WorldWideScience

Sample records for auto-luminescent genetically-encoded ratiometric

  1. Auto-luminescent genetically-encoded ratiometric indicator for real-time Ca2+ imaging at the single cell level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Saito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Efficient bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET from a bioluminescent protein to a fluorescent protein with high fluorescent quantum yield has been utilized to enhance luminescence intensity, allowing single-cell imaging in near real time without external light illumination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied BRET to develop an autoluminescent Ca(2+ indicator, BRAC, which is composed of Ca(2+-binding protein, calmodulin, and its target peptide, M13, sandwiched between a yellow fluorescent protein variant, Venus, and an enhanced Renilla luciferase, RLuc8. Adjusting the relative dipole orientation of the luminescent protein's chromophores improved the dynamic range of BRET signal change in BRAC up to 60%, which is the largest dynamic range among BRET-based indicators reported so far. Using BRAC, we demonstrated successful visualization of Ca(2+ dynamics at the single-cell level with temporal resolution at 1 Hz. Moreover, BRAC signals were acquired by ratiometric imaging capable of canceling out Ca(2+-independent signal drifts due to change in cell shape, focus shift, etc. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The brightness and large dynamic range of BRAC should facilitate high-sensitive Ca(2+ imaging not only in single live cells but also in small living subjects.

  2. pHlash: a new genetically encoded and ratiometric luminescence sensor of intracellular pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zhang

    Full Text Available We report the development of a genetically encodable and ratiometic pH probe named "pHlash" that utilizes Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET rather than fluorescence excitation. The pHlash sensor-composed of a donor luciferase that is genetically fused to a Venus fluorophore-exhibits pH dependence of its spectral emission in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification in vivo. Its spectral ratio response is H(+ specific; neither Ca(++, Mg(++, Na(+, nor K(+ changes the spectral form of its luminescence emission. Moreover, it can be used to image pH in single cells. This is the first BRET-based sensor of H(+ ions, and it should allow the approximation of pH in cytosolic and organellar compartments in applications where current pH probes are inadequate.

  3. Live-Cell Imaging and Measurement of Intracellular pH in Filamentous Fungi Using a Genetically Encoded Ratiometric Probe▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bagar, Tanja; Altenbach, Kirsten; Read, Nick D.; Benčina, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    A novel, genetically encoded, ratiometric pH probe (RaVC) was constructed to image and measure intracellular pH in living hyphae of Aspergillus niger. RaVC is a chimeric protein based on the pH-sensitive probe pHluorin, which was partially codon optimized for expression in Aspergillus. Intracellular pH imaging and measurement was performed by simultaneous, dual-excitation confocal ratio imaging. The mean cytoplasmic pH measured was 7.4 to 7.7 based on calibrating RaVC in situ within nigericin...

  4. Illumination of the Spatial Order of Intracellular pH by Genetically Encoded pH-Sensitive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Benčina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins have been extensively used for engineering genetically encoded sensors that can monitor levels of ions, enzyme activities, redox potential, and metabolites. Certain fluorescent proteins possess specific pH-dependent spectroscopic features, and thus can be used as indicators of intracellular pH. Moreover, concatenated pH-sensitive proteins with target proteins pin the pH sensors to a definite location within the cell, compartment, or tissue. This study provides an overview of the continually expanding family of pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins that have become essential tools for studies of pH homeostasis and cell physiology. We describe and discuss the design of intensity-based and ratiometric pH sensors, their spectral properties and pH-dependency, as well as their performance. Finally, we illustrate some examples of the applications of pH sensors targeted at different subcellular compartments.

  5. Heme dynamics and trafficking factors revealed by genetically encoded fluorescent heme sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David A; Harvey, Raven M; Martinez-Guzman, Osiris; Yuan, Xiaojing; Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Raju, Gheevarghese; Outten, F Wayne; Hamza, Iqbal; Reddi, Amit R

    2016-07-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor and signaling molecule. Heme acquisition by proteins and heme signaling are ultimately reliant on the ability to mobilize labile heme (LH). However, the properties of LH pools, including concentration, oxidation state, distribution, speciation, and dynamics, are poorly understood. Herein, we elucidate the nature and dynamics of LH using genetically encoded ratiometric fluorescent heme sensors in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae We find that the subcellular distribution of LH is heterogeneous; the cytosol maintains LH at ∼20-40 nM, whereas the mitochondria and nucleus maintain it at concentrations below 2.5 nM. Further, we find that the signaling molecule nitric oxide can initiate the rapid mobilization of heme in the cytosol and nucleus from certain thiol-containing factors. We also find that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase constitutes a major cellular heme buffer, and is responsible for maintaining the activity of the heme-dependent nuclear transcription factor heme activator protein (Hap1p). Altogether, we demonstrate that the heme sensors can be used to reveal fundamental aspects of heme trafficking and dynamics and can be used across multiple organisms, including Escherichia coli, yeast, and human cell lines. PMID:27247412

  6. Analog Genetic Encoding for the Evolution of Circuits and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiussi, Claudio; Floreano, Dario

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of genetic representation called analog genetic encoding (AGE). The representation is aimed at the evolutionary synthesis and reverse engineering of circuits and networks such as analog electronic circuits, neural networks, and genetic regulatory networks. AGE permits the simultaneous evolution of the topology and sizing of the networks. The establishment of the links between the devices that form the network is based on an implicit definition of the interactio...

  7. Calibration and functional analysis of three genetically encoded Cl−/pH sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Mukhtarov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the intracellular concentrations of Cl− and H+ requires sensitive probes that allow reliable quantitative measurements without perturbation of cell functioning. For these purposes the most promising are genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, which have become powerful tools for non-invasive intracellular monitoring of ions, molecules and enzymatic activity. A ratiometric CFP/YFP-based construct with a relatively good sensitivity to Cl− has been developed (Markova et al., 2008; Waseem et al., 2010. Recently, a combined Cl−/pH sensor (ClopHensor opened the way for simultaneous ratiometric measurement of these two ions (Arosio et al., 2010. ClopHensor was obtained by fusion of a red-fluorescent protein (DsRed-monomer to the E2GFP variant that contains a specific Cl−-binding site. This construct possesses pKa = 6.8 for H+ and Kd in the 40-50 mM range for Cl− at physiological pH (~7.3 As in the majority of cell types the intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i is about 10 mM, the development of sensors with higher sensitivity is highly desirable. Here we report the intracellular calibration and functional characterization of ClopHensor and its two derivatives: the membrane targeting PalmPalm-ClopHensor and the H148G/V224L mutant with improved Cl− affinity, reduced pH dependence and pKa shifted to more alkaline values. For functional analysis, constructs were expressed in CHO cells and [Cl−]i was changed by using pipettes with different Cl− concentrations during whole-cell recordings. Kd values for Cl− measured at 33°C and pH ~ 7.3 were, respectively, 39 mM, 47 mM and 21 mM for ClopHensor, PalmPalm-ClopHensor and the H148G/V224L mutant. PalmPalm-ClopHensor resolved responses to activation of Cl−-selective glycine receptor channels better than did ClopHensor. Our observations indicate that these different ClopHensor constructs are promising tools for non-invasive measurement of [Cl−]i in various living

  8. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  9. Real-time determination of intracellular oxygen in bacteria using a genetically encoded FRET-based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potzkei Janko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular oxygen (O2 is one of the key metabolites of all obligate and facultative aerobic pro- and eukaryotes. It plays a fundamental role in energy homeostasis whereas oxygen deprivation, in turn, broadly affects various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Therefore, real-time monitoring of cellular oxygen levels is basically a prerequisite for the analysis of hypoxia-induced processes in living cells and tissues. Results We developed a genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based biosensor allowing the observation of changing molecular oxygen concentrations inside living cells. This biosensor named FluBO (fluorescent protein-based biosensor for oxygen consists of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP that is sensitive towards oxygen depletion and the hypoxia-tolerant flavin-binding fluorescent protein (FbFP. Since O2 is essential for the formation of the YFP chromophore, efficient FRET from the FbFP donor domain to the YFP acceptor domain only occurs in the presence but not in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen biosensor was used for continuous real-time monitoring of temporal changes of O2 levels in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells during batch cultivation. Conclusions FluBO represents a unique FRET-based oxygen biosensor which allows the non-invasive ratiometric readout of cellular oxygen. Thus, FluBO can serve as a novel and powerful probe for investigating the occurrence of hypoxia and its effects on a variety of (pathophysiological processes in living cells.

  10. Monitoring Intracellular pH Change with a Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor in Yeast and Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Robertson, J Brian; Xie, Qiguang; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2016-01-01

    "pHlash" is a novel bioluminescence-based pH sensor for measuring intracellular pH, which is developed based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). pHlash is a fusion protein between a mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) and a Venus fluorophore. The spectral emission of purified pHlash protein exhibits pH dependence in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro characterization of pHlash, and also in vivo assays including in yeast cells and in HeLa cells using pHlash as a cytoplasmic pH indicator. PMID:27424899

  11. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  12. Genetically encoded calcium indicators for multi-color neural activity imaging and combination with optogenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Akerboom, Jasper; Carreras Calderón, Nicole; Tian, Lin; Wabnig, Sebastian; Prigge, Matthias; Tolö, Johan; Gordus, Andrew; Orger, Michael B; Severi, Kristen E.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Pulver, Stefan R.; Trevor J Wardill; Fischer, Elisabeth; Schüler, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This work was supported by Goethe University Frankfurt; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), grant EXC115; European Union FP7 grant “EUTrigTreat and German Research Council (DFG) Grant MI 685/2-1. Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Here we describe red, single-wavelength GECIs, "RCaMPs," engineered from circular permutation of the thermostable red fluorescent protein mRuby. High-resolution crystal structures of mRuby, the red senso...

  13. Genetically encoded molecular tools for light-driven silencing of targeted neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Brian Y.; Han, Xue; Boyden, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to silence, in a temporally precise fashion, the electrical activity of specific neurons embedded within intact brain tissue, is important for understanding the role that those neurons play in behaviors, brain disorders, and neural computations. “Optogenetic” silencers, genetically encoded molecules that, when expressed in targeted cells within neural networks, enable their electrical activity to be quieted in response to pulses of light, are enabling these kinds of causal circuit...

  14. Genetically encoded voltage indicators for large scale cortical imaging come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöpfel, Thomas; Gallero-Salas, Yasir; Song, Chenchen

    2015-08-01

    Electrical signals are fundamental to cellular sensing, communication and motility. In the nervous system, information is represented as receptor, synaptic and action potentials. Understanding how brain functions emerge from these electrical signals is one of the ultimate challenges in neuroscience and requires a methodology to monitor membrane voltage transients from large numbers of cells at high spatio-temporal resolution. Optical voltage imaging holds longstanding promises to achieve this, and has gained a fresh powerful momentum with the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). With a focus on neuroimaging studies on intact mouse brains, we highlight recent advances in this field. PMID:26115448

  15. Statistical sulcal shape comparisons: application to the detection of genetic encoding of the central sulcus shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Goualher, G; Argenti, A.M.; Duyme, M;

    2000-01-01

    measurements in order to detect a statistically significant difference between two groups. We have applied this methodology to highlight evidence of genetic encoding of the shape of neuroanatomical structures. To investigate genetic constraint, we studied if shapes were more similar within 10 pairs of...... encoding. When applied to real data, this study highlighted genetic constraints on the shape of the central sulcus. We found from 10 pairs of monozygotic twins that the intrapair modal distance of the central sulcus was significantly smaller than the interpair modal distance, for both the left central...

  16. Visualizing Presynaptic Calcium Dynamics and Vesicle Fusion with a Single Genetically Encoded Reporter at Individual Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rachel E; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission depends on the influx of calcium into the presynaptic compartment, which drives neurotransmitter release. Genetically encoded reporters are widely used tools to understand these processes, particularly pHluorin-based reporters that report vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis through pH dependent changes in fluorescence, and genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) that exhibit changes in fluorescence upon binding to calcium. The recent expansion of the color palette of available indicators has made it possible to image multiple probes simultaneously within a cell. We have constructed a single molecule reporter capable of concurrent imaging of both presynaptic calcium influx and exocytosis, by fusion of sypHy, the vesicle associated protein synaptophysin containing a GFP-based pHluorin sensor, with the red-shifted GECI R-GECO1. Due to the fixed stoichiometry of the two probes, the ratio of the two responses can also be measured, providing an all optical correlate of the calcium dependence of release. Here, we have characterized stimulus-evoked sypHy-RGECO responses of hippocampal synapses in vitro, exploring the effects of different stimulus strengths and frequencies as well as variations in external calcium concentrations. By combining live sypHy-RGECO imaging with post hoc fixation and immunofluorescence, we have also investigated correlations between structural and functional properties of synapses. PMID:27507942

  17. Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology in intact adult fruit flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Laurent

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded optical indicators hold the promise of enabling non-invasive monitoring of activity in identified neurons in behaving organisms. However, the interpretation of images of brain activity produced using such sensors is not straightforward. Several recent studies of sensory coding used G-CaMP 1.3-a calcium sensor-as an indicator of neural activity; some of these studies characterized the imaged neurons as having narrow tuning curves, a conclusion not always supported by parallel electrophysiological studies. To better understand the possible cause of these conflicting results, we performed simultaneous in vivo 2-photon imaging and electrophysiological recording of G-CaMP 1.3 expressing neurons in the antennal lobe (AL of intact fruitflies. We find that G-CaMP has a relatively high threshold, that its signal often fails to capture spiking response kinetics, and that it can miss even high instantaneous rates of activity if those are not sustained. While G-CaMP can be misleading, it is clearly useful for the identification of promising neural targets: when electrical activity is well above the sensor's detection threshold, its signal is fairly well correlated with mean firing rate and G-CaMP does not appear to alter significantly the responses of neurons that express it. The methods we present should enable any genetically encoded sensor, activator, or silencer to be evaluated in an intact neural circuit in vivo in Drosophila.

  18. Compartmentalized AMPK Signaling Illuminated by Genetically Encoded Molecular Sensors and Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Miyamoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, whose activity is a critical determinant of cell health, serves a fundamental role in integrating extracellular and intracellular nutrient information into signals that regulate various metabolic processes. Despite the importance of AMPK, its specific roles within the different intracellular spaces remain unresolved, largely due to the lack of real-time, organelle-specific AMPK activity probes. Here, we present a series of molecular tools that allows for the measurement of AMPK activity at the different subcellular localizations and that allows for the rapid induction of AMPK inhibition. We discovered that AMPKα1, not AMPKα2, was the subunit that preferentially conferred spatial specificity to AMPK, and that inhibition of AMPK activity at the mitochondria was sufficient for triggering cytosolic ATP increase. These findings suggest that genetically encoded molecular probes represent a powerful approach for revealing the basic principles of the spatiotemporal nature of AMPK regulation.

  19. A Genetically Encodable System for Sequence-Specific Detection of RNAs in Two Colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Stefanie J; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2016-05-17

    Multicolor readout is an important feature of RNA detection techniques aiming at the investigation of RNA localization. Several detection methods have been developed, however they require either transfection of cells with the probe or prior tagging of the target RNA. We report a fully genetically encodable system for simultaneous detection of two RNAs by using green and yellow fluorescence based on tetramolecular fluorescence complementation (TetFC). To obtain yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), substitution T203Y was introduced into one of the three non-fluorescent GFP fragments; this was fused to different variants of the Homo sapiens Pumilio homology domain. Using different sets of fusion proteins we were able to discriminate between two closely related target RNAs based on the fluorescence signals at the respective wavelengths. PMID:26919688

  20. KillerRed and miniSOG as genetically encoded photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, Marina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatova, Nadezhda I.; Klementieva, Natalia V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-06-01

    Despite of the success of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer treatment, the problems of low selective accumulation of a photosensitizer in a tumor and skin phototoxicity have not resolved yet. The idea of encoding of a photosensitizer in genome of cancer cells is attractive, particularly because it can provide highly selective light induced cell killing. This work is aimed at the development of new approach to PDT of cancer, namely to using genetically encoded photosensitizers. A phototoxicity of red fluorescent GFP-like protein KillerRed and FMN-binding protein miniSOG was investigated on HeLa tumor xenografts in nude mice. The tumors were generated by subcutaneous injection of HeLa cells stably expressing the phototoxic proteins. The tumors were irradiated with 594 nm or 473 nm laser at 150 mW/cm2 for 20 or 30 min, repeatedly. Fluorescence intensity of the tumors was measured in vivo before and after each treatment procedure. Detailed pathomorphological analysis was performed 24 h after the therapy. On the epi-fluorescence images in vivo photobleaching of both proteins was observed indicating photodynamic reaction. Substantial pathomorphological abnormalities were found in the treated KillerRed-expressing tumor tissue, such as vacuolization of cytoplasm, cellular and nuclear membrane destruction, activation of apoptosis. In contrast, miniSOG-expressing tumors displayed no reaction to PDT, presumably due to the lack of FMN cofactor needed for fluorescence recovery of the flavoprotein. The results are of interest for photodynamic therapy as a proof of possibility to induce photodamages in cancer cells in vivo using genetically encoded photosensitizers.

  1. Reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography using a genetically encoded near-infrared phytochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of genetically encoded probes has revolutionized biomedical studies by providing valuable information about targeted biological processes. Here, we report a novel imaging technique, termed reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography (RS-PAT), which exhibits large penetration depth, high detection sensitivity, and super-resolution. RS-PAT combines advanced photoacoustic imaging techniques with, for the first time, a nonfluorescent photoswitchable bacterial phytochrome. This bacterial phytochrome is the most near-infrared shifted genetically encoded probe reported so far. Moreover, this bacterial phytochrome is reversibly photoconvertible between its far-red and near-infrared light absorption states. Taking maximum advantage of the powerful imaging capability of PAT and the unique photochemical properties of the phytochrome, RS-PAT has broken through both the optical diffusion limit for deep-tissue imaging and the optical diffraction limit for super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, with RS-PAT we have achieved an unprecedented detection sensitivity of ~2 μM, or as few as ~20 tumor cells, at a centimeter depth. Such high sensitivity is fully demonstrated in our study by monitoring tumor growth and metastasis at whole-body level with ~100 μm resolution. Moreover, our microscopic implementation of RS-PAT is capable of imaging mammalian cells with a sub-diffraction lateral resolution of ~140 nm and axial resolution of ~400 nm, which are respectively ~2-fold and ~75-fold finer than those of our conventional photoacoustic microscopy. Overall, RS-PAT is a new and promising imaging technology for studying biological processes at different length scales.

  2. Ratiometric Temperature Sensing with Semiconducting Polymer Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Fangmao; Wu, Changfeng; Jin, Yuhui; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Zhang, Xuanjun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    This communication describes ultra-bright single-nanoparticle ratiometric temperature sensors based on semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots). We attached the temperature sensitive dye—Rhodamine B (RhB), whose emission intensity decreases with increasing temperature—within the matrix of Pdots. The as-prepared Pdot-RhB nanoparticle showed excellent temperature sensitivity and high brightness because it took advantage of the light harvesting and amplified energy transfer capability of Pdots. More ...

  3. Dissecting T Cell Contraction In Vivo Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter of Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kym R. Garrod

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Contraction is a critical phase of immunity whereby the vast majority of effector T cells die by apoptosis, sparing a population of long-lived memory cells. Where, when, and why contraction occurs has been difficult to address directly due in large part to the rapid clearance of apoptotic T cells in vivo. To circumvent this issue, we introduced a genetically encoded reporter for caspase-3 activity into naive T cells to identify cells entering the contraction phase. Using two-photon imaging, we found that caspase-3 activity in T cells was maximal at the peak of the response and was associated with loss of motility followed minutes later by cell death. We demonstrated that contraction is a widespread process occurring uniformly in all organs tested and targeting phenotypically diverse T cells. Importantly, we identified a critical window of time during which antigen encounters act to antagonize T cell apoptosis, supporting a causal link between antigen clearance and T cell contraction. Our results offer insight into a poorly explored phase of immunity and provide a versatile methodology to study apoptosis during the development or function of a variety of immune cells in vivo.

  4. A neuron-based screening platform for optimizing genetically-encoded calcium indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor J Wardill

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein-based sensors for detecting neuronal activity have been developed largely based on non-neuronal screening systems. However, the dynamics of neuronal state variables (e.g., voltage, calcium, etc. are typically very rapid compared to those of non-excitable cells. We developed an electrical stimulation and fluorescence imaging platform based on dissociated rat primary neuronal cultures. We describe its use in testing genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs. Efficient neuronal GECI expression was achieved using lentiviruses containing a neuronal-selective gene promoter. Action potentials (APs and thus neuronal calcium levels were quantitatively controlled by electrical field stimulation, and fluorescence images were recorded. Images were segmented to extract fluorescence signals corresponding to individual GECI-expressing neurons, which improved sensitivity over full-field measurements. We demonstrate the superiority of screening GECIs in neurons compared with solution measurements. Neuronal screening was useful for efficient identification of variants with both improved response kinetics and high signal amplitudes. This platform can be used to screen many types of sensors with cellular resolution under realistic conditions where neuronal state variables are in relevant ranges with respect to timing and amplitude.

  5. Imaging Membrane Potential with Two Types of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmoo; Piao, Hong Hua; Sepheri-Rad, Masoud; Jung, Arong; Sung, Uhna; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) have improved to the point where they are beginning to be useful for in vivo recordings. While the ultimate goal is to image neuronal activity in vivo, one must be able to image activity of a single cell to ensure successful in vivo preparations. This procedure will describe how to image membrane potential in a single cell to provide a foundation to eventually image in vivo. Here we describe methods for imaging GEVIs consisting of a voltage-sensing domain fused to either a single fluorescent protein (FP) or two fluorescent proteins capable of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in vitro. Using an image splitter enables the projection of images created by two different wavelengths onto the same charge-coupled device (CCD) camera simultaneously. The image splitter positions a second filter cube in the light path. This second filter cube consists of a dichroic and two emission filters to separate the donor and acceptor fluorescent wavelengths depending on the FPs of the GEVI. This setup enables the simultaneous recording of both the acceptor and donor fluorescent partners while the membrane potential is manipulated via whole cell patch clamp configuration. When using a GEVI consisting of a single FP, the second filter cube can be removed allowing the mirrors in the image splitter to project a single image onto the CCD camera. PMID:26890551

  6. Genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators; expanded affinity range, color hue and compatibility with optogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Nagai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein-based indicators are invaluable tools for functional imaging of living cells and organisms. Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs such as derivatives of yellow cameleons (YCs and GCaMPs/pericams (Miyawaki et al., 1997; Nakai et al., 2001; Nagai et al., 2001 are a highly advanced class of indicators. Continued efforts for improvement of the performance of GECIs have resulted in brighter indicators with better photo-stability and expanded dynamic range, thus improving the sensitivity of detection. Fine-tuning of other properties, including Ca2+ affinity and Hill constant, have also contributed to increase the detectability of Ca2+ dynamics. Emerging optogenetic technology has forced the spectrally compatible GECI color variants. In this opinion, we highlight the recent development of GECIs including photo-switchable Ca2+ indicators and bioluminescence-based Ca2+ indicator, mainly invented in our group, focusing especially on the parameters determining their performance in order to provide a guideline for the selection of appropriate GECI for a given experiment.

  7. Flow Cytometry Enables Multiplexed Measurements of Genetically Encoded Intramolecular FRET Sensors Suitable for Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Jaimee; Zhao, Ziyan; Geyer, Rory J; Barra, Melanie M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Genetically encoded sensors based on intramolecular FRET between CFP and YFP are used extensively in cell biology research. Flow cytometry has been shown to offer a means to measure CFP-YFP FRET; we suspected it would provide a unique way to conduct multiplexed measurements from cells expressing different FRET sensors, which is difficult to do with microscopy, and that this could be used for screening. We confirmed that flow cytometry accurately measures FRET signals using cells transiently transfected with an ERK activity reporter, comparing responses measured with imaging and cytometry. We created polyclonal long-term transfectant lines, each expressing a different intramolecular FRET sensor, and devised a way to bar-code four distinct populations of cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of multiplexed measurements and determined that robust multiplexed measurements can be conducted in plate format. To validate the suitability of the method for screening, we measured responses from a plate of bacterial extracts that in unrelated experiments we had determined contained the protein kinase C (PKC)-activating compound teleocidin A-1. The multiplexed assay correctly identifying the teleocidin A-1-containing well. We propose that multiplexed cytometric FRET measurements will be useful for analyzing cellular function and for screening compound collections. PMID:26908592

  8. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, J Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S Craig; Smeal, Roy M; Flynn, Katherine F; Economo, Michael N; Cizek, Christian G; Capecchi, Mario R; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S; White, John A

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5-14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal activity in the rat brain. PMID:25926768

  9. Engineering genetically encoded nanosensors for real-time in vivo measurements of citrate concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Ewald

    Full Text Available Citrate is an intermediate in catabolic as well as biosynthetic pathways and is an important regulatory molecule in the control of glycolysis and lipid metabolism. Mass spectrometric and NMR based metabolomics allow measuring citrate concentrations, but only with limited spatial and temporal resolution. Methods are so far lacking to monitor citrate levels in real-time in-vivo. Here, we present a series of genetically encoded citrate sensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. We screened databases for citrate-binding proteins and tested three candidates in vitro. The citrate binding domain of the Klebsiella pneumoniae histidine sensor kinase CitA, inserted between the FRET pair Venus/CFP, yielded a sensor highly specific for citrate. We optimized the peptide linkers to achieve maximal FRET change upon citrate binding. By modifying residues in the citrate binding pocket, we were able to construct seven sensors with different affinities spanning a concentration range of three orders of magnitude without losing specificity. In a first in vivo application we show that E. coli maintains the capacity to take up glucose or acetate within seconds even after long-term starvation.

  10. Using a Genetically Encoded Sensor to Identify Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii Ca2+ Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Saima M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Paul, Aditya S; El Bakkouri, Majida; Hackett, Caroline G; Tran, Fanny; Westwood, Nicholas J; Hui, Raymond; Zuercher, William J; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Moreno, Silvia N J; Lourido, Sebastian

    2016-04-29

    The life cycles of apicomplexan parasites progress in accordance with fluxes in cytosolic Ca(2+) Such fluxes are necessary for events like motility and egress from host cells. We used genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GCaMPs) to develop a cell-based phenotypic screen for compounds that modulate Ca(2+) signaling in the model apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii In doing so, we took advantage of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast, which we show acts in part through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase G; PKG) to raise levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) We define the pool of Ca(2+) regulated by PKG to be a neutral store distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum. Screening a library of 823 ATP mimetics, we identify both inhibitors and enhancers of Ca(2+) signaling. Two such compounds constitute novel PKG inhibitors and prevent zaprinast from increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) The enhancers identified are capable of releasing intracellular Ca(2+) stores independently of zaprinast or PKG. One of these enhancers blocks parasite egress and invasion and shows strong antiparasitic activity against T. gondii The same compound inhibits invasion of the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum Inhibition of Ca(2+)-related phenotypes in these two apicomplexan parasites suggests that depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by the enhancer may be an effective antiparasitic strategy. These results establish a powerful new strategy for identifying compounds that modulate the essential parasite signaling pathways regulated by Ca(2+), underscoring the importance of these pathways and the therapeutic potential of their inhibition. PMID:26933036

  11. Genetically encoded calcium indicators for multi-color neural activity imaging and combination with optogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper eAkerboom

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs are powerful tools for systems neuroscience. Here we describe red, single-wavelength GECIs, RCaMPs, engineered from circular permutation of the thermostable red fluorescent protein mRuby. High-resolution crystal structures of mRuby, the red sensor RCaMP, and the recently published red GECI R-GECO1 give insight into the chromophore environments of the Ca2+-bound state of the sensors and the engineered protein domain interfaces of the different indicators. We characterized the biophysical properties and performance of RCaMP sensors in vitro and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila larvae, and larval zebrafish. Further, we demonstrate 2-color calcium imaging both within the same cell (registering mitochondrial and somatic [Ca2+] and between two populations of cells: neurons and astrocytes. Finally, we perform integrated optogenetics experiments, wherein neural activation via channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 or a red-shifted variant, and activity imaging via RCaMP or GCaMP, are conducted simultaneously, with the ChR2/RCaMP pair providing independently addressable spectral channels. Using this paradigm, we measure calcium responses of naturalistic and ChR2-evoked muscle contractions in vivo in crawling C. elegans. We systematically compare the RCaMP sensors to R-GECO1, in terms of action potential-evoked fluorescence increases in neurons, photobleaching, and photoswitching. R-GECO1 displays higher Ca2+ affinity and larger dynamic range than RCaMP, but exhibits significant photoactivation with blue and green light, suggesting that integrated channelrhodopsin-based optogenetics using R-GECO1 may be subject to artifact. Finally, we create and test blue, cyan and yellow variants engineered from GCaMP by rational design. This engineered set of chromatic variants facilitates new experiments in functional imaging and optogenetics.

  12. Monitoring cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) in stimulated breast cancer cells using genetically encoded FRET sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, Anne M; Taylor, Kathryn M; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    The Zn(2+)-specific ion channel ZIP7 has been implicated to play an important role in releasing Zn(2+) from the ER. External stimulation of breast cancer cells has been proposed to induce phosphorylation of ZIP7 by CK2α, resulting in ZIP7-mediated Zn(2+) release from the ER into the cytosol. Here, we examined whether changes in cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) concentrations can be detected upon such external stimuli. Two previously developed FRET sensors for Zn(2+), eZinCh-2 (Kd = 1 nM at pH 7.1) and eCALWY-4 (Kd = 0.63 nM at pH 7.1), were expressed in both the cytosol and the ER of wild-type MCF-7 and TamR cells. Treatment of MCF-7 and TamR cells with external Zn(2+) and pyrithione, one of the previously used triggers, resulted in an immediate increase in free Zn(2+) in both cytosol and ER, suggesting that Zn(2+) was directly transferred across the cellular membranes by pyrithione. Cells treated with a second trigger, EGF/ionomycin, showed no changes in intracellular Zn(2+) levels, neither in multicolor imaging experiments that allowed simultaneous imaging of cytosolic and ER Zn(2+), nor in experiments in which cytosolic and ER Zn(2+) were monitored separately. In contrast to previous work using small-molecule fluorescent dyes, these results indicate that EGF-ionomycin treatment does not result in significant changes in cytosolic Zn(2+) levels as a result from Zn(2+) release from the ER. These results underline the importance of using genetically encoded fluorescent sensors to complement and verify intracellular imaging experiments with synthetic fluorescent Zn(2+) dyes. PMID:26739447

  13. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eGee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators, have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (< 5 kb. In utero electroporation offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5-14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal

  14. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  15. Illumination of the Spatial Order of Intracellular pH by Genetically Encoded pH-Sensitive Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Mojca Benčina

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been extensively used for engineering genetically encoded sensors that can monitor levels of ions, enzyme activities, redox potential, and metabolites. Certain fluorescent proteins possess specific pH-dependent spectroscopic features, and thus can be used as indicators of intracellular pH. Moreover, concatenated pH-sensitive proteins with target proteins pin the pH sensors to a definite location within the cell, compartment, or tissue. This study provides an overview...

  16. Engineering of a genetically encodable fluorescent voltage sensor exploiting fast Ci-VSP voltage-sensing movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Mutoh, Hiroki; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Akemann, Walther; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Ci-VSP contains a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) homologous to that of voltage-gated potassium channels. Using charge displacement ('gating' current) measurements we show that voltage-sensing movements of this VSD can occur within 1 ms in mammalian membranes. Our analysis lead to development of a g...... genetically encodable fluorescent protein voltage sensor (VSFP) in which the fast, voltage-dependent conformational changes of the Ci-VSP voltage sensor are transduced to similarly fast fluorescence read-outs....

  17. Genetically Encoded FRET-Sensor Based on Terbium Chelate and Red Fluorescent Protein for Detection of Caspase-3 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Maria G. Khrenova; Bochkova, Anna A.; Ivashina, Tatiana V.; Vinokurov, Leonid M.; Alexander P. Savitsky

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the genetically encoded caspase-3 FRET-sensor based on the terbium-binding peptide, cleavable linker with caspase-3 recognition site, and red fluorescent protein TagRFP. The engineered construction performs two induction-resonance energy transfer processes: from tryptophan of the terbium-binding peptide to Tb3+ and from sensitized Tb3+ to acceptor—the chromophore of TagRFP. Long-lived terbium-sensitized emission (microseconds), pulse excitation source, and time-resolved...

  18. Transgenic mouse lines for non-invasive ratiometric monitoring of intracellular chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Batti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloride is the most abundant physiological anion and participates in a variety of cellular processes including trans-epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, and regulation of electrical excitability. The development of tools to monitor intracellular chloride concentration ([Cli] is therefore important for the evaluation of cellular function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently, several Cl-sensitive genetically encoded probes have been described which allow for non-invasive monitoring of [Cli]. Here we describe two mouse lines expressing a CFP-YFP-based Cl probe called Cl-Sensor. First, we generated transgenic mice expressing Cl-Sensor under the control of the mouse Thy1 mini promoter. Cl-Sensor exhibited good expression from postnatal day two (P2 in neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and its level increased strongly during development. Using simultaneous whole-cell monitoring of ionic currents and Cl-dependent fluorescence, we determined that the apparent EC50 to Cli was 46 mM, indicating that this line is appropriate for measuring neuronal [Cli] in postnatal mice. We also describe a transgenic mouse reporter line for Cre-dependent conditional expression of Cl-Sensor, which was targeted to the Rosa26 locus and by incorporating a strong exogenous promoter induced robust expression upon Cre-mediated recombination. We demonstrate high levels of tissue-specific expression in two different Cre-driver lines targeting cells of the myeloid lineage and peripheral sensory neurons. Using these mice the apparent EC50 of Cli was estimated to be 61 mM and 54 mM in macrophages and DRG respectively. Our data suggest that these mouse lines will be useful models for ratiometric monitoring of Cli in specific cell types in vivo.

  19. Targeted silver nanoparticles for ratiometric cell phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Toome, Kadri; Paiste, Päärn; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Braun, Gary B.; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The binding and uptake of the peptide-functionalized AgNPs by cultured PPC-1 prostate cancer and M21 melanoma cells was dependent on the cell surface expression of the cognate peptide receptors. Barcoded peptide-functionalized AgNPs were synthesized from silver and palladium isotopes. The cells were incubated with a cocktail of the barcoded nanoparticles [RPARPAR (R), GKRK (K), and control], and cellular binding and internalization of each type of nanoparticle was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of isotopic analysis were in agreement with data obtained using optical methods. Using ratiometric measurements, we were able to classify the PPC-1 cell line as mainly NRP-1-positive, with 75 +/- 5% R-AgNP uptake, and the M21 cell line as only p32-positive, with 89 +/- 9% K-AgNP uptake. The isotopically barcoded multiplexed AgNPs are useful as an in vitro ratiometric phenotyping tool and have potential uses in functional evaluation of the expression of accessible homing peptide receptors in vivo.Affinity targeting is used to deliver nanoparticles to cells and tissues. For efficient targeting, it is critical to consider the expression and accessibility of the relevant receptors in the target cells. Here, we describe isotopically barcoded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a tool for auditing affinity ligand receptors in cells. Tumor penetrating peptide RPARPAR (receptor: NRP-1) and tumor homing peptide GKRK (receptor: p32) were used as affinity ligands on the AgNPs. The

  20. Imaging voltage in zebrafish as a route to characterizing a vertebrate functional connectome: promises and pitfalls of genetically encoded indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibat, Caroline; Krishnan, Seetha; Ramaswamy, Mahathi; Baker, Bradley J; Jesuthasan, Suresh

    2016-06-01

    Neural circuits are non-linear dynamical systems that transform information based on the pattern of input, current state and functional connectivity. To understand how a given stimulus is processed, one would ideally record neural activity across the entire brain of a behaving animal, at cellular or even subcellular resolution, in addition to characterizing anatomical connectivity. Given their transparency and relatively small size, larval zebrafish provide a powerful system for brain-wide monitoring of neural activity. Genetically encoded calcium indicators have been used for this purpose, but cannot directly report hyperpolarization or sub-threshold activity. Voltage indicators, in contrast, have this capability. Here, we test whether two different genetically encoded voltage reporters, ASAP1 and Bongwoori, can be expressed and report activity in the zebrafish brain, using widefield, two-photon and light sheet microscopy. We were unable to express ASAP1 in neurons. Bongwoori, in contrast expressed well, and because of its membrane localization, allowed visualization of axon trajectories in 3D. Bongwoori displayed stimulus-evoked changes in fluorescence, which could be detected in single trials. However, under high laser illumination, puncta on neural membranes underwent spontaneous fluctuations in intensity, suggesting that the probe is susceptible to blinking artefacts. These data indicate that larval zebrafish can be used to image electrical activity in the brain of an intact vertebrate at high resolution, although care is needed in imaging and analysis. Recording activity across the whole brain will benefit from further developments in imaging hardware and indicators. PMID:27328843

  1. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Shinnawi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be developed for high-resolution, large-scale, long-term, and serial functional cellular phenotyping of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs. To achieve this goal, we combined the hiPSC technology with genetically encoded voltage (ArcLight and calcium (GCaMP5G fluorescent indicators. Expression of ArcLight and GCaMP5G in hiPSC-CMs permitted to reliably follow changes in transmembrane potential and intracellular calcium levels, respectively. This allowed monitoring short- and long-term changes in action-potential and calcium-handling properties and the development of arrhythmias in response to several pharmaceutical agents and in hiPSC-CMs derived from patients with different inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes. Combining genetically encoded fluorescent reporters with hiPSC-CMs may bring a unique value to the study of inherited disorders, developmental biology, and drug development and testing.

  2. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  3. Genetically Encoded FRET-Sensor Based on Terbium Chelate and Red Fluorescent Protein for Detection of Caspase-3 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Goryashchenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the genetically encoded caspase-3 FRET-sensor based on the terbium-binding peptide, cleavable linker with caspase-3 recognition site, and red fluorescent protein TagRFP. The engineered construction performs two induction-resonance energy transfer processes: from tryptophan of the terbium-binding peptide to Tb3+ and from sensitized Tb3+ to acceptor—the chromophore of TagRFP. Long-lived terbium-sensitized emission (microseconds, pulse excitation source, and time-resolved detection were utilized to eliminate directly excited TagRFP fluorescence and background cellular autofluorescence, which lasts a fraction of nanosecond, and thus to improve sensitivity of analyses. Furthermore the technique facilitates selective detection of fluorescence, induced by uncleaved acceptor emission. For the first time it was shown that fluorescence resonance energy transfer between sensitized terbium and TagRFP in the engineered construction can be studied via detection of microsecond TagRFP fluorescence intensities. The lifetime and distance distribution between donor and acceptor were calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. Using this data, quantum yield of terbium ions with binding peptide was estimated.

  4. A genetically encoded reporter for real-time imaging of cofilin-actin rods in living neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjie Mi

    Full Text Available Filament bundles (rods of cofilin and actin (1:1 form in neurites of stressed neurons where they inhibit synaptic function. Live-cell imaging of rod formation is hampered by the fact that overexpression of a chimera of wild type cofilin with a fluorescent protein causes formation of spontaneous and persistent rods, which is exacerbated by the photostress of imaging. The study of rod induction in living cells calls for a rod reporter that does not cause spontaneous rods. From a study in which single cofilin surface residues were mutated, we identified a mutant, cofilinR21Q, which when fused with monomeric Red Fluorescent Protein (mRFP and expressed several fold above endogenous cofilin, does not induce spontaneous rods even during the photostress of imaging. CofilinR21Q-mRFP only incorporates into rods when they form from endogenous proteins in stressed cells. In neurons, cofilinR21Q-mRFP reports on rods formed from endogenous cofilin and induced by all modes tested thus far. Rods have a half-life of 30-60 min upon removal of the inducer. Vesicle transport in neurites is arrested upon treatments that form rods and recovers as rods disappear. CofilinR21Q-mRFP is a genetically encoded rod reporter that is useful in live cell imaging studies of induced rod formation, including rod dynamics, and kinetics of rod elimination.

  5. Resolution improvement of a ratiometric wavelength measurement system by using an optical microfibre coupler

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Ding, M.; Brambilla, G; Semenova, Y.; Wu, G; Farrell, G.

    2012-01-01

    The application of microfibre couplers in a comb-filter-based ratiometric wavelength measurement system is discussed. The fabrication of microfibre coupler is presented and its temperature-dependent performance is investigated. The resolution of the ratiometric wavelength measurement system with a microfiber coupler is significantly improved in comparison with a conventional ratiometric system to better than 4 pm maintaining the potential for high measurement speed and wide measurable wavelen...

  6. Ratiometric Alcohol Sensor based on a Polymeric Nile Blue

    OpenAIRE

    Sherif Ibrahim; Nirmala Chandrasekharan; Yordan Kostov; Govind Rao

    2008-01-01

    We present a sterilizable ratiometric fluorescent ethanol sensor with sensitivity over a wide range (0-100%) of ethanol concentration v/v. The sensor is composed of a near infra red fluorescent solvatochromic dye, nile blue methacrylamide polymerized into a polyethylene (glycol) dimethacrylate matrix. The dye can typically exhibit two or more wavelength dependent shifts in the fluorescence intensities based on its different micropolar environments. Two different concentrations of the nile blu...

  7. Ratiometric Alcohol Sensor based on a Polymeric Nile Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ibrahim

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sterilizable ratiometric fluorescent ethanol sensor with sensitivity over a wide range (0-100% of ethanol concentration v/v. The sensor is composed of a near infra red fluorescent solvatochromic dye, nile blue methacrylamide polymerized into a polyethylene (glycol dimethacrylate matrix. The dye can typically exhibit two or more wavelength dependent shifts in the fluorescence intensities based on its different micropolar environments. Two different concentrations of the nile blue methacrylamide dye were prepared and polymerized into homogenous films. The fluorescence properties of the two different films were investigated with a view to determining their ethanol sensing capabilities. The sensor was immersed in a water-ethanol solvent mixture. Excitation of the dye was performed at 470 nm. The range of emission wavelengths was 480-800 nm. The ratio of the fluorescence intensities at 620 nm and 554 nm was obtained for ethanol concentrations varying from 0-100% and the calibration curve of the ratiometric fluorescence intensities over the entire concentration range of ethanol was plotted. A ratiometric intensity change of over 33% has been obtained for pure ethanol compared to that obtained for pure water. The sensor response was rapid (≤10 minutes. The sterilizable ethanol sensor exhibits good potential for on-line monitoring of the ethanol generated in an LB fermentation chamber.

  8. Fluorescent Peptide Beacons for the Selective Ratiometric Detection of Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Debabrata; Schmuck, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Heparin is extensively used as an anticoagulant drug during surgery. Two fluorophore-functionalized cationic oligopeptides HS 1 and HS 2 were developed to monitor heparin ratiometrically in aqueous media. Upon binding to heparin, HS 1 and HS 2 undergo a conformational change from an open form to a folded form, which leads to a distinct change in the fluorescence properties. HS 1 switches from pyrene monomer emission to an excimer emission. For HS 2, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process is enabled between a naphthalene donor and a dansyl acceptor. This method is highly selective for heparin relative to other similar biological analytes such as hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate. HS 1 and HS 2 could also detect heparin ratiometrically in diluted bovine serum. The strong ratiometric emission color change can also be observed by the naked eye. Addition of the polycationic protein protamine releases both HS 1 and HS 2 from their heparin complex, which simultaneously restores pyrene monomer emission for the first case and decreases the FRET process for the latter case, respectively. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and AFM studies confirm aggregate formation of heparin with HS 1 and HS 2. PMID:27534383

  9. Optical recording of neuronal activity with a genetically-encoded calcium indicator in anesthetized and freely moving mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lütcke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent calcium (Ca2+ indicator proteins (FCIPs are promising tools for functional imaging of cellular activity in living animals. However, they have still not reached their full potential for in vivo imaging of neuronal activity due to limitations in expression levels, dynamic range, and sensitivity for reporting action potentials. Here, we report that viral expression of the ratiometric Ca2+ sensor yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60 in pyramidal neurons of mouse barrel cortex enables in vivo measurement of neuronal activity with high dynamic range and sensitivity across multiple spatial scales. By combining juxtacellular recordings and two-photon imaging in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that YC3.60 can resolve single action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ transients and reliably reports bursts of APs with negligible saturation. Spontaneous and whisker-evoked Ca2+ transients were detected in individual apical dendrites and somata as well as in local neuronal populations. Moreover, bulk measurements using wide-field imaging or fiber-optics revealed sensory-evoked YC3.60 signals in large areas of the barrel field. Fiber-optic recordings in particular enabled measurements in awake, freely moving mice and revealed complex Ca2+ dynamics, possibly reflecting different behavior-related brain states. Viral expression of YC3.60 - in combination with various optical techniques - thus opens a multitude of opportunities for functional studies of the neural basis of animal behavior, from dendrites to the levels of local and large-scale neuronal populations.

  10. Visual and fluorescent detection of tyrosinase activity by using a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Zheng, Weishi; Su, Xingguang

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we designed a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe by hybridizing two differently colored quantum dots (QDs), which possess a built-in correction that eliminates the environmental effects and increases sensor accuracy. Red emissive QDs were embedded in the silica nanoparticle as reference while the green emissive QDs were covalently linked to the silica nanoparticle surface to form ratiometric fluorescence probes (RF-QDs). Dopamine (DA) was then conjugated to the surface of RF-QDs via covalent bonding. The ratiometric fluorescence probe functionalized with dopamine (DA) was highly reactive toward tyrosinase (TYR), which can catalyze the oxidization of DA to dopamine quinine and therefore quenched the fluorescence of the green QDs on the surface of ratiometric fluorescence probe. With the addition of different amounts of TYR, the ratiometric fluorescence intensity of the probe continually varied, leading to color changes from yellow-green to red. So the ratiometric fluorescence probe could be utilized for sensitive and selective detection of TYR activity. There was a good linear relationship between the ratiometric fluorescence intensity and TYR concentration in the range of 0.05-5.0 μg mL(-1), with the detection limit of 0.02 μg mL(-1). Significantly, the ratiometric fluorescence probe has been used to fabricate paper-based test strips for visual detection of TYR activity, which validates the potential on-site application. PMID:26249217

  11. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  12. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Shirmanova

    Full Text Available The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation.

  13. DNA-regulated silver nanoclusters for label-free ratiometric fluorescence detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Yang, Qianhui; Lei, Jianping; Xu, Nan; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-11-18

    Two kinds of DNA-regulated Ag nanoclusters were one-pot synthesized on an oligonucleotide, and delicately utilized in the design of a label-free ratiometric fluorescence strategy for DNA detection with simplicity and high sensitivity. PMID:25247781

  14. A Ratiometric Fluorescence Imaging System for Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Wilson

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-chip CCD imaging system has been developed for quantitative in vivo fluorescence imaging. This incorporates a ratiometric algorithm to correct for the effects of tissue optical absorption and scattering, imaging “geometry” and tissue autofluorescence background. The performance was characterized, and the algorithm was validated in tissue-simulating optical phantoms for quantitative measurement of the fluorescent molecule protoporphyrin IX (PpIX. The technical feasibility to use this system for fluorescence-guided surgical resection of malignant brain tumor tissue was assessed in an animal model in which PpIX was induced exogenously in the tumor cells by systemic administration of aminolevulinic acid (ALA.

  15. Ratiometric fluorescence signalling of fluoride ions by an amidophthalimide derivative

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moloy Sarkar; Raghavendra Yellampalli; Bhaswati Bhattacharya; Ravi Kumar Kanaparthi; Anunay Samanta

    2007-03-01

    Fluorescence behaviour of 4-benzoylamido-N-methylphthalimide (1), designed and developed for selective detection of fluoride ions, is reported. 1 displays F--induced colour change that allows its detection with the naked eye. The F- specificity of the sensor system is evident from the fact that unlike F-, other halides do not affect the absorption characteristics of 1. Apart from the colorimetric response, the fluorescence output of 1 is also modulated by F- in a manner that permits ratiometric fluorescence signalling of F- as well. It is found that the system can detect F- in the concentration range of 10- 60 M. The results of the experiments and theoretical calculations unambiguously suggest that the changes of the electronic absorption and fluorescence behaviour of 1, which have been exploited for signalling purpose, are due to F--induced deprotonation of the 4-amido moiety of the sensor system.

  16. Ratiometric fluorescence, electrochemiluminescence, and photoelectrochemical chemo/biosensing based on semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent sensors, which can provide built-in self-calibration for correction of a variety of analyte-independent factors, have attracted particular attention for analytical sensing and optical imaging with the potential to provide a precise and quantitative analysis. A wide variety of ratiometric sensing probes using small fluorescent molecules have been developed. Compared with organic dyes, exploiting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in ratiometric fluorescence sensing is even more intriguing, owing to their unique optical and photophysical properties that offer significant advantages over organic dyes. In this review, the main photophysical mechanism for generating dual-emission from QDs for ratiometry is discussed and categorized in detail. Typically, dual-emission can be obtained either with energy transfer from QDs to dyes or with independent dual fluorophores of QDs and dye/QDs. The recent discovery of intrinsic dual-emission from Mn-doped QDs offers new opportunities for ratiometric sensing. Particularly, the signal transduction of QDs is not restricted to fluorescence, and electrochemiluminescence and photoelectrochemistry from QDs are also promising for sensing, which can be made ratiometric for correction of interferences typically encountered in electrochemistry. All these unique photophysical properties of QDs lead to a new avenue of ratiometry, and the recent progress in this area is addressed and summarized here. Several interesting applications of QD-based ratiometry are presented for the determination of metal ions, temperature, and biomolecules, with specific emphasis on the design principles and photophysical mechanisms of these probes.

  17. Economical wireless optical ratiometric pH sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuppu, Sandeep; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2009-04-01

    The development and application of a portable, wireless fluorescence-based optical pH sensor is presented. The design incorporates the MSP430 microcontroller as the control unit, an RF transceiver for wireless communication, digital filters and amplifiers and a USB-based communication module for data transmission. The pH sensor is based on ratiometric fluorescence detection from pH sensitive dye incorporated in a peel-and-stick patch. The ability of the instrument to detect the pH of the solution with contact only between the sensor patch and the solution makes it partially non-invasive. The instrument also has the ability to transmit data wirelessly, enabling its use in processes that entail stringent temperature control and sterility. The use of the microcontroller makes it a reliable, low-cost and low-power device. The luminous intensity of the light source can be digitally controlled to maximize the sensitivity of the instrument. It has a resolution of 0.05 pH. The sensor is accurate and reversible over the pH range of 6.5-9.

  18. Economical wireless optical ratiometric pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and application of a portable, wireless fluorescence-based optical pH sensor is presented. The design incorporates the MSP430 microcontroller as the control unit, an RF transceiver for wireless communication, digital filters and amplifiers and a USB-based communication module for data transmission. The pH sensor is based on ratiometric fluorescence detection from pH sensitive dye incorporated in a peel-and-stick patch. The ability of the instrument to detect the pH of the solution with contact only between the sensor patch and the solution makes it partially non-invasive. The instrument also has the ability to transmit data wirelessly, enabling its use in processes that entail stringent temperature control and sterility. The use of the microcontroller makes it a reliable, low-cost and low-power device. The luminous intensity of the light source can be digitally controlled to maximize the sensitivity of the instrument. It has a resolution of 0.05 pH. The sensor is accurate and reversible over the pH range of 6.5–9

  19. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  20. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms Using C-SNARF-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Nyvad, Bente; Bælum, Vibeke; Schlafer, Sebastian

    H-sensitive ratiometric dye and as a bacterial stain. We tested the method on natural 48-h in-situ-grown dental biofilms from two individuals. Four biofilms per person were collected on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances. Digital image analysis was employed to remove the bacterial biomass from the...... fluorescent microscopy can overcome these problems. The aim of this demonstration study was to monitor extracellular biofilm pH microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in in-situ-grown dental biofilms. Methods: Using confocal microscopy, the dye C-SNARF-4 was employed both as p...

  1. Fluorescence Ratiometric Properties Induced by Nanoparticle Plasmonics and Nanoscale Dye Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Hakonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale transport of merocyanine 540 within/near the plasmon field of gold nanoparticles was recognized as an effective inducer of single-excitation dual-emission ratiometric properties. With a high concentration of the signal transducer (ammonium, a 700% increase in fluorescence was observed at the new red-shifted emission maximum, compared to a nanoparticle free sensor membrane. A previously nonrecognized isosbestic point is demonstrated at  nm. The mechanism can be utilized for enhanced and simplified ratiometric optical chemical sensors and potentially for thin film engineering to make solar cells more effective and stable by a broader and more regulated absorption.

  2. Design of modular "plug-and-play" expression platforms derived from natural riboswitches for engineering novel genetically encodable RNA regulatory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Batey, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encodable RNA devices that directly detect small molecules in the cellular environment are of increasing interest for a variety of applications including live cell imaging and synthetic biology. Riboswitches are naturally occurring sensors of intracellular metabolites, primarily found in the bacterial mRNA leaders and regulating their expression. These regulatory elements are generally composed of two domains: an aptamer that binds a specific effector molecule and an expression platform that informs the transcriptional or translational machinery. While it was long established that riboswitch aptamers are modular and portable, capable of directing different output domains including ribozymes, switches, and fluorophore-binding modules, the same has not been demonstrated until recently for expression platforms. We have engineered and validated a set of expression platforms that regulate transcription through a secondary structural switch that can host a variety of different aptamers, including those derived through in vitro selection methods, to create novel chimeric riboswitches. These synthetic switches are capable of a highly specific regulatory response both in vitro and in vivo. Here we present the methodology for the design and engineering of chimeric switches using biological expression platforms. PMID:25605380

  3. Preassembly-driven ratiometric sensing of H2PO4(-) anions in organic and aqueous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei-tao; Na, Duo; Fang, Le; Mehdi, Hassan; Ning, Gui-ling

    2015-02-21

    Gemini surfactant-like receptor is designed and synthesized. The special preassembly phenomenon of in a nonpolar solvent facilitates the novel ratiometric fluorescence sensing of H2PO4(-)via an anion-induced reassembly process in organic solvents and an anion-induced disassembly process in water. PMID:25563510

  4. Enhanced ratiometric fluorescent indicators for magnesium based on azoles of the heavier chalcogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Mohammad S; Pitteloud, Jean-Philippe; Buccella, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    Red-shifted fluorescent indicators for magnesium were developed by incorporation of sulfur or selenium in the azole moiety of 'fura' fluorophores. Single atom replacement in the acceptor of these ITC probes affords longer excitation and emission wavelengths as well as greater separation between excitation bands, valuable for ratiometric intracellular Mg(2+) imaging. PMID:25164869

  5. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of biogenic primary amines with nanomolar sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Suman; Chandra, Falguni; Koner, Apurba L

    2016-02-01

    An ultrasensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor made of an N,N-dimethylaminonaphthalene anhydride moiety for detection of aliphatic primary amines is reported. Biogenic amines at nanomolar concentration is detected with the additional ability to discriminate between primary, secondary and tertiary amines by using both UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26734688

  6. A ratiometric strategy to detect hydrogen sulfide with a gold nanoclusters based fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Lei, Yingjie; Zhang, Xinrong; Zhang, Sichun

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of ratiometric fluorescent probes have offered more convincing results to the bioanalytical field of research. In particular, using nanoparticles as scaffolds for the construction of ratiometric systems has received increasing attention. In this work, a novel design strategy was implemented for ratiometric sensing of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), in which bovine serum albumin templated gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) was served as the internal reference fluorophore and HSip-1, a azamacrocyclic Cu(2+) complex based fluorescent probe toward H2S, acted as both the signal indicator and specific recognition element. Under single wavelength excitation, the nanohybrid probe HSip-1@AuNC emitted dual fluorescence at 519 and 632nm, coming from HSip-1 and AuNCs respectively. The effective fluorescence response of organic dye to H2S and constant fluorescence of AuNCs enabled the proposed HSip-1@AuNC to achieve the ratiometric measurement with a dynamic linear range of 7-100μM and a detection limit of 0.73μM. This probe also possesses high selectivity, stability against pH change and continuously light illumination. In addition, we provided HSip-1@AuNC as a valuable tool to analyze sulfides in serum samples and perfect recoveries verified its potential in biological applications. PMID:27154665

  7. Dual-emitting MOF⊃dye composite for ratiometric temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanjing; Song, Ruijing; Yu, Jiancan; Liu, Min; Wang, Ziqi; Wu, Chuande; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Chen, Banglin; Qian, Guodong

    2015-02-25

    A strategy to achieve a ratiometric thermometer by encapsulating luminescent perylene dye into the pores of a europium metal-organic framework (MOF) is developed. The resulting MOF⊃dye thermometer exhibits highly temperature-dependent luminescence intensity ratio over the physiological temperature range, with a maximum sensitivity of 1.28% °C(-1) at 20 °C. PMID:25581401

  8. Unconventional ratiometric-enhanced optical sensing of oxygen by mixed-phase TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, S.; Pallotti, D. K.; Gesuele, F.; Maddalena, P.

    2016-07-01

    We show that mixed-phase titanium dioxide (TiO2) can be effectively employed as an unconventional, inorganic, dual-emitting, and ratiometric optical sensor of O2. Simultaneous availability of rutile and anatase TiO2 photoluminescence (PL) and their peculiar "anti-correlated" PL responses to O2 allow using their ratio as a measurement parameter associated with the O2 concentration, leading to an experimental responsivity being by construction larger than the one obtainable for single-phase PL detection. A proof of this concept is given, showing a two-fold enhancement of the optical responsivity provided by the ratiometric approach. Besides the peculiar ratiometric-enhanced responsivity, other characteristics of mixed phase TiO2 can be envisaged as favorable for O2 optical probing, namely (a) low production costs, (b) absence of heterogeneous components, and (c) self-supporting properties. These characteristics encourage experimenting with its use for applications requiring high indicator quantities at a competitive price, possibly also tackling the need to develop supporting matrixes that carry the luminescent probes and avoiding issues related to the use of different components for ratiometric sensing.

  9. Biosynthesis of the 22nd Genetically Encoded Amino Acid Pyrrolysine: Structure and Reaction Mechanism of PylC at 1.5Å Resolution

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2012-12-01

    The second step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid pyrrolysine (Pyl) is catalyzed by PylC that forms the pseudopeptide l-lysine-Nε-3R-methyl-d-ornithine. Here, we present six crystal structures of the monomeric active ligase in complex with substrates, reaction intermediates, and products including ATP, the non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue 5′-adenylyl-β-γ-imidodiphosphate, ADP, d-ornithine (d-Orn), l-lysine (Lys), phosphorylated d-Orn, l-lysine-Nε-d-ornithine, inorganic phosphate, carbonate, and Mg2 +. The overall structure of PylC reveals similarities to the superfamily of ATP-grasp enzymes; however, there exist unique structural and functional features for a topological control of successive substrate entry and product release. Furthermore, the presented high-resolution structures provide detailed insights into the reaction mechanism of isopeptide bond formation starting with phosphorylation of d-Orn by transfer of a phosphate moiety from activated ATP. The binding of Lys to the enzyme complex is then followed by an SN2 reaction resulting in l-lysine-Nε-d-ornithine and inorganic phosphate. Surprisingly, PylC harbors two adenine nucleotides bound at the active site, what has not been observed in any ATP-grasp protein analyzed to date. Whereas one ATP molecule is involved in catalysis, the second adenine nucleotide functions as a selective anchor for the C- and N-terminus of the Lys substrate and is responsible for protein stability as shown by mutagenesis. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A near-Infrared Fluorescent Chemodosimeter for Ratiometric Detecting Fluoride Based on Desilylation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Puhui; Guo, Fengqi; Gao, Guangqin; Fan, Wei; Yang, Guoyu; Xie, Lixia

    2016-09-01

    A new chemodosimeter based on dicyanomethylene-4H-chromene chromophore (probe 1) was developed as a ratiometric fluorescent probe in near-infrared range for F(-) with good selectivity in acetonitrile. Probe 1 could be used to directly visualize F(-) by the naked eye and showed more than 621-fold fluorescence enhancement at 715 nm upon reaction with F(-) upon excitation at 625 nm. The recognition of probe 1 to fluoride was featured by F(-)-induced red-shifts of both absorption (185 nm) and fluorescence peaks (132 nm) based on internal charge transfer (ICT) in acetonitrile. The desilylation reaction of 1 by F(-) was proposed for its dual absorption and emission ratiometric detection of fluoride. PMID:27365125

  11. A simple ratiometric and colorimetric chemosensor for the selective detection of fluoride in DMSO buffered solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hu; Shu, Qinghai; Jin, Shaohua; Li, Bingjun; Zhu, Jiaping; Li, Lijie; Chen, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    A derivative of squaramide (cyclobuta[b]quinoxaline-1, 2(3H, 8H)-dione) has been synthesized for the ratiometric and colorimetric sensing of F- in aqueous solution in competitive fashion. With F-, probe 1 showed a highly selective naked-eye detectable color change along with a characteristic UV-Vis absorbance over other tested ions, which probably originates from the deprotonation occurred between 1 and F-, as proved by the 1H NMR titration experiments and DFT calculations.

  12. Peptide-Based, Two-Fluorophore, Ratiometric Probe for Quantifying Mobile Zinc in Biological Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Daniel Y.; Azrad, Maria; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frederickson, Christopher J.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Radford, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule fluorescent sensors are versatile agents for detecting mobile zinc in biology. Capitalizing on the abundance of validated mobile zinc probes, we devised a strategy for repurposing existing intensity-based sensors for quantitative applications. Using solid-phase peptide synthesis, we conjugated a zinc-sensitive Zinpyr-1 derivative and a zinc-insensitive 7-hydroxycoumarin derivative onto opposite ends of a rigid P9K peptide scaffold to create HcZ9, a ratiometric fluorescent probe...

  13. Studies of Hematopoietic Cell Differentiation with a Ratiometric and Reversible Sensor of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jankowska, Karolina; Pilgrim, Chelsea; Fraser, Stuart T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Chronic elevations in cellular redox state are known to result in the onset of various pathological conditions, but transient increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are necessary for signal transduction and various physiological functions. There is a distinct lack of reversible fluorescent tools that can aid in studying and unraveling the roles of ROS/RNS in physiology and pathology by monitoring the variations in cellular ROS levels over time. In this work, we report the development of ratiometric fluorescent sensors that reversibly respond to changes in mitochondrial redox state. Results: Photophysical studies of the developed flavin–rhodamine redox sensors, flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 1 (FRR1) and flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 2 (FRR2), confirmed the reversible response of the probes upon reduction and re-oxidation over more than five cycles. The ratiometric output of FRR1 and FRR2 remained unaltered in the presence of other possible cellular interferants (metals and pH). Microscopy studies indicated clear mitochondrial localization of both probes, and FRR2 was shown to report the time-dependent increase of mitochondrial ROS levels after lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages. Moreover, it was used to study the variations in mitochondrial redox state in mouse hematopoietic cells at different stages of embryonic development and maturation. Innovation: This study provides the first ratiometric and reversible probes for ROS, targeted to the mitochondria, which reveal variations in mitochondrial ROS levels at different stages of embryonic and adult blood cell production. Conclusions: Our results suggest that with their ratiometric and reversible outputs, FRR1 and FRR2 are valuable tools for the future study of oxidative stress and its implications in physiology and pathology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 667–679. PMID:26865422

  14. A Highly Selective Ratiometric Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Human Cytochrome P450 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zi-Ru; Ge, Guang-Bo; Feng, Lei; Ning, Jing; Hu, Liang-Hai; Jin, Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Lv, Xia; Dou, Tong-Yi; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2015-11-18

    Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), one of the most important phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans, plays a crucial role in the metabolic activation of procarcinogenic compounds to their ultimate carcinogens. Herein, we reported the development of a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe NCMN that allowed for selective and sensitive detection of CYP1A for the first time. The probe was designed on the basis of substrate preference of CYP1A and its high capacity for O-dealkylation, while 1,8-naphthalimide was selected as fluorophore because of its two-photon absorption properties. To achieve a highly selective probe for CYP1A, a series of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives were synthesized and used to explore the potential structure-selectivity relationship, by using a panel of human CYP isoforms for selectivity screening. After screening and optimization, NCMN displayed the best combination of selectivity, sensitivity and ratiometric fluorescence response following CYP1A-catalyzed O-demetylation. Furthermore, the probe can be used to real-time monitor the enzyme activity of CYP1A in complex biological systems, and it has the potential for rapid screening of CYP1A modulators using tissue preparation as enzyme sources. NCMN has also been successfully used for two-photon imaging of intracellular CYP1A in living cells and tissues, and showed high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep-tissue imaging depth. In summary, a two-photon excited ratiometric fluorescent probe NCMN has been developed and well-characterized for sensitive and selective detection of CYP1A, which holds great promise for bioimaging of endogenous CYP1A in living cells and for further investigation on CYP1A associated biological functions in complex biological systems. PMID:26488456

  15. A quinoline based pH sensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor: Structure and spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soma Mukherjee; Amit Kumar Paul; Helen Stoeckli-Evans

    2015-09-01

    A new quinoline based hydrazone was synthesized via a condensation reaction and characterized by NMR, mass and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. It was investigated for suitability as a reversible ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor in acidic pH region. The sensor exhibits intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) type photophysical changes upon protonation of the quinoline ring. No significant interference on emission behavior was observed in the presence of various metal ions.

  16. An effective colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe for bisulfite in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed the first two-photon colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe, BICO, for the detection of bisulfite (HSO3−) in aqueous solution. The probe contains coumarin and benzimidazole moieties and can detect HSO3− based on the Michael addition reaction with a limit of detection 5.3 × 10−8 M in phosphate-buffered saline solution. The probe was used to detect bisulfite in tap water, sugar and dry white wine. Moreover, test strips were made and used easily. We successfully applied the probe to image living cells, using one-photon fluorescence imaging. BICO overcomes the limitations in sensitivity of previously reported probes and the solvation effect of bisulfite, which demonstrates its excellent value in practical application. - Highlights: • A colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe was developed. • The probe could detect bisulfite in PBS buffer solution and real samples. • Bisulfite test paper was made to naked-eye detect bisulfite. • This probe successfully used to living cell imaging in ratiometric manner

  17. An effective colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe for bisulfite in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xi [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Tao [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Du, Zhi-Fang; Cao, Xiang-Jian; Chen, Ming-Yu [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Hu, Sheng-Wen [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Miao, Jun-Ying, E-mail: miaojy@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Bao-Xiang, E-mail: bxzhao@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-08-12

    We have developed the first two-photon colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe, BICO, for the detection of bisulfite (HSO{sub 3}{sup −}) in aqueous solution. The probe contains coumarin and benzimidazole moieties and can detect HSO{sub 3}{sup −} based on the Michael addition reaction with a limit of detection 5.3 × 10{sup −8} M in phosphate-buffered saline solution. The probe was used to detect bisulfite in tap water, sugar and dry white wine. Moreover, test strips were made and used easily. We successfully applied the probe to image living cells, using one-photon fluorescence imaging. BICO overcomes the limitations in sensitivity of previously reported probes and the solvation effect of bisulfite, which demonstrates its excellent value in practical application. - Highlights: • A colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe was developed. • The probe could detect bisulfite in PBS buffer solution and real samples. • Bisulfite test paper was made to naked-eye detect bisulfite. • This probe successfully used to living cell imaging in ratiometric manner.

  18. Antibody-based fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh Nhat, Kim Phuong; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Yoshikoshi, Kensuke; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescent indicators for protein phosphorylation are very important in not only fundamental biology but also biomedical applications. In this study, we developed novel fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators for detection of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) derivatives. A single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv) against phosphotyrosine was fluorescent-labeled by incorporation of tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)-linked nonnatural amino acid at the N- or C-terminus. The TAMRA-labeled scFv showed fluorescence enhancement upon addition of pTyr-containing peptides based on antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect on TAMRA. The TAMRA-labeled scFv was further fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to generate a double-labeled scFv for pTyr. In the absence of antigen, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred from EGFP to TAMRA but TAMRA was quenched. The antigen-binding removed the quenching of TAMRA while FRET occurred without altering its efficiency. As a result of the FRET and antigen-dependent fluorescence quenching effect, the double-labeled scFv exhibited fluorescence ratio enhancement upon the antigen-binding. The fluorescent and fluorescent ratiometric indicators obtained in this study will become a novel tool for analysis of protein phosphorylation. Moreover, this strategy utilizes antibody derivatives, and therefore, can be easily applied to other antigen-antibody pairs to generate fluorescent ratiometric indicators for various target molecules. PMID:26896314

  19. Imaging of Fluoride Ion in Living Cells and Tissues with a Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A reaction-based two-photon (TP ratiometric fluorescence probe Z2 has been developed and successfully applied to detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues. The Z2 probe was designed designed to utilize an ICT mechanism between n-butylnaphthalimide as a fluorophore and tert-butyldiphenylsilane (TBDPS as a response group. Upon addition of fluoride ion, the Si-O bond in the Z2 would be cleaved, and then a stronger electron-donating group was released. The fluorescent changes at 450 and 540 nm, respectively, made it possible to achieve ratiometric fluorescence detection. The results indicated that the Z2 could ratiometrically detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues in a depth of 250 μm by two-photon microscopy (TPM.

  20. A novel ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for imaging of Pd2 + ions in living cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probes can not only eliminate interferences from environmental factors but also achieve deep-tissue imaging with improved spatial localization. To quantitatively track Pd2 + in biosystems, herein, we reported a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe, termed as Np-Pd, which based on a D-π-A-structure two-photon fluorophore of the naphthalimide derivative and deprotection of aryl propargyl ethers by palladium species. The probe Np-Pd displayed a more than 25-fold enhancement towards palladium species with high sensitivity and selectivity. Additionally, the probe Np-Pd was further used for fluorescence imaging of Pd2 + ions in living cells and tissues under two-photon excitation (820 nm), which showed large tissue-imaging depth (19.6-184.6 μm), and a high resolution for ratiometric imaging.

  1. A novel ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for imaging of Pd(2+) ions in living cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probes can not only eliminate interferences from environmental factors but also achieve deep-tissue imaging with improved spatial localization. To quantitatively track Pd(2+) in biosystems, herein, we reported a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe, termed as Np-Pd, which based on a D-π-A-structure two-photon fluorophore of the naphthalimide derivative and deprotection of aryl propargyl ethers by palladium species. The probe Np-Pd displayed a more than 25-fold enhancement towards palladium species with high sensitivity and selectivity. Additionally, the probe Np-Pd was further used for fluorescence imaging of Pd(2+) ions in living cells and tissues under two-photon excitation (820nm), which showed large tissue-imaging depth (19.6-184.6μm), and a high resolution for ratiometric imaging. PMID:27203231

  2. A Three-Photon Active Organic Fluorophore for Deep Tissue Ratiometric Imaging of Intracellular Divalent Zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Divya Susan; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; He, Tingchao; Menon, Nishanth Venugopal; Anees, Palapuravan; Mathew, Jomon; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Kang, Yuejun; Stuparu, Mihaiela Corina; Sun, Handong; Zhao, Yanli; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2016-05-20

    Deep tissue bioimaging with three-photon (3P) excitation using near-infrared (NIR) light in the second IR window (1.0-1.4 μm) could provide high resolution images with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we report a photostable and nontoxic 3P excitable donor-π-acceptor system (GMP) having 3P cross-section (σ3 ) of 1.78×10(-80)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) and action cross-section (σ3 η3 ) of 2.31×10(-81)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) , which provides ratiometric fluorescence response with divalent zinc ions in aqueous conditions. The probe signals the Zn(2+) binding at 530 and 600 nm, respectively, upon 1150 nm excitation with enhanced σ3 of 1.85×10(-80)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) and σ3 η3 of 3.33×10(-81)  cm(6)  s(2)  photon(-2) . The application of this probe is demonstrated for ratiometric 3P imaging of Zn(2+) in vitro using HuH-7 cell lines. Furthermore, the Zn(2+) concentration in rat hippocampal slices was imaged at 1150 nm excitation after incubation with GMP, illustrating its potential as a 3P ratiometric probe for deep tissue Zn(2+) ion imaging. PMID:26991763

  3. Development of Ultrabright Semiconducting Polymer Dots for Ratiometric pH Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Wu, Changfeng; Ye, Fangmao; Jin, Yuhui; Smith, Polina B.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconducting polymer-based nanoparticles (Pdots) have recently emerged as a new class of ultrabright probes for biological detection and imaging. This paper describes the development of poly(2,5-di(3', 7'-dimethyloctyl)phenylene-1,4-ethynylene) (PPE) Pdots as a platform for designing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric pH nanoprobes. We describe and compare three routes for coupling the pH-sensitive dye, fluorescein, to PPE Pdots, which is a pH-insensitive semiconduct...

  4. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  5. Small quinolinium-based enzymatic probes via blue-to-red ratiometric fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Du, Jiajun; Liu, Huijing; Bi, Guoqiang; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-02-01

    A small fluorescence ratiometric probe consisting of a single dye species, N-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium (MHQ), and coupled enzymatic substrates, exhibits a dramatic colour change (deep blue to red) and possesses a huge response ratio (over 2000 fold) upon specific recognition of target enzymes. Such dramatic responses are attributed to the excited-state proton transfer processes of MHQ molecules in water. Here the detection of β-galactosidase and porcine pancreatic lipase is successfully demonstrated and this class of molecules has the potential to be developed as a "naked-eye" probe in vitro. PMID:26788553

  6. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  7. A ratiometric nanosensor based on conjugated polyelectrolyte-stabilized AgNPs for ultrasensitive fluorescent and colorimetric sensing of melamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xixi; Xiao, Yi; Jiang, Xiaoying; Li, Jiahui; Qin, Hongling; Huang, Hongmei; Zhang, Youyu; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2016-05-01

    A new ratiometric nanosensor is developed for selective and ultrasensitive detection of melamine based on conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)-stabilized silver nanoparticles (P1-AgNPs) by perfectly combining the advantages of CPE and AgNPs. P1 featuring a π-delocalized backbone bearing pyridinyl groups can act as an excellent dual-emission fluorescent probe as well as a polymer localizer for AgNPs. In the presence of melamine, the fluorescence intensity at 386nm increases owing to the turn-on of the fluorescence of P1, whereas FL intensity at 488nm decreases due to the melamine-induced aggregation and subsequent aggregation-enhanced emission quenching of P1-AgNPs, therefore leading to the ratiometric fluorescent sensing of analyte. Moreover, analyte-induced aggregation of P1-AgNPs also allows the ratiometric colorimetric measurement of melamine. Under the optimum conditions, this facile ratiometric nanosensor favors the fluorescent and colorimetric determination of melamine in liquid milk products with the detection limit as low as 0.1 and 0.45nM, respectively. PMID:26946011

  8. A C2-symmetric ratiometric fluorescence and colorimetric anion sensor based on pyrrole derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A C2-symmetric fluorescence and colorimetric anion sensor (1) based on pyrrole derivative was designed and synthesized according to binding site-signaling subunit approach. The compound 1 was easily prepared by reaction of pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde with 4-nitrophenylhydrazine in ethanol (yield=78%). In DMSO, the sensor 1 exhibited a visible color change from red to brown upon exposure to anions such as AcO- and F-; however, no obvious color changes were observed when the other tested anions (e. g. H2PO4-, Cl-, Br- and I-) were added. There was a significant redshift (Δλmax=160 nm) in UV-vis spectrum during UV-vis spectral titrations. In particular, the sensor 1 showed ratiometric fluorescence responses to anions. - Highlights: → C2-symmetric fluorescence and colorimetric anion sensor based on pyrrole derivative was designed and synthesized according to binding site-signaling subunit approach. → The sensor was easily prepared by reaction of pyrrole-2,5-dicarboxaldehyde with 4-nitrophenylhydrazine in ethanol (yield=78%). → In DMSO, the sensor exhibited a visible color change from red to brown upon exposure to anions such as AcO- and F-, however, no obvious color changes were observed when the other anions tested (e. g. H2PO4-, Cl-, Br- and I-) were added. → The sensor showed ratiometric fluorescence responses to anions.

  9. Dual excitation ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor for noninvasive bioprocess monitoring: development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermis, Haley R; Kostov, Yordan; Harms, Peter; Rao, Govind

    2002-01-01

    The development and application of a fluorescent excitation-ratiometric, noninvasive pH sensor for continuous on-line fermentation monitoring is presented. The ratiometric approach is robust and insensitive to factors such as source intensity, photobleaching, or orientation of the patch, and since measurements can be made with external instrumentation and without direct contact with the patch, detection is completely noninvasive. The fluorescent dye 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene trisulfonic acid was immobilized onto Dowex strongly basic anion-exchange resin, which was subsequently entrapped into a proton-permeable hydrogel layer. The sensor layer was polymerized directly onto a white microfiltration membrane backing that provided an optical barrier to the fluorescence and scatter of the fermentation medium. The ratio of emission intensity at 515 nm excited at 468 nm to that excited at 408 nm correlated well with the pH of clear buffers, over the pH range of 6-9. The sensor responded rapidly (line pH monitoring of an E. coli fermentation. The output from the indwelling sensor patch was always in good agreement with the pH recorded off-line with an ISFET probe, with a maximum discrepancy of 0.05 pH units. The sensor is easily adaptable to closed-loop feedback control systems. PMID:12363356

  10. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms Using C-SNARF-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene

    H-sensitive ratiometric dye and as a bacterial stain. We tested the method on natural 48-h in-situ-grown dental biofilms from two individuals. Four biofilms per person were collected on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances. Digital image analysis was employed to remove the bacterial biomass from the......pH in dental biofilms plays a central role for the development of caries lesions. For decades, pH measurements in biofilms have been limited to recording pH with electrodes/microelectrodes that do not permit monitoring horizontal pH gradients in biofilms in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent...... microscopy can overcome these problems. Objective: The aim of this demonstration study was to monitor extracellular biofilm pH microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in in-situ-grown dental biofilms. Methods: Using confocal microscopy, the dye C-SNARF-4 was employed both as p...

  11. Ratiometric QD-FRET Sensing of Aqueous H2S in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamirian, Armen; Samareh Afsari, Hamid; Wu, Donghui; Miller, Lawrence W; Snee, Preston T

    2016-06-01

    We report a platform for the ratiometric fluorescent sensing of endogenously generated gaseous transmitter H2S in its aqueous form (bisulfide or hydrogen sulfide anion) based on the alteration of Förster resonance energy transfer from an emissive semiconductor quantum dot (QD) donor to a dithiol-linked organic dye acceptor. The disulfide bridge between the two chromophores is cleaved upon exposure to bisulfide, resulting in termination of FRET as the dye diffuses away from the QD. This results in enhanced QD emission and dye quenching. The resulting ratiometric response can be correlated quantitatively to the concentration of bisulfide and was found to have a detection limit as low as 1.36 ± 0.03 μM. The potential for use in biological applications was demonstrated by measuring the response of the QD-based FRET sensor microinjected into live HeLa cells upon extracellular exposure to bisulfide. The methodology used here is built upon a highly multifunctional platform that offers numerous advantages, such as low detection limit, enhanced photochemical stability, and sensing ability within a biological milieu. PMID:27156947

  12. An efficient ratiometric fluorescent probe for tracking dynamic changes in lysosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhou, Liyi; Qiu, Liping; Lu, Danqing; Wu, Yongxiang; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2015-08-21

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles (approximately pH 4.5-5.5) and tracking the changes in lysosomal pH is of great biological importance. To address this issue, quite a few of fluorescent probes have been developed. However, few of these probes can realize the tracking of dynamic changes in lysosomal pH. Herein, we report a new lysosome-targeted ratiometric fluorescent probe (FR-Lys) by hybridizing morpholine with a xanthane derivative and an o-hydroxy benzoxazole group. In this probe, the morpholine group serves as a targeting unit for lysosome, the xanthane derivative exhibits a pH-modulated open/close reaction of the spirocycle, while the o-hydroxy benzoxazole moiety shows a pH modulated excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. Such a design affords the probe a ratiometric fluorescence response towards pH with pH values ranging from 4.0 to 6.3. The response of the probe to pH was fast and reversible with high selectivity. Moreover, this probe possesses further advantages such as easy synthesis, high photostability and low cytotoxicity. These features are favorable for tracking dynamic pH changes in biosystems. It was then applied for dynamic imaging pH changes in lysosomes with satisfactory results. PMID:26107774

  13. A cyclization-induced emission enhancement (CIEE)-based ratiometric fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for the facile detection of a nerve agent simulant DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Ajit Kumar; Maiti, Kalipada; Manna, Saikat Kumar; Maji, Rajkishor; Mondal, Sanchita; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Sahoo, Prithidipa; Mandal, Debasish

    2015-06-14

    The first ratiometric fluorescent probe for the detection of a nerve agent simulant was developed based on tandem phosphorylation and intramolecular cyclization, by which high sensitivity as well as large emission shift could be achieved. PMID:25980383

  14. Novel pH-sensitive probes with a ratiometric detection for intracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipuy, Martin; Billon, Cyrielle; Micouin, Guillaume; Samarut, Jacques; Andraud, Chantal; Bretonnière, Yann

    2014-08-01

    The development of new pH-sensitive fluorescent probes based on a push-pull architecture is presented with a 2- dicyanomethylene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofurane as strong electron acceptor group. With a small structural change, it is possible to obtain a large range of phenolic pKa from 4.8 to 8.6 with some close to neutrality, underlining the role of the electron density modulation on the acidic properties. Remarkable changes in the optical properties (both absorption and fluorescence) were observed as a function of the pH. Ratiometric imaging of intracellular pH was carried out with the most promising probes and highlighted the possibility to distinguish near-neutral minor pH fluctuations in cells.

  15. Compact, Polyvalent Mannose Quantum Dots as Sensitive, Ratiometric FRET Probes for Multivalent Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuan; Sakonsinsiri, Chadamas; Nehlmeier, Inga; Fascione, Martin A; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Weili; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Turnbull, W Bruce; Zhou, Dejian

    2016-04-01

    A highly efficient cap-exchange approach for preparing compact, dense polyvalent mannose-capped quantum dots (QDs) has been developed. The resulting QDs have been successfully used to probe multivalent interactions of HIV/Ebola receptors DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR (collectively termed as DC-SIGN/R) using a sensitive, ratiometric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The QD probes specifically bind DC-SIGN, but not its closely related receptor DC-SIGNR, which is further confirmed by its specific blocking of DC-SIGN engagement with the Ebola virus glycoprotein. Tuning the QD surface mannose valency reveals that DC-SIGN binds more efficiently to densely packed mannosides. A FRET-based thermodynamic study reveals that the binding is enthalpy-driven. This work establishes QD FRET as a rapid, sensitive technique for probing structure and thermodynamics of multivalent protein-ligand interactions. PMID:26990806

  16. Compact, Polyvalent Mannose Quantum Dots as Sensitive, Ratiometric FRET Probes for Multivalent Protein–Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakonsinsiri, Chadamas; Nehlmeier, Inga; Fascione, Martin A.; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Weili; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Turnbull, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A highly efficient cap‐exchange approach for preparing compact, dense polyvalent mannose‐capped quantum dots (QDs) has been developed. The resulting QDs have been successfully used to probe multivalent interactions of HIV/Ebola receptors DC‐SIGN and DC‐SIGNR (collectively termed as DC‐SIGN/R) using a sensitive, ratiometric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The QD probes specifically bind DC‐SIGN, but not its closely related receptor DC‐SIGNR, which is further confirmed by its specific blocking of DC‐SIGN engagement with the Ebola virus glycoprotein. Tuning the QD surface mannose valency reveals that DC‐SIGN binds more efficiently to densely packed mannosides. A FRET‐based thermodynamic study reveals that the binding is enthalpy‐driven. This work establishes QD FRET as a rapid, sensitive technique for probing structure and thermodynamics of multivalent protein–ligand interactions.

  17. Mixed-Lanthanoid Metal-Organic Framework for Ratiometric Cryogenic Temperature Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Akerboom, Sebastiaan; de Jong, Mathijs; Mutikainen, Ilpo; Tanase, Stefania; Meijerink, Andries; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    A ratiometric thermometer based on a mixed-metal Ln(III) metal-organic framework is reported that has good sensitivity in a wide temperature range from 4 to 290 K and a quantum yield of 22% at room temperature. The sensing mechanism in the europium-doped compound Tb0.95Eu0.05HL (H4L = 5-hydroxy-1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid) is based not only on phonon-assisted energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) centers, but also on phonon-assisted energy migration between neighboring Tb(III) ions. It shows good performance in a wide temperature range, especially in the range 4-50 K, reaching a sensitivity up to 31% K(-1) at 4 K. PMID:26599972

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy incorporating a ratiometric approach for the diagnosis and classification of urothelial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Crisci, Alfonso; Nesi, Gabriella; Carini, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-02-01

    The current most popular clinical method for the screening of urothelial carcinoma is white light cystoscopy. This method has inherent disadvantages making a strong genesis towards developing more powerful diagnostic techniques. Laser induced intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied as an adjunct to current methods for the detection of tumors. This technique allows real time results based on the changes in spectral profile between normal and tumor tissues. We conducted a pilot study based on fluorescence spectroscopy at two wavelengths 378 and 445 nm excitation for the differentiation of urothelial carcinoma. At both the excitation wavelengths, the measured fluorescence signal showed an increased intensity at wavelengths greater than 520 nm. In addition, the emission profile showed modulation at 580 nm which is due to the reabsorption of emitted fluo- rescence due to hemoglobin. Additionally, we developed a tissue characterizing algorithm, based on fluorescence intensity ratios, F510/F600 and F520/F580 at 378 and 445 nm excitation wavelengths respectively. Further, the results were correlated with the pathologists assessment of urothelial carcinoma. This ratiometric classification algorithm yielded 81% sensitivity and 83% specificity at 378 nm and while at 445 nm excitation we achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 86% for classifying normal and tumor bladder tissues. In this study we have demonstrated the potential of a simple ratiometric algorithm based on fluorescence spectroscopy could be an alternative tool to tissue biopsy. Furthermore, this technique based fiber-based fluorescence spectroscopy could be integrated into an endoscopy system for use in the operating room.

  19. Analysis of Temperature Dependence for a Ratiometric Wavelength Measurement System Using SMS Fiber Structure Based Edged Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hatta, Agus; Semenova, Yuliya; Rajan, Ginu; Wang, Pengfei; Zheng, J; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Temperature dependence of an edge filter based on singlemode-multimodesinglemode (SMS) fiber structure is investigated numerically and experimentally. The experimental results and numerical results are in good agreement within an operational temperature range from 10 to 40 oC. It is found that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) has a more significant effect on the temperature dependence of an SMS edge filter compared to the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC). In the ratiometric wavelength me...

  20. A FRET-enabled molecular peptide beacon with a significant red shift for the ratiometric detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Debabrata; Jiang, Juanjuan; Ehlers, Martin; Wu, Junchen; Schmuck, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    A cationic molecular peptide beacon NAP1 functionalized with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-pair at its ends allows the ratiometric detection of ds-DNA with a preference for AT rich sequences. NAP1 most likely binds in a folded form into the minor groove of ds-DNA, which results in a remarkable change in its fluorescence properties. As NAP1 exhibits quite low cytotoxicity, it can also be used for imaging of nuclear DNA in cells. PMID:27071707

  1. A FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent and colorimetric probe for the facile detection of organophosphonate nerve agent mimic DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weimin; Cao, Yanting; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-18

    A FRET ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling a fast and highly sensitive response to OP nerve agent mimic DCP within 1 min and with as low as 0.17 ppm concentration detection limit has been developed. Moreover, the probe exhibits noticeable color changes under UV light and even with the naked eye. It is also demonstrated that it can detect both liquid and gas nerve agents. PMID:24080856

  2. Construction of single fluorophore ratiometric pH sensors using dual-emission Mn(2+)-doped quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, Feby Wijaya; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Yang, Shun-Min; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Chen, Peilin

    2016-10-15

    We present a novel ratiometric pH sensor design using water-soluble, dual-emission, Mn(2+)-doped quantum dots (Qdots) decorated with D-penicillamine (DPA-MnQdots). In contrast to more commonly used ratiometric pH sensors that rely on the coupling of two fluorophores, our design uses only a single emitter, which simplifies ratiometric sensing and broadens the applications of the sensor. Our single-emitter DPA-MnQdots exhibit two emission bands, at 510nm (green) and 610nm (red), which are, respectively, attributable to exciton recombination and emission of the Mn(2+) dopants. The emission intensity ratio (I510/I610) of the DPA-MnQdots depends linearly on surrounding pH values within physiological conditions (from pH 4.5 to 8.5). Moreover, the biocompatible DPA-MnQdots were used for long-term monitoring of local pH values in HeLa cells. PMID:26852157

  3. A ratiometric fluorescence sensor for Be2+ based on Beryllon II/layered double hydroxide ultrathin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: This paper reports the fabrication of Beryllon II/layered double hydroxide ultrathin films via the layer-by-layer assembly technique, which can be used as a ratiometric fluorescence chemosensor for Be2+ with good repeatability, high stability and excellent selectivity. Highlights: ► A ratiometric fluorescence sensor for Be2+ was fabricated by LBL method. ► The chemosensor shows a broad linear response range and a low detection limit. ► The sensor exhibits a high stability and excellent selectivity toward Be2+. ► The chemosensor can be easily regenerated and reused. - Abstract: A ratiometric fluorescence sensor for Be2+ has been fabricated via alternate assembly of 2-(3,6-disulfo-8-hydroxynaphthylazo)-1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-3, 6-disulfonate (Beryllon II) and MgAl-LDH nanosheets on quartz substrates using the layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition technique. UV–vis absorption and the fluorescence emission spectroscopy indicate a stepwise and regular growth of the Beryllon II/LDH UTFs upon increasing deposition cycle. The film of Beryllon II/LDH possesses a periodic layered structure perpendicular to the substrate revealed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy images show that the film surface is continuous and uniform. The Beryllon II/LDH UTFs display ratiometric fluorescence response for Be2+ with a linear response range in 1.0 × 10−7 1.9 × 10−6 mol L−1 and a detection limit of 4.2 × 10−9 mol L−1. Furthermore, the ratiometric sensor exhibits good repeatability, high stability (thermal, storage and mechanical) as well as excellent selectivity toward Be2+. XPS and Raman measurements demonstrate that the specific response of the sensor is attributed to the coordination between Be2+ and Beryllon II in the UTF. The Beryllon II/LDH UTFs in this work can be potentially used as a chemosensor for the detection of Be2+ in the environmental and biomedical field.

  4. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-07-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag+ ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection.DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the

  5. Highly-sensitive Eu3+ ratiometric thermometers based on excited state absorption with predictable calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Adelmo S.; Nunes, Luiz A. O.; Silva, Ivan G. N.; Oliveira, Fernando A. M.; da Luz, Leonis L.; Brito, Hermi F.; Felinto, Maria C. F. C.; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Júnior, Severino A.; Carlos, Luís D.; Malta, Oscar L.

    2016-02-01

    Temperature measurements ranging from a few degrees to a few hundreds of Kelvin are of great interest in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Here, we report a new ratiometric luminescent thermometer using thermally excited state absorption of the Eu3+ ion. The thermometer is based on the simple Eu3+ energy level structure and can operate between 180 and 323 K with a relative sensitivity ranging from 0.7 to 1.7% K-1. The thermometric parameter is defined as the ratio between the emission intensities of the 5D0 --> 7F4 transition when the 5D0 emitting level is excited through the 7F2 (physiological range) or 7F1 (down to 180 K) level. Nano and microcrystals of Y2O3:Eu3+ were chosen as a proof of concept of the operational principles in which both excitation and detection are within the first biological transparent window. A novel and of paramount importance aspect is that the calibration factor can be calculated from the Eu3+ emission spectrum avoiding the need for new calibration procedures whenever the thermometer operates in different media.Temperature measurements ranging from a few degrees to a few hundreds of Kelvin are of great interest in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Here, we report a new ratiometric luminescent thermometer using thermally excited state absorption of the Eu3+ ion. The thermometer is based on the simple Eu3+ energy level structure and can operate between 180 and 323 K with a relative sensitivity ranging from 0.7 to 1.7% K-1. The thermometric parameter is defined as the ratio between the emission intensities of the 5D0 --> 7F4 transition when the 5D0 emitting level is excited through the 7F2 (physiological range) or 7F1 (down to 180 K) level. Nano and microcrystals of Y2O3:Eu3+ were chosen as a proof of concept of the operational principles in which both excitation and detection are within the first biological transparent window. A novel and of paramount importance aspect is that the calibration factor can be

  6. A novel reaction-based colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for cyanide anion with a large emission shift and high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaodan; Fei, Xiaoliang; Guo, Jing; Yang, Qingbiao; Li, Yaoxian; Song, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A hybrid carbazole-hemicyanine dye (Cac) has been developed as a novel colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for cyanide detection. Upon treatment with cyanide, Cac displayed a remarkable fluorescence ratiometric response, with the emission wavelength displaying a very large emission shift (214 nm). The detection of cyanide was performed via the nucleophilic addition of cyanide anion to the indolium group of the sensor, which resulted in the blocking of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in the sensor, inducing a ratiometric fluorescence change and simultaneously an obvious color change. Furthermore, competitive anions did not showed any significant changes both in color and emission intensity ratio (I381/I595), indicating the high selectivity of the sensor to CN(-). PMID:26653444

  7. Ratiometric fluorescence polarization as a cytometric functional parameter: theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yishai, Yitzhak; Fixler, Dror; Cohen-Kashi, Meir; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai [The Biophysical Interdisciplinary Jerome Schottenstein Center for the Research and the Technology of the Cellome, Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2003-08-07

    The use of ratiometric fluorescence polarization (RFP) as a functional parameter in monitoring cellular activation is suggested, based on the physical phenomenon of fluorescence polarization dependency on emission wavelengths in multiple (at least binary) solutions. The theoretical basis of this dependency is thoroughly discussed and examined via simulation. For simulation, aimed to imitate a fluorophore-stained cell, real values of the fluorescence spectrum and polarization of different single fluorophore solutions were used. The simulation as well as the experimentally obtained values of RFP indicated the high sensitivity of this measure. Finally, the RFP parameter was utilized as a cytometric measure in three exemplary cellular bioassays. In the first, the apoptotic effect of oxLDL in a human Jurkat FDA-stained T cell line was monitored by RFP. In the second, the interaction between cell surface membrane receptors of human T lymphocyte cells was monitored by RFP measurements as a complementary means to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the third bioassay, cellular thiol level of FDA- and CMFDA-labelled Jurkat T cells was monitored via RFP.

  8. Polycation-induced benzoperylene probe excimer formation and the ratiometric detection of heparin and heparinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meiding; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Huipeng; Li, Wenying; Wang, Yan; Li, Juanmin; Zhang, Cuiyun; Zhou, Chuibei; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-15

    A benzoperylene probe excimer emission in an aqueous buffer solution is observed for the first time, and a novel ratiometric fluorescence method based on the probe excimer emission for the sensitive detection of heparin and heparinase is demonstrated. A negatively charged benzoperylene derivative, 6-(benzo[ghi]perylene-1,2-dicarboxylic imide-yl)hexanoic acid (BPDI), was employed. A polycation, poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (poly-DDA), could induce aggregation of BPDI through noncovalent interactions. A decrease of BPDI monomer emission and a simultaneous increase of BPDI excimer emission were observed. Upon the addition of heparin, the strong binding between heparin and poly-DDA caused release of BPDI monomer molecules, and an excimer-monomer emission signal transition was detected. However, after the enzymatic hydrolysis of heparin by heparinase, heparin was hydrolyzed into small fragments, which weakened the competitive binding of heparin to poly-DDA. Poly-DDA induced aggregation of BPDI, and a monomer-excimer emission signal transition was detected. Our assay is simple, rapid, inexpensive, sensitive and selective, which could facilitate the heparin and heparinase related biochemical and biomedical research. PMID:26344903

  9. A ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots based biosensor for organophosphorus pesticides detection by inner-filter effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Han, Xiaosong; Su, Xingguang

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we develop a novel and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides based on the inner-filter effect (IFE) between gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots (RF-QDs). The RF-QDs has been designed by hybridizing two differently colored CdTe QDs, in which the red emissive QDs entrapped in the silica sphere acting as the reference signal, and the green emissive QDs covalently attached on the silica surface serving as the response signal.The fluorescence of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on IFE. Protamine could effectively turn on the fluorescence due to the electrostatic attraction between protamine and AuNPs. Trypsin can easily hydrolyze protamine, leading to the quench of the fluorescence. Then, the fluorescence could be recovered again by the addition of parathion-methyl (PM) which could inhibit the activity of trypsin. By measuring the fluorescence of RF-QDs, the inhibition efficiency of PM to trypsin activity was evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, the inhibition efficiency was proportional to the logarithm of PM concentration in the range of 0.04-400 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.018 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the simple and convenient method had been used for PM detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26143468

  10. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  11. Molecular imprinting ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Jialuo; Kang, Qi; Shen, Dazhong; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-03-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare molecular imprinting ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of phycocyanin (PC) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), via a sol-gel polymerization process using nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) as fluorescent signal source. The ratio of two fluorescence peak emission intensities of NBD and PC was utilized to determine the concentration of PC, which could effectively reduce the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. As a result, this sensor obtained high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 0.14 nM within 6 min, and excellent recognition specificity for PC over its analogues with a high imprinting factor of 9.1. Furthermore, the sensor attained high recoveries in the range of 93.8-110.2% at three spiking levels of PC, with precisions below 4.7% in seawater and lake water samples. The developed sensor strategy demonstrated simplicity, reliability, rapidity, high selectivity and high sensitivity, proving to be a feasible way to develop high efficient fluorescence sensors and thus potentially applicable for ultratrace analysis of complicated matrices. PMID:26485176

  12. New highly fluorescent pH indicator for ratiometric RGB imaging of pCO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole (DPP) indicator dye for optical sensing of carbon dioxide is prepared via a simple one step synthesis from commercially available low cost ‘Pigment Orange 73’. The pigment is modified via alkylation of one of the lactam nitrogens with a tert-butylbenzyl group. The indicator dye is highly soluble in organic solvents and in polymers and shows pH-dependent absorption (λmax 501 and 572 nm for the protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively) and emission spectra (λmax 524 and 605 nm for the protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively). Both the protonated and the deprotonated forms show high fluorescence quantum yields (Φprot 0.86; Φdeprot 0.66). Hence, colorimetric read-out and ratiometric fluorescence intensity measurements are possible. The emission of the two forms of the indicator excellently matches the response of the green and the red channels of an RGB camera. This enables imaging of carbon dioxide distribution with a simple and low cost optical set-up. The sensor based on the new DPP dye shows very high sensitivity and is particularly promising for monitoring atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. (paper)

  13. Quadruple labelled dual oxygen and pH-sensitive ratiometric nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeren M. Chauhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanosensors capable of simultaneously measuring dissolved oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100% saturation and pH over the full physiological range, from pH 3.5 to 7.5, that advance the methods towards understanding of key biological gradients, were synthesised. A library of water soluble oxygen-sensitive porphyrins, with three substituted charged functional groups and a chemically flexible carboxylate functional group were spectroscopically analysed to assess their sensitivity to changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations as free species in solution and in suspension as nanoparticle conjugates. A platinum cationic porphyrin was taken forward to fabricate ratiometric oxygen-sensitive nanosensors, using 5-(and-6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA as internal standard. In addition, quadruple labelled dual oxygen and pH-sensitive nanosensors were synthesised using the cationic Pt porphyrin, pH-sensitive fluorescein dyes, carboxyfluorescein (FAM and Oregon Green (OG, in a 1:1 ratio, and TAMRA. We envisage the dual oxygen and pH nanosensors will find broad utility in the characterisation of diverse microenvironments, where there are complex interactions between molecular oxygen and pH.

  14. Highly stable and sensitive LnMOF ratiometric thermometers constructed with mixed ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongqin; Sa, Rongjian; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2015-02-21

    The mixed-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (M'LnMOFs) applied for accurate, non-invasive and self-reference temperature measurements have been only recently recognized. It is a great challenge for chemists to fulfil the requirements of a thermostable structure, intense luminescence and high temperature sensitivity on one LnMOF ratiometric thermometer for thermometric applications. By choosing 2,4-(2,2':6',2''-terpyridin-4'-yl)-benzenedisulfonic acid (H2DSTP) as the first ligand and changing the ancillary ligand to oxalic acid (OA) or 1,4-benzene dicarboxylic acid (BDC), we have successfully developed two types of highly stable and sensitive thermometers [Tb1-xEux(OA)0.5(DSTP)]·3H2O and [Tb1-xEux(BDC)0.5(DSTP)]·2H2O (x = 0.01, 0.02) that in addition exhibit brilliant luminescence over a wide temperature range, providing a new strategy to explore luminescence-based M'LnMOF thermometers. PMID:25566973

  15. Highly-sensitive Eu(3+) ratiometric thermometers based on excited state absorption with predictable calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Adelmo S; Nunes, Luiz A O; Silva, Ivan G N; Oliveira, Fernando A M; da Luz, Leonis L; Brito, Hermi F; Felinto, Maria C F C; Ferreira, Rute A S; Júnior, Severino A; Carlos, Luís D; Malta, Oscar L

    2016-02-25

    Temperature measurements ranging from a few degrees to a few hundreds of Kelvin are of great interest in the fields of nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Here, we report a new ratiometric luminescent thermometer using thermally excited state absorption of the Eu(3+) ion. The thermometer is based on the simple Eu(3+) energy level structure and can operate between 180 and 323 K with a relative sensitivity ranging from 0.7 to 1.7% K(-1). The thermometric parameter is defined as the ratio between the emission intensities of the (5)D0 → (7)F4 transition when the (5)D0 emitting level is excited through the (7)F2 (physiological range) or (7)F1 (down to 180 K) level. Nano and microcrystals of Y2O3:Eu(3+) were chosen as a proof of concept of the operational principles in which both excitation and detection are within the first biological transparent window. A novel and of paramount importance aspect is that the calibration factor can be calculated from the Eu(3+) emission spectrum avoiding the need for new calibration procedures whenever the thermometer operates in different media. PMID:26883124

  16. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-08-14

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag(+) ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection. PMID:27406901

  17. Ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor based on metalloporphyrin and CdSe quantum dots embedded in sol–gel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor has been presented. The ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor comprising a plastic optical fiber coated at one end with Pd(II)/CdSe QDs or Pt(II)/CdSe QDs embedded in sol–gel matrix. Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405 nm as an excitation source, it is shown that the emission wavelengths of the oxygen-sensitive dye (PdTFPP, PdTCPP, PtTFPP and PtOEP) and the reference CdSe QDs have no spectral overlap and therefore permit the dissolved oxygen concentration to be measured using a ratiometric-based method. The sensitivity of optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I0/I100, where I0 and I100 represent the detected luminescence intensities in fully-deoxygenated and fully-oxygenated water, respectively. The experimental results show that the sensitivities of the ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensors are estimated to be 21.7 for PdTFPP-doped sensor, 7.4 for PdTCPP-doped sensor, 6.5 for PtTFPP-doped sensor and 9.2 for PtOEP-doped sensor. The ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing the effects of spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source and optical transmission properties of the optic fiber. - Highlights: • A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber DO sensor. • Optical fiber coated with Pd(II) or Pt(II)/CdSe QDs embedded in sol-gel matrix. • Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405 nm as an excitation source. • Suppressing the effects of spurious fluctuations in the intensity

  18. Ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor based on metalloporphyrin and CdSe quantum dots embedded in sol–gel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane, E-mail: cschu@mail.mcut.edu.tw; Chuang, Chih-Yung

    2015-11-15

    A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor has been presented. The ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor comprising a plastic optical fiber coated at one end with Pd(II)/CdSe QDs or Pt(II)/CdSe QDs embedded in sol–gel matrix. Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405 nm as an excitation source, it is shown that the emission wavelengths of the oxygen-sensitive dye (PdTFPP, PdTCPP, PtTFPP and PtOEP) and the reference CdSe QDs have no spectral overlap and therefore permit the dissolved oxygen concentration to be measured using a ratiometric-based method. The sensitivity of optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I{sub 0}/I{sub 100}, where I{sub 0} and I{sub 100} represent the detected luminescence intensities in fully-deoxygenated and fully-oxygenated water, respectively. The experimental results show that the sensitivities of the ratiometric optical fiber dissolved oxygen sensors are estimated to be 21.7 for PdTFPP-doped sensor, 7.4 for PdTCPP-doped sensor, 6.5 for PtTFPP-doped sensor and 9.2 for PtOEP-doped sensor. The ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing the effects of spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source and optical transmission properties of the optic fiber. - Highlights: • A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber DO sensor. • Optical fiber coated with Pd(II) or Pt(II)/CdSe QDs embedded in sol-gel matrix. • Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405 nm as an excitation source. • Suppressing the effects of spurious fluctuations in the intensity.

  19. FITC Doped Rattle-Type Silica Colloidal Particle-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensor for Biosensing and Imaging of Superoxide Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Ding, Jie; Liang, Tingxizi; Abdel-Halim, E S; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-03-16

    Fluorescent nanosensors have been widely applied in recognition and imaging of bioactive small molecules; however, the complicated surface modification process and background interference limit their applications in practical biological samples. Here, a simple, universal method was developed for ratiometric fluorescent determination of general small molecules. Taking superoxide anion (O2(•-)) as an example, the designed sensor was composed of three main moieties: probe carrier, rattle-type silica colloidal particles (mSiO2@hmSiO2 NPs); reference fluorophore doped into the core of NPs, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescent probe for superoxide anion, hydroethidine (HE). In the absence of O2(•-), the sensor just emitted green fluorescence of FITC at 518 nm. When released HE was oxidized by O2(•-), the oxidation product exhibited red fluorescence at 570 nm and the intensity was linearly associated with the concentration of O2(•-), while that of reference element remained constant. Accordingly, ratiometric determination of O2(•-) was sensitively and selectively achieved with a linear range of 0.2-20 μM, and the detection limit was calculated as low as 80 nM. Besides, the technique was also successfully applied for dual-emission imaging of O2(•-) in live cells and realized visual recognition with obvious fluorescence color change in normal conditions or under oxidative stress. As long as appropriate reference dyes and sensing probes are selected, ratiometric biosensing and imaging of bioactive small molecules would be achieved. Therefore, the design could provide a simple, accurate, universal platform for biological applications. PMID:26910878

  20. Ratiometric fluorescent paper sensor utilizing hybrid carbon dots-quantum dots for the visual determination of copper ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yahui; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xiaochun; Yang, Bo; Yang, Liang; Jiang, Changlong; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-03-01

    A simple and effective ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor for the selective detection of Cu2+ has been developed by covalently connecting the carboxyl-modified red fluorescent cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) to the amino-functionalized blue fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs). The sensor exhibits the dual-emissions peaked at 437 and 654 nm, under a single excitation wavelength of 340 nm. The red fluorescence can be selectively quenched by Cu2+, while the blue fluorescence is a internal reference, resulting in a distinguishable fluorescence color change from pink to blue under a UV lamp. The detection limit of this highly sensitive ratiometric probe is as low as 0.36 nM, which is lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defined limit (20 μM). Moreover, a paper-based sensor has been prepared by printing the hybrid carbon dots-quantum dots probe on a microporous membrane, which provides a convenient and simple approach for the visual detection of Cu2+. Therefore, the as-synthesized probe shows great potential application for the determination of Cu2+ in real samples.A simple and effective ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor for the selective detection of Cu2+ has been developed by covalently connecting the carboxyl-modified red fluorescent cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) to the amino-functionalized blue fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs). The sensor exhibits the dual-emissions peaked at 437 and 654 nm, under a single excitation wavelength of 340 nm. The red fluorescence can be selectively quenched by Cu2+, while the blue fluorescence is a internal reference, resulting in a distinguishable fluorescence color change from pink to blue under a UV lamp. The detection limit of this highly sensitive ratiometric probe is as low as 0.36 nM, which is lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defined limit (20 μM). Moreover, a paper-based sensor has been prepared by printing the hybrid carbon dots-quantum dots probe on a

  1. Water-soluble phosphorescent ruthenium complex with a fluorescent coumarin unit for ratiometric sensing of oxygen levels in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Son, Aoi; Nishimoto, Sei-Ichi; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2015-04-15

    Dual emission was applied to a molecular probe for the ratiometric sensing of oxygen concentration in a living system. We prepared ruthenium complexes possessing a coumarin unit (Ru-Cou), in which the (3)MLCT phosphorescence of the ruthenium complex was efficiently quenched by molecular oxygen, whereas the coumarin unit emitted constant fluorescence independent of the oxygen concentration. The oxygen status could be determined precisely from the ratio of phosphorescence to fluorescence. We achieved the molecular imaging of cellular oxygen levels using Ru-Cou possessing an alkyl chain, which provided appropriate lipophilicity to increase cellular uptake. PMID:25848851

  2. Use of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs combined with advanced motion tracking techniques to examine the behavior of neurons and glia in the enteric nervous system of the intact murine colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Willem Hennig

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (GECIs have been used extensively in many body systems to detect Ca2+ transients associated with neuronal activity. Their adoption in enteric neurobiology has been slower, although they offer many advantages in terms of selectivity, signal-to-noise and non-invasiveness. Our aims were to utilize a number of cell-specific promoters to express the Ca2+ indicator GCaMP3 in different classes of neurons and glia to determine their effectiveness in measuring activity in enteric neural networks during colonic motor behaviors. We developed several GCaMP3 mice: 1 Wnt1-GCaMP3, all enteric neurons and glia; 2 GFAP-GCaMP3, enteric glia; 3 nNOS-GaMP3, enteric nitrergic neurons, and 4 ChAT-GCaMP3, enteric cholinergic neurons. These mice allowed us to study the behavior of the enteric neurons in the intact colon maintained at a physiological temperature, especially during the colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC, using low power Ca2+ imaging. In this preliminary study, we observed neuronal and glial cell Ca2+ transients in specific cells in both the myenteric and submucous plexus in all of the transgenic mice variants. The number of cells that could be simultaneously imaged at low power (100-1000 active cells through the undissected gut required advanced motion tracking and analysis routines. The pattern of Ca2+ transients in myenteric neurons showed significant differences in response to spontaneous, oral or anal stimulation. Brief anal elongation or mucosal stimulation, which evokes a CMMC, were the most effective stimuli and elicited a powerful synchronized and prolonged burst of Ca2+ transients in many myenteric neurons, especially when compared with the same neurons during a spontaneous CMMC. In contrast, oral elongation, which normally inhibits CMMCs, appeared to suppress Ca2+ transients some of the neurons active during a spontaneous or an anally evoked CMMC. The activity in glial networks appeared to follow neural

  3. Magnetic core-shell fluorescent pH ratiometric nanosensor using a Stoeber coating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapresta-Fernandez, A., E-mail: lapresta@ugr.es [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstrasse 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, centro mixto CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Doussineau, T. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstrasse 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5579, LASIM, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Moro, A.J. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstrasse 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Dutz, S. [Institute of Photonic Technology, Department of Nano Biophotonics, Jena (Germany); Steiniger, F. [Center for Electron Microscopy of the Medical Faculty, Jena (Germany); Mohr, G.J. [Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid State Technologies, Department of Polytronic Systems, Workgroup Sensor Materials, Josef-Engert-Strasse 13, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Architecture combination of magnetic core with two fluorescence silica shells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both shells properly functionalized which develops ratiometric pH measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reference dye does not change significantly ({approx}1.9%) by modifying the pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity range between 2.0% and 4.9% and a few seconds of response time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One month stability with a signal variation of 4.3%. - Abstract: We describe the use of a modified Stoeber method for coating maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with silica shells in order to built magnetic fluorescent sensor nanoparticles in the 50-70 nm diameter range. In detail, the magnetic cores were coated by two successive silica shells embedding two fluorophores (two different silylated dye derivatives), which allows for ratiometric pH-measurements in the pH range 5-8. Silica coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared using maghemite nanocrystals as cores (5-10 nm in diameter) coated by tetraethoxyorthosilicate via hydrolysis/condensation in ethanol, catalyzed by ammonia. In the inner shell was covalently attached a sulforhodamine B, which was used as a reference dye; while a pH-sensitive fluorescein was incorporated into the outer shell. Once synthesized, the particles were characterized in terms of morphology, size, composition and magnetization, using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). TEM analysis showed the nanoparticles to be very uniform in size. Wide-angle X-ray diffractograms showed, for uncoated as well as coated nanoparticles, typical peaks for the spinel structure of maghemite at the same diffraction angle, with no structural changes after coating. When using VSM, we obtained the magnetization curves of the resulting nanoparticles and the typical magnetization

  4. Magnetically assisted fluorescence ratiometric assays for adenosine deaminase using water-soluble conjusated polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fang; YU MingHui; WANG Shu

    2009-01-01

    A magnetically assisted fluorescence ratiometric technique has been developed for adenosine deami-nase assays with high sensitivity using water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs).The assay contains three elements:a biotin-labeled aptamer of adenosine (biotin-aptamer),a signaling probe single-stranded DNA-tagged fiuorescein at terminus (ssDNA-FI) and a CCP.The specific binding of adenosine to biotin-aptamer makes biotin-aptamer and ssDNA-FI unhybridized,and the ssDNA-FI is washed out after streptavidin-coated magnetic beads are added and separated from the assay solution under magnetic field.In this case,after the addition of CCP to the magnetic beads solution,the fluo-rescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from CCP to fluorescein is inefficient.Upon adding adenosine deaminase,the adenosine is converted into inosine,and the biotin-aptamer is hybridized with ssDNA-FI to form doubled stranded DNA (biotin-dsDNA-FI).The ssONA-FI is attached to the mag-netic beads at the separation step,and the addition of CCP to the magnetic beads solution leads to efficient FRET from CCP to fluorescein.Thus the adenosine deaminase activity can be monitored by fluorescence spectra in view of the intensity decrease of CCP emission or the increase of fluorescein emission in aqueous solutions.The assay integrates surface-functionalized magnetic particles with significant amplification of detection signal of water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers.

  5. Magnetic and fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles for ratiometric pH sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapresta-Fernández, Alejandro; Doussineau, Tristan; Dutz, Silvio; Steiniger, Frank; Moro, Artur J.; Mohr, Gerhard J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the preparation of nanoparticles composed of a magnetic core surrounded by two successive silica shells embedding two fluorophores, showing uniform nanoparticle size (50-60 nm in diameter) and shape, which allow ratiometric pH measurements in the pH range 5-8. Uncoated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (~10 nm in diameter) were formed by the coprecipitation reaction of ferrous and ferric salts. Then, they were added to a water-in-oil microemulsion where the hydrophilic silica shells were obtained through hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxyorthosilicate together with the corresponding silylated dye derivatives—a sulforhodamine was embedded in the inner silica shell and used as the reference dye while a pH-sensitive fluorescein was incorporated in the outer shell as the pH indicator. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The relationship between the analytical parameter, that is, the ratio of fluorescence between the sensing and reference dyes versus the pH was adjusted to a sigmoidal fit using a Boltzmann type equation giving an apparent pKa value of 6.8. The fluorescence intensity of the reference dye did not change significantly (~3.0%) on modifying the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion. Finally, the proposed method was statistically validated against a reference procedure using samples of water and physiological buffer with 2% of horse serum, indicating that there are no significant statistical differences at a 95% confidence level.

  6. A new 3,5-bisporphyrinylpyridine derivative as a fluorescent ratiometric probe for zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Nuno M M; Núñez, Cristina; Santos, Sérgio M; Faustino, M Amparo F; Cavaleiro, José A S; Almeida Paz, Filipe A; Neves, M Graça P M S; Capelo, José Luis; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2014-05-26

    A new 3,5-disubstituted pyridine with two porphyrin moieties was prepared through an efficient synthetic approach involving 2-formyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (1), piperidine, and catalytic amounts of [La(OTf)3]. 3,5-Bis(5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin-2-ylmethyl)pyridine (2) was fully characterized and its sensing ability towards Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Cd(2+), and Ag(+) was evaluated in solution by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and in gas phase by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-TOF mass spectrometry. Strong changes in the ground and excited state were detected in the case of the soft metal ions Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), and Cu(2+). A three-metal-per-ligand molar ratio was obtained in all cases and a significant ratiometric behavior was observed in the presence of Zn(2+) with the appearance of a new band at 608 nm, which can be assigned to a metal-to-ligand charge transfer. The system was able to quantify 79 ppb of Zn(2+) and the theoretical calculations are in accordance with the stoichiometry observed in solution. The gas-phase sensorial ability of compound 2 towards all metal ions was confirmed by using MALDI-TOF MS and in solid state by using polymeric films of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) doped with ligand 2. The results showed that compound 2 can be analytically used to develop new colorimetric molecular devices that are able to discriminate between Hg(2+) and Zn(2+) in solid phase. The crystal structure of Zn(II) complex of 3,5-bisporphyrinylpyridine was unequivocally elucidated by using single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. PMID:24782336

  7. Intracellular cascade FRET for temperature imaging of living cells with polymeric ratiometric fluorescent thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianglong; Li, Yang; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-07-22

    Intracellular temperature plays a prominent role in cellular functions and biochemical activities inside living cells, but effective intracellular temperature sensing and imaging is still in its infancy. Herein, thermoresponsive double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBCs)-based fluorescent thermometers were fabricated to investigate their application in intracellular temperature imaging. Blue-emitting coumarin monomer, CMA, green-emitting 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD) monomer, NBDAE, and red-emitting rhodamine B monomer, RhBEA, were copolymerized separately with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to afford dye-labeled PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-CMA), PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-NBDAE), and PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBEA). Because of the favorable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) potentials between CMA and NBDAE, NBDAE and RhBEA, as well as the slight tendency between CMA and RhBEA fluorophore pairs, three polymeric thermometers based on traditional one-step FRET were fabricated by facile mixing two of these three fluorescent DHBCs, whereas exhibiting limited advantages. Thus, two-step cascade FRET among three polymeric fluorophores was further interrogated, in which NBD acted as a bridging dye by transferring energy from CMA to RhBEA. Through the delicate optimization of the molar contents of three polymeric components, a ∼8.4-fold ratio change occurred in the temperature range of 20-44 °C, and the detection sensitivity improved significantly, reached as low as ∼0.4 °C, which definitely outperformed other one-step FRET thermometers in the intracellular temperature imaging of living cells. To our knowledge, this work represents the first example of polymeric ratiometric thermometer employing thermoresponsive polymer-based cascade FRET mechanism. PMID:26114380

  8. Magnetic and fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles for ratiometric pH sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapresta-Fernandez, Alejandro; Doussineau, Tristan; Moro, Artur J [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstrasse 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Dutz, Silvio [Institute of Photonic Technology, Department of Nano-Biophotonics, Jena (Germany); Steiniger, Frank [Centre for Electron Microscopy of the Medical Faculty, Jena (Germany); Mohr, Gerhard J, E-mail: lapresta@ugr.es [Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid State Technologies, Department of Polytronic Systems, Workgroup Sensor Materials, Josef-Engert-Strasse 9, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-10-14

    This paper describes the preparation of nanoparticles composed of a magnetic core surrounded by two successive silica shells embedding two fluorophores, showing uniform nanoparticle size (50-60 nm in diameter) and shape, which allow ratiometric pH measurements in the pH range 5-8. Uncoated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles ({approx}10 nm in diameter) were formed by the coprecipitation reaction of ferrous and ferric salts. Then, they were added to a water-in-oil microemulsion where the hydrophilic silica shells were obtained through hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxyorthosilicate together with the corresponding silylated dye derivatives-a sulforhodamine was embedded in the inner silica shell and used as the reference dye while a pH-sensitive fluorescein was incorporated in the outer shell as the pH indicator. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The relationship between the analytical parameter, that is, the ratio of fluorescence between the sensing and reference dyes versus the pH was adjusted to a sigmoidal fit using a Boltzmann type equation giving an apparent pK{sub a} value of 6.8. The fluorescence intensity of the reference dye did not change significantly ({approx}3.0%) on modifying the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion. Finally, the proposed method was statistically validated against a reference procedure using samples of water and physiological buffer with 2% of horse serum, indicating that there are no significant statistical differences at a 95% confidence level.

  9. A TP-FRET-based two-photon fluorescent probe for ratiometric visualization of endogenous sulfur dioxide derivatives in mitochondria of living cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Yibo; Zhang, Xiufang; Yang, Sheng; Chen, Yun; Guo, Jingru; Li, Xiaoxuan; Qing, Zhihe; Yang, Ronghua

    2016-08-11

    A ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for SO2 derivatives was first proposed based on acedan-merocyanine dyads via a TP-FRET strategy. It was successfully applied to visualization of the fluctuations of enzymatically generated SO2 derivatives in the mitochondria of HepG2 cells and rat liver tissues using two-photon fluorescence microscopy imaging. PMID:27469474

  10. A versatile approach for ratiometric time-resolved read-out of colorimetric chemosensors using broadband phosphors as secondary emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A robust referencing schema for colorimetric indicators is proposed. •Time-resolved ratiometric read-out is realized. •(Photo)chemically stable inorganic phosphors are used. •The new method enables simple and low cost read-out set-up. •Application of the schema for sensing pH or carbon dioxide is demonstrated. -- Abstract: A new approach for referencing of colorimetric chemosensors is described. The sensing materials rely on combination of absorption-based indicators and inorganic phosphors. Chromium(III)-activated yttrium aluminum borate and gadolinium aluminum borate were chosen to illustrate the new sensing scheme due to their spectral properties and high chemical and photochemical stability. The ratiometric luminescence read-out becomes possible due to the overlap of at least one form of the indicator with broadband emission (650–900 nm) or excitation (400–700 nm) of the phosphor. Long luminescence decay time of the phosphors (80–150 μs) allows for complete elimination of background fluorescence originating from the media, optical components or the indicator. The versatile scheme enables robust read-out of numerous colorimetric chemosensors and probes. Examples of sensing pH (using a BF2-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethene dye as an indicator) and carbon dioxide (a triphenylmethane dye as an indicator) are provided. It is also demonstrated that temperature can be accessed via luminescence decay time of the phosphor to enable compensation of the sensors for temperature effects

  11. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for hyaluronidase detection via hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinghua; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2016-05-15

    Hyaluronidase (HAase), which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, can selectively degrade hyaluronan (HA) into small fragments, and it has been reported as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for bladder cancer. Herein, a facile ratiometric fluorescent sensing system for HAase has been developed, which is based on hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers and can realize sensitive detection of HAase with a detection limit of 0.007 U/mL. A positively-charged pyrene analog (N-Py) has been synthesized and then mixed with the negatively-charged HA, due to electrostatic interaction between the two components, aggregation along with the N-Py excimers readily form which emits red light. While in the presence of HAase, the enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of HA into small fragments, which in turn triggers disassembly of excimers; consequently the N-Py excimer emission turns into monomer emission. The emission ratio resulted from the excimer-monomer transition can be used as the sensing signal for detecting HAase. The probe features visible-light excitation and red light emission (excimer), which is conducive to reducing possible interference from autofluorescence of biological samples. Furthermore, the assay system can be successfully used to determine HAase in human urine samples with satisfactory accuracy. This strategy may provide a suitable sensitive and accurate assay for HAase as well as an effective approach for developing fluorescent ratiometric assays for other enzymes. PMID:26774093

  12. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  13. Rapid and facile ratiometric detection of an anthrax biomarker by regulating energy transfer process in bio-metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihe; Li, Bin; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Liming; Zheng, Youxuan

    2016-11-15

    A ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on luminescent bio-metal-organic framework was prepared by exchanging both Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) cations into anionic bio-MOF-1. Due to a highly efficient energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) (>89%), emission color of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 was orange-red even though Tb(3+) was the dominant content in this Tb/Eu co-doping material. More interestingly, this energy transfer process could be modulated by dipicolinic acid (DPA), an unique biomarker for bacillus spores. With DPA addition, corresponding DPA-to-Tb(3+) energy transfer was gradually enhanced while the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) was significantly weakened. By regulating the energy transfer process in Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1, visual colorimetric sensing of DPA in porous MOF was realized for the first time. Detection limit of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 for DPA was 34nM, which was much lower than an infectious dosage of Bacillus anthracis spores (60μM) for human being. Besides, Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 showed a remarkable selectivity over other aromatic ligands and amino acids. More importantly, this porous ratiometric sensor worked equally well in human serum. These particularly attractive features of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 made the direct, rapid and naked-eye detection of DPA for practical application possible. PMID:27183278

  14. FRET ratiometric probes reveal the chiral-sensitive cysteine-dependent H2S production and regulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lv; Yi, Long; Song, Fanbo; Wei, Chao; Wang, Bai-Fan; Xi, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. In order to visualize and quantify the endogenous in situ production of H2S in living cells, here we developed two new sulphide ratiometric probes (SR400 and SR550) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for live capture of H2S. The FRET-based probes show excellent selectivity toward H2S in a high thiol background under physiological buffer. The probe can be used to in situ visualize cysteine-dependent H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. The ratiometric imaging studies indicated that D-Cys induces more H2S production than that of L-Cys in mitochondria of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The cysteine mimics propargylglycine (PPG) has also been found to inhibit the cysteine-dependent endogenous H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. D-PPG inhibited D-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than L-PPG, while, L-PPG inhibited L-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than D-PPG. Our bioimaging studies support Kimura's discovery of H2S production from D-cysteine in mammalian cells and further highlight the potential of D-cysteine and its derivatives as an alternative strategy for classical H2S-releasing drugs.

  15. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (CC) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution. PMID:27236136

  16. Ratiometric Fluorescent Detection of Phosphate in Aqueous Solution Based on Near Infrared Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters/Metal-Organic Shell Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-11-17

    Synthesis of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent AgNCs with high quantum yield and stability is challenging but important for sensing and bioimaging application. Here, we report the fabrication of AgNCs/metal-organic shell composite via the deposition of metal-organic (zinc-nitrogen) coordination shell around AgNCs for ratiometric detection of phosphate. The composite exhibits NIR emission at 720 nm with 30 nm red-shift in comparison to bare AgNCs and a weak emission at 510 nm from the shell. The absolute quantum yield of NIR fluorescence of the composite is 15%, owing to FRET from the shell to the AgNCs core under the excitation at 430 nm. Besides, the composite is stable due to the protection of the shell. On the basis of the composite, a novel ratiometric fluorescence probe for the detection of phosphate in aqueous solution with good sensitivity and selectivity was developed. The limit of detection (3s) is 0.06 μM, and the relative standard deviation for 10 replicate detections of 10 μM phosphate was 0.6%. The recoveries of spiked phosphate in water, human urine, and serum samples ranged from 94.1% to 103.4%. PMID:26489902

  17. Selective detection of endogenous H2S in living cells and the mouse hippocampus using a ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Meng, Wen-Qi; Lu, Liang; Xue, Yun-Sheng; Li, Cheng; Zou, Fang; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Jing

    2014-07-01

    As one of three gasotransmitters, the fundamental signalling roles of hydrogen sulphide are receiving increasing attention. New tools for the accurate detection of hydrogen sulphide in cells and tissues are in demand to probe its biological functions. We report the p-nitrobenzyl-based ratiometric fluorescent probe RHP-2, which features a low detection limit, high selectivity and good photostability. The emission intensity ratios had a good linear relationship with the sulphide concentrations in PBS buffer and bovine serum. Our probe was applied to the ratiometric determination and imaging of endogenous H2S in living cells. Furthermore, RHP-2 was used as an effective tool to measure endogenous H2S in the mouse hippocampus. We observed a significant reduction in sulphide concentrations and downregulated expression of cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) mRNA and CBS protein in the mouse hippocampus in a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced depression model. These data suggested that decreased concentrations of endogenous H2S may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic stress depression.

  18. A near-infrared ratiometric fluorescent probe for cysteine detection over glutathione indicating mitochondrial oxidative stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Yu, Fabiao; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-12-15

    We establish a near-infrared (NIR) ratiometric fluorescent probe Cy-NB for the selective detection of cysteine (Cys) over glutathione (GSH) and homocysteine (Hcy) in mitochondria to indicate oxidative stress. Heptamethine cyanine dye is chosen as the fluorophore of Cy-NB whose emission locates in NIR region. And p-nitrobenzoyl is employed as the fluorescent modulator due to its capability of selective-Cys response. Once triggered by Cys, the uncaged p-nitrobenzoyl rearranges the polymethine π-electron system of the fluorophore, which leads to a remarkable spectrum shifts in absorption and emission profiles. Taking advantage of these spectroscopic properties, we construct a ratiometric fluorescent signal for the detection of Cys with a detection limit of 0.2 µM within 5 min. Our probe Cy-NB can sensitively detect the mitochondrial Cys pool changes under different oxidative stress status in HepG2 cells. We also successfully employ Cy-NB to imaging Cys level changes in living mice. It suggests that mitochondrial Cys can be used as an oxidative stress biomarker with simple potential clinical applications. And our probe Cy-NB is of great potential for further utilizing in exploring the physiological function of Cys in biological systems. PMID:26141101

  19. A Simple and Effective Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for the Selective Detection of Cysteine and Homocysteine in Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risong Na

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biothiols such as cysteine (Cys and homocysteine (Hcy are essential biomolecules participating in molecular and physiological processes in an organism. However, their selective detection remains challenging. In this study, ethyl 2-(3-formyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylate (NL was synthesized as a ratiometric fluorescent probe for the rapid and selective detection of Cys and Hcy over glutathione (GSH and other amino acids. The fluorescence intensity of the probe in the presence of Cys/Hcy increased about 3-fold at a concentration of 20 equiv. of the probe, compared with that in the absence of these chemicals in aqueous media. The limits of detection of the fluorescent assay were 0.911 μM and 0.828 μM of Cys and Hcy, respectively. 1H-NMR and MS analyses indicated that an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer is the mechanism of fluorescence sensing. This ratiometric probe is structurally simple and highly selective. The results suggest that it has useful applications in analytical chemistry and diagnostics.

  20. Highly Selective and Sensitive One- and Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Intracellular Hydrogen Polysulfide Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingxin; Mou, Zuolin; Wang, Haihong; Tang, Xiaoliang; Dong, Zhe; Wang, Li; Dong, Xue; Liu, Weisheng

    2016-07-19

    Hydrogen polysulfide (H2Sn) has attracted increasing attention due to the fact that it is actually the key signaling molecule rather than hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Therefore, developing a sensitive and accurate assay to investigate the biosynthetic pathways of H2Sn is of physiological and pathological significance. In this work, based on the commonly used two-photon fluorophore, 1,8-naphthalimide, a new probe, NRT-HP, has been designed and synthesized that displayed both one- and two-photon ratiometric fluorescence changes toward H2Sn via H2Sn-mediated benzodithiolone formation. NRT-HP exhibits excellent pH stability, high selectivity and low detection limit (0.1 μM) in aqueous media. Furthermore, two-photon fluorescence microscopy experiments have demonstrated that NRT-HP could be used for the H2Sn detection in live cells as well as tissue slices. PMID:27312769

  1. A ratiometric solvent polarity sensing Schiff base molecule for estimating the interfacial polarity of versatile amphiphilic self-assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Rini; Sarkar, Yeasmin; Das, Sanju; Jewrajka, Suresh K; Ray, Ambarish; Parui, Partha Pratim

    2016-05-23

    A newly synthesised Schiff base molecule (PMP) existing in equilibrium between non-ionic and zwitterionic forms displays solvent polarity induced ratiometric interconversion from one form to another, such novelty being useful to detect the medium polarity. The specific interface localisation of PMP in versatile amphiphilic self-assembled systems has been exploited to monitor their interfacial polarity by evaluating such interconversion equilibrium with simple UV-Vis spectroscopy. In spite of the large differences in pH and/or viscosity between the bulk and interface, the unchanged equilibrium between the two molecular forms on varying the medium pH or viscosity provides a huge advantage for the exclusive detection of interfacial polarity. PMID:27174234

  2. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited

  3. Theoretical investigation on ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe for Zn2+ detection based on ICT mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuang; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Ren, Ai-Min

    2016-06-01

    OPA (one-photon absorption), TPA (two-photon absorption) and fluorescence properties of a free ligand L upon coordination with Zn2+, and the regeneration with CN- were investigated in theory. According to our research, OPA spectra of ligand L show red-shift binding with Zn2+ while blue-shift with CN-. The fluorescence spectra and TPA wavelength are shifted in the same situation as those of OPA spectra. The value of TPA cross-section decreased at first, and then increased to 1813 GM for [L-Zn(CN)4]2-. Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanism was investigated by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. It demonstrates that L is hopeful to be a good ratiometric fluorescent probe for zinc ion detection in solution, and it can regenerate after CN- was introduced.

  4. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  5. Integrity of lipid nanocarriers in bloodstream and tumor quantified by near-infrared ratiometric FRET imaging in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaala, Redouane; Mercier, Luc; Andreiuk, Bohdan; Mély, Yves; Vandamme, Thierry; Anton, Nicolas; Goetz, Jacky G; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-08-28

    Lipid nanocarriers are considered as promising candidates for drug delivery and cancer targeting because of their low toxicity, biodegradability and capacity to encapsulate drugs and/or contrasting agents. However, their biomedical applications are currently limited because of a poor understanding of their integrity in vivo. To address this problem, we report on fluorescent nano-emulsion droplets of 100nm size encapsulating lipophilic near-infrared cyanine 5.5 and 7.5 dyes with a help of bulky hydrophobic counterion tetraphenylborate. Excellent brightness and efficient Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) inside lipid NCs enabled for the first time quantitative fluorescence ratiometric imaging of NCs integrity directly in the blood circulation, liver and tumor xenografts of living mice using a whole-animal imaging set-up. This unique methodology revealed that the integrity of our FRET NCs in the blood circulation of healthy mice is preserved at 93% at 6h of post-administration, while it drops to 66% in the liver (half-life is 8.2h). Moreover, these NCs show fast and efficient accumulation in tumors, where they enter in nearly intact form (77% integrity at 2h) before losing their integrity to 40% at 6h (half-life is 4.4h). Thus, we propose a simple and robust methodology based on ratiometric FRET imaging in vivo to evaluate quantitatively nanocarrier integrity in small animals. We also demonstrate that nano-emulsion droplets are remarkably stable nano-objects that remain nearly intact in the blood circulation and release their content mainly after entering tumors. PMID:27327767

  6. Dual-Emissive Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Polypyridine Complexes as Ratiometric Biological Probes and Organelle-Selective Bioimaging Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Hua-Wei; Tang, Man-Chung; Choi, Alex Wing-Tat; Zhu, Nianyong; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2015-07-01

    In this Article, we present a series of cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes of the formula [Ir(N^C)2(N^N)](PF6) that showed dual emission under ambient conditions. The structures of the cyclometalating and diimine ligands were changed systematically to investigate the effects of the substituents on the dual-emission properties of the complexes. On the basis of the photophysical data, the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) emission features of the complexes were assigned to triplet intraligand ((3)IL) and triplet charge-transfer ((3)CT) excited states, respectively. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations supported these assignments and indicated that the dual emission resulted from the interruption of the communication between the higher-lying (3)IL and the lower-lying (3)CT states by a triplet amine-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)NLCT) state. Also, the avidin-binding properties of the biotin complexes were studied by emission titrations, and the results showed that the dual-emissive complexes can be utilized as ratiometric probes for avidin. Additionally, all the complexes exhibited efficient cellular uptake by live HeLa cells. The MTT and Annexin V assays confirmed that no cell death and early apoptosis occurred during the cell imaging experiments. Interestingly, laser-scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the complexes were selectively localized on the cell membrane, mitochondria, or both, depending on the nature of the substituents of the ligands. The results of this work will contribute to the future development of dual-emissive transition metal complexes as ratiometric probes and organelle-selective bioimaging reagents. PMID:26087119

  7. An efficient core-shell fluorescent silica nanoprobe for ratiometric fluorescence detection of pH in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingni; Ding, Changqin; Zhu, Anwei; Tian, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular pH plays a vital role in cell biology, including signal transduction, ion transport and homeostasis. Herein, a ratiometric fluorescent silica probe was developed to detect intracellular pH values. The pH sensitive dye fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I (FITC), emitting green fluorescence, was hybridized with reference dye rhodamine B (RB), emitting red fluorescence, as a dual-emission fluorophore, in which RB was embedded in a silica core of ∼40 nm diameter. Moreover, to prevent fluorescence resonance energy transfer between FITC and RB, FITC was grafted onto the surface of core-shell silica colloidal particles with a shell thickness of 10-12 nm. The nanoprobe exhibited dual emission bands centered at 517 and 570 nm, under single wavelength excitation of 488 nm. RB encapsulated in silica was inert to pH change and only served as reference signals for providing built-in correction to avoid environmental effects. Moreover, FITC (λem = 517 nm) showed high selectivity toward H(+) against metal ions and amino acids, leading to fluorescence variation upon pH change. Consequently, variations of the two fluorescence intensities (Fgreen/Fred) resulted in a ratiometric pH fluorescent sensor. The specific nanoprobe showed good linearity with pH variation in the range of 6.0-7.8. It can be noted that the fluorescent silica probe demonstrated good water dispersibility, high stability and low cytotoxicity. Accordingly, imaging and biosensing of pH variation was successfully achieved in HeLa cells. PMID:27291898

  8. Ratiometric and colorimetric near-infrared sensors for multi-channel detection of cyanide ion and their application to measure β-glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Panfei; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Shuhui; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-11-01

    A near-infrared sensor for cyanide ion (CN-) was developed via internal charge transfer (ICT). This sensor can selectively detect CN- either through dual-ratiometric fluorescence (logarithm of I414/I564 and I803/I564) or under various absorption (356 and 440 nm) and emission (414, 564 and 803 nm) channels. Especially, the proposed method can be employed to measure β-glucosidase by detecting CN- traces in commercial amygdalin samples.

  9. One Single Molecule as a Multifunctional Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Sensing of Fe3+, Cr3+ and Colorimetric Sensing of Cu2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The reagent Rh-C, incorporating a rhodamine moiety and a coumarin backbone and prepared via click chemistry, was developed as the first single molecule for detecting Cu2+, Fe3+ and Cr3+. Its response to Cu2+ in different solutions is visible to the naked eye and it exhibits a ratiometric fluorescence response to Fe3+ in methanol and Cr3+ in acetonitrile.

  10. Chemosensitivity assay in mice prostate tumor: Preliminary report of flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, ion ratiometric methods of anti-neoplastic drug monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Kline Richard; Sharma Rakesh

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, ion ratiomateric analysis and NMR peaks characterized drug chemosensitivity of antineoplastic drugs. Hypotheses were: 1. The chemosensitive effect of different cancer cell lines is characteristic; 2. DNA fragmentation, ion ratiometric analysis suggest apoptosis status of tumor cells. Methods PC-3 cell lines were compared with DU-145, LNCaP cell lines in culture for the [Na]i and [Ca]i ion sensing dyes, cell death, NMR peaks and apoptosis staining fo...

  11. Signal-Amplified Near-Infrared Ratiometric Electrochemiluminescence Aptasensor Based on Multiple Quenching and Enhancement Effect of Graphene/Gold Nanorods/G-Quadruplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Kang; Wang, Biru; Ye, Shiyi; Zuo, Yunpeng; Wu, Long; Li, Qin; Lu, Zhicheng; Tan, XueCai; Han, Heyou

    2016-08-16

    Dual-signaling ratiometric electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technology has attracted particular attention in analytical science due to its precise measurement to normalize variation in environmental changes. Creating new mated ECL report units with two emitting states and improving the detection sensitivity are major challenges for ratiometric ECL measurement. Here, we fabricate an ultrasensitive near-infrared ratiometric ECL aptasensor based on a dual-potential signal amplification strategy triggered by the quencher/enhancer [graphene/hemin/gold nanorods/G-quadruplex-hemin (rGO-H-AuNRs-G4H) composite]. The composite was initially prepared through three consecutive steps: the π-π stacking interaction between hemin and graphene, in-site growth of AuNRs, and surface ligand exchange. Dual ECL quenching of quantum dots (QDs) and multiple signal enhancement of luminol can be achieved simultaneously by the fabrication of the sandwich "thrombin aptamer I (TBA1)-TB-TBA2 (rGO-H-AuNRs-G4H)" mode: (i) the formation of three-dimensional G-quadruplex between aptamer and thrombin not only shortens the distance between the donor (QDs) and receptor (rGO-H and AuNRs) to trigger electrochemiluminescence energy transfer but also provides the place for intercalating hemin; (ii) the hemin intercalated into G4 structure and hemin connected onto rGO together with AuNRs/rGO nanomaterials can achieve the multiple peroxidase-like catalysis of H2O2 to greatly enhance the ECL of luminol. The ratiometric ECL aptasensor self-calibrated by the internal reference (luminol or QDs) exhibits ultrasensitive and accurate analytical performance toward thrombin (TB) with a linear detection range from 100 ng/mL to 0.5 pg/mL and a detection limit of 4.2 fg/mL [defined as signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3]. PMID:27435830

  12. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg2+. The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg2+, the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg2+ in a broad linear range of 10 nM–22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg2+ contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg2+ quantification related biological systems. - Highlights: • A facile strategy for preparing GQDs based core-satellite hybrid spheres was reported. • Such spheres can be used as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for Hg2+ detection. • The Hg2+ content can be easily distinguished by the naked eye. • The sensor shows high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg2+ detection. • The ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, and excellent stability

  13. One-pot synthesis of mesoporous structured ratiometric fluorescence molecularly imprinted sensor for highly sensitive detection of melamine from milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2015-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured ratiometric fluorescence molecularly imprinted sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of melamine using CdTe QDs as target sensitive dye and hematoporphyrin as reference dyes. One-pot synthesis method was employed because it could simplify the imprinting process and shorten the experimental period. The as-prepared fluorescence MIPs sensor, which combined ratiometric fluorescence technique with mesoporous silica materials into one system, exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity. Under optimum conditions, these mesoporous structured ratiometric fluorescence MIP@QDs sensors showed detection limit as low as 38 nM, which was much lower than those non-mesoporous one. The recycling process was sustainable at least 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of melamine in raw milk and milk powder samples with satisfactory recoveries of 92-101%. The developed method proposed in this work proved to be a convenient, rapid, reliable and practical way to prepared high sensitive and selective fluorescence sensors with potentially applicable for trace pollutants analysis in complicated samples. PMID:26057736

  14. Magnetic core–shell fluorescent pH ratiometric nanosensor using a Stöber coating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Architecture combination of magnetic core with two fluorescence silica shells. ► Both shells properly functionalized which develops ratiometric pH measurements. ► Reference dye does not change significantly (∼1.9%) by modifying the pH. ► Sensitivity range between 2.0% and 4.9% and a few seconds of response time. ► One month stability with a signal variation of 4.3%. - Abstract: We describe the use of a modified Stöber method for coating maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanocrystals with silica shells in order to built magnetic fluorescent sensor nanoparticles in the 50–70 nm diameter range. In detail, the magnetic cores were coated by two successive silica shells embedding two fluorophores (two different silylated dye derivatives), which allows for ratiometric pH-measurements in the pH range 5–8. Silica coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared using maghemite nanocrystals as cores (5–10 nm in diameter) coated by tetraethoxyorthosilicate via hydrolysis/condensation in ethanol, catalyzed by ammonia. In the inner shell was covalently attached a sulforhodamine B, which was used as a reference dye; while a pH-sensitive fluorescein was incorporated into the outer shell. Once synthesized, the particles were characterized in terms of morphology, size, composition and magnetization, using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). TEM analysis showed the nanoparticles to be very uniform in size. Wide-angle X-ray diffractograms showed, for uncoated as well as coated nanoparticles, typical peaks for the spinel structure of maghemite at the same diffraction angle, with no structural changes after coating. When using VSM, we obtained the magnetization curves of the resulting nanoparticles and the typical magnetization parameters as saturation magnetization (Ms), coercivity (Hc), and remanent magnetization (Mr). The dual-dye doped magnetic-silica nanoparticles

  15. Fluorescence Ratiometric Assay Strategy for Chemical Transmitter of Living Cells Using H2O2-Sensitive Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxia; Li, Shengliang; Feng, Liheng; Nie, Chenyao; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-01

    A new water-soluble conjugated poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) derivative (PFP-FB) modified with boronate-protected fluorescein (peroxyfluor-1) via PEG linker has been designed and synthesized. In the presence of H2O2, the peroxyfluor-1 group can transform into green fluorescent fluorescein by deprotecting the boronate protecting groups. In this case, upon selective excitation of PFP-FB backbone at 380 nm, efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-FB backbone to fluorescein occurs, and accordingly, the fluorescence color of PFP-FB changes from blue to green. Furthermore, the emission color of PFP-FB and the FRET ratio change in a concentration-dependent manner. By taking advantage of PFP-FB, ratiometric detection of choline and acetylcholine (ACh) through cascade enzymatic reactions and further dynamic monitoring of the choline consumption process of cancer cells have been successfully realized. Thus, this new polymer probe promotes the development of enzymatic biosensors and provides a simpler and more effective way for detecting the chemical transmitter of living cells. PMID:26451624

  16. A portable fiberoptic ratiometric fluorescence analyzer provides rapid point-of-care determination of glomerular filtration rate in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Exing; Meier, Daniel J; Sandoval, Ruben M; Von Hendy-Willson, Vanessa E; Pressler, Barrak M; Bunch, Robert M; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael S; Schwartz, George J; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the gold standard for precise assessment of kidney function. A rapid, point-of-care determination of the GFR may provide advantages in the clinical setting over currently available assays. Here we demonstrate a proof of principle for such an approach in a pig and dogs, two species that approximate the vascular access and GFR results expected in humans. In both animal models, a sub-millimeter optical fiber that delivered excitation light and collected fluorescent emissions was inserted into a peripheral vein (dog) or central venous access (pig) by means of commercial intravenous catheters. A mixture of fluorescent chimeras of a small freely filterable reporter and large non-filterable plasma volume marker were infused as a bolus, excited by light-emitting diodes, and the in vivo signals detected and quantified by photomultiplier tubes in both species in less than 60 min. Concurrent standardized 6-h iohexol plasma kidney clearances validated the accuracy of our results for both physiologic and a chronic kidney disease setting. Thus, our ratiometric technique allows for both measurement of plasma vascular volume and highly accurate real-time GFR determinations, enabling clinical decision making in real time. PMID:21881552

  17. Mapping of healthy oral mucosal tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: ratiometric-based total hemoglobin comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Razan; Hamadah, Omar; Bachir, Wesam

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clinically evaluate the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) ratiometric method for differentiation of normal oral mucosal tissues with different histological natures and vascularizations in the oral cavity. Twenty-one healthy patients aged 20-44 years were diagnosed as healthy and probed with a portable DRS system. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded in vivo in the range (450-650 nm). In this study, the following three oral mucosal tissues were considered: masticatory mucosa, lining mucosa, and specialized mucosa. Spectral features based on spectral intensity ratios were determined at five specific wavelengths (512, 540, 558, 575, and 620 nm). Total hemoglobin based on spectral ratios for the three anatomical regions have also been evaluated. The three studied groups representing different anatomical regions in the oral cavity were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the mean of diffuse spectral ratios between the groups (P oral sites in terms of total hemoglobin content. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy might be used for creating a DRS databank of normal oral mucosal tissue with specific spectral ratios featuring the total hemoglobin concentrations. That would further enhance the discrimination of oral tissue for examining the histological nature of oral mucosa and diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the oral cavity based on non-invasive monitoring of neovascularization. PMID:25987341

  18. DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters for ratiometric and visual detection of Hg²⁺ and its immobilization in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, James L; Morishita, Kiyoshi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-10-15

    DNA oligomers are particularly interesting templates for making silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) as different emission colors can be obtained by varying the DNA sequence. Many AgNCs have been used as Hg²⁺ sensors since Hg²⁺ induces fluorescence quenching. From an analytical chemistry standpoint, however, these 'light off' sensors are undesirable. In this work, taking advantage of the fact that some AgNCs are not as effectively quenched by Hg²⁺, we design a sensor with AgNCs containing two emission peaks. The red peak is strongly quenched by Hg²⁺ while the green peak shows a concomitant increase, producing an orange-to-green visual fluorescence transformation. Using this AgNC, we demonstrate ratiometric detection with a detection limit of 4 nM Hg²⁺. This sensor is further immobilized in a hydrogel matrix and this gel is also capable of detecting Hg²⁺ with a visual response. PMID:23651572

  19. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia, E-mail: phwen@ust.hk [Department of Physics, KAUST-HKUST Joint Micro/Nanofluidic Laboratory, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Cao, Wenbin [Nano Science and Technology Program, Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  20. Ratiometric Optical Temperature Sensor Using Two Fluorescent Dyes Dissolved in an Ionic Liquid Encapsulated by Parylene Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Shimoyama

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A temperature sensor that uses temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes is developed. The droplet sensor has a diameter of 40 µm and uses 1 g/L of Rhodamine B (RhB and 0.5 g/L of Rhodamine 110 (Rh110, which are fluorescent dyes that are dissolved in an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate to function as temperature indicators. This ionic liquid is encapsulated using vacuum Parylene film deposition (which is known as the Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (PoLD method. The droplet is sealed by the chemically stable and impermeable Parylene film, which prevents the dye from interacting with the molecules in the solution and keeps the volume and concentration of the fluorescent material fixed. The two fluorescent dyes enable the temperature to be measured ratiometrically such that the droplet sensor can be used in various applications, such as the wireless temperature measurement of microregions. The sensor can measure the temperature of such microregions with an accuracy of 1.9 °C, a precision of 3.7 °C, and a fluorescence intensity change sensitivity of 1.0%/K. The sensor can measure temperatures at different sensor depths in water, ranging from 0 to 850 µm. The droplet sensor is fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology and is highly applicable to lab-on-a-chip devices.

  1. A pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate portraying aggregation induced emission, a ratiometric detection and live cell visualization of HSO3(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Uzra; Kumar, Virendra; Mishra, Rakesh K; Rana, Nishant Kumar; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Manish Kumar; Upadhyay, K K

    2016-07-27

    The present study deals with the photophysical property of a pyrene-benzthiazolium conjugate R1, as a strong intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe exhibiting long wavelength emission in the red region. Unlike traditional planar polyaromatic hydrocarbons whose aggregation generally quenches the light emission, the pyrene based R1 was found to display aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property along with simultaneous increase in its quantum yield upon increasing the water content of the medium. The R1 exhibits high specificity towards HSO3(-)/SO3(2-) by interrupting its own ICT producing there upon a large ratiometric blue shift of ∼220 nm in its emission spectrum. The lowest detection limit for the above measurement was found to be 8.90 × 10(-8) M. The fluorescent detection of HSO3(-) was also demonstrated excellently by test paper strip and silica coated TLC plate incorporating R1. The live cell imaging of HSO3(─) through R1 in HeLa cells was studied using fluorescence microscopic studies. The particle size and morphological features of R1 and R1-HSO3(-) aggregates in aqueous solution were characterized by DLS along with SEM analysis. PMID:27251947

  2. Construction of near-infrared photonic crystal glucose-sensing materials for ratiometric sensing of glucose in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yumei; Jiang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Laiying; Fan, Jiao; Wu, Weitai

    2013-10-15

    Noninvasive monitoring of glucose in tears is highly desirable in tight glucose control. The polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) that can be incorporated into contact lens represents one of the most promising materials for noninvasive monitoring of glucose in tears. However, low sensitivity and slow time response of the PCCA reported in previous arts has limited its clinical utility. This paper presents a new PCCA, denoted as NIR-PCCA, comprising a CCA of glucose-responsive sub-micrometered poly(styrene-co-acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) microgels embedded within a slightly positive charged hydrogel matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate). This newly designed NIR-PCCA can reflect near-infrared (NIR) light, whose intensity (at 1722 nm) would decrease evidently with increasing glucose concentration over the physiologically relevant range in tears. The lowest glucose concentration reliably detectable was as low as ca. 6.1 μg/dL. The characteristic response time τ(sensing) was 22.1±0.2s when adding glucose to 7.5 mg/dL, and the higher the glucose concentration is, the faster the time response. Such a rationally designed NIR-PCCA is well suited for ratiometric NIR sensing of tear glucose under physiological conditions, thereby likely to bring this promising glucose-sensing material to the forefront of analytical devices for diabetes. PMID:23651573

  3. A low cytotoxic and ratiometric fluorescent nanosensor based on carbon-dots for intracellular pH sensing and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangkai; Ming, Yunhao; Zeng, Fang; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH plays a critical role in the function of cells, and its regulation is essential for most cellular processes. In this study, we demonstrate a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ratiometric pH nanosensor with carbon-dot (CD) as the carrier. The sensor was prepared by covalently linking a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) onto carbon-dot. As the FRET donor, the carbon-dot exhibits bright fluorescence emission as well as λex-dependent photoluminescence emission, and a suitable excitation wavelength for the donor (CD) can be chosen to match the energy acceptor (fluorescein moiety). The fluorescein moieties on a CD undergo structural and spectral conversion as the pH changes, affording the nanoplatform a FRET-based pH sensor. The CD-based system exhibits a significant change in fluorescence intensity ratio between pH 4 and 8 with a pKa value of 5.69. It also displays excellent water dispersibility, good spectral reversibility, satisfactory cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Following the living cell uptake, this nanoplatform with dual-chromatic emissions can facilitate real-time visualization of the pH evolution involved in the endocytic pathway of the nanosensor. This reversible and low cytotoxic fluorescent nanoplatform may be highly valuable in a variety of biological studies, such as endocytic trafficking, endosome/lysosome maturation, and pH regulation in subcellular organelles.

  4. Reaction-Driven Self-Assembled Micellar Nanoprobes for Ratiometric Fluorescence Detection of CS2 with High Selectivity and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Zhenzhong; Gu, Jincui; Zhang, Jiawei; Huang, Youju; Huang, Qing; Chen, Tao

    2016-08-10

    The detection of highly toxic CS2, which is known as a notorious occupational hazard in various industrial processes, is important from both environmental and public safety perspectives. We describe here a robust type of chemical-reaction-based supramolecular fluorescent nanoprobes for ratiometric determination of CS2 with high selectivity and sensitivity in water medium. The micellar nanoprobes self-assemble from amphiphilic pyrene-modified hyperbranched polyethylenimine (Py-HPEI) polymers with intense pyrene excimer emission. Selective sensing is based on a CS2-specific reaction with hydrophilic amino groups to produce hydrophobic dithiocarbamate moieties, which can strongly quench the pyrene excimer emission via a known photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Therefore, the developed micellar nanoprobes are free of the H2S interference problem often encountered in the widely used colorimetric assays and proved to show high selectivity over many potentially competing chemical species. Importantly, the developed approach is capable of CS2 sensing even in complex tap and river water samples. In addition, in view of the modular design principle of these powerful micellar nanoprobes, the sensing strategy used here is expected to be applicable to the development of various sensory systems for other environmentally important guest species. PMID:27419849

  5. Ratiometric two-photon excited photoluminescence of quantum dots triggered by near-infrared-light for real-time detection of nitric oxide release in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-05-30

    Probe-donor integrated nanocomposites were developed from conjugating silica-coated Mn(2+):ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with MoS2 QDs and photosensitive nitric oxide (NO) donors (Fe4S3(NO)7(-), RBS). Under excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light at 808 nm, the Mn(2+):ZnS@SiO2/MoS2-RBS nanocomposites showed the dual-emissive two-photon excited photoluminescence (TPEPL) that induced RBS photolysis to release NO in situ. NO caused TPEPL quenching of Mn(2+):ZnS QDs, but it produced almost no impact on the TPEPL of MoS2 QDs. Hence, the nanocomposites were developed as a novel QDs-based ratiometric TPEPL probe for real-time detection of NO release in situ. The ratiometric TPEPL intensity is nearly linear (R(2) = 0.9901) with NO concentration in the range of 0.01∼0.8 μM, which corresponds to the range of NO release time (0∼15 min). The detection limit was calculated to be approximately 4 nM of NO. Experimental results confirmed that this novel ratiometric TPEPL probe possessed high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of NO against potential competitors, and especially showed high detection performance for NIR-light triggered NO release in tumor intracellular microenvironments. These results would promote the development of versatile probe-donor integrated systems, also providing a facile and efficient strategy to real-time detect the highly controllable drug release in situ, especially in physiological microenvironments. PMID:27154831

  6. UV-Light-Induced Improvement of Fluorescence Quantum Yield of DNA-Templated Gold Nanoclusters: Application to Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensing of Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Yu; Wu, Yun-Tse; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-10-28

    The use of DNA as a template has been demonstrated as an effective method for synthesizing different-sized silver nanoclusters. Although DNA-templated silver nanoclusters show outstanding performance as fluorescent probes for chemical sensing and cellular imaging, the synthesis of DNA-stabilized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with high fluorescence intensity remains a challenge. Here a facile, reproducible, scalable, NaBH4-free, UV-light-assisted method was developed to prepare AuNCs using repeats of 30 adenosine nucleotides (A30). The maximal fluorescence of A30-stabilized AuNCs appeared at 475 nm with moderate quantum yield, two fluorescence lifetimes, and a small amount of Au(+) on the surface of the Au core. Results of size-exclusion chromatography revealed that A30-stabilized AuNCs were more compact than A30. A series of control experiments showed that UV light played a dual role in the reduction of gold-ion precursors and the decomposition of citrate ions. A30 also acted as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of AuNCs. In addition, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of an AuNC-nucleation sequence and a hybridization sequence was utilized to develop a AuNC-based ratiometric fluorescent probe in the presence of the double-strand-chelating dye SYBR Green I (SG). Under conditions of single-wavelength excitation, the combination of AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA and perfectly matched DNA emitted fluorescence at 475 and 525 nm, respectively. The formed AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA enabled the sensitive, selective, and ratiometric detection of specific nucleic acid targets. Finally, the AuNC-based ratiometric probes were successfully applied to determine specific nucleic acid targets in human serum. PMID:26443919

  7. Carbon-Dot and Quantum-Dot-Coated Dual-Emission Core-Satellite Silica Nanoparticles for Ratiometric Intracellular Cu(2+) Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chenchen; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Tan, Xuecai; Shao, Kang; Wu, Long; Lu, Zhicheng; Bahlol, Hagar Shendy; Han, Heyou

    2016-07-19

    Copper (Cu(2+)) is physiologically essential, but excessive Cu(2+) may cause potential risk to plants and animals due to the bioaccumulative properties. Hence, sensitive recognition is crucial to avoid overintake of Cu(2+), and visual recognition is more favored for practical application. In this work, a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe was developed possessing the required intensity ratio, which can facilitate the sensitive identification of Cu(2+) by the naked eye. The probe hybridizes two fluorescence nanodots (quantum dots (QDs) and carbon dots (CDs)). Although both of them can be viable fluorescence probes for metal ion detection, rarely research has coupled this two different kinds of fluorescence material in one nanosensor to fabricate a selectively ratiometric fluorescence probe for intracellular imaging. The red emitting CdTe/CdS QDs were capped around the silica microsphere to serve as the response signal label, and the blue-emitting CDs, which is insensitive to the analyte, were covalently attached to the QDs surface to act as the reference signal. This core-satellite hybrid sphere not only improves the stability and brightness of QDs significantly but also decreases the cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells tremendously. Moreover, the Cu(2+) could quench the QDs emission effectively but have no ability for reduction of the CDs emission. Accordingly, a simple, efficient, and precise method for tracing Cu(2+) was proposed. The increase of Cu(2+) concentration in the series of 0-3 × 10(-6) M was in accordance with linearly decrease of the F650/F425 ratio. As for practical application, this nanosensor was utilized to the ratiometric fluorescence imaging of copper ions in HeLa cells. PMID:27347813

  8. Novel Pyrene-armed Calix[4]arenes through Triazole Connec-tion: Ratiometric Fluorescent Chemosensor for Zn2+ and Promising Structure for Integrated Logic Gates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Lin-Na; GONG Shao-Long; GONG Shu-Ling; YANG Chu-Luo; QIN Jin-Gui

    2008-01-01

    Two novel pyrene-armed calix[4]arenes by triazole connection were synthesized using "click" chemistry. Com-pound 1 with two pyrene subunits appended to the lower rims of the calix[4]arene shows ratiometric fluorescence response toward Zn2+, and selective fluorescence quenching toward heavy metal ions such as Cu2+, Hg2+ and pb2+; while compound 2 with one pyrene subunit exhibits significant fluorescence quenching toward Cu2+ and moderate quenching behaviour toward Hg2+. By utilizing the different fluorescence behavior of 1 toward Zn2+and Cu2+, inhi-bition (INH) and not or (NOR) logic gates were established.

  9. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Mengjuan [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Chengquan [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Qian, Jing, E-mail: qianj@ujs.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Kan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Kun, E-mail: wangkun@ujs.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-08-12

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg{sup 2+}. The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg{sup 2+}, the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} in a broad linear range of 10 nM–22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg{sup 2+} contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg{sup 2+} quantification related biological systems. - Highlights: • A facile strategy for preparing GQDs based core-satellite hybrid spheres was reported. • Such spheres can be used as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The Hg{sup 2+} content can be easily distinguished by the naked eye. • The sensor shows high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, and

  10. Ratiometric fluorescence transduction by hybridization after isothermal amplification for determination of zeptomole quantities of oligonucleotide biomarkers with a paper-based platform and camera-based detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M. Omair; Hrovat, David [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Moazami-Goudarzi, Maryam [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Espie, George S. [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2015-07-23

    Highlights: • Solid-phase QD-FRET transduction of isothermal tHDA amplicons on paper substrates. • Ratiometric QD-FRET transduction improves assay precision and lowers the detection limit. • Zeptomole detection limit by an iPad camera after isothermal amplification. • Tunable assay sensitivity by immobilizing different amounts of QD–probe bioconjugates. - Abstract: Paper is a promising platform for the development of decentralized diagnostic assays owing to the low cost and ease of use of paper-based analytical devices (PADs). It can be challenging to detect on PADs very low concentrations of nucleic acid biomarkers of lengths as used in clinical assays. Herein we report the use of thermophilic helicase-dependent amplification (tHDA) in combination with a paper-based platform for fluorescence detection of probe-target hybridization. Paper substrates were patterned using wax printing. The cellulosic fibers were chemically derivatized with imidazole groups for the assembly of the transduction interface that consisted of immobilized quantum dot (QD)–probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as the acceptor dye in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based transduction method. After probe-target hybridization, a further hybridization event with a reporter sequence brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs, triggering a FRET sensitized emission that served as an analytical signal. Ratiometric detection was evaluated using both an epifluorescence microscope and a low-cost iPad camera as detectors. Addition of the tHDA method for target amplification to produce sequences of ∼100 base length allowed for the detection of zmol quantities of nucleic acid targets using the two detection platforms. The ratiometric QD-FRET transduction method not only offered improved assay precision, but also lowered the limit of detection of the assay when compared with the non-ratiometric

  11. Preparation of europium-quantum dots and europium-fluorescein composite nanoparticles available for ratiometric luminescent detection of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haitao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Wenzhu; Ye, Zhiqiang; Wang, Guilan; Yuan, Jingli

    2010-10-01

    The silica-encapsulated luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles have been developed for the selective tagging of a wide range of important targets in recent years, however, they are mainly limited to europium and terbium compounds. In this work, two types of europium-containing dual-luminophore silica nanoparticles, silica-encapsulated CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs)-BHHCT-Eu3 + complex nanoparticles and BHHCT-Eu3 + surface-bound silica-encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) nanoparticles (BHHCT: 4, 4'-bis(1'', 1'', 1'', 2'', 2'', 3'', 3''-heptafluoro-4'', 6''-hexanedion-6''-yl)chlorosulfo-o-terphenyl), were successfully prepared using a water-in-oil (W/O) reverse microemulsion method. The results of transmission electron microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the two types of nanoparticles are all monodisperse, spherical and uniform in size (~50 nm in diameter), and have well-resolved and stable dual luminescence emission properties. The CdTe QDs-BHHCT-Eu3 + nanoparticles can be excited at 365 nm to give dual-emission peaks at 535 and 610 nm, and the FITC-BHHCT-Eu3 + nanoparticles can be excited at 335 nm to give dual-emission peaks at 515 and 610 nm. The luminescence response investigations of the nanoparticles to different metal ions indicate that the new nanoparticles can be used as ratiometric luminescent sensing probes for the selective detection of Cu2 + and Fe2 + ions, respectively. The performance of the nanoparticle probe for metal ion detection was investigated.

  12. Discriminative detection of bivalent Cu by dual-emission ZnSe quantum dot fluorescence sensing via ratiometric fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we showed that 1-thioglycerol (TG)-capped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) with dual-emission could perform ideal QD fluorescence sensing for ratiometric fluorescence measurements. By comparing the fluorescence ratios at two emission peaks before and after the addition of cations, the discriminative detection of Cu(II) was realized, even in the case of co-existing with large amounts of other sensitive cations, such as Ag(I). The discriminative detection of Cu(II) is accurate with co-existing Ag(I) below 10 μmol L−1. By a joint investigation of the ionic diffuse dynamics and carrier recombination dynamics, we found that the adsorbed layer of QDs plays a key role in the discriminative detection of Cu(II) from Ag(I) or other sensitive cations. The moderate adsorption capacity with a QD adsorbed layer makes Cu(II) capable of travelling across the QD double-layer structure, following a surface doping process via chemical reactions between Cu(II) and the QD surface atoms. As a result of Cu(II) doping, there were three major carrier recombination channels: the non-radiation recombination between the QD conduction band to the Cu(II) energy level, together with the non-radiation recombination and radiation recombination between the trap state energy levels and the Cu(II) energy level. As for Ag(I) and other sensitive cations, they have a strong adsorption capacity with the QD adsorbed layer, making them mainly present on the adsorbed layer. Due to the blocking of the ligand layer, we only observed weak coupling of the ZnSe conduction band with the Ag(I) energy level via a non-radiation recombination channel. (paper)

  13. Visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on ratiometric fluorescence quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The RF-QDs were fabricated by two different QDs using layer-by-layer assembly methods. • The PL intensity of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on inner-filter effect. • Acetamiprid can adsorb on AuNPs led to the PL intensity of RF-QDs recover properly. • AuNPs serve a dual function as fluorescence quencher and colorimetric reporter in the sensor. - Abstract: In this work, we develop a simple and rapid sensing method for the visual and fluorescent detection of acetamiprid (AC) based on the inner-filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on ratiometric fluorescent quantum dots (RF-QDs). The RF-QDs based dual-emission nanosensor was fabricated by assembling green emissive QDs (QDs539 nm, λem = 539 nm) on the surface of red emissive QDs (QDs661 nm, λem = 661 nm)-doped silica microspheres. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of RF-QDs could be quenched by AuNPs based on IFE. Acetamiprid can adsorb on the surface of AuNPs due to its cyano group that has good affinity with gold, which could induce the aggregation of AuNPs accompanying color change from red to blue. Thus, the IFE of AuNPs on RF-QDs was weakened and the PL intensity of RF-QDs was recovered accordingly. Under the optimized conditions, the PL intensity of the RF-QDs/AuNPs system was proportional to the concentration of AC in the range of 0.025–5.0 μg mL−1, with a detection limit of 16.8 μg L−1. The established method had been used for AC detection in environmental and agricultural samples with satisfactory results

  14. Quantum dot-DNA aptamer conjugates coupled with capillary electrophoresis: A universal strategy for ratiometric detection of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tingting; Deng, Jingjing; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    Based on the highly sensitivity and stable-fluorescence of water-soluble CdTe/CdS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) with broad-specificity DNA aptamers, a novel ratiometric detection strategy was proposed for the sensitive detection of organophosphorus pesticides by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF). The as-prepared QDs were first conjugated with the amino-modified oligonucleotide (AMO) by amidation reaction, which is partial complementary to the DNA aptamer of organophosphorus pesticides. Then QD-labeled AMO (QD-AMO) was incubated with the DNA aptamer to form QD-AMO-aptamer duplex. When the target organophosphorus pesticides were added, they could specifically bind the DNA aptamer, leading to the cleavage of QD-AMO-aptamer duplex, accompany with the release of QD-AMO. As a result, the ratio of peak height between QD-AMO and QD-AMO-aptamer duplex changed in the detection process of CE-LIF. This strategy was subsequently applied for the detection of phorate, profenofos, isocarbophos, and omethoate with the detection limits of 0.20, 0.10, 0.17, and 0.23μM, respectively. This is the first report about using QDs as the signal indicators for organophosphorus pesticides detection based on broad-specificity DNA aptamers by CE-LIF, thus contributing to extend the scope of application of QDs in different fields. The proposed method has great potential to be a universal strategy for rapid detection of aptamer-specific small molecule targets by simply changing the types of aptamer sequences. PMID:26695234

  15. rFRET: A comprehensive, Matlab-based program for analyzing intensity-based ratiometric microscopic FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Szöllősi, János

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) remains one of the most widely used methods for assessing protein clustering and conformation. Although it is a method with solid physical foundations, many applications of FRET fall short of providing quantitative results due to inappropriate calibration and controls. This shortcoming is especially valid for microscopy where currently available tools have limited or no capability at all to display parameter distributions or to perform gating. Since users of multiparameter flow cytometry usually apply these tools, the absence of these features in applications developed for microscopic FRET analysis is a significant limitation. Therefore, we developed a graphical user interface-controlled Matlab application for the evaluation of ratiometric, intensity-based microscopic FRET measurements. The program can calculate all the necessary overspill and spectroscopic correction factors and the FRET efficiency and it displays the results on histograms and dot plots. Gating on plots and mask images can be used to limit the calculation to certain parts of the image. It is an important feature of the program that the calculated parameters can be determined by regression methods, maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and from summed intensities in addition to pixel-by-pixel evaluation. The confidence interval of calculated parameters can be estimated using parameter simulations if the approximate average number of detected photons is known. The program is not only user-friendly, but it provides rich output, it gives the user freedom to choose from different calculation modes and it gives insight into the reliability and distribution of the calculated parameters. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27003481

  16. Preparation of europium-quantum dots and europium-fluorescein composite nanoparticles available for ratiometric luminescent detection of metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Haitao; Liu Yan; Wang Dandan; Zhang Wenzhu; Ye Zhiqiang; Wang Guilan; Yuan Jingli, E-mail: zhiqiangye2001@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: jingliyuan@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2010-10-01

    The silica-encapsulated luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles have been developed for the selective tagging of a wide range of important targets in recent years, however, they are mainly limited to europium and terbium compounds. In this work, two types of europium-containing dual-luminophore silica nanoparticles, silica-encapsulated CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs)-BHHCT-Eu{sup 3+} complex nanoparticles and BHHCT-Eu{sup 3+} surface-bound silica-encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) nanoparticles (BHHCT: 4, 4'-bis(1{sup ''}, 1{sup ''}, 1{sup ''}, 2{sup ''}, 2{sup ''}, 3{sup ''}, 3{sup ''}-heptafluoro-4{sup ''}, 6{sup ''}-hexanedion-6{sup ''}-yl)chlorosulfo-o-terphenyl), were successfully prepared using a water-in-oil (W/O) reverse microemulsion method. The results of transmission electron microscopy and luminescence spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the two types of nanoparticles are all monodisperse, spherical and uniform in size ({approx}50 nm in diameter), and have well-resolved and stable dual luminescence emission properties. The CdTe QDs-BHHCT-Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles can be excited at 365 nm to give dual-emission peaks at 535 and 610 nm, and the FITC-BHHCT-Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticles can be excited at 335 nm to give dual-emission peaks at 515 and 610 nm. The luminescence response investigations of the nanoparticles to different metal ions indicate that the new nanoparticles can be used as ratiometric luminescent sensing probes for the selective detection of Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} ions, respectively. The performance of the nanoparticle probe for metal ion detection was investigated.

  17. A ratiometric rhodamine–naphthalimide pH selective probe built on the basis of a PAMAM light-harvesting architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAMAM light harvesting antenna of second generation was synthesized and investigated. Novel compound was configured as a wavelength-shifting bichromophoric molecule where the system surface is labeled with yellow-green emitting 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethylamino-1,8-naphthalimide “donor” units capable of absorbing light and efficiently transferring the energy to a focal Rhodamine 6G “acceptor”. Furthermore, the 1,8-naphthalimide periphery of the system was designed on the “fluorophore-spacer-receptor” format, capable of acting as a molecular fluorescence photoinduced electron transfer based probe. Due to the both effects, photoinduced electron transfer in the periphery of the system and pH dependent rhodamine core absorption, novel antenna is able to act as a selective ratiometric pH fluorescence probe in aqueous medium. Thus, the distinguishing features of light-harvesting systems (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) were successfully combined with the properties of classical ring-opening sensor systems, which may be beneficial for monitoring pH variations in complex samples. - Highlights: • PAMAM antenna decorated with Rhodamine 6G and 1,8-naphthalimides is synthesized. • Periphery of the antenna is designed as a PET based fluorescence probe. • System manifests excellent selective response to protons in aqueous medium. • Core emission of the systems is enhanced more than 10 times as a function of pH. • Bichromophoric system acts as a selective ratiometric probe in complex samples

  18. Pyrene Derivative Emitting Red or near-Infrared Light with Monomer/Excimer Conversion and Its Application to Ratiometric Detection of Hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinglong; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Fang; Huang, Shuailing; Huang, Jing; Xie, Huiting; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2016-01-20

    Fluorescent sensors are attractive and versatile tools for both chemical sensing and biological imaging. Herein, a novel pyrene derivative fluorophore, Py-Cy, possessing the monomer/excimer conversion feature, was synthesized; and the design rationale for this fluorophore is combination of extending conjugation length and incorporating donor-π-acceptor structure. The positively charged Py-Cy shows quite good water solubility and exhibits absorption in the visible-light range, and its monomer and excimer emit red light and near-infrared light respectively, which is extremely beneficial for biosensing or bioimaging. To explore the potential utilization of this new fluorophore, we choose hypochlorite as a model analyte, which can break the double bond in the molecular structure, thereby generating the water-insoluble pyrenecarboxaldehyde; this process correspondingly leads to fluorescence changes and thus affords the ratiometric fluorescent detection of hypochlorite in real samples and cell imaging. The approach offers new insights for designing other fluorophores which emit red or near-infrared light and for devising technically simple ratiometric fluorescent sensors. PMID:26701212

  19. A ratiometric rhodamine–naphthalimide pH selective probe built on the basis of a PAMAM light-harvesting architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamry, Khalid A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Georgiev, Nikolai I. [Department of Organic Synthesis, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kliment Ohridsky Street, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); El-Daly, Samy Abdullah [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, P.O. Box 80203 (Saudi Arabia); Taib, Layla A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Bojinov, Vladimir B., E-mail: vlbojin@uctm.edu [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Organic Synthesis, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kliment Ohridsky Street, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-02-15

    PAMAM light harvesting antenna of second generation was synthesized and investigated. Novel compound was configured as a wavelength-shifting bichromophoric molecule where the system surface is labeled with yellow-green emitting 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethylamino-1,8-naphthalimide “donor” units capable of absorbing light and efficiently transferring the energy to a focal Rhodamine 6G “acceptor”. Furthermore, the 1,8-naphthalimide periphery of the system was designed on the “fluorophore-spacer-receptor” format, capable of acting as a molecular fluorescence photoinduced electron transfer based probe. Due to the both effects, photoinduced electron transfer in the periphery of the system and pH dependent rhodamine core absorption, novel antenna is able to act as a selective ratiometric pH fluorescence probe in aqueous medium. Thus, the distinguishing features of light-harvesting systems (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) were successfully combined with the properties of classical ring-opening sensor systems, which may be beneficial for monitoring pH variations in complex samples. - Highlights: • PAMAM antenna decorated with Rhodamine 6G and 1,8-naphthalimides is synthesized. • Periphery of the antenna is designed as a PET based fluorescence probe. • System manifests excellent selective response to protons in aqueous medium. • Core emission of the systems is enhanced more than 10 times as a function of pH. • Bichromophoric system acts as a selective ratiometric probe in complex samples.

  20. Synthesis and spectroscopic–electrochemical properties of novel ratiometric Hg (II) chemosensor containing Bodipy and the N-phenylaza-15-crown-5 moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aryl-amine containing azacrown ether ring and alkyl-chloro boradiazaindacene (Bodipy) were synthesized by the Schiff base condensation. The absorption and emission of a novel Schiff base derivative (based on azacrown–Bodipy) were performed in presence of different cations such as Zn2+, Ga3+, Pb2+, Hg2+, NH4+ Ca2+, Cu2+, Na+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Cr3+. The complexation property of the Schiff base was studied in dimethylformamide (DMF) by interacting azacrown-ether group and transition metal nitrates–ammonium chloride. The electrochemical behavior of the Schiff base has also been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. All experimental results indicated that the new compound acts as a selective ratiometric chemosensor for Hg2+. -- Highlights: ► The Schiff base prepared by several techniques shows a ratiometric fluorescent behavior toward Hg (II) cation such as classical reaction of complexation. ► To the best of our knowledge, this is an important fixation Crown–Bodipy based reactive sensor for Hg (II) cation

  1. Label-free and ratiometric detection of nuclei acids based on graphene quantum dots utilizing cascade amplification by nicking endonuclease and catalytic G-quadruplex DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fang, Xin; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Hu, Xue-Lian; Li, Zai-Jun

    2016-07-15

    Herein, we report a ratiometric fluorescence assay based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the ultrasensitive DNA detection by coupling the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for cascade signal amplifications. With o-phenylenediamine acted as the substrate of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, whose oxidization product (that is, 2,3-diaminophenazine, DAP) quenched the fluorescence intensity of GQDs (at 460nm) obviously, accompanied with the emergence of a new emission of DAP (at 564nm). The ratiometric signal variations at the emission wavelengths of 564 and 460nm (I564/I460) were utilized for label-free, sensitive, and selective detection of target DNA. Utilizing the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for amplified cascade generation of DAP, the proposed bioassay exhibited high sensitivity toward target DNA with a detection limit of 30fM. The method also had additional advantages such as facile preparation and easy operation. PMID:26950646

  2. Synthesis and spectroscopic–electrochemical properties of novel ratiometric Hg (II) chemosensor containing Bodipy and the N-phenylaza-15-crown-5 moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursunlu, Ahmed Nuri, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Selcuk, Campus, 42075 Konya (Turkey); Deveci, Pervin; Guler, Ersin [Department of Chemistry, University of Selcuk, Campus, 42075 Konya (Turkey)

    2013-04-15

    The aryl-amine containing azacrown ether ring and alkyl-chloro boradiazaindacene (Bodipy) were synthesized by the Schiff base condensation. The absorption and emission of a novel Schiff base derivative (based on azacrown–Bodipy) were performed in presence of different cations such as Zn{sup 2+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+}. The complexation property of the Schiff base was studied in dimethylformamide (DMF) by interacting azacrown-ether group and transition metal nitrates–ammonium chloride. The electrochemical behavior of the Schiff base has also been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. All experimental results indicated that the new compound acts as a selective ratiometric chemosensor for Hg{sup 2+}. -- Highlights: ► The Schiff base prepared by several techniques shows a ratiometric fluorescent behavior toward Hg (II) cation such as classical reaction of complexation. ► To the best of our knowledge, this is an important fixation Crown–Bodipy based reactive sensor for Hg (II) cation.

  3. Efficient On-Off Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe for Cyanide Ion Based on Perturbation of the Interaction between Gold Nanoclusters and a Copper(II)-Phthalocyanine Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeifard, Zahra; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2016-06-22

    A new ratiometric fluorescent sensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of cyanide ion (CN(-)) in aqueous media. The ratiometric sensing system is based on CN(-) modulated recovery of copper(II) phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) fluorescence signal at the expense of diminished fluorescence intensity of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Preliminary experiments revealed that the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) possess a turn-off effect on each other, the interaction of which being verified through studying their interactions by principle component analysis (PCA) and multivariate cure resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods. In the presence of CN(-) anion, the AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) interaction was perturbed, so that the fluorescence of Cu (PcTs), already quenched by AuNCs, was found to be efficiently recovered, while the fluorescence intensity of AuNCs was quenched via the formation of a stable [Au(CN)2](-) species. The ratiometric variation of AuNCs and Cu(PcTs) fluorescence intensities leads to designing a highly sensitive probe for CN(-) ion detection. Under the optimal conditions, CN(-) anion was detected without needing any etching time, over the concentration range of 100 nM-220 μM, with a detection limit of 75 nM, which is much lower than the allowable level of CN(-) in water permitted by the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the detection of CN(-) was developed based on the CN(-) effects on the blue and red florescent colors of Cu(PcTs) and AuNCs, respectively. The designed probe displays a continuous color change from red to blue by addition of CN(-), which can be clearly observed by the naked eye in the range of 7-350 μM, under UV lamp. The prepared AuNCs/Cu(PcTs) probe was successfully utilized for the selective and sensitive determination of CN(-) anion in two different types of natural water (Rodbal dam and rainwater) and also in blood serum as a biological sample. PMID:27211049

  4. Synthesis in aqueous solution and characterisation of a new cobalt-doped ZnS quantum dot as a hybrid ratiometric chemosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CoD ZnS QDs were synthesised in aqueous solution and characterised. ► Phosphorescence lifetime of the synthesised CoD ZnS QDs was 3.0 ms. ► CoD ZnS QDs has great potential as a hybrid colorimetric assay for sensing TNT. ► This colorimetric probe can detect down to 25 nM TNT. - Abstract: In this paper, cobalt (Co2+)-doped (CoD) ZnS quantum dots (QDs) are synthesised in aqueous solution and characterised for the first time. L-Cysteine (L-Cys) ligands on the surface of CoD ZnS QDs can bind 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to form Meisenheimer complexes (MHCs) mainly through acid–base pairing interactions between TNT and L-Cys and the assistance of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic co-interactions among L-Cys intermolecules. The aggregation of inter-dots induced by MHCs greatly influenced the light scattering property of the QDs in aqueous solution, and Rayleigh scattering (RS) enhancement at the defect-related emission wavelengths as well as its left side was observed with the excitation of CoD ZnS QDs by violet light. RS enhancement, combining with the quenching of the orange transition emission induced by TNT anions, resulted in a change in the ratiometric visualisation of the system being investigated. A novel CoD ZnS QD-based hybrid ratiometric chemosensor has therefore been developed for simple and sensitive analysis of TNT in water. This ratiometric probe can assay down to 25 nM TNT in solution without interference from a matrix of real water sample and other nitroaromatic compounds. Because of the excellent electron-accepting ability and strong affinity of TNT to L-Cys on the surface of CoD ZnS QDs, the CoD photoluminescent nanomaterials reported here are well suited for detecting ultra-trace TNT and for distinguishing different nitro-compounds in aqueous solution.

  5. Genetically encoded biosensors based on engineered fluorescent proteins†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Frommer, Wolf B.; Davidson, Michael W.; Campbell, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized cell biology by allowing researchers to non-invasively peer into the inner workings of cells and organisms. While the most common applications of fluorescent proteins are to image expression, localization, and dynamics of protein chimeras, there is a growing interest in using fluorescent proteins to create biosensors for minimally invasive imaging of concentrations of ions and small molecules, the activity of enzymes, and changes in the conformation of...

  6. A genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for illuminating proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Bae; Ozawa, Takeaki; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a method to evaluate the activities of cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB. A pair of bioluminescent indicators was made for conferring cytokine sensitivity to cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells. The principle is based on reconstitution of split fragments of Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) by protein splicing with a DnaE intein from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The bioluminescence intensity of thus reconstituted RLuc in the HeLa cells was used as a measure of the activities for cytokines. With the present method, we evaluated the activities of various cytokines based on the nuclear transport of NF-κB in human cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells carrying the indicators. The present approach to evaluating the activities of cytokines may provide a potential clinical value in monitoring drug activity and directing treatment for various diseases related with NF-κB. The method highlights the experimental procedure from our original publications, Anal. Biochem. 2006, 359, 147-149 and Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2004, 101, 11542. The summary of the method is: •Cytokine activities are determined within 2 h after stimulation.•Temporarily inactivated split-luciferase fragments are reconstituted by protein splicing.•Nucleartrafficking of NF-κB was illuminated for gauging the ligand-driven activity. PMID:27489781

  7. Ratiometric fluorescent ion detection in water with high sensitivity via aggregation-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer using a conjugated polyelectrolyte as an optical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Van Sang; Kim, Boram; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Yang, Renqiang; Woo, Han Young

    2013-05-14

    A cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte was designed and synthesized based on poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) containing 5 mol% benzothiadiazole (BT) as a low energy trap and 15-crown-5 as a recognizing group for potassium ions. A potassium ion can form a sandwich-type 2:1 Lewis acid-based complex with 15-crown-5, to cause the intermolecular aggregation of polymers. This facilitates inter-chain fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a low-energy BT segment, resulting in fluorescent signal amplification, even at dilute analyte concentrations. Highly sensitive and selective detection of K(+) ions was demonstrated in water. The linear response of ratiometric fluorescent signal as a function of [K(+) ] allows K(+) quantification in a range of nanomolar concentrations with a detection limit of ≈0.7 × 10(-9) M. PMID:23417971

  8. Turn-On Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Selective Discrimination of Cr(3+) from Fe(3+) in Aqueous Media for Living Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Lubna; Yousuf, Muhammad; Youn, Il Seung; Yoon, Taeseung; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Seo, Young-Kyo; Shi, Genggongwo; Saleh, Muhammad; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-01

    Pyrene-based turn-on ratiometric fluorescent probe 1 demonstrates high sensitivity and exceptional selectivity toward Cr(3+) in the presence of other metals, including Fe(3+) in aqueous media. Interaction of Cr(3+) with probe 1 brings pyrene moieties close enough to have better aligned π-π stacking, thus enhancing the excimer peak many fold. On the other hand, the interaction of Fe(3+) with probe 1 brings forth a negligible difference in stacking, resulting in an insignificant change in fluorescence intensity. Exceptional selectivity of probe 1 with Cr(3+) over Fe(3+) and other metals has been confirmed by theoretical studies in addition to experimental results. Imaging of HeLa cells observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals that probe 1 can be used to monitor Cr(3+) in live cells to map its subcellular distribution. PMID:26418848

  9. Fluorescent biosensor for the detection of hyaluronidase: intensity-based ratiometric sensing and fluorescence lifetime-based sensing using a long lifetime azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chib, Rahul; Mummert, Mark; Bora, Ilkay; Laursen, Bo W; Shah, Sunil; Pendry, Robert; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Fudala, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we have designed a rapid and sensitive, intensity-based ratiometric sensing as well as lifetime-based sensing probe for the detection of hyaluronidase activity. Hyaluronidase expression is known to be upregulated in various pathological conditions. We have developed a fluorescent probe by heavy labeling of hyaluronic acid with a new orange/red-emitting organic azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore, which exhibits a long fluorescence lifetime (∼20 ns). The ADOTA fluorophore in water has a peak fluorescence lifetime of ∼20 ns and emission spectra centered at 560 nm. The heavily ADOTA-labeled hyaluronic acid (HA-ADOTA) shows a red shift in the peak emission wavelength (605 nm), a weak fluorescence signal, and a shorter fluorescence lifetime (∼4 ns) due to efficient self-quenching and formation of aggregates. In the presence of hyaluronidase, the brightness and fluorescence lifetime of the sample increase with a blue shift in the peak emission to its original wavelength at 560 nm. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity of the HA-ADOTA probe at 560 and 605 nm can be used as the sensing method for the detection of hyaluronidase. The cleavage of the hyaluronic acid macromolecule reduces the energy migration between ADOTA molecules, as well as the degree of self-quenching and aggregation. This probe can be efficiently used for both intensity-based ratiometric sensing as well as fluorescence lifetime-based sensing of hyaluronidase. The proposed method makes it a rapid and sensitive assay, useful for analyzing levels of hyaluronidase in relevant clinical samples like urine or plasma. Graphical Abstract Scheme showing cleavage of HA-ADOTA probe by hyaluronidase and the change in the emission spectrum of HA-ADOTA probe before and after cleavage by hyaluronidase. PMID:26993308

  10. Terbium(III)/gold nanocluster conjugates: the development of a novel ratiometric fluorescent probe for mercury(II) and a paper-based visual sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-08-21

    In this work, a novel ratiometric fluorescent probe was developed for rapid, highly accurate, sensitive and selective detection of mercury(II) (Hg(2+)) based on terbium(III)/gold nanocluster conjugates (Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNCs), in which bovine serum albumin capped gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) acted as the signal indicator and terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) was used as the build-in reference. Our proposed ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited unique specificity toward Hg(2+) against other common environmentally and biologically important metal ions, and had high accuracy and sensitivity with a low detection limit of 1 nM. In addition, our proposed probe was effectively employed to detect Hg(2+) in the biological samples from the artificial Hg(2+)-infected rats. More significantly, an appealing paper-based visual sensor for Hg(2+) was designed by using filter paper embedded with Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNC conjugates, and we have further demonstrated its feasibility for facile fluorescent sensing of Hg(2+) in a visual format, in which only a handheld UV lamp is used. In the presence of Hg(2+), the paper-based visual sensor, illuminated by a handheld UV lamp, would undergo a distinct fluorescence color change from red to green, which can be readily observed with naked eyes even in trace Hg(2+) concentrations. The Tb(3+)/BSA-AuNC-derived paper-based visual sensor is cost-effective, portable, disposable and easy-to-use. This work unveiled a facile approach for accurate, sensitive and selective measuring of Hg(2+) with self-calibration. PMID:26140286

  11. Neuronal acid-induced [Zn²⁺]i elevations calibrated using the low-affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2015-11-01

    The experiments were carried out on primary cultures of murine cortical neurons from cryopreserved preparations obtained from embryonic-day-16 fetuses. To calibrate acid-induced intracelluar [Zn(2+) ] ([Zn(2+) ]i ) elevations, a low affinity (Kd = 39 μM at pH 6.1) ratiometric Zn(2+) probe, FuraZin-1, was used. A pHi drop from 7.2 to 6.1 caused [Zn(2+) ]i elevations reaching 2 μM; when the thiol-reactive agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was subsequently applied, [Zn(2+) ]i increased further to 5.6 μM; analogous acid- and NEM-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations could also be detected but not calibrated, using the high affinity Zn(2+) probe FluoZin-3. The data indicate that NEM causes Zn(2+) release from ligands that chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1. ATP could also chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1 because its pKa is about 6.8. Therefore, it was tested whether an ATP depletion affects the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. The ATP depletion was induced by inhibiting mitochondrial and glycolytic ATP production. Interestingly, an almost complete ATP depletion (confirmed using a luciferin/luciferase assay) failed to affect the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i increases. These data suggest that the total amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in intracellular ATP-dependent stores (Zn(2+) -ATP complexes and organelles that accumulate Zn(2+) in an ATP-dependent manner) is negligible compared to the amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in the acid-sensitive intracellular ligands. In vitro, upon acidification, Zn(2+) -cysteine complexes release Zn(2+) and ATP chelates the released Zn(2+) . However, in vivo (cultured neurons), an ATP depletion failed to enhance acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. These [Zn(2+) ]i elevations were calibrated using a low affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1; they reached 2 µM levels and increased to 5 µM when a thiol-reactive agent, N-ethylmaleimide, compromised Zn(2+) binding by cysteines. PMID:26263185

  12. A molecular imprinting-based turn-on Ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Jialuo; Wu, Xiaqing; Fu, Junqing; Kang, Qi; Shen, Dazhong; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-07-15

    A novel molecular imprinting-based turn-on ratiometric fluorescence sensor was constructed via a facile sol-gel polymerization for detection of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on the basis of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) by using nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) as detection signal source and quantum dots (QDs) as reference signal source. With the presence and increase of 2,4-D, the amine groups on the surface of QDs@SiO2 could bind with 2,4-D and thereby the NBD fluorescence intensities could be significantly enhanced since the PET process was inhibited, while the QDs maintained constant intensities. Accordingly, the ratio of the dual-emission intensities of green NBD and red QDs could be utilized for turn-on fluorescent detection of 2,4-D, along with continuous color changes from orange-red to green readily observed by the naked eye. The as-prepared fluorescence sensor obtained high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 0.14μM within 5min, and distinguished recognition selectivity for 2,4-D over its analogs. Moreover, the sensor was successfully applied to determine 2,4-D in real water samples, and high recoveries at three spiking levels of 2,4-D ranged from 95.0% to 110.1% with precisions below 4.5%. The simple, rapid and reliable visual sensing strategy would not only provide potential applications for high selective ultratrace analysis of complicated matrices, but also greatly enrich the research connotations of molecularly imprinted sensors. PMID:27015146

  13. Design of NIR Chromenylium-Cyanine Fluorophore Library for "Switch-ON" and Ratiometric Detection of Bio-Active Species In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanfen; Cheng, Dan; Ren, Tianbing; Li, Yinhui; Zeng, Zebing; Yuan, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The real-time monitoring of key biospecies in the living systems has received thrusting attention during the past decades. Specifically, fluorescent detection based on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes is highly favorable for live cells, live tissues, and even animal imaging, owing to the substantial merits of the NIR window, such as minimal phototoxicity, deep penetration into tissues, and low autofluorescence background. Nevertheless, developing potent NIR fluorescent probes still poses serious challenges to the chemists because traditional NIR fluorophores are less tunable than visible-wavelength fluorophores. To address this issue, here we report a set of novel NIR hybrid fluorophores, namely, the hybrid chromenylium-cyanine fluorophore (CC-Fluor), in which both the fluorescence intensity and the emission wavelength can be easily adjusted by the conformational changes and substitution groups. Compared to known NIR fluorophores, the new CC-Fluors are substantially advantageous for NIR probe development: (1) CC-Fluors display tunable and moderate Stokes shifts and quantum yields; (2) the fluorophores are stable at physiological conditions after long-term incubation; (3) the absorption maxima of CC-Fluors coincide with the common laser spectral lines in mainstream in vivo imaging systems; (4) most importantly, CC-Fluors can be easily modified to prepare NIR probes targeting various biospecies. To fully demonstrate the practical utility of CC-Fluors, we report two innovative NIR probes, a ratiometric pH probe and a turn-on Hg(2+) probe, both are successfully employed in live animal imaging. Hence, the detailed studies allow us to confirm that CC-Fluors can work as an excellent platform for developing NIR probes for the detection of species in living systems. PMID:26730493

  14. A polymer-based ratiometric intracellular glucose sensor† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The synthesis of a sensor, sensor selectivity, and co-localizations. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc01110d Click here for additional data file.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liqiang; Su, Fengyu; Buizer, Sean; Kong, Xiangxing; Lee, Fred; Day, Kevin; Tian, Yanqing; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2014-01-01

    The glucose metabolism level reflects cell proliferative status. A polymeric glucose ratiometric sensor comprising poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (PHPMA) and poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PMAETMA) was synthesized. Cellular internalization and glucose response of the polymer within HeLa cells were investigated.

  15. Development of dual-emission ratiometric probe-based on fluorescent silica nanoparticle and CdTe quantum dots for determination of glucose in beverages and human body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hong; Feng, Ting; Dong, Lingyu; Wang, Liyun; Wang, Xiangfeng; Liu, Hailing; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Luan; Xie, MengXia

    2016-08-01

    A novel dual emission ratiometric fluorescence probe for determination of glucose has been developed. The reference dye fluorescence isothiocyanate (FITC) has been encapsulated in the silica nanoparticles and then the red emission CdTe QDs were grafted on the surface of the silica particles to obtain the fluorescence probe. With glucose and dopamine as substrates, the glucose level was proportional to the fluorescence ratio change of above probe caused by dopamine oxidation, which was produced via bienzyme catalysis (glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase). The established approach was sensitive and selective, and has been applied to determine the glucose in beverage, urine and serum samples. The average recoveries of the glucose at various spiking levels ranged from 95.5% to 108.9% with relative standard deviations from 1.5% to 4.3%. The results provided a clue to develop sensors for rapid determination of the target analytes from complex matrices. PMID:26988523

  16. Genetically encoded sensors enable real-time observation of metabolite production

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jameson K.; Church, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology are enabling engineers to harness natural processes for the production of valuable new chemicals and materials. Cells engineered for chemical production act as renewable factories and redefine what is possible in industries as diverse as manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, and energy. Despite this potential, long and uncertain timelines for biobased product development hinder progress. Engineering cells for chemical production is challenging because the complexity of bio...

  17. Generation of a genetically encoded marker of rod photoreceptor outer segment growth and renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Willoughby

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are specialized light sensing neurons. The photoreceptor outer segment is a highly modified cilium where photons of light are transduced into a chemical and electrical signal. The outer segment has the typical cilary axoneme but, in addition, it has a large number of densely packed, stacked, intramembranous discs. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to vertebrate photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis are still largely unknown. Unlike typical cilia, the outer segment is continuously regenerated or renewed throughout the life of the animal through the combined process of distal outer segment shedding and proximal outer segment growth. The process of outer segment renewal was discovered over forty years ago, but we still lack an understanding of how photoreceptors renew their outer segments and few, if any, molecular mechanisms that regulate outer segment growth or shedding have been described. Our lack of progress in understanding how photoreceptors renew their outer segments has been hampered by the difficulty in measuring rates of renewal. We have created a new method that uses heat-shock induction of a fluorescent protein that can be used to rapidly measure outer segment growth rates. We describe this method, the stable transgenic line we created, and the growth rates observed in larval and adult rod photoreceptors using this new method. This new method will allow us to begin to define the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate rod outer segment renewal, a crucial aspect of photoreceptor function and, possibly, viability.

  18. Use of genetically encoded, light-gated ion translocators to control tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernet, Brook T.; Adams, Dany S.; Lobikin, Maria; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that the resting potential of tumor cells is depolarized relative to their normal counterparts. More recent work has provided evidence that resting potential is not just a readout of cell state: it regulates cell behavior as well. Thus, the ability to control resting potential in vivo would provide a powerful new tool for the study and treatment of tumors, a tool capable of revealing living-state physiological information impossible to obtain using molecular tools applied to isolated cell components. Here we describe the first use of optogenetics to manipulate ion-flux mediated regulation of membrane potential specifically to prevent and cause regression of oncogene-induced tumors. Injection of mutant-KRAS mRNA induces tumor-like structures with many documented similarities to tumors, in Xenopus tadpoles. We show that expression and activation of either ChR2D156A, a blue-light activated cation channel, or Arch, a green-light activated proton pump, both of which hyperpolarize cells, significantly lowers the incidence of KRAS tumor formation. Excitingly, we also demonstrate that activation of co-expressed light-activated ion translocators after tumor formation significantly increases the frequency with which the tumors regress in a process called normalization. These data demonstrate an optogenetic approach to dissect the biophysics of cancer. Moreover, they provide proof-of-principle for a novel class of interventions, directed at regulating cell state by targeting physiological regulators that can over-ride the presence of mutations. PMID:26988909

  19. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering. PMID:26036278

  20. Optimization of a whole-cell biocatalyst by employing genetically encoded product sensors inside nanolitre reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, René; Potot, Sébastien; Becker, Katja; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Microcompartmentalization offers a high-throughput method for screening large numbers of biocatalysts generated from genetic libraries. Here we present a microcompartmentalization protocol for benchmarking the performance of whole-cell biocatalysts. Gel capsules served as nanolitre reactors (nLRs) for the cultivation and analysis of a library of Bacillus subtilis biocatalysts. The B. subtilis cells, which were co-confined with E. coli sensor cells inside the nLRs, converted the starting material cellobiose into the industrial product vitamin B2. Product formation triggered a sequence of reactions in the sensor cells: (1) conversion of B2 into flavin mononucleotide (FMN), (2) binding of FMN by a RNA riboswitch and (3) self-cleavage of RNA, which resulted in (4) the synthesis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intensity of GFP fluorescence was then used to isolate B. subtilis variants that convert cellobiose into vitamin B2 with elevated efficiency. The underlying design principles of the assay are general and enable the development of similar protocols, which ultimately will speed up the optimization of whole-cell biocatalysts.

  1. Imaging bacterial protein expression using genetically encoded sensors composed of RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wenjiao; Strack, Rita L.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2013-01-01

    We show that the difficulties in imaging the dynamics of protein expression in live bacterial cells can be overcome using fluorescent sensors based on Spinach, an RNA that activates the fluorescence of a small-molecule fluorophore. These RNAs selectively bind target proteins, and exhibit fluorescence increases that enable protein expression to be imaged in living cells. These sensors provide a general strategy to image protein expression in single bacteria in real-time.

  2. Imaging Neuronal Responses in Slice Preparations of Vomeronasal Organ Expressing a Genetically Encoded Calcium Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Limei; Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Yu, Qingfeng Elden; Qiu, Qiang; Kim, Sangseong; Yu, C. Ron

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects chemosensory signals that carry information about the social, sexual and reproductive status of the individuals within the same species 1,2. These intraspecies signals, the pheromones, as well as signals from some predators 3, activate the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) with high levels of specificity and sensitivity 4. At least three distinct families of G-protein coupled receptors, V1R, V2R and FPR 5-14, are expressed in VNO neurons to mediate the det...

  3. Structural Basis for Phototoxicity of the Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletnev, Sergei; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Chudakov, Dmitri M.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Popov, Vladimir O.; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir; (SOIBC); (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (NCI)

    2009-11-23

    KillerRed is the only known fluorescent protein that demonstrates notable phototoxicity, exceeding that of the other green and red fluorescent proteins by at least 1,000-fold. KillerRed could serve as an instrument to inactivate target proteins or to kill cell populations in photodynamic therapy. However, the nature of KillerRed phototoxicity has remained unclear, impeding the development of more phototoxic variants. Here we present the results of a high resolution crystallographic study of KillerRed in the active fluorescent and in the photobleached non-fluorescent states. A unique and striking feature of the structure is a water-filled channel reaching the chromophore area from the end cap of the {beta}-barrel that is probably one of the key structural features responsible for phototoxicity. A study of the structure-function relationship of KillerRed, supported by structure-based, site-directed mutagenesis, has also revealed the key residues most likely responsible for the phototoxic effect. In particular, Glu68 and Ser119, located adjacent to the chromophore, have been assigned as the primary trigger of the reaction chain.

  4. Exploration of genetically encoded voltage indicators based on a chimeric voltage sensing domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Mishina

    2014-09-01

    We recently introduced a new VSFP design in which the voltage-sensing domain (VSD is sandwiched between a FRET pair of fluorescent proteins (termed VSFP-Butterflies and also demonstrated a series of chimeric VSD in which portions of the VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP are substituted by homologous portions of a voltage-gated potassium channel subunit. These chimeric VSD had faster sensing kinetics than that of the native Ci-VSD. Here, we describe a new set of VSFPs that combine chimeric VSD with the Butterfly structure. We show that these chimeric VSFP-Butterflies can report membrane voltage oscillations of up to 200 Hz in cultured cells and report sensory evoked cortical population responses in living mice. This class of GEVIs may be suitable for imaging of brain rhythms in behaving mammalians.

  5. Genetically Encoded Cyclopropene Directs Rapid, Photoclick Chemistry-Mediated Protein Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhipeng; Pan, Yanchao; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Jiangyun; Lin, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Genetic incorporation of a cyclopropene amino acid, Nε-(1-methylcycloprop-2-enecarboxamido)-lysine (CpK), into sperm whale myoglobin site-specifically in E. coli as well as enhanced green fluorescent protein in mammalian cells was achieved through amber codon suppression employing an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair. Because of its high ring strain, cyclopropene exhibited fast reaction kinetics (up to 58 ± 16 M−1 s−1) in the photoclick reaction and allowed rapid (~ 2 min) bio...

  6. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  7. Herpesvirus-Mediated Delivery of a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Ca2+ Sensor to Canine Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Prorok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the development and application of a pseudorabies virus-based system for delivery of troponeon, a fluorescent Ca2+ sensor to adult canine cardiomyocytes. The efficacy of transduction was assessed by calculating the ratio of fluorescently labelled and nonlabelled cells in cell culture. Interaction of the virus vector with electrophysiological properties of cardiomyocytes was evaluated by the analysis of transient outward current (Ito, kinetics of the intracellular Ca2+ transients, and cell shortening. Functionality of transferred troponeon was verified by FRET analysis. We demonstrated that the transfer efficiency of troponeon to cultured adult cardiac myocytes was virtually 100%. We showed that even after four days neither the amplitude nor the kinetics of the Ito current was significantly changed and no major shifts occurred in parameters of [Ca2+]i transients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that infection of cardiomyocytes with the virus did not affect the morphology, viability, and physiological attributes of cells.

  8. Visualizing translocation and localization of bacterial type III effector proteins using a genetically encoded reporter system

    OpenAIRE

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost; Andrew J. Roe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type Three Secretion System (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bac...

  9. Genetically Encoded Molecular Tension Probe for Tracing Protein-Protein Interactions in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Bae; Nishihara, Ryo; Citterio, Daniel; Suzuki, Koji

    2016-02-17

    Optical imaging of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) facilitates comprehensive elucidation of intracellular molecular events. We demonstrate an optical measure for visualizing molecular tension triggered by any PPI in mammalian cells. Twenty-three kinds of candidate designs were fabricated, in which a full-length artificial luciferase (ALuc) was sandwiched between two model proteins of interest, e.g., FKBP and FRB. One of the designs greatly enhanced the bioluminescence in response to varying concentrations of rapamycin. It is confirmed with negative controls that the elevated bioluminescence is solely motivated from the molecular tension. The probe design was further modified toward eliminating the C-terminal end of ALuc and was found to improve signal-to-background ratios, named "a combinational probe". The utilities were elucidated with detailed substrate selectivity, bioluminescence imaging of live cells, and different PPI models. This study expands capabilities of luciferases as a tool for analyses of molecular dynamics and cell signaling in living subjects. PMID:26322739

  10. Photophysical Properties of a Red-Shift Cu(II) Ratiometric Fluorescent Chemosensor%红移型Cu(II)离子比率荧光探针的光物理性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔俐丽; 周丹红; 李苗苗

    2013-01-01

      应用密度泛函理论(DFT)及含时密度泛函理论(TDDFT)方法研究了N-丁基-4,5-二[2-(苯胺基)乙胺基]-l,8萘酰亚胺红移型铜离子比率荧光探针的光物理性质。通过探针分子与金属离子结合前后的几何构型优化,结合自然键轨道分析,揭示了探针分子对铜离子的识别作用。通过激发态计算阐明了光诱导分子内电荷转移(ICT)机理。研究结果表明,由于Cu(II)离子络合导致萘胺脱氢,带负电荷的胺基N原子与萘环形成C=N双键,延长了共轭体系;N的非键电子向Cu(II)离子的空d轨道转移一个电子,抑制了Cu(II)离子的顺磁效应所导致的荧光淬灭,受光激发后,共轭N与萘环之间发生n→π*电子转移导致ICT效应和荧光红移。%Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) were used to study the photophysical properties of N-butyl-4,5-di[2-(phenylamino)ethylamino]-1,8-naphthalimide, a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for Cu(II). The geometric structures of the compounds at the ground state were optimized by DFT. Combined with natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, the binding characteristics of the chemosensor molecule coordinated with a Cu(II) ion were identified. The excitation states of the compounds were investigated and the internal charge transfer (ICT) mechanism was elucidated by theoretical calculations. The results indicated that the coordinated Cu(II) ion induced the dehydrogenation of naphthylamine. The negatively-charged amino N atom then formed a C=N double bond with the naphthalene ring, extending the conjugation of the system. The nonbonding electron of N was transferred to the unoccupied d orbital of Cu(II), preventing fluorescence quenching by paramagnetic Cu(II). It was proposed that in the excited state, n→π*electron transfer from the amino N to the naphthalene ring led to internal charge transfer and resulted in the red shift of fluorescence.

  11. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M; Enninga, Jost; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found theEscherichia coliO157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of theShigella flexnerieffector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  12. Benzimidazole based ratiometric and colourimetric chemosensor for Ni(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective benzimidazole based colourimetric chemosensor (HL) for the efficient detection of Ni2 + has been reported. The synthesized chemosensor HL is highly efficient in detecting Ni2 + over other metal ions that commonly coexist with Ni2 + in physiological and environmental samples. HL also shows distinct color change from orange yellow to blue visible under the naked eye due to specific binding with Ni2 +. This color change corresponds to a large red shift of the UV-Vis spectrum from 403 nm to 600 nm with a distinct isosbestic point at around 500 nm. The cation sensing property of the receptor HL has been examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Electronic structure of the HL-Ni2 + complex and sensing mechanism has been interpreted by DFT and TDDFT calculations.

  13. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the...... diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms......) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of...

  14. Genetically Encoded Azide Containing Amino Acid in Mammalian Cells Enables Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Click Cycloaddition Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrunt, Michael P; Shanebeck, Kurt; Caldwell, Zachary; Johnson, Jeffrey; Thompson, Pamela; Martin, Thomas; Dong, Huifang; Li, Gary; Xu, Hengyu; D'Hooge, Francois; Masterson, Luke; Bariola, Pauline; Tiberghien, Arnaud; Ezeadi, Ebele; Williams, David G; Hartley, John A; Howard, Philip W; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Bowen, Michael A; Marelli, Marcello

    2015-11-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have emerged as potent antitumor drugs that provide increased efficacy, specificity, and tolerability over chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. ADCs generated by targeting cysteines and lysines on the antibody have shown efficacy, but these products are heterogeneous, and instability may limit their dosing. Here, a novel technology is described that enables site-specific conjugation of toxins to antibodies using chemistry to produce homogeneous, potent, and highly stable conjugates. We have developed a cell-based mammalian expression system capable of site-specific integration of a non-natural amino acid containing an azide moiety. The azide group enables click cycloaddition chemistry that generates a stable heterocyclic triazole linkage. Antibodies to Her2/neu were expressed to contain N6-((2-azidoethoxy)carbonyl)-l-lysine at four different positions. Each site allowed over 95% conjugation efficacy with the toxins auristatin F or a pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer to generate ADCs with a drug to antibody ratio of >1.9. The ADCs were potent and specific in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. An anti Her2/neu conjugate demonstrated stability in vivo and a PBD containing ADC showed potent efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograph model. This technology was extended to generate fully functional ADCs with four toxins per antibody. The high stability of the azide-alkyne linkage, combined with the site-specific nature of the expression system, provides a means for the generation of ADCs with optimized pharmacokinetic, biological, and biophysical properties. PMID:26332743

  15. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  16. Linear approaches to intramolecular Forster resonance energy transfer probe measurements for quantitative modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc R Birtwistle

    Full Text Available Numerous unimolecular, genetically-encoded Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET probes for monitoring biochemical activities in live cells have been developed over the past decade. As these probes allow for collection of high frequency, spatially resolved data on signaling events in live cells and tissues, they are an attractive technology for obtaining data to develop quantitative, mathematical models of spatiotemporal signaling dynamics. However, to be useful for such purposes the observed FRET from such probes should be related to a biological quantity of interest through a defined mathematical relationship, which is straightforward when this relationship is linear, and can be difficult otherwise. First, we show that only in rare circumstances is the observed FRET linearly proportional to a biochemical activity. Therefore in most cases FRET measurements should only be compared either to explicitly modeled probes or to concentrations of products of the biochemical activity, but not to activities themselves. Importantly, we find that FRET measured by standard intensity-based, ratiometric methods is inherently non-linear with respect to the fraction of probes undergoing FRET. Alternatively, we find that quantifying FRET either via (1 fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM or (2 ratiometric methods where the donor emission intensity is divided by the directly-excited acceptor emission intensity (denoted R(alt is linear with respect to the fraction of probes undergoing FRET. This linearity property allows one to calculate the fraction of active probes based on the FRET measurement. Thus, our results suggest that either FLIM or ratiometric methods based on R(alt are the preferred techniques for obtaining quantitative data from FRET probe experiments for mathematical modeling purposes.

  17. Trihydroxytrioxatriangulene - An Extended Fluorescein and a Ratiometric pH Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Fredrik; Hildebrandt, Christoffer Boli; Sørensen, Thomas Just;

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescein ver. 2.0: A new, highly fluorescent, pH-sensitive trihydroxytrioxatriangulenium dye (H-TOTA) has been synthesised and characterised. The dye is closely related to fluorescein and may be considered to be a two-dimensional extended version. This new dye can exist in four different...

  18. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric i-motif sensor for extracellular pH detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Le; Xie, Nuli; Yang, Yanjing; Yang, Xiaohai; Zhou, Qifeng; Yin, Bincheng; Huang, Jin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-14

    A FRET-based sensor is anchored on the cell surface through streptavidin-biotin interactions. Due to the excellent properties of the pH-sensitive i-motif structure, the sensor can detect extracellular pH with high sensitivity and excellent reversibility. PMID:27241716

  19. Fluorogenic ratiometric dipodal optode containing imine-amide linkages: exploiting subtle thorium (IV) ion sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayade, Kundan; Kaur, Amanpreet; Tetgure, Sandesh; Chaitanya, G Krishana; Singh, Narinder; Kuwar, Anil

    2014-12-10

    The (13E,19E)-N1',N3'-bis[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene]malonohydrazide (L) has been developed for the detection of Th(4+) ions using dual channel signalling system. The UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed the formation of L-Th(4+) complex in 1:1 equilibrium. The density functional theory (DFT) also confirms the optimum binding cavity for the recognition of metal ion. The binding constant computed from different mathematical models for an assembly of L-Th(4+). The detection limit of L for Th(4+) recognition is to a concentration down to 0.1 μM (0.023 μg g(-1)). The present sensing system is also successfully applied for the detection of Th(4+) ion present in soil near nuclear atomic plants. PMID:25441898

  20. Fluorogenic ratiometric dipodal optode containing imine-amide linkages: Exploiting subtle thorium (IV) ion sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayade, Kundan [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Kaur, Amanpreet [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Tetgure, Sandesh [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Chaitanya, G. Krishana [School of Chemical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Tirth Marathawada University, Nanded (India); Singh, Narinder [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Ropar, Punjab (India); Kuwar, Anil, E-mail: kuwaras@gmail.com [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • A highly selective, simple, noncyclic, imine-amide based dipodal off–on fluorescence chemosensor for Th{sup 4+} ion is reported. • Sensing mechanism is based upon twisted plane intramolecular charge–transfer upon interaction with cations. • Th{sup 4+} ion on detection limit (as low as 0.1 μM) is reported. • This system can also be applied in real samples. - Abstract: The (13E,19E)-N1′,N3′-bis[4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxybenzylidene]malonohydrazide (L) has been developed for the detection of Th{sup 4+} ions using dual channel signalling system. The UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed the formation of L–Th{sup 4+} complex in 1:1 equilibrium. The density functional theory (DFT) also confirms the optimum binding cavity for the recognition of metal ion. The binding constant computed from different mathematical models for an assembly of L–Th{sup 4+}. The detection limit of L for Th{sup 4+} recognition is to a concentration down to 0.1 μM (0.023 μg g{sup −1}). The present sensing system is also successfully applied for the detection of Th{sup 4+} ion present in soil near nuclear atomic plants.

  1. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  2. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  3. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Bacterial Biofilms with C-SNARF-4

    OpenAIRE

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier E.; Greve, Matilde; Merete K Raarup; Nyvad, Bente; Dige, Irene

    2014-01-01

    pH in the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms is of central importance for microbial metabolism. Biofilms possess a complex three-dimensional architecture characterized by chemically different microenvironments in close proximity. For decades, pH measurements in biofilms have been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit the monitoring of horizontal pH gradients in biofilms in rea...

  4. Ratiometric Organic Fibers for Localized and Reversible Ion Sensing with Micrometer‐Scale Spatial Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    del Mercato, Loretta L.; Moffa, Maria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental issue in biomedical and environmental sciences is the development of sensitive and robust sensors able to probe the analyte of interest, under physiological and pathological conditions or in environmental samples, and with very high spatial resolution. In this work, novel hybrid organic fibers that can effectively report the analyte concentration within the local microenvironment are reported. The nanostructured and flexible wires are prepared by embedding fluorescent pH sensors...

  5. Ratiometric Organic Fibers for Localized and Reversible Ion Sensing with Micrometer‐Scale Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffa, Maria; Rinaldi, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental issue in biomedical and environmental sciences is the development of sensitive and robust sensors able to probe the analyte of interest, under physiological and pathological conditions or in environmental samples, and with very high spatial resolution. In this work, novel hybrid organic fibers that can effectively report the analyte concentration within the local microenvironment are reported. The nanostructured and flexible wires are prepared by embedding fluorescent pH sensors based on seminaphtho‐rhodafluor‐1‐dextran conjugate. By adjusting capsule/polymer ratio and spinning conditions, the diameter of the fibers and the alignment of the reporting capsules are both tuned. The hybrid wires display excellent stability, high sensitivity, as well as reversible response, and their operation relies on effective diffusional kinetic coupling of the sensing regions and the embedding polymer matrix. These devices are believed to be a powerful new sensing platform for clinical diagnostics, bioassays and environmental monitoring. PMID:26539625

  6. Bimetallic lanthanide complexes that display a ratiometric response to oxygen concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, TJ; Kenwright, AM; Faulkner, S.

    2015-01-01

    A pair of hetero-bimetallic lanthanide complexes containing terbium and europium ions have been prepared by coupling kinetically stable complexes together using an Ugi methodology to incorporate a naphthyl chromophore. Both complexes exhibit emission from terbium and europium in solution. The terbium centred emission varies with dissolved oxygen concentration, while the europium intensity remains essentially constant in one of the complexes.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of ratiometric nanosensors for pH quantification: a mixed micelle approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2012-01-01

    and is prone to batch-to-batch variations, which is undesirable for succeeding sensor calibrations and cellular measurements. Here we provide a new synthetic approach for preparing nanoparticle pH sensors based on self-organization principles, which in comparison to earlier strategies offers a much...

  8. Ratiometric Organic Fibers for Localized and Reversible Ion Sensing with Micrometer-Scale Spatial Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mercato, Loretta L; Moffa, Maria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-12-22

    A fundamental issue in biomedical and environmental sciences is the development of sensitive and robust sensors able to probe the analyte of interest, under physiological and pathological conditions or in environmental samples, and with very high spatial resolution. In this work, novel hybrid organic fibers that can effectively report the analyte concentration within the local microenvironment are reported. The nanostructured and flexible wires are prepared by embedding fluorescent pH sensors based on seminaphtho-rhodafluor-1-dextran conjugate. By adjusting capsule/polymer ratio and spinning conditions, the diameter of the fibers and the alignment of the reporting capsules are both tuned. The hybrid wires display excellent stability, high sensitivity, as well as reversible response, and their operation relies on effective diffusional kinetic coupling of the sensing regions and the embedding polymer matrix. These devices are believed to be a powerful new sensing platform for clinical diagnostics, bioassays and environmental monitoring. PMID:26539625

  9. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Greotti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+] within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2. The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls.

  10. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  11. Primary cilia are not calcium-responsive mechanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delling, M; Indzhykulian, A A; Liu, X; Li, Y; Xie, T; Corey, D P; Clapham, D E

    2016-03-31

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling. PMID:27007841

  12. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  13. Cancer cell-targeted two-photon fluorescence probe for the real-time ratiometric imaging of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Nie, Yamin; Guo, Haiming

    2016-05-01

    Real-time imaging of DNA damage in cancer cells could provide valuable information on the formation and development of cancer. Herein, a two-photon fluorescence probe was discovered. Through sequential ICT processes, it allows successful in vivo visualization of DNA damage in cancer cells by one/two-photon microscopic imaging or by the unaided eye and a hand-held ultraviolet lamp. PMID:27087314

  14. A fluorescent coumarin-thiophene hybrid as a ratiometric chemosensor for anions: Synthesis, photophysics, anion sensing and orbital interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanar, Ufuk; Babür, Banu; Pekyılmaz, Damla; Yahaya, Issah; Aydıner, Burcu; Dede, Yavuz; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2016-03-01

    A colorimetric and fluorimetric fluorescent chemosensor (CT-2), having a coumarin ring as a signaling unit and an acetamido thiophene ring as an H-donor receptor, has been synthesized from amino derivative (CT-1) of CT-2 for the purpose of recognition of anions in DMSO. The absorption and emission maxima were both determined for the fluorescent dye in different solvents. Both hypsochromic shift at the absorption maximum, and quenching of fluorescence after interactions between the anions and the receptoric part, were observed. This phenomenon was explained using orbital interactions based on quantum chemical calculations. The selectivity and sensitivity of CT-2 for F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO-, CN-, H2PO4-, HSO4- and ClO4- anions were determined with spectrophotometric, fluorimetric and 1H NMR titration techniques and it was found that CT-2 be utilized for the detection of CN-, F- and AcO- in the presence of other ions as competitors. Color and fluorescence changes visible to the naked eye and under UV (365 nm) were observed upon addition of CN-, F- and AcO- to the solution of chemosensor (CT-2) in DMSO. The sensor showed no colorimetric and fluorimetric response for the anions such as Cl-, Br-, I-, H2PO4-, HSO4-, and ClO4-. However, 1H NMR titration shows that the chemosensor was more sensitive to CN-, than F- and AcO- at the stochiometric ratio of 1:2.5 respectively. Additionally, the compounds CT-1 and CT-2 showed good thermal stability for practical applications.

  15. Synthesis and Application of Ratiometric and "Turn-On" Fluorescent pH Sensors: An Advanced Organic Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Johnathon T.; Aron, Zachary D.

    2014-01-01

    An upper-division organic chemistry laboratory experiment exploring fluorescent sensing over two laboratory periods and part of a third is described. Two functionally distinct pH-responsive sensors are prepared through a dehydrative three-component coupling reaction. During the abbreviated (<1 h) first laboratory period, students set up…

  16. Smart protein biogate as a mediator to regulate competitive host-guest interaction for sensitive ratiometric electrochemical assay of prion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jiawan; Xiong, Erhu; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jinhua

    2015-11-01

    A novel competitive host-guest strategy regulated by protein biogate was developed for sensitive and selective analysis of prion protein. The methylene blue (MB)-tagged prion aptamer (MB-Apt) was introduced to the multiwalled carbon nanotubes-β-cyclodextrins (MWCNTs-β-CD) composites-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode through the host-guest interaction between β-CD and MB. In the absence of prion, MB-Apt could be displaced by ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FCA) due to its stronger binding affinity to β-CD, resulting in a large oxidation peak of FCA. However, in the presence of prion, the specific prion-aptamer interaction drove the formation of protein biogate to seal the cavity of β-CD, which hindered the guest displacement of MB by FCA and resulted in the oxidation peak current of MB (IMB) increased and that of FCA (IFCA) decreased. The developed aptasensor showed good response towards the target (prion protein) with a low detection limit of 160 fM. By changing the specific aptamers, this strategy could be easily extended to detect other proteins, showing promising potential for extensive applications in bioanalysis.

  17. Highly sensitive and selective ratiometric fluorescent copper sensors: Different binding affinities modulated by three separate side chains of naphthalimide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU YuFang; LU Feng; XU ZhaoChao; CHENG TanYu; QIAN XuHong

    2009-01-01

    A series of compounds 1 --11 with different side chains of naphthalimide as fluorescent copper sensors were designed and synthesized. Compounds 1, 9, 10 and 11 presented a high selectivity to Cu2+ in a neutral aqueous environment. Here 1, 9 and 10 showed selectivity and affinity to Cu2+ with an association constant of about ~106. It gave somewhat response to Ag+, Co2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+ while 1 detected copper. 9 and 10 displayed better selectivity by changing their hydrophobic side chains to the hydrophilic ones on imide moieties. 11, with one flexible side chain, showed high selectivity and an association constant (Ka = 2.2 × 108), which were much higher than those of 1, 9 and 10. These results indicated that the selectivity and affinity could be improved by changing side chains of naphthalimide. That might provide a novel strategy or method for the development of fluorescent sensors.

  18. Stable DNA Nanomachine Based on Duplex-Triplex Transition for Ratiometric Imaging Instantaneous pH Changes in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengqi; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Haipeng; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Wen; Tan, Weihong

    2015-06-16

    DNA nanomachines are becoming useful tools for molecular recognition, imaging, and diagnostics and have drawn gradual attention. Unfortunately, the present application of most DNA nanomachines is limited in vitro, so expanding their application in organism has become a primary focus. Hence, a novel DNA nanomachine named t-switch, based on the DNA duplex-triplex transition, is developed for monitoring the intracellular pH gradient. Our strategy is based on the DNA triplex structure containing C(+)-G-C triplets and pH-dependent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Our results indicate that the t-switch is an efficient reporter of pH from pH 5.3 to 6.0 with a fast response of a few seconds. Also the uptake of the t-switch is speedy. In order to protect the t-switch from enzymatic degradation, PEI is used for modification of our DNA nanomachine. At the same time, the dynamic range could be extended to pH 4.6-7.8. The successful application of this pH-depended DNA nanomachine and motoring spatiotemporal pH changes associated with endocytosis is strong evidence of the possibility of self-assembly DNA nanomachine for imaging, targeted therapies, and controllable drug delivery. PMID:26016566

  19. A simple and inexpensive high resolution color ratiometric planar optode imaging approach: application to oxygen and pH sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.; Borisov, S. M.; Grunwald, B.;

    2011-01-01

    A simple, high resolution colormetric planar optode imaging approach is presented. The approach is simple and inexpensive yet versatile, and can be used to study the two-dimensional distribution and dynamics of a range of analytes. The imaging approach utilizes the inbuilt color filter of standard...... commercial digital single lens reflex cameras to simultaneously record different colors (red, green, and blue) of luminophore emission light using only one excitation light source. Using the ratio between the intensity of the different colors recorded in a single image analyte concentrations can be......) salt derivate for O-2 and pH measurements, respectively. The brightness of both indicators is dramatically enhanced by making use of energy transfer from a donor molecule (Macrolex yellow coumarin). Furthermore, the emission from the donor serves as an internal reference for the O-2 sensor. The...

  20. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  1. Ratiometric Optical Temperature Sensor Using Two Fluorescent Dyes Dissolved in an Ionic Liquid Encapsulated by Parylene Film

    OpenAIRE

    Isao Shimoyama; Nguyen Binh-Khiem; Tetsuo Kan; Hironori Aoki; Kiyoshi Matsumoto

    2013-01-01

    A temperature sensor that uses temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes is developed. The droplet sensor has a diameter of 40 µm and uses 1 g/L of Rhodamine B (RhB) and 0.5 g/L of Rhodamine 110 (Rh110), which are fluorescent dyes that are dissolved in an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate) to function as temperature indicators. This ionic liquid is encapsulated using vacuum Parylene film deposition (which is known as the Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (PoLD) method). The dro...

  2. Tunable Carbon-Dot-Based Dual-Emission Fluorescent Nanohybrids for Ratiometric Optical Thermometry in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Lin, Huihui; Xu, Zhenzhu; Huang, Yijun; Humphrey, Mark G; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    The use of carbon-dot-based dual-emission fluorescent nanohybrids (DEFNs) as versatile nanothermometry devices for spatially resolved temperature measurements in living cells is demonstrated. The carbon dots (CDs) are prepared in the organic phase and display tunable photoluminescence (PL) across a wide visible range by adjusting the excitation wavelengths and extend of N-doping. DEFNs are formed in a straightforward fashion from CDs (emitting blue PL) and gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, emitting red PL). The DEFNs display ideal single-excitation, dual-emission with two well-resolved, intensity-comparable fluorescence peaks, and function in optical thermometry with high reliability and accuracy by exploiting the temperature sensitivity of their fluorescence intensity ratio (blue/red). Furthermore, the DEFNs have been introduced into cells, exhibiting good biocompatibility, and have facilitated physiological temperature measurements in the range of 25-45 °C; the DEFNs can therefore function as "non-contact" tools for the accurate measurement of temperature and its gradient inside a living cell. PMID:26909643

  3. A broadening temperature sensitivity range with a core-shell YbEr@YbNd double ratiometric optical nanothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, L.; Prorok, K.; Francés-Soriano, L.; Pérez-Prieto, J.; Bednarkiewicz, A.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle based optical nano-thermometer under single ~808 nm wavelength photo-excitation from around ΔT = 150 K to over ΔT = 300 K (150-450 K). Such engineered nanocrystals are suitable for remote optical temperature measurements in technology and biotechnology at the sub-micron scale.The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle based optical nano-thermometer under single ~808 nm wavelength photo-excitation from around ΔT = 150 K to over ΔT = 300 K (150-450 K). Such engineered nanocrystals are suitable for remote optical temperature measurements in technology and biotechnology at the sub-micron scale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization, structural and morphological characterization of nanocrystals, the measurement setup. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08223d

  4. A single and rapid calcium wave at egg activation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H. York-Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation is an essential process that accompanies fertilisation in all animals and heralds major cellular changes, most notably, resumption of the cell cycle. While activation involves wave-like oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in mammals, ascidians and polychaete worms and a single Ca2+ peak in fish and frogs, in insects, such as Drosophila, to date, it has not been shown what changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels occur. Here, we utilise ratiometric imaging of Ca2+ indicator dyes and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator proteins to identify and characterise a single, rapid, transient wave of Ca2+ in the Drosophila egg at activation. Using genetic tools, physical manipulation and pharmacological treatments we demonstrate that the propagation of the Ca2+ wave requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ can be uncoupled from egg swelling, but not from progression of the cell cycle. We further show that mechanical pressure alone is not sufficient to initiate a Ca2+ wave. We also find that processing bodies, sites of mRNA decay and translational regulation, become dispersed following the Ca2+ transient. Based on this data we propose the following model for egg activation in Drosophila: exposure to lateral oviduct fluid initiates an increase in intracellular Ca2+ at the egg posterior via osmotic swelling, possibly through mechano-sensitive Ca2+ channels; a single Ca2+ wave then propagates in an actin dependent manner; this Ca2+ wave co-ordinates key developmental events including resumption of the cell cycle and initiation of translation of mRNAs such as bicoid.

  5. Strain Sensor Based on a Pair of Single-Mode-Multimode-Single-Mode Fiber Structures in a Ratiometric Power Measurement Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Hatta, Agus; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The strain and temperature dependencies of a step-index single-mode–multimode–single-mode (SMS) fiber structure are investigated numerically and experimentally. For intensity-based strain measurement using a single SMS fiber structure, at a selected wavelength, it is found that there is a high strain dependence, but also a temperature dependence that will induce strain measurement error. To minimize the temperature-induced strain measurement error, two SMS fiber structures are proposed and de...

  6. Highly Luminescent Microporous Organic Polymer with Lewis Acidic Boron Sites on the Pore Surface: Ratiometric Sensing and Capture of F(-) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Venkata M; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Roy, Syamantak; Pati, Swapan K; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-07-20

    Reversible and selective capture/detection of F(-) ions in water is of the utmost importance, as excess intake leads to adverse effects on human health. Highly robust Lewis acidic luminescent porous organic materials have potential for efficient sequestration and detection of F(-) ions. Herein, the rational design and synthesis of a boron-based, Lewis acidic microporous organic polymer (BMOP) derived from tris(4-bromo-2,3,5,6-tetramethylphenyl)boron nodes and diethynylbiphenyl linkers with a pore size of 1.08 nm for selective turn-on sensing and capture of F(-) ion are reported. The presence of a vacant pπ orbital on the boron center of BMOP results in intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) from the linker to boron. BMOP shows selective turn-on blue emission for F(-) ions in aqueous mixtures with a detection limit of 2.6 μM. Strong B-F interactions facilitate rapid sequestration of F(-) by BMOP. The ICT emission of BMOP can be reversibly regenerated by addition of an excess of water, and the polymer can be reused several times. PMID:26074403

  7. Ratiometric measurements of adiponectin by mass spectrometry in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus with iron overload reveal an association with insulin resistance and glucagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Neely

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High molecular weight (HMW adiponectin levels are reduced in humans with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Similar to humans with insulin resistance, managed bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus diagnosed with hemochromatosis (iron overload have higher levels of 2 h post-prandial plasma insulin than healthy controls. A parallel reaction monitoring assay for dolphin serum adiponectin was developed based on tryptic peptides identified by mass spectrometry. Using identified post-translational modifications, a differential measurement was constructed. Total and unmodified adiponectin levels were measured in sera from dolphins with (n=4 and without (n=5 iron overload. This measurement yielded total adiponectin levels as well as site specific percent unmodified adiponectin that may inversely correlate with HMW adiponectin. Differences in insulin levels between iron overload cases and controls were observed 2 h post-prandial, but not during the fasting state. Thus, post-prandial as well as fasting serum adiponectin levels were measured to determine whether adiponectin and insulin would follow similar patterns. There was no difference in total adiponectin or percent unmodified adiponectin from case or control fasting animals. There was no difference in post-prandial total adiponectin levels between case and control dolphins (mean ± S.D. at 763 ± 298 and 727 ± 291 pmol/ml, respectively (p = 0.91; however, percent unmodified adiponectin was significantly higher in post-prandial cases compared controls (30.0 ± 6.3 versus 17.0 ± 6.6%, respectively; p = 0.016. Interestingly, both total and percent unmodified adiponectin were correlated with glucagon levels in controls (r = 0.999, p < 0.001, but not in cases, which is possibly a reflection of insulin resistance. Although total adiponectin levels were not significantly different, the elevated percent unmodified adiponectin follows a trend similar to HMW adiponectin reported for humans with metabolic disorders.

  8. A water-soluble ESIPT fluorescent probe with high quantum yield and red emission for ratiometric detection of inorganic and organic palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tang; Xu, Pengfei; Liu, Meihui; Bi, Anyao; Hu, Pengzhi; Ye, Bin; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenbin

    2015-05-01

    A novel fluorescent probe with a high quantum yield (0.41), large Stokes shifts (255 nm), and red emission (635 nm) was designed to detect all typical oxidation states of palladium species (0, +2, +4) by palladium-mediated terminal propargyl ethers cleavage reaction in water solution without any organic media. The probe showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity for palladium species, with a detection as low as 57 nM (6.2 μg L(-1)). PMID:25757156

  9. A colorimetric and ratiometric turn-on BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for double-channel detection of Cu{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinlong; Ma, Xiaowei; Liu, Bin; Cai, Libo; Li, Qi; Zhang, Yeqin [College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Jiang, Kezhi [Key Laboratory of Organosilicon Chemistry and Material Technology of Ministry of Education, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Yin, Shouchun, E-mail: yinsc@ustc.edu [College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China)

    2013-09-15

    A colorimetric and turn-on fluorescent chemosensor (RS1) for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} based on BODIPY has been synthesized. RS1 selectively binds with Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions in CH{sub 3}CN among various metal ions. RS1 shows a significant red-shift in absorption spectra from 522 nm to 581 nm for Hg{sup 2+} and 600 nm for Cu{sup 2+}, which induces naked-eye color changes from pink to purple and blue. Upon excitation at 520 nm, RS1 upon interaction with Hg{sup 2+} ions shows the increase of the ratio of fluorescent intensities (I{sub 589}/I{sub 576}) from 0.84 to 1.87, while RS1 with Cu{sup 2+} exhibits a huge increase of I{sub 610}/I{sub 576} from 0.72 to 7.87. The binding stoichiometries of RS1 with Hg{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+} have been determined to be 1:1 by Job's plot and ESI. The binding of RS1 with Hg{sup 2+} is chemically reversible, while the sensing processing of RS1 in response to Cu{sup 2+} ions is irreversible. Highlights: • A new colorimetric and turn-on fluorescent chemosensor (RS1) was synthesized. • RS1 exhibits different fluorescence enhancement in the presence of Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} upon excitation at 520 nm in CH{sub 3}CN. • The remarkable and different naked-eye visible color changes also provide RS1 as a colorimetric senor for Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}.

  10. Ratiometric Measurements of Adiponectin by Mass Spectrometry in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with Iron Overload Reveal an Association with Insulin Resistance and Glucagon

    OpenAIRE

    Neely, Benjamin A.; Kevin P Carlin; Arthur, John M.; McFee, Wayne E.; Janech, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels are reduced in humans with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Similar to humans with insulin resistance, managed bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) diagnosed with hemochromatosis (iron overload) have higher levels of 2 h post-prandial plasma insulin than healthy controls. A parallel reaction monitoring assay for dolphin serum adiponectin was developed based on tryptic peptides identified by mass spectrometry. Using identified post-tran...

  11. Towards Behavior Control for Evolutionary Robot Based on RL with ENN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingan Yang

    2013-03-01

    In comparison with the conventional behavior network and the adaptive behavior method, our algorithm simplified the genetic encoding complexity, improved the convergence rate  and the network performance.

  12. Design of selective 8-methylquinolinol based ratiometric Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} fluorescent chemosensor mimicking NOR and IMPLICATION logic gates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurjaspreet, E-mail: gjpsingh@pu.ac.in; Singh, Jandeep; Singh, Jasbhinder; Mangat, Satinderpal Singh

    2015-09-15

    This report describes an on–off module of a fluorescent probe for selectively sensing of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions by a single chemosensor with unique output optical response and is being reported for the first time. The probe 8-methylquinolinyl-1,2,3-triazolyl silatrane (QTS) was efficiently developed using click silylation route, followed by transetherification of silane. Moreover, the color change in probe QTS by response of this colorimetric sensor can be visualized by naked eye. The anti-quenching response for quenched QTS–Fe{sup 3+} fluorescence spectra by addition of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} ions in the MeOH/H{sub 2}O solvent system results into reversion of fluorescence maximum. These fluctuations in spectral response, under electronic behavior, can be viewed to mimic as NOR and IMPLICATION logic gate. - Highlights: • The probe 8-methylquinolinyl-1,2,3-triazolyl silatrane (QTS) was efficiently developed by using click silylation route. • The fluorescence emission response of sensor QTS towards Fe{sup 3+} ions show 'turn-on' mode, with red shift of 79 nm. • UV–vis spectra illustrate increase in absorption maxima on sensing of both ionic species.

  13. 系列混合碳源条件下颗粒化EBPR系统茵群结构变化规律研究%A study of microbial diversity of granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems cultivated with ratiometric propionate and acetate as mixed carbon sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涛; 孙培德; 金均

    2012-01-01

    A series of mixed carbon sources with different ratios of propionate and acetate was applied in granule-based enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge in SBR reactor. Microbial diversity change during the granular process and functional bacteria competition under different carbon sources were studied. Significant microbial diversity change in EBPR system was exhibited during granulation. Uncultured bacteria previously dominated in the system disappeared rapidly, while uncultured rhodocyclaceae bacterium and portions of candidatus competibacter phosphatis, denitrifying bacterium, acinetobacter and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were gradually washed out. Uncultured chlorobi bacterium and uncultured alpha proteobacterium were the primary phosphorus removal bacteria in developed granular EBPR system. The change of bacteria population ofcandidatus competibacterphosphatis and uncultured chlorobi bacterium was evidenced as a result of microbial diversity under different ratios of mixed carbon sources. The population of candidatus competibacter phosphatis increased monotonically with acetate concentration, decreaseing the system phosphorus removal efficiency. Meanwhile, the population of uncultured chlorobi bacterium had a positive correlation with propionate concentration, which maintained good phosphorus removal efficiency of the EBPR system.%在SBR反应器中接种富含聚磷菌的活性污泥,采用一系列不同丙酸/乙酸比例混合的碳源进行EBPR系统污泥的颗粒化培养,并考察了颗粒化进程中的系统菌群结构变化,以及不同混合碳源条件对系统功能菌种竞争的影响.结果表明,污泥颗粒化过程对EBPR系统菌群结构产生了较大的筛选作用.原本在系统中占优势的一类Uncultured bacterium被迅速淘汰;Uncultured Rhodocyclaceae bacterium、部分Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis、部分Denitrifying bacterium、Acinetobacter及部分Uncultured alpha proteobacterium分别逐渐被淘汰.在各个成熟的颗粒化EBPR系统中,除磷微生物主要为Uncultured Chlorobi bacterium与Uncultured alpha proteobacterium.不同混合碳源条件培养的颗粒化EBPR系统菌群结构差异主要表现为Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis(聚糖菌)与Uncultured Chlorobi bacterium(聚磷菌)菌群数量的不同.混合碳源中乙酸比例的提高可造成颗粒化EBPR系统中Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis的增长,使系统的除磷效率下降.而碳源中丙酸比例相对较高的条件有利于Uncultured Chlorobi bacterium增长,从而有助于颗粒化EBPR系统维持较好的除磷效率.

  14. Calcium Imaging of Pheromone Responses in the Insect Antennal Lobe

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Susy M.; Wang, Jing W.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium imaging is a powerful technique that permits the visual monitoring of neural responses to pheromones and other odors in large ensembles of neurons. Here, we describe a method that permits the monitoring of Drosophila antennal lobe responses to odors using the genetically encoded calcium monitor GCaMP.

  15. Improved monomeric red, orange and yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaner, Nathan C; Campbell, Robert E; Steinbach, Paul A; Giepmans, Ben N G; Palmer, Amy E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are genetically encoded, easily imaged reporters crucial in biology and biotechnology. When a protein is tagged by fusion to a fluorescent protein, interactions between fluorescent proteins can undesirably disturb targeting or function. Unfortunately, all wild-type yellow-to-red

  16. Molecular Neuroanatomy: A Generation of Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, Jonathan D.; Wu, Da-Yu; Satterlee, John

    2013-01-01

    The neuroscience research landscape has changed dramatically over the past decade. An impressive array of neuroscience tools and technologies have been generated, including brain gene expression atlases, genetically encoded proteins to monitor and manipulate neuronal activity and function, cost effective genome sequencing, new technologies enabling genome manipulation, new imaging methods and new tools for mapping neuronal circuits. However, despite these technological advances, several signi...

  17. Visualization of Plasticity in Fear-Evoked Calcium Signals in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Bryan B.; Soden, Marta E.; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is broadly implicated in fear-related processes, yet we know very little about signaling dynamics in these neurons during active fear conditioning. We describe the direct imaging of calcium signals of dopamine neurons during Pavlovian fear conditioning using fiber-optic confocal microscopy coupled with the genetically encoded calcium…

  18. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  19. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  20. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  1. Calcium imaging of vomeronasal organ response using slice preparations from transgenic mice expressing G-CaMP2

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, C. Ron

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) in vertebrate animals detects pheromones and interspecies chemical signals. We describe in this chapter a Ca2+ imaging approach using transgenic mice that express the genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor G-CaMP2 in VNO tissue. This approach allows us to analyze the complex patterns of the vomeronasal neuron response to large numbers of chemosensory stimuli.

  2. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Biosynthesis of the Polycyclic Antimicrobial Peptides Lacticin 481, Haloduracin, and Cinnamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    Lantibiotics are bacterial-derived polycyclic antimicrobial peptides. They are genetically encoded and ribosomally synthesized as precursor peptides containing a structural region that undergoes post-translational modification and a leader sequence that is not modified. Specific serine and threonine residues in the pre-lantibiotic structural…

  4. Tapered-Fiber Optical Sensor for Physiological pH Range

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cui, Q.; Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Proboštová, Jana; Kašík, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 9 (2015), s. 4967-4973. ISSN 1530-437X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04011400 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fluorescence * Ratiometric * Immobilization Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.762, year: 2014

  5. Synthesis of Cross-Linked Polymeric Micelle pH Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    The design flexibility that polymeric micelles offer in the fabrication of optical nanosensors for ratiometric pH measurements is investigated. pH nanosensors based on polymeric micelles are synthesized either by a mixed-micellization approach or by a postmicelle modification strategy. In the mixed...

  6. A Pyrenyl-Appended Triazole-Based Calix arene as a Fluorescent Sensor for Iodide Ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seung; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sang Hoon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Thuery, Pierre [CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, LCCEf, Yvette (France); Matthews, Susan E. [University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Souane, Rachid; Vicens, Jacques [IPHC-UdS-ECPM-CNRS, Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    The synthesis and evaluation of a novel calix arene-based fluorescent chemosensor 1 for the detection of I. is described. The fluorescent changes observed upon addition of various anions show that 1 is selective for I. over other anions. Addition of I. results in ratiometric measurements with 1 : 1 complex ratio.

  7. Expanding the dynamic measurement range for polymeric nanoparticle pH sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2011-01-01

    Conventional optical nanoparticle pH sensors that are designed for ratiometric measurements in cells have been based on utilizing one sensor fluorophore and one reference fluorophore in each nanoparticle, which results in a relatively narrow dynamic measurement range. This results in substantial...

  8. Cross-linked self-assembled micelle based nanosensor for intracellular pH measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Windschiegl, Barbara;

    2014-01-01

    A micelle based nanosensor was synthesized and investigated as a ratiometric pH sensor for use in measurements in living cells by fluorescent microscopy. The nanosensor synthesis was based on self-assembly of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer, which was chemically cross-linked after micelle forma...

  9. In vivo optical detection of pH in microscopic tissue samples of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Martan, Tomáš; Matějec, Vlastimil; Hoyerová, Klára; Kamínek, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 8 (2013), s. 4809-4815. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/2139 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Ratiometric fluorescence * Arabidopsis thaliana * Tissue Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  10. Polymeric nanosensors for measuring the full dynamic pH range of endosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki;

    2009-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticle sensors have been constructed for studying pH in the endocytic pathway in mammalian cells. The pH sensors for fluorescence ratiometric measurements were prepared using inverse microemulsion polymerization with rhodamine as reference fluorophor and fluorescein and oregon green...

  11. Measuring intracellular redox conditions using GFP-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Ostergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of methods for analyzing the redox conditions in specific compartments in living cells. These methods are based on genetically encoded sensors comprising variants of Green Fluorescent Protein in which vicinal cysteine residues have been introduced at solvent......-exposed positions. Several mutant forms have been identified in which formation of a disulfide bond between these cysteine residues results in changes of their fluorescence properties. The redox sensors have been characterized biochemically and found to behave differently, both spectroscopically and in terms...... of redox properties. As genetically encoded sensors they can be expressed in living cells and used for analysis of intracellular redox conditions; however, which parameters are measured depends on how the sensors interact with various cellular redox components. Results of both biochemical and cell...

  12. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Viktoria Liss; Britta Barlag; Monika Nietschke; Michael Hensel

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded m...

  13. FLIPPER, a combinatorial probe for correlated live imaging and electron microscopy, allows identification and quantitative analysis of various cells and organelles

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, Jeroen; van Ham, Tjakko J.; Ruby D. Kalicharan; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sjollema, Klaas A.; van Dijk, Freerk; Schnell, Ulrike; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2015-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of cells and tissues by electron microscopy (EM) yields detailed information on subcellular structures. However, EM is typically restricted to small fields of view at high magnification; this makes quantifying events in multiple large-area sample sections extremely difficult. Even when combining light microscopy (LM) with EM (correlated LM and EM: CLEM) to find areas of interest, the labeling of molecules is still a challenge. We present a new genetically encoded p...

  14. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    OpenAIRE

    Dridi S.; Lehmann L.

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and form...

  15. Blue Fluorescent cGMP Sensor for Multiparameter Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Niino, Yusuke; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP) and Ca2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indica...

  16. Selective Chemical Labeling of Proteins with Small Fluorescent Molecules Based on Metal-Chelation Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuaki Soh

    2008-01-01

    Site-specific chemical labeling utilizing small fluorescent molecules is a powerful and attractive technique for in vivo and in vitro analysis of cellular proteins, which can circumvent some problems in genetic encoding labeling by large fluorescent proteins. In particular, affinity labeling based on metal-chelation, advantageous due to the high selectivity/simplicity and the small tag-size, is promising, as well as enzymatic covalent labeling, thereby a variety of novel methods have been stu...

  17. A simple method for enhancing the bioorthogonality of cyclooctyne reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, He; Sakmar, Thomas P; Huber, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The cross-reactivity between some cyclooctynes and thiols limits the bioorthogonality of the strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. We show that a low concentration of β-mercaptoethanol significantly reduces the undesirable side reaction between bicyclononyne (BCN) and cysteine and while preserving free cysteines. We site-specifically label a genetically-encoded azido group in the visual photoreceptor rhodopsin to demonstrate the utility of the strategy. PMID:27009873

  18. Hierarchical sparse coding in the sensory system of Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Zaslaver, Alon; Liani, Idan; Shtangel, Oshrat; Ginzburg, Shira; Yee, Lisa; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Animals with compact sensory systems face an encoding problem where a small number of sensory neurons are required to encode information about its surrounding complex environment. Using Caenorhabditis elegans worms as a model, we ask how chemical stimuli are encoded by a small and highly connected sensory system. We first generated a comprehensive library of transgenic worms where each animal expresses a genetically encoded calcium indicator in individual sensory neurons....

  19. Lhx6 Delineates a Pathway Mediating Innate Reproductive Behaviors from the Amygdala to the Hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Gloria B.; Dong, Hong-Wei; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; George D. Yancopoulos; Swanson, Larry W; Anderson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, innate reproductive and defensive behaviors are mediated by anatomically segregated connections between the amygdala and hypothalamus. This anatomic segregation poses the problem of how the brain integrates activity in these circuits when faced with conflicting stimuli eliciting such mutually exclusive behaviors. Using genetically encoded and conventional axonal tracers, we have found that the transcription factor Lhx6 delineates the reproductive branch of this pathway. Other Lhx ...

  20. Struktur und Reaktionsmechanismus der Pyrrolysinsynthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product.

  1. Conditions and constraints for astrocyte calcium signaling in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Haustein, Martin D.; Kracun, Sebastian; Lu, Xiao-Hong; Shih, Tiffany; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Tong, Xiaoping; Xu, Ji; Yang, X William; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Bushong, Eric A.; Looger, Loren L.; Khakh, Baljit S.

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal activities of astrocyte Ca2+ signaling in mature neuronal circuits remain unclear. We used genetically encoded Ca2+ and glutamate indicators as well as pharmacogenetic and electrical control of neurotransmitter release to explore astrocyte activity in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. Our data revealed numerous localised spontaneous Ca2+ signals in astrocyte branches and territories, but these were not driven by neuronal activity or glutamate. Moreover, evoked astrocyte ...

  2. la bioluminescence de l'aequorine en réponse au calcium In vitro et dans le Cortex cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Tricoire, Ludovic

    2006-01-01

    During my PhD, I investigated in vitro the calcium-dependent bioluminescence of thephotoprotein aequorin and then used its bioluminescence to image neuronal activities in theneocortical network. This genetically encoded calcium sensor can be expressed in specific cell types and its bioluminescence is not toxic and exhibit a high signal/noise ratio.I first search for mutations modifying aequorin bioluminescence, using a randommutagenesis and in vitro evolution approach. I isolated mutants show...

  3. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types Using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    OpenAIRE

    Fengqiu Diao; Holly Ironfield; Haojiang Luan; Feici Diao; William C. Shropshire; John Ewer; Elizabeth Marr; Christopher J. Potter; Matthias Landgraf; Benjamin H. White

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest ...

  4. Imaging Light Responses of Foveal Ganglion Cells in the Living Macaque Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Lu; Masella, Benjamin; Dalkara, Deniz; Zhang, Jie; Flannery, John G.; Schaffer, David V; Williams, David R.; Merigan, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The fovea dominates primate vision, and its anatomy and perceptual abilities are well studied, but its physiology has been little explored because of limitations of current physiological methods. In this study, we adapted a novel in vivo imaging method, originally developed in mouse retina, to explore foveal physiology in the macaque, which permits the repeated imaging of the functional response of many retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) simultaneously. A genetically encoded calcium indicator, G-C...

  5. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB - E. coli cytoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Markiv Anatoliy; Beatson Richard; Burchell Joy; Durvasula Ravi V; Kang Angray S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Antibody-fluorophore conjugates are invaluable reagents used in contemporary molecular cell biology for imaging, cell sorting and tracking intracellular events. However they suffer in some cases from batch to batch variation, partial loss of binding and susceptibility to photo-bleaching. In theory, these issues can all be addressed by using recombinant antibody fused directly to genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. However, single-chain fragment variable domains link...

  6. Super-Resolution Microscopy Using Standard Fluorescent Proteins in Intact Cells under Cryo-Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Schellenberger, Pascale; Seiradake, Elena; Dobbie, Ian M.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a super-resolution technique for fluorescence cryo-microscopy based on photoswitching of standard genetically encoded fluorescent marker proteins in intact mammalian cells at low temperature (81 K). Given the limit imposed by the lack of cryo-immersion objectives, current applications of fluorescence cryo-microscopy to biological specimens achieve resolutions between 400–500 nm only. We demonstrate that the single molecule characteristics of reversible photobleaching of mEGFP and...

  7. 77Se Chemical Shift Tensor of L-selenocystine: Experimental NMR Measurements and Quantum Chemical Investigations of Structural Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Struppe, Jochem; Zhang, Yong; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine and its dimeric form, selenocystine, are both utilized by nature. They are found in active sites of selenoproteins, enzymes that facilitate a diverse range of reactions, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and regulation of redox pathways. Due to selenocysteine and selenocystine’s specialized biological roles, it is of interest to examine their 77Se NMR properties and how those can in turn be employed to study biological sy...

  8. Fucci2a: A bicistronic cell cycle reporter that allows Cre mediated tissue specific expression in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mort, Richard Lester; Ford, Matthew Jonathan; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Lindstrom, Nils Olof; Casadio, Angela; Douglas, Adam Thomas; Keighren, Margaret Anne; Hohenstein, Peter; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jackson, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    Markers of cell cycle stage allow estimation of cell cycle dynamics in cell culture and during embryonic development. The Fucci system incorporates genetically encoded probes that highlight G1 and S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle allowing live imaging. However the available mouse models that incorporate Fucci are beset by problems with transgene inactivation, varying expression level, lack of conditional potential and/or the need to maintain separate transgenes—there is no transgenic mouse mod...

  9. Phosphatidylserine dynamics in cellular membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Jason G.; Koivusalo, Mirkka; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wohland, Thorsten; Grinstein, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Much has been learned about the role of exofacial phosphatidylserine (PS) in apoptosis and blood clotting using annexin V. However, because annexins are impermeant and unable to bind PS at low calcium concentration, they are unsuitable for intracellular use. Thus little is known about the topology and dynamics of PS in the endomembranes of normal cells. We used two new probes—green fluorescent protein (GFP)–LactC2, a genetically encoded fluorescent PS biosensor, and 1-palmitoyl-2-(dipyrrometh...

  10. Optically Highlighting Basement Membrane Components in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Elliott Hagedorn & David Sherwood ### Abstract Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other genetically encoded fluorescent proteins provide a means to study gene expression pattern and protein localization in living tissues. Recently discovered GFP-like fluorophores and engineered variants have further expanded the fluorescent protein toolkit for in vivo imaging. Here we describe a technique using transgenic C. elegans that contain laminin or type IV collagen fused to the g...

  11. Synthetic Physiology: Strategies for Adapting Tools from Nature for Genetically-Targeted Control of Fast Biological Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Brian Y.; Chuong, Amy S.; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The life and operation of cells involve many physiological processes that take place over fast timescales of milliseconds to minutes. Genetically-encoded technologies for driving or suppressing specific fast physiological processes in intact cells, perhaps embedded within intact tissues in living organisms, are critical for the ability to understand how these physiological processes contribute to emergent cellular and organismal functions and behaviors. Such “synthetic physiology” tools are o...

  12. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Victor Beltran-Ramirez; Miller, David J.; Jörg Wiedenmann; Anya Salih; Matz, Mikhail V

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full ...

  13. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwamu Takemoto; Tomoki Matsuda; Naoki Sakai; Donald Fu; Masanori Noda; Susumu Uchiyama; Ippei Kotera; Yoshiyuki Arai; Masataka Horiuchi; Kiichi Fukui; Tokiyoshi Ayabe; Fuyuhiko Inagaki; Hiroshi Suzuki; Takeharu Nagai

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subce...

  14. aequorine bioluminescence response to calcium in vitro and in cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tricoire, Ludovic

    2006-01-01

    During my PhD, I investigated in vitro the calcium-dependent bioluminescence of thephotoprotein aequorin and then used its bioluminescence to image neuronal activities in theneocortical network. This genetically encoded calcium sensor can be expressed in specific cell types and its bioluminescence is not toxic and exhibit a high signal/noise ratio.I first search for mutations modifying aequorin bioluminescence, using a randommutagenesis and in vitro evolution approach. I isolated mutants show...

  15. Genetic visualization with an improved GCaMP calcium indicator reveals spatiotemporal activation of the spinal motor neurons in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, Akira; Ohkura, Masamichi; Kotani, Tomoya; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Animal behaviors are generated by well-coordinated activation of neural circuits. In zebrafish, embryos start to show spontaneous muscle contractions at 17 to 19 h postfertilization. To visualize how motor circuits in the spinal cord are activated during this behavior, we developed GCaMP-HS (GCaMP-hyper sensitive), an improved version of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP, and created transgenic zebrafish carrying the GCaMP-HS gene downstream of the Gal4-recognition sequence, UAS...

  16. Culture Prefigures Cognition in Pan/Homo Bonobos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue SAVAGE-RUMBAUGH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article questions traditional approaches to the study of primate cognition. Because of a widespread assumption that cognition in non-human primates is genetically encoded, these approaches neglect how profoundly apes’ cultural rearing experiences affect test results. We describe how three advanced cognitive abilities – imitation, theory of mind and language – emerged in bonobos maturing in a Pan/Homo culture.

  17. Optogenetics: Molecular and Optical Tools for Controlling Life with Light

    OpenAIRE

    Boyden, Edward Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic tools are genetically-encoded reagents that, when targeted to specific brain cells, enable their activity to be controlled by light. These tools are having broad impact on science, and may serve clinical roles as well. 150-word Biography: Ed Boyden is Associate Professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences, at the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute. He leads the Synthetic Neurobiology Group, which develops tools for analyzing and engineering the ci...

  18. Enhanced Yield of Recombinant Proteins with Site-specifically Incorporated Unnatural Amino Acids Using a Cell-Free Expression System

    OpenAIRE

    Smolskaya, Sviatlana; Zhang, Zhiwen Jonathan; Alfonta, Lital

    2013-01-01

    Using a commercial protein expression system, we sought the crucial elements and conditions for the expression of proteins with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. By identifying the most important translational components, we were able to increase suppression efficiency to 55% and to increase mutant protein yields to levels higher than achieved with wild type expression (120%), reaching over 500 µg/mL of translated protein (comprising 25 µg in 50 µL of reaction mixture). To our knowle...

  19. Cell Surface Sensors: Lightning the Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Md Monsur; Kang, Dong-Ku; Tsang, Kyle; Fu, Moyu; Karp, Jeffrey M; Zhao, Weian

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface sensors are powerful tools to elucidate cell functions including cell signaling, metabolism and cell-to-cell communication. These sensors not only facilitate our understanding in basic biology but also advance the development of effective therapeutics and diagnostics. While genetically encoded fluorescent protein/peptide sensors have been most popular, emerging cell surface sensor systems including polymer-, nanoparticle-, and nucleic acid aptamer-based sensors have largely expan...

  20. Direct visualization of specifically modified extracellular glycans in living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attreed, Matthew; Desbois, Muriel; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Bülow, Hannes E

    2012-05-01

    Modification patterns of heparan sulfate coordinate protein function in metazoans, yet in vivo imaging of such non-genetically encoded structures has been impossible. Here we report a transgenic method in Caenorhabditis elegans that allows direct live imaging of specific heparan sulfate modification patterns. This experimental approach reveals a dynamic and cell-specific heparan sulfate landscape and could in principle be adapted to visualize and analyze any extracellular molecule in vivo. PMID:22466794

  1. Direct visualization of specifically modified extracellular glycans in living animals

    OpenAIRE

    Attreed, Matthew; Desbois, Muriel; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Bülow, Hannes E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification patterns of the extracellular glycan heparan sulfate coordinate protein function in metazoans, yet in vivo imaging of such non-genetically encoded structures has been impossible. Here we report a transgenic method in Caenorhabditis elegans that allows direct live imaging of specific heparan sulfate modification patterns. This experimental approach reveals a dynamic and cell-specific heparan sulfate landscape and could in principle be adapted to visualize and analyze any extracell...

  2. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-sh...

  3. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan eLi; Foss, Sarah M.; Yuriy eDobryy; C. Kevin ePark; Samuel Andrew Hires; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-...

  4. Skin care during the menopause period: noninvasive procedures of beauty studies

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Joanna; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena; Skotnicka-Graca, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Ageing is a resultant of two processes, including genetically encoded changes in an organism and modifications caused by a negative external environment impact. In the histological aspect, the skin ageing, due to endogenous factors and hormonal changes shows: excessive dryness, Malpighian layer thinning, microcirculation disorders, collagenic or elastin fiber degradation and simultaneous glycation, decreased speed of sebum and perspiration secretion. It is said that skin is a functional pictu...

  5. Modern metabolism as a palimpsest of the RNA world.

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, S A; Ellington, A. D.; Tauer, A

    1989-01-01

    An approach is developed for constructing models of ancient organisms using data from metabolic pathways, genetic organization, chemical structure, and enzymatic reaction mechanisms found in contemporary organisms. This approach is illustrated by a partial reconstruction of a model for the "breakthrough organism," the last organism to use RNA as the sole genetically encoded biological catalyst. As reconstructed here, this organism had a complex metabolism that included dehydrogenations, trans...

  6. Optical Neural Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals.

  7. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  8. Second and third generation voltage-sensitive fluorescent proteins for monitoring membrane potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Knopfel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, optical neuroimaging methods have been enriched by engineered biosensors derived from fluorescent protein (FP reporters fused to protein detectors that convert physiological signals into changes of intrinsic FP fluorescence. These FP-based indicators are genetically encoded, and hence targetable to specific cell populations within networks of heterologous cell types. Among this class of biosensors, the development of optical probes for membrane potential is both highly desirable and challenging. A suitable FP voltage sensor would indeed be a valuable tool for monitoring the activity of thousands of individual neurons simultaneously in a non-invasive manner. Previous prototypic genetically-encoded FP voltage indicators achieved a proof of principle but also highlighted several difficulties such as poor cell surface targeting and slow kinetics. Recently, we developed a new series of FRET-based Voltage-Sensitive Fluorescent Proteins (VSFPs, referred to as VSFP2s, with efficient targeting to the plasma membrane and high responsiveness to membrane potential signaling in excitable cells. In addition to these FRET-based voltage sensors, we also generated a third series of probes consisting of single FPs with response kinetics suitable for the optical imaging of fast neuronal signals. These newly available genetically-encoded reporters for membrane potential will be instrumental for future experimental approaches directed toward the understanding of neuronal network dynamics and information processing in the brain. Here, we review the development and current status of these novel fluorescent probes.

  9. Easily Accessible and Highly Selective "Turn-on" Fluorescent Sensor for Imaging Cadmium in Living Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; ZHANG Ying-mu; LI Yao-xian; ZHAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    A new schiff base of phenothiazine derivative was designed for ratiometric sensing of Cd2+ selectively.Upon the addition of Cd2+ to the solution of phenothiazine derivative,the fluorescence intensity of it was enhanced in a linear fashion and the maximum fluorescence peak exhibited a blue shift from 575 nm to 525 nm.This ratiometric fluorescent sensor displays a very high sensitivity(detection limits were 0.34 and 1.0 μmol/L of Cd2+ using the visual fluorescence changes and UV-Vis changes,respectively),a rapid response time(<10 s) and high selectivity for Cd2+ over other transition metal ions.Moreover,the living cells image experiments also demonstrate the value of the sensor in fluorescent visualization of Cd2+ in the environmental and biological systems.

  10. A Luminescent Metal-Organic Framework Thermometer with Intrinsic Dual Emission from Organic Lumophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Lin, Chensheng; Sheng, Tianlu; Hu, Shengmin; Zhuo, Chao; Fu, Ruibiao; Wen, Yuehong; Li, Haoran; Su, Shaodong; Wu, Xintao

    2016-03-18

    A new mixed-ligand metal-organic framework (MOF), ZnATZ-BTB, has been constructed as a luminescent ratiometric thermometer by making use of the intrinsic dual emission at cryogenic temperatures. Its twofold interpenetrated network promotes the Dexter energy transfer (DET) between the mixed organic lumophores. The temperature-dependent luminescent behavior arises from the thermal equilibrium between two separated excited states coupled by DET, which is confirmed by Boltzmann distribution fitting. The small excited-state energy gap allows ZnATZ-BTB to measure and visualize cryogenic temperatures (30-130 K) with significantly high relative sensitivity (up to 5.29 % K(-1) at 30 K). Moreover, it is the first example of a ratiometric MOF thermometer the dual emitting sources of which are widely applicable mixed organic ligands, opening up new opportunities for designing such devices. PMID:26864609

  11. Acidic Microclimate pH Distribution in PLGA Microspheres Monitored by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Amy G.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The microclimate pH (μpH) distribution inside poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres was monitored quantitatively over an acidic range as a function of several formulation variables. A ratiometric method by confocal laser scanning microscopy with Lysosensor yellow/blue® dextran was adapted from those previously reported, and μpH distribution kinetics inside PLGA microspheres was examined during incubation under physiologic conditions for 4 weeks. The effects of polymer molecular we...

  12. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo-ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging-and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  13. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Radbruch; Daniel Bremer; Ronja Mothes; Robert Günther; Jan Leo Rinnenthal; Julian Pohlan; Carolin Ulbricht; Hauser, Anja E.; Raluca Niesner

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context o...

  14. Temperature Induced Instabilities in Macro-bend Fiber Based Wavelength Measurement Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Wang, Pengfei; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    An investigation of temperature-induced instabilities in a wavelength measurement system based on macro-bend fiber filter used in the ratiometric scheme are presented. Two wavelength measurement systems based on macro-bend fiber, a standard low bend loss single-mode fiber filter based system and a high bend loss fiber filter based system are considered. In the case of a low bend loss fiber filter based system, the oscillatory variation in the ratio response with temperature and the difference...

  15. Role of Synthetic and Dimensional Synthetic Organic Chemistry in Block Copolymer Micelle Nanosensor Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigated the role of amphiphilic triblock copolymer micelle nanomaterials in nanosensors, with emphasis on the synthesis of micelle particle sensors. The thesis is focused on the role of synthetic and dimensional synthetic organic chemistry in amphiphilic triblock core-shellcorona micelle based ratiometric fluorescence pH nanosensor fabrications. Two synthetic strategies such as post micelle modification and mixed micellisation (co-micellisation) were employed for pH nanosenso...

  16. A plotting optical densitometer for routine radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note the authors describe a modified densitometer for evaluation of film blackening during electron dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance work. The instability and drift of previous plotting densitometers have been eliminated. Using a cold light source and a ratiometric measurement technique has removed the major sources of error inherent in these units. Using a minimum of components and a high quality integrated circuit log amplifier has improved accuracy and linearily. (author)

  17. Techniques for quantifying effects of dietary antioxidants on transcription factor translocation and nitric oxide production in cultured cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ewins, B. A.; Vassiliadou, M.; Minihane, A. M.; Rimbach, G. H.; Weinberg, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants can affect cellular processes relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. We have used non-standard techniques to quantify effects of the antioxidant soy isoflavones genistein and daidzein on translocation of Nuclear Factor-KB (NF-KB) and nitric oxide (NO) production, which are important in these diseases. Translocation was quantified using confocal immunofluoresecence microscopy and ratiometric image analysis. NO was quantified by an electrochemica...

  18. Absolute Photoacoustic Thermometry in Deep Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here, we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes...

  19. Green fluorescent protein: A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Remington, S James

    2011-01-01

    A brief personal perspective is provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP), covering the period 1994–2011. The topics discussed are primarily those in which my research group has made a contribution and include structure and function of the GFP polypeptide, the mechanism of fluorescence emission, excited state protein transfer, the design of ratiometric fluorescent protein biosensors and an overview of the fluorescent proteins derived from coral reef animals. Structure-function relationship...

  20. Stringent control of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in guard cells of intact plants compared to their counterparts in epidermal strips or guard cell protoplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Levchenko, V.; Guinot, D. R.; Klein, M.; Roelfsema, M. R. G.; Hedrich, R; Dietrich, P

    2008-01-01

    Cytoplasmic calcium elevations, transients, and oscillations are thought to encode information that triggers a variety of physiological responses in plant cells. Yet Ca2+ signals induced by a single stimulus vary, depending on the physiological state of the cell and experimental conditions. We compared Ca2+ homeostasis and stimulus-induced Ca2+ signals in guard cells of intact plants, epidermal strips, and isolated protoplasts. Single-cell ratiometric imaging with the Ca2+-s...

  1. Spermine detection via metal-mediated ethynylarene ‘turn-on’ fluorescence signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, James T.; Bruck, Brent S.

    2015-01-01

    A dicarboxylated ethynylarene was shown to behave as a fluorescent chemosensor for millimolar concentrations of polyamines when mixed with Cd(II), Pb(II) or Zn(II) ions at micromolar concentrations. A bathochromic shift and intensification of fluorescence emission was observed with increasing amounts of metal ion in the presence of aqueous polyamines buffered at pH = 7.6. Such perturbations manifested as ‘turn-on’ signals from a ratiometric comparison of emission intensities at 390 nm versus ...

  2. Smart load cells : an industrial application

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, J. G.; Couto, Carlos; Correia, J H

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a data acquisition solution using a single-chip RISC type microcontroller with very few other active and passive components around, taking advantage of the ratiometric functioning of the load cells. The need for thermally stable circuits and components is minimized through the use of the same amplification chain for both signal and reference, together with software calibration. The amplification and filtering is done through switched-capacitors techniques, controlled by t...

  3. Digital filtering in smart load cells

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, J H; Couto, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an application of a Self Adaptive Pseudo-Moving Average Filter used in the implementation of a Smart Load Cell, to combine a stable digital output with a fast response to weight changes. The Smart Load Cell is a data acquisition solution using a single chip RISC microcontroller with very few other active and passive components around and taking advantage of the ratiometric functioning of load cell. The use of Smart Load Cells with digital outputs needs a cost effectiv...

  4. An All-fiber Temperature Sensor Based on a Macro-bend Singlemode Fiber Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    An all-fibre temperature sensor is proposed based on a macro-bend singlemode fibre loop using a ratiometric power measurement scheme. The sensor has a linear characteristic with temperature at a fixed wavelength and bend radius. A direct linear relationship between the bend loss of the singlemode fibre and temperature is reported for the first time. By measuring the change in bend loss of the system a change in temperature can be measured assuming the system is calibrated. The proposed sensor...

  5. Experimental Analysis and Demonstration of a Low Cost Fibre Optic Temperature Sensor System for Engineering Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Mathew, Jinesh; Farrell, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    An epoxy packaged surface mountable fibre temperature sensor for engineering applications is presented in this paper. The temperature sensor is based on a macro-bend single-mode fibre loop employed in a ratiometric power measurement scheme and has a linear characteristic with temperature at a fixed wavelength and bend radius. The sensor head consists of a single turn of a bare bend sensitive single-mode fibre with an applied absorption coating. The temperature of the sensor head is varied up ...

  6. Photoacoustic Imaging: Semiconducting Oligomer Nanoparticles as an Activatable Photoacoustic Probe with Amplified Brightness for In Vivo Imaging of pH (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qingqing; Lyu, Yan; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-05-01

    Despite the great potential of photoacoustic imaging in the life sciences, the development of smart activatable photoacoustic probes remains elusive. On page 3662, K. Pu and co-workers report a facile nanoengineering approach based on semiconducting oligomer nano-particles to develop ratiometric photoacoustic probes with amplified brightness and enhanced sensing capability for accurate photoacoustic mapping of pH in the tumors of living mice. PMID:27167028

  7. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Classification of High Energy Materials using Elemental Intensity Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Sreedhar, S.; Manoj Kumar Gundawar; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, yet efficient, methodology is proposed to classify three high energy materials (HEMs) with diverse composition using nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopic data. We have calculated O/N, N/H, and O/H elemental peaks ratios using a ratiometric method. The present work describes a novel way to construct 1D, 2D, and 3D classification model using the above mentioned ratios. Multivariate statistical methods are followed for construction of the classification models. A detailed p...

  8. High-content screening identifies a role for Na+ channels in insulin production

    OpenAIRE

    Szabat, Marta; Modi, Honey; Ramracheya, Reshma; Girbinger, Vroni; Chan, Forson; Lee, Jason T. C.; Piske, Micah; Kamal, Sepehr; Carol Yang, Yu Hsuan; Welling, Andrea; Rorsman, Patrik; Johnson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin production is the central feature of functionally mature and differentiated pancreatic β-cells. Reduced insulin transcription and dedifferentiation have been implicated in type 2 diabetes, making drugs that could reverse these processes potentially useful. We have previously established ratiometric live-cell imaging tools to identify factors that increase insulin promoter activity and promote β-cell differentiation. Here, we present a single vector imaging tool with eGFP and mRFP, dri...

  9. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  10. Development of biosensors and their application in metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay

    2015-01-01

    for the desired phenotypes. However, methods available for microbial genome diversification far exceed our ability to screen and select for those variants with optimal performance. Genetically encoded biosensors have shown the potential to address this gap, given their ability to respond to small...... molecule binding and ease of implementation with high-throughput analysis. Here we describe recent progress in biosensor development and their applications in a metabolic engineering context. We also highlight examples of how biosensors can be integrated with synthetic circuits to exert feedback regulation...

  11. Arduino Due based tool to facilitate in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artoni, Pietro; Landi, Silvia; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; Luin, Stefano; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon excitation spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the characterization of the optical properties of genetically encoded and synthetic fluorescent molecules. Excitation spectroscopy requires tuning the wavelength of the Ti:sapphire laser while carefully monitoring the delivered power. To assist laser tuning and the control of delivered power, we developed an Arduino Due based tool for the automatic acquisition of high quality spectra. This tool is portable, fast, affordable and precise. It allowed studying the impact of scattering and of blood absorption on two-photon excitation light. In this way, we determined the wavelength-dependent deformation of excitation spectra occurring in deep tissues in vivo. PMID:27446677

  12. Tandem Spinach Array for mRNA Imaging in Living Bacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jichuan Zhang; Jingyi Fei; Leslie, Benjamin J.; Kyu Young Han; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Taekjip Ha

    2015-01-01

    Live cell RNA imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent labels is an important tool for monitoring RNA activities. A recently reported RNA aptamer-fluorogen system, the Spinach, in which an RNA aptamer binds and induces the fluorescence of a GFP-like 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) ligand, can be readily tagged to the RNA of interest. Although the aptamer–fluorogen system is sufficient for imaging highly abundant non-coding RNAs (tRNAs, rRNAs, etc.), it performs po...

  13. Fluorogen-based reporters for fluorescence imaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence bioimaging has recently jumped into a new area of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity thanks to synergistic advances in both optical physics and probe/biosensor design. This review focuses on the recent development of genetically encodable fluorescent reporters that bind endogenously present or exogenously applied fluorogenic chromophores (so-called fluorogens) and activate their fluorescence. We highlight the innovative engineering and design that gave rise to these new natural and synthetic fluorescent reporters, and describe some of the emerging applications in imaging and biosensing.

  14. X-ray irradiation activates K+ channels via H2O2 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Gibhardt, Christine S.; Bastian Roth; Indra Schroeder; Sebastian Fuck; Patrick Becker; Burkhard Jakob; Claudia Fournier; Anna Moroni; Gerhard Thiel

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a universal tool in tumor therapy but may also cause secondary cancers or cell invasiveness. These negative side effects could be causally related to the human-intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated-K+-channel (hIK), which is activated by X-ray irradiation and affects cell proliferation and migration. To analyze the signaling cascade downstream of ionizing radiation we use genetically encoded reporters for H2O2 (HyPer) and for the dominant redox-buffer glutathione (Grx1...

  15. The tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor-P with (R)-ß-lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Hervé; Zou, S Betty; Bullwinkle, Tammy J;

    2011-01-01

    The lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor P (EF-P) with a-lysine at low efficiency. Cell-free extracts containing non-a-lysine substrates of PoxA modified EF-P with a change in mass consistent with addition of ß-lysine, a substrate also predicted by genomic analyses. EF......-P was efficiently functionally modified with (R)-ß-lysine but not (S)-ß-lysine or genetically encoded a-amino acids, indicating that PoxA has evolved an activity orthogonal to that of the canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases....

  16. ZntR-mediated transcription of zntA responds to nanomolar intracellular free zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, DA; Hosteen, Olijahwon; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    In E. coli, ZitB and ZntA are important metal exporters that enhance cell viability under high environmental zinc. To understand their functions in maintaining zinc homeostasis, we applied a novel genetically-encoded fluorescent zinc sensor to monitor the intracellular free zinc changes in wild type, ΔzitB and ΔzntA E. coli cells upon sudden exposure to toxic levels of zinc (“zinc shock”). The intracellular readily exchangeable zinc concentration (or “free” zinc) increases transiently from pi...

  17. Circulating microRNAs as Hormones: Intercellular and Inter-organ Conveyors of Epigenetic Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yusuke; Katsuda, Takeshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has created a paradigm shift not only in the traditional central dogma of molecular biology but also in the research of a variety of human diseases. Fourteen years after the discovery of miRNAs, there was another revolutionary finding: cells can shuttle miRNAs between each other via small lipid bilayer vesicles called exosomes. This exosome-mediated horizontal transfer of genetically encoded messages is now recognized as a means of intercellular communication. This chapter reviews the concept that miRNAs can function as hormones conveying epigenetic information. PMID:26608208

  18. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. ATP increases within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum upon intracellular Ca2+ release

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Neelanjan; Jadoon Khan, Muhammad; Karsten, Felix; Groschner, Lukas N.; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Rost, Rene; Hallström, Seth; Imamura, Hiromi; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Multiple functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) essentially depend on ATP within this organelle. However, little is known about ER ATP dynamics and the regulation of ER ATP import. Here we describe real-time recordings of ER ATP fluxes in single cells using an ER-targeted, genetically encoded ATP sensor. In vitro experiments prove that the ATP sensor is both Ca2+ and redox insensitive, which makes it possible to monitor Ca2+-coupled ER ATP dynamics specifically. The approach uncovers a c...

  20. Optical Control of CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, James; Borchardt, Erin K.; Brown, Kalyn; Asokan, Aravind; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has emerged as an important tool in biomedical research for a wide range of applications, with significant potential for genome engineering and gene therapy. In order to achieve conditional control of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, a genetically encoded light-activated Cas9 was engineered through the site-specific installation of a caged lysine amino acid. Several potential lysine residues were identified as viable caging sites that can be modified to optically control Cas9 function, as demonstrated through optical activation and deactivation of both exogenous and endogenous gene function. PMID:25905628

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence reader with a turbidimetric system for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.H.; Lim, H.B., E-mail: plasma@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-07-09

    Graphical abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence reader with ratiometric correction for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Laser-induced fluorescence system with ratiometric correction was developed. • The system reduced experimental error caused by particle loss and aggregation. • The detection limit of about 39 pg mL{sup −1} for salinomycin was obtained. • Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also significantly improved. • The system has the potential for bioanalysis using various nanoparticles. - Abstract: A unique laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reader equipped with a turbidimetric system was developed for a sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. The system was specifically designed to reduce experimental error caused by particle loss, aggregation and sinking, and to improve analytical performance through ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence with respect to the turbidimetric absorbance. For application to determine the concentration of salinomycin, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and FITC-doped silica nanoparticles (colored balls) immobilized with antibody were synthesized for magnetic extraction and for tagging as a fluorescence probe, respectively. The detection limit of about 39 pg mL{sup −1} was obtained, which was an improvement of about 2-fold compared to that obtained without employment of the turbidimetric system. Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also improved, with increase from 0.8601 to 0.9905 in the R{sup 2}-coefficient and by 1.92-fold for the curve slope, respectively. The developed LIF reader has the potential to be used for fluorescence measurements using various nanomaterials, such as quantum dots.

  2. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-04-01

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence

  3. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sun, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    Precise measurements of pH in cells and intracellular compartments are of importance to both the fundamental understanding of metabolism and to the development of drugs that are released from the endosomes-lysome pathway. We have developed polymer gel nanoparticles as carriers of covalently bound fluorophores for ratiometric measurements of pH. One pH insensitive fluorophore serves as a reference while one or more pH sensitive fluorophores serve to give the desired pH dependence of the output...

  4. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Radbruch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice.

  5. Study on the Interferation of the Concentration of Free Calcium in Peripheral Human Lymphocyte by Low Dose Penicillin, Using Fura-2 as Fluorescent Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Yan WANG; Dan Dan WANG; Chun Gui ZHAO; Ye Hong ZHOU; Shao Min SHUANG; Chuan DONG

    2006-01-01

    The effect of penicillin on the human peripheral lymphocytes was studied by steady fluorescent technique and ratiometric fluorescence dye, Fura-2. The change of the free calcium concentration in cytosol was examined under different conditions. A characterization of Fura-2-Ca interaction in an isotonic saline solution showed that Ca2+ formed a 1:1 Fura-2-Ca complex with the apparent dissociation constant 1.81×10-7 mol/L. The mechanism, by which penicillin induced the decrease of [Ca2+]i, was discussed in detail. The low dose of penicillin might modify the lymphocytes' immunology response by interfering the increase in the intracellular free calcium concentration.

  6. A novel fluorescent turn-on probe for bisulfite based on NBD chromophore

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Puhui Xie; Guangqin Gao; Wenjie Zhang; Guoyu Yang; Qiu Jin

    2015-07-01

    A novel fluorescent turn-on probe (compound 1) for bisulfite based on 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) chromophore has been developed. Its sensing behavior toward various anions was investigated by absorption and fluorescence techniques. This probe shows a selective, turn-on fluorescent response and ratiometric colorimetric response toward bisulfite in aqueous acetonitrile solutions. The possible recognition mechanism of probe 1 toward bisulfite was illustrated by MS spectra analysis and DFT calculations Probe 1 was used to determine bisulfite in real-life samples with good recoveries.

  7. Analysis and Performance Evaluation of an All-Fiber Wide Range Interrogation System for a Bragg Grating Sensor Array

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Analysis and performance evaluation of a macro-bend ¯ber based interrogation system for a Bragg grating sensor array is presented. Due to the characteristic properties of the macro-bend ¯ber ¯lter such as polarization and temperature dependence and the total noise associated with the ratiometric system, a best ¯t ratio slope is required to interrogate multiple FBGs whose peak wavelengths are spread over a wide wavelength range, rather than the optimal slope for individual FBG. In this paper f...

  8. Effects of trimetazidine on pHi regulation in the rat isolated ventricular myocyte.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Le Prigent, K.; Feuvray, D.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ) on intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in rat isolated ventricular myocytes. pHi was recorded ratiometrically by use of the pH-sensitive fluoroprobe, carboxy-SNARF-1 (carboxy-seminaphtorhodafluor). 2. Following an intracellular acid load (induced by 10 mM NH4Cl removal), pHi recovery in HEPES-buffered Tyrode solution was significantly slowed down upon application of 0.3 mM TMZ only when myocytes were pretreated for 5 h 30 min (slowing by ap...

  9. Cytoplasmic pH Response to Acid Stress in Individual Cells of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis Observed by Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Keith A.; Ryan D Kitko; Mershon, J. Patrick; Adcox, Haley E.; Malek, Kotiba A.; Berkmen, Melanie B.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis to regulate their cytoplasmic pH is well studied in cell suspensions but is poorly understood in individual adherent cells and biofilms. We observed the cytoplasmic pH of individual cells using ratiometric pHluorin. A standard curve equating the fluorescence ratio with pH was obtained by perfusion at a range of external pH 5.0 to 9.0, with uncouplers that collapse the transmembrane pH difference. Adherent cells were acid stressed by switch...

  10. Fluorescent and colorimetric chemosensors for cations based on 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives: design principles and optical signalling mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives as the photoactive units for the design of optical chemosensors for metal cations and protons with different mechanisms of analyte binding signal transduction and different receptors is discussed. Examples are given of fluorescent and colorimetric cation chemosensors in which the change of the spectral characteristics of the naphthalimide chromophore upon complex formation is due to switching of photophysical processes of charge transfer, electron transfer, energy transfer or excimer formation. The problems of detection of heavy and transition metal cations as well as development of ratiometric optical probes are discussed. The bibliography includes 170 references

  11. Calcium waves induced by large voltage pulses in fish keratocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Brust-Mascher, I; Webb, W W

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular calcium waves in fish keratocytes are induced by the application of electric field pulses with amplitudes between 55 and 120 V/cm and full width at half-maximum of 65-100 ms. Calcium concentrations were imaged using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy (Denk et al., 1990 Science. 248:73-76; Williams et al. 1994 FASEB J. 8:804-813) and the ratiometric calcium indicator indo-1. The applied electric field pulses induced waves with fast calcium rise times and slow decays, whic...

  12. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in vivo in the presence and absence of sucrose

    OpenAIRE

    Dige, Irene; Baelum, Vibeke; Nyvad, Bente; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply.Design: Dental biofilms (48 h) from 10 individuals were collected on glass slabs mounted on intra-oral appliances. During growth, appliances were immersed extra-orally in either physiological saline or 4% s...

  13. Novel water-soluble methanofullerenes C60[C13H18O4(OH)4]6 and C60[C9H10O4(OH)4]6: Promising uncouplers of respiration and phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalacheva, Natalia V; Gubskaya, Valentina P; Fazleeva, Guzel M; Igtisamova, Gulzada R; Nuretdinov, Ildus A; Rizvanov, Albert A; Cherepnev, Georgi V

    2015-11-15

    Here, we report for the first time on two novel water-soluble polyol-methanofullerenes which uncouple respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. A cytofluorimetric JC-1-based ratiometric assay was used to quantify mitochondrial potential Ψm in Yarrowia lipolytica cells exposed to the fullerenes tested. Both methanofullerenes significantly downregulated Ψm, thereby decreasing the subset of cells with high mitochondrial potential compared with intact control cells. The Ψm-low subset of Yarrowia lipolytica cells resulted from methanofullerenes exposure preserved physiological cell size and granularity patterns. PMID:26483197

  14. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, Sekhar; Saha, Jaba; Roy, Arpan Datta; Chakraborty, Santanu; Debnath, Pintu; Bhattacharjee, D

    2014-01-01

    The applications of Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have expanded tremendously in the last 25 years, and the technique has become a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields. FRET can be used as spectroscopic ruler in various areas such as structural elucidation of biological molecules and their interactions, in vitro assays, in vivo monitoring in cellular research, nucleic acid analysis, signal transduction, light harvesting, and metallic nanomaterials etc. Based on the mechanism of FRET a variety of novel chemical sensors and Biosensors have been developed. This review highlights the recent applications of sensitive and selective ratiometric FRET based sensors.

  15. The future of fluorescence sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P

    2005-09-01

    The rapid progress in sensor and biosensor array technologies needs a general strategy in the design of fluorescence reporters. Such reporters should provide a high density of sensor elements, allow analysis of targets of different affinities, and be internally calibrated, reproducible and have a rapid readout. Several criteria are introduced here for the comparative evaluation of fluorescence-sensing techniques. It is shown that only the two-band wavelength ratiometric sensing with a single reporter dye exhibiting rapid reversible excited-state reaction can satisfy all these criteria and is a prospective candidate for further development. PMID:15967523

  16. A Fiber-Optic Voltage Sensor Based on Macrobending Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical voltage sensing scheme based on a macrobending optical fiber in a ratiometric power measurement system. This novel approach to sensing has not been utilized before and has the advantage that the sensor involves simple fabrication compared to existing fiber-optic voltage sensors. To prove the feasibility of such a fiber-optic sensor, a sensor for a voltage range from 0 similar to 100 V is demonstrated, with a resolution of 0.5 V. The sensor is robust, line...

  17. A fiber-optic voltage sensor based on macrobending structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical voltage sensing scheme based on a macrobending optical fiber in a ratiometric power measurement system. This novel approach to sensing has not been utilized before and has the advantage that the sensor involves simple fabrication compared to existing fiber-optic voltage sensors. To prove the feasibility of such a fiber-optic sensor, a sensor for a voltage range from 0˜100 V is demonstrated, with a resolution of 0.5 V. The sensor is robust, linear, and shows a competitive measurement resolution. The sensor can be easily scaled to suit other voltage levels and be effectively combined with optical current sensors.

  18. One-step growth of lanthanoid metal-organic framework (MOF) films under solvothermal conditions for temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Fu, Wentian; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2016-05-25

    A one-step direct solvothermal synthesis of an Ln metal-organic framework (MOF) film is reported. The LnHL (Ln = Tb and Gd) films that were deposited on a Gd2O3 subtrate are continuous and smooth. The Gd0.9Tb0.1HL film can be used as a ratiometric thermometer, showing good linear behaviour in the temperature range of 110-250 K with a sensitivity up to 0.8% K(-1). PMID:27147478

  19. Investigating CNS synaptogenesis at single-synapse resolution by combining reverse genetics with correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urwyler, Olivier; Izadifar, Azadeh; Dascenco, Dan; Petrovic, Milan; He, Haihuai; Ayaz, Derya; Kremer, Anna; Lippens, Saskia; Baatsen, Pieter; Guérin, Christopher J; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2015-01-15

    Determining direct synaptic connections of specific neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) is a major technical challenge in neuroscience. As a corollary, molecular pathways controlling developmental synaptogenesis in vivo remain difficult to address. Here, we present genetic tools for efficient and versatile labeling of organelles, cytoskeletal components and proteins at single-neuron and single-synapse resolution in Drosophila mechanosensory (ms) neurons. We extended the imaging analysis to the ultrastructural level by developing a protocol for correlative light and 3D electron microscopy (3D CLEM). We show that in ms neurons, synaptic puncta revealed by genetically encoded markers serve as a reliable indicator of individual active zones. Block-face scanning electron microscopy analysis of ms axons revealed T-bar-shaped dense bodies and other characteristic ultrastructural features of CNS synapses. For a mechanistic analysis, we directly combined the single-neuron labeling approach with cell-specific gene disruption techniques. In proof-of-principle experiments we found evidence for a highly similar requirement for the scaffolding molecule Liprin-α and its interactors Lar and DSyd-1 (RhoGAP100F) in synaptic vesicle recruitment. This suggests that these important synapse regulators might serve a shared role at presynaptic sites within the CNS. In principle, our CLEM approach is broadly applicable to the developmental and ultrastructural analysis of any cell type that can be targeted with genetically encoded markers. PMID:25503410

  20. Simultaneous mapping of membrane voltage and calcium in zebrafish heart in vivo reveals chamber-specific developmental transitions in ionic currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jennifer H; Kralj, Joel M; Douglass, Adam D; Engert, Florian; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac action potential (AP) and the consequent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient are key indicators of cardiac function. Natural developmental processes, as well as many drugs and pathologies change the waveform, propagation, or variability (between cells or over time) of these parameters. Here we apply a genetically encoded dual-function calcium and voltage reporter (CaViar) to study the development of the zebrafish heart in vivo between 1.5 and 4 days post fertilization (dpf). We developed a high-sensitivity spinning disk confocal microscope and associated software for simultaneous three-dimensional optical mapping of voltage and calcium. We produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing CaViar under control of the heart-specific cmlc2 promoter, and applied ion channel blockers at a series of developmental stages to map the maturation of the action potential in vivo. Early in development, the AP initiated via a calcium current through L-type calcium channels. Between 90 and 102 h post fertilization (hpf), the ventricular AP switched to a sodium-driven upswing, while the atrial AP remained calcium driven. In the adult zebrafish heart, a sodium current drives the AP in both the atrium and ventricle. Simultaneous voltage and calcium imaging with genetically encoded reporters provides a new approach for monitoring cardiac development, and the effects of drugs on cardiac function. PMID:25309445

  1. Simultaneous mapping of membrane voltage and calcium in zebrafish heart in vivo reveals chamber-specific developmental transitions in ionic currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP and the consequent cytosolic Ca2+ transient are key indicators of cardiac function. Natural developmental processes, as well as many drugs and pathologies change the waveform, propagation, or variability (between cells or over time of these parameters. Here we apply a genetically encoded dual-function calcium and voltage reporter (CaViar to study the development of the zebrafish heart in vivo between 1.5 and 4 days post fertilization (dpf. We developed a high-sensitivity spinning disk confocal microscope and associated software for simultaneous three-dimensional optical mapping of voltage and calcium. We produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing CaViar under control of the heart-specific cmlc2 promoter, and applied ion channel blockers at a series of developmental stages to map the maturation of the action potential in vivo. Early in development, the AP initiated via a calcium current through L-type calcium channels. Between 90 – 102 hours post fertilization (hpf, the ventricular AP switched to a sodium-driven upswing, while the atrial AP remained calcium driven. In the adult zebrafish heart, a sodium current drives the AP in both the atrium and ventricle. Simultaneous voltage and calcium imaging with genetically encoded reporters provides a new approach for monitoring cardiac development, and the effects of drugs on cardiac function.

  2. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  3. Studying the mechanism of neurostimulation by infrared laser light using GCaMP6s and Rhodamine B imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Bardet, Sylvia M.; O'Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared laser light radiation can be used to depolarize neurons and to stimulate neural activity. The absorption of infrared radiation and heating of biological tissue is thought to be the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon whereby local temperature increases in the plasma membrane of cells either directly influence membrane properties or act via temperature sensitive ion channels. Action potentials are typically measured electrically in neurons with microelectrodes, but they can also be observed using fluorescence microscopy techniques that use synthetic or genetically encoded calcium indicators. In this work, we studied the impact of infrared laser light on neuronal calcium signals to address the mechanism of these thermal effects. Cultured primary mouse hippocampal neurons expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP6s were used in combination with the temperature sensitive fluorophore Rhodamine B to measure calcium signals and temperature changes at the cellular level. Here we present our all-optical strategy for studying the influence of infrared laser light on neuronal activity.

  4. Fiber-optic control and thermometry of single-cell thermosensation logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Safronov, N. A.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Belousov, V. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels is one of the most striking examples of temperature-controlled processes in cell biology. As the evidence indicating the fundamental role of such processes in thermosensation builds at a fast pace, adequately accurate tools that would allow heat receptor logic behind thermosensation to be examined on a single-cell level are in great demand. Here, we demonstrate a specifically designed fiber-optic probe that enables thermal activation with simultaneous online thermometry of individual cells expressing genetically encoded TRP channels. This probe integrates a fiber-optic tract for the delivery of laser light with a two-wire microwave transmission line. A diamond microcrystal fixed on the fiber tip is heated by laser radiation transmitted through the fiber, providing a local heating of a cell culture, enabling a well-controlled TRP-assisted thermal activation of cells. Online local temperature measurements are performed by using the temperature-dependent frequency shift of optically detected magnetic resonance, induced by coupling the microwave field, delivered by the microwave transmission line, to nitrogen—vacancy centers in the diamond microcrystal. Activation of TRP channels is verified by using genetically encoded fluorescence indicators, visualizing an increase in the calcium flow through activated TRP channels.

  5. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  6. ICT based molecular recognition of 2,5-dinitrophenol in methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first report of wavelength ratiometric sensing of electron deficient nitroaromatic explosive, 2,5-dinitrophenol (N4) with photoluminescent electron rich Schiff base H2salen (A1) derived from 1,2-ethanediamine and salicyldehyde and related complexes [Zn(salen)]·H2O (A2) and [Ni(salen)]·H2O (A3) in methanol is presented. DFT based optimization reveals that NACs (N1–N5) induce the formation of 1:2 donor–acceptor complexes with the salen based compounds. - Highlights: • Ratiometric sensing of nitroaromatics, especially 2,5-dinitrophenol (N4), is demonstrated. • H2salen (A1) exhibit equilibrium with nitroaromatics except 2,5-dinitrophenol in excited state. • [Ni(salen)]·H2O (A3) exhibits both ground and excited state equilibrium with only 2,5-dinitrophenol among five NACs. • Nitroaromatics form 1:2 donor–acceptor complexes with salen type compounds

  7. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-Ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  8. An evolutionary optimized nonlinear function to improve the linearity of transducer characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a nonlinear optimal-function-based algorithm which can be utilized to replace electronic circuitry traditionally employed to linearize the characteristics of commonly used temperature transducers such as resistance temperature detectors, thermistors and thermocouples. The function exploits ratiometric-logarithmic operation for linearization. The optimal parameters of the function are determined using a covariance matrix adopted evolutionary strategy (CMAES) algorithm. Transducers' input–output data are derived from the Yokogawa handy calibrator model CA 150 and subjected to the proposed algorithm to evaluate the performance of the method. The performance measures such as full-scale error and mean square error are considered to compare the performance of the proposed technique with other methods reported for transducers. The present linearization algorithm was implemented using LabVIEW 7.1 Professional Development System in a personal computer that provides the facility to interface with the National Instruments data acquisition module NI DAQCard PCI-6221. Experimental results reveal that the proposed evolutionary optimized nonlinear function based software linearizer does its job efficiently in a better way than that of the conventional hardware and software methods. Also, the results obtained using the CMAES algorithm are compared with the results of a real-coded genetic algorithm. The comparison shows that the CMAES algorithm is more consistent in determining the best solution for the proposed ratiometric-logarithmic function with reasonable computation time

  9. An evolutionary optimized nonlinear function to improve the linearity of transducer characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudhahir, A.; Baskar, S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper proposes a nonlinear optimal-function-based algorithm which can be utilized to replace electronic circuitry traditionally employed to linearize the characteristics of commonly used temperature transducers such as resistance temperature detectors, thermistors and thermocouples. The function exploits ratiometric-logarithmic operation for linearization. The optimal parameters of the function are determined using a covariance matrix adopted evolutionary strategy (CMAES) algorithm. Transducers' input-output data are derived from the Yokogawa handy calibrator model CA 150 and subjected to the proposed algorithm to evaluate the performance of the method. The performance measures such as full-scale error and mean square error are considered to compare the performance of the proposed technique with other methods reported for transducers. The present linearization algorithm was implemented using LabVIEW 7.1 Professional Development System in a personal computer that provides the facility to interface with the National Instruments data acquisition module NI DAQCard PCI-6221. Experimental results reveal that the proposed evolutionary optimized nonlinear function based software linearizer does its job efficiently in a better way than that of the conventional hardware and software methods. Also, the results obtained using the CMAES algorithm are compared with the results of a real-coded genetic algorithm. The comparison shows that the CMAES algorithm is more consistent in determining the best solution for the proposed ratiometric-logarithmic function with reasonable computation time.

  10. Research of the relationship of intracellular acidification and apoptosis in Hela cells based on pH nanosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE XiaoXiao; WANG Yan; WANG KeMin; PENG JiaoFeng; LIU Fang; TAN WeiHong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship of intracellular acidification and apoptosis in Hela cells induced by vincristine sulfate has been studied by use of the ratiometric pH nanosensors that have been developed by our group, employing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped as the pH-sensitive dye and Tris(2,2'-bipyidyl) dichlororuthenium(Ⅱ) hexahydrate (RuBpy) doped as reference dye. The pH change of the Hela cells induced by vincristine sulfate has been monitored in vivo, in situ and real time by use of the ratiometric pH nanosensors. The experimental results show that the pH of the apoptotic Hela cells induced by vincristine sulfate has been acidified from 7.11 to 6.51, and the percentage of intracellular acidification is correlated with the induced concentration and incubation time of the vincristine sulfate. The further study of the percentage of intracellular acidification and the percentage of apoptosis of Hela cells at the same time reveals that apoptosis of Hela cells induced by vincristine sulfate is preceded by intracellular acidification. These results would provide theoretical foundation for the therapy of cancer through interfering the pH of cells by use of vincristine sulfate or other anti-cancer drugs.

  11. 0.5 V and 0.43 pJ/bit Capacitive Sensor Interface for Passive Wireless Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriain, Andoni; Gutierrez, Iñigo; Solar, Hector; Berenguer, Roc

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ultra low-power and low-voltage pulse-width modulation based ratiometric capacitive sensor interface. The interface was designed and fabricated in a standard 90 nm CMOS 1P9M technology. The measurements show an effective resolution of 10 bits using 0.5 V of supply voltage. The active occupied area is only 0.0045 mm2 and the Figure of Merit (FOM), which takes into account the energy required per conversion bit, is 0.43 pJ/bit. Furthermore, the results show low sensitivity to PVT variations due to the proposed ratiometric architecture. In addition, the sensor interface was connected to a commercial pressure transducer and the measurements of the resulting complete pressure sensor show a FOM of 0.226 pJ/bit with an effective linear resolution of 7.64 bits. The results validate the use of the proposed interface as part of a pressure sensor, and its low-power and low-voltage characteristics make it suitable for wireless sensor networks and low power consumer electronics. PMID:26343681

  12. Effects of chloride channel blockers on rat renal vascular responses to angiotensin II and norepinephrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steendahl, Joen; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Salomonsson, Max;

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels in the renal vasoconstriction elicited by angiotensin II (ANG II) and norepinephrine (NE). Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in vivo using electromagnetic flowmetry. Ratiometric photometry of fura 2 fluoresc......The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels in the renal vasoconstriction elicited by angiotensin II (ANG II) and norepinephrine (NE). Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in vivo using electromagnetic flowmetry. Ratiometric photometry of fura 2......-[(2-cyclopentenyl-6,7-dichloro-2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-1-oxo-1H-inden-5-yl)oxy]acetic acid (IAA-94; 0.045 and 0.09 micromol/min) did not affect the vasoconstrictive responses of these compounds. Pretreatment with niflumic acid (50 microM) or IAA-94 (30 microM) for 2 min decreased baseline [Ca2+]i but did not change...

  13. Molecular recognition of 4′-Nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 by bis(benzimidazolium)propane borontetrafluoride in acetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Tandrima, E-mail: tanchem_bu@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Dr. Bhupendranath Dutta Smriti Mahavidyalaya, Burdwan 713407 (India); Karmakar, Animesh [Department of Chemistry, Dr. Bhupendranath Dutta Smriti Mahavidyalaya, Burdwan 713407 (India); Ghosh, Sabari; Mukhopadhyay, Chhanda [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Pal, Sunanda [Department of Chemistry, Dr. Bhupendranath Dutta Smriti Mahavidyalaya, Burdwan 713407 (India); Banerjee, Manas [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2015-05-15

    ICT based ratiometric sensing due to H-bonding interaction among three different crown ethers (C): Dibenzo-24-crown-8 (DB24C8 or C1), Benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5 or C2) and 4′-Nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 (4′–NB15C5 or C3) along with the axle bis(benzimidazolium)propane borontetrafluoride (BBIM-propane) (3a–3d) have been studied. The association were initially ascertained from isosbestic formation and later corroborated by iso-emissive formation where C3 fails to establish iso-emissive. Stoichiometry of adducts were 1:1 both in the ground as well as in excited state. The threading or external association was finally distinguished by Monte Carlo simulation and frontier molecular orbital interaction. - Highlights: • The first report of ICT–based wavelength ratiometric interaction of crown–axle system. • Photophysical recognition of 4′-Nitrobenzo-15-crown-5 (4′-NB15C5 or C3) in acetonitrile. • Evidence of charge transfer interaction along with H-bond formation even in excited state is reported. • Monte Carlo simulation and FMO interaction justified the experimental findings.

  14. Dual-emissive Polymer Dots for Rapid Detection of Fluoride in Pure Water and Biological Systems with Improved Reliability and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Chuanqi; Liu, Shujuan; Liu, Yahong; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Jiang, Jiayang; Xu, Wenjuan; Yang, Tianshe; Huang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    It is of paramount importance to develop new probes that can selectively, sensitively, accurately and rapidly detect fluoride in aqueous media and biological systems, because F- is found to be closely related to many health and environmental concerns. Herein, a dual-emissive conjugated polyelectrolyte P1 containing phosphorescent iridium(III) complex was designed and synthesized, which can form ultrasmall polymer dots (Pdots) in aqueous media. The F--responsive tert-butyldiphenylsilyl moiety was introduced into iridium(III) complex as the signaling unit for sensing F- with the quenched phosphorescence. Thus, the dual-emissive Pdots can rapidly and accurately detect F- in aqueous media and live cells as a ratiometric probe by measuring the change in the ratio of the F--sensitive red phosphorescence from iridium(III) complex to the F--insensitive blue fluorescence from polyfluorene. Moreover, the interaction of Pdots with F- also changes its emission lifetime, and the lifetime-based detection of F- in live cells has been realized through photoluminescence lifetime imaging microscopy for the first time. Both the ratiometric luminescence and lifetime imaging have been demonstrated to be resistant to external influences, such as the probe’s concentration and excitation power. This study provides a new perspective for the design of promising Pdots-based probes for biological applications.

  15. Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles with Size-Independent Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbin; Duchesne, Paul N; Yu, Mengxiao; Jiang, Xingya; Ning, Xuhui; Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Zhang, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-07-25

    Size-independent emission has been widely observed for ultrasmall thiolated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) but our understanding of the photoluminescence mechanisms of noble metals on the nanoscale has remained limited. Herein, we report how the emission wavelength of a AuNP and the local binding geometry of a thiolate ligand (glutathione) on the AuNP are correlated, as these AuNPs emit at different wavelengths in spite of their identical size (ca. 2.5 nm). By using circular dichroism, X-ray absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy, we found that a high Au-S coordination number (CN) and a high surface coverage resulted in strong Au(I) -ligand charge transfer, a chiral conformation, and 600 nm emission, whereas a low Au-S CN and a low surface coverage led to weak charge transfer, an achiral conformation, and 810 nm emission. These two size-independent emissions can be integrated into one single 2.5 nm AuNP by fine-tuning of the surface coverage; a ratiometric pH response was then observed owing to strong energy transfer between two emission centers, opening up new possibilities for the design of ultrasmall ratiometric pH nanoindicators. PMID:27348584

  16. Enhanced fluorescence cyanide detection at physiologically lethal levels: reduced ICT-based signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2005-03-16

    Three water-soluble fluorescent probes have been specifically designed to determine free cyanide concentrations up to physiologically lethal levels, >20 microM. The probes have been designed in such a way as to afford many notable sensing features, which render them unique with regard to signal transduction, photophysical characteristics, and their application to physiological cyanide determination and safeguard. The probes are readily able to reversibly bind free aqueous cyanide with dissociation constants around 4 microM3. Subsequent cyanide binding modulates the intramolecular charge transfer within the probes, a change in the electronic properties within the probes, resulting in enhanced fluorescence optical signals as a function of increased solution cyanide concentration. The ground-state chelation with cyanide produces wavelength shifts, which also enable the probes to sense cyanide in both an excitation and emission ratiometric manner, in addition to enhanced fluorescence signaling. This has enabled a generic cyanide sensing platform to be realized that is not dependent on fluorescent probe concentration, probe photodegradation, or fluctuations in the intensity of any employed excitation sources, ideal for remote cyanide sensing applications. Further, the >600 nm fluorescence emission of the probes potentially allows for enhanced fluorescence ratiometric cyanide sensing in the optical window of tissues and blood, facilitating their use for the transdermal monitoring of cyanide for mammalian safeguard or postmortem in fire victims, both areas of active research. PMID:15755185

  17. Albumin-NIR dye self-assembled nanoparticles for photoacoustic pH imaging and pH-responsive photothermal therapy effective for large tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Xiaodong; Zeng, Jianfeng; Cheng, Zhenping; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-08-01

    Real-time in vivo pH imaging in the tumor, as well as designing therapies responsive to the acidic tumor microenvironment to achieve optimized therapeutic outcomes have been of great interests in the field of nanomedicine. Herein, a pH-responsive near-infrared (NIR) croconine (Croc) dye is able to induce the self-assembly of human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA-Croc nanoparticles useful not only for real-time ratiometric photoacoustic pH imaging of the tumor, but also for pH responsive photothermal therapy with unexpected great performance against tumors with relatively large sizes. Such HSA-Croc nanoparticles upon intravenous injection exhibit efficient tumor homing. As the decrease of pH, the absorption of Croc at 810 nm would increase while that at 680 nm would decrease, allowing real-time pH sensing in the tumor by double-wavelength ratiometric photoacoustic imaging, which reveals the largely decreased pH inside the cores of large tumors. Moreover, utilizing HSA-Croc as a pH-responsive photothermal agent, effective photothermal ablation of large tumors is realized, likely owing to the more evenly distributed intratumoral heating compared to that achieved by conventional pH-insensitive photothermal agents, which are effective mostly for tumors with small sizes. PMID:27177219

  18. Nanoparticle/Polymer assembled microcapsules with pH sensing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Song, Xiaoxue; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2014-10-01

    The dual-labeled microcapsules via nanoparticle/polymer assembly based on polyamine-salt aggregates can be fabricated for the ratiometric intracellular pH sensing. After deposition of SiO2 nanoparticles on the poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/multivalent anionic salt aggregates followed by silicic acid treatment, the generated microcapsules are stable in a wide pH range (3.0 ∼ 8.0). pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye are simultaneously labeled on the capsules, which enable the ratiometric pH sensing. Due to the rough and positively charged surface, the microcapsules can be internalized by several kinds of cells naturally. Real-time measurement of intracellular pH in several living cells shows that the capsules are all located in acidic organelles after being taken up. Furthermore, the negatively charged DNA and dyes can be easily encapsulated into the capsules via charge interaction. The microcapsules with combination of localized pH sensing and drug loading abilities have many advantages, such as following the real-time transportation and processing of the carriers in cells. PMID:25081194

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of the near-infrared fluorescent protein iRFP in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Filonov, Grigory S.; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Genetically encoded probes powerfully and non-invasively target specific tissues, cells, and subcellular locations. iRFP, a novel near-infrared fluorescent protein with low quantum yield whose absorption and fluorescence maxima are located at wavelengths longer than the Q-band of hemoglobin absorption, is ideal for PAT. Here, we report on an in vitro comparison of iRFP with other far-red fluorescent proteins, and its use in imaging a mouse tumor xenograft model. In an in vivo experiment, we stably transfected iRFP into MTLn3 adenocarcinoma cells and injected them into the mammary fat pad of female SCID/NCr mice, then imaged the resulting tumors two and three weeks post injection. The contrast increase from the protein expression was high enough to clearly separate the tumor region from the rest of the animal.

  20. High-speed recording of neural spikes in awake mice and flies with a fluorescent voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yiyang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jin Zhong; Grewe, Benjamin F.; Zhang, Yanping; Eismann, Stephan; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) are a promising technology for fluorescence readout of millisecond-scale neuronal dynamics. Previous GEVIs had insufficient signaling speed and dynamic range to resolve action potentials in live animals. We coupled fast voltage-sensing domains from a rhodopsin protein to bright fluorophores through resonance energy transfer. The resulting GEVIs are sufficiently bright and fast to report neuronal action potentials and membrane voltage dynamics in awake mice and flies, resolving fast spike trains with 0.2-millisecond timing precision at spike detection error rates orders of magnitude better than previous GEVIs. In vivo imaging revealed sensory-evoked responses, including somatic spiking, dendritic dynamics, and intracellular voltage propagation. These results empower in vivo optical studies of neuronal electrophysiology and coding and motivate further advancements in high-speed microscopy. PMID:26586188

  1. Imaging light responses of foveal ganglion cells in the living macaque eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Masella, Benjamin; Dalkara, Deniz; Zhang, Jie; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Williams, David R; Merigan, William H

    2014-05-01

    The fovea dominates primate vision, and its anatomy and perceptual abilities are well studied, but its physiology has been little explored because of limitations of current physiological methods. In this study, we adapted a novel in vivo imaging method, originally developed in mouse retina, to explore foveal physiology in the macaque, which permits the repeated imaging of the functional response of many retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) simultaneously. A genetically encoded calcium indicator, G-CaMP5, was inserted into foveal RGCs, followed by calcium imaging of the displacement of foveal RGCs from their receptive fields, and their intensity-response functions. The spatial offset of foveal RGCs from their cone inputs makes this method especially appropriate for fovea by permitting imaging of RGC responses without excessive light adaptation of cones. This new method will permit the tracking of visual development, progression of retinal disease, or therapeutic interventions, such as insertion of visual prostheses. PMID:24806684

  2. CYP2D6 genotype predicts antipsychotic side effects in schizophrenia inpatients: a retrospective matched case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobylecki, Camilla J; Jakobsen, Klaus D; Hansen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present retrospective pilot study was to examine the clinical impact of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme CYP2D6 poor metabolizer (PM) genotype in patients taking antipsychotic medication. The impaired metabolic capacity of the PM genotype results in higher steady......-state plasma concentrations at a given dose, thus increasing the risk of toxic effects from medication. METHODS: We identified 18 PM patients with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis from a clinical database covering all patients who have been analyzed in an ongoing standardized CYP2D6 screening program. Each...... significantly higher prevalence of noncompliance among the same PM patients. Importantly, this association was not due to differences in the use of CYP2D6-dependent or EPS/TD-causing medication across the 3 matched patient groups. CONCLUSIONS: This leads us to conclude that genetically encoded differences in...

  3. Super-resolution microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins in intact cells under cryo-conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Schellenberger, Pascale; Seiradake, Elena; Dobbie, Ian M; Jones, E Yvonne; Davis, Ilan; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a super-resolution technique for fluorescence cryo-microscopy based on photoswitching of standard genetically encoded fluorescent marker proteins in intact mammalian cells at low temperature (81 K). Given the limit imposed by the lack of cryo-immersion objectives, current applications of fluorescence cryo-microscopy to biological specimens achieve resolutions between 400-500 nm only. We demonstrate that the single molecule characteristics of reversible photobleaching of mEGFP and mVenus at liquid nitrogen temperature are suitable for the basic concept of single molecule localization microscopy. This enabled us to perform super-resolution imaging of vitrified biological samples and to visualize structures in unperturbed fast frozen cells for the first time with a structural resolution of ∼125 nm (average single molecule localization accuracy ∼40 nm), corresponding to a 3-5 fold resolution improvement. PMID:24884378

  4. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. PMID:23242824

  5. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  6. Fixed and live visualization of RNAs in Drosophila oocytes and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Evan K; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-04-01

    The ability to visualize RNA in situ is essential to dissect mechanisms for the temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression that drives development. Although considerable attention has been focused on transcriptional control, studies in model organisms like Drosophila have highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms - most notably intracellular mRNA localization - in the formation and patterning of the body axes, specification of cell fates, and polarized cell functions. Our understanding of both types of regulation has been greatly advanced by technological innovations that enable a combination of highly quantitative and dynamic analysis of RNA. This review presents two methods, single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization for high resolution quantitative RNA detection in fixed Drosophila oocytes and embryos and genetically encoded fluorescent RNA labeling for detection in live cells. PMID:26827935

  7. Dynamic visualization of calcium-dependent signaling in cellular microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Cells rely on the coordinated action of diverse signaling molecules to sense, interpret, and respond to their highly dynamic external environment. To ensure the specific and robust flow of information, signaling molecules are often spatially organized to form distinct signaling compartments, and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that guide intracellular signaling hinges on the ability to directly probe signaling events within these cellular microdomains. Ca(2+) signaling in particular owes much of its functional versatility to this type of exquisite spatial regulation. As discussed below, a number of methods have been developed to investigate the mechanistic and functional implications of microdomains of Ca(2+) signaling, ranging from the application of Ca(2+) buffers to the direct and targeted visualization of Ca(2+) signaling microdomains using genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. PMID:25703691

  8. Fluorescent Reporter Libraries as Useful Tools for Optimizing Microbial Cell Factories: A Review of the Current Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigne, Frank; Pêcheux, Hélène; Tarayre, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters allows speeding up the initial optimization steps of microbial bioprocesses. These reporters can be used for determining the expression level of a particular promoter, not only the synthesis of a specific protein but also the content of intracellular metabolites. The level of protein/metabolite is thus proportional to a fluorescence signal. By this way, mean expression profiles of protein/metabolites can be determined non-invasively at a high-throughput rate, allowing the rapid identification of the best producers. Actually, different kinds of reporter systems are available, as well as specific cultivation devices allowing the on-line recording of the fluorescent signal. Cell-to-cell variability is another important phenomenon that can be integrated into the screening procedures for the selection of more efficient microbial cell factories. PMID:26442261

  9. Selective, rapid and optically switchable regulation of protein function in live mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Essig, Sebastian; James, John R.; Lang, Kathrin; Chin, Jason W.

    2015-07-01

    The rapid and selective regulation of a target protein within living cells that contain closely related family members is an outstanding challenge. Here we introduce genetically directed bioorthogonal ligand tethering (BOLT) and demonstrate selective inhibition (iBOLT) of protein function. In iBOLT, inhibitor-conjugate/target protein pairs are created where the target protein contains a genetically encoded unnatural amino acid with bioorthogonal reactivity and the inhibitor conjugate contains a complementary bioorthogonal group. iBOLT enables the first rapid and specific inhibition of MEK isozymes, and introducing photoisomerizable linkers in the inhibitor conjugate enables reversible, optical regulation of protein activity (photo-BOLT) in live mammalian cells. We demonstrate that a pan kinase inhibitor conjugate allows selective and rapid inhibition of the lymphocyte specific kinase, indicating the modularity and scalability of BOLT. We anticipate that BOLT will enable the rapid and selective regulation of diverse proteins for which no selective small-molecule ligands exist.

  10. From jellyfish to biosensors: the use of fluorescent proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ute; Larrieu, Antoine; Wells, Darren M

    2013-01-01

    The milestone discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its optimisation for efficient use in plantae, and subsequent improvements in techniques for fluorescent detection and quantification have changed plant molecular biology research dramatically. Using fluorescent protein tags allows the temporal and spatial monitoring of dynamic expression patterns at tissue, cellular and subcellular scales. Genetically-encoded fluorescence has become the basis for applications such as cell-type specific transcriptomics, monitoring cell fate and identity during development of individual organs or embryos, and visualising protein-protein interactions in vivo. In this article, we will give an overview of currently available fluorescent proteins, their applications in plant research, the techniques used to analyse them and, using the recent development of an auxin sensor as an example, discuss the design principles and prospects for the next generation of fluorescent plant biosensors. PMID:24166435

  11. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  12. Lysosome-associated miniSOG as a photosensitizer for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryumina, Alina P; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O; Staroverov, Dmitry B; Zlobovskaya, Olga A; Shcheglov, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded photosensitizers represent a promising optogenetic tool for the induction of light-controlled oxidative stress strictly localized to a selected intracellular compartment. Here we tested the phototoxic effects of the flavin-containing phototoxic protein miniSOG targeted to the cytoplasmic surfaces of late endosomes and lysosomes by fusion with Rab7. In HeLa Kyoto cells stably expressing miniSOG-Rab7, we demonstrated a high level of cell death upon blue-light illumination. Pepstatin A completely abolished phototoxicity of miniSOG-Rab7, showing a key role for cathepsin D in this model. Using a far-red fluorescence sensor for caspase-3, we observed caspase-3 activation during miniSOG-Rab7-mediated cell death. We conclude that upon illumination, miniSOG-Rab7 induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and leakage of cathepsins into the cytosol, resulting in caspase-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27528074

  13. Dependence of fluorescent protein brightness on protein concentration in solution and enhancement of it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takamitsu J.; Fujita, Hideaki; Kitamura, Akira; Horio, Takashi; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Sasaki, Akira; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Ichimura, Taro; Imada, Katsumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used in biology because of their compatibility and varied applications in living specimens. Fluorescent proteins are often undesirably sensitive to intracellular conditions such as pH and ion concentration, generating considerable issues at times. However, harnessing these intrinsic sensitivities can help develop functional probes. In this study, we found that the fluorescence of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) depends on the protein concentration in the solution and that this dependence can be enhanced by adding a glycine residue in to the YFP; we applied this finding to construct an intracellular protein-crowding sensor. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, involving a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) insensitive to protein concentration and a glycine-inserted YFP, works as a genetically encoded probe to evaluate intracellular crowding. By measuring the fluorescence of the present FRET probe, we were able to detect dynamic changes in protein crowding in living cells. PMID:26956628

  14. A general method to improve fluorophores for live-cell and single-molecule microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jonathan B; English, Brian P; Chen, Jiji; Slaughter, Joel P; Zhang, Zhengjian; Revyakin, Andrey; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Normanno, Davide; Singer, Robert H; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D

    2015-03-01

    Specific labeling of biomolecules with bright fluorophores is the keystone of fluorescence microscopy. Genetically encoded self-labeling tag proteins can be coupled to synthetic dyes inside living cells, resulting in brighter reporters than fluorescent proteins. Intracellular labeling using these techniques requires cell-permeable fluorescent ligands, however, limiting utility to a small number of classic fluorophores. Here we describe a simple structural modification that improves the brightness and photostability of dyes while preserving spectral properties and cell permeability. Inspired by molecular modeling, we replaced the N,N-dimethylamino substituents in tetramethylrhodamine with four-membered azetidine rings. This addition of two carbon atoms doubles the quantum efficiency and improves the photon yield of the dye in applications ranging from in vitro single-molecule measurements to super-resolution imaging. The novel substitution is generalizable, yielding a palette of chemical dyes with improved quantum efficiencies that spans the UV and visible range. PMID:25599551

  15. Simultaneous imaging of GFP, CFP and collagen in tumors in vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segall Jeffrey E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy has greatly facilitated the imaging of living tissues. However, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins to distinguish different cell types in living animals has not been described at single cell resolution using multiphoton microscopy. Results Here we describe a method for the simultaneous imaging, by multiphoton microscopy, of Green Fluorescent Protein, Cyan Fluorescent Protein and collagen in vivo in living tumors. This novel method enables: 1 the simultaneous visualization of overall cell shape and sub-cellular structures such as the plasma membrane or proteins of interest in cells inside living animals, 2 direct comparison of the behavior of single cells from different cell lines in the same microenvironment in vivo. Conclusion Using this multi-fluor, multiphoton technique, we demonstrate that motility and metastatic differences between carcinoma cells of differing metastatic potential can be imaged in the same animal simultaneously at sub-cellular resolution.

  16. Monitoring disulfide bond formation in the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Henrik; Tachibana, Christine; Winther, Jakob R.

    2004-01-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight thiol in the eukaryotic cytosol. The compartment-specific ratio and absolute concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively) are, however, not easily determined. Here, we present a glutathione-specific green...... fluorescent protein-based redox probe termed redox sensitive YFP (rxYFP). Using yeast with genetically manipulated GSSG levels, we find that rxYFP equilibrates with the cytosolic glutathione redox buffer. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro data show the equilibration to be catalyzed by glutaredoxins and that...... conditions of high intracellular GSSG confer to these a new role as dithiol oxidases. For the first time a genetically encoded probe is used to determine the redox potential specifically of cytosolic glutathione. We find it to be -289 mV, indicating that the glutathione redox status is highly reducing and...

  17. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  18. Rapid adaptation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Angela M

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, amid growing concerns that changing climate is affecting species distributions and ecosystems, predicting responses to rapid environmental change has become a major goal. In this issue, Franks and colleagues take a first step towards this objective (Franks et al. 2016). They examine genomewide signatures of selection in populations of Brassica rapa after a severe multiyear drought. Together with other authors, Franks had previously shown that flowering time was reduced after this particular drought and that the reduction was genetically encoded. Now, the authors have sequenced previously stored samples to compare allele frequencies before and after the drought and identify the loci with the most extreme shifts in frequencies. The loci they identify largely differ between populations, suggesting that different genetic variants may be responsible for reduction in flowering time in the two populations. PMID:27463237

  19. Large-Scale Fluorescence Calcium-Imaging Methods for Studies of Long-Term Memory in Behaving Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jercog, Pablo; Rogerson, Thomas; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    During long-term memory formation, cellular and molecular processes reshape how individual neurons respond to specific patterns of synaptic input. It remains poorly understood how such changes impact information processing across networks of mammalian neurons. To observe how networks encode, store, and retrieve information, neuroscientists must track the dynamics of large ensembles of individual cells in behaving animals, over timescales commensurate with long-term memory. Fluorescence Ca(2+)-imaging techniques can monitor hundreds of neurons in behaving mice, opening exciting avenues for studies of learning and memory at the network level. Genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators allow neurons to be targeted by genetic type or connectivity. Chronic animal preparations permit repeated imaging of neural Ca(2+) dynamics over multiple weeks. Together, these capabilities should enable unprecedented analyses of how ensemble neural codes evolve throughout memory processing and provide new insights into how memories are organized in the brain. PMID:27048190

  20. New Optical Sensing Materials for Application in Marine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, S.; Klimant, I.

    2012-04-01

    Optical chemosensors are versatile analytical tools which find application in numerous fields of science and technology. They proved to be a promising alternative to electrochemical methods and are applied increasingly often in marine research. However, not all state-of-the- art optical chemosensors are suitable for these demanding applications since they do not fully fulfil the requirements of high luminescence brightness, high chemical- and photochemical stability or their spectral properties are not adequate. Therefore, development of new advanced sensing materials is still of utmost importance. Here we present a set of novel optical sensing materials recently developed in the Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry which are optimized for marine applications. Particularly, we present new NIR indicators and sensors for oxygen and pH which feature high brightness and low level of autofluorescence. The oxygen sensors rely on highly photostable metal complexes of benzoporphyrins and azabenzoporphyrins and enable several important applications such as simultaneous monitoring of oxygen and chlorophyll or ultra-fast oxygen monitoring (Eddy correlation). We also developed ulta-sensitive oxygen optodes which enable monitoring in nM range and are primary designed for investigation of oxygen minimum zones. The dynamic range of our new NIR pH indicators based on aza-BODIPY dyes is optimized for the marine environment. A highly sensitive NIR luminescent phosphor (chromium(III) doped yttrium aluminium borate) can be used for non-invasive temperature measurements. Notably, the oxygen, pH sensors and temperature sensors are fully compatible with the commercially available fiber-optic readers (Firesting from PyroScience). An optical CO2 sensor for marine applications employs novel diketopyrrolopyrrol indicators and enables ratiometric imaging using a CCD camera. Oxygen, pH and temperature sensors suitable for lifetime and ratiometric imaging of analytes

  1. Species specificity in major urinary proteins by parallel evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren W Logan

    Full Text Available Species-specific chemosignals, pheromones, regulate social behaviors such as aggression, mating, pup-suckling, territory establishment, and dominance. The identity of these cues remains mostly undetermined and few mammalian pheromones have been identified. Genetically-encoded pheromones are expected to exhibit several different mechanisms for coding 1 diversity, to enable the signaling of multiple behaviors, 2 dynamic regulation, to indicate age and dominance, and 3 species-specificity. Recently, the major urinary proteins (Mups have been shown to function themselves as genetically-encoded pheromones to regulate species-specific behavior. Mups are multiple highly related proteins expressed in combinatorial patterns that differ between individuals, gender, and age; which are sufficient to fulfill the first two criteria. We have now characterized and fully annotated the mouse Mup gene content in detail. This has enabled us to further analyze the extent of Mup coding diversity and determine their potential to encode species-specific cues.Our results show that the mouse Mup gene cluster is composed of two subgroups: an older, more divergent class of genes and pseudogenes, and a second class with high sequence identity formed by recent sequential duplications of a single gene/pseudogene pair. Previous work suggests that truncated Mup pseudogenes may encode a family of functional hexapeptides with the potential for pheromone activity. Sequence comparison, however, reveals that they have limited coding potential. Similar analyses of nine other completed genomes find Mup gene expansions in divergent lineages, including those of rat, horse and grey mouse lemur, occurring independently from a single ancestral Mup present in other placental mammals. Our findings illustrate that increasing genomic complexity of the Mup gene family is not evolutionarily isolated, but is instead a recurring mechanism of generating coding diversity consistent with a species

  2. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Taniguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneruons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particulary focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells (ChCs, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  3. Identification of lesion subtypes in biopsies of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies propose aggressive and non-aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they cannot be identified with conventional histopathology. We now report a retrospective study of human biopsy samples using biomarker ratio imaging microscopy (BRIM). Using BRIM, micrographs of biomarkers whose expression correlates with breast cancer aggressiveness are divided by micrographs of biomarkers whose expression negatively correlates with aggressiveness to create computed micrographs reflecting aggressiveness. The biomarker pairs CD44/CD24, N-cadherin/E-cadherin, and CD74/CD59 stratified DCIS samples. BRIM identified subpopulations of DCIS lesions with ratiometric properties resembling either benign fibroadenoma or invasive carcinoma samples. Our work confirms the existence of distinct subpopulations of DCIS lesions, which will likely have utility in breast cancer research and clinical practice. PMID:27247112

  4. Stability of a fiber optic pH sensor at 100 degree F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple ratiometric fiber-optic pH sensor was developed and accelerated aging studies were performed in 100 degree F distilled water. A ph-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye, HPTS (hydroxypyrenetrisulfonic acid) was convalently attached, using a procedure that was developed during this work, to a polyacrylamide polymer that was subsequently immobilized at the end of an optical fiber. Different immobilization techniques were compared and it was found that physically attaching the indicator gels to the fibers gave the most reproducible long-term results. These fiber-optic sensors were found to give linear pH responses, between pH 6 and 8, and resolution greater than 0.25 pH unit with useful lifetimes exceeding one year

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of a Micelle-Based pH Nanosensor with an Unprecedented Broad Measurement Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Feldborg, Lise N.; Almdal, Kristoffer;

    2013-01-01

    irradiation (320 nm <λ <500 nm), and the progress of the cross-linking was monitored by UV spectroscopy. The formed cross-linked core–shell–corona micelle was converted into ratiometric pH nanosensors by binding the pH-sensitive fluorophores oregon green 488 and 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6...... macroinitiator atom transfer radical polymerization. Micelles were formed by PEG-b-PAEMA-b-PCMA self-assembly in water, giving micelles with an average diameter of 45 nm. The PCMA core was employed to utilize coumarin-based photoinduced cross-linking in the core of the micelles, which was performed by UV...

  6. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde;

    then employed digital image analysis to remove the bacterial biomass from the microscopic images and adequately calculate extracellular pH values. As a proof of concept, we monitored the extracellular pH drop in six replicate dental biofilms fermenting glucose. The observed pH drops differed between...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or p...... differ considerably, and only extracellular pH in dental biofilms affects the underlying tooth. We here developed a method to reliably monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilm microscopically with the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4. Fluorescent emissions of CSNARF- 4 can be used to calculate...

  7. Intracellular pH Campylobacter jejuni when treated with aqueous chlorine dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Arneborg, Nils;

    2011-01-01

    H-sensitive, ratiometric 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester probe. In addition, the culturability expressed in colony counts was determined. Our results revealed that several subpopulations with different physiological states, as judged by their pHi, were created by ClO2 treatment. The greater the...... concentration of ClO2, the smaller the subpopulation of healthy cells with pHi¿>¿6.8 and the smaller the colony count as determined on nonselective agar plates. ClO2 at concentrations (60¿ppm) induced injuries that resulted in complete loss of culturability and adversely affected the ability to resuscitate...... under subsequent more favorable conditions. The presence of injured cells in food could present a risk for public health. Additional hurdles have to be included in food preservation to suppress the survival and recovery of injured cells....

  8. The Role of L- and T-Type Calcium Channels in Local and Remote Calcium Responses in Rat Mesenteric Terminal Arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Inoue, Ryuji; Cribbs, Leanne;

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims: The roles of intercellular communication and T-type versus L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) in conducted vasoconstriction to local KCl-induced depolarization were investigated in mesenteric arterioles. Methods: Ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging (R) using Fura-PE3 with...... local (DeltaR = 0.54) and remote (DeltaR = 0.17 at 500 mum) increases in intracellular Ca(2+). Remote Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by the gap junction uncouplers carbenoxolone and palmitoleic acid. Ca(V)1.2, Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.2 channels were immunolocalized in vascular smooth muscle cells and Ca...... arterioles (at 200-300 mum) using micro-application of VDCC blockers. Conclusion: Both L- and T-type channels mediate Ca(2+) entry during conducted vasoconstriction to local KCl in mesenteric arterioles. However, these channels do not participate in the conduction process per se....

  9. Glutamine-containing “turn-on” fluorescence sensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of chromium (III) ion in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meili; Ma, Liguo; Zhang, Min; Cao, Weiguang; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we reported a new fluorescence sensor for chromium (III) ion, dansyl-L-glutamine (1). The sensor displayed a unique selective fluorescence “turn-on” response to Cr3+ over other common metal ions in water. Notably, 1 still showed a ratiometric response to Cr3+ in UV-vis absorption spectra. The binding mechanism of 1 to Cr3+ was further clarified by using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. The experiment results indicated that the dual-responses of 1 to Cr3+ should attribute to the coordination of deprotonated sulfonamide group with Cr3+ and the protonation of the dimethylamino group due to the coordination of Cr3+ for 1. In addition, two chloride ions also coordinated to the complex of sensor-chromium (III) ion, which further strengthened the conformation of 1-Cr3+.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and ion recognition studies of lower rim 1,3-di{rhodamine} conjugate of calix[4]arene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jugun Prakash Chinta; Jayaraman Dessingou; Chebrolu Pulla Rao

    2013-11-01

    An amido-linked rhodamine conjugate of calix[4]arene, L has been synthesized and characterized. Metal ion recognition properties of L have been studied by emission and absorption techniques with 14 different metal ions including the transition ones. Results show that, L exhibits ratiometric emission intensity towards Hg2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+. Composition of the complex formed in the solution has been found to be 1:2 (L:M+), based on the Job’s plot. The L can also act as a chemosensor for Hg2+ through naked eye detection. Fluorescence quenching observed at 485 nm follows an order, Hg2+>>Fe3+∼Cu2+>Zn2+>Pb2+>Ca2+, while the enhancement observed at 580 nm follows, Hg2+>>Fe2+∼Pb2+>Zn2+. Mode of interaction of M+ with L is by the ring opening of spirolactam moiety.

  11. Imaging collagen remodeling and sensing transplanted autologous fibroblast metabolism in mouse dermis using multimode nonlinear optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen remodeling and transplanted autologous fibroblast metabolic states in mouse dermis after cellular injection are investigated using multimode nonlinear optical imaging. Our findings show that the technique can image the progress of collagen remodeling in mouse dermis. It can also image transplanted autologous fibroblasts in their collagen matrix environment in the dermis, because of metabolic activity. It was also found that the approach can provide two-photon ratiometric redox fluorometry based on autologous fibroblast fluorescence from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme and oxidized flavoproteins for sensing the autologous fibroblast metabolic state. These results show that the multimode nonlinear optical imaging technique may have potential in a clinical setting as an in vivo diagnostic and monitoring system for cellular therapy in plastic surgery

  12. Design and Implementation Model for Linearization Sensor Characteristic by FPAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdul Hussein Salman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Linearization sensors characteristics becomes very interest field for researchers due to the importance in enhance the system performance, measurement accuracy, system design simplicity (hardware and software, reduce system cost, ..etc. in this paper, two approaches has been introduced in order to linearize the sensor characteristics; first is signal condition circuit based on lock up table (LUT which this method performed for linearize NTC sensor characteristic. Second is ratiometric measurement equation which this method performed for linearize LVDT sensor characteristic. The proposed methods has been simulated by MATLAB, and then implemented by using Anadigm AN221E04 Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA development kit which several experiments performed in order to improve the performance of these approaches.

  13. pH-Insensitive FRET voltage dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyan-Tsz; Ao, Hong

    2007-08-01

    Many high-throughput ion channel assays require the use of voltage-sensitive dyes to detect channel activity in the presence of test compounds. Dye systems employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between 2 membrane-bound dyes are advantageous in combining high sensitivity, relatively fast response, and ratiometric output. The most widely used FRET voltage dye system employs a coumarin fluorescence donor whose excitation spectrum is pH dependent. The authors have validated a new class of voltage-sensitive FRET donors based on a pyrene moiety. These dyes are significantly brighter than CC2-DMPE and are not pH sensitive in the physiological range. With the new dye system, the authors demonstrate a new high-throughput assay for the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family. They also introduce a novel method for absolute calibration of voltage-sensitive dyes, simultaneously determining the resting membrane potential of a cell. PMID:17517905

  14. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in vivo in the presence and absence of sucrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Baelum, Vibeke; Nyvad, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. DESIGN...... kind to apply the combination of pH ratiometry and digital image analysis to systematically record extracellular pH in intact dental biofilms from several individuals for up to 1 h. We observed highly heterogeneous pH landscapes and the presence of acidogenic microenvironments - 'acidogenic hotspots......: Dental biofilms (48 h) from 10 individuals were collected on glass slabs mounted on intra-oral appliances. During growth, appliances were immersed extra-orally in either physiological saline or 4% sucrose for 2 min, eight times per day. Fluorescence emissions of C-SNARF-4 in deep layers of the biofilms...

  15. QD-Based FRET Probes at a Glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Shamirian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique optoelectronic properties of quantum dots (QDs give them significant advantages over traditional organic dyes, not only as fluorescent labels for bioimaging, but also as emissive sensing probes. QD sensors that function via manipulation of fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET are of special interest due to the multiple response mechanisms that may be utilized, which in turn imparts enhanced flexibility in their design. They may also function as ratiometric, or “color-changing” probes. In this review, we describe the fundamentals of FRET and provide examples of QD-FRET sensors as grouped by their response mechanisms such as link cleavage and structural rearrangement. An overview of early works, recent advances, and various models of QD-FRET sensors for the measurement of pH and oxygen, as well as the presence of metal ions and proteins such as enzymes, are also provided.

  16. Assembly and Calcium Binding Properties of Quantum Dot-Calmodulin Calcium Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Su-yong; Nguyen-ta, Kim; Yoo, Hoon; Silva, Gabriel A; Kim, Soon-jong

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the first nanoengineered quantum dot molecular complex designed to measure changes of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration at high spatial and temporal resolutions in real time. The sensor is ratiometric and composed of three components: a quantum dot (QD) emitting at 620 nm as a fluorescence donor, an organic dye (Alexa Fluor 647) as a fluorescence acceptor, and a calmodulin-M13 (CaM-M13) protein part as a calcium sensing component. In this work, we have determined the maximal number of CaM-M13 required for saturating a single QD particle to be approximately 16. The dissociation constant, Kd of the QD-based calcium ion sensor was also estimated to be around 30 microM. PMID:27433729

  17. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Classification of High Energy Materials using Elemental Intensity Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sreedhar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple, yet efficient, methodology is proposed to classify three high energy materials (HEMs with diverse composition using nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopic data. We have calculated O/N, N/H, and O/H elemental peaks ratios using a ratiometric method. The present work describes a novel way to construct 1D, 2D, and 3D classification model using the above mentioned ratios. Multivariate statistical methods are followed for construction of the classification models. A detailed procedure for classification of three different HEMs is presented here.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 4, July 2014, pp.332-338, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.4741

  18. Cotransport of H+, lactate, and H2O in porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; la Cour, Morten;

    2003-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye transports water and lactate ions in the direction from retina to choroid. The water transport is important in maintenance of retinal adhesion and the transport of lactate ions serves to regulate the lactate levels and pH of the subretinal space. This...... placed in a perfusion chamber in which the solution facing the retinal membrane could be changed rapidly. Two types of experiments were performed: Changes in cell water volume were measured by self-quenching of the fluorescent dye Calcein, and changes in intracellular pH were measured ratiometrically...... using the fluorescent dye BCECF. In lactate-free solutions, mannitol addition to the retinal bath caused intracellular acidification and cell shrinkage, given by a single osmotic water permeability of 1.2+/-0.1 x 10(-4)cmsec(-1) (osmoll(-1))(-1). In solutions containing 50 mmoll(-1) lactate, however...

  19. Visualization of the Activity of Rac1 Small GTPase in a Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho family G proteins including Rac regulate a variety of cellular functions, such as morphology, motility, and gene expression. Here we developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based analysis in which we could monitor the activity of Rac1. To detect fluorescence resonance energy transfer, yellow fluorescent protein fused Rac1 and cyan fluorescent protein fused Cdc42-Rac1-interaction-binding domain of Pak1 protein were used as intermolecular probes of FRET. The fluorophores were separated with linear unmixing method. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was measured by acceptor photobleaching assisted assay. With these methods, the Rac1 activity was visualized in a cell. The present findings indicate that this approach is sensitive enough to achieve results similar to those from ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis

  20. Design and Synthesis of an MOF Thermometer with High Sensitivity in the Physiological Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dian; Rao, Xingtang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    An important result of research on mixed-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (M'LnMOFs) is the realization of highly sensitive ratiometric luminescent thermometers. Here, we report the design and synthesis of the new M'LnMOF Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA with high relative sensitivity in the physiological temperature regime (298-318 K). The emission intensity and luminescence lifetime were investigated and compared to those of existing materials. It was found that the temperature-dependent luminescence properties of Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA are strongly associated with the distribution of the energy levels of the ligand. Such a property can be useful in the design of highly sensitive M'LnMOF thermometers. PMID:26575207

  1. Photoluminescent thermometer based on a phase-transition lanthanide silicate with unusual structural disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananias, Duarte; Paz, Filipe A Almeida; Yufit, Dmitry S; Carlos, Luís D; Rocha, João

    2015-03-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of the novel Na[LnSiO4] (Ln = Gd, Eu, Tb) disordered orthorhombic system is reported. At 100 K, and above, these materials are best described in the centrosymmetric orthorhombic Pnma space group. At lower temperatures (structure solved at 30 K) the unit cell changes to body-centered with Imma symmetry. The materials exhibit unique photophysical properties, arising from both, this phase transformation, and the disorder of the Ln(3+) ions, located at a site with D2d point symmetry. Na[(Gd0.8Eu0.1Tb0.1)SiO4] is an unprecedented case of a luminescent ratiometric thermometer based on a very stable silicate matrix. Moreover, it is the first example of an optical thermometer whose performance (viz., excellent sensitivity at cryogenic temperatures <100 K) is determined mainly by a structural transition, opening up new opportunities for designing such devices. PMID:25664963

  2. Anion recognition ability of a novel azo dye derived from 4-hydroxycoumarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anion recognition ability of a novel azo dye derived from 4-hydroxycuomarin (L) was investigated by experimental (UV–vis, fluorescence and 1H NMR) and theoretical [(B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)] methods. Among the surveyed anions, the receptor L showed both naked-eye detectable color and spectral changes in the presence of F−, AcO− and H2PO4− due to the formation of hydrogen bonding complexes followed by deprotonation between these anions and L. - Highlights: • Anion recognition ability of an easy-to-prepare coumarin derivative L was reported. • L showed both naked-eye and spectral responses towards AcO−, F− and H2PO4−. • Deprotonation mechanism was proposed for the observed spectral responses. • L showed selective ratiometric fluorescence ‘turn-on’ responses towards AcO− and F−

  3. Synthesis, selective pH-sensing activity and logic behavior of highly water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide and dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiev, Nikolai I.; Dimov, Stefan M. [Department of Organic Synthesis, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kliment Ohridsky Street, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alamry, Khalid A.; Obaid, Abdullah Y. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Bojinov, Vladimir B., E-mail: vlbojin@uctm.edu [Department of Organic Synthesis, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kliment Ohridsky Street, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on the design, synthesis and fluorescence pH-sensing activity of a novel highly water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide and its 9,10-dihydro-7H-imidazo[1,2-b]benz[d,e]isoqionolin-7-one derivative. The changes in the photophysical properties of the compounds as a function of pH were investigated in 100% aqueous medium. The 1,8-naphthalimide dye manifests “off–on” pH sensing properties based on photoinduced electron transfer, while its condensed heterocyclic derivative revealed ratiometric “off–on–off” fluorescence pH probe activity. Due to the two different “off”-states the dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative is able to execute the logical functions INH and XNOR and as such, to act as a magnitude digital comparator. The synthesized compounds show excellent selectivity toward protons over the representative transition metal ions (Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Ag{sup +}) is commonly used buffer solutions. The high water solubility and excellent pH selectivity of both probes as well as the ratiometric pH sensitivity of dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative may be beneficially for monitoring pH variations in complex samples. - Highlights: • Two novel highly water-soluble fluorescent dihydroimidazonaphthalimide and 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives are synthesized. • Compounds are designed as fluorescent “off–on” and “off–on–off” molecular pH probes based on PET and ICT. • Probes manifest selective response to protons over representative transition metal ions in 100% aqueous medium. • Logic functions INH and XNOR are achieved for dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative. • A combinatorial logic circuit (magnitude digital comparator) is demonstrated.

  4. Synthesis, selective pH-sensing activity and logic behavior of highly water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide and dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the design, synthesis and fluorescence pH-sensing activity of a novel highly water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide and its 9,10-dihydro-7H-imidazo[1,2-b]benz[d,e]isoqionolin-7-one derivative. The changes in the photophysical properties of the compounds as a function of pH were investigated in 100% aqueous medium. The 1,8-naphthalimide dye manifests “off–on” pH sensing properties based on photoinduced electron transfer, while its condensed heterocyclic derivative revealed ratiometric “off–on–off” fluorescence pH probe activity. Due to the two different “off”-states the dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative is able to execute the logical functions INH and XNOR and as such, to act as a magnitude digital comparator. The synthesized compounds show excellent selectivity toward protons over the representative transition metal ions (Co2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Hg2+ and Ag+) is commonly used buffer solutions. The high water solubility and excellent pH selectivity of both probes as well as the ratiometric pH sensitivity of dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative may be beneficially for monitoring pH variations in complex samples. - Highlights: • Two novel highly water-soluble fluorescent dihydroimidazonaphthalimide and 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives are synthesized. • Compounds are designed as fluorescent “off–on” and “off–on–off” molecular pH probes based on PET and ICT. • Probes manifest selective response to protons over representative transition metal ions in 100% aqueous medium. • Logic functions INH and XNOR are achieved for dihydroimidazonaphthalimide derivative. • A combinatorial logic circuit (magnitude digital comparator) is demonstrated

  5. Monitoring of extracellular pH in young dental biofilms grown in vivo in the presence and absence of sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Dige

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: pH in dental biofilms is of central importance for the development of caries. We used the ratiometric pH-sensitive dye C-SNARF-4 in combination with digital image analysis to monitor extracellular pH in dental biofilms grown in situ with and without sucrose supply. Design: Dental biofilms (48 h from 10 individuals were collected on glass slabs mounted on intra-oral appliances. During growth, appliances were immersed extra-orally in either physiological saline or 4% sucrose for 2 min, eight times per day. Fluorescence emissions of C-SNARF-4 in deep layers of the biofilms were recorded ex vivo with confocal microscopy for 15 min or for 1 h after exposure to 0.4% glucose. Extracellular pH was determined ratiometrically using digital image analysis. Results: Extracellular pH dropped rapidly in most examined sites after addition of glucose. Distinct pH microenvironments were observed within single biofilms. The variation in pH was similar between sites within the same biofilm and sites from different individuals. pH drop patterns did not differ between biofilms exposed to sucrose-free and sucrose-rich environments. Conclusion: The present study is the first of its kind to apply the combination of pH ratiometry and digital image analysis to systematically record extracellular pH in intact dental biofilms from several individuals for up to 1 h. We observed highly heterogeneous pH landscapes and the presence of acidogenic microenvironments – ‘acidogenic hotspots’ – within the biofilms. The data suggest that pH drops in young (48 h dental biofilms are independent of the sucrose supply during growth.

  6. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests. PMID:26900709

  7. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  8. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  9. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  10. Leveraging material properties in fluorescence anion sensor arrays: a general approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzenbacher, Pavel; Liu, Yuanli; Palacios, Manuel A; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Wang, Zhuo; Nishiyabu, Ryuhei

    2013-06-24

    As the demand for probes suitable for sensor development increases, investigation of approaches that utilize known successful receptors gains in general importance. This study describes a two-prong approach that can be used as a guide to developing sensors from known receptors. First, the conversion of a simple receptor, calix[4]pyrrole, into a fluorescent probe to establish a ratiometric signal is described. Secondly, the sensors that employ an output from a single ratiometric calix[4]pyrrole probe are fabricated by using poly(ether-urethane) hydrogel copolymers. These hydrogels are designed to absorb, internalize and transport aqueous electrolytes. A sensor array of ten different poly(ether-urethane) matrices with varying comonomer proportions were doped with a single probe and were exposed to eight different anions: acetate, benzoate, fluoride, chloride, phosphate, pyrophosphate, hydrogen sulfide, and cyanide, eight urine samples and anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The poly(ether-urethane) matrices comprise different proportions of anion-binding urethane moieties and different hydrophilicity given by the ratio between ethylene glycol ether and butylene glycol ether. This diversity in the hydration behavior provides different environment polarity, in which the recognition and self-assembly processes display enough diverse behavior to allow for unique response of the probe to the analytes. Furthermore, a single probe is shown to recognize eight different aqueous anions and eight urine samples when embedded in ten different polyurethanes in an array that displays 100 % classification accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the concept for quantitative studies, an estimation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and diclofenac in water and in saliva was performed. A limit of detection of 0.1 ppm and a dynamic range of 0.1-0.6 and 0.05-60 ppm was observed, respectively. Given the general difficulty of chemosensors to recognize aqueous anions

  11. Thiazole derivative-modified upconversion nanoparticles for Hg2+ detection in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Xiaowang; Zhang, Yuhai; Marks, Robert; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Qichun

    2015-12-01

    Mercury ion (Hg2+) is an extremely toxic ion, which will accumulate in human bodies and cause severe nervous system damage. Therefore, the sensitive and efficient monitoring of Hg2+ in human bodies is of great importance. Upconversion nanoparticle (UCNPs) based nano probes exhibit no autofluorescence, deep penetration depth and chemical stability in biological samples, as well as a large anti-stokes shift. In this study, we have developed thiazole-derivative-functionalized UCNPs, and employed an upconversion emission intensity ratio of 540 nm to 803 nm (I540/I803) as a ratiometric signal to detect Hg2+ in living cells showing excellent photo stability and high selectivity. Our nano probe was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The low cytotoxicity of our probe was confirmed by an MTT assay and the UCL test in HeLa cells was carried out by confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrated that organic-dye-functionalized UCNPs should be a good strategy for detecting toxic metal ions when studying cellular biosystems.Mercury ion (Hg2+) is an extremely toxic ion, which will accumulate in human bodies and cause severe nervous system damage. Therefore, the sensitive and efficient monitoring of Hg2+ in human bodies is of great importance. Upconversion nanoparticle (UCNPs) based nano probes exhibit no autofluorescence, deep penetration depth and chemical stability in biological samples, as well as a large anti-stokes shift. In this study, we have developed thiazole-derivative-functionalized UCNPs, and employed an upconversion emission intensity ratio of 540 nm to 803 nm (I540/I803) as a ratiometric signal to detect Hg2+ in living cells showing excellent photo stability and high selectivity. Our nano probe was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The low cytotoxicity of our probe was confirmed by an MTT assay and the UCL test in HeLa cells was carried out by

  12. Cyclometallated ruthenium complex-modified upconversion nanophosphors for selective detection of Hg2+ ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianghong; Wu, Yongquan; Liu, Yi; Zou, Xianmei; Yao, Liming; Li, Fuyou; Feng, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Upconversion detection nanocomposites were assembled for the selective luminescent detection of mercury ions in water. A hydrophobic cyclometallated ruthenium complex [RuII(bpy)2(thpy)]PF6 (abbreviated as Ru1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and thpy = 2-(2-thienyl)pyridine) is employed as a chemodosimeter to assemble on amphiphilic polymer-coating upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) based on the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. Upon addition of Hg2+, the nanocomposite not only exhibits a remarkable color change from deep-red to yellow, but also an enhanced upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission by hindering the luminescent resonance energy transfer (LRET) process from the upconversion emission of UCNPs to Ru1. Using the ratiometric UCL emission as a detection signal, the detection limit of Hg2+ for this nanoprobe in aqueous solution is 8.2 ppb, which is much lower than that (329 ppb) determined by UV/Vis technology. Such an Hg2+-tunable LRET process provides a general strategy for fabricating a water-soluble upconversion-based nanoprobe for some special analyte.Upconversion detection nanocomposites were assembled for the selective luminescent detection of mercury ions in water. A hydrophobic cyclometallated ruthenium complex [RuII(bpy)2(thpy)]PF6 (abbreviated as Ru1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and thpy = 2-(2-thienyl)pyridine) is employed as a chemodosimeter to assemble on amphiphilic polymer-coating upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) based on the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. Upon addition of Hg2+, the nanocomposite not only exhibits a remarkable color change from deep-red to yellow, but also an enhanced upconversion luminescence (UCL) emission by hindering the luminescent resonance energy transfer (LRET) process from the upconversion emission of UCNPs to Ru1. Using the ratiometric UCL emission as a detection signal, the detection limit of Hg2+ for this nanoprobe in aqueous solution is 8.2 ppb, which is much lower than that (329 ppb) determined by UV/Vis technology

  13. pH landscapes in a novel five-species model of early dental biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite continued preventive efforts, dental caries remains the most common disease of man. Organic acids produced by microorganisms in dental plaque play a crucial role for the development of carious lesions. During early stages of the pathogenetic process, repeated pH drops induce changes in microbial composition and favour the establishment of an increasingly acidogenic and aciduric microflora. The complex structure of dental biofilms, allowing for a multitude of different ecological environments in close proximity, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we designed a laboratory biofilm model that mimics the bacterial community present during early acidogenic stages of the caries process. We then performed a time-resolved microscopic analysis of the extracellular pH landscape at the interface between bacterial biofilm and underlying substrate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strains of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Actinomyces naeslundii were employed in the model. Biofilms were grown in flow channels that allowed for direct microscopic analysis of the biofilms in situ. The architecture and composition of the biofilms were analysed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both biofilm structure and composition were highly reproducible and showed similarity to in-vivo-grown dental plaque. We employed the pH-sensitive ratiometric probe C-SNARF-4 to perform real-time microscopic analyses of the biofilm pH in response to salivary solutions containing glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis in the model biofilms created a mildly acidic environment. Decrease in pH in different areas of the biofilms varied, and distinct extracellular pH-microenvironments were conserved over several hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The designed biofilm model represents a promising tool to determine the effect of potential therapeutic agents on biofilm growth

  14. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  15. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiu Diao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here, we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell-type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e., introns between coding exons. Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons” that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC (Minos-mediated integration cassette transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system.

  16. Plug-and-Play Genetic Access to Drosophila Cell Types Using Exchangeable Exon Cassettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Fengqiu; Ironfield, Holly; Luan, Haojiang; Diao, Feici; Shropshire, William C.; Ewer, John; Marr, Elizabeth; Potter, Christopher J.; Landgraf, Matthias; White, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetically encoded effectors are important tools for probing cellular function in living animals, but improved methods for directing their expression to specific cell types are required. Here we introduce a simple, versatile method for achieving cell type-specific expression of transgenes that leverages the untapped potential of “coding introns” (i.e. introns between coding exons). Our method couples the expression of a transgene to that of a native gene expressed in the cells of interest using intronically inserted “plug-and-play” cassettes (called “Trojan exons”) that carry a splice acceptor site followed by the coding sequences of T2A peptide and an effector transgene. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach in Drosophila using lines containing suitable MiMIC transposons and a palette of Trojan exons capable of expressing a range of commonly used transcription factors. We also introduce an exchangeable, MiMIC-like Trojan exon construct that can be targeted to coding introns using the Crispr/Cas system. PMID:25732830

  17. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  18. Inducible control of subcellular RNA localization using a synthetic protein-RNA aptamer interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Belmont

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating in support of the functional importance of subcellular RNA localization in diverse biological contexts. In different cell types, distinct RNA localization patterns are frequently observed, and the available data indicate that this is achieved through a series of highly coordinated events. Classically, cis-elements within the RNA to be localized are recognized by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs, which then direct specific localization of a target RNA. Until now, the precise control of the spatiotemporal parameters inherent to regulating RNA localization has not been experimentally possible. Here, we demonstrate the development and use of a chemically-inducible RNA-protein interaction to regulate subcellular RNA localization. Our system is composed primarily of two parts: (i the Tet Repressor protein (TetR genetically fused to proteins natively involved in localizing endogenous transcripts; and (ii a target transcript containing genetically encoded TetR-binding RNA aptamers. TetR-fusion protein binding to the target RNA and subsequent localization of the latter are directly regulated by doxycycline. Using this platform, we demonstrate that enhanced and controlled subcellular localization of engineered transcripts are achievable. We also analyze rules for forward engineering this RNA localization system in an effort to facilitate its straightforward application to studying RNA localization more generally.

  19. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  20. Large-scale imaging of cortical dynamics during sensory perception and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekselblatt, Joseph B; Flister, Erik D; Piscopo, Denise M; Niell, Cristopher M

    2016-06-01

    Sensory-driven behaviors engage a cascade of cortical regions to process sensory input and generate motor output. To investigate the temporal dynamics of neural activity at this global scale, we have improved and integrated tools to perform functional imaging across large areas of cortex using a transgenic mouse expressing the genetically encoded calcium sensor GCaMP6s, together with a head-fixed visual discrimination behavior. This technique allows imaging of activity across the dorsal surface of cortex, with spatial resolution adequate to detect differential activity in local regions at least as small as 100 μm. Imaging during an orientation discrimination task reveals a progression of activity in different cortical regions associated with different phases of the task. After cortex-wide patterns of activity are determined, we demonstrate the ability to select a region that displayed conspicuous responses for two-photon microscopy and find that activity in populations of individual neurons in that region correlates with locomotion in trained mice. We expect that this paradigm will be a useful probe of information flow and network processing in brain-wide circuits involved in many sensory and cognitive processes. PMID:26912600

  1. Versatile three-dimensional virus-based template for dye-sensitized solar cells with improved electron transport and light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Yen; Dang, Xiangnan; Klug, Matthew T; Qi, Jifa; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Burpo, Fred J; Fang, Nicholas; Hammond, Paula T; Belcher, Angela M

    2013-08-27

    By genetically encoding affinity for inorganic materials into the capsid proteins of the M13 bacteriophage, the virus can act as a template for the synthesis of nanomaterial composites for use in various device applications. Herein, the M13 bacteriophage is employed to build a multifunctional and three-dimensional scaffold capable of improving both electron collection and light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). This has been accomplished by binding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to the virus proteins and encapsulating the AuNP-virus complexes in TiO2 to produce a plasmon-enhanced and nanowire (NW)-based photoanode. The NW morphology exhibits an improved electron diffusion length compared to traditional nanoparticle-based DSSCs, and the AuNPs increase the light absorption of the dye-molecules through the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance. Consequently, we report a virus-templated and plasmon-enhanced DSSC with an efficiency of 8.46%, which is achieved through optimizing both the NW morphology and the concentration of AuNPs loaded into the solar cells. In addition, we propose a theoretical model that predicts the experimentally observed trends of plasmon enhancement. PMID:23808626

  2. Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive imaging of biological processes in vivo is invaluable in advancing biology. Photoacoustic tomography is a scalable imaging technique that provides higher resolution at greater depths in tissue than achievable by purely optical methods. Here we report the application of two spectrally distinct near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720, engineered from bacterial phytochromes, as photoacoustic contrast agents. iRFPs provide tissue-specific contrast without the need for delivery of any additional substances. Compared to conventional GFP-like red-shifted fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720 demonstrate stronger photoacoustic signals at longer wavelengths, and can be spectrally resolved from each other and hemoglobin. We simultaneously visualized two differently labeled tumors, one with iRFP670 and the other with iRFP720, as well as blood vessels. We acquired images of a mouse as 2D sections of a whole animal, and as localized 3D volumetric images with high contrast and sub-millimeter resolution at depths up to 8 mm. Our results suggest iRFPs are genetically-encoded probes of choice for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging of several tissues or processes in vivo.

  3. High-throughput automated home-cage mesoscopic functional imaging of mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy H.; Boyd, Jamie D.; Bolaños, Federico; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Silasi, Gergely; Haupt, Dirk; LeDue, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse head-fixed behaviour coupled with functional imaging has become a powerful technique in rodent systems neuroscience. However, training mice can be time consuming and is potentially stressful for animals. Here we report a fully automated, open source, self-initiated head-fixation system for mesoscopic functional imaging in mice. The system supports five mice at a time and requires minimal investigator intervention. Using genetically encoded calcium indicator transgenic mice, we longitudinally monitor cortical functional connectivity up to 24 h per day in >7,000 self-initiated and unsupervised imaging sessions up to 90 days. The procedure provides robust assessment of functional cortical maps on the basis of both spontaneous activity and brief sensory stimuli such as light flashes. The approach is scalable to a number of remotely controlled cages that can be assessed within the controlled conditions of dedicated animal facilities. We anticipate that home-cage brain imaging will permit flexible and chronic assessment of mesoscale cortical function. PMID:27291514

  4. Screening action potentials: The power of light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eKaestner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated readout and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for e.g. pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable readout with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials.

  5. New Tools for Investigating Astrocyte-to-Neuron Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong eLi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Grey matter protoplasmic astrocytes extend very thin processes and establish close contacts with synapses. It has been suggested that the release of neuroactive gliotransmitters at the tripartite synapse contributes to information processing. However, the concept of calcium (Ca2+-dependent gliotransmitter release from astrocytes, and the release mechanisms are being debated.Studying astrocytes in their natural environment is challenging because: i astrocytes are electrically silent; ii astrocytes and neurons express an overlapping repertoire of transmembrane receptors; iii astrocyte processes in contact with synapses are below confocal and two-photon microscope resolution; iv bulk-loading techniques using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators lack cellular specificity.In this review, we will discuss some limitations of conventional methodologies and highlight the interest of novel tools and approaches for studying gliotransmission. Genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (GECIs, light-gated channels, and exogenous receptors are being developed to selectively read out and stimulate astrocyte activity. Our review discusses emerging perspectives on: i the complexity of astrocyte Ca2+ signalling revealed by GECIs; ii new pharmacogenetic and optogenetic approaches to activate specific Ca2+ signalling pathways in astrocytes; iii classical and new techniques to monitor vesicle fusion in cultured astrocytes; iv possible strategies to express specifically reporter genes in astrocytes.

  6. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Currier, Michael C; Moore, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  7. Single molecule super-resolution imaging of proteins in living Salmonella enterica using self-labelling enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Britta; Beutel, Oliver; Janning, Dennis; Czarniak, Frederik; Richter, Christian P; Kommnick, Carina; Göser, Vera; Kurre, Rainer; Fabiani, Florian; Erhardt, Marc; Piehler, Jacob; Hensel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the subcellular localization, dynamics and interaction of proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes is complicated by the small size of the cells. Super-resolution microscopy (SRM) comprise various new techniques that allow light microscopy with a resolution that can be up to ten-fold higher than conventional light microscopy. Application of SRM techniques to living prokaryotes demands the introduction of suitable fluorescent probes, usually by fusion of proteins of interest to fluorescent proteins with properties compatible to SRM. Here we describe an approach that is based on the genetically encoded self-labelling enzymes HaloTag and SNAP-tag. Proteins of interest are fused to HaloTag or SNAP-tag and cell permeable substrates can be labelled with various SRM-compatible fluorochromes. Fusions of the enzyme tags to subunits of a type I secretion system (T1SS), a T3SS, the flagellar rotor and a transcription factor were generated and analysed in living Salmonella enterica. The new approach is versatile in tagging proteins of interest in bacterial cells and allows to determine the number, relative subcellular localization and dynamics of protein complexes in living cells. PMID:27534893

  8. Towards Behavior Control for Evolutionary Robot Based on RL with ENN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingan Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a behavior-switching control strategy of anevolutionary robotics based on Artificial NeuralNetwork (ANN and Genetic Algorithms (GA. This method is able not only to construct thereinforcement learning models for autonomous robots and evolutionary robot modules thatcontrol behaviors and reinforcement learning environments, and but also to perform thebehavior-switching control and obstacle avoidance of an evolutionary robotics (ER intime-varying environments with static and moving obstacles by combining ANN and GA.The experimental results on thebasic behaviors and behavior-switching control have demonstrated that ourmethod can perform the decision-making strategy and parameters set opimization ofFNN and GA by learning and can escape successfully from the trap of a localminima and avoid \\emph{"motion deadlock" status} of humanoid soccer robotics agents,and reduce the oscillation of the planned trajectory betweenthe multiple obstacles by crossover and mutation. Some results of the proposed algorithmhave been successfully applied to our simulation humanoid robotics soccer team CIT3Dwhich won \\emph{the 1st prize} of RoboCup Championship and ChinaOpen2010 (July 2010 and \\emph{the $2^{nd}$ place}of the official RoboCup World Championship on 5-11 July, 2011 in Istanbul, Turkey.As compared with the conventional behavior network and the adaptive behavior method,the genetic encoding complexity of our algorithm is simplified, and the networkperformance and the {\\em convergence rate $\\rho$} have been greatlyimproved.

  9. Bioorthogonal chemistry:a covalent strategy for the study of biological systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIM; Reyna; K.V.

    2010-01-01

    The development of genetically encoded,wavelength-tunable fluorescent proteins has provided a powerful imaging tool to the study of protein dynamics and functions in cellular and organismal biology.However,many biological functions are not directly encoded in the protein primary sequence,e.g.,dynamic regulation afforded by protein posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation.To meet this challenge,an emerging field of bioorthogonal chemistry has promised to offer a versatile strategy to selectively label a biomolecule of interest and track their dynamic regulations in its native habitat.This strategy has been successfully applied to the studies of all classes of biomolecules in living systems,including proteins,nucleic acids,carbohydrates,and lipids.Whereas the incorporation of a bioorthogonal reporter site-selectively into a biomolecule through either genetic or metabolic approaches has been well established,the development of bioorthogonal reactions that allow fast ligation of exogenous chemical probes with the bioorthogonal reporter in living systems remains in its early stage.Here,we review the recent development of bioorthogonal reactions and their applications in various biological systems,with a detailed discussion about our own work―the development of the tetrazole-based,photoinducible 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction.

  10. Visualization of cortical, subcortical and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Shanna L; Jennings, Josh H; Ung, Randall L; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-03-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, owing to the light-scattering properties of the brain, as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head-fixed behavioral tasks. These limitations can now be circumvented by using miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here we describe steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate that the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6-11 weeks to complete. PMID:26914316

  11. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  12. Versatile strategy for controlling the specificity and activity of engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Kim, Ji Young; Kazane, Stephanie A; Choi, Sei-Hyun; Yun, Hwa Young; Kim, Min Soo; Rodgers, David T; Pugh, Holly M; Singer, Oded; Sun, Sophie B; Fonslow, Bryan R; Kochenderfer, James N; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Young, Travis S; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Cao, Yu

    2016-01-26

    The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a promising cancer therapy. Despite impressive clinical efficacy, the general application of current CAR-T--cell therapy is limited by serious treatment-related toxicities. One approach to improve the safety of CAR-T cells involves making their activation and proliferation dependent upon adaptor molecules that mediate formation of the immunological synapse between the target cancer cell and T-cell. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of structurally defined semisynthetic adaptors we refer to as "switch" molecules, in which anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 antibody fragments are site-specifically modified with FITC using genetically encoded noncanonical amino acids. This approach allows the precise control over the geometry and stoichiometry of complex formation between CD19- or CD22-expressing cancer cells and a "universal" anti-FITC-directed CAR-T cell. Optimization of this CAR-switch combination results in potent, dose-dependent in vivo antitumor activity in xenograft models. The advantage of being able to titrate CAR-T-cell in vivo activity was further evidenced by reduced in vivo toxicity and the elimination of persistent B-cell aplasia in immune-competent mice. The ability to control CAR-T cell and cancer cell interactions using intermediate switch molecules may expand the scope of engineered T-cell therapy to solid tumors, as well as indications beyond cancer therapy. PMID:26759368

  13. Syntax of Phase Transition Peptide Polymers with LCST and UCST Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Quiroz, Felipe

    "Smart" polymers that sense stimuli in aqueous environments and that respond with a pronounced change in their solvation are of great utility in biotechnology and medicine. Currently, however, only few peptide polymers are known to display this behavior. Here, we uncover the syntax -- defined as the arrangement of amino acids (letters) into repeat units (words) that have a functional behavior of interest -- of a novel and extensive family of genetically encoded "smart" peptide polymers, termed syntactomers, that dictates their ability to undergo a soluble to insoluble phase transition at temperatures above a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) or below an upper critical solution temperature (UCST). We show that this syntax ranges from phase transition polymers composed of simple repeats of a few amino acids to polymers whose syntax resembles the complex sequence of peptide drugs and protein domains that exhibit dual levels of function, as seen by their stimulus responsiveness and biological activity. This seamless fusion of materials and protein design embodied by syntactomers promises, we hope, a new generation of designer polymers with multiple levels of embedded functionality that should lead to new functional materials of broad interest

  14. Prolonged, brain-wide expression of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 for functional circuit mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kay Kim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Larval zebrafish offer the potential for large-scale optical imaging of neural activity throughout the central nervous system; however, several barriers challenge their utility. First, ~panneuronal probe expression has to date only been demonstrated at early larval stages up to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf, precluding imaging at later time points when circuits are more mature. Second, nuclear exclusion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs limits the resolution of functional fluorescence signals collected during imaging. Here, we report the creation of transgenic zebrafish strains exhibiting robust, nuclearly targeted expression of GCaMP3 across the brain up to at least 14 dpf utilizing a previously described optimized Gal4-UAS system. We confirmed both nuclear targeting and functionality of the modified probe in vitro and measured its kinetics in response to action potentials. We then demonstrated in vivo functionality of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 in transgenic zebrafish strains by identifying eye position-sensitive fluorescence fluctuations in caudal hindbrain neurons during spontaneous eye movements. Our methodological approach will facilitate studies of larval zebrafish circuitry by both improving resolution of functional Ca2+ signals and by allowing brain-wide expression of improved GECIs, or potentially any probe, further into development.

  15. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins. PMID:26308583

  16. Orthogonal Optical Control of a G Protein-Coupled Receptor with a SNAP-Tethered Photochromic Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Damijonaitis, Arunas; Levitz, Joshua; Sokol, Kevin R; Leippe, Philipp; Konrad, David; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-28

    The covalent attachment of synthetic photoswitches is a general approach to impart light sensitivity onto native receptors. It mimics the logic of natural photoreceptors and significantly expands the reach of optogenetics. Here we describe a novel photoswitch design-the photoswitchable orthogonal remotely tethered ligand (PORTL)-that combines the genetically encoded SNAP-tag with photochromic ligands connected to a benzylguanine via a long flexible linker. We use the method to convert the G protein-coupled receptor mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor, into a photoreceptor (SNAG-mGluR2) that provides efficient optical control over the neuronal functions of mGluR2: presynaptic inhibition and control of excitability. The PORTL approach enables multiplexed optical control of different native receptors using distinct bioconjugation methods. It should be broadly applicable since SNAP-tags have proven to be reliable, many SNAP-tagged receptors are already available, and photochromic ligands on a long leash are readily designed and synthesized. PMID:27162996

  17. Promising future for the transgenic rat in transplantation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorschodt, B M; Teubner, A; Kobayashi, E; Tolba, R H

    2014-10-01

    The rat is the most widely used animal species in surgical research and offers distinct advantages over the mouse in transplantation models due to its size and close genetic similarity to humans. Sequencing of the rat genome and successful application of transgenic technologies which had only been available for mice have since led to a resurgence of the use of rat models. Transplantation provides the possibility to deliver transgenes through a variety of routes which can potentially offer treatment modalities for post-transplant dysfunction and rejection. Moreover, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent light probes has enabled in vivo visualization of organs and tissue in living animals. In recent years, generation of gene knockout rats via the zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies has offered alternatives to the sophisticated embryonic stem cell based gene-targeting. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of transplantation studies involving transgenic techniques using rat models and recent advances in methods to modify the rat genome. Through novel gene modification techniques, precise, complete and conditional knockout and knockin rat models have become available which can provide promising new treatment options and opportunities for studying human transplant-related pathophysiology. PMID:24975516

  18. A novel family of fluorescent hypoxia sensors reveal strong heterogeneity in tumor hypoxia at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erapaneedi, Raghu; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Schäfers, Michael; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an intensively investigated condition with profound effects on cell metabolism, migration, and angiogenesis during development and disease. Physiologically, hypoxia is linked to tissue homeostasis and maintenance of pluripotency. Hypoxia also contributes to pathologies including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Despite its importance, microscopic visualization of hypoxia is largely restricted to the detection of reductively activated probes by immunostaining. Here, we describe a novel family of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors that detect the activation of HIF transcription factors reported by the oxygen-independent fluorescent protein UnaG. It comprises sensors with different switching and memory behavior and combination sensors that allow the distinction of hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. We tested these sensors on orthotopically transplanted glioma cell lines. Using a cranial window, we could visualize hypoxia intravitally at cellular resolution. In tissue samples, sensor activity was detected in regions, which were largely devoid of blood vessels, correlated with HIF-1α stabilization, and were highly heterogeneous at a cellular level. Frequently, we detected recently reoxygenated cells outside hypoxic areas in the proximity of blood vessels, suggestive of hypoxia-promoted cell migration. PMID:26598532

  19. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  20. Using optogenetics to translate the "inflammatory dialogue" between heart and brain in the context of stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinbo Cheng; Jie Zhang; Caiyi Lu; Liping Wang

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are an integral part of the stress response and are likely to result from a programmed adaptation that is vital to the organism's survival and well-being.The whole inflammatory response is mediated by largely overlapping circuits in the limbic forebrain,hypothalamus and brainstem,but is also under the control of the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems.Genetically predisposed individuals who fail to tune the respective contributions of the two systems in accordance with stressor modality and intensity after adverse experiences can be at risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular diseases.Altered glucocorticoid (GC) homeostasis due to GC resistance leads to the failure of neural and negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during chronic inflammation,and this might be the mechanism underlying the ensuing brain and heart diseases and the high prevalence of co-morbidity between the two systems.By the combined use of light and genetically-encoded lightsensitive proteins,optogenetics allows cell-type-specific,fast (millisecond-scale) control of precisely defined events in biological systems.This method is an important breakthrough to explore the causality between neural activity patterns and behavioral profiles relevant to anxiety,depression,autism and schizophrenia.Optogenetics also helps to understand the "inflammatory dialogue",the inflammatory processes in psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular diseases,shared by heart and brain in the context of stress.

  1. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-07-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs.

  2. MOUSE VISION AS A GATEWAY FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW EXPERIENCE SHAPES NEURAL CIRCUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Priebe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic programs controlling ontogeny drive many of the essential connectivity patterns within the brain. Yet it is activity, derived from the experience of interacting with the world, that sculpts the precise circuitry of the central nervous system. Such experience-dependent plasticity has been observed throughout the brain but has been most extensively studied in the neocortex. A prime example of this refinement of neural circuitry is found in primary visual cortex (V1, where functional connectivity changes have been observed both during development and in adulthood. The mouse visual system has become a predominant model for investigating the principles that underlie experience-dependent plasticity, given the general conservation of visual neural circuitry across mammals as well as the powerful tools and techniques recently developed for use in rodent. The genetic tractability of mice has permitted the identification of signaling pathways that translate experience-driven activity patterns into changes in circuitry. Further, the accessibility of visual cortex has allowed neural activity to be manipulated with optogenetics and observed with genetically-encoded calcium sensors. Consequently, mouse visual cortex has become one of the dominant platforms to study experience-dependent plasticity.

  3. Understanding how discrete populations of hypothalamic neurons orchestrate complicated behavioral states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison eGraebner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A major question in systems neuroscience is how a single population of neurons can interact with the rest of the brain to orchestrate complex behavioral states. The hypothalamus contains many such discrete neuronal populations that individually regulate arousal, feeding, and drinking. For example, hypothalamic neurons that express hypocretin (Hcrt neuropeptides can sense homeostatic and metabolic factors affecting wakefulness and orchestrate organismal arousal. Neurons that express agouti-related protein (AgRP can sense the metabolic needs of the body and orchestrate a state of hunger. The organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT can detect the hypertonicity of blood and orchestrate a state of thirst. Each hypothalamic population is sufficient to generate complicated behavioral states through the combined efforts of distinct efferent projections. The principal challenge to understanding these brain systems is therefore to determine the individual roles of each downstream projection for each behavioral state. In recent years, the development and application of temporally precise, genetically encoded tools have greatly improved our understanding of the structure and function of these neural systems. This review will survey recent advances in our understanding of how these individual hypothalamic populations can orchestrate complicated behavioral states due to the combined efforts of individual downstream projections.

  4. Brain selective transgene expression in zebrafish using an NRSE derived motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Antony Burgess

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic technologies enable the manipulation and observation of circuits controlling behavior by permitting expression of genetically encoded reporter genes in neurons. Frequently though, neuronal expression is accompanied by transgene expression in non-neuronal tissues, which may preclude key experimental manipulations, including assessment of the contribution of neurons to behavior by ablation. To better restrict transgene expression to the nervous system in zebrafish larvae, we have used DNA sequences derived from the neuron-restrictive silencing element (NRSE. We find that one such sequence, REx2, when used in conjunction with several basal promoters, robustly suppresses transgene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Both in transient transgenic experiments and in stable enhancer trap lines, suppression is achieved without compromising expression within the nervous system. Furthermore, in REx2 enhancer trap lines non-neuronal expression can be de-repressed by knocking down expression of the NRSE binding protein Rest. In one line, we show that the resulting pattern of reporter gene expression coincides with that of the adjacent endogenous gene, hapln3. We demonstrate that three common basal promoters are susceptible to the effects of the REx2 element, suggesting that this method may be useful for confining expression from many other promoters to the nervous system. This technique enables neural specific targeting of reporter genes and thus will facilitate the use of transgenic methods to manipulate circuit function in freely behaving larvae.

  5. Analysis of amino acid substitutions in AraC variants that respond to triacetic acid lactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Christopher S; Wang, Zhiqing; Qian, Shuai; Deutsch, Samuel; Sutter, Markus; Cirino, Patrick C

    2016-04-01

    The Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC regulates expression of ara genes in response to l-arabinose. In efforts to develop genetically encoded molecular reporters, we previously engineered an AraC variant that responds to the compound triacetic acid lactone (TAL). This variant (named "AraC-TAL1") was isolated by screening a library of AraC variants, in which five amino acid positions in the ligand-binding pocket were simultaneously randomized. Screening was carried out through multiple rounds of alternating positive and negative fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Here we show that changing the screening protocol results in the identification of different TAL-responsive variants (nine new variants). Individual substituted residues within these variants were found to primarily act cooperatively toward the gene expression response. Finally, X-ray diffraction was used to solve the crystal structure of the apo AraC-TAL1 ligand-binding domain. The resolved crystal structure confirms that this variant takes on a structure nearly identical to the apo wild-type AraC ligand-binding domain (root-mean-square deviation 0.93 Å), suggesting that AraC-TAL1 behaves similar to wild-type with regard to ligand recognition and gene regulation. Our results provide amino acid sequence-function data sets for training and validating AraC modeling studies, and contribute to our understanding of how to design new biosensors based on AraC. PMID:26749125

  6. Utilizing Natural and Engineered Peroxiredoxins As Intracellular Peroxide Reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laer, Koen; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-01-31

    It is increasingly apparent that nature evolved peroxiredoxins not only as H2O2 scavengers but also as highly sensitive H2O2 sensors and signal transducers. Here we ask whether the H2O2 sensing role of Prx can be exploited to develop probes that allow to monitor intracellular H2O2 levels with unprecedented sensitivity. Indeed, simple gel shift assays visualizing the oxidation of endogenous 2-Cys peroxiredoxins have already been used to detect subtle changes in intracellular H2O2 concentration. The challenge however is to create a genetically encoded probe that offers real-time measurements of H2O2 levels in intact cells via the Prx oxidation state. We discuss potential design strategies for Prx-based probes based on either the redox-sensitive fluorophore roGFP or the conformation-sensitive fluorophore cpYFP. Furthermore, we outline the structural and chemical complexities which need to be addressed when using Prx as a sensing moiety for H2O2 probes. We suggest experimental strategies to investigate the influence of these complexities on probe behavior. In doing so, we hope to stimulate the development of Prx-based probes which may spearhead the further study of cellular H2O2 homeostasis and Prx signaling. PMID:26810074

  7. The AmpliChip CYP450 test: principles, challenges, and future clinical utility in digestive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Brian D; Egan, Laurence J; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2006-07-01

    Understanding genetically encoded inherited differences in drug metabolism and targets (ie, receptors, transporters) offers the promise of minimizing adverse drug reactions and improving therapies. Among the enzymes involved in drug metabolism, the cytochromes P450 (CYP450) hold a central position. In fact, CYP450 are involved in the biotransformation of most drugs used in clinical practice. Recent advances in the development of DNA-based diagnostics, coupled with a better understanding of genetic polymorphisms in influencing pharmacologic responses, have provided the foundation for novel in vitro tests that may predict side effects and/or therapeutic responses. The AmpliChip CYP450 test was developed as a clinical test to evaluate an individual's metabolic capacity for certain drugs by identifying polymorphisms of 2 CYP450 enzymes (ie, CYP2D6 and CYP2D19). Even though the AmpliChip CYP450 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, its practical clinical utility has not yet been determined, and there is a paucity of data related to gastrointestinal and liver diseases. An understanding of the principles and opportunities provided by this new category of diagnostic test is key before planning the necessary studies to evaluate the usefulness of AmpliChip CYP450 in gastroenterologic clinical practice. PMID:16797246

  8. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed. PMID:24043132

  9. The N-B Interaction through a Water Bridge: Understanding the Chemoselectivity of a Fluorescent Protein Based Probe for Peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Jie; Tian, Ziqi; Kallio, Karen; Oleson, April L; Ji, Ao; Borchardt, Dan; Jiang, De-En; Remington, S James; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2016-04-13

    Boronic acid and esters have been extensively utilized for molecular recognition and chemical sensing. We recently reported a genetically encoded peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-specific fluorescent sensor, pnGFP, based on the incorporation of a boronic acid moiety into a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP) followed by directed protein evolution. Different from typical arylboronic acids and esters, the chromophore of pnGFP is unreactive to millimolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The focus of this study is to explore the mechanism for the observed unusual chemoselectivity of pnGFP toward peroxynitrite over hydrogen peroxide by using site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, (11)B NMR, and computational analysis. Our data collectively support that a His residue on the protein scaffold polarizes a water molecule to induce the formation of an sp(3)-hybridized boron in the chromophore, thereby tuning the reactivity of pnGFP with various reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Our study demonstrates the first example of tunable boron chemistry in a folded nonnative protein, which offers wide implications in designing selective chemical probes. PMID:27019313

  10. Monovalent Strep-Tactin for strong and site-specific tethering in nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Fabian; Bauer, Magnus S.; Milles, Lukas F.; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Gaub, Hermann E.; Pippig, Diana A.

    2016-01-01

    Strep-Tactin, an engineered form of streptavidin, binds avidly to the genetically encoded peptide Strep-tag II in a manner comparable to streptavidin binding to biotin. These interactions have been used in protein purification and detection applications. However, in single-molecule studies, for example using atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), the tetravalency of these systems impedes the measurement of monodispersed data. Here, we introduce a monovalent form of Strep-Tactin that harbours a unique binding site for Strep-tag II and a single cysteine that allows Strep-Tactin to specifically attach to the atomic force microscope cantilever and form a consistent pulling geometry to obtain homogeneous rupture data. Using AFM-SMFS, the mechanical properties of the interaction between Strep-tag II and monovalent Strep-Tactin were characterized. Rupture forces comparable to biotin:streptavidin unbinding were observed. Using titin kinase and green fluorescent protein, we show that monovalent Strep-Tactin is generally applicable to protein unfolding experiments. We expect monovalent Strep-Tactin to be a reliable anchoring tool for a range of single-molecule studies.

  11. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  12. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  13. What genetic model organisms offer the study of behavior and neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin H

    2016-06-01

    The past decade has witnessed the development of powerful, genetically encoded tools for manipulating and monitoring neuronal function in freely moving animals. These tools are most readily deployed in genetic model organisms and efforts to map the circuits that govern behavior have increasingly focused on worms, flies, zebrafish, and mice. The traditional virtues of these animals for genetic studies in terms of small size, short generation times, and ease of animal husbandry in a laboratory setting have facilitated rapid progress, and the neural basis of an increasing number of behaviors is being established at cellular resolution in each of these animals. The depth and breadth of this analysis should soon offer a significantly more comprehensive understanding of how the circuitry underlying behavior is organized in particular animals and promises to help answer long-standing questions that have waited for such a brain-wide perspective on nervous system function. The comprehensive understanding achieved in genetic model animals is thus likely to make them into paradigmatic examples that will serve as touchstones for comparisons to understand how behavior is organized in other animals, including ourselves. PMID:27328841

  14. X-ray irradiation activates K+ channels via H2O2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibhardt, Christine S; Roth, Bastian; Schroeder, Indra; Fuck, Sebastian; Becker, Patrick; Jakob, Burkhard; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a universal tool in tumor therapy but may also cause secondary cancers or cell invasiveness. These negative side effects could be causally related to the human-intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated-K+-channel (hIK), which is activated by X-ray irradiation and affects cell proliferation and migration. To analyze the signaling cascade downstream of ionizing radiation we use genetically encoded reporters for H2O2 (HyPer) and for the dominant redox-buffer glutathione (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor with high spatial and temporal resolution, radiation-triggered excursions of H2O2 in A549 and HEK293 cells. The data show that challenging cells with ≥1 Gy X-rays or with UV-A laser micro-irradiation causes a rapid rise of H2O2 in the nucleus and in the cytosol. This rise, which is determined by the rate of H2O2 production and glutathione-buffering, is sufficient for triggering a signaling cascade that involves an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ and eventually an activation of hIK channels. PMID:26350345

  15. SensiPath: computer-aided design of sensing-enabling metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delépine, Baudoin; Libis, Vincent; Carbonell, Pablo; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-07-01

    Genetically-encoded biosensors offer a wide range of opportunities to develop advanced synthetic biology applications. Circuits with the ability of detecting and quantifying intracellular amounts of a compound of interest are central to whole-cell biosensors design for medical and environmental applications, and they also constitute essential parts for the selection and regulation of high-producer strains in metabolic engineering. However, the number of compounds that can be detected through natural mechanisms, like allosteric transcription factors, is limited; expanding the set of detectable compounds is therefore highly desirable. Here, we present the SensiPath web server, accessible at http://sensipath.micalis.fr SensiPath implements a strategy to enlarge the set of detectable compounds by screening for multi-step enzymatic transformations converting non-detectable compounds into detectable ones. The SensiPath approach is based on the encoding of reactions through signature descriptors to explore sensing-enabling metabolic pathways, which are putative biochemical transformations of the target compound leading to known effectors of transcription factors. In that way, SensiPath enlarges the design space by broadening the potential use of biosensors in synthetic biology applications. PMID:27106061

  16. Real-time monitoring of basal H2O2 levels with peroxiredoxin-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bruce; Van Laer, Koen; Owusu, Theresa N E; Ezeriņa, Daria; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Amponsah, Prince Saforo; Tursch, Anja; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-06-01

    Genetically encoded probes based on the H2O2-sensing proteins OxyR and Orp1 have greatly increased the ability to detect elevated H2O2 levels in stimulated or stressed cells. However, these proteins are not sensitive enough to monitor metabolic H2O2 baseline levels. Using yeast as a platform for probe development, we developed two peroxiredoxin-based H2O2 probes, roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCR and roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCPΔCR, that afford such sensitivity. These probes are ∼50% oxidized under 'normal' unstressed conditions and are equally responsive to increases and decreases in H2O2. Hence, they permit fully dynamic, real-time measurement of basal H2O2 levels, with subcellular resolution, in living cells. We demonstrate that expression of these probes does not alter endogenous H2O2 homeostasis. The roGFP2-Tsa2ΔCR probe revealed real-time interplay between basal H2O2 levels and partial oxygen pressure. Furthermore, it exposed asymmetry in H2O2 trafficking between the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix and a strong correlation between matrix H2O2 levels and cellular growth rate. PMID:27089028

  17. Multiphoton photochemistry of red fluorescent proteins in solution and live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Stoltzfus, Caleb; Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Barnett, Lauren; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2014-08-01

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), and biosensors based on them, provide new insights into how living cells and tissues function. Ultimately, the goal of the bioimaging community is to use these probes deep in tissues and even in entire organisms, and this will require two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), with its greater tissue penetration, lower autofluorescence background, and minimum photodamage in the out-of-focus volume. However, the extremely high instantaneous light intensities of femtosecond pulses in the focal volume dramatically increase the probability of further stepwise resonant photon absorption, leading to highly excited, ionizable and reactive states, often resulting in fast bleaching of fluorescent proteins in TPLSM. Here, we show that the femtosecond multiphoton excitation of red FPs (DsRed2 and mFruits), both in solution and live cells, results in a chain of consecutive, partially reversible reactions, with individual rates driven by a high-order (3-5 photon) absorption. The first step of this process corresponds to a three- (DsRed2) or four-photon (mFruits) induced fast isomerization of the chromophore, yielding intermediate fluorescent forms, which then subsequently transform into nonfluorescent products. Our experimental data and model calculations are consistent with a mechanism in which ultrafast electron transfer from the chromophore to a neighboring positively charged amino acid residue triggers the first step of multiphoton chromophore transformations in DsRed2 and mFruits, consisting of decarboxylation of a nearby deprotonated glutamic acid residue. PMID:25004113

  18. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics and fluorescence deactivation of near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacteriophytochromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Hontani, Yusaku; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFPs, are recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent probes for deep-tissue in vivo imaging. Their functions depend on the corresponding fluorescence efficiencies and electronic excited state properties. Here we report the electronic excited state deactivation dynamics of the most red-shifted iRFPs: iRFP702, iRFP713 and iRFP720. Complementary measurements by ultrafast broadband fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy show that single exponential decays of the excited state with 600 ~ 700 ps dominate in all three iRFPs, while photoinduced isomerization was completely inhibited. Significant kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were observed with a factor of ~1.8 in D2O, and are interpreted in terms of an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) process that deactivates the excited state in competition with fluorescence and chromophore mobility. On this basis, new approaches for rational molecular engineering may be applied to iRFPs to improve their fluorescence.

  19. Active Shop Scheduling Of Production Process Based On RFID Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In industry 4.0 environment, intelligent technology is almost applied to all parts of the manufacturing process, such as process design, job shop scheduling, etc.. This paper presents an efficient approach to job shop scheduling actively by using RFID to collect real-time manufacturing data. Identified the workpiece by RFID which needs to be machined, it can “ask for” the resource actively for the following process. With these active asking-for strategy, a double genetically encoded improved genetic algorithm is proposed for achieving active job shop scheduling solution during the actual manufacturing process. A case was used to evaluate its effectiveness. Meanwhile, , it can effectively and actively carry out job shop scheduling and has much better convergence effect comparing with basic genetic algorithm. And the job shop scheduler in management center can use the proposed algorithm to get the satisfied scheduling result timely by reducing waiting time and making begin time earlier during transmission between manufacturing process, which makes the scheduling result feasible and accurate.

  20. Advanced femtosecond lasers enable new developments in non-linear imaging and functional studies in neuroscience, biology and medical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Marco; McCoy, Darryl

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years Multiphoton Excitation Microscopy witnessed a mutation from tool for imaging cellular structures in living animals deeper than other high-resolution techniques, into an instrument for monitoring functionality and even stimulating or inhibiting inter-cellular signalling. This paradigm shift has been enabled primarily by the development of genetically encoded probes like Ca indicators (GECI) and Opsins for optogenetics inhibition and stimulation. These developments will hopefully enable the understanding of how local network of hundreds or thousands of neurons operate in response to actual tasks or induced stimuli. Imaging, monitoring signals and activating neurons, all on a millisecond time scale, requires new laser tools providing a combination of wavelengths, higher powers and operating regimes different from the ones traditionally used for classic multiphoton imaging. The other key development in multiphoton techniques relates to potential diagnostic and clinical applications where non-linear imaging could provide all optical marker-free replacement of H and E techniques and even intra-operative guidance for procedures like cancer surgery. These developments will eventually drive the development of specialized laser sources where compact size, ease of use, beam delivery and cost are primary concerns. In this talk we will discuss recent laser product developments targeting the various applications of multiphoton imaging, as fiber lasers and other new type of lasers gradually gain popularity and their own space, side-by-side or as an alternative to conventional titanium sapphire femtosecond lasers.

  1. Highly efficient adenoviral transduction of pancreatic islets using a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pamuditha N; Atto, Zaid; Regeenes, Romario; Tufa, Uilki; Chen, Yih Yang; Chan, Warren C W; Volchuk, Allen; Kilkenny, Dawn M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V

    2016-08-01

    Tissues are challenging to genetically manipulate due to limited penetration of viral particles resulting in low transduction efficiency. We are particularly interested in expressing genetically-encoded sensors in ex vivo pancreatic islets to measure glucose-stimulated metabolism, however poor viral penetration biases these measurements to only a subset of cells at the periphery. To increase mass transfer of viral particles, we designed a microfluidic device that holds islets in parallel hydrodynamic traps connected by an expanding by-pass channel. We modeled viral particle flow into the tissue using fluorescently-labelled gold nanoparticles of varying sizes and showed a penetration threshold of only ∼5 nm. To increase this threshold, we used EDTA to transiently reduce cell-cell adhesion and expand intercellular space. Ultimately, a combination of media flow and ETDA treatment significantly increased adenoviral transduction to the core of the islet. As proof-of-principle, we used this protocol to transduce an ER-targeted redox sensitive sensor (eroGFP), and revealed significantly greater ER redox capacity at core islet cells. Overall, these data demonstrate a robust method to enhance transduction efficiency of islets, and potentially other tissues, by using a combination of microfluidic flow and transient tissue expansion. PMID:27378588

  2. Lipid droplets, lipophagy, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are essential components for life. Their various structural and physical properties influence diverse cellular processes and, thereby, human health. Lipids are not genetically encoded but are synthesized and modified by complex metabolic pathways, supplying energy, membranes, signaling molecules, and hormones to affect growth, physiology, and response to environmental insults. Lipid homeostasis is crucial, such that excess fatty acids (FAs) can be harmful to cells. To prevent such lipotoxicity, cells convert excess FAs into neutral lipids for storage in organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). These organelles do not simply manage lipid storage and metabolism but also are involved in protein quality management, pathogenesis, immune responses, and, potentially, neurodegeneration. In recent years, a major trend in LD biology has centered around the physiology of lipid mobilization via lipophagy of fat stored within LDs. This review summarizes key findings in LD biology and lipophagy, offering novel insights into this rapidly growing field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26713677

  3. Detection of pathological biomarkers in human clinical samples via amplifying genetic switches and logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbet, Alexis; Endy, Drew; Renard, Eric; Molina, Franck; Bonnet, Jérôme

    2015-05-27

    Whole-cell biosensors have several advantages for the detection of biological substances and have proven to be useful analytical tools. However, several hurdles have limited whole-cell biosensor application in the clinic, primarily their unreliable operation in complex media and low signal-to-noise ratio. We report that bacterial biosensors with genetically encoded digital amplifying genetic switches can detect clinically relevant biomarkers in human urine and serum. These bactosensors perform signal digitization and amplification, multiplexed signal processing with the use of Boolean logic gates, and data storage. In addition, we provide a framework with which to quantify whole-cell biosensor robustness in clinical samples together with a method for easily reprogramming the sensor module for distinct medical detection agendas. Last, we demonstrate that bactosensors can be used to detect pathological glycosuria in urine from diabetic patients. These next-generation whole-cell biosensors with improved computing and amplification capacity could meet clinical requirements and should enable new approaches for medical diagnosis. PMID:26019219

  4. A disposable picolitre bioreactor for cultivation and investigation of industrially relevant bacteria on the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberger, Alexander; Paczia, Nicole; Probst, Christopher; Schendzielorz, Georg; Eggeling, Lothar; Noack, Stephan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2012-05-01

    In the continuously growing field of industrial biotechnology the scale-up from lab to industrial scale is still a major hurdle to develop competitive bioprocesses. During scale-up the productivity of single cells might be affected by bioreactor inhomogeneity and population heterogeneity. Currently, these complex interactions are difficult to investigate. In this report, design, fabrication and operation of a disposable picolitre cultivation system is described, in which environmental conditions can be well controlled on a short time scale and bacterial microcolony growth experiments can be observed by time-lapse microscopy. Three exemplary investigations will be discussed emphasizing the applicability and versatility of the device. Growth and analysis of industrially relevant bacteria with single cell resolution (in particular Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum) starting from one single mother cell to densely packed cultures is demonstrated. Applying the picolitre bioreactor, 1.5-fold increased growth rates of C. glutamicum wild type cells were observed compared to typical 1 litre lab-scale batch cultivation. Moreover, the device was used to analyse and quantify the morphological changes of an industrially relevant l-lysine producer C. glutamicum after artificially inducing starvation conditions. Instead of a one week lab-scale experiment, only 1 h was sufficient to reveal the same information. Furthermore, time lapse microscopy during 24 h picolitre cultivation of an arginine producing strain containing a genetically encoded fluorescence sensor disclosed time dependent single cell productivity and growth, which was not possible with conventional methods. PMID:22511122

  5. Spatiotemporal microbial single-cell analysis using a high-throughput microfluidics cultivation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberger, Alexander; Probst, Christopher; Helfrich, Stefan; Nanda, Arun; Stute, Birgit; Wiechert, Wolfgang; von Lieres, Eric; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2015-12-01

    Cell-to-cell heterogeneity typically evolves due to a manifold of biological and environmental factors and special phenotypes are often relevant for the fate of the whole population but challenging to detect during conventional analysis. We demonstrate a microfluidic single-cell cultivation platform that incorporates several hundred growth chambers, in which isogenic bacteria microcolonies growing in cell monolayers are tracked by automated time-lapse microscopy with spatiotemporal resolution. The device was not explicitly developed for a specific organism, but has a very generic configuration suitable for various different microbial organisms. In the present study, we analyzed Corynebacterium glutamicum microcolonies, thereby generating complete lineage trees and detailed single-cell data on division behavior and morphology in order to demonstrate the platform's overall capabilities. Furthermore, the occurrence of spontaneously induced stress in individual C. glutamicum cells was investigated by analyzing strains with genetically encoded reporter systems and optically visualizing SOS response. The experiments revealed spontaneous SOS induction in the absence of any external trigger comparable to results obtained by flow cytometry (FC) analyzing cell samples from conventional shake flask cultivation. Our microfluidic setup delivers detailed single-cell data with spatial and temporal resolution; complementary information to conventional FC results. PMID:26348020

  6. NH4+ triggers the release of astrocytic lactate via mitochondrial pyruvate shunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Mächler, Philipp; Wyss, Matthias T.; Stobart, Jillian; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Weber, Bruno; Barros, L. Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity is accompanied by a transient mismatch between local glucose and oxygen metabolism, a phenomenon of physiological and pathophysiological importance termed aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies have proposed glutamate and K+ as the neuronal signals that trigger aerobic glycolysis in astrocytes. Here we used a panel of genetically encoded FRET sensors in vitro and in vivo to investigate the participation of NH4+, a by-product of catabolism that is also released by active neurons. Astrocytes in mixed cortical cultures responded to physiological levels of NH4+ with an acute rise in cytosolic lactate followed by lactate release into the extracellular space, as detected by a lactate-sniffer. An acute increase in astrocytic lactate was also observed in acute hippocampal slices exposed to NH4+ and in the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized mice in response to i.v. NH4+. Unexpectedly, NH4+ had no effect on astrocytic glucose consumption. Parallel measurements showed simultaneous cytosolic pyruvate accumulation and NADH depletion, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria. An inhibitor-stop technique confirmed a strong inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate uptake that can be explained by mitochondrial matrix acidification. These results show that physiological NH4+ diverts the flux of pyruvate from mitochondria to lactate production and release. Considering that NH4+ is produced stoichiometrically with glutamate during excitatory neurotransmission, we propose that NH4+ behaves as an intercellular signal and that pyruvate shunting contributes to aerobic lactate production by astrocytes. PMID:26286989

  7. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes. PMID:27162342

  8. Efficiently folding and circularly permuted variants of the Sapphire mutant of GFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griesbeck Oliver

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The green fluorescent protein (GFP has been widely used in cell biology as a marker of gene expression, label of cellular structures, fusion tag or as a crucial constituent of genetically encoded biosensors. Mutagenesis of the wildtype gene has yielded a number of improved variants such as EGFP or colour variants suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. However, folding of some of these mutants is still a problem when targeted to certain organelles or fused to other proteins. Results By directed rational mutagenesis, we have produced a new variant of the Sapphire mutant of GFP with improved folding properties that turns out to be especially beneficial when expressed within organelles or as a fusion tag. Its absorption spectrum is pH-stable and the pKa of its emission is 4.9, making it very resistant to pH perturbation inside cells. Conclusion "T-Sapphire" and its circular permutations can be used as labels of proteins or cellular structures and as FRET donors in combination with red-fluorescent acceptor proteins such as DsRed, making it possible to completely separate donor and acceptor excitation and emission in intensity-based FRET experiments.

  9. Hydrolases of the ILR1-like family of Arabidopsis thaliana modulate auxin response by regulating auxin homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Carranza, Ana Paula; Singh, Aparajita; Steinberger, Karoline; Panigrahi, Kishore; Palme, Klaus; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Dal Bosco, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Amide-linked conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) have been identified in most plant species. They function in storage, inactivation or inhibition of the growth regulator auxin. We investigated how the major known endogenous amide-linked IAA conjugates with auxin-like activity act in auxin signaling and what role ILR1-like proteins play in this process in Arabidopsis. We used a genetically encoded auxin sensor to show that IAA-Leu, IAA-Ala and IAA-Phe act through the TIR1-dependent signaling pathway. Furthermore, by using the sensor as a free IAA reporter, we followed conjugate hydrolysis mediated by ILR1, ILL2 and IAR3 in plant cells and correlated the activity of the hydrolases with a modulation of auxin response. The conjugate preferences that we observed are in agreement with available in vitro data for ILR1. Moreover, we identified IAA-Leu as an additional substrate for IAR3 and showed that ILL2 has a more moderate kinetic performance than observed in vitro. Finally, we proved that IAR3, ILL2 and ILR1 reside in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that in this compartment the hydrolases regulate the rates of amido-IAA hydrolysis which results in activation of auxin signaling. PMID:27063913

  10. The past, present and future of fluorescent protein tags in anaerobic protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The world health organization currently recognizes diarrhoeal diseases as a significant cause of death in children globally. Protozoan parasites such as Giardia and Entamoeba that thrive in the oxygen-deprived environment of the human gut are common etiological agents of diarrhoea. In the urogenital tract of humans, the anaerobic protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is notorious as the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted pathogen. Even with high medical impact, our understanding of anaerobic parasite physiology is scarce and as a result, treatment choices are limited. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are invaluable tools as genetically encoded protein tags for advancing knowledge of cellular function. These FP tags emit fluorescent colours and once attached to a protein of interest, allow tracking of parasite proteins in the dynamic cellular space. Application of green FPs-like FPs in anaerobic protozoans is hindered by their oxygen dependency. In this review, we examine aspects of anaerobic parasite biology that clash with physio-chemical properties of FPs and limit their use as live-parasite protein tags. We expose novel FPs, such as miniSOG that do not require oxygen for signal production. The potential use of novel FPs has the opportunity to leverage the anaerobe parasitologist toolkit to that of aerobe parasitologist. PMID:26653973

  11. Dual-colour imaging of RNAs using quencher- and fluorophore-binding aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Sunbul, Murat; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain deeper insight into the functions and dynamics of RNA in cells, the development of methods for imaging multiple RNAs simultaneously is of paramount importance. Here, we describe a modular approach to image RNA in living cells using an RNA aptamer that binds to dinitroaniline, an efficient general contact quencher. Dinitroaniline quenches the fluorescence of different fluorophores when directly conjugated to them via ethylene glycol linkers by forming a non-fluorescent intramolecular complex. Since the binding of the RNA aptamer to the quencher destroys the fluorophore-quencher complex, fluorescence increases dramatically upon binding. Using this principle, a series of fluorophores were turned into fluorescent turn-on probes by conjugating them to dinitroaniline. These probes ranged from fluorescein-dinitroaniline (green) to TexasRed-dinitroaniline (red) spanning across the visible spectrum. The dinitroaniline-binding aptamer (DNB) was generated by in vitro selection, and was found to bind all probes, leading to fluorescence increase in vitro and in living cells. When expressed in E. coli, the DNB aptamer could be labelled and visualized with different-coloured fluorophores and therefore it can be used as a genetically encoded tag to image target RNAs. Furthermore, combining contact-quenched fluorogenic probes with orthogonal DNB (the quencher-binding RNA aptamer) and SRB-2 aptamers (a fluorophore-binding RNA aptamer) allowed dual-colour imaging of two different fluorescence-enhancing RNA tags in living cells, opening new avenues for studying RNA co-localization and trafficking. PMID:26175046

  12. A Low Affinity GCaMP3 Variant (GCaMPer for Imaging the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Henderson

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is critical for cellular functions and is disrupted in diverse pathologies including neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. Owing to the high concentration of calcium within the ER, studying this subcellular compartment requires tools that are optimized for these conditions. To develop a single-fluorophore genetically encoded calcium indicator for this organelle, we targeted a low affinity variant of GCaMP3 to the ER lumen (GCaMPer (10.19. A set of viral vectors was constructed to express GCaMPer in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary cortical neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We observed dynamic changes in GCaMPer (10.19 fluorescence in response to pharmacologic manipulations of the ER calcium store. Additionally, periodic calcium efflux from the ER was observed during spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes. GCaMPer (10.19 has utility in imaging ER calcium in living cells and providing insight into luminal calcium dynamics under physiologic and pathologic states.

  13. Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporter Myxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A.; Currier, Michael C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of virus reverse genetics has enabled the incorporation of genetically encoded reporter proteins into replication-competent viruses. These reporters include fluorescent proteins which have intrinsic chromophores that absorb light and re-emit it at lower wavelengths, and bioluminescent proteins which are luciferase enzymes that react with substrates to produce visible light. The incorporation of these reporters into replication-competent viruses has revolutionized our understanding of molecular virology and aspects of viral tropism and transmission. Reporter viruses have also enabled the development of high-throughput assays to screen antiviral compounds and antibodies and to perform neutralization assays. However, there remain technical challenges with the design of replication-competent reporter viruses, and each reporter has unique advantages and disadvantages for specific applications. This review describes currently available reporters, design strategies for incorporating reporters into replication-competent paramyxoviruses and orthomyxoviruses, and the variety of applications for which these tools can be utilized both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27527209

  14. Channel-Mediated Lactate Release by K+-Stimulated Astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Sotelo-Hitschfeld, T.

    2015-03-11

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is accompanied by a local surge in interstitial lactate that occurs despite adequate oxygen availability, a puzzling phenomenon termed aerobic glycolysis. In addition to its role as an energy substrate, recent studies have shown that lactate modulates neuronal excitability acting through various targets, including NMDA receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors specific for lactate, but little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the increase in interstitial lactate. Using a panel of genetically encoded fluorescence nanosensors for energy metabolites, we show here that mouse astrocytes in culture, in cortical slices, and in vivo maintain a steady-state reservoir of lactate. The reservoir was released to the extracellular space immediately after exposure of astrocytes to a physiological rise in extracellular K+ or cell depolarization. Cell-attached patch-clamp analysis of cultured astrocytes revealed a 37 pS lactate-permeable ion channel activated by cell depolarization. The channel was modulated by lactate itself, resulting in a positive feedback loop for lactate release. A rapid fall in intracellular lactate levels was also observed in cortical astrocytes of anesthetized mice in response to local field stimulation. The existence of an astrocytic lactate reservoir and its quick mobilization via an ion channel in response to a neuronal cue provides fresh support to lactate roles in neuronal fueling and in gliotransmission.

  15. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  16. Molecular mechanism of a green-shifted, pH-dependent red fluorescent protein mKate variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins that can switch between distinct colors have contributed significantly to modern biomedical imaging technologies and molecular cell biology. Here we report the identification and biochemical analysis of a green-shifted red fluorescent protein variant GmKate, produced by the introduction of two mutations into mKate. Although the mutations decrease the overall brightness of the protein, GmKate is subject to pH-dependent, reversible green-to-red color conversion. At physiological pH, GmKate absorbs blue light (445 nm and emits green fluorescence (525 nm. At pH above 9.0, GmKate absorbs 598 nm light and emits 646 nm, far-red fluorescence, similar to its sequence homolog mNeptune. Based on optical spectra and crystal structures of GmKate in its green and red states, the reversible color transition is attributed to the different protonation states of the cis-chromophore, an interpretation that was confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. Crystal structures reveal potential hydrogen bond networks around the chromophore that may facilitate the protonation switch, and indicate a molecular basis for the unusual bathochromic shift observed at high pH. This study provides mechanistic insights into the color tuning of mKate variants, which may aid the development of green-to-red color-convertible fluorescent sensors, and suggests GmKate as a prototype of genetically encoded pH sensors for biological studies.

  17. Generation of Red-Shifted Cameleons for Imaging Ca2+ Dynamics of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Waldeck-Weiermair

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cameleons are sophisticated genetically encoded fluorescent probes that allow quantifying cellular Ca2+ signals. The probes are based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET between terminally located fluorescent proteins (FPs, which move together upon binding of Ca2+ to the central calmodulin myosin light chain kinase M13 domain. Most of the available cameleons consist of cyan and yellow FPs (CFP and YFP as the FRET pair. However, red-shifted versions with green and orange or red FPs (GFP, OFP, RFP have some advantages such as less phototoxicity and minimal spectral overlay with autofluorescence of cells and fura-2, a prominent chemical Ca2+ indicator. While GFP/OFP- or GFP/RFP-based cameleons have been successfully used to study cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ signals, red-shifted cameleons to visualize Ca2+ dynamics of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER have not been developed so far. In this study, we generated and tested several ER targeted red-shifted cameleons. Our results show that GFP/OFP-based cameleons due to miss-targeting and their high Ca2+ binding affinity are inappropriate to record ER Ca2+ signals. However, ER targeted GFP/RFP-based probes were suitable to sense ER Ca2+ in a reliable manner. With this study we increased the palette of cameleons for visualizing Ca2+ dynamics within the main intracellular Ca2+ store.

  18. Modulation of Neural Network Activity through Single Cell Ablation: An in Vitro Model of Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Bisio, Marta; Palazzolo, Gemma; Chiappalone, Michela; Bonifazi, Paolo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The technological advancement of optical approaches, and the growth of their applications in neuroscience, has allowed investigations of the physio-pathology of neural networks at a single cell level. Therefore, better understanding the role of single neurons in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative conditions has resulted in a strong demand for surgical tools operating with single cell resolution. Optical systems already provide subcellular resolution to monitor and manipulate living tissues, and thus allow understanding the potentiality of surgery actuated at single cell level. In the present work, we report an in vitro experimental model of minimally invasive surgery applied on neuronal cultures expressing a genetically encoded calcium sensor. The experimental protocol entails the continuous monitoring of the network activity before and after the ablation of a single neuron, to provide a robust evaluation of the induced changes in the network activity. We report that in subpopulations of about 1000 neurons, even the ablation of a single unit produces a reduction of the overall network activity. The reported protocol represents a simple and cost effective model to study the efficacy of single-cell surgery, and it could represent a test-bed to study surgical procedures circumventing the abrupt and complete tissue removal in pathological conditions. PMID:27527143

  19. Elongation factor-P at the crossroads of the host-endosymbiont interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Rajkovic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elongation factor P (EF-P is an ancient bacterial translational factor that aids the ribosome in polymerizing oligo-prolines. EF-P structurally resembles tRNA and binds in-between the exit and peptidyl sites of the ribosome to accelerate the intrinsically slow reaction of peptidyl-prolyl bond formation. Recent studies have identified in separate organisms, two evolutionarily convergent EF-P posttranslational modification systems (EPMS, split predominantly between gammaproteobacteria, and betaproteobacteria. In both cases EF-P receives a post-translational modification, critical for its function, on a highly conserved residue that protrudes into the peptidyl-transfer center of the ribosome. EPMSs are comprised of a gene(s that synthesizes the precursor molecule used in modifying EF-P, and a gene(s encoding an enzyme that reacts with the precursor molecule to catalyze covalent attachment to EF-P. However, not all organisms genetically encode a complete EPMS. For instance, some symbiotic bacteria harbor efp and the corresponding gene that enzymatically attaches the modification, but lack the ability to synthesize the substrate used in the modification reaction. Here we highlight the recent discoveries made regarding EPMSs, with a focus on how these incomplete modification pathways shape or have been shaped by the endosymbiont-host relationship.

  20. Serum Albumin Stimulates Protein Kinase G-dependent Microneme Secretion in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin M; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L David

    2016-04-29

    Microneme secretion is essential for motility, invasion, and egress in apicomplexan parasites. Although previous studies indicate that Ca(2+) and cGMP control microneme secretion, little is known about how these pathways are naturally activated. Here we have developed genetically encoded indicators for Ca(2+) and microneme secretion to better define the signaling pathways that regulate these processes in Toxoplasma gondii We found that microneme secretion was triggered in vitro by exposure to a single host protein, serum albumin. The natural agonist serum albumin induced microneme secretion in a protein kinase G-dependent manner that correlated with increased cGMP levels. Surprisingly, serum albumin acted independently of elevated Ca(2+) and yet it was augmented by artificial agonists that raise Ca(2+), such as ethanol. Furthermore, although ethanol elevated intracellular Ca(2+), it alone was unable to trigger secretion without the presence of serum or serum albumin. This dichotomy was recapitulated by zaprinast, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that elevated cGMP and separately increased Ca(2+) in a protein kinase G-independent manner leading to microneme secretion. Taken together, these findings reveal that microneme secretion is centrally controlled by protein kinase G and that this pathway is further augmented by elevation of intracellular Ca(2.) PMID:26933037