WorldWideScience

Sample records for autoanalysis

  1. Research on data auto-analysis algorithms in the explosive detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haidong; Li Yuanjing; Yang Yigang; Li Tiezhu; Chen Boxian; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly describe some auto-analysis algorithms in explosive detection system with TNA method. These include the auto-calibration algorithm when disturbed by other factors, MCA auto-calibration algorithm with calibrated spectrum, the auto-fitting and integral of hydrogen and nitrogen elements data. With these numerical algorithms, the authors can automatically and precisely analysis the gamma-spectra and ultimately achieve the explosive auto-detection. (authors)

  2. SEM AutoAnalysis: enhancing photomask and NIL defect disposition and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristian; Egodage, Kokila; Tabbone, Gilles; Ehrlich, Christian; Garetto, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    For defect disposition and repair verification regarding printability, AIMS™ is the state of the art measurement tool in industry. With its unique capability of capturing aerial images of photomasks it is the one method that comes closest to emulating the printing behaviour of a scanner. However for nanoimprint lithography (NIL) templates aerial images cannot be applied to evaluate the success of a repair process. Hence, for NIL defect dispositioning scanning, electron microscopy (SEM) imaging is the method of choice. In addition, it has been a standard imaging method for further root cause analysis of defects and defect review on optical photomasks which enables 2D or even 3D mask profiling at high resolutions. In recent years a trend observed in mask shops has been the automation of processes that traditionally were driven by operators. This of course has brought many advantages one of which is freeing cost intensive labour from conducting repetitive and tedious work. Furthermore, it reduces variability in processes due to different operator skill and experience levels which at the end contributes to eliminating the human factor. Taking these factors into consideration, one of the software based solutions available under the FAVOR® brand to support customer needs is the aerial image evaluation software, AIMS™ AutoAnalysis (AAA). It provides fully automated analysis of AIMS™ images and runs in parallel to measurements. This is enabled by its direct connection and communication with the AIMS™tools. As one of many positive outcomes, generating automated result reports is facilitated, standardizing the mask manufacturing workflow. Today, AAA has been successfully introduced into production at multiple customers and is supporting the workflow as described above. These trends indeed have triggered the demand for similar automation with respect to SEM measurements leading to the development of SEM AutoAnalysis (SAA). It aims towards a fully automated SEM image

  3. Integration of auto analysis program of gamma spectrum and software and determination of element content in sample by k-zero method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Quang Vinh; Truong Thi Hong Loan; Mai Van Nhon; Huynh Truc Phuong

    2014-01-01

    Integrating the gamma spectrum auto-analysis program with elemental analysis software by k-zero method is the objective for many researchers. This work is the first stepin building an auto analysis program of gamma spectrum, which includes modules of reading spectrum, displaying spectrum, calibrating energy of peak, smoothing spectrum, calculating peak area and determining content of elements in sample. Then, the results from the measurements of standard samples by a low level spectrometer using HPGe detector are compared to those of other gamma spectrum auto-analysis programs. (author)

  4. Důvěra ve vztazích mezi učiteli a začínajícím školním psychologem

    OpenAIRE

    Suchardová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    A goal of this research was to find out, by what means can school psychologist obtain a trust of teacher and how can this trust look like in one specific school. Following methods were used: Observation, interviews, document analysis, autoanalysis. Categories crucial for school psychologist to obtain trust were observed. These were compared with other researches made with similar intention. At the end work reveals few types of relationships between the teacher and beginner school psychologist.

  5. Freud and history before 1905: from defending to questioning the theory of a glorious past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    By sticking closely to Freud's use of the German term Geschichte (history, story) between 1894 and 1905, I will reveal two conceptions of history. The first one, the theory of the glorious past and its archaeological metaphor, which accompanied and sustained the seduction theory of cultural history. I will define how this change was determined by an evolution in Freud's conceptions of childhood prehistory and original history. I will also question how the history problem interfered with Freud's auto-analysis.

  6. RevospECT® field experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, T.

    2012-01-01

    The RevospECT process of auto-analysis of steam generator eddy current data has been deployed in multiple roles from the production secondary analysis function all the way to full auto where it solely analyzes all of the data from multiple probe technologies. RevospECT is bridging processes in the analysis of eddy current data to provide a more comprehensive, efficient, and accurate viewpoint into the understanding of steam generator tubing degradation. This paper will discuss the various modes of deployment to fit industry needs, auto-process oriented functions such as historical data comparison, noise monitoring, and auto-resolution decision functions. (author)

  7. A young patient with atypical type-B Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome accompanied by left ventricular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Takahiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Kasai, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Daisuke; Yoshie, Koji; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Oguchi, Yasutaka; Kozuka, Ayako; Gautam, Milan; Motoki, Hirohiko; Okada, Ayako; Shiba, Yuji; Aizawa, Kazunori; Izawa, Atsushi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Koyama, Jun; Hongo, Minoru; Ikeda, Uichi

    2014-01-01

    A 15-year-old asymptomatic male patient presented with an electrocardiographic abnormality and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (left ventricle ejection fraction of 40%) in a physical examination performed 2 years previously. LV dysfunction did not improve despite optimal medical therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed a normal PR interval (138 ms) with a small delta-like wave in V2, but not a typical diagnostic wave that could be diagnosed as Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW) syndrome by an electrocardiogram auto-analysis. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a remarkable asynchronous septal motion. An electrophysiological study was performed to exclude WPW syndrome. An accessory pathway (AP) was revealed on the lateral wall of the right ventricle, and radiofrequency catheter ablation was successfully performed to disconnect the AP. Thereafter, the dyssynchrony disappeared, and LV function improved. The intrinsic atrioventricular nodal conduction was very slow (A-H, 237 ms). The results of electrocardiogram auto-analysis could not be used to confirm the diagnosis of WPW syndrome because of the atypical delta wave. Conduction via the right lateral AP caused electrical dyssynchrony in the LV. This case suggests that atypical delta waves should be evaluated without depending on electrocardiographic auto-analyses in patients with LV dysfunction accompanied by dyssynchrony. PMID:26336525

  8. A young patient with atypical type-B Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome accompanied by left ventricular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Takeuchi, MD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old asymptomatic male patient presented with an electrocardiographic abnormality and left ventricular (LV dysfunction (left ventricle ejection fraction of 40% in a physical examination performed 2 years previously. LV dysfunction did not improve despite optimal medical therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed a normal PR interval (138 ms with a small delta-like wave in V2, but not a typical diagnostic wave that could be diagnosed as Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW syndrome by an electrocardiogram auto-analysis. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a remarkable asynchronous septal motion. An electrophysiological study was performed to exclude WPW syndrome. An accessory pathway (AP was revealed on the lateral wall of the right ventricle, and radiofrequency catheter ablation was successfully performed to disconnect the AP. Thereafter, the dyssynchrony disappeared, and LV function improved. The intrinsic atrioventricular nodal conduction was very slow (A-H, 237 ms. The results of electrocardiogram auto-analysis could not be used to confirm the diagnosis of WPW syndrome because of the atypical delta wave. Conduction via the right lateral AP caused electrical dyssynchrony in the LV. This case suggests that atypical delta waves should be evaluated without depending on electrocardiographic auto-analyses in patients with LV dysfunction accompanied by dyssynchrony.

  9. The comparison of automated urine analyzers with manual microscopic examination for urinalysis automated urine analyzers and manual urinalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Demet Ä°nce

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Urinalysis is one of the most commonly performed tests in the clinical laboratory. However, manual microscopic sediment examination is labor-intensive, time-consuming, and lacks standardization in high-volume laboratories. In this study, the concordance of analyses between manual microscopic examination and two different automatic urine sediment analyzers has been evaluated. Design and methods: 209 urine samples were analyzed by the Iris iQ200 ELITE (Ä°ris Diagnostics, USA, Dirui FUS-200 (DIRUI Industrial Co., China automatic urine sediment analyzers and by manual microscopic examination. The degree of concordance (Kappa coefficient and the rates within the same grading were evaluated. Results: For erythrocytes, leukocytes, epithelial cells, bacteria, crystals and yeasts, the degree of concordance between the two instruments was better than the degree of concordance between the manual microscopic method and the individual devices. There was no concordance between all methods for casts. Conclusion: The results from the automated analyzers for erythrocytes, leukocytes and epithelial cells were similar to the result of microscopic examination. However, in order to avoid any error or uncertainty, some images (particularly: dysmorphic cells, bacteria, yeasts, casts and crystals have to be analyzed by manual microscopic examination by trained staff. Therefore, the software programs which are used in automatic urine sediment analysers need further development to recognize urinary shaped elements more accurately. Automated systems are important in terms of time saving and standardization. Keywords: Urinalysis, Autoanalysis, Microscopy

  10. Sequential injection analysis for automation of the Winkler methodology, with real-time SIMPLEX optimization and shipboard application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Tovar Sanchez, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M. [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Institut Mediterrani d' Estudis Avancats, Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles (Spain); Cerda, Victor, E-mail: Victor.Cerda@uib.es [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry Carreterra de Valldemossa km 7.5, 07011 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2010-01-25

    A multipurpose analyzer system based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO) in seawater is presented. Three operation modes were established and successfully applied onboard during a research cruise in the Southern ocean: 1st, in-line execution of the entire Winkler method including precipitation of manganese (II) hydroxide, fixation of DO, precipitate dissolution by confluent acidification, and spectrophotometric quantification of the generated iodine/tri-iodide (I{sub 2}/I{sub 3}{sup -}), 2nd, spectrophotometric quantification of I{sub 2}/I{sub 3}{sup -} in samples prepared according the classical Winkler protocol, and 3rd, accurate batch-wise titration of I{sub 2}/I{sub 3}{sup -} with thiosulfate using one syringe pump of the analyzer as automatic burette. In the first mode, the zone stacking principle was applied to achieve high dispersion of the reagent solutions in the sample zone. Spectrophotometric detection was done at the isobestic wavelength 466 nm of I{sub 2}/I{sub 3}{sup -}. Highly reduced consumption of reagents and sample compared to the classical Winkler protocol, linear response up to 16 mg L{sup -1} DO, and an injection frequency of 30 per hour were achieved. It is noteworthy that for the offline protocol, sample metering and quantification with a potentiometric titrator lasts in general over 5 min without counting sample fixation, incubation, and glassware cleaning. The modified SIMPLEX methodology was used for the simultaneous optimization of four volumetric and two chemical variables. Vertex calculation and consequent application including in-line preparation of one reagent was carried out in real-time using the software AutoAnalysis. The analytical system featured high signal stability, robustness, and a repeatability of 3% RSD (1st mode) and 0.8% (2nd mode) during shipboard application.

  11. Sequential injection analysis for automation of the Winkler methodology, with real-time SIMPLEX optimization and shipboard application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Tovar Sanchez, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M.; Cerda, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A multipurpose analyzer system based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO) in seawater is presented. Three operation modes were established and successfully applied onboard during a research cruise in the Southern ocean: 1st, in-line execution of the entire Winkler method including precipitation of manganese (II) hydroxide, fixation of DO, precipitate dissolution by confluent acidification, and spectrophotometric quantification of the generated iodine/tri-iodide (I 2 /I 3 - ), 2nd, spectrophotometric quantification of I 2 /I 3 - in samples prepared according the classical Winkler protocol, and 3rd, accurate batch-wise titration of I 2 /I 3 - with thiosulfate using one syringe pump of the analyzer as automatic burette. In the first mode, the zone stacking principle was applied to achieve high dispersion of the reagent solutions in the sample zone. Spectrophotometric detection was done at the isobestic wavelength 466 nm of I 2 /I 3 - . Highly reduced consumption of reagents and sample compared to the classical Winkler protocol, linear response up to 16 mg L -1 DO, and an injection frequency of 30 per hour were achieved. It is noteworthy that for the offline protocol, sample metering and quantification with a potentiometric titrator lasts in general over 5 min without counting sample fixation, incubation, and glassware cleaning. The modified SIMPLEX methodology was used for the simultaneous optimization of four volumetric and two chemical variables. Vertex calculation and consequent application including in-line preparation of one reagent was carried out in real-time using the software AutoAnalysis. The analytical system featured high signal stability, robustness, and a repeatability of 3% RSD (1st mode) and 0.8% (2nd mode) during shipboard application.