employment, and co-living were associated with better survival. Level of S-amylase had no impact on the mortality. AP can progress to CP not only from alcoholic but also from idiopathic AP...

  11. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients...... registries. Factors associated with mortality in AP patients were high age, alcohol and diabetes, whereas female gender, employment, and co-living were associated with better survival. Level of S-amylase had no impact on the mortality. AP can progress to CP not only from alcoholic but also from idiopathic AP...

  12. Adipose Stem Cell Therapy Mitigates Chronic Pancreatitis via Differentiation into Acinar-like Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen; Gou, Wenyu; Kim, Do-Sung; Dong, Xiao; Strange, Charlie; Tan, Yu; Adams, David B; Wang, Hongjun

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the capacity of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) to mitigate disease progression in an experimental chronic pancreatitis mouse model. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) was induced in C57BL/6 mice by repeated ethanol and cerulein injection, and mice were then infused with 4 × 10 5 or 1 × 10 6 GFP + ASCs. Pancreas morphology, fibrosis, inflammation, and presence of GFP + ASCs in pancreases were assessed 2 weeks after treatment. We found that ASC infusion attenuated pancreatic damage, preserved pancreas morphology, and reduced pancreatic fibrosis and cell death. GFP + ASCs migrated to pancreas and differentiated into amylase + cells. In further confirmation of the plasticity of ASCs, ASCs co-cultured with acinar cells in a Transwell system differentiated into amylase + cells with increased expression of acinar cell-specific genes including amylase and chymoB1. Furthermore, culture of acinar or pancreatic stellate cell lines in ASC-conditioned medium attenuated ethanol and cerulein-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro. Our data show that a single intravenous injection of ASCs ameliorated CP progression, likely by directly differentiating into acinar-like cells and by suppressing inflammation, fibrosis, and pancreatic tissue damage. These results suggest that ASC cell therapy has the potential to be a valuable treatment for patients with pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyun Seok; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is known to be caused by a variety of clinical disorders. The authors encountered a case of PRES associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism. A 49-year-old man presented with altered mental status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) displayed vasogenic edema at the bilateral posterior temporal and parieto-occipital lobes and cerebellum. Laboratory tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered completely, and follow-up brain MRI and abdominal CT exhibited resolution of the previous lesions. We suggest that acute pancreatitis might be an etiology of PRES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mass lesions in chronic pancreatitis: benign or malignant? An "evidence-based practice" approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gerstenmaier, Jan F

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of a pancreatic mass lesion in the presence of chronic pancreatitis can be extremely challenging. At the same time, a high level of certainty about the diagnosis is necessary for appropriate management planning. The aim of this study was to establish current best evidence about which imaging methods reliably differentiate a benign from a malignant lesion, and show how that evidence is best applied. A diagnostic algorithm based on Bayesian analysis is proposed.

  15. [Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis based on classification of M. Buchler and coworkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, I A; Boĭko, V V; Goncharova, N N; Andreeshchev, S A

    2011-08-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 452 patients, suffering chronic pancreatitis (CHP), were analyzed. The CHP classification, elaborated by M. Buchler and coworkers (2009), based on clinical signs, morphological peculiarities and pancreatic function analysis, contains scientifically substantiated recommendations for choice of diagnostic methods and complex treatment of the disease. The classification proposed is simple in application and constitutes an instrument for studying and comparison of the CHP course severity, the patients prognosis and treatment.

  16. Mesenteric ossification in CT indicates sclerosing peritonitis in chronic bacterial infection and pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Kirchner, E.M.; Kickuth, R.; Stein, A.

    2004-01-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis already has been described as a serious complication of the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. But different other affections of the pertioneum such as chronic bacterial peritonitis and pancreatitis may result in sclerosing peritonitis, too. The symptom is characterised by thickened small bowel walls and periotoneal membranes as well as peritoneal calcifications which can be shown in computed tomography. We demonstrate two cases of peritoneal ossifications due to peritonitis and pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  17. The prevalence of malnutrition and fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sinead N; Smyth, Niamh D; O'Sullivan, Maria; Feehan, Sinead; Ridgway, Paul F; Conlon, Kevin C

    2014-06-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at risk of malnutrition and nutrient deficiency due to malabsorption, pain, and poor diet. We sought to examine fat-soluble vitamin levels and malnutrition parameters in patients with chronic pancreatitis. In a prospective controlled cohort study, 128 subjects (62 chronic pancreatitis patients and 66 age-/sex-matched controls) were recruited. Body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength (measure of functional capacity), fat stores (triceps skin fold), muscle stores (mid-arm muscle circumference), exocrine function, and serum levels of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E) were measured. Half of patients in the chronic pancreatitis group were overweight or obese, although the mean BMI was lower in patients than in controls (P = .007). Handgrip strength (P = .048), fat stores (P = .000), and muscle stores (P = .001) were lower in patients than in controls. Of the patients, 14.5% and 24.2% were deficient in vitamins A and E, respectively. Nineteen percent of patients had excess serum vitamin A levels. Despite the prevalence of overweight and obesity, patients had lower muscle stores, strength, and abnormal vitamin levels. Detailed nutrition assessment including anthropometry and vitamin status is warranted in chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of benign Wirsung duct strictures treatment in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łaski, Dariusz; Hać, Stanisław; Marek, Iwona; Kobiela, Jarosław; Kostro, Justyna; Adrych, Krystian; Śledziński, Zbigniew

    2018-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an important problem for modern medicine, the healthcare system (Poland - NFZ) and the national insurance system (Poland - ZUS). The chronic nature of the disease, the lack of targeted treatment and the low mortality rate lead to an accumulation of patients who demand expensive treatment, both conservative and invasive. Rising costs in health care are forcing the need for a more cost-effective method of treatment. The primary aim of this study was to perform a retrospective calculation of costs in both surgical and endoscopic treatment, hospital stay, healthcare, and public insurance of patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Parallel quality of life analysis was performed. It was possible to develop a cost-effective therapeutic algorithm for patients with an uncomplicated stricture of Wirsung's duct within the Polish health care system. In Poland, the hospital costs of endoscopic treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis were higher than those of the surgical treatment group despite both resulting in a similar life quality. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, it was shown that surgical intervention is a more cost-effective therapy than endotherapy. Furthermore, patients with benign stricture of the main pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis should not be treated with endotherapy for longer than 12 months.

  19. Is endoscopic therapy the treatment of choice in all patients with chronic pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska, Beata

    2013-01-07

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma with subsequent fibrosis that leads to pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Abdominal pain and local complications (bile duct or duodenal stenosis and pancreatic tumor) secondary to CP are indications for therapy. At the beginning, medical therapy is used. More invasive treatment is recommended for patients with pancreatic duct stones (PDS) and pancreatic obstruction in whom standard medical therapy is not sufficient. Recently, Clarke et al assessed the long-term effectiveness of endoscopic therapy (ET) in CP patients. The authors compared ET with medical treatment. They reported that ET was clinically successful in 50% of patients with symptomatic CP. In this commentary, current CP treatment, including indications for ET and surgery in CP patients, is discussed. Recommendations for endoscopic treatment of CP according to the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinical Guidelines are reviewed. Different surgical methods used in the treatment of CP patients are also discussed. ET is the most useful in patients with large PDS, pancreatic duct obstruction and dilation. It should be the first-line option because it is less invasive than surgery. Surgery should be the first-line option in patients in whom ET has failed or in those with a pancreatic mass with suspicion of malignancy. ET is a very effective and less invasive procedure, but it cannot be recommended as the treatment of choice in all CP patients.

  20. Prognosis of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis after corticosteroid therapy-induced remission in terms of relapse and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Relapse and diabetes mellitus (DM are major problems for the prognosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP. We examined the prognosis of type 1 AIP after corticosteroid therapy (CST-induced remission in terms of relapse and DM.The study enrolled 82 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIP who achieved remission with CST. We retrospectively evaluated the relapse rate in terms of the administration period of CST, clinical factors associated with relapse, and the temporal change in glucose tolerance.During follow-up, 32 patients (39.0% experienced relapse. There was no significant clinical factor that could predict relapse before beginning CST. AIP patients who ceased CST within 2 or 3 years experienced significantly earlier relapse than those who had the continuance of CST (p = 0.050 or p = 0.020. Of the 37 DM patients, 15 patients (40.5% had pre-existing DM, 17 (45.9% showed new-onset DM, and 5 (13.5% developed CST-induced DM. Patients with new-onset DM were significantly more likely to show improvement (p = 0.008 than those with pre-existing DM.It was difficult to predict relapse of AIP based on clinical parameters before beginning CST. Relapse was likely to occur within 3 years after the beginning of CST and maintenance of CST for at least 3 years reduced the risk of relapse. The early initiation of CST for AIP with impaired glucose tolerance is desirable because pre-existing DM is refractory to CST.

  1. Sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis versus primary sclerosing cholangitis: comparison on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, MR cholangiography, CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim; Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Inst. of Radiology, Univ. of Ulsan Coll. of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Myung-Hwan [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Ulsan Coll. of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Background: It is essential to differentiate sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as the treatment and prognosis of the two diseases are totally different. Purpose: To compare image findings of SC-AIP and PSC on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed ERC, MRC, CT, and MRI in 28 SC-AIP and 23 PSC patients in consensus. Factors evaluated included the length, location, and multiplicity of bile duct stricture, the presence of characteristic cholangiographic features of PSC on ERC and MRC, and the presence, location, thickness, and pattern of bile duct wall thickening on CT and MRI. Results: On ERC, focal stricture, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture, and beaded, pruned-tree, and diverticulum-like appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.006). On MRC, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture and pruned-tree appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.044). On CT and MRI, the bile duct wall was thicker (5.1 mm vs. 3.1 mm; P = 0.033 and 4.3 mm vs. 3.0 mm; P = 0.01, respectively) in SC-AIP than in PSC patients. PSC was more frequently associated with intrahepatic bile duct wall thickening on both CT (93% vs. 50%; P = 0.024) and MRI (100% vs. 50%; P = 0.023) than SC-AIP. Conclusion: The combination of ERC or MRC with cross-sectional images, including CT and MRI, may be helpful in differentiating between SC-AIP and PSC.

  2. Sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis versus primary sclerosing cholangitis: comparison on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, MR cholangiography, CT, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim; Jin Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is essential to differentiate sclerosing cholangitis with autoimmune pancreatitis (SC-AIP) from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as the treatment and prognosis of the two diseases are totally different. Purpose: To compare image findings of SC-AIP and PSC on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed ERC, MRC, CT, and MRI in 28 SC-AIP and 23 PSC patients in consensus. Factors evaluated included the length, location, and multiplicity of bile duct stricture, the presence of characteristic cholangiographic features of PSC on ERC and MRC, and the presence, location, thickness, and pattern of bile duct wall thickening on CT and MRI. Results: On ERC, focal stricture, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture, and beaded, pruned-tree, and diverticulum-like appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.006). On MRC, multifocal and intrahepatic bile duct stricture and pruned-tree appearance were more frequent in PSC than in SC-AIP patients (P = 0.044). On CT and MRI, the bile duct wall was thicker (5.1 mm vs. 3.1 mm; P = 0.033 and 4.3 mm vs. 3.0 mm; P = 0.01, respectively) in SC-AIP than in PSC patients. PSC was more frequently associated with intrahepatic bile duct wall thickening on both CT (93% vs. 50%; P = 0.024) and MRI (100% vs. 50%; P = 0.023) than SC-AIP. Conclusion: The combination of ERC or MRC with cross-sectional images, including CT and MRI, may be helpful in differentiating between SC-AIP and PSC

  3. Clinical response to dorsal duct drainage via the minor papilla in refractory obstructing chronic calcific pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Gromski, Mark A.; Sherman, Stuart; El Hajj, Ihab I.; Easler, Jeffrey J.; Watkins, James; McHenry, Lee; Lehman, Glen A.; Fogel, Evan L.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Complete stone removal from the main pancreatic duct might not be achieved in all patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis. We report our results for endoscopic dorsal pancreatic duct (DPD) bypass of obstructing stones in the ventral pancreatic duct (VPD). Patients and methods 16 patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis were treated with a DPD bypass. Clinical success was defined as significant pain relief and no hospital admissions for pain management during the ongoing treatment period. Results Among 16 patients meeting entry criteria, 10 (62.5%) had a history of unsuccessful endoscopic therapy, and 8 had failed extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Clinical success was achieved in 12 patients (75 %). Among these responders, 10 patients (83.3 %) had markedly improved or complete pain relief after the first stent placement, which persisted throughout the follow-up period; 11 patients (91.7 %) were able to discontinue their daily analgesics. Conclusions In selected patients with obstructive chronic calcific pancreatitis, the DPD bypass may be considered as a rescue endoscopic therapy, potentially obviating the need for surgery when standard endoscopic methods and ESWL fail. PMID:28201840

  4. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  5. Progressive loss of pancreatic function in chronic pancreatitis is delayed by main pancreatic duct decompression. A longitudinal prospective analysis of the modified puestow procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, W H; Thompson, J C

    1993-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of operative drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on functional derangements associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The author previously reported delayed functional impairment in an evaluation of the impact of operative drainage in patients with CP. The author now reports on a prospective study of 143 patients with this diagnosis. Each patient underwent 1) ERCP, 2) the Bentiromide PABA, 3) 72-hour fecal fat test, 4) oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and 5) fat meal (LIPOMUL)--stimulated pancreatic polypeptide release (PP). All patients were stratified as mild/moderate (M/M) or severe CP on the basis of a 5-point system that was developed by the author. Patients were studied at 16-month intervals. All 143 patients underwent initial and follow-up evaluations in a mean follow-up of 47.3 months; 83 of 143 patients had M/M grade at initial evaluation. Eighty-seven patients underwent (MPD) decompression to relieve abdominal pain. In a separate prospective 17 patients with a diagnosis of CP, a grade of M/M and non-disabling abdominal pain were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment; 9 of these randomized patients were operated upon and 8 were not. No patient improved their grade during follow-up; 47 of 83 M/M patients had operative drainage and 36 did not. This grade was preserved in 41 of 47 (87%) operated patients but in only 8 of the 36 non-operated patients (22%). In the randomized trial, seven of nine operated patients retained their functional status in follow-up, whereas only two of eight patients (25%) randomized to non-operation preserved their functional grade. These data in this large study as well as among a previous randomized sample, support a policy of early operative drainage before the development of irreversible functional impairment in patients with chronic pancreatitis and associated dilation of the main pancreatic duct.

  6. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löhr, J. Matthias; Dominguez-Munoz, Enrique; Rosendahl, Jonas; Besselink, Marc; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Haas, Stephan; Akisik, Fatih; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Keller, Jutta; Boermeester, Marja; Werner, Jens; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Fockens, Paul; Drewes, Asbjorn; Ceyhan, Gürlap; Lindkvist, Björn; Drenth, Joost; Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip; de Madaria, Enrique; Witt, Heiko; Schneider, Alexander; Manfredi, Riccardo; Brøndum, Frøkjer J.; Rudolf, Sasa; Bollen, Thomas; Bruno, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background:There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  7. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohr, J.M.; Dominguez-Munoz, E.; Rosendahl, J.; Besselink, M.; Mayerle, J.; Lerch, M.M.; Haas, S.; Akisik, F.; Kartalis, N.; Iglesias-Garcia, J.; Keller, J.; Boermeester, M.; Werner, J.; Dumonceau, J.M.; Fockens, P.; Drewes, A.; Ceyhan, G.; Lindkvist, B.; Drenth, J.P.; Ewald, N.; Hardt, P.; Madaria, E. de; Witt, H.; Schneider, A.; Manfredi, R.; Brondum, F.J.; Rudolf, S.; Bollen, T.; Bruno, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on 'Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  8. Negotiating the complexities of exocrine and endocrine dysfunction in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Sinead N

    2017-11-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterised by irreversible morphological change and typically causing pain and/or permanent loss of function. This progressive, irreversible disease results in destruction of healthy pancreatic tissue and the development of fibrous scar tissue. Gradual loss of exocrine and endocrine function follows, along with clinical manifestations such as steatorrhoea, abdominal pain and diabetes. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis has been described as a problem area and, until recently, there was little research on the topic. It is often asserted that >90 % of the pancreas must be damaged before exocrine insufficiency occurs; however, an exploration of the original studies from the 1970s found that the data do not support this assertion. The management of steatorrhoea with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of nutritional management, and early identification and treatment is a key. The presence of steatorrhoea, coupled with poor dietary intake (due to intractable abdominal pain, gastrointestinal side effects and often alcoholism) renders the chronic pancreatitis patients at considerable risk for undernutrition, muscle depletion and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency. Premature osteoporosis/osteopenia afflicts two-thirds of patients as a consequence of poor dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, low physical activity, low sunlight exposure, heavy smoking, as well as chronic low-grade inflammation. Bone metabolism studies show increased bone formation as well as bone resorption in chronic pancreatitis, indicating that bone turnover is abnormally high. Loss of the pancreatic islet cells occurs later in the disease process as the endocrine cells are diffusely distributed throughout the pancreatic parenchyma. Patients may develop type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes, which is complicated by concurrent decreased glucagon secretion, and hence an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Diabetes control is

  9. Morphologic and morphometric evaluation of pancreatic islets in chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saldanha João Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hyperglycemia and abnormal glucose tolerance tests observed in some patients with chronic Chagas' disease suggest the possibility of morphological changes in pancreatic islets and/or denervation. The purpose of this study was to describe the morphology and morphometry of pancreatic islets in chronic Chagas' disease. METHODS: Morphologic and computerized morphometric studies were performed in fragments of the head, body, and tail regions of the pancreas obtained at necropsies of 8 normal controls and 17 patients with chronic Chagas' disease: 8 with the digestive form (Megas and 9 with the congestive heart failure form. RESULTS: The Megas group had a larger (p < 0.05 pancreatic islet area in the tail of the pancreas (10649.3 ± 4408.8 µm² than the normal control (9481.8 ± 3242.4 µm² and congestive heart failure (9475.1 ± 2104.9 µm² groups; likewise, the density of the pancreatic islets (PI was greater (1.2 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.9 ± 1.0 PI/mm², respectively. In the tail region of the pancreas of patients with the Megas form, there was a significant and positive correlation (r = +0.73 between the area and density of pancreatic islets. Discrete fibrosis and leukocytic infiltrates were found in pancreatic ganglia and pancreatic islets of the patients with Chagas' disease. Trypanosoma cruzi nests were not observed in the examined sections. Individuals with the Megas form of Chagas' disease showed increased area and density of pancreatic islets in the tail of the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The observed morphometric and morphologic alterations are consistent with functional changes in the pancreas, including glycemia and insulin disturbances.

  10. Diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge classification): comparative study using secretin injection-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin-Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2008-02-28

    To investigate the usefulness of secretin injection-MRCP for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis. Sixteen patients having mild chronic pancreatitis according to the Cambridge classification and 12 control subjects with no abnormal findings on the pancreatogram were examined for the diagnostic accuracy of secretin injection-MRCP regarding abnormal branch pancreatic ducts associated with mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge Classification), using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for comparison. The sensitivity and specificity for abnormal branch pancreatic ducts determined by two reviewers were respectively 55%-63% and 75%-83% in the head, 57%-64% and 82%-83% in the body, and 44%-44% and 72%-76% in the tail of the pancreas. The sensitivity and specificity for mild chronic pancreatitis were 56%-63% and 92%-92%, respectively. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) concerning the diagnosis of an abnormal branch pancreatic duct and of mild chronic pancreatitis was good to excellent. Secretin injection-MRCP might be useful for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Long-term outcome of patients with chronic pancreatitis treated with micronutrient antioxidant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasinghe, Sukitha Namal; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2017-04-01

    Micronutrient antioxidant therapy did not relieve pain in a European randomized trial of patients with chronic pancreatitis without malnutrition. However, intervention was undertaken only for 6 months leaving unanswered the question of whether long-term antioxidant therapy may modulate chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of long-term use of micronutrient antioxidant therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. This is a single center clinical cohort report of patients with chronic pancreatitis prescribed micronutrient antioxidant therapy and followed for up to 10 years. Data were collected on demographic detail, clinic pain assessment, insulin requirements, interventions and outcome. A group of 30 patients with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis constitute the study population. Median age at time of diagnosis was 40 years (range 14-66); 19 (63%) were male and the median duration of symptoms was 2 years (range 0-18). Alcohol was the dominant cause in 22 (73%) patients and 16 (53%) patients were Cambridge stage 1. Twenty-four (80%) patients had pain at presentation. During antioxidant treatment of 4 years (range 1-10), pain decreased but the proportion with abdominal pain compared to those who were pain-free remained constant (P=0.16; two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction). There was a significant increase in requirement for insulin (P=0.028) with time together with use of both endoscopic and surgical interventions. This is the first study to report long-term disease-specific outcome in patients with chronic pancreatitis prescribed micronutrient antioxidant therapy. There appears to be no effect of intervention on outcome.

  12. TREATMENT COMPLIANCE AMONG PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS IN THE MOSCOW REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Beljakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the past decade, incidence of chronic pancreatitis among different age groups has been growing globally and in Russia. Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive disease characterized by development of complications and decrease of exocrine function of pancreas. Treatment should be initiated early, before the complications occur; therapy should account for international experience and established Russian guidelines. Continuous usage of high-dose enzyme preparations preferably in modern dosage forms (microgranules, minimicrospheres or microtablets is one of the key principles in the management of chronic pancreatitis. Patient’s cooperative behavior and good compliance is crucial for achieving treatment targets. Aim: To assess treatment compliance among patients with chronic pancreatitis in the Moscow Region and to identify sources of information on the disease used by the patients. Materials and methods: One hundred patients with chronic pancreatitis in Moscow Region were questionnaired anonymously on their adherence to the medical recommendations for diet, alcohol consumption and medications, particularly enzyme preparations. Patients’ sources of information on the disease were also determined. Results: Poor compliance results were shown: only 28% of patients were fully adherent to medical recommendations; other patients took their medications irregularly, changed drug doses or preparations choosing less expensive and effective drugs. The majority of patients (89% were aware of the main treatment principles, though, 53% didn’t adhere to them. Patients used varied sources of information on the disease including special literature and the web; nevertheless, the information could be incorrectly understood. Only some patients received disease-related information from their physician, and many of the patients described physician-derived information as insufficient. As a result, treatment was often inadequate. Conclusion:  Improved

  13. Effectiveness of Single-Port Thoracoscopic Splanchnicectomy in Controlling Pain in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis

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    Reza Bagheri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a persistent pancreatic inflammatory disease. In chronic pancreatitis, recurrent episodes of inflammation lead to the replacement of pancreatic parenchyma with fibrotic connective tissue. Chronic pancreatitis pain, which may initially mimic acute pancreatitis, is severe, frequent, and continual and has a major impact on the quality of life and social functioning of patients. The standard treatments for this disease are endoscopy, surgery, splanchnic nerve denervation, thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy (TS, and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS. Considering the advantages of the single-port method, we attempted to describe the post-treatment conditions of the patients undergoing this therapeutic approach.Materials & Methods: Ten chronic pancreatitis patients with severe resistant pain volunteered to enter the study. We recorded the data on patients’ age, gender, pre-operative pain level, surgical complications, and post-operative pain level (two weeks after surgery were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VATS was used for pain assessment and paired sample t-test was performed for statistical evaluation of response to the treatment for pain.Results: The participants included one female and nine male patients with the mean age of 53.3±0.8 years. The mean duration of severe pain before the onset of treatment was 13 months (range: 6 to 20 months. The pain level was determined 3 to 5 days before the operation and re-graded two weeks post-operation. Pre- and post-operative pain scores showed a significant reduction in the severity of pain before and after surgery (P

  14. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  15. Hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Marchiori, Edson; Mello, Walter de Assis; Nogueira, Aline Silva; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Martins, Renata Romano; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase. A 43-year-old woman, chronic alcoholic, who had pancreatitis 5 years ago, with symptoms of strong abdominal pain in the epigastrium, nausea and fever. Abdominal sonography showed a lesion contiguous to the spleen and computed tomography demonstrated an heterogeneous lesion of not well defined limits, in the lateral and posterior parts of the spleen. The patient was submitted to Roux-Y cystojejunostomy, he does not present any symptoms at the moment, and is undergoing clinical control. (author)

  16. Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography: value for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Burbelko, M.; Schenck zu Schweinsberg, T.; Funke, C.; Wecker, C.; Walthers, E.M.; Rominger, M.

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) is the morphologic gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables the visualization of not only the pancreatic duct but also the surrounding parenchyma using T2- and T1-weighted sequences before and after the application of a contrast agent. Moreover, it allows the depiction of ductal segments distal to a stenosis or occlusion. However, conventional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) was not able to achieve accuracy similar to that of ERCP. Despite many technological innovations, such as fast breath-hold acquisitions or respiratory-gated 3D sequences, this drawback could not be overcome. In recent years, secretin-enhanced MRCP has been used for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. A recent study showed that secretin not only improves the visibility of the pancreatic duct and its side branches but it also enhances the diagnostic accuracy of MRCP. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were improved by the application of secretin. Moreover, the agreement between independent observers increased after the use of secretin. In addition, quantitative post-processing tools have been developed that enable the measurement of the exocrine pancreatic output non-invasively using secretin-enhanced MRCP. These tools facilitate applications, such as functional follow-up after pancreaticogastrostomy and pancreaticogastric anastomoses, evaluation of the functional status of the graft after pancreas transplantation and follow-up of pancreatic drainage procedures and duct disruption. (orig.)

  17. The relationship between the use of statins and mortality, severity, and pancreatic cancer in Danish patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich C; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is associated with a shortened life expectancy. Statins have anti-inflammatory properties and we aimed to evaluate the association between the use of statins and the risk of death, progression of CP, and pancreatic cancer in patients with CP. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: We carried out a nested case-cohort study and included patients with CP. We used claims of proton pump inhibitors as an active comparator. Patients with cirrhosis or cancer were excluded. We evaluated the exposure on the basis of pharmacy claims of statins. We used propensity score matching...... with a statins : nonstatins ratio of 1 : 1. RESULTS: A total of 4807 patients were eligible for propensity score matching; 33% were women and the mean (SD) age at cohort entry was 56 (10) years. During follow-up, a total of 2073 (43%) patients had died and the risk of death was significantly lower among patients...

  18. Mathematical models of differential diagnostics and prognosis in chronic pancreatitis and cancer with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kryvoruchko

    2017-02-01

    Methods. Analyzed the results of surgical treatment of 132 patients, including 68 - for cancer of the pancreatic head (in 46 - with jaundice and 64 - chronic pancreatitis (CP with a primary lesion of the pancreatic head (16 - with jaundice. The distribution of patients into groups was carried out with a maximum value of classification functions calculated by special formulas. Next studied indicators of endothelial dysfunction for differential diagnosis.  Results. It was defined the threshold of VEGF = 346 pg/ml, which shared the group of chronic pancreatitis or cancer of the pancreatic head, which was determined based on the Pareto criterion. This model sensitivity was 72.1% and specificity of 75% for the overall accuracy of 72.7%. Even more precision indicator was on the threshold of VEGF = 248 pg/ml, which compared groups of patients with cancer and software of the control group (125.9 pg/ml and the sensitivity was 86.8%, specificity 82.4%, and overall accuracy of 82.3%. At about the same accuracy had this test and the comparison group of patients with chronic pancreatitis and control: sensitivity 84.4% and specificity of 76.5% overall accuracy of 81.5% in the threshold VEGF of 155 pg/ml (p<0,05. To develop a prognosis of a pathological process, along with the use of diagnostic data used a method of classification trees. The model showed that the index VEGF is the criterion that discriminates for pancreas- pancreatic cancer-pancreas, but relative differences in the presence of jaundice in patients defined using S-nitrozothiol. The accuracy of the proposed method of prediction was 89%, the price of cross-checking - 82,6% (p<0,05. Pancreatoduodenal resection for Whipple was performed in 23 patients, for Traverso-Longmire - in 8, subtotal right sided pancreatectomy for Fortner - in 3, hepaticojejunostomy by Roux - in 8, duodenopreserving resection for Beger - in 6, her Bernese option - in 7, operation Frey - in 51. In 26 (19.7% patients, minimally invasive

  19. The Q705K and F359L Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of NOD-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway: Association with Chronic Pancreatitis, Pancreatic Cancer, and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskiewicz, Andrzej; Szparecki, Grzegorz; Durlik, Marek; Rydzewska, Grażyna; Ziobrowski, Ireneusz; Górska, Renata

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the correlation between the occurrence of Q705K and F359L polymorphisms in patients diagnosed with pancreatic diseases and periodontal conditions of various degrees of severity. The above-mentioned genetic markers were assessed in patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 18) and chronic pancreatitis (n = 39) as well as in a healthy control group (n = 115). The established inclusion criteria were the following: Caucasian descent, non-smoking, and age range 20-80, with different levels of periodontitis activity according to S. Offenbacher's scale. The genotyping reactions were performed by means of an RT-PCR with the use of TaqMan(®) genotyping assay. Results of the study revealed that the state of periodontium was significantly worse in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The Q705K and F359L polymorphisms were associated with more advanced cases of periodontitis measured by clinical attachment level, whereas the Q705K was associated with intensified bleeding index. Furthermore, the F359L single-nucleotide polymorphism was significantly higher in the group with chronic pancreatitis (p periodontitis, pancreatic cancer, and chronic pancreatitis. These findings might constitute the basis for a new diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  20. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride joint ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ying-Li; Chen, Yu; Liu, Fang; Gu, Jie; Zhu, Lin-Jia; Wu, Nan

    2016-03-14

    To search for a new chronic pancreatitis model in mice suitable for investigating the pathophysiological processes leading to pancreatic fibrosis. The mice were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 50), control group and model group. The mice in model group were given ethanol (10%) in drinking water after injection of dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) (8 mg/kg BW) in tail vein. The mice in control group were injected with only solvent into tail vein (60% ethanol, 20% glycerine and 20% normal saline) and drank common water. At days 1, 7, 14, 28, and 56 after application of DBTC or solvent, 10 mice in one group were killed at each time point respectively. Blood was obtained by inferior vena cava puncture. The activity of amylase, concentration of bilirubin and hyaluronic acid in serum were assayed. The pancreas was taken to observe the pancreatic morphology by HE staining, and to characterize the pancreatic fibrosis by Masson staining. The expression of F4/80, CD3 and fibronectin (FN) were assayed by immuno-histochemistry or Immunofluorescence technique. Collagen type I (COL1A1) in pancreas were detected by Western blot. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) mRNA in the pancreas was assessed by real time PCR. DBTC induced an acute edematous pancreatitis within 1 d. The dilated acini, scattered acinar cell necrosis, and inflammatory cells were found at day 7. Extensive infiltration with inflammatory cells following deposition of connective tissue was observed at day 14. At day 28, level of pancreatic fibrosis was aggravated. The pancreatic tissue was replaced by an extended interstitial fibrosis at the end of 2 mo. There was significant difference in the level of amylase, bilirubin and hyaluronic acid in serum between control group and model group (P chronic pancreatitis in accordance with the pathophysiological modification of human. DBTC joint Ethanol-induced pancreatitis in mice is an effective and

  1. Undiagnosed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis in functional GI disorder patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald; Nguyen, Quoc Nam; Gibson, Peter; Bampton, Peter; Veysey, Martin; Wong, James; Philcox, Stephen; Koloski, Natasha; Bunby, Lisa; Jones, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A previous UK study showed that 6.1% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) had evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), but these findings need replication. We aimed to identify the prevalence of PEI based on fecal elastase stool testing in consecutive outpatients presenting with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea and/or IBS-D. Patients aged over 40 years presenting to hospital outpatient clinics from six sites within Australia with unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea for at least 3 months and/or IBS-D were studied. Patients completed validated questionnaires and donated a stool sample in which elastase concentration was measured by ELISA. A concentration of abdominal CT. Two hundred eighteen patients (mean age of 60 years, 29.4% male) were studied. PEI was found in 4.6% (95% CI 2.2-8.3%) (n = 10), with five patients (2.3% (95% CI 0.8-5.3%) having severe PEI. Only male sex and heavy alcohol use were significantly associated with abnormal versus normal pancreatic functioning. Of seven patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound or CT, two had features indicative of chronic pancreatitis. One in 50 patients with IBS-D or otherwise unexplained abdominal pain or diarrhea have an abnormal fecal elastase, but unexpected pancreatic insufficiency was detected in only a minority of these. This study failed to confirm the high prevalence of PEI among patients with unexplained GI symptoms previously reported. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  3. Pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis: Computed tomography findings – a retrospective analysis of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Amir, E-mail: amir.med87@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Ayav, Ahmet [Department of HPB Surgery, University Hospital of Nancy (France); Belle, Arthur [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Orry, Xavier [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Unité Inserm U954, Nancy (France); Laurent, Valerie [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Laboratory IADI, INSERM u947 (France)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: Chronic calcifying pancreatitis (CCP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC). Symptoms of PC are non-specific in patients with CCP, and diagnostic imaging can be difficult. Some studies have shown that diagnosis may take several months, leading to delays in treatment (Lin et al., 2015; Lennon et al., 2014) . The aim of this study was to describe the radiological signs of PC in patients with CCP. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study was conducted between January 2004 and December 2014. Patients with CCP who were being monitored for PC were included. Each patient diagnosed with PC was matched with two CCP controls who did not develop PC. Results: We studied 48 patients with CCP (30 men (62%) and 18 women (38%), mean age 69.4 years). Sixteen patients (with 18 tumor sites) who developed PC (1.52%) were compared with 32 controls who did not develop PC. A hypodense mass was observed in all of the patients with PC, predominantly in the pancreatic head (61.2%). No such masses were observed in the controls (p < 0.001). The average mass size was 36.3 mm, and the masses were observed to push aside the calcifications in all patients (p < 0.001). Calcifications were very abundant (>10) in 33.3% of the patients with PC and in 71.9% of the controls (p = 0.0076). The main pancreatic duct (MPD) was dilated in all of the patients with PC (average diameter 8.6 mm; homogeneous in 83.3%) and in only 46.9% of the controls (average 7.4 mm; homogeneous in 37.5%) (p > 0.05). Dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts and common bile duct was observed in 15 (94.4%) of the patients with PC and in none of the controls (p < 0.0001). The average alcohol consumption was 1 g/day (0–5 g/day) in the PC group and 4.6 g/day (0–20 g/day) in the control group. In addition, the average smoking history was 14.25 pack-years (0–40 PY) in the PC group and 27.70 PY (0–60 PY) in the control group. Conclusion: The presence of a pancreatic mass in a patient with CCP is

  4. Total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David E R; Radosevich, David M; Bellin, Melena D; Hering, Bernard J; Beilman, Gregory J; Dunn, Ty B; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Vickers, Selwyn M; Bland, Barbara; Balamurugan, A N; Freeman, Martin L; Pruett, Timothy L

    2012-04-01

    Total pancreatectomy (TP) with intraportal islet autotransplantation (IAT) can relieve pain and preserve β-cell mass in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) when other therapies fail. We report on a >30-year single-center series. Four hundred and nine patients (including 53 children, 5 to 18 years) with CP underwent TP-IAT from February 1977 to September 2011 (etiology: idiopathic, 41%; Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction/biliary, 9%; genetic, 14%; divisum, 17%; alcohol, 7%; and other, 12%; mean age was 35.3 years, 74% were female; 21% has earlier operations, including 9% Puestow procedure, 6% Whipple, 7% distal pancreatectomy, and 2% other). Islet function was classified as insulin independent for those on no insulin; partial, if known C-peptide positive or euglycemic on once-daily insulin; and insulin dependent if on standard basal-bolus diabetic regimen. A 36-item Short Form (SF-36) survey for quality of life was completed by patients before and in serial follow-up since 2007, with an integrated survey that was added in 2008. Actuarial patient survival post TP-IAT was 96% in adults and 98% in children (1 year) and 89% and 98% (5 years). Complications requiring relaparotomy occurred in 15.9% and bleeding (9.5%) was the most common complication. IAT function was achieved in 90% (C-peptide >0.6 ng/mL). At 3 years, 30% were insulin independent (25% in adults, 55% in children) and 33% had partial function. Mean hemoglobin A1c was 5,000/kg [24%]) correlated with degree of function with insulin-independent rates at 3 years of 12%, 22%, and 72%, and rates of partial function 33%, 62%, and 24%. All patients had pain before TP-IAT and nearly all were on daily narcotics. After TP-IAT, 85% had pain improvement. By 2 years, 59% had ceased narcotics. All children were on narcotics before, 39% at follow-up; pain improved in 94%; and 67% became pain-free. In the SF-36 survey, there was significant improvement from baseline in all dimensions, including the Physical and Mental

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells and CX3CR1: occurrence in normal pancreas, acute and chronic pancreatitis and effect of their activation by a CX3CR1 agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masahiko; Ito, Tetsuhide; Nakamura, Taichi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Oono, Takamasa; Kato, Masaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous studies suggest important roles of the chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1) in acute/chronic pancreatitis, however the possible mechanisms of the effects are unclear. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can play important roles in pancreatitis, secreting inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, as well as proliferation. Therefore, we investigated CX3CL1 receptor (CX3CR1) occurrence in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues, and the effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs. Methods CX3CR1 expression/localization in normal pancreas and pancreatitis (acute/chronic) tissues were evaluated with immunohistochemical analysis. CX3CR1 expression and effects of CX3CL1 on activated-PSCs were examined with realtime-PCR, BrdU assays and Western Blotting. Results In normal pancreas, acinar cells expressed CX3CR1 within granule-like-formations in the cytoplasm, whereas in acute/chronic pancreatitis, acinar, ductal and activated-PSCs expressed CX3CR1 on cell membranes. With activation of normal PSCs, CX3CR1 is increased. CX3CL1 activated multiple signaling cascades in PSCs. CX3CL1, did not induce inflammatory-genes expression in activated-PSCs, but induced proliferation. Conclusions CX3CR1s are expressed in normal pancreas. Expression is increased in acute/chronic pancreatitis and the CX3CR1s are activated. CX3CL1 induces proliferation of activated-PSCs without increasing release of inflammatory-mediators. These results suggest that CX3CR1 activation of PSCs could be important in their effects in pancreatitis, especially to PSCs proliferation in pancreatitis where CX3CL1 levels are elevated. PMID:24681877

  6. Involvement of chronic epipharyngitis in autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayaki; Torigoe, Akira; Imai, Kazuaki; Ieiri, Norio

    2017-02-01

    The epipharynx is an immunologically active site even under normal conditions, and enhanced immunologic activation is prone to occur in response to an upper respiratory infection, air pollution, and possibly to vaccine adjuvants. Due to the potential link between the central nervous system and immune function, a relationship between epipharyngitis and autonomic nervous disturbance as well as autoimmune disease has been suggested. Various functional somatic symptoms have been described after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, although a causal relationship has not been established. We examined the epipharynx in young women showing functional somatic symptoms following HPV vaccination. Surprisingly, despite having minimal symptoms involving the pharynx, all patients were found to have severe epipharyngitis. In addition, significant improvement in symptoms was seen in most patients who underwent epipharyngeal treatment. Thus, we speculate that the chronic epipharyngitis potentially caused by the vaccine adjuvant may be involved in the pathogenesis of functional somatic syndrome (FSS) post-HPV vaccination. Further, we suggest that epipharyngeal treatment may be effective for various types of FSS regardless of the initial cause, as well as for some autoimmune diseases, and that this may be an important direction in future research.

  7. The insulinotropic effect of GIP is impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis and secondary diabetes mellitus as compared to patients with chronic pancreatitis and normal glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Højberg, Patricia V

    2007-01-01

    patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 5.5 (4.5-6.0) mM (mean (range); HbA(1c): 5.8 (5.4-6.3) %) and 8 patients with CP and secondary diabetes not requiring insulin (FPG: 7.1 (6.0-8.8) mM; HbA(1c): 7.0 (5.8-10.0) %) during three 15-m...

  8. THE RUSSIAN CONSENSUS ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS: POINTS OF DEBATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Khat'kov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most controversial provisions of the Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis (hereinafter, the Consensus are presented. The debate has been initiated by the Russian Pancreatic Club and performed with the use of the Delphi system, based on interdisciplinary approach with participation of leading gastroenterologists, surgeons and pediatricians. This paper is the first in the series of the Consensus-related publications. Here we discuss the most controversial issues of Chapter 5 "Treatment of acute episodes" and Chapter 8 "Strategies of pain syndrome management". While discussing the conventional recommendation of a period of starvation for patients with clinical symptom of exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis, it was noted that for a long time it had been virtually the only way to provide functional rest for the pancreas. However, patients with chronic pancreatitis are frequently in malnutrition, therefore, starving may aggravate nutritional deficit that significantly affects the prognosis; therefore, early nutritional support is indicated. To alleviate functional strain of the pancreas, it is reasonable to use enteral nutrition elemental and semi-elemental formulas. The transition from formulas to conventional nutrition should be accompanied by administration of adequate pancreatin doses. The role of pancreatic enzymes, spasmolytics and proton pump inhibitors in the management of pain syndrome was also controversial.

  9. Usefulness of percutaneous elastography by acoustic radiation force impulse for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Julio Llamoza-Torres

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the accuracy of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI technique for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We present an observational, single-center study that included patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis in the period between October 2012 and September 2015 who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and were classified according to the standard and Rosemont criteria. The same group of patients was assessed by the ARFI technology using ACUSON S2000™ equipment with Virtual Touch™ Quantification software for the assessment of pancreatic stiffness by obtaining the shear wave velocity (SWV in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and nonparametric correlation methods. Diagnostic accuracy was obtained by analyzing receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Results: A total of thirty-three patients were studied (45.5% women; mean age was 58.3 ± 11.8 years. Seventeen with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and sixteen classified as normal according to standard criteria. A significant difference was detected between the means of SWV in pancreatic body of patients without (SWV: 1.27 m/s and with chronic pancreatitis (SWV 1.57 m/s, p = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve was 71.3% (95% CI 0.532-0.895 and the accuracy of ARFI for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis was 69.7% for a SWV of 1.4 m/s in the pancreatic body. The SWV means in head (r = 0.421, p < 0.05 and body (r = 0.455, p < 0.05 of the pancreas showed a significant correlation with the number of EUS criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: Quantification of pancreatic stiffness with ARFI elastography technique has proven to be useful for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Predictors of Relapse after Discontinuing Systemic Treatment in Childhood Autoimmune Chronic Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonini, Gabriele; Bracaglia, Claudia; Cattalini, Marco; Taddio, Andrea; Brambilla, Alice; De Libero, Cinzia; Pires Marafon, Denise; Caputo, Roberto; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-06-01

    To identify clinical predictors of relapse in childhood autoimmune chronic uveitis after stopping systemic treatment. A retrospective, multicenter, cohort study. Ninety-four children in remission, receiving no treatments and with at least a 6-month followup, were enrolled. A higher probability of maintaining remission after discontinuing treatment was shown in idiopathic compared with juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 23.21) if inactivity had been obtained within 6 months from starting systemic treatment (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 24.17) and by antitumor necrosis factor-α treatment (Mantel-Cox chi-square = 6.43). Type of disease, time, and type of systemic therapy to achieve inactivity predict different duration of uveitis remission after treatment withdrawal.

  11. Selenium Supplementation Significantly Reduces Thyroid Autoantibody Levels in Patients with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichman, Johanna Eva Märta; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium supplementation may decrease circulating thyroid autoantibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), but the available trials are heterogenous. This study expands and critically reappraises the knowledge on this topic. METHODS: A literature search identified...... 3366 records. Controlled trials in adults (≥18 years of age) with AIT, comparing selenium with or without levothyroxine (LT4), versus placebo and/or LT4, were eligible. Assessed outcomes were serum thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin (TgAb) autoantibody levels, and immunomodulatory effects...... and LT4-untreated. Heterogeneity was estimated using I(2), and quality of evidence was assessed per outcome, using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. RESULTS: In LT4-treated populations, the selenium group had significantly lower TPOAb levels after...

  12. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: an evidence-based review of past theories and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Tyler; Conwell, Darwin L; Zuccaro, Gregory

    2004-11-01

    In the past several decades, four prominent theories of chronic pancreatitis pathogenesis have emerged: the toxic-metabolic theory, the oxidative stress hypothesis, the stone and duct obstruction theory, and the necrosis-fibrosis hypothesis. Although these traditional theories are formulated based on compelling scientific observations, substantial contradictory data also exist for each. Furthermore, the basic premises of some of these theories are directly contradictory. Because of the recent scientific progress in the underlying genetic, cellular, and molecular pathophysiology, there have been substantial advances in the understanding of chronic pancreatitis pathogenesis. This paper will provide an evidence-based review and critique of the traditional pathogenic theories, followed by a discussion of the new advances in pancreatic fibrogenesis. Moreover, we will discuss plausible pathogenic sequences applied to each of the known etiologies.

  13. Isolation of Human Islets for Autologous Islet Transplantation in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Bottino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas that causes permanent changes in the function and structure of the pancreas. It is most commonly a complication of cystic fibrosis or due to a genetic predisposition. Chronic pancreatitis generally presents symptomatically as recurrent abdominal pain, which becomes persistent over time. The pain eventually becomes disabling. Once specific medical treatments and endoscopic interventions are no longer efficacious, total pancreatectomy is the alternative of choice for helping the patient achieve pain control. While daily administrations of digestive enzymes cannot be avoided, insulin-dependent diabetes can be prevented by transplanting the isolated pancreatic islets back to the patient. The greater the number of islets infused, the greater the chance to prevent or at least control the effects of surgical diabetes. We present here a technical approach for the isolation and preservation of the islets proven to be efficient to obtain high numbers of islets, favoring the successful treatment of young patients.

  14. Gallbladder emptying evaluation in calcific chronic pancreatitis using Tc-99m DISIDA scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Martha Regina A.; Cunha, Renata M.; Guarita, Dulce R.; Buchpieguel, Carlos A.; Mott, Carlos B.; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the gallbladder motor function in chronic pancreatitis (C) patients. Gallbladder emptying was evaluated in 11 patients, without and with addition of pancreatic extract and in ten controls. The results were compared and analyzed statistically. The ejection fraction (E F) of the gallbladder (GB) at 30, 45 and 60 minutes were calculated by using Tc-9 9 m DISIDA scintigraphy. The E F of GB at 60 minutes was significantly higher in the controls when compared to patients, although the results between patients were similar without and with addition of pancreatic extract. The results suggest that the delay in the GB emptying does not depend on the eventual alteration in the intestinal phase of the vesicular stimulation, but it probably results from a mechanic factor, which depends on the chronic pathological process located in the head of the pancreas. (author)

  15. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    . The predrainage pressures were higher in the tail of the pancreas (29 mm Hg; range, 16-37 mm Hg) than in the head (18 mm Hg; range, 2-30 mm Hg; p = 0.02). The regional pressure differences were significantly greater in four patients who had previously undergone pancreatic surgery than in the 12 patients without...

  16. Predictive factors for and incidence of hospital readmissions of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchsland, Till; Aghdassi, Ali; Kühn, Kristina; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Flessa, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis are common gastroenterological disorders that have a fairly unpredictable long-term course often associated with unplanned hospital readmissions. Little is known about the factors that increase or decrease the risk for a hospital readmission. The aim of this study was to identify positive and negative predictive factors for hospital readmissions of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis after in-hospital treatment. In a retrospective analysis data from the hospital information and reimbursement data system (HIS) were evaluated for 606 hospital stays for either acute or chronic pancreatitis between 2006 and 2011. Additional clinical data were obtained from a questionnaire covering quality of life and socio-economic status. A total of 973 patient variables were assessed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Between 2006 and 2011, 373 patients were admitted for acute or chronic pancreatitis; 107 patients of them were readmitted and 266 had only one hospitalization. Predictors for readmission were concomitant liver disease, presence of a pseudocyst or a suspected tumor of the pancreas as well as alcohol, tobacco or substance abuse or coexisting mental disorders. Patients who had undergone a CT-scan were more susceptible to readmission. Lower readmissions rates were found in patients with diabetes mellitus or gallstone disease as co-morbidity. While factors like age and severity of the initial disease cannot be influenced to reduce the readmission rate for pancreatitis, variables like alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse can be addressed in outpatient programs to reduce disease recurrence and readmission rates for pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: epidemiology and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In Nederland zijn de afgelopen jaren de incidentiecijfers en de ziekenhuisopnamen voor acute en chronische alvleesklierontsteking (pancreatitis) gestegen. De verwachting is dat deze blijven toenemen bij een vergrijzende samenleving. Uit de EARL-studie van Marcel Spanier komt naar voren dat bij acute

  18. S-ketamine modulates hyperalgesia in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.W.; Buscher, H.C.J.L.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Upper abdominal pain is a dominant feature of chronic pancreatitis. A key phenomenon in this context is hyperalgesia, typically associated with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. This exploratory study evaluates acute effects of S-ketamine, a noncompetitive

  19. Self-expanding metal stents in benign biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, A. M.; Cahen, D. L.; van Westerloo, D. J.; Rauws, E. A.; Huibregtse, K.; Bruno, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In selected patients with chronic pancreatitis in whom conventional plastic stenting fails and in whom surgery is contraindicated or declined, insertion of a biliary self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a valuable treatment option. Patients and Methods: Between 1994

  20. Increased markers of oxidative stress in plasma of patients with chronic pancreatitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podborská, Martina; Ševčíková, A.; Trna, J.; Dítě, P.; Lojek, Antonín; Kubala, Lukáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2009), s. 116-120 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC08058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chronic pancreatitis * lipid peroxidation * nitrites Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.047, year: 2009

  1. Antipyrine, oxazepam, and indocyanine green clearance in patients with chronic pancreatitis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Sonne, J; Larsen, S

    1999-01-01

    Hepatic drug metabolism was examined in patients with chronic pancreatitis and healthy controls by using a cocktail design with three different model compounds: antipyrine to express phase-I oxidation, oxazepam to express phase-II conjugation, and indocyanine green (ICG), a high-clearance compound....

  2. Increased Levels of YKL-40 and Interleukin 6 in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis and Secondary Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Circulating levels of YKL-40 and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to evaluate YKL-40 levels in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) with and without secondary diabetes mellitus (DM) to investigate whether elevated plasma YKL-40 could play a primary...

  3. Is Timing of Medical Therapy Related to Outcome in Painful Chronic Pancreatitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Graversen, C.; Bouwense, S.A.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van; Drewes, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The authors investigated if timing of medical treatment is associated with the analgesic effect of pregabalin or placebo in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: Sixty-four patients received pregabalin (150-300 mg twice a day) or matching placebo for 3 consecutive weeks.

  4. Effects of pregabalin on central sensitization in patients with chronic pancreatitis in a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.W.; Olesen, S.S.; Drewes, A.M.; Poley, J.W.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intense abdominal pain is the dominant feature of chronic pancreatitis. During the disease changes in central pain processing, e.g. central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia, can result from ongoing nociceptive input. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect

  5. Pregabalin reduces pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis in a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Bouwense, S.A.W.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van; Drewes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Pain is a disabling symptom for patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and difficult to treat. Evidence from basic science and human studies indicates that pain processing by the central nervous system is abnormal and resembles that observed in patients with neuropathic pain

  6. Effects of pregabalin on central sensitization in patients with chronic pancreatitis in a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.W. Bouwense (Stefan); S.S. Olesen (Søren); A.M. Drewes (Asbjørn); J.-W. Poley (Jan-Werner); H. van Goor (Harry); O.H.G. Wilder-Smith (Oliver)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Intense abdominal pain is the dominant feature of chronic pancreatitis. During the disease changes in central pain processing, e.g. central sensitization manifest as spreading hyperalgesia, can result from ongoing nociceptive input. The aim of the present study is to evaluate

  7. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Wook; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2009-01-01

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  8. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Sang Wook [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  9. The Practical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis: A Multidisciplinary Symposium Held at the Annual Meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Manchester 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheeswaran, Santhalingam; Puleston, Joanne M; Duggan, Sinead; Hart, Andrew; Conlon, Kevin C; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2018-01-16

    This study is about a questionnaire survey of delegates attending the chronic pancreatitis symposium at the 2016 meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland and seeks a multidisciplinary "snapshot" overview of practice. A questionnaire was developed with multidisciplinary input. Questions on access to specialist care, methods of diagnosis and treatment including specific scenarios were incorporated. Eighty-three (66%) of 125 delegates effectively participated in this survey. Twenty-four (29%) had neither a chronic pancreatitis MDT in their hospital nor a chronic pancreatitis referral MDT. Most frequently utilised diagnostic modalities were CT, MR and EUS with no respondents utilising duodenal intubation tests. Initial treatment was provided through non-opiate analgesia by 69 (93%), through the use of opiates by 56 (76%) and through the use of co-analgesics by 49 (66%). Fifty two (68%) routinely referred patients with alcohol-related disease for counselling. Preferred treatment for large duct disease without mass was endoscopic therapy. In older patients with a mass, pancreaticoduodenectomy was preferred. This is a small study likely to be skewed by sampling bias but is thought to be the first multidisciplinary survey of the management of chronic pancreatitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The results show a need for comprehensive access to specialist pancreatitis MDT care and there remains substantial variation in management. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. The Etiology and Clinical Course of Chronic Pancreatitis in Children With Early Onset of the Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wejnarska, Karolina; Kolodziejczyk, Elwira; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Dadalski, Maciej; Sobczynska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Kierkus, Jarosław; Bal, Jerzy; Rygiel, Agnieszka Magdalena; Oracz, Grzegorz

    2016-12-01

    The etiological factors of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in children differ from those in adults. To date, no study has assessed the clinical course of CP in young children. The aim of our study was to evaluate the etiology and the clinical presentation of the disease in children with disease onset before 5 years of age in comparison to later-onset of CP. A total of 276 children with CP, hospitalized from 1988 to 2015, were enrolled in the study. Data on presentation, diagnostic findings, and treatment were reviewed. Two hundred sixty patients were screened for the most frequent mutations in major pancreatitis-associated genes, such as cationic trypsinogen/serine protease gene (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 gene (SPINK1), and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). The disease onset before the age of 5 years occurred in 51 patients (group 1), the later onset in 225 patients (group 2). We found no significant discrepancies in distribution of the etiological factors between groups. The youngest patients (group 1) had more pancreatitis episodes (median 5.0 vs 3.00; P pancreatic function. Early- and later-onset pancreatitis have similar etiological factors with predominance of gene mutations. The most frequent mutation found was p.Asn34Ser (N34S) in SPINK1 gene. The clinical presentation differed in number of pancreatitis episodes and frequency of surgeries.

  11. Ductal Mucus Obstruction and Reduced Fluid Secretion Are Early Defects in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Balázs

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Defective mucus production in the pancreas may be an important factor in the initiation and progression of chronic pancreatitis (CP, therefore we aimed to (i investigate the qualitative and quantitative changes of mucus both in human CP and in an experimental pancreatitis model and (ii to correlate the mucus phenotype with epithelial ion transport function.Design: Utilizing human tissue samples and a murine model of cerulein induced CP we measured pancreatic ductal mucus content by morphometric analysis and the relative expression of different mucins in health and disease. Pancreatic fluid secretion in CP model was measured in vivo by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP and in vitro on cultured pancreatic ducts. Time-changes of ductal secretory function were correlated to those of the mucin production.Results: We demonstrate increased mucus content in the small pancreatic ducts in CP. Secretory mucins MUC6 and MUC5B were upregulated in human, Muc6 in mouse CP. In vivo and in vitro fluid secretion was decreased in cerulein-induced CP. Analysis of time-course changes showed that impaired ductal ion transport is paralleled by increased Muc6 expression.Conclusion: Mucus accumulation in the small ducts is a combined effect of mucus hypersecretion and epithelial fluid secretion defect, which may lead to ductal obstruction. These results suggest that imbalance of mucus homeostasis may have an important role in the early-phase development of CP, which may have novel diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  12. Defects in α-Cell Function in Patients With Diabetes Due to Chronic Pancreatitis Compared With Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Lena; Breuer, Thomas G K; Rohrer, Stephan; Schenker, Nina; Menge, Björn A; Holst, Jens J; Nauck, Michael A; Meier, Juris J

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes frequently develops in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We examined the alterations in the glucagon response to hypoglycemia and to oral glucose administration in patients with diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis. Ten patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis were compared with 13 patients with type 2 diabetes and 10 healthy control subjects. A stepwise hypoglycemic clamp and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed. Glucose levels during the OGTT were higher in patients with diabetes and chronic pancreatitis and lower in control subjects ( P chronic pancreatitis and with type 2 diabetes ( P chronic pancreatitis. α-Cell responses to oral glucose ingestion and to hypoglycemia are disturbed in patients with diabetes and chronic pancreatitis and in patients with type 2 diabetes. The similarities between these defects suggest a common etiology. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falzon, Miriam, E-mail: mfalzon@utmb.edu; Bhatia, Vandanajay [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  14. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Falzon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP, a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  15. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, Miriam; Bhatia, Vandanajay

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation

  16. Gallstones, a cholecystectomy, chronic pancreatitis, and the risk of subsequent pancreatic cancer in diabetic patients: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Tsai, I-Ju; Chen, Pei-Chun; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chou, Jen-Wei; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Lai, Shih-Wei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lyu, Shu-Yu; Morisky, Donald E

    2013-06-01

    The causal association between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains unclear in Asian populations. This study examined whether gallstones, a cholecystectomy, chronic pancreatitis and the treatment of antidiabetic agents affect the risk of subsequent pancreatic cancer for patients with diabetes in a Taiwanese population. Using claims data from the universal health insurance program in Taiwan, 449,685 newly diagnosed diabetic cases among insured people from 2000 to 2003 were identified as the case group. The comparison group, matched for gender, age, and the index year of the diabetes cohort, consisted of 325,729 persons without diabetes. Pancreatic cancer incidence was measured in both groups until the end of 2008. Other risk factors associated with this cancer were also measured. The incidence of pancreatic cancer in the diabetic cohort was 2-fold greater than that in the comparison group (1.46 vs. 0.71 per 10,000 person-years) with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.75 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.45-2.10]. The risk slightly increased for diabetic patients with gallstones, cholecystitis, and a cholecystectomy (HR 1.92, 95% CI 1.18-3.11), but greatly increased for those with comorbidity of chronic pancreatitis (HR 22.9, 95% CI 12.6-41.4). Pancreatic cancer risk also increased significantly for those patients who used more insulin for treating diabetes (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.40-3.45). Our data suggest that the risk of pancreatic cancer is moderately increased in patients with diabetes, especially those using insulin therapy. The risk is greatly increased for diabetic patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Nutritional status and nutritional support before and after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagianni, Vasiliki Th; Papalois, Apostolos E; Triantafillidis, John K

    2012-12-01

    Cachexia, malnutrition, significant weight loss, and reduction in food intake due to anorexia represent the most important pathophysiological consequences of pancreatic cancer. Pathophysiological consequences result also from pancreatectomy, the type and severity of which differ significantly and depend on the type of the operation performed. Nutritional intervention, either parenteral or enteral, needs to be seen as a method of support in pancreatic cancer patients aiming at the maintenance of the nutritional and functional status and the prevention or attenuation of cachexia. Oral nutrition could reduce complications while restoring quality of life. Enteral nutrition in the post-operative period could also reduce infective complications. The evidence for immune-enhanced feed in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer is supported by the available clinical data. Nutritional support during the post-operative period on a cyclical basis is preferred because it is associated with low incidence of gastric stasis. Postoperative total parenteral nutrition is indicated only to those patients who are unable to be fed orally or enterally. Thus nutritional deficiency is a relatively widesoread and constant finding suggesting that we must optimise the nutritional status both before and after surgery.

  18. Surgical Treatment for Chronic Pancreatitis: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Plagemann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas was one of the last explored organs in the human body. The first surgical experiences were made before fully understanding the function of the gland. Surgical procedures remained less successful until the discovery of insulin, blood groups, and finally the possibility of blood donation. Throughout the centuries, the surgical approach went from radical resections to minimal resections or only drainage of the gland in comparison to an adequate resection combined with drainage procedures. Today, the well-known and standardized procedures are considered as safe due to the high experience of operating surgeons, the centering of pancreatic surgery in specialized centers, and optimized perioperative treatment. Although surgical procedures have become safer and more efficient than ever, the overall perioperative morbidity after pancreatic surgery remains high and management of postoperative complications stagnates. Current research focuses on the prevention of complications, optimizing the patient’s general condition preoperatively and finding the appropriate timing for surgical treatment.

  19. Chronic pancreatitis: indications to surgery and remote results assessment criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Present indications to surgery include intractable pain syndrome, severe dilation of the Wirsung’s duct, strictures and stones in the Wirsung’s duct, pancreatic pseudocysts, duodenal stenosis and obstructive jaundice because of “inflammatory mass” in the pancreatic head. But these absolute indications mean that in the most cases pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions are already decompensated. Therefore it is important to produce new indications to surgical treatment of the CP in early stages. Also it is necessary to make such remote results assessment criteria that will allow to range among parenchymapreserving and resectional technics according to anatomical and functional parameters. Goal: to adjust indications to surgical treatment of the CP according to leading pathogenetic factors and develop criteria to assess remote results. Patients and methods: 122 CP patients have undergone surgery. There were 103 (84,4% men and – 19 (15,6% women, mean age - 45. Alcohol etiology of the CP was in 79 (64,8% patients, postpancreonecrotic – in 29 (23,8%, biliary – in 6 (4,9%, idiopathic – in 8 (6,6%. Wirsung’s duct diameter of 4 – 8 mm – was in 65 (53,3% patients, 8 – 12 and more – in 57 (46,7%. By Shalimov classification there were “pseudotumorous” – in 39 (31,9%, “calculouse” – in 40 (32,8%, fibrose-cystic – in 17 (13,9%, fibrose-degenerative with adjacent organs involvement and hampering of their function – in 26 (21,4% patients. All patients had pain syndrome and 79 (64,8% – exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. All patients underwent abdominal CT-scan, fecal elastase test, C-peptide, endogenic insulin, glucose, immunehystochemical investigation of biopsy samples taken from body corpus and tale simultaneously etc. Results: We have found that gastroenterologists poorly recognize “surgical” type of CP and restrain patients from being directed to surgical pancreatologists for surgical therapy. We

  20. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  1. [Principles of direct surgical procedures on the pancreas in surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchak, V M; Khomiak, I V; Cheverdiuk, D A; Kopchak, K V; Duvalko, A V; Serdiuk, V P

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of treatment of 584 patients with complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis operated during 2000-2100 years was carried out. Quality of life of postoperative patients was estimated according to a technique of calculations of modules EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-PAN26. The indicators of quality of life have improved by 19.7% in performance of saving duodenal outflow of operations of pancreatic juice. Change of the surgical strategy has led to decreased number of postoperative complications by 4.6% and to satisfactory long-term results in 92.6% of the patients.

  2. Surgical and endoscopic treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis: a multidisciplinary update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Y; van Santvoort, H C; van Goor, H; Cahen, D L; Bruno, M J; Boermeester, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with abdominal pain as the most prominent symptom. Adequate treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis remains a major challenge, mainly because of the lack of evidence-based treatment protocols. The primary goal of treatment is to achieve long-term pain relief, control of the complications associated with the disease, and to restore the quality of life. Currently, a conservative step-up approach is often used for the treatment of pain; progression to severe and intractable pain is considered necessary before invasive treatment is considered. Recent studies, however, suggest that surgical intervention should not be considered only as last-resort treatment, since it can mitigate disease progression, achieve excellent pain control, and preserve pancreatic function. In this review, we present a state-of-the art overview of endoscopic and surgical treatment options for patients with painful chronic pancreatitis, and elaborate on the timing of surgery. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Pancreatectomy and autologous islet transplantation for painful chronic pancreatitis: indications and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Melena D; Sutherland, David E R; Robertson, R Paul

    2012-08-01

    Total pancreatectomy with intrahepatic autoislet transplantation (TP/IAT) is a definitive treatment for relentlessly painful chronic pancreatitis. Pain relief is reported to be achieved in approximately 80% of patients. Overall, 30% to 40% achieve insulin independence, and 70% of recipients remain insulin independent for > 2 years, sometimes longer if > 300 000 islets are successfully transplanted. Yet, this approach to chronic pancreatitis is underemphasized in the general medical and surgical literature and vastly underused in the United States. This review emphasizes the history and metabolic outcomes of TP/IAT and considers its usefulness in the context of other, more frequently used approaches, such as operative intervention with partial pancreatectomy and/or lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow procedure), as well as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with pancreatic duct modification and stent placement. Distal pancreatectomy and Puestow procedures compromise isolation of islet mass, and adversely affect islet autotransplant outcomes. Therefore, when endoscopic measures fail to relieve pain in severe chronic pancreatitis, we recommend early intervention with TP/IAT.

  4. Chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis associated with primary hyperparathyroidism: a transversal prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massironi, Sara; Cavalcoli, Federica; Rossi, Roberta Elisa; Conte, Dario; Spampatti, Matilde Pia; Ciafardini, Clorinda; Verga, Uberta; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2013-05-01

    The coexistence of chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG) and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has been described previously, even if its extent and underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We therefore prospectively evaluated this association in two series of patients, one with CAAG and the other with sporadic PHPT. From January 2005 to March 2012, 107 histologically confirmed CAAG patients and 149 PHPT patients were consecutively enrolled. Routine laboratory assays included serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), plasma gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA). In CAAG patients with high PTH levels, ionized calcium and 25(OH)-vitamin D were evaluated. All CAAG and hypergastrinemic PHPT patients received an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Exclusion criteria were familial PHPT, MEN1 syndrome, treatment with proton pump inhibitor drugs, Helicobacter pylori infection and renal failure. Of the 107 CAAG patients, nine (8.4%) had PHPT and 13 (12.1%) had secondary hyperparathyroidism stemming from vitamin D deficiency. Among the 149 PHPT patients, 11 (7.4%) had CAAG. Gastrin and CgA levels were similar in the CAAG patients with vs those without hyperparathyroidism (either primary or secondary), and calcium and PTH levels were similar in the PHPT patients with vs those without CAAG. This study confirms a non-casual association between PHPT and CAAG. The prevalence of PHPT in CAAG patients is threefold that of the general population (8.4 vs 1-3%), and the prevalence of CAAG in PHPT patients is fourfold that of the general population (7.4 vs 2%). The mechanisms underlying this association remain unknown, but a potential role for autoimmunity is suggested.

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease: A Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19-1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19-1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31-1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04-1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02-1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31-1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16-1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72-1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56-1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06-1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is associated with increased

  6. Autoimmunity and Extrahepatic Manifestations in Treatment-Naïve Children with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Indolfi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been associated with autoimmunity and extrahepatic manifestations in adults. Few data are available on these topics in children. Nonorgan specific auto-antibodies development is part of the natural course of chronic hepatitis C in children. Smooth muscle autoantibody is the most common autoantibody found, while liver-kidney microsomal type-1 antibody positivity is the most peculiar autoimmune feature of children with HCV infection. The clinical significance of non-organ specific autoantibodies in the course of paediatric chronic hepatitis C is still debated. Autoantibody positivity can be considered neutral for most patients, while it can be associated with negative connotations for others, especially those positive for liver-kidney microsomal type-1 autoantibody. Subclinical hypothyroidism but not autoimmune thyroiditis has been demonstrated in HCV infection in children, while only few cases of HCV-associated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis have been described. Single reports are available in the literature reporting the anecdotal association between chronic hepatitis C and other extrahepatic manifestations such as myopathy and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Despite the low incidence of extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C in children, overall, available data suggest a careful monitoring.

  7. Safety and feasibility of the robotic platform in the management of surgical sequelae of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Ahmad; Zenati, Mazen S; Nguyen, Trang K; Hogg, Melissa E; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H

    2018-02-01

    The application of minimally invasive surgery to chronic pancreatitis (CP) procedures is uncommon. Our objective was to report the safety and feasibility of the robotic approach in the treatment of surgical sequelae of CP, and provide insights into the technique, tricks, and pitfalls associated with the application of robotics to this challenging disease entity. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of patients undergoing robotic-assisted resections and/or drainage procedures for CP at the University of Pittsburgh between May 2009 and January 2017 was performed. A video of a robotic Frey procedure is also shown. Of 812 robotic pancreatic resections and reconstructions 39 were for CP indications. These included 11 total pancreatectomies [with and without auto islet transplantation], 8 Puestow procedures, 4 Frey procedures, 6 pancreaticoduodenectomies, and 10 distal pancreatectomies. Median age was 49, and 41% of the patients were female. The most common etiology for CP was idiopathic pancreatitis (n = 16, 46%). Median operative time was 324 min with a median estimated blood loss of 250 ml. None of the patients required conversion to laparotomy. A Clavien III-IV complication rate was experienced by 5 (13%) patients, including one reoperation. Excluding the eleven patients who underwent TP, rate of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula was 7% (Grade B = 2, Grade C = 0). No 30 or 90 day mortalities were recorded. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days. Use of the robotic platform is safe and feasible when tackling complex pancreatic resections for sequelae of chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Long-term Outcomes Favor Duodenum-preserving Pancreatic Head Resection over Pylorus-preserving Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Chronic Pancreatitis: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharamwala, Prashant B; Patel, Krishen D; Teta, Anthony F; Parikh, Shailraj; Ross, Sharona B; Ryan, Carrie E; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2015-09-01

    Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) are important treatment options for patients with chronic pancreatitis. This meta-analysis was undertaken to compare the long-term outcomes of DPPHR versus PPPD in patients with chronic pancreatitis. A systematic literature search was conducted using Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and PubMed databases on all studies published between January 1991 and January 2013 reporting intermediate and long-term outcomes after DPPHR and PPPD for chronic pancreatitis. Long-term outcomes of interest were complete pain relief, quality of life, professional rehabilitation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency. Other outcomes of interest included perioperative morbidity and length of stay (LOS). Ten studies were included comprising of 569 patients. There was no significant difference in complete pain relief (P = 0.24), endocrine insufficiency (P = 0.15), and perioperative morbidity (P = 0.13) between DPPHR and PPPD. However, quality of life (P insufficiency (P = 0.005), and LOS (P = 0.00001) were significantly better for patients undergoing DPPHR compared with PPPD. In conclusion, there is no significant difference in endocrine insufficiency, postoperative pain relief, and perioperative morbidity for patients undergoing DPPHR versus PPPD. Improved intermediate and long-term outcomes including LOS, quality of life, professional rehabilitation, and preservation of exocrine function make DPPHR a more favorable approach than PPPD for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Early surgery versus optimal current step-up practice for chronic pancreatitis (ESCAPE): design and rationale of a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, U.; Issa, Y.; Bruno, M.J.; Goor, H. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Busch, O.R.; Dejong, C.H.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Eijck, C.H. van; Dullemen, H.M. van; Fockens, P.; Siersema, P.D.; Gouma, D.J.; Hooft, J.E. van; Keulemans, Y.; Poley, J.W.; Timmer, R.; Besselink, M.G.; Vleggaar, F.P.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Boermeester, M.A.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In current practice, patients with chronic pancreatitis undergo surgical intervention in a late stage of the disease, when conservative treatment and endoscopic interventions have failed. Recent evidence suggests that surgical intervention early on in the disease benefits patients in

  10. Early surgery versus optimal current step-up practice for chronic pancreatitis (ESCAPE): Design and rationale of a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Ahmed Ali (Usama); Y. Issa (Yama); M.J. Bruno (Marco); H. van Goor (Harry); H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); O.R.C. Busch (Olivier); C.H. Dejong (Cees); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); H.M. van Dullemen (Hendrik); P. Fockens (Paul); P.D. Siersema (Peter); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); J.E. van Hooft (Jeanin); Y. Keulemans (Yolande); J.-W. Poley (Jan-Werner); R. Timmer (Robin); M.G. Besselink (Marc); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); O.H. Wilder-Smith (O.); H.G. Gooszen (Hein); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); M.A. Boermeester (Marja)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In current practice, patients with chronic pancreatitis undergo surgical intervention in a late stage of the disease, when conservative treatment and endoscopic interventions have failed. Recent evidence suggests that surgical intervention early on in the disease benefits

  11. Glucagon suppression during OGTT worsens while suppression during IVGTT sustains alongside development of glucose intolerance in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T; Larsen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    To examine plasma glucagon responses to oral and intravenous (iv) glucose in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and either normal glucose tolerance (NGT), secondary impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or secondary diabetes mellitus (DM)....

  12. Early surgery versus optimal current step-up practice for chronic pancreatitis (ESCAPE) : design and rationale of a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Usama Ahmed; Issa, Yama; Bruno, Marco J.; van Goor, Harry; van Santvoort, Hjalmar; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; van Eijck, Casper H.; van Dullemen, Hendrik M.; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D.; Gouma, Dirk J.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Keulemans, Yolande; Poley, Jan W.; Timmer, Robin; Besselink, Marc G.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In current practice, patients with chronic pancreatitis undergo surgical intervention in a late stage of the disease, when conservative treatment and endoscopic interventions have failed. Recent evidence suggests that surgical intervention early on in the disease benefits patients in

  13. Prevalence, severity, and clinical features of acute and chronic pancreatitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Shen, Min; Leng, Xiaomei; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Qian, Jiaming

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatitis is a rare, life-threatening complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to describe the clinical features of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) in patients with SLE. Data of patients who fulfilled the revised criteria of the American Rheumatism Association for diagnosis of SLE were retrospectively analyzed. SLE activity was graded according to the SLE Disease Activity Index. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to find out independent associations. Survival rates were estimated by using Kaplan-Meier plots. This study included 5665 SLE patients admitted between January 1983 and January 2014, of whom 52 patients were diagnosed with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis prevalence in SLE patients was 0.92 % (52/5665). AP (0.8 %, 46/5665) was more prevalent than CP (0.1 %, 6/5665), presented mostly during active SLE, and affected more organs. Hypertriglyceridemia occurred in 76.9 % of AP patients and in none of the CP patients. AP patients were divided into severe (n = 10) or mild (n = 20) cases. The average triglyceride level in severe AP cases was higher than that in mild AP cases (P = 0.006), and the mortality rate of lupus-associated AP was 32.6 % (15/46). Concomitant infections and thrombocytopenia were independently associated with poor prognosis (P risk factors for poor prognosis.

  14. Multicenter Approach to Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States: The North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Adam, Slivka; Hawes, Robert H.; Brand, Randall E.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Bishop, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Burton, Frank R.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Gelrud, Andres; Lo, Simon K.; DeMeo, Mark T.; Steinberg, William M.; Kochman, Michael L.; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Elinoff, Beth; Greer, Julia B.; O’Connell, Michael; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are complex syndromes associated with numerous etiologies, clinical variables and complications. We developed the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2) to be sufficiently powered to understand the complex environmental, metabolic and genetic mechanisms underlying RAP and CP. Methods Between August 2000 and September 2006, a consortium of 20 expert academic and private sites prospectively ascertained 1,000 human subjects with RAP or CP, plus 695 controls (spouse, family, friend or unrelated). Standardized questionnaires were completed by both the physicians and study subjects and blood was drawn for genomic DNA and biomarker studies. All data were double-entered into a database and systematically reviewed to minimize errors and include missing data. Results A total of 1,000 subjects (460 RAP, 540 CP) and 695 controls who completed consent forms and questionnaires and donated blood samples comprised the final dataset. Data were organized according to diagnosis, supporting documentation, etiological classification, clinical signs and symptoms (including pain patterns and duration, and quality of life), past medical history, family history, environmental exposures (including alcohol and tobacco use), medication use and therapeutic interventions. Upon achieving the target enrollment, data were organized and classified to facilitate future analysis. The approaches, rationale and datasets are described, along with final demographic results. Conclusion The NAPS2 consortium has successfully completed a prospective ascertai