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Sample records for autohydrolysis

  1. Autohydrolysis Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang

    Autohydrolysis, a simple and environmental friendly process, has long been studied but often abandoned as a financially viable pretreatment for bioethanol production due to the low yields of fermentable sugars at economic enzyme dosages. The introduction of mechanical refining can generate substantial improvements for autohydrolysis process, making it an attractive pretreatment technology for bioethanol commercialization. In this study, several lignocellulosic biomass including wheat straw, switchgrass, corn stover, waste wheat straw have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment followed by mechanical refining to evaluate the total sugar recovery at affordable enzyme dosages. Encouraging results have been found that using autohydrolysis plus refining strategy, the total sugar recovery of most feedstock can be as high as 76% at 4 FPU/g enzymes dosages. The mechanical refining contributed to the improvement of enzymatic sugar yield by as much as 30%. Three non-woody biomass (sugarcane bagasse, wheat straw, and switchgrass) and three woody biomass (maple, sweet gum, and nitens) have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment to acquire a fundamental understanding of biomass characteristics that affect the autohydrolysis and the following enzymatic hydrolysis. It is of interest to note that the nonwoody biomass went through substantial delignification during autohydrolysis compared to woody biomass due to a significant amount of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. It has been found that hardwood which has a higher S/V ratio in the lignin structure tends to have a higher total sugar recovery from autohydrolysis pretreatment. The economics of bioethanol production from autohydrolysis of different feedstocks have been investigated. Regardless of different feedstocks, in the conventional design, producing bioethanol and co-producing steam and power, the minimum ethanol revenues (MER) required to generate a 12% internal rate of return (IRR) are high enough to

  2. EFFECT OF OZONE AND AUTOHYDROLYSIS PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC DIGESTIBILITY OF COASTAL BERMUDA GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Myoung Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Coastal Bermuda grass (CBG has been shown to have potential as a biomass feedstock for sugar production. In this study, the effectiveness of ozone pretreatment for CBG to improve the sugar recovery via enzyme hydrolysis was investigated. Raw CBG and autohydrolysis-treated CBG were pretreated with ozone at ozone consumption of 1.8 to 26.4 % (w/w at room temperature. Lignin degradation and hemicellulose solubilization increased with increased ozone consumption. At 26.4% ozone consumption by weight on CBG the amount of lignin in the CBG was reduced by 34%. Autohydrolysis of CBG increased the reactivity of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin with ozone. The maximum total sugar recovery after enzymatic hydrolysis was 32% for a 14.0% consumption of ozone on raw CBG. For CBG samples pretreated with autohydrolysis followed by a 3.1% ozone consumption pretreatment the maximum total sugar recovery after enzyme hydrolysis was 40.1%. Autohydrolysis pretreatment followed by enzyme hydrolysis yielded a 36.4% sugar recovery, indicating that the application and benefits of ozone after autohydrolysis with the conditions studied herein are marginally better than autohydrolysis alone.

  3. Biorefinery valorization of autohydrolysis wheat straw hemicellulose to be applied in a polymer-blend film

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, Héctor A.; Cerqueira, M. A.; Ruíz, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa María; Vicente, A.A.; J. A. Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were the extraction of hemicellulose from wheat straw (WS) and its utilization in the reinforcement of a κ-carrageenan/locust bean gum (κ-car/LBG) polymeric blend films (PBFs). WS hemicellulose extraction was performed under autohydrolysis process and hemicellulose extracted (HE) under optimum condition was used in PBFs. PBFs were prepared varying different proportions of HE into the κ-car/LBG film-forming solutions. Barrier properties (water vapor permeability, WVP), m...

  4. Understanding of pH value and its effect on autohydrolysis pretreatment prior to poplar chemi-thermomechanical pulping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihui; Liu, Wei; Hou, Qingxi; Chen, Junwei; Xu, Ningpan

    2015-11-01

    Autohydrolysis pretreatment with different severity factors was performed on poplar chips prior to chemi-thermomechanical pulping (CTMP) in order to investigate the change in pH value and its effect on the autohydrolysis pretreatment. The results showed that the dissolution amount of acetic acid increased with raising the severity factor of the pretreatment and declining the size of poplar chips, respectively. Besides, a logarithmic relationship between the amount of acetic acid released in the autohydrolysis liquor (AHL) and pH value of the AHL was observed. The amounts of glucose and xylose (including those in the form of monomers, oligomers, and polysaccharides) as well as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) also depended on the pH value of the AHL to some extent. PMID:26313534

  5. Quantitative analysis of sugars in wood hydrolyzates with 1H NMR during the autohydrolysis of hardwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Scott, Gary M; Amidon, Thomas E; Kiemle, David J; Stipanovic, Arthur J

    2009-12-01

    The focus of this work was to determine the utility of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in the quantification of sugars resulting from the solubilization of hemicelluloses during the autohydrolysis of hardwoods and the use of this technique to evaluate the kinetics of this process over a range of temperatures and times. Yields of residual xylan, xylooligomers, xylose, glucose, and the degraded products of sugars, i.e., furfural and HMF (5-hydroxymethyl furfural), were determined. The monosaccharide and oligomer contents were quantified with a recently developed high resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopic analysis. This method provided precise measurement of the residual xylan and cellulose remaining in the extracted wood samples and xylose and glucose in the hydrolyzates. NMR was found to exhibit good repeatability and provided carbohydrate compositional results comparable to published methods for sugar maple and aspen woods. PMID:19674893

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE LIMITATIONS OF REMOVAL OF HEMICELLULOSES DURING AUTOHYDROLYSIS OF A MIXTURE OF SOUTHERN HARDWOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sefik Tunc

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of hemicelluloses from wood prior to pulping is being pursued to generate more value-added products, while still producing high quality pulp from the pre-extracted wood. For a better understanding of the factors limiting selective extraction, enzymatic hydrolysis in combination with size exclusion chromatography (SEC was applied to milled wood and hydrothermally treated wood. Complete dissolution was achieved in a lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent system after mild ball-milling of a Southern Hardwood Mixture (SHM, of SHM extracted using auto-hydrolysis, and of enzyme-treated SHM. SEC tests showed that severe degradation of wood polymers occurred after a milling time of 3 hours. The SEC data also confirmed the presence of lignin-carbohydrate complexes. Based on the results, it is suggested that linkages between lignin and polysaccharides may play an important role in limiting extraction of hemicelluloses.

  7. XYLO-OLIGOSACCHARIDES PRODUCTION BY AUTOHYDROLYSIS OF CORN FIBER SEPARATED FROM DDGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Samala,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS are reported to have beneficial health properties, and they are considered to be functional food ingredients. Corn fiber separated from distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS could be a valuable feedstock for XOS production. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy for autohydrolysis to produce XOS using fiber separated from DDGS and to determine the optimum temperature for XOS production. Corn fiber was treated with deionized water in a Parr-reactor, at temperatures ranging from 140 to 220 °C to produce XOS. The maximum total yield of XOS in the solution was 18.6 wt% of the corn fiber at 180 °C.

  8. Comparison, modeling and simulation of enzymatic saccharification on olive tree biomass under dilute acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ruíz, Héctor A.; E. Ruiz; de Castro, E.

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol can be produced from pretreated olive tree biomass (OTB) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. In order to obtain high overall ethanol yield, the pretreatment step should improve the accessibility of cellulose to hydrolytic enzymes. The modeling and simulation of enzymatic hydrolysis pretreated solids obtained by diluted acid (DA) and autohydrolysis (AH) were studied. The assumptions of the first and second order model of cellulase deactivation are: 1) a single combine...

  9. Evaluation of agave bagasse recalcitrance using AFEX™, autohydrolysis, and ionic liquid pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pimienta, Jose A; Flores-Gómez, Carlos A; Ruiz, Héctor A; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Dale, Bruce E; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A

    2016-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the response of agave bagasse (AGB) to pretreatment by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™), autohydrolysis (AH) and ionic liquid (IL) was performed using 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, wet chemistry, enzymatic saccharification and mass balances. It has been found that AFEX pretreatment preserved all carbohydrates in the biomass, whereas AH removed 62.4% of xylan and IL extracted 25% of lignin into wash streams. Syringyl and guaiacyl lignin ratio of untreated AGB was 4.3, whereas for the pretreated biomass the ratios were 4.2, 5.0 and 4.7 for AFEX, AH and IL, respectively. Using NMR spectra, the intensity of β-aryl ether units in aliphatic, anomeric, and aromatic regions decreased in all three pretreated samples when compared to untreated biomass. Yields of glucose plus xylose in the major hydrolysate stream were 42.5, 39.7 and 26.9kg per 100kg of untreated AGB for AFEX, IL and AH, respectively. PMID:27017132

  10. Ethanol production from olive prunings by autohydrolysis and fermentation with Candida tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martin, Juan Francisco; Bravo, Vicente [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Granada, Campus Universitario de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Cuevas, Manuel; Sanchez, Sebastian [Department of Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Hydrolysates from olive prunings (a renewable, low-cost, easily available, agricultural residue) were fermented with the unconventional yeast Candida tropicalis NBRC 0618 to produce not only ethanol fuel but also xylitol as a by-product, which adds value to the economic viability of the bioprocess. Autohydrolysis took place at 200 C in a stirred stainless-steel tank reactor. The influence of the solid/liquid ratio in the reactor was studied. Fermentation experiments were conducted in a batch-culture reactor at a temperature of 30 C, a stirring rate of 500 rpm and pH values of between 5.0 and 6.5. Under the operating conditions tested the highest yields of ethanol and xylitol were obtained with the hydrolysate fermented at pH 5.0 and solely the airflow that entered via the stirring vortex. Under these conditions, the instantaneous ethanol yield was 0.44 g g{sup -1} and the overall xylitol yield 0.13 g g{sup -1}. (author)

  11. Generation of xylose solutions from Eucalyptus globulus wood by autohydrolysis-posthydrolysis processes: posthydrolysis kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, G; Domínguez, H; Parajó, J C

    2001-09-01

    Eucalyptus wood samples were treated with water under selected operational conditions (autohydrolysis reaction) to obtain a liquid phase containing hemicellulose-decomposition products (mainly acetylated xylooligosaccharides, xylose and acetic acid). In a further acid-catalysed step (posthydrolysis reaction), xylooligosaccharides were converted into xylose, a carbon source for further fermentation. The kinetic pattern governing the posthydrolysis step was established by reacting xylooligosaccharide-containing liquors at 100.5 degrees C, 115 degrees C, 125 degrees C or 135 degrees C in media containing 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 or 2 wt% of catalyst (sulphuric acid). The time course of the concentrations of xylooligosaccharides, xylose, furfural and acetic acid were determined, and the results were interpreted by means of a kinetic model which allowed a close reproduction of the experimental data. Almost quantitative conversion of xylooligosaccharides into xylose was achieved under a variety of experimental conditions. The first-order, kinetic coefficient for xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis (k1, h(-1)) varied with both temperature (T, K) and molar sulphuric acid concentration (C) according to the equation In k1 = 36.66 + 1.00lnC - 108.0/(8.314T). The hydrolysis of acetyl groups followed a first-order kinetics. The corresponding kinetic coefficient (ka, h(-1) was correlated with the operational conditions by the equation Inka = 26.80+ 1.18 InC - 73.37/(8.314T). PMID:11480924

  12. Evaluation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis and by autohydrolysis in practical diets for Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayra Lizett González-Félix; Martin Perez-Velazquez; Josafat Marina Ezquerra-Brauer; Lorena Bringas-Alvarado; Anabel Sánchez-Sánchez; Wilfrido Torres-Arreola

    2014-01-01

    The marine bioprocessing industry offers great potential to utilize byproducts for fish meal replacement in aquafeeds. Jumbo squid is an important fishery commodity in Mexico, but only the mantle is marketed. Head, fins, guts and tentacles are discarded in spite of being protein-rich byproducts. This study evaluated the use of two jumbo squid byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis (AEH) and by autohydrolysis (AH) as ingredients in practical diets for shrimp. The hydrolys...

  13. Evaluation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis and by autohydrolysis in practical diets for Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Lizett González-Félix

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The marine bioprocessing industry offers great potential to utilize byproducts for fish meal replacement in aquafeeds. Jumbo squid is an important fishery commodity in Mexico, but only the mantle is marketed. Head, fins, guts and tentacles are discarded in spite of being protein-rich byproducts. This study evaluated the use of two jumbo squid byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis (AEH and by autohydrolysis (AH as ingredients in practical diets for shrimp. The hydrolysates were included at levels of 2.5 and 5.0% of the diet dry weight in four practical diets, including a control diet without hydrolysate. Shrimp growth and survival were not significantly affected by the dietary treatments. Postharvest quality of abdominal muscle was evaluated in terms of proximate composition and sensory evaluation. Significantly higher crude protein was observed in the muscle of shrimp fed the highest hydrolysate levels, AH 5% (204.8 g kg- 1 or AEH 5% (201.3 g kg- 1. Sensory analysis of cooked muscle showed significant differences for all variables evaluated: color, odor, flavor, and firmness. It was concluded that Jumbo squid byproducts can be successfully processed by autohydrolysis or acid-enzymatic hydrolysis, and that up to 5.0% of the hydrolysates can be incorporated into shrimp diets without affecting growth or survival.

  14. Autohydrolysis of plant xylans by apoplastic expression of thermophilic bacterial endo-xylanases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkhardt, Bernhard; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter Bjarne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Jørgensen, Bodil; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The genes encoding the two endo-xylanases XynA and XynB from the thermophilic bacterium Dictyoglomus thermophilum were codon optimized for expression in plants. Both xylanases were designed to be constitutively expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and targeted to the apoplast. Tra...

  15. Effects of Eucalyptus globulus Wood Autohydrolysis Conditions on the Reaction Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrote, G.; Kabel, M.A.; Schols, H.A.; Falque, E.; Domingues, H.; Parajo, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus wood samples were reacted in aqueous media (hydrothermal treatments) at 160 °C for 30¿66 min. Liquors from the several experiments were analyzed by spectrophotometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, or gas chromatography¿mass spectrometry for monosaccharides, oligosacchar

  16. Production of xylo-oligosaccharides from Miscanthus x giganteus by autohydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligero, P.; Kolk, van der J.C.; Vega, de A.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Xylo-oligosaccharides were obtained from Miscanthus x giganteus. The process was designed as a biorefinery scheme, which seeks the separation of the three main components: cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. To extract the hemicelluloses, particularly xylans, in an efficient way, Miscanthus was s

  17. Xylanase and β-xylosidase production by Aspergillus ochraceus : new perspectives for the application of wheat straw autohydrolysis liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Michelin, Michele; Maria de Lourdes T. M Polizeli; Ruzene, Denise S.; Silva, Daniel Pereira da; Vicente, A.A.; Jorge, João A.; Terenzi, Héctor F.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The xylanase biosynthesis is induced by its substrate—xylan. The high xylan content in some wastes such as wheat residues (wheat bran and wheat straw) makes them accessible and cheap sources of inducers to be mainly applied in great volumes of fermentation, such as those of industrial bioreactors. Thus, in this work, the main proposal was incorporated in the nutrient medium wheat straw particles decomposed to soluble compounds (liquor) through treatment of lignocellulosic materials in autohyd...

  18. Kinetic study of biomass hydrolysis under high pressure conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Relvas, Frederico Miguel Horta de Albuquerque Moura

    2014-01-01

    This study was focused on the kinetics of lignocellulosic biomass pre-treatment, in particular CO2-assisted autohydrolysis. The temperature was fixed at 180 ºC, varying pressure from 0 (CO2-free autohydrolysis), 20, 35 to 50 bar. For every pressure, a set of isothermal reactions was performed for various reaction times from 0 and 45 minutes. The pre-treatment resulted in a liquid, solid and gas phases, which were analyzed by HPLC. The liquid phase is essentially composed by sugars both in ...

  19. Lignocellulosic bioethanol production with revalorization of low-cost agroindustrial by-products as nutritional supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Kelbert, Maikon; Romaní, Aloia; Coelho, Eduardo; Pereira, Francisco B.; Teixeira, J.A.; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-01-01

    During the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for second generation bioethanol production, fermentation inhibitors are released. To overcome this, the use of a robust industrial strain together with agro-industrial by-products as nutritional supplementation was proposed to increase ethanol productivity and yields. Two factorial experimental designs were carried out to optimize fermentation of hydrolysate from autohydrolysis of Eucalyptus globulus. The mostinfluential variable...

  20. Agricultural residue valorization using a hydrothermal process for second generation bioethanol and oligosaccharides production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Fátima; Domínguez, Elena; Vila, Carlos; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Garrote, Gil

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the hydrothermal valorization of an abundant agricultural residue has been studied in order to look for high added value applications by means of hydrothermal pretreatment followed by fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, to obtain oligomers and sugars from autohydrolysis liquors and bioethanol from the solid phase. Non-isothermal autohydrolysis was applied to barley straw, leading to a solid phase with about a 90% of glucan and lignin and a liquid phase with up to 168 g kg(-1) raw material valuable hemicellulose-derived compounds. The solid phase showed a high enzymatic susceptibility (up to 95%). It was employed in the optimization study of the fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, carried out at high solids loading, led up to 52 g ethanol/L (6.5% v/v). PMID:26000836

  1. Extraction of hemicelluloses from wood in a pulp biorefinery, and subsequent fermentation into ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hemicellulosic ethanol from softwood hemicelluloses in a pulp mill. • Comparison of acid hydrolysis and autohydrolysis to extract hemicelluloses. • Effects of the extraction process conditions on inhibitors concentrations. • Effects of inhibitors on fermentation. - Abstract: This study deals with the production of ethanol and paper pulp in a kraft pulp mill. The use of an acid hydrolysis or a two-step treatment composed of an autohydrolysis followed by a secondary acid hydrolysis was studied. Acid hydrolysis allowed the extraction of higher quantities of sugars but led also to higher degradations of these sugars into inhibitors of fermentation. The direct fermentation of a hydrolysate resulting from an acid hydrolysis gave excellent yields after 24 h. However, the fermentation of hydrolysates after their concentration proved to be impossible. The study of the impact of the inhibitors on the fermentations showed that organic acids, and more specifically formic acid and acetic acid were greatly involved in the inhibition

  2. Prebiotic xylo-oligosaccharides as high-value co-products on an integrated biorefinery approach from lignocellulosic feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Patrícia; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Esteves, M. P.; Gírio, Francisco M.

    2008-01-01

    The present work proposes the production of prebiotic xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) as high-value co-products of the Lignocellulose Feedstock Biorefinery concept, foreseeing potential applications on food, feed and nutraceutical industries. Autohydrolysis was used to selectively solubilise the hemicellulosic fraction of several xylan-rich, widely available, agricultural, agro-industrial and forestry by-products: corn cobs, brewery’s spent grain and Eucalyptus wood chips. The soluble hemicellulo...

  3. ON THE RECOVERY OF HEMICELLULOSE BEFORE KRAFT PULPING

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Vila; Javier Romero; José Luis Francisco,; Valentín Santos,; Juan Carlos Parajó

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of implementing hemicellulose recovery stages in kraft mills, Eucalyptus globulus wood samples were subjected to aqueous treatments with hot, compressed water (autohydrolysis processing) to achieve partial dissolution of xylan. Autohydrolyzed solids were subjected to kraft pulping under selected conditions to yield a pulp of low kappa number, and to an optimized TCF bleaching sequence made up of three stages (alkaline oxygen delignification, chelating, and pressurize...

  4. Prebiotic xylooligosaccharides from lignocellulosic materials: production, purification and applications – An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian-Teodor BURUIANĂ; Camelia VIZIREANU

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a state-of-the-art review and a consolidated source of information regarding the prebiotic potential of xylooligosaccharides (XOS) derived from lignocellulosic materials (LCM) as bioactive molecules with high-added value for human health. XOS can be obtained by hydrothermal pretreatment (or autohydrolysis), a primary technological step in biological conversion of LCM into value-added products. Purification of XOS is a complex process which aims to remove unwanted compounds and t...

  5. Co-production of electricity and ethanol, process economics of value prior combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Economics of producing cellulosic ethanol and bio-power in the same facility using an autohydrolysis process. ► Feedstock considerably affect the economics of the biorefinery facility. ► Lower moisture content improves financial performance of the bio-power business. - Abstract: A process economic analysis of co-producing bioethanol and electricity (value prior to combustion) from mixed southern hardwood and southern yellow pine is presented. Bioethanol is produced by extracting carbohydrates from wood via autohydrolysis, membrane separation of byproducts, enzymatic hydrolysis of extracted oligomers and fermentation to ethanol. The residual solids after autohydrolysis are pressed and burned in a power boiler to generate steam and electricity. A base case scenario of biomass combustion to produce electricity is presented as a reference to understand the basics of bio-power generation economics. For the base case, minimum electricity revenue of $70–$96/MWh must be realized to achieve a 6–12% internal rate of return. In the alternative co-production cases, the ethanol facility is treated as a separate business entity that purchases power and steam from the biomass power plant. Minimum ethanol revenue required to achieve a 12% internal rate of return was estimated to be $0.84–$1.05/l for hardwood and $0.74–$0.85/l for softwood. Based on current market conditions and an assumed future ethanol selling price of $0.65/l, the co-production of cellulosic bioethanol and power does not produce financeable returns. A risk analysis indicates that there is a probability of 26.6% to achieve an internal rate of return equal or higher than 12%. It is suggested that focus be placed on improving yield and reducing CAPEX before this technology can be applied commercially. This modeling approach is a robust method to evaluate economic feasibility of integrated production of bio-power and other products based on extracted hemicellulose.

  6. Effect of steam pretreatment on oil palm empty fruit bunch for the production of sugars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignocellulose into fuel ethanol is the most feasible conversion route strategy in terms of sustainability. Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) generated from palm oil production is a huge source of cellulosic material and represents a cheap renewable feedstock which awaits further commercial exploitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using steam at 0.28 MPa and 140 °C generated from the palm oil mill boiler as a pretreatment to enhance the digestibility of EFB for sugars production. The effects of steam pretreatment or autohydrolysis on chemical composition changes, polysaccharide conversion, sugar production and morphology alterations of four different types of EFB namely fresh EFB (EFB1), sterilized EFB (EFB2), shredded EFB (EFB3) and ground EFB (EFB4) were evaluated. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment showed major alterations in the morphology of EFB as observed under the scanning electron microscope. Steam pretreated EFB2 was found to have the highest total conversion of 30% to sugars with 209 g kg−1 EFB. This production was 10.5 fold higher than for EFB1 and 1.6 fold and 1.7 fold higher than EFB3 and EFB4, respectively. The results suggested that pretreatment of EFB by autohydrolysis using steam from the mill boiler could be considered as being a suitable pretreatment process for the production of sugars. These sugars can be utilized as potential substrates for the production of various products such as fuel ethanol. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the feasibility of steam pretreatment to enhance digestibility of EFB. ► Steam pretreatment increased sugars to 3.4 fold and caused major alteration in EFB morphology under SEM. ► Autohydrolysis which does not require the addition of chemicals is an attractive pretreatment approach to EFB.

  7. Rapid Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a Novel Fucoidan, Extracted from the Brown Alga Coccophora langsdorfii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav D. Anastyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel highly sulfated (35% fucoidan fraction Cf2 , which contained, along with fucose, galactose and traces of xylose and uronic acids was purified from the brown alga Coccophora langsdorfii. Its structural features were predominantly determined (in comparison with fragments of known structure by a rapid mass spectrometric investigation of the low-molecular-weight fragments, obtained by “mild” (5 mg/mL and “exhaustive” (maximal concentration autohydrolysis. Tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra (MALDI-TOF/TOFMS of fucooligosaccharides with even degree of polymerization (DP, obtained by “mild” autohydrolysis, were the same as that observed for fucoidan from Fucus evanescens, which have a backbone of alternating (1 → 3- and (1 → 4 linked sulfated at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of 3-linked α-L-Fucp residues. Fragmentation patterns of oligosaccharides with odd DP indicated sulfation at C-2 and at C-4 of (1 → 3 linked α-L-Fucp residues on the reducing terminus. Minor sulfation at C-3 was also suggested. The “exhaustive” autohydrolysis allowed us to observe the “mixed” oligosaccharides, built up of fucose/xylose and fucose/galactose. Xylose residues were found to occupy both the reducing and nonreducing termini of FucXyl disaccharides. Nonreducing galactose residues as part of GalFuc disaccharides were found to be linked, possibly, by 2-type of linkage to fucose residues and were found to be sulfated, most likely, at position C-2.

  8. Impact of the lignin structure of three lignocellulosic feedstocks on their organosolv delignification. Effect of carbonium ion scavengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of autohydrolysis and aromatic scavengers on delignification patterns were evaluated using miscanthus (MxG), empty palm fruit bunch (EFB) and typha grass residue as feedstocks. Autohydrolysis was carried out without naphthol and in the presence of naphthol followed by delignification by ethanol organosolv process. Despite their close chemical composition, the three feedstocks demonstrated quite different patterns of delignification under the same condition of pretreatment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic characterization of ethanol organosolv lignins (EOLs) extracted from the three feedstocks revealed information concerning syringyl, guaiacyl and hydroxyphenyl content (S/G/H ratios) which underpinned the differences among the feedstock behavior. The (S + H)/G ratios for MxG, EFB and typha were determined as 1.27, 2.33 and 2.70 respectively. The major cause of difference in behavior of feedstock during the pretreatment process was attributed to the variation in lignin composition. A good relationship was observed between S/G ratio and the scavenging effect of 2-naphthol. The effect of four additional aromatic scavengers viz. p-cresol, o-cresol, hydroquinone and dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ) tested in miscanthus demonstrated a significant enhancement on delignification; the effect of p-cresol and DHAQ was tantamount to that of naphthol. Cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) extracted from typha grass was also subjected to 13C NMR characterization in order to obtain a more complete picture of typha lignin. Comparison of NMR spectra of CEL and EOL from TC was performed for determining the processing effect in lignin structure. -- Highlights: ► Effect of autohydrolysis and aromatic scavengers on delignification patterns were evaluated. ► Ethanol organosolv lignins and Cellulolytic Enzyme Lignin extracted from typha were characterized. ► A correlation was observed between S + H/G ratio and the effect of aromatic scavengers

  9. ON THE RECOVERY OF HEMICELLULOSE BEFORE KRAFT PULPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vila,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of implementing hemicellulose recovery stages in kraft mills, Eucalyptus globulus wood samples were subjected to aqueous treatments with hot, compressed water (autohydrolysis processing to achieve partial dissolution of xylan. Autohydrolyzed solids were subjected to kraft pulping under selected conditions to yield a pulp of low kappa number, and to an optimized TCF bleaching sequence made up of three stages (alkaline oxygen delignification, chelating, and pressurized hydrogen peroxide, with minimized additions of pulping and bleaching chemicals. The final product had a relatively low kappa number (1.4, 641 mL/g ISO intrinsic viscosity, and 86.4% brightness.

  10. Almond shell xylo-oligosaccharides exhibiting immunostimulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabarlatz, Debora; Montané, Daniel; Kardosová, Alzbeta; Bekesová, Slávka; Hríbalová, Vera; Ebringerová, Anna

    2007-06-11

    Partially O-acetylated xylo-oligosaccharides (DXO) isolated from almond shells by autohydrolysis as well as their de-acetylated form (DeXO) were subjected to chemical, molecular, and structural analyses. They represent a mixture of neutral and acidic oligomers and low-molecular weight polymers related to (4-O-methyl-D-glucurono)-D-xylan. DXO and DeXO showed direct mitogenic activity and enhancement of the T-mitogen-induced proliferation of rat thymocytes, indicating the immunostimulatory potential of the almond shell xylo-oligosaccharides. PMID:17362891

  11. Production and purification of xylooligosaccharides from oil palm empty fruit bunch fibre by a non-isothermal process

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Ai Ling; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Duarte, Luís C.; Roseiro, Luísa; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Rastall, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) fibre, a by-product generated from non-woody, tropical perennial oil palm crop was evaluated for xylooligosaccharides (XOS) production. Samples of OPEFB fibre were subjected to non-isothermal autohydrolysis treatment using a temperature range from 150 to 220 ºC. The highest XOS concentration, 17.6 g/L which relayed from solubilisation of 63 g/100 g xylan was achieved at 210 ºC and there was a minimum amount of xylose and furfural being produced. The ch...

  12. PURIFICATION OF HARDWOOD-DERIVED AUTOHYDROLYSATES

    OpenAIRE

    Joni Tapani Lehto,; Raimo Juhani Alén

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing hydrolysates (1.1 to 14.9% of wood dry matter) obtained from autohydrolysis (at 130 to 150°C for 30 to 120 minutes) of birch (Betula pendula) chips prior to pulping were purified with respect to non-carbohydrate materials, without carbohydrate losses, either by ethyl acetate extraction or XAD-4 resin treatment. In the former case, about 50% of lignin and practically all the furanoic compounds (2-furaldehyde and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural) could be removed, whereas in th...

  13. Effect of hemicellulose liquid phase on the enzymatic hydrolysis of autohydrolyzed Eucalyptus globulus wood

    OpenAIRE

    Romaní, Aloia; Ruíz, Héctor A.; Pereira, Francisco B.; Domingues, Lucília; Teixeira, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Eucalyptus globulus wood was pretreated under non-isothermal autohydrolysis process at 210, 220, and 230 °C, obtaining a pretreated solid with high cellulose content and a hemicellulosic liquid phase (HLP) containing mainly xylose, acetic acid, furfural, xylooligosaccharides, and phenolic compounds. The maximum concentration of xylooligosaccharides (8.97 g/L) and phenolic compounds (2.66 g/L) was obtained at 210 and 230 °C, respectively. To evaluate the effect of HLP addition on...

  14. Assessment of suitability of vine shoots for hemicellulosic oligosaccharides production through aqueous processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, Izaskun; Gordobil, Oihana; Labidi, Jalel; Gullón, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Vine shoots were subjected to non-isothermal aqueous processing. A range of severities (S0) from 3.20 to 4.65 was assayed and their effects in terms of solubilization, composition, molar mass distribution, structural characterization and thermal stability of the liquors were studied using HPLC, HPSEC, TGA and FTIR. The spent solids were characterized by HPLC and FTIR. When autohydrolysis was carried out at S0=4.01, the substrate solubilization achieved a 38.7% of the raw material and 83.1% of the initial xylan was converted into xylooligosaccharides (XOS). The amount of TOS (total oligosaccharides) in the hydrolysates was 28.4g/L while the other non volatile compounds (ONVC) were 0.08g/g NVC. The spent solid from the treatment at S0=4.01 was composed about 90% of cellulose and lignin. Therefore, it can be concluded that autohydrolysis is a suitable pretreatment of vine shoots such as a first stage of a biomass refinery. PMID:27054881

  15. Development of Geothermally Assisted Process for Production of Liquid Fuels and Chemicals from Wheat Straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

    1981-06-01

    Recently there has been much interest in developing processes for producing liquid fuels from renewable resources. The most logical long term approach in terms of economics derives the carbohydrate substrate for fermentation from the hydrolysis of cellulosic crop and forest residues rather than from grains or other high grade food materials (1,2). Since the presence of lignin is the main barrier to the hydrolysis of cellulose from lignocellulosic materials, delignification processes developed by the wood pulping industry have been considered as possible prehydrolysis treatments. The delignification process under study in our laboratory is envisioned as a synthesis of two recently developed pulping processes. In the first step, called autohydrolysis, hot water is used directly to solubilize hemicellulose and to depolymerize lignin (3). Then, in a second step known as organosolv pulping (4), the autohydrolyzed material is extracted with aqueous alcohol. A s shown in Figure 1, this process can separate the original lignocellulosic material into three streams--hemicellulose in water, lignin in aqueous alcohol, and a cellulose pulp. Without further mechanical milling, delignified cellulose can be enzymatically hydrolyzed at 45-50 C to greater than 80% theoretical yield of glucose using fungal cellulases (5, 6). The resulting glucose syrup can then be fermented by yeast to produce ethanol or by selected bacteria to produce acetone and butanol or acetic and propionic acids (7). One objection to such a process, however, is the large energy input that is required. In order to extend our supplies of liquid fuels and chemicals, it is important that the use of fossil fuels in any lignocellulosic conversion process be minimized. The direct use of geothermal hot water in carrying out the autohydrolysis and extraction operations, therefore, seems especially attractive. On the one hand, it facilitates the conversion of non-food biomass to fuels and chemicals without wasting fossil

  16. Production and purification of xylooligosaccharides from oil palm empty fruit bunch fibre by a non-isothermal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ai Ling; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Duarte, Luís C; Roseiro, Luísa B; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Rastall, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) fibre, a by-product generated from non-woody, tropical perennial oil palm crop was evaluated for xylooligosaccharides (XOS) production. Samples of OPEFB fibre were subjected to non-isothermal autohydrolysis treatment using a temperature range from 150 to 220 °C. The highest XOS concentration, 17.6g/L which relayed from solubilisation of 63 g/100 g xylan was achieved at 210 °C and there was a minimum amount of xylose and furfural being produced. The chromatographic purification which was undertaken to purify the oligosaccharide-rich liquor resulted in a product with 74-78% purity, of which 83-85% was XOS with degree of polymerisation (DP) between 5 and 40. PMID:24275261

  17. CHEMICAL VALORIZATION OF AGRICULTURAL BY-PRODUCTS: ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF XYLAN-BASED ANTIOXIDANTS FROM ALMOND SHELL BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ebringerová

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of non-cellulosic polysaccharides from both almond shells and their solid residue after autohydrolysis using a two-step alkaline extraction without and in combination with short ultrasonic treatment was investigated. The obtained polysaccharide preparations were characterized by yield, chemical composition and structural features, and the antioxidant activity of the water-soluble preparations was discussed in relation to the content of phenolics. The results suggested that, depending on the extraction conditions used, xylan associated to various extent with pectic polysaccharides and phenolics can be prepared, and the reaction time significantly shortened by application of ultrasound. The xylan polymers might serve as biopolymer sources in native form or after targeted modification for production of value-added substances and polysaccharide-based antioxidants, applicable in food, cosmetics and other areas.

  18. Method and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Burke, Murray J.; Hillier, Sunalie N.

    2015-09-08

    Methods and apparatus for treating, pre-treating, preparing and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, such as for ethanol production, are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to methods and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock by mixing and heating the cellulosic feedstock and/or by moistening and heating the cellulosic feedstock. The invention also relates to a holding tank, and a method of utilizing the holding tank whereby bridging may be reduced or eliminated and may result in a product stream from autohydrolysis or hydrolysis having an improved yield. The invention further relates to methods and apparatus for obtaining and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, which may be used for the subsequent production of a fermentable sugar stream from the cellulose and hemicellulose in the cellulosic feedstock wherein the fermentable sugar stream may be used for subsequent ethanol production. The invention also relates to a method and apparatus for withdrawing one or more feedstock stream from a holding tank.

  19. PURIFICATION OF HARDWOOD-DERIVED AUTOHYDROLYSATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joni Tapani Lehto,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-containing hydrolysates (1.1 to 14.9% of wood dry matter obtained from autohydrolysis (at 130 to 150°C for 30 to 120 minutes of birch (Betula pendula chips prior to pulping were purified with respect to non-carbohydrate materials, without carbohydrate losses, either by ethyl acetate extraction or XAD-4 resin treatment. In the former case, about 50% of lignin and practically all the furanoic compounds (2-furaldehyde and 5-(hydroxymethylfurfural could be removed, whereas in the latter case, the corresponding amounts were about 30% and 50 to 90%, respectively. A partial recovery of various unsaturated impurities is of importance, because they may act as inhibitors when biochemically converting carbohydrates in hydrolysates into value-added products.

  20. Total recovery of the waste of two-phase olive oil processing: isolation of added-value compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bolaños, Juan; Rodríguez, Guillermo; Gómez, Esther; Guillén, Rafael; Jiménez, Ana; Heredia, Antonia; Rodríguez, Rocío

    2004-09-22

    A process for the value addition of solid waste from two-phase olive oil extraction or "alperujo" that includes a hydrothermal treatment has been suggested. In this treatment an autohydrolysis process occurs and the solid olive byproduct is partially solubilized. From this water-soluble fraction can be obtained besides the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol several other compounds of high added value. In this paper three different samples of alperujo were characterized and subjected to a hydrothermal treatment with and without acid catalyst. The main soluble compounds after the hydrolysis were represented by monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, and glucose; oligosaccharides, mannitol and products of sugar destruction. Oligosaccharides were separated by size exclusion chromatography. It was possible to get highly purified mannitol by applying a simple purification method. PMID:15366831

  1. Review of pretreatment processes for lignocellulosic ethanol production, and development of an innovative method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass pretreatment aims at separating and providing easier access to the main biomass components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), eventually removing lignin, preserving the hemicellulose, reducing the cellulose crystallinity and increasing the porosity of the material. Pretreatment is an essential step towards the development and industrialization of efficient 2nd generation lignocellulosic ethanol processes. The present work reviewed the main options available in pretreatment. Autohydrolysis and steam explosion were then selected for further investigation. Experimental work was carried out on batch scale reactors, using Miscanthus as biomass feedstock: the effects on sugar solubilization and degradation products generation have been examined for each of these two pretreatment systems. A new process using only water and steam as reacting media was then developed, experimentally tested, and results compared to those achieved by the autohydrolysis and steam explosion processes. Products obtained with the new pretreatment contained a lower amount of usual fermentation inhibitor compounds compared to that typically obtained in steam explosion. This result was achieved under operating conditions that at the same time allowed a good xylan yield, preventing degradation of hemicelluloses. The new pretreatment process was also able to act as an equalization step, as the solid material from the pretreatment phase had a similar composition even under different operating conditions. As regards the effect of pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis, the new process achieved yields similar to steam explosion on glucans: however, this was obtained reducing the formation of degradation products from sugars, mainly from C5 sugars. These results made the proposed pretreatment system suitable for further development and industrialization on pilot and industrial scale.

  2. Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

    1979-10-01

    This study provides cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. Agricultural statistics indicate that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of sheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm, cooperative, and industrial scales. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low-cost chemicals can be utilized. Use of low-cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low-cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

  3. Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Dynatech report No. 1935

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

    1979-07-31

    The objective of this study was to provide cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. A review of agricultural statistics indicated that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm-, cooperative-, and industrial scales. The small farm scale processed the residue from an average size US farm (400 acres), and the other sizes were two and three orders of magnitude greater. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low cost chemicals can be utilized. Additional development is necessary in this area. Use of low cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

  4. Assessment of the bifidogenic effect of substituted xylo-oligosaccharides obtained from corn straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Patrícia; Ho, Ai Ling; Duarte, Luís C; Kolida, Sofia; Rastall, Robert A; Pereira, Helena; Carvalheiro, Florbela

    2016-01-20

    This work evaluates the bifidogenic potential of substituted xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) obtained from a lignocellulosic feedstock (corn straw). Autohydrolysis was used to selectively hydrolyse the xylan-rich hemicellulosic fraction and the soluble oligosaccharides were purified by gel filtration chromatography. Selected oligosaccharides fractions within the target ranges of polymerization degree (4-6 and 9-21, samples S1 and S2, respectively) were characterized and their bifidogenic potential was investigated by in vitro fermentations using human fecal inocula. Bacterial growth was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). XOS consumption and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production were evaluated and compared with commercial oligosaccharides. Under the tested conditions, all the substrates were utilized by the microbiota, and fermentation resulted in increased bifidobacteria populations. Samples S1 and S2 increased bifidobacteria populations and the production profile of SCFA was similar for XOS samples and commercial oligosaccharides although XOS samples displayed the highest concentration of SCFA on longer fermentation times. PMID:26572377

  5. Autohydrolysed Tilapia nilotica Fish Viscera as a Peptone Source in Bacteriocin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraz, Sahar F; El-Fawal, Gomaa F; Abd-Ellatif, Sawsan A; Khalil, Ashraf A

    2011-06-01

    Fish processing generates large amounts of solid and liquid wastes. Many different by-products have been produced from fish processing wastes. Studies on solubilization of Bolti fish (Tilapia nilotica) viscera by endogenous enzymes at different pHs are described. Hydrolysis reactions were conducted with freshly thawed viscera utilizing an initial temperature gradient and terminated at various time points by heat inactivation of the enzymes. Various peptones obtained from hydrolysed visceral homogenates of Bolti fish residues showed their suitability for promoting the growth of lactic acid bacteria (mainly Lactobacillus sake Lb 706), microorganisms with particularly complex nutritional requirements especially peptidic sources. The assay of several treatments with L. sakei Lb 706, producer of the bacteriocin sakacin A, demonstrated that optimum conditions for biomass and bacteriocin production only imply a brief autohydrolysis at room temperature. The results showed that the Bolti fish hydrolysates gave remarkable results to those found in costly commercial media, specifically recommended for culturing and large-scale production of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:22654160

  6. Extraction of valuable compounds from mangosteen pericarps by hydrothermal assisted sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machmudah, Siti; Lestari, Sarah Duta; Shiddiqi, Qifni Yasa'Ash; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng; Wahyudiono, Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2015-12-01

    Valuable compounds, such as xanthone and phenolic compounds, from mangosteen pericarps was extracted by hydrothermal treatment at temperatures of 120-160 °C and pressures of 5 MPa using batch and semi-batch extractor. This method is a simple and environmentally friendly extraction method requiring no chemicals other than water. Under these conditions, there is possibility for the formation of phenolic compounds from mangosteen pericarps from decomposition of bounds between lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose via autohydrolysis. In order to increase the amount of extracted valuable compounds, sonication pre-treament was performed prior to the hydrothermal extraction process. 30 min of sonication pre-treatment could increase significantly the amount of xanthone and phenolic compounds mangosteen pericarps extraction. In batch-system, the xanthone recovery approach to 100 % at 160 °C with 30 min sonication pre-treatment for 150 min extraction time. Under semi-batch process, the total phenolic compounds in the extract was 217 mg/g sample at 160 °C with 30 min sonication pre-treatment for 150 min total extraction time. The results revealed that hydrothermal extraction assisted sonication pre-treatment is applicable method for the isolation of polyphenolic compounds from other types of biomass and may lead to an advanced plant biomass components extraction technology.

  7. Production of cellulosic ethanol from sugarcane bagasse by steam explosion: Effect of extractives content, acid catalysis and different fermentation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, P V; Pitarelo, A P; Ramos, L P

    2016-05-01

    The production of cellulosic ethanol was carried out using samples of native (NCB) and ethanol-extracted (EECB) sugarcane bagasse. Autohydrolysis (AH) exhibited the best glucose recovery from both samples, compared to the use of both H3PO4 and H2SO4 catalysis at the same pretreatment time and temperature. All water-insoluble steam-exploded materials (SEB-WI) resulted in high glucose yields by enzymatic hydrolysis. SHF (separate hydrolysis and fermentation) gave ethanol yields higher than those obtained by SSF (simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation) and pSSF (pre-hydrolysis followed by SSF). For instance, AH gave 25, 18 and 16gL(-1) of ethanol by SHF, SSF and pSSF, respectively. However, when the total processing time was taken into account, pSSF provided the best overall ethanol volumetric productivity of 0.58gL(-1)h(-1). Also, the removal of ethanol-extractable materials from cane bagasse had no influence on the cellulosic ethanol production of SEB-WI, regardless of the fermentation strategy used for conversion. PMID:26943936

  8. Prebiotic xylooligosaccharides from lignocellulosic materials: production, purification and applications – An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian-Teodor BURUIANĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a state-of-the-art review and a consolidated source of information regarding the prebiotic potential of xylooligosaccharides (XOS derived from lignocellulosic materials (LCM as bioactive molecules with high-added value for human health. XOS can be obtained by hydrothermal pretreatment (or autohydrolysis, a primary technological step in biological conversion of LCM into value-added products. Purification of XOS is a complex process which aims to remove unwanted compounds and to achieve the necessary degree of polymerization. Proven benefits and positive effects on the human health are mainly in the intestinal microbiota, where food-grade XOS stimulate the growth and proliferation of probiotic bacteria. The main objective of this study was to provide an in-depth overview of the recent published investigations reported in the scientific literature on the production of XOS from xylan-containing LCM by hydrothermal pretreatment, purification of hydrothermally produced XOS and, furthermore, evaluation of the bioactive properties of purified XOS.

  9. Evaluation of hydrogen and methane production from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulose hydrolysates by two-stage anaerobic digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baêta, Bruno Eduardo Lobo; Lima, Diego Roberto Sousa; Filho, José Gabriel Balena; Adarme, Oscar Fernando Herrera; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Aquino, Sérgio Francisco de

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at optimizing the net energy recovery from hydrogen and methane production through anaerobic digestion of the hemicellulose hydrolysate (HH) obtained by desirable conditions (DC) of autohydrolysis pretreatment (AH) of sugarcane bagasse (SB). Anaerobic digestion was carried out in a two-stage (acidogenic-methanogenic) batch system where the acidogenic phase worked as a hydrolysis and biodetoxification step. This allowed the utilization of more severe AH pretreatment conditions, i.e. T=178.6°C and t=55min (DC3) and T=182.9°C and t=40.71min (DC4). Such severe conditions resulted in higher extraction of hemicelluloses from SB (DC1=68.07%, DC2=48.99%, DC3=77.40% and DC4=73.90%), which consequently improved the net energy balance of the proposed process. The estimated energy from the combustion of both biogases (H2 and CH4) accumulated during the two-stage anaerobic digestion of HH generated by DC4 condition was capable of producing a net energy of 3.15MJ·kgSB(-1)dry weight. PMID:27393834

  10. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples. PMID:25965949

  11. Production, Purification, and in Vitro Evaluation of the Prebiotic Potential of Arabinoxylooligosaccharides from Brewer's Spent Grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Belén; Míguez, Beatriz; Veiga, Adán; Parajó, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luís

    2015-09-30

    Brewer's spent grain (BSG) samples were subjected to a two-step aqueous processing (starch extraction and autohydrolysis) in order to assess their potential as a raw material for obtaining a mixture of arabinoxylooligosaccharides (AXOS) suitable to be use as prebiotics for elderly. After hydrothermal treatment, the liquors were refined by a sequence of purification and conditioning steps including membrane filtration, enzymatic hydrolysis, and ion exchange. The presence of both substituted (degree of polimerization (DP) = 2-10) and unsubstituted (DP = 2-16) oligosaccharides made up of xylose and arabinose (AXOS) were confirmed in purified mixtures (in which total OS content = 84% w/w) by using chromatographic techniques and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Finally, AXOS were evaluated for their prebiotic activity by in vitro fermentation assays using fecal inocula from elderly people, demonstrating that AXOS were slightly better substrates than FOS, in terms of bacterial population shifts as in the production of SCFA. PMID:26345203

  12. Submerged citric acid fermentation on orange peel autohydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Beatriz; Torrado, Ana; Torre, Paolo; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2008-04-01

    The citrus-processing industry generates in the Mediterranean area huge amounts of orange peel as a byproduct from the industrial extraction of citrus juices. To reduce its environmental impact as well as to provide an extra profit, this residue was investigated in this study as an alternative substrate for the fermentative production of citric acid. Orange peel contained 16.9% soluble sugars, 9.21% cellulose, 10.5% hemicellulose, and 42.5% pectin as the most important components. To get solutions rich in soluble and starchy sugars to be used as a carbon source for citric acid fermentation, this raw material was submitted to autohydrolysis, a process that does not make use of any acidic catalyst. Liquors obtained by this process under optimum conditions (temperature of 130 degrees C and a liquid/solid ratio of 8.0 g/g) contained 38.2 g/L free sugars (8.3 g/L sucrose, 13.7 g/L glucose, and 16.2 g/L fructose) and significant amounts of metals, particularly Mg, Ca, Zn, and K. Without additional nutrients, these liquors were employed for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger CECT 2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599). Addition of calcium carbonate enhanced citric acid production because it prevented progressive acidification of the medium. Moreover, the influence of methanol addition on citric acid formation was investigated. Under the best conditions (40 mL of methanol/kg of medium), an effective conversion of sugars into citric acid was ensured (maximum citric acid concentration of 9.2 g/L, volumetric productivity of 0.128 g/(L.h), and yield of product on consumed sugars of 0.53 g/g), hence demonstrating the potential of orange peel wastes as an alternative raw material for citric acid fermentation. PMID:18321055

  13. Arsenic toxicity: the effects on plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PatrickFinnegan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The two forms inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV and arsenite (AsIII, are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analogue of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or other sulfhydryl-containing groups. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. These effects are reflected in a dramatic restructuring of amino acid pools in Arabidopsis thaliana upon AsV exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified.

  14. Carbon materials obtained from self-binding sugar cane bagasse and deciduous wood residues plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that dispersed biomass residues (bagasse, sawdust) can be processed into hard carbonaceous blocks, panels or boards with good strength and thermodynamic properties. There are two possible approaches: to mould dispersed biomass charcoal with a phenol-formaldehyde binder or to produce this material by carbonising the biomass fiberboard prepared by making use of steam explosion autohydrolysis pulp or steam explosion lignin as a binder. In the first step, steam explosion lignin, as a modifier and a binder is introduced to the lignocellulosic biomass by impregnation or during the hot pressing process to form a hard fiberboard. By subsequent carbonisation of the fiberboard panels or blocks, carbonised panels or blocks with high bending and crushing strength and suitable thermodynamic properties are obtained due to the formation of an internal lignin reinforcement in cell lumina and impregnation of cell walls with lignin solution or molten lignin. The carbonised panels demonstrate a good dimensional stability after a standard treatment with water. The bending strength of the carbonised panels after 24 h soaking in water is 93% of that in dry state. The thermodynamic properties and porosity of the carbonised panels demonstrate their suitability for use as a building material. Lignin, a natural binder of fiberboards, has proven to be suitable for preparation of cabonaceous panels and boards. In this respect new carbon building blocks and panels from moulded biomass and carbonised steam exploded biomass act as a concentrated form of long term carbon storage and will be a factor stabilizing the growing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. [Proceedings of the First Workshop of QITS, Materials Life-Cycle and Environmentally Sustainable Development, March 2-4, Campinas, UNU/IAS San Paulo, Brazil, 1998, pp. 95-101; Proceedings of the Workshop in ''Targeting Zero Emissions for the Utilization of Renewable Resources'', ANESC, Tokyo, 1999, pp. 2-11.

  15. Carbon materials obtained from self-binding sugar cane bagasse and deciduous wood residues plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandersons, J.; Gravitis, J.; Zhurinsh, A.; Kokorevics, A. [Latvian State Inst. of Wood Chemistry, Riga (Latvia); Kallavus, U. [Tallinn TechnicaL Univ. (Estonia). Center of Material Research; Suzuki, C.K. [University of Campinas (Brazil). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-04-01

    It is demonstrated that dispersed biomass residues (bagasse, sawdust) can be processed into hard carbonaceous blocks, panels or boards with good strength and thermodynamic properties. There are two possible approaches: to mould dispersed biomass charcoal with a phenol-formaldehyde binder or to produce this material by carbonising the biomass fiberboard prepared by making use of steam explosion autohydrolysis pulp or steam explosion lignin as a binder. In the first step, steam explosion lignin, as a modifier and a binder is introduced to the lignocellulosic biomass by impregnation or during the hot pressing process to form a hard fiberboard. By subsequent carbonisation of the fiberboard panels or blocks, carbonised panels or blocks with high bending and crushing strength and suitable thermodynamic properties are obtained due to the formation of an internal lignin reinforcement in cell lumina and impregnation of cell walls with lignin solution or molten lignin. The carbonised panels demonstrate a good dimensional stability after a standard treatment with water. The bending strength of the carbonised panels after 24 h soaking in water is 93 % of that in dry state. The thermodynamic properties and porosity of the carbonised panels demonstrate their suitability for use as a building material. Lignin, a natural binder of fiberboards, has proven to be suitable for preparation of carbonaceous panels and boards. In this respect new carbon building blocks and panels from moulded biomass and carbonised steam exploded biomass act as a concentrated form of long term carbon storage and will be a factor stabilizing the growing CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere.[Proceedings of the First Workshop of QITS, Materials Life-Cycle and Environmentally Sustainable Development, March 2-4, Campinas, UNU/IAS San Paulo, Brazil, 1998, pp. 95-101; Proceedings of the Workshop in ''Targeting Zero Emissions for the Utilization of Renewable Resources'', ANESC, Tokyo

  16. DOEGO85004_1: Final Non-proprietary Technical Report, Generating Process and Economic Data for Preliminary Design of PureVision Biorefineries DOEGO85004_2: One Original Final Proprietary Technical Report to be mailed to DOE Golden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Kiran L., Ph.D; Lehrburger, Ed

    2008-01-17

    The overall objective of the project was to define a two-stage reactive fractionation process for converting corn stover into a solid cellulose stream and two liquid streams containing mostly hemicellulosic sugars and lignin, respectively. Toward this goal, biomass fractionation was conducted using a small continuous pilot unit with a nominal capacity of 100 pounds per day of dry biomass to generate performance data using primarily corn stover as feedstock. In the course of the program, the PureVision process was optimized for efficient hemicellulose hydrolysis in the first stage employing autohydrolysis and delignification in the second stage using sodium hydroxide as a catalyst. The remaining cellulose was deemed to be an excellent substrate for producing fermentation sugars, requiring 40% less enzymes for hydrolysis than conventional pretreatment systems using dilute acid. The fractionated cellulose was also determined to have potential higher-value applications as a pulp product. The lignin coproduct was determined to be substantially lower in molecular weight (MW) compared to lignins produced in the kraft or sulfite pulping processes. This low-MW lignin can be used as a feed and concrete binder and as an intermediate for producing a range of high-value products including phenolic resins. This research adds to the understanding of the biomass conversion area in that a new process was developed in the true spirit of biorefineries. The work completed successfully demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process at the pilot level indicating the technology is ready to advance to a 2–3 ton per day scale. No technical showstoppers are anticipated in scaling up the PureVision fractionation process to commercial scale. Also, economic feasibility of using the PureVision process in a commercial-scale biorefinery was investigated and the minimum ethanol selling price for the PureVision process was calculated to be $0.94/gal ethanol vs. $1.07/gal ethanol for the

  17. 用木材生产生物燃料与纸浆%From Wood to Biofuels and Pulp Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚光裕

    2012-01-01

    A mild alkaline treatment was applied to aspen chips prior to kraft pulping in order .to ex- tract hemicellulose for use as biofuels(bioethanol),the extraction was performed at 90℃, NaOH 1-2M,liguor towood ratio 1-4. It resulted in a recovery of 40-50kg of hemicellulose per ton of chips and yieled the same amount of pulp after subsequent pulping of the extracted chips,as compared to a control cook. The pre-extract process requires careful optimization of the pulping process and allows shorter cooking time and lower chemical charges. The process did not costly pressurized reaction ves- sels. Kraft pulps obtained from per-extracted chips have a slightiy higher cellulose/hemicellulose ratio and demonstrate a small decrease in tensile index(10%), but improved brightness and shive content, while the hemiecllulose yield for this process is low, this problem is outweighed by the fact that pulp properties and pulping yield can be maintained at a high level. The recovered hemicellulose can be con- centrated and isolateed more easily than furfural obtained by autohydrolysis or dilute acid treatment.%杨木木片硫酸盐制浆前,进行缓和的碱抽提处理,抽提出半纤维素用作生物燃料(生物乙醇),在温度90℃,NaOH1-2M,液比1:4条件下进行碱处理,不需要高压设备,每吨木片得到半纤维素40-50kg,经碱抽提后木片进行硫酸盐蒸煮,与未经碱抽提木片参照对比,纸浆得率基本相同,但是需要很好地控制碱抽提与硫酸盐蒸煮工艺条件,能缩短蒸煮时间和节省化学品用量。碱预抽提木片得到的硫酸盐纸浆中纤维素/半纤维素的比率稍高,导致纸浆的抗张指数稍有降低(约10%),但是纸浆白度较高且筛渣含量低,为使硫酸盐纸浆的质量和得率保持较高水平,采用缓和的碱预抽提,使半纤维素得率较低,而回收的半纤维素的浓缩和离析比木片自水解或稀酸水解回收糠醛更加容易。

  18. Biorefinery Technologies for Biomass Conversion Into Chemicals and Fuels Towards Zero Emissions (Review) / Nulles Emisiju Princips Biomasas Konversijas Tehnoloģijās Aizstājot Fosilos Resursus (Pārskata Raksts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravitis, J.; Abolins, J.

    2013-10-01

    Exhausting of world resources, increasing pollution, and climate change are compelling the shift of the world economy from continuous growth to a kind of economy based on integration of technologies into zero emissions production systems. Transition from non-renewable fossil resources to renewable resources provided by solar radiation and the current processes in biosphere is seen in the bio-refinery approach - replacing crude oil refineries by biomass refineries. Biotechnology and nano-technologies are getting accepted as important players along with conventional biomass refinery technologies. Systems design is a significant element in the integration of bio-refinery technologies in clusters. A number of case-studies, steam explosion auto-hydrolysis (SEA) in particular, are reviewed to demonstrate conversion of biomass into value-added chemicals and fuels. Analysis of energy flows is made as part of modelling the SEA processes, the eMergy (energy memory) approach and sustainability indices being applied to assess environmental impacts. Resursu izsīkums, vides piesārņojums un globāla mēroga klimatiskās izmaiņas ir civilizācijas izdzīvošanai būtiski faktori, kas virza pasaules ekonomikas pārmaiņas, atsakoties no nepārtrauktas izaugsmes idejas par labu tādai ekonomikai, kas balstās uz atjaunojošamies resursiem un dažādu tehnoloģiju integrācijemisiju principam atbilstošās ražošanas sistēmās. Saules radiācijas ierosinātajos planētas biosfērā notiekošajos procesos radīto organisko vielu pārstrādes kompleksi, kas operē ievērojot sabalansētu nulles emisiju principu, tiek uzlūkoti kā tās ekonomiskās (ražošanas) struktūras, kurām jānodrošina pāreja uz atjaunojošos resursu izmantošanu, aizstājot esošās fosilo resursu (naftas, ogļu) pārstrādes rūpnīcas. Līdzās jau apgūtajām biomasas rafinēšanas tehnoloģijām svarīga un pieaugoša loma ekonomiskās sistēmas resursu bāzes nomaiņā ir bio- un nanotehnolo