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Sample records for autogeny

  1. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Anuluck Junkum; Wej Choochote; Atchariya Jitpakdi; Somjai Leemingsawat; Narumon Komalamisra; Narissara Jariyapan; Chavalit Boonyatakorn

    2003-01-01

    Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40) were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gra...

  2. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuluck Junkum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40 were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gravid female (F11/F38; F13/F40, embryonation rate (F13/F40, hatchability rate (F11/F38; F13/F40, egg width (F11/F38, wing length of females (F13/F40, and wing length and width of males (F11/F38 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly greater than that in the autogenous sub-colony; and egg length (F11/F38 and width (F13/F40, and mean longevity of adult females (F11/F38 and males (F13/F40 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly less than that in the autogenous sub-colony. The results of comparison on filarial susceptibility demonstrated that both sub-colonies yielded similar susceptibilities to Brugia malayi [blood-feeding/autogeny = 56.7% (F11/53.3%(F38, 60%(F13/83.3%(F40] and Dirofilaria immitis [blood-feeding/autogeny = 85.7%(F11/75%(F38, 45%(F13/29.4%(F40], suggesting autogenous Ae. togoi sub-colony was an efficient laboratory vector in study of filariasis.

  3. Characteristics and mechanism of low permeability beach-bar sandstone reservoir of Es4 in Dongying sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua-ai; ZHONG Jian-hua; ZHONG Fu-ping; NIU Yong-bin; WANG Pei-jun

    2009-01-01

    Core and cast sections observation and description, and logging, scanning electron microscope and core lab analysis data etc. Were applied to the present research of the characteristics and mechanism of low permeability beach-bar sandstone reservoir of Es4 in Dongying sag. The results indicated the reservoir has the characteristics of middle-low pores, low-permeability, low compo-sitional and structural maturity, and thin throat. The low-permeability is mainly due to sedimentation (fine particles and argillaceous inter beds) and diagenesis (compaction, cementation, and dissolution). The cementation reduced the physical property of the reser-voir mainly by carbonate cementation, quartz autogeny and enragement, and autogeny clay. Clay minerals usually jam the pores by filling holes, close-fitting the wall of hole, bridging, wrapping grains, and separate attaching the pores and so on. The dissolution is insufficient so as not to improve the porosity and permeability of the reservoir obviously. So it is also an important factor of form-ing low-permeability reservoir.

  4. Distributional Feature of Detrital Minerais in the Superficial Sediment of South Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红霞; 林振宏; 郭玉贵

    2004-01-01

    The composition of detrital minerals with grades of 0.063 - 0.25 mm in the superficial sediment of South Yellow Sea is mainly studied in the paper. The research result shows that the minerals can be divided into more than fifty sorts. The light minerals are mainly feldspar, quartz, mica, etc. The heavy minerals are mainly composed of amphibole, epidote, mica, autogeny pyrite, magnetite, hematite, garnet,zircon and so on, which mainly distribute in the sediments of silty clay and lutaceous silt. According to the content and distribution of the main minerals, the research area isdivided into five miteral combination provinces. The assembled types of minerals in every province have close relationship with its hydrodynamic conditions and sedimentary environment. And the sorts of detrital minerals also show that the detrital substances in the sedimentary areas mainly originate from the drainage areas of rivers,bedrock weathering, and transformed sediment, etc.

  5. Multiple factors contribute to anautogenous reproduction by the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia-Nuss, Monika; Elliot, Anne; Brown, Mark R; Strand, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti is an anautogenous mosquito that must blood feed on a vertebrate host to produce and lay a clutch of eggs. The rockpool mosquito, Georgecraigius atropalpus, is related to A. aegypti but is a facultatively autogenous species that produces its first clutch of eggs shortly after emerging without blood feeding. Consumption of a blood meal by A. aegypti triggers the release of ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone (OEH) and insulin-like peptide 3 (ILP3) from the brain, which stimulate egg formation. OEH and ILP3 also stimulate egg formation in G. atropalpus but are released at eclosion independently of blood feeding. These results collectively suggest that blood meal dependent release of OEH and ILP3 is one factor that prevents A. aegypti from reproducing autogenously. Here, we examined two other factors that potentially inhibit autogeny in A. aegypti: teneral nutrient reserves and the ability of OEH and ILP3 to stimulate egg formation in the absence of blood feeding. Measures of nutrient reserves showed that newly emerged A. aegypti females had similar wet weights but significantly lower protein and glycogen reserves than G. atropalpus females when larvae were reared under identical conditions. OEH stimulated non-blood fed A. aegypti females to produce ecdysteroid hormone and package yolk into oocytes more strongly than ILP3. OEH also reduced host seeking and blood feeding behavior, yet females produced few mature eggs. Overall, our results indicate that multiple factors prevent A. aegypti from reproducing autogenously. PMID:26255841