WorldWideScience

Sample records for australis root secreted

  1. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonising roots and root nodules of New Zealand kauri Agathis australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Mahajabeen; Johansen, Renee B; Stuckey, S Alexander; Williams, Stephen E; Hooker, John E; Burns, Bruce R; Bellgard, Stanley E

    2016-05-01

    As the only endemic member in New Zealand of the ancient conifer family, Araucariaceae, Agathis australis is an ideal species to study putatively long-evolved mycorrhizal symbioses. However, little is known about A. australis root and nodular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and how mycorrhizal colonisation occurs. We used light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to characterise colonisation, and 454-sequencing to identify the AMF associated with A. australis roots and nodules. We interpreted the results in terms of the edaphic characteristics of the A. australis-influenced ecosystem. Representatives of five families of Glomeromycota were identified via high-throughput pyrosequencing. Imaging studies showed that there is abundant, but not ubiquitous, colonisation of nodules, which suggests that nodules are mostly colonised by horizontal transmission. Roots were also found to harbour AMF. This study is the first to demonstrate the multiple Glomeromycota lineages associated with A. australis including some that may not have been previously detected. PMID:27109376

  2. Influence of season and salinity on the exudation of aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs) by Phragmites australis and Halimione portulacoides roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere. This phenomenon occurs for several purposes, for instance, the detoxification of pollutants. Nevertheless, knowledge about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots is still scarce. This work aimed at studying: 1) the ability of marsh plants, freshly collected in estuarine marshes, to liberate ALMWOAs into the surrounding medium and 2) the influence of the physiological cycle of these plants on the exudation of those substances. In vitro experiments were carried out, in different seasons, with Phragmites australis and Halimione portulacoides (two marsh plants widely distributed in Europe). Root exudates were collected in freshwater to which plant specimens, in different physiological stages, were exposed. Both marsh plants were capable of liberating oxalic and citric acids into the surrounding medium. Formic acid was also released by P. australis roots and acetic acid by H. portulacoides. There was a seasonal effect on the liberation of ALMWOAs by both plant roots. Marked changes were registered in the nature and levels of the ALMWOAs liberated and such changes depended upon the season in which the specimens were collected. In growing season, a significantly higher liberation of oxalic and citric acids (and acetic acid but only in H. portulacoides case) was observed. For P. australis, formic acid was only found in the decaying stage (autumn and winter). The nature of the medium (in particular, salinity) was a feature conditioning the exudation of ALMWOAs. Both plants were shown to contribute for the presence of ALMWOAs in marsh rhizosediments (some ALMWOAs were found in pore waters extracted). The nature and extent of this contribution will be however dependent upon plants' physiological stage, in addition to plant species. Therefore, these features should be taken into consideration in the event of

  3. Archaeal communities associated with roots of the common reed (Phragmites australis) in Beijing Cuihu Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Li, Hong; Liu, Qun Fang; Li, Yan Hong

    2015-05-01

    The richness, phylogeny and composition of archaeal community associated with the roots of common reed (Phragmites australis) growing in the Beijing Cuihu Wetland, China was investigated using a 16S rDNA library. In total, 235 individual sequences were collected, and a phylogenetic analysis revealed that 69.4 and 11.5 % of clones were affiliated with the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, respectively. In Euryarchaeota, the archaeal community was dominated by species in following genera: Methanobacterium in the order Methanobacteriales (60.7 %); Methanoregula and Methanospirillum in the order Methanomicrobiales (20.2 %), and Methanomethylovorans, Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales (17.2 %). Of 27 sequences assigned to uncultured Crenarchaeota, 22 were grouped into Group 1.3, and five grouped into Group 1.1b. Hence, the archaeal communities associated with reed roots are largely involved in methane production, and, to a lesser extent, in ammonia oxidization. Quantification of the archaeal amoA gene indicated that ammonia oxidizing archaea were more numerous in the rhizosphere soil than in the root tissue or surrounding water. A total of 19.1 % of the sequences were unclassified, suggesting that many unidentified archaea are probably involved in the reed wetland ecosystem. PMID:25739566

  4. Root tip-dependent, active riboflavin secretion by Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots under iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Higa, Ataru; Miyamoto, Erika; Rahman, Laiq ur; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2008-01-01

    Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots with/without an exogenous gene (11 clones) were established by inoculation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. All clones cultured under iron deficient condition secreted riboflavin from root tips into the culture medium and the productivity depended on the number and size of root tips among the clones, although the addition of sucrose was essential for riboflavin production. A decline of pH was observed before riboflavin production and root development using either a ro...

  5. Root tip-dependent, active riboflavin secretion by Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots under iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Ataru; Miyamoto, Erika; ur Rahman, Laiq; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2008-04-01

    Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots with/without an exogenous gene (11 clones) were established by inoculation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. All clones cultured under iron-deficient condition secreted riboflavin from the root tips into the culture medium and the productivity depended on the number and size of root tips among the clones. A decline of pH was observed before riboflavin production and root development. By studying effects of proton-pump inhibitors, medium acidification with external organic acid, and riboflavin addition upon pH change and riboflavin productivity, we indicate that riboflavin efflux is not directly connected to active pH reduction, and more significantly active riboflavin secretion occurs as a response to an internal requirement in H. albus hairy roots under iron deficiency. PMID:18367404

  6. Functional role of bacteria from invasive Phragmites australis in promotion of host growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, M. A.; Li, H-Y; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Bergen, M.; Torres, M. S.; White, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that bacterial endophytes may enhance the competitiveness and invasiveness of Phragmites australis. To evaluate this hypothesis, endophytic bacteria were isolated from P. australis. The majority of the shoot meristem isolates represent species from phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. We chose one species from each phylum to characterize further and to conduct growth promotion experiments in Phragmites. Bacteria tested include Bacillus amyloliquefaciens A9a, Achromobacter spanius B1, and Microbacterium oxydans B2. Isolates were characterized for known growth promotional traits, including indole acetic acid (IAA) production, secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, phosphate solubilization, and antibiosis activity. Potentially defensive antimicrobial lipopeptides were assayed for through application of co-culturing experiments and mass spectrometer analysis. B. amyloliquefaciens A9a and M. oxydans B2 produced IAA. B. amyloliquefaciens A9a secreted antifungal lipopeptides. Capability to promote growth of P. australis under low nitrogen conditions was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. All three isolates were found to increase the growth of P. australis under low soil nitrogen conditions and showed increased absorption of isotopic nitrogen into plants. This suggests that the Phragmites microbes we evaluated most likely promote growth of Phragmites by enhanced scavenging of nitrogenous compounds from the rhizosphere and transfer to host roots. Collectively, our results support the hypothesis that endophytic bacteria play a role in enhancing growth of P. australis in natural populations. Gaining a better understanding of the precise contributions and mechanisms of endophytes in enabling P. australis to develop high densities rapidly could lead to new symbiosis-based strategies for management and control of the host.

  7. Functional Role of Bacteria from Invasive Phragmites australis in Promotion of Host Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, M A; Li, H-Y; Kowalski, K P; Bergen, M; Torres, M S; White, J F

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesize that bacterial endophytes may enhance the competitiveness and invasiveness of Phragmites australis. To evaluate this hypothesis, endophytic bacteria were isolated from P. australis. The majority of the shoot meristem isolates represent species from phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. We chose one species from each phylum to characterize further and to conduct growth promotion experiments in Phragmites. Bacteria tested include Bacillus amyloliquefaciens A9a, Achromobacter spanius B1, and Microbacterium oxydans B2. Isolates were characterized for known growth promotional traits, including indole acetic acid (IAA) production, secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, phosphate solubilization, and antibiosis activity. Potentially defensive antimicrobial lipopeptides were assayed for through application of co-culturing experiments and mass spectrometer analysis. B. amyloliquefaciens A9a and M. oxydans B2 produced IAA. B. amyloliquefaciens A9a secreted antifungal lipopeptides. Capability to promote growth of P. australis under low nitrogen conditions was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. All three isolates were found to increase the growth of P. australis under low soil nitrogen conditions and showed increased absorption of isotopic nitrogen into plants. This suggests that the Phragmites microbes we evaluated most likely promote growth of Phragmites by enhanced scavenging of nitrogenous compounds from the rhizosphere and transfer to host roots. Collectively, our results support the hypothesis that endophytic bacteria play a role in enhancing growth of P. australis in natural populations. Gaining a better understanding of the precise contributions and mechanisms of endophytes in enabling P. australis to develop high densities rapidly could lead to new symbiosis-based strategies for management and control of the host.

  8. Root secretion stimulating ash growth in larch-ash mixed forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊民; 刘广平; 王晓水; 吴保国

    2000-01-01

    Allelopathic effect of larch (Larix gmelini ) on the ash growth (Fraximus mandshurica) was studied in artificial cultivation tests. The results revealed that the larch root secretion obviously stimulated the ash growth. In order to determine the main stimulation allelochemicals, the chemical composition was analyzed. By contrasting the contents of carbohydrate and aminoacid in root secretion of larch and ash, it was concluded that the carbohydrate and aminoacid were not important stimulation allelochemicals. The organic acid and other components in root secretion of larch and ash were analyzed by GC and GC-MS analysis. The sand culture tests were carried out with selected model compounds. The results showed that benzeneacetic acid, benzenepropionic acid and phenolic acids in root secretion of larch were the main stimulation allelochemicals.

  9. Root border cells and secretions as critical elements in plant host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hawes, Martha

    2013-08-01

    Border cells and border-like cells are released from the root tip as individual cells and small aggregates, or as a group of attached cells. These are viable components of the root system that play a key role in controlling root interaction with living microbes of the rhizosphere. As their separation from root tip proceeds, the cells synthesize and secrete a hydrated mucilage that contains polysaccharides, secondary metabolites, antimicrobial proteins and extracellular DNA (exDNA). This exDNA-based matrix seems to function in root defense in a way similar to that of recently characterized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mammalian cells. This review discusses the role of the cells and secreted compounds in the protection of root tip against microbial infections.

  10. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  11. Dynamic change of organic acids secreted from wheat roots in Mn deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng FANG; Zhenfeng AN; Yingli LI

    2008-01-01

    Through solution culture experiment and liquid chromatogram technique, two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes with different tolerances to Mn deficiency were used to study the dynamic change of organic acids secreted from wheat root in the conditions of no Mn, low Mn and normal Mn supply. Nine kinds of organic acids were measured in wheat root exudate. The results showed that there were significant differences of organic acids in root exudate between tolerant genotype and susceptible genotype under Mn-stressed conditions. Tolerant genotype 9023 secreted more organic acids from the plant roots than susceptible genotype CM28. The main organic acid exudate included tartaric acid, malic acid, acetic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid. Of all these acids, the amounts of tartaric acid and malic acid in root exudate showed significant differences between the tolerant genotype and susceptible genotype under Mn-stressed conditions. The results also indicated that secreting organic acids into root rhizosphere was an active response to Mn deficiency for the tolerant genotype of wheat.

  12. Defective secretion of mucilage is the cellular basis for agravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Ageotropic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Root caps of primary, secondary, and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Kys secrete large amounts of mucilage and are in close contact with the root all along the root apex. These roots are strongly graviresponsive. Secondary and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are also strongly graviresponsive. Similarly, their caps secrete mucilage and closely appress the root all along the root apex. However, primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are non-responsive to gravity. Their caps secrete negligible amounts of mucilage and contact the root only at the extreme apex of the root along the calyptrogen. These roots become graviresponsive when their tips are coated with mucilage or mucilage-like materials. Peripheral cells of root caps of roots of Z. mays cv. Kys contain many dictyosomes associated with vesicles that migrate to and fuse with the plasmalemma. Root-cap cells of secondary and seminal (i.e. graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are similar to those of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Kys. However, root-cap cells of primary (i.e. non-graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic have distended dictyosomal cisternae filled with an electron-dense, granular material. Large vesicles full of this material populate the cells and apparently do not fuse with the plasmalemma. Taken together, these results suggest that non-graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic results from the lack of apoplastic continuity between the root and the periphery of the root cap. This is a result of negligible secretion of mucilage by cells along the edge of the root cap which, in turn, appears to be due to the malfunctioning of dictyosomes in these cells.

  13. Molecular farming in tobacco hairy roots by triggering the secretion of a pharmaceutical antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häkkinen, S.T.; Raven, N.; Henquet, M.G.L.; Laukkanen, M.L.; Anderlei, T.; Pitkänen, J.P.; Twyman, R.M.; Bosch, H.J.; Oksman-Caldentey, K.M.; Schillberg, S.; Ritala, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins expressed in hairy root cultures can be secreted into the medium to improve product homogeneity and to facilitate purification, although this may result in significant degradation if the protein is inherently unstable or particularly susceptible to proteases. To a

  14. Immobilization of aluminum with mucilage secreted by root cap and root border cells is related to aluminum resistance in Glycine max L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miaozhen; Wang, Ning; Xing, Chenghua; Wang, Fangmei; Wu, Kun; Du, Xing

    2013-12-01

    The root cap and root border cells (RBCs) of most plant species produced pectinaceous mucilage, which can bind metal cations. In order to evaluate the potential role of root mucilage on aluminum (Al) resistance, two soybean cultivars differing in Al resistance were aeroponic cultured, the effects of Al on root mucilage secretion, root growth, contents of mucilage-bound Al and root tip Al, and the capability of mucilage to bind Al were investigated. Increasing Al concentration and exposure time significantly enhanced mucilage excretion from both root caps and RBCs, decreased RBCs viability and relative root elongation except roots exposed to 400 μM Al for 48 h in Al-resistant cultivar. Removal of root mucilage from root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation. Of the total Al accumulated in root, mucilage accounted 48-72 and 12-27 %, while root tip accounted 22-52 and 73-88 % in Al-resistant and Al-sensitive cultivars, respectively. A (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the Al-adsorbed mucilage showed Al tightly bound to mucilage. Higher capacity to exclude Al in Al-resistant soybean cultivar is related to the immobilization and detoxification of Al by the mucilage secreted from root cap and RBCs.

  15. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia-Meng; Lou, He-Qiang; Xiao, Chuan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al) stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA) and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La) nor cadmium chloride (Cd) induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27144562

  16. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La nor cadmium chloride (Cd induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms.

  17. Physiological and Molecular Analysis of Aluminium-Induced Organic Acid Anion Secretion from Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia-Meng; Lou, He-Qiang; Xiao, Chuan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jian-Li

    2016-04-30

    Grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) is abundant in oxalate and can secrete oxalate under aluminium (Al) stress. However, the features of Al-induced secretion of organic acid anions (OA) and potential genes responsible for OA secretion are poorly understood. Here, Al-induced OA secretion in grain amaranth roots was characterized by ion charomatography and enzymology methods, and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) together with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to identify up-regulated genes that are potentially involved in OA secretion. The results showed that grain amaranth roots secrete both oxalate and citrate in response to Al stress. The secretion pattern, however, differs between oxalate and citrate. Neither lanthanum chloride (La) nor cadmium chloride (Cd) induced OA secretion. A total of 84 genes were identified as up-regulated by Al, in which six genes were considered as being potentially involved in OA secretion. The expression pattern of a gene belonging to multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, AhMATE1, was in close agreement with that of citrate secretion. The expression of a gene encoding tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter and four genes encoding ATP-binding cassette transporters was differentially regulated by Al stress, but the expression pattern was not correlated well with that of oxalate secretion. Our results not only reveal the secretion pattern of oxalate and citrate from grain amaranth roots under Al stress, but also provide some genetic information that will be useful for further characterization of genes involved in Al toxicity and tolerance mechanisms.

  18. Australis: Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, S.H.; Niklaus, T.R.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    The first stage of the development of AUSTRALIS, a microbeam AMS system at the HIGF laboratory at North Ryde, Sydney has been completed. The system is designed to enable in-situ microanalysis of geological samples for ultra-traces and for isotopic data for minerals exploration research. The negative ions for analysis are produced by sputtering with a microbeam of Cs{sup +}from a modified General Ionex model 834 HICONEX ion source. The source features a novel intermediate or `screen` electrode to correct for the effect of the secondary ion extraction field on the trajectory of the primary beam,in order to bring the primary beam to the geometric centre. The high energy analysis system of AUSTRALIS features a pair of deflector systems to permit fast switching of isotopes without altering the magnet setting. The paper describes the initial tests` results showing good agreement with the design parameters. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Phragmites australis response to Cu in terms of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) exudation: Influence of the physiological cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere for several purposes, including in response to metal contamination. Despite this, little is yet known about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots in response to metal exposure. This work aimed at assessing the influence of the physiological cycle of marsh plants on the exudation of ALMWOAs in response to Cu contamination. In vitro experiments were carried out with Phragmites australis specimens, collected in different seasons. Plant roots were exposed to freshwater contaminated with two different Cu concentrations (67 μg/L and 6.9 mg/L), being the ALMWOAs released by the roots measured. Significant differences (both qualitative and quantitative) were observed during the Phragmites australis life cycle. At growing stage, Cu stimulated the exudation of oxalic and formic acids but no significant stimulation was observed for citric acid. At developing stage, exposure to Cu caused inhibition of oxalic acid exudation whereas citric acid liberation was stimulated but only in the media spiked with the lowest Cu concentration tested. At the decaying stage, no significant variation on oxalic acid was observed, whereas the citric and formic acids release increased as a consequence of the plant exposure to Cu. The physiological cycle of Phragmites australis, and probably also of other marsh plants, is therefore an important feature conditioning plants response to Cu contamination, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation. Hence this aspect should be considered when conducting studies on rhizodeposition involving marsh plants exposed to metals and in the event of using marsh plants for phytoremediation purposes in contaminated estuarine areas.

  20. Effects of elevated selenium and salinity concentrations in root zone on selenium and salt secretion in saltgrass (Distichlis spicata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Enberg, A W; Guo, X

    1997-08-01

    The effects of elevated selenium (Se) and salinity concentrations in the root zone on Se and salt secretion and accumulation were studied for an inland (Kesterson) and a coastal (Bodega Bay) saltgrass in sand culture and under greenhouse conditions. The results of this study indicate that the secretory mechanism of the saltgrass exhibits high ion specificity. Plants of both ecotypes were more efficient at Cl- and Na+ secretion than at SO4(2-) and Se secretion, suggesting that the saltgrass secretion mechanism is adapted primarily to saline environments high in NaCl. The saltgrass plants of the Kesterson ecotype secreted more Se than the Bodega Bay plants when treated with Se alone. However, the Bodega Bay plants secreted more Se than the Kesterson plants when the plants were treated with Se+NaCl. These differences reflect a ecotypical difference in which the Kesterson plants are more adaptive to the seleniferous soil, and the Bodega Bay plants are more adaptive to a coastal saline soil high in NaCl. Sulfate availability inhibited both Se accumulation and Se secretion in the plants of both ecotypes by approximately 98%. Ion secretion molar ratios of Na:Cl were calculated and the results suggest that Na+ secretion is dependent on the availability of Cl-. Selenium was taken up by plants with little discrimination, and thus it may be regarded as a master of chemical mimicry sharing similar physical and chemical properties with sulfur (S). Selenium and salt accumulation indices and secretion efficiency indices were calculated and found that the accumulation indices were higher for Se than for S, suggesting that Se uptake may be more passive and less regulated by active transport than S. Secretion efficiency was much higher for Na+ and Cl- than for Se and SO4(2-), but the efficiency indices between ecotypes were comparable, suggesting that the secretion mechanism in this species is designed mainly for adaptation of high NaCl concentrations. About 85% of the secreted Se

  1. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  2. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  3. The role of VuMATE1 expression in aluminium-inducible citrate secretion in rice bean (Vigna umbellata) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei Ya; Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium (Al)-activated citrate secretion plays an important role in Al resistance in a number of plant species, such as rice bean (Vigna umbellata). This study further characterized the regulation of VuMATE1, an aluminium-activated citrate transporter. Al stress induced VuMATE1 expression, followed by the secretion of citrate. Citrate secretion was specific to Al stress, whereas VuMATE1 expression was not, which could be explained by a combined regulation of VuMATE1 expression and Al-specific activation of VuMATE1 protein. Pre-treatment with a protein translation inhibitor suppressed VuMATE1 expression, indicating that de novo biosynthesis of proteins is required for gene expression. Furthermore, post-treatment with a protein translation inhibitor inhibited citrate secretion, indicating that post-transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 is critical for citrate secretion. Protein kinase and phosphatase inhibitor studies showed that reversible phosphorylation was important not only for transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 expression but also for post-translational regulation of VuMATE1 protein activity. These results suggest that citrate secretion is dependent on both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1. Additionally, VuMATE1 promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion lines revealed that VuMATE1 expression was restricted to the root apex and was entirely Al induced, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements regulating root tip-specific and Al-inducible gene expression, which will be an important resource for genetic improvement of plant Al resistance.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from root cultures of pokeweed and its mechanism of secretion from roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Wook; Lawrence, Christopher B; Linden, James C; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2002-09-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins are N-glycosidases that remove a specific adenine from the sarcin/ricin loop of the large rRNA, thus arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. In the present study, a novel type I ribosome-inactivating protein, termed PAP-H, was purified from Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed hairy roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana). The protein was purified by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography. PAP-H has a molecular mass of 29.5 kD as detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its isoelectric point was determined to be 7.8. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ribosomes incubated with PAP-H released the 360-nucleotide diagnostic fragment from the 26S rRNA upon aniline treatment, an indication of its ribosome-inactivating activity. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, PAP-H was found to be located in the cell walls of hairy roots and root border cells. PAP-H was determined to be constitutively secreted as part of the root exudates, with its secretion enhanced by a mechanism mediated by ethylene induction. Purified PAP-H did not show in vitro antifungal activity against soil-borne fungi. In contrast, root exudates containing PAP-H as well as additional chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, and protease activities did inhibit the growth of soil-borne fungi. We found that PAP-H depurinates fungal ribosomes in vitro and in vivo, suggesting an additive mechanism that enables PAP-H to penetrate fungal cells.

  5. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings secrete proteases from the roots and, after protein addition, grow well on medium without inorganic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, B; Godlewski, M; Zimny, J; Zimny, A

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on the role of proteases secreted by roots in nitrogen capture by plants. The study was conducted on aseptically cultivated wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum cv. Tacher) obtained from embryos isolated from grains. Seedlings were cultivated for 21 days on deionised water, Murashige Skoog medium (MS), MS without inorganic nitrogen (IN), and MS without IN, in which IN was replaced by casein (0.01%, 0.1% or 1%). Comparison of seedlings grown on these media showed that casein entirely compensated for the lack of inorganic nitrogen in the medium. Shoots and roots of seedlings cultivated on MS medium with this protein had higher fresh weight than those cultivated on MS medium without casein. The increase in fresh weight of seedlings was correlated with casein concentration and proteolytic activity in the medium. In conclusion, wheat that uses proteases secreted by the roots can directly utilise proteins in the medium as a source of nitrogen without prior digestion by microbial proteases and without protein mineralisation. These results suggest the important role of organic nitrogen fertilisers in increasing wheat yield. PMID:18950429

  6. Secretion activity of white lupin’s cluster roots influences bacterial abundance, function and community structure

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Laure; Fromin, Nathalie; Tomasi, Nicola; Aragno, Michel; Martinoia, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L. cv. Amiga) reacts to phosphate deficiency by producing cluster roots which exude large amounts of organic acids. The detailed knowledge of the excretion physiology of the different root parts makes it a good model plant to study plant-bacteria interaction. Since the effect of the organic acid exudation by cluster roots on the rhizosphere microflora is still poorly understood, we investigated the abundance, diversity and functions of bacteria associated with the c...

  7. Heavy metals in sediments and their bioaccumulation in Phragmites australis in the Anzali wetland of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Marjan; Karbassi, Abdolreza; Moattar, Faramarz

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of metals in both sediments and Phragmites australis organs was studied. Samples were collected from seven stations located in Anzali wetland, Iran. The samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results showed that concentration of the studied metals (except As and Cd) were higher in sediments than in P. australis organs. Metal accumulation was found to be significantly ( P <0.05) higher in roots than in above-ground organs of P. australis. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) and the transfer factor (TF) also verified the highest rate of metal accumulation in roots and their reduced mobility from roots to the above-ground organs. Pearson correlation coefficient showed significant relationships between metal concentrations in sediments and those in plant organs. It should be pointed out that sediment and plant samples exhibited higher metal concentrations in eastern and central parts than in western and southern parts of the wetland. The mean concentrations of all studied elements (except for Fe, V and Al) were higher in these sediment samples than in the Earth's crust and shale. High accumulation of metals in P. australis organs (roots and shoots) is indicative of their high bioavailability in sediments of the wetland. The correlation between metal concentrations in sediments and in P. australis indicates that plant organs are good bioindicators of metal pollution in sediments of Anzali wetland.

  8. Studies on the secretion of maize root-cap slime. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoradiography was used to localize the sites of incorporation of L-[3H]fucose into root tips of maize (Zea mays L. cv. S.X. 17). By light microscopy, accumulation of label from [3H]fucose could be seen in the peripheral cells of the root cap. Extraction of sections prepared by freeze-substitution showed that most of the label in the cytoplasm of peripheral root-cap cells is water-soluble whereas label associated with the wall is sodium-hydroxide-soluble. In the electron microscope, glutaraldehyde-fixed peripheral cells of maize root caps are characterized by the presence of numerous dictyosomes and vesicles. The distended dictyosome cisternae and vesicles have large deposits of silver after staining with periodic acid-silver methanamine. An accumulation of material similar to that found in dictyosomes and vesicles is observed between the cell membrane and wall in glutaraldehyde-formaldehyde-fixed tissue. At the electron-microscope level label in peripheral root cap cells incubated in [3H]fucose for periods from 10 to 120 min was found primarily over dictyosomes and vesicles. In pulse-chase experiments label was chased from the diclyosomes and vesicles to the exterior of the cell in 20-30 min. Less than 19% of the label in pulse-chase experiments was associated with organelles other than dictyosomes vesicles. (orig.)

  9. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by Phragmites australis cultivated in synthesized substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG He; JIA Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals from various oxides with adsorbed cadmium by wetland plant Phragmites australis was studied to evaluate the fate of heavy metals in the sediment of constructed wetlands.Hoagland solution Was used as nutrition supply,and single metal oxide with adsorbed cadmium was applied as contaminant to study the accumulation characteristics of cadmium and the substrate metals by P. australis.After 45-d treatment,the bioaccumulation degree in root followed the order:Al(OH)3>Al2O3>Fe3O4>MnO2 >FeOOH.Heavy metals absorbed by P. australis were largely immobilized by the roots with little translocation to aboveground Darts.

  10. Increased de novo riboflavin synthesis and hydrolysis of FMN are involved in riboflavin secretion from Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots under iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Higa, Ataru; Khandakar, Jebunnahar; MORI, Yuko; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin secretion by Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots under Fe deficiency was examined to determine where riboflavin is produced and whether production occurs via an enhancement of riboflavin biosynthesis or a stimulation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) hydrolysis. Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed that riboflavin was mainly localized in the epidermis and cortex of the root tip and, at the cellular level, in the apoplast. The expressions of three genes involved in the de novo biosynthesis ...

  11. [Effects of Cuscuta australis parasitism on the growth, reproduction and defense of Solidago canadensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bei-fen; Du, Le-shan; Li, Jun-min

    2015-11-01

    In order to find out how parasitic Cuscuta australis influences the growth and reproduction of Solidago canadensis, the effects of the parasitism of C. australis on the morphological, growth and reproductive traits of S. canadensis were examined and the relationships between the biomass and the contents of the secondary metabolites were analyzed. The results showed that the parasitism significantly reduced the plant height, basal diameter, root length, root diameter, root biomass, stem biomass, leaf biomass, total biomass, number of inflorescences branches, axis length of inflorescence, and number of inflorescence. In particular, plant height, number of inflorescence and the stem biomass of parasitized S. canadensis were only 1/2, 1/5 and 1/8 of non-parasitized plants, respectively. There was no significant difference of plant height, root length, stem biomass and total biomass between plants parasitized with high and low intensities. But the basal diameter, root volume, leaf biomass, root biomass, the number of inflorescences branches, axis length of inflorescence and number of inflorescence of S. canadensis parasitized with high intensity were significantly lower than those of plants parasitized with low intensity. The parasitism of C. australis significantly increased the tannins content in the root and the flavonoids content in the stem of S. canadensis. The biomass of S. canadensis was significantly negatively correlated with the tannin content in the root and the flavonoids content in the stem. These results indicated that the parasitism of C. australis could inhibit the growth of S. canadensis by changing the resources allocation patterns as well as reducing the resources obtained by S. canadensis.

  12. Effect of Asiasarum Root Extract and Its Constituents on Interleukin-1β-Stimulated Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Secretion from Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futamura-Masuda, Megumi; Yokota-Honda, Mami; Anraku, Takuya; Nakanishi, Kanae; Murata, Kazuya; Shinada, Tetsuro; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Asiasarum root (roots and rhizome of Asiasarum sieboldii or A. heterotropoides var. mandshuricum) has been frequently used in traditional Chinese medicinal formulas for the management of oral malodor syndrome caused by periodontal disease. However, there are no scientific reports concerning these effects and the mechanism of action. The objective of this study was to examine the inhibitory effects of Asiasarum root and its constituents on oral malodor syndrome and periodontal disease. A 50% ethanolic extract of Asiasarum root (AR-ext) showed L-methionine γ-lyase (METase) inhibitory activity at a concentration of 200 µg/mL, and inhibited interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 secretion from human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at a concentration of 10 and 50 µg/mL without cytotoxic effects. Activity-guided fractionation of the AR-ext suggested that METase inhibitory activity was attributable to a mixture of linoleic and oleic acid, because these unsaturated fatty acids showed weak METase inhibitory activities. Similar fractionation using MMP-1 secretion inhibitory activity led to the isolation of two unsaturated fatty acid amides, (2E,4E,8Z,10E)-N-(2-methylpropyl)dodeca-2,4,8,10-tetraenamide (1) and (2E,4E,8Z,10Z)-N-(2-methylpropyl)dodeca-2,4,8,10-tetraenamide (2), as active constituents with inhibitory activity on MMP-1 secretion from HGFs. To elucidate the inhibition mechanism on MMP-1 secretion, the effect of 2 on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was examined. Western blotting analysis revealed that 2 (10 µM) reduced the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase. These results suggested that 2 suppresses intracellular MMP-1 expression and MMP-1 secretion from IL-1β-stimulated HGFs by down-regulation of MAPK phosphorylation. PMID:27150151

  13. Predicting Invasion Rates for Phragmites australis

    OpenAIRE

    Nydegger, Rachel; Duncan, Jacob; Powell, James A.

    2015-01-01

    In wetlands of Utah and southern Idaho as well as estuaries of the east coast, the ten-foot tall invasive grass Phragmites australis can be found near waterways, where it outcompetes native plants and degrades wildlife habitat. Phragmites australis is an obligate out-crossing plant that can spread sexually through seed disper- sal, or asexually via stolons and rhi- zomes (Kettenring and Mock 2012). Small patches are usually a single genetic individual, spreading vegetatively (and slowly) via ...

  14. Seasonal changes in metal accumulation and distribution in the organs of Phragmites australis (common reed from Lake Skadar, Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastratović Vlatko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to accumulate metals, availability throughout the year and its large biomass, Phragmites australis (common reed is suitable for biomonitoring studies for the evaluation of load level of water ecosystem with trace metals. The heavy metals concentration in P.australis tissue can be several ten to several thousand times higher than those in the surrounding water. In this study we examined the content of heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Sr and V in sediment, water and different organs of Phragmites australis collected from Lake Skadar, Montenegro, during different seasons of the year 2011. The highest concentrations of Sr were found in the leaves, while the other studied metals showed their highest concentrations in the roots. Thus, P. australis is considered a root bioaccumulation species. For most metals the concentration in roots and stems increases over time until the end of the growing season, and then decreases, while the concentration in leaves increases even after the growing season of the plant. If P. australis is used for phytoremediation purposes, then it should be harvested after the growing season because then the concentration of metals in the aboveground parts is maximal.

  15. Differences in salinity tolerance of genetically distinct Phragmites australis clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Luciana; Eller, Franziska; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Brix, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Different clones of the wetland grass Phragmites australis differ in their morphology and physiology, and hence in their ability to cope with environmental stress. We analysed the responses of 15 P. australis clones with distinct ploidy levels (PLs) (4n, 6n, 8n, 10n, 12n) and geographic origins (Romania, Russia, Japan, Czech Republic, Australia) to step-wise increased salinity (8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 56 and 72 ppt). Shoot elongation rate, photosynthesis and plant part-specific ion accumulation were studied in order to assess if traits associated with salinity tolerance can be related to the genetic background and the geographic origin of the clones. Salt stress affected all clones, but at different rates. The maximum height was reduced from 1860 mm in control plants to 660 mm at 40 ppt salinity. The shoot elongation rate of salt-exposed plants varied significantly between clones until 40 ppt salinity. The light-saturated photosynthesis rate (Pmax) was stimulated by a salinity of 8 ppt, but decreased significantly at higher salinities. The stomatal conductance (gs) and the transpiration rate (E) decreased with increasing salinity. Only three clones survived at 72 ppt salinity, although their rates of photosynthesis were strongly inhibited. The roots and basal leaves of the salt-exposed plants accumulated high concentrations of water-extractable Na+ (1646 and 1004 µmol g−1 dry mass (DM), respectively) and Cl− (1876 and 1400 µmol g−1 DM, respectively). The concentrations of water-extractable Mg2+ and Ca2+ were reduced in salt-exposed plants compared with controls. The variation of all the measured parameters was higher among clones than among PLs. We conclude that the salinity tolerance of distinct P. australis clones varies widely and can be partially attributed to their longitudinal geographic origin, but not to PL. Further investigation will help in improving the understanding of this species' salt tolerance mechanisms and their connection to genetic factors.

  16. Non-targeted profiling of semi-polar metabolites in Arabidopsis root exudates uncovers a role for coumarin secretion and lignification during the local response to phosphate limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Jörg; Schmidt, Stephan; Chutia, Ranju; Müller, Jens; Böttcher, Christoph; Strehmel, Nadine; Scheel, Dierk; Abel, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Plants have evolved two major strategies to cope with phosphate (Pi) limitation. The systemic response, mainly comprising increased Pi uptake and metabolic adjustments for more efficient Pi use, and the local response, enabling plants to explore Pi-rich soil patches by reorganization of the root system architecture. Unlike previous reports, this study focused on root exudation controlled by the local response to Pi deficiency. To approach this, a hydroponic system separating the local and systemic responses was developed. Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes exhibiting distinct sensitivities to Pi deficiency could be clearly distinguished by their root exudate composition as determined by non-targeted reversed-phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolite profiling. Compared with wild-type plants or insensitive low phosphate root 1 and 2 (lpr1 lpr2) double mutant plants, the hypersensitive phosphate deficiency response 2 (pdr2) mutant exhibited a reduced number of differential features in root exudates after Pi starvation, suggesting the involvement of PDR2-encoded P5-type ATPase in root exudation. Identification and analysis of coumarins revealed common and antagonistic regulatory pathways between Pi and Fe deficiency-induced coumarin secretion. The accumulation of oligolignols in root exudates after Pi deficiency was inversely correlated with Pi starvation-induced lignification at the root tips. The strongest oligolignol accumulation in root exudates was observed for the insensitive lpr1 lpr2 double mutant, which was accompanied by the absence of Pi deficiency-induced lignin deposition, suggesting a role of LPR ferroxidases in lignin polymerization during Pi starvation. PMID:26685189

  17. Hybrid origins and F1 dominance in the free-floating, sterile bladderwort, Utricularia australis f. australis (Lentibulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Yoshiaki; Toyama, Masahiro; Ohara, Masashi

    2005-03-01

    Abandonment of sexual reproduction is a well-known characteristic in aquatic plants, while the causes, levels, and consequences of sterility are often unknown. Utricularia australis f. australis (Lentibulariaceae) is a free-floating, sterile bladderwort distributed widely in temperate and tropical regions. Experimental crosses in cultivated conditions, AFLP analysis, and cpDNA haplotypes of natural populations clearly demonstrated that U. australis f. australis originates from the asymmetric hybridization between two parental taxa: U. australis f. tenuicaulis (mostly as female) and U. macrorhiza (mostly as male). No post-F(1) hybrids were detected using the additive patterns of AFLP bands combined with the observation of extensive sterility in U. australis f. australis. Recurrent hybridizations and subsequent perpetuation by asexual reproduction were demonstrated by the unique, but monomorphic, AFLP genotypes observed in each U. australis f. australis population. Hybrids and parental species did not coexist, implying the superiority of the hybrid U. australis f. australis in certain environmental conditions. It remains unclear whether populations of U. australis f. australis are maintained by colonizing propagules or as relicts of past hybridization events. PMID:21652424

  18. Evaluating the phytoremediation potential of Phragmites australis grown in pentachlorophenol and cadmium co-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechmi, Nejla; Aissa, Nadhira Ben; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2014-01-01

    Pot-culture experiments were conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation potential of a wetland plant species, Phragmites australis in cadmium (Cd) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) co-contaminated soil under glasshouse conditions for 70 days. The treatments included Cd (0, 5 and 50 mg kg(-1)) without or with PCP (50 and 250 mg kg(-1)). The results showed that growth of P. australis was significantly influenced by interaction of Cd and PCP, decreasing with either Cd or PCP additions. Plant biomass was inhibited and reduced by the rate of 89 and 92% in the low and high Cd treatments and by 20 and 40% in the low and high PCP treatments compared to the control. The mixture of low Cd and low PCP lessened Cd toxicity to plants, resulting in improved plant growth (by 144%). Under the joint stress of the two contaminants, the ability of Cd uptake and translocation by P. australis was weak, and the BF and TF values were inferior to 1.0. A low proportion of the metal is found aboveground in comparison to roots, indicating a restriction on transport upwards and an excluding effect on Cd uptake. Thus, P. australis cannot be useful for phytoextraction. The removal rate of PCP increased significantly (70%) in planted soil. Significant positive correlations were found between the DHA and the removal of PCP in planted soils which implied that plant root exudates promote the rhizosphere microorganisms and enzyme activity, thereby improving biodegradation of PCP. Based on results, P. australis cannot be effective for phytoremediation of soil co-contaminated with Cd and PCP. Further, high levels of pollutant hamper and eventually inhibit plant growth. Therefore, developing supplementary methods (e.g. exploring the partnership of plant-microbe) for either enhancing (phytoextraction) or reducing the bioavailability of contaminants in the rhizosphere (phytostabilization) as well as plant growth promoting could significantly improve the process of phytoremediation in co-contaminated soil.

  19. Auxin secretion by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 both stimulates root exudation and limits phosphorus uptake in Triticum aestivum

    OpenAIRE

    Talboys, Peter J.; Owen, Darren W; Healey, John R; Withers, Paul JA; Jones, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of auxin-producing rhizosphere bacteria as agricultural products promises increased root production and therefore greater phosphate (Pi) uptake. Whilst such bacteria promote root production in vitro, the nature of the bacteria-plant interaction in live soil, particularly concerning any effects on nutrient uptake, are not known. This study uses Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, an auxin-producing rhizobacterium, as a dressing on Triticum aestivum seeds. It then examines the ...

  20. 铝胁迫下黑麦和小麦根尖分泌有机酸的研究%Secretion of organic acids from root apices under Al stress in rye and wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴柳杰; 张永先; 凌桂芝; 黎晓峰

    2014-01-01

    Secretion of organic acids from roots apices in rye and wheat were investigated by a system for in vivo root apex culture and micro-exudates collection,to elucidate the mechanisms for Al-induced secretion of organic acids.The results showed that Al (50,100,200,300 μmolL-1 AlCl3 )induced secretion of citrate and malate from rye root api-ces,while wheat root apices secreted malate alone in response to Al treatment.Malate was significantly secreted from root apices of rye and wheat after the treatment with Al for 3 h,and malate was secreted with a high secretion rate within 9 h treatment.There was a lag between the secretion of citrate and Al treatment in rye.At initial 3 h,Al failed to induce significantly secretion of citrate.On the other hand,the addiction of anion channel inhibitor A-9-C (20、60、100 μmolL-1 )to Al solution,the secretion of organic acids was significantly inhibited.However,the amount of or-ganic acids secreted elevated significantly after the exposure of root apices to Al solution with heterotrimeric G-protein agonist cholera toxin (50 ngmL-1 ).These results suggested that our system for in vivo root apex culture and mi-cro-exudates collection was a available tool for the studies on Al-induced secretion of organic acids,and organic acids were secreted from root apices of rye and wheat by anion channels in different patterns,while heterotrimeric G-protein may mediate the secretion of organic acids from root apices.%通过建立的活体根培养及微量根尖分泌物收集系统,对铝胁迫下黑麦和小麦根尖分泌的有机酸进行研究。结果表明:50、100、200、300μmolL-1 AlCl3处理后黑麦根尖分泌柠檬酸和苹果酸,而铝仅诱导小麦根尖分泌苹果酸。铝处理3 h 后,根尖分泌的苹果酸显著增加,并在9 h 内维持较高的分泌速率。铝诱导黑麦根尖分泌柠檬酸有明显的迟缓期,Al(300μmolL-1)处理后的最初3 h,根尖分泌的柠檬酸并不显著增加。在铝溶液中添

  1. Mycorrhizal compatibility and symbiotic reproduction of Gavilea australis, an endangered terrestrial orchid from south Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchia, Sebastián; Aranda-Rickert, Adriana; Flachsland, Eduardo; Terada, Graciela; Sede, Silvana

    2014-11-01

    Gavilea australis is a terrestrial orchid endemic from insular south Argentina and Chile. Meeting aspects of mycorrhizal fungi identity and compatibility in this orchid species is essential for propagation and conservation purposes. These knowledge represent also a first approach to elucidate the mycorrhizal specificity of this species. In order to evaluate both the mycorrhizal compatibility and the symbiotic seed germination of G. australis, we isolated and identified its root endophytic fungal strains as well as those from two sympatric species: Gavilea lutea and Codonorchis lessonii. In addition, we tested two other strains isolated from allopatric terrestrial orchid species from central Argentina. All fungal strains formed coilings and pelotons inside protocorms and promoted, at varying degrees, seed germination, and protocorm development until seedlings had two to three leaves. These results suggest a low mycorrhizal specificity of G. australis and contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of this orchid as well as of other sympatric Patagonian orchid species, all of them currently under serious risk of extinction.

  2. Accumulation, distribution and transformation of DDT and PCBs by Phragmites australis and Oryza sativa L.: II. Enzyme study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, W K; Wong, M H; Zhang, J

    2006-01-01

    Two wetland plant species, Phragmites australis and Oryza sativa, were grown in a glasshouse under hydroponics conditions. Enzyme extracts from different parts of the plants were used to determine the transformation rate of o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDT and PCBs. The organic pollutants were directly spiked into the enzyme extracts, and samples were collected every 30 min and analyzed with a GC-ECD. Root extracts of P. australis readily degraded and transformed DDT and some PCB congeners with a low degree of chlorination. In contrast, crude extracts of O. sativa showed no appreciable degradation or transformation of DDT or PCBs. Inhibition studies indicated that the degradation and transformation of both DDT and PCBs by P. australis enzymes were partly mediated by peroxidase and the plant P-450 system. PCBs with a high degree of chlorination were highly resistant to transformation or degradation by plant enzymes. Both wetland plant species accumulated substantial quantities of the persistent organic chemicals but had different degradation capacities. The enzyme systems in P. australis were much more effective that those in rice in the degradation and transformation of the organic pollutants. PMID:16547764

  3. Zinc isotopic fractionation in Phragmites australis in response to toxic levels of zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Caldelas, Cristina; Dong, Shuofei; Araus, José Luis; Jakob Weiss, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotope signatures of Zn have shown great promise in elucidating changes in uptake and translocation mechanisms of this metal in plants during environmental changes. Here this potential was tested by investigating the effect of high Zn concentrations on the isotopic fractionation patterns of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. Plants were grown for 40 d in a nutritive solution containing 3.2 μM (sufficient) or 2 mM (toxic) Zn. The Zn isotopic composition of roots, rhizomes, sho...

  4. Partitioning of heavy metals in the surface sediments of Quanzhou Bay wetland and its availability to Suaeda australis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate distributions of heavy metal pollution in Quanzhou Bay wetland, the total concentration and chemical partitioning of a number of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Hg) in sediments of three sampling sites of Quanzhou Bay wetland and their availability to Suaeda australis were analyzed. The Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) values reveal that the sediments of three sampling sites may all be considered as moderately contaminated for Pb and Zn, and all sediments might be strongly contaminated with cadmium. The partitioning analyses revealed the measured heavy metals in three sites are bound to the exchangeable fraction at lower concentrations. The measured metals in a considerable amount are bound to the reducible and oxidizable fractions, and a high proportion of the measured heavy metals were distributed in the residual fraction in the sediment samples. The concentrations of Cd in each chemical phase extracted from the sediments are above natural global background levels and should be further investigated because of its toxicity. Suaeda australis has different accumulation abilities for the measured heavy metals. For the root and stem, the bioaccumulation ability assessed by bioaccumulation factor (BA F) for the measured heavy metals follows the decreasing order as: Cu>Cr> Zn>Cd, Pb, Hg. In the leaf, stronger bioaccumulation ability for Hg is exhibited. The heavy metal concentrations in Suaeda australis roots have positive correlations with their available fractions, while the exchangeable fraction of Cu and Cd might have be more important to both mature plant roots and seedling roots uptake than other fractions; as for Cr, the oxidizable fraction might make a greater contribution to the plant root uptake; as for Zn, the reducible fraction might make so contribution; and for Pb, the oxidizable fraction might make a significant contribution to the mature plant root uptake, however, the exchangeable fraction might have a significant

  5. Evaluation of the functional roles of fungal endophytes of Phragmites australis from high saline and low saline habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marcos Antonio; Li, Hai-Yan; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Bergen, Marshall; Torres, Monica S.; White, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native Phragmites australis decreases biodiversity and produces dense stands in North America. We surveyed the endophyte communities in the stems, leaves and roots of collections of P. australis obtained from two sites with a low and high salt concentration to determine differences in endophyte composition and assess differences in functional roles of microbes in plants from both sites. We found differences in the abundance, richness and diversity of endophytes between the low saline collections (18 species distributed in phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Stramenopiles (Oomycota); from orders Dothideales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Eurotiales, Cantharellales and Pythiales; Shannon H = 2.639; Fisher alpha = 7.335) and high saline collections (15 species from phylum Ascomycota; belonging to orders Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Diaporthales, Xylariales and Dothideales; Shannon H = 2.289; Fisher alpha = 4.181). Peyronellaea glomerata, Phoma macrostoma and Alternaria tenuissima were species obtained from both sites. The high salt endophyte community showed higher resistance to zinc, mercury and salt stress compared to fungal species from the low salt site. These endophytes also showed a greater propensity for growth promotion of rice seedlings (a model species) under salt stress. The results of this study are consistent with the ‘habitat-adapted symbiosis hypothesis’ that holds that endophytic microbes may help plants adapt to extreme habitats. The capacity of P. australis to establish symbiotic relationships with diverse endophytic microbes that enhance its tolerance to abiotic stresses could be a factor that contributes to its invasiveness in saline environments. Targeting the symbiotic associates of P. australis could lead to more sustainable control of non-native P. australis.

  6. R Coronae Australis: A Cosmic Watercolour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This magnificent view of the region around the star R Coronae Australis was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. R Coronae Australis lies at the heart of a nearby star-forming region and is surrounded by a delicate bluish reflection nebula embedded in a huge dust cloud. The image reveals surprising new details in this dramatic area of sky. The star R Coronae Australis lies in one of the nearest and most spectacular star-forming regions. This portrait was taken by the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image is a combination of twelve separate pictures taken through red, green and blue filters. This image shows a section of sky that spans roughly the width of the full Moon. This is equivalent to about four light-years at the distance of the nebula, which is located some 420 light-years away in the small constellation of Corona Australis (the Southern Crown). The complex is named after the star R Coronae Australis, which lies at the centre of the image. It is one of several stars in this region that belong to the class of very young stars that vary in brightness and are still surrounded by the clouds of gas and dust from which they formed. The intense radiation given off by these hot young stars interacts with the gas surrounding them and is either reflected or re-emitted at a different wavelength. These complex processes, determined by the physics of the interstellar medium and the properties of the stars, are responsible for the magnificent colours of nebulae. The light blue nebulosity seen in this picture is mostly due to the reflection of starlight off small dust particles. The young stars in the R Coronae Australis complex are similar in mass to the Sun and do not emit enough ultraviolet light to ionise a substantial fraction of the surrounding hydrogen. This means that the cloud does not glow with the characteristic red colour seen in

  7. Phytoremediation potential of Phragmites australis in Hokersar wetland - a Ramsar site of Kashmir Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Shakeel; Reshi, Zafar A; Shah, Manzoor A; Rashid, Irfan; Ara, Roshan; Andrabi, Syed M A

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are an important class of pollutants with both lethal and sublethal effects on organisms. Wetlands are cheap natural alternatives for removal of heavy metals from soils; however, wetland plants vary greatly in their degree of metal uptake. Hokersar wetland, a Ramsar site of Kashmir Himalaya, India is a game reserve of international importance that provides suitable habitat for resident birds and an excellent stopover point for migratory birds visiting from Palaearctic breeding grounds in Central Asia, China, N-Europe and Siberia. The toxicity of chronic dietary metal exposure in birds may have adverse reproductive effects which include decreased egg production, decreased hatchability, and increased hatchling mortality. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the heavy metal sequestration capability of one of the most common wetland plant species Phragmites australis in Hokersar wetland. The accumulation of the different elements was in order of Al > Mn > Ba > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mo > Co > Cr > Cd > Ni. Translocation factor, i.e. ratio of shoot to root metal concentration revealed that metals were largely retained in the roots of P. australis, thus reducing the supply of metals to avifauna and preventing their bio-accumulation. PMID:24933910

  8. Diel methane emission patterns from Scirpus lacustris and Phragmites australis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, J.W.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Van Meteren, D.; Wielemaker, A.

    1998-01-01

    In mature Phragmites australis and Scirpus lacustris vegetated sediment methane was emitted almost exclusively by plant- mediated transport, whereas in unvegetated, but otherwise identical sediment, methane was emitted almost exclusively by ebullition. Diel variations in methane emission, with highe

  9. Research Ship Aurora Australis Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Research Ship Aurora Australis Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic...

  10. Feasibility of Treatment of the Waters of a Wadi Charged in Iron by Filters Planted of Macrophytes (Phragmites australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semadi Faten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The context is summarized by the presence of important Steel manufactory close to the wadi Meboudja and its effluents rejected into the wadi which contaminate the water used for irrigation by the local farmer. Approach: The goal is to determine the usefulness of Macrophytes (Phragmites australis to filter some specific industrial effluents (Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mn and Cr present into water of wadi Meboudja. The use of Reeds (Phragmites australis can be considered as a biologic and an economic solution to minimize the concentration of some industrial effluent, especially Iron which is highlighted in this article. An experimental device was built, and considered as pilot, formed of three basins plus reservoir. We use the water of Wadi to irrigate the "Phragmites australis" which are initially appropriated from Oubaiira Lake in a natural medium. Water and Reeds samples are selected for analyses. Results: Iron is found in important concentration compared to the other Elements Metal Traces (ETM. Such a variation seems to be directly related to the rate of industrial production, fluctuations of the climatic factors and the capacities of assimilation of the plants crop. It is essentially concentrated into the roots of Reeds compared to stems and leafs. For example, in one repetition we found difference between the exit sample and the entry one in basin-1of (60-23= 37 mg g-1 into roots. Conclusion: Plantation of Reeds (Phragmites australis seems a natural solution to reduce elements metal traces, in particularly Iron, into water of wadi Meboudja. Other analysis on the garden products of local farmers should be conducted in order to quantify possible hazards on the health of consumers.

  11. Spread and genetic relatedness of native vs. introduced Phragmites australis in Utah wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Utah is experiencing a dramatic invasion of an aggressive European subspecies of the common reed (Phragmites australis subsp. australis). This invasion is...

  12. Suitability of Using Phragmites australis and Tamarix aphylla as Vegetation Filters in Industrial Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa’a A. Al-Taisan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Many soils of different areas of the world are subjected to heavy metal pollution due to human activities especially the industry. These metals are hazardous to human health and could affect ecosystems. Toxic metal pollution in water and soil is a major environmental problem and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solution, hence the studies of reducing such effects were launched. Phytoremediation, popularly known as green clean is an ecologically recommended strategy for the removal of toxic contaminations from the environment by using plants. Approach: The present study is an attempt to assess the suitability of using two species namely: Phragmites australis and Ttamarix aphylla as vegetation filterers in an industrial area to reduce the danger of contamination of heavy metals in the environment. The studied species viz. Phragmites australis and Tamarix aphylla were collected at four different locations (A, B, C and D around a petrochemical and detergents factory in the industrial areas of Eastern Region, Dammam city, Saudi Arabia. The concentrations of seven heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cd and Cu were evaluated in different organs of Phragmites australis and Tamarix aphylla. Also, Soil samples were collected from each location for the chemical and mechanical analyses. Results: The results showed that the concentrations of heavy metals in Phragmites australis and Tamarix aphllya exhibited the same trend. In shoots of the studied species, Zn accumulated less heavy metals than the under ground parts, creeping rhizome and roots. The highest bioaccumulation factor (BAF for Cd and Zn was noted in location B. In general, Zn was the most absorbed element followed by Fe, Mn while Ni as well as Pb and Cd were accumulated in lower quantities. In chemical and physical analyses of soil samples, location C showed the highest concentration of all of the investigated elements and it is the most alkaline

  13. Phytotoxic potential of celtis australis L. (family ulmaceae) against four crop species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassays were conducted to test the phytotoxic potential of Celtis australis against Trifolium alexandrinum, Brassica campestris, Triticum aestivum and Lactuca sativa under laboratory condition. Aqueous extracts from twigs and leaves were obtained by soaking 5 and 10g plant material in 100 ml distilled water for 24 and 48hr durations. Aqueous extracts significantly delayed/retarded the germination and reduced the plumule and radicle growth of all the four test species. Generally, extracts soaked for 48h especially 10 gm/100ml were inhibitory than 24h extracts of 5 or 10gm material. Extracts from twigs were inhibitory to germination of wheat while same extracts inhibited the plumule growth of B. campestris. Radicle growth of T. alexandrinum was inhibited more by twig extracts. Hot water extracts from twigs were less inhibitory than leaf extracts. Litter and mulch also significantly delayed the seed germination and retarded the overall growth of seedlings of all test species. The number and length of seminal roots of T. aestivum was suppressed by all aqueous extracts, added litter and mulch. The inhibitory response depended upon the test species, concentration, soaking duration and physiological parameters. The results suggested that Celtis australis has strong phytotoxic potential. (author)

  14. BOOK REVIEW: European Perceptions of Terra Australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-12-01

    Terra Australis - the southern land - has been one of the most widespread concepts in European geography from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. This book comprises a set of 14 interdisciplinary scholarly contributions that deal with personal perceptions of Terra Australis by cartographers and explorers, and with putting these perceptions in their historical and cultural environments. This book seems, at a first glance, to be very remote from astronomy - and even from the history of astronomy - however, as it also offers an excellent background to Captain James Cook's second voyage to observe the 1769 transit of Venus from Tahiti, it definitely is a work of truly interdisciplinary character. Cook's voyages, in fact, became a model in which key scientists of many nationalities and disciplines traveled together on ships. In these voyages, art, science, technology and political power were centralised and united. The chapters range across history, the visual arts, literature, popular culture, technology, politics and science. Issues of scientific reasoning are raised in the description of how people did think about the south before there even existed a perception of the unknown land - quite comparable to how ancient and early-modern astronomers had their thought about cosmology even before any observational data were available. Several early map systems - like the zonal and T-O maps (medieval world maps with the letter T inside an O representing the lands inside a circle of oceans) - are described, and the description of Roman geography shows the amazing fact that theory and practice were not unified, and existed independently of each other insofar that a real paradox between theory and observation had persisted for a very long time. The maps and charts also exemplify the long-lasting consequences of early modern copy-paste practice: navigators copied original sketch charts of coasts that were previously unknown to them, herewith committing many translation and

  15. Emestrins: Anti-Cryptococcus Epipolythiodioxopiperazines from Podospora australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yue, Qun; Krausert, Nicole M; An, Zhiqiang; Gloer, James B; Bills, Gerald F

    2016-09-23

    Eleven emestrin-type epipolythiodioxopiperazines, including four new compounds, emestrins H-K (1-4), were isolated from the crude extracts of two strains of the coprophilous fungus Podospora australis. The structures of 1-4 were established primarily by analysis of NMR data, and the absolute configuration of C-6 in 1 was independently assigned using the modified Mosher method. Four of the known emestrins obtained (emestrins C-E and MPC1001C) were found to selectively inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans. These results also represent the first report of chemistry from any strain of P. australis. PMID:27557418

  16. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel;

    2014-01-01

    The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated by an interm......The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF RESPIRATORY AND GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES OF THREE SPECIES OF PINNIPEDS (ARCTOCEPHALUS AUSTRALIS, ARCTOCEPHALUS GAZELLA, AND OTARIA FLAVESCENS) IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Kristy; Marigo, Juliana; Gastal, Silvia Bainy; Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Ruoppolo, Valeria; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Tseng, Florina

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve understanding of parasitism in South American pinnipeds, respiratory and gastrointestinal samples were collected from 12 Arctocephalus australis (South American fur seal), one Arctocephalus gazella (Antarctic fur seal), and one Otaria flavescens (South American sea lion). Ova and larvae were microscopically identified from fecal samples and respiratory secretions collected from live A. australis undergoing rehabilitation at Centro de Recuperação de Animais Marinhos (CRAM-FURG) in Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil during June-July 2012. Adult parasites were collected from the lungs and gastrointestinal tracts of animals that died while undergoing treatment or were found dead along the southern Brazil coast. Parasites were identified by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, microscopic examination, comparison with keys, and histologic examination of tissues. Lung parasites of the Parafilaroides genus (Metastrongyloidea, Filaroididae) were identified at necropsy in both A. australis and A. gazella and gastrointestinal parasites were found in all three species of pinniped studied. Gastrointestinal parasites identified in A. australis included the nematodes Contracaecum sp. and Pseudoterranova cattani, the cestodes Adenocephalus pacificus (previously Diphyllobothrium pacificum), one from the Tetrabothridae family and one undetermined, and the acanthocephalans Corynosoma sp. and Bolbosoma sp.; from A. gazella the nematode Contracaecum sp. and the acanthocephalan Corynosoma sp.; and from O. flavescens the acanthocephalan Corynosoma sp. Ova from fecal samples from A. australis represent ascarid nematodes, Parafilaroides sp., Adenocephalus pacificus, acanthocephalans, and an egg determined either to be a trematode or pseuophyllidean cestode. With limited information surrounding parasitism, these findings are an important contribution to knowledge of the health of Southern Hemisphere pinnipeds.

  18. The parasitic plant Cuscuta australis is highly insensitive to abscisic acid-induced suppression of hypocotyl elongation and seed germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Around 1% of angiosperms are parasitic plants. Their growth and development solely or partly depend on host plants from which they extract water, nutrients, and other molecules using a parasitic plant-specific organ, the haustorium. Strong depletion of nutrients can result in serious growth retardation and in some cases, death of the hosts. The genus Cuscuta (dodder comprises about 200 holoparasitic species occurring on all continents. Their seedlings have no roots and cotyledons but are only string-like hypocotyls. When they contact suitable host plants, haustoria are formed and thereafter seedlings rapidly develop into vigorously growing branches without roots and leaves. This highly specialized lifestyle suggests that Cuscuta plants likely have unique physiology in development and stress responses. Using germination and seedling growth assays, we show that C. australis seeds and seedlings are highly insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA. Transcriptome analysis and protein sequence alignment with Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice homologs revealed that C. australis most likely consists of only four functional ABA receptors. Given that Cuscuta plants are no longer severely challenged by drought stress, we hypothesize that the ABA-mediated drought resistance pathway in Cuscuta spp. might have had degenerated over time during evolution.

  19. The parasitic plant Cuscuta australis is highly insensitive to abscisic acid-induced suppression of hypocotyl elongation and seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Sun, Guiling; Zhuang, Huifu; Li, Jian-Hong; Wu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Around 1% of angiosperms are parasitic plants. Their growth and development solely or partly depend on host plants from which they extract water, nutrients, and other molecules using a parasitic plant-specific organ, the haustorium. Strong depletion of nutrients can result in serious growth retardation and in some cases, death of the hosts. The genus Cuscuta (dodder) comprises about 200 holoparasitic species occurring on all continents. Their seedlings have no roots and cotyledons but are only string-like hypocotyls. When they contact suitable host plants, haustoria are formed and thereafter seedlings rapidly develop into vigorously growing branches without roots and leaves. This highly specialized lifestyle suggests that Cuscuta plants likely have unique physiology in development and stress responses. Using germination and seedling growth assays, we show that C. australis seeds and seedlings are highly insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA). Transcriptome analysis and protein sequence alignment with Arabidopsis, tomato, and rice homologs revealed that C. australis most likely consists of only four functional ABA receptors. Given that Cuscuta plants are no longer severely challenged by drought stress, we hypothesize that the ABA-mediated drought resistance pathway in Cuscuta spp. might have had degenerated over time during evolution. PMID:26258814

  20. The presence of eucalyptol in Artemisia australis validates its use in traditional Hawaiian medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Zant; Daniel A. Gubler

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the major organic compounds of Artemisia australis (A. australis), a plant used in traditional Hawaiian medicine for the treatment of asthma.Methods:The dichloromethane extract of A. australis was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and major compounds were identified by a National Institute of Standards and Technology library search and confirmed by peak enhancement.Results:The major chemical components of A. australis include eucalyptol, borneol, and caryophyllene.Conclusions:The presence and biological activity of eucalyptol correlate very well with the usage of this plant in traditional Hawaiian medicine.

  1. [Secretion of Phenolic Compounds into Root Exudates of Pea Seedlings upon Inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae or Pseudomonas siringae pv. Pisi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L E; Dudareva, L V; Petrova, I G; Vasil'eva, G G

    2016-01-01

    The content of apigenin, naringenin, pisatin, dibutyl-ortho-phthalate, and N-phenyl-2-naphthyl-amine were assayed in root exudates of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings one day after their inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum, bv. viceae or Pseudomonas siringae pv. pisi, which represent, respectively, mutualistic and antagonistic strategies of interaction with a host plant. After inoculation with either bacteria, the concentrations of apigenin and pisatin in the root exudates were equal, whereas the concentrations of naringenin and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine were different and those of dibutyl-o-phthalate were unchanged. A certain role is suggested for the phenolic compounds in an accomplishment of symbiotic relations of bacteria with a host plant. PMID:27266251

  2. [Secretion of Phenolic Compounds into Root Exudates of Pea Seedlings upon Inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae or Pseudomonas siringae pv. Pisi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L E; Dudareva, L V; Petrova, I G; Vasil'eva, G G

    2016-01-01

    The content of apigenin, naringenin, pisatin, dibutyl-ortho-phthalate, and N-phenyl-2-naphthyl-amine were assayed in root exudates of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings one day after their inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum, bv. viceae or Pseudomonas siringae pv. pisi, which represent, respectively, mutualistic and antagonistic strategies of interaction with a host plant. After inoculation with either bacteria, the concentrations of apigenin and pisatin in the root exudates were equal, whereas the concentrations of naringenin and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine were different and those of dibutyl-o-phthalate were unchanged. A certain role is suggested for the phenolic compounds in an accomplishment of symbiotic relations of bacteria with a host plant.

  3. Sustainable biodegradation of phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals by Phragmites australis-rhizosphere bacteria association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, T; Ojima, T; Tanaka, Y; Mori, K; Morikawa, M

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of two rhizobacteria (Sphingobium fuliginis TIK1 and Sphingobium sp. IT4) of Phragmites australis for the sustainable treatment of water polluted with phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) was investigated. Strains TIK1 and IT4 have recently been isolated from Phragmites rhizosphere and shown to degrade various 4-alkylphenols-TIK1 via phenolic ring hydroxylation and meta-cleavage and IT4 via ipso-hydroxylation. The two strains also degraded bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol F, bisphenol P and bisphenol S (BPS). Thus, strains TIK1 and IT4 have wide degradation spectra for phenolic EDCs. The two strains utilized Phragmites root extracts as a sole carbon source and sustainably colonized Phragmites roots, where they degraded phenolic EDCs. In sequencing batch reactor experiments using Phragmites in association with TIK1 or IT4, both associations repeatedly removed phenolic EDCs from polluted secondary effluent water (BPA, BPS, 4-tert-butylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol) from polluted secondary effluent water. The results suggest that hydroponic systems using Phragmites-TIK and Phragmites-IT4 associations would be useful for sustainable treatment of polluted waters containing various phenolic EDCs.

  4. The secretion of the bacterial phytase PHY-US417 by Arabidopsis roots reveals its potential for increasing phosphate acquisition and biomass production during co-growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaroui, Nibras; Berthomieu, Pierre; Rouached, Hatem; Hanin, Moez

    2016-09-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is a major source of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the soil; however, the plant lacks the capacity to utilize it for Pi nutrition and growth. Microbial phytases constitute a group of enzymes that are able to remobilize Pi from PA. Thus, the use of these phytases to increase the capacity of higher plants to remobilize Pi from PA is of agronomical interest. In the current study, we generate transgenic Arabidopsis lines (ePHY) overexpressing an extracellular form of the phytase PHY-US417 of Bacillus subtilis, which are characterized by high levels of secreted phytase activity. In the presence of PA as sole source of Pi, while the wild-type plants show hallmark of Pi deficiency phenotypes, including the induction of the expression of Pi starvation-induced genes (PSI, e.g. PHT1;4) and the inhibition of growth capacity, the ePHY overexpressing lines show a higher biomass production and no PSI induction. Interestingly, when co-cultured with ePHY overexpressors, wild-type Arabidopsis plants (or tobacco) show repression of the PSI genes, improvement of Pi content and increases in biomass production. In line with these results, mutants in the high-affinity Pi transporters, namely pht1;1 and pht1;1-1;4, both fail to accumulate Pi and to grow when co-cultured with ePHY overexpressors. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of secreted phytases in improving the Pi content and enhancing growth of not only the transgenic lines but also the neighbouring plants. PMID:26914451

  5. A comparison of the functional traits of common reed (Phragmites australis) in northern China: aquatic vs. terrestrial ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Han, Wenxuan; Thevs, Niels; Jia, Xiuhong; Ji, Chengjun; Jin, Dongmei; He, Ping; Schmitt, Armin O; Cirella, Giuseppe Tommaso; Zerbe, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.) is distributed widely throughout the world with various ecotypes. This research compares the functional traits and biomass allocation patterns of two contrasting reed ecotypes. Twelve pairs of aquatic and terrestrial reed samples were collected in northern China. Significant differences in functional traits between the two reed ecotypes were observed, while biomass allocation patterns of reed organs did not differ significantly except for at the root. The dry matter content (DMC) in the whole of the reed plant, leaf, root, and rhizome was higher; while the specific leaf area (SLA) and specific root length (SRL) were lower in terrestrial versus aquatic reed. The biomass allocation in organs of the two forms of reed was isometric, only root in the terrestrial habitat increased faster with an increase in the whole plant biomass. It can be affirmed that aquatic and terrestrial reed that adapt to different environments generally has distinct leaf and root functional traits but isometric biomass allocation patterns. This suggests different resource acquisition strategies: (1) aquatic reed grows faster with high SLA and SRL and is more responsive to the environment, while (2) terrestrial reed with high DMC grows slower and is less responsive to the adverse environment (e.g. dry soil conditions).

  6. A comparison of the functional traits of common reed (Phragmites australis in northern China: aquatic vs. terrestrial ecotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Li

    Full Text Available Common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud. is distributed widely throughout the world with various ecotypes. This research compares the functional traits and biomass allocation patterns of two contrasting reed ecotypes. Twelve pairs of aquatic and terrestrial reed samples were collected in northern China. Significant differences in functional traits between the two reed ecotypes were observed, while biomass allocation patterns of reed organs did not differ significantly except for at the root. The dry matter content (DMC in the whole of the reed plant, leaf, root, and rhizome was higher; while the specific leaf area (SLA and specific root length (SRL were lower in terrestrial versus aquatic reed. The biomass allocation in organs of the two forms of reed was isometric, only root in the terrestrial habitat increased faster with an increase in the whole plant biomass. It can be affirmed that aquatic and terrestrial reed that adapt to different environments generally has distinct leaf and root functional traits but isometric biomass allocation patterns. This suggests different resource acquisition strategies: (1 aquatic reed grows faster with high SLA and SRL and is more responsive to the environment, while (2 terrestrial reed with high DMC grows slower and is less responsive to the adverse environment (e.g. dry soil conditions.

  7. Population size, growth and movements of Anguilla australis in a small lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellyman, D J; Crow, S K

    2016-06-01

    To study growth rates, movements and estimate population size of shortfin eels Anguilla australis in a small lake (2·5 ha) near Christchurch, New Zealand, 617 A. australis were tagged with PIT tags. Tag retention was high (95%) and over the seven recapture events spread over 2 years, 55% of tagged A. australis were recaptured. Growth of recaptured A. australis averaged 13·1 mm year(-1) and declined slightly with increasing total length. Distance moved from original capture site increased with increasing time at large. Population estimates of A. australis > 400 mm (susceptible to capture by fyke net) from recaptures of individuals averaged 1451 A. australis, with a biomass of 170 kg ha(-1) . An average of 6·6% of the estimated total population matured as male silver A. australis each year. Results from radio-tracking of four A. australis gave an average nightly foraging area of 2780 m(2) , and there was no apparent preference for inshore movement (within 5-6 m of the shoreline) or offshore movement. Fyke-net efficiency (total catch relative to the estimated total population available to each net) measured over four consecutive nights fishing was 88%. The lack of precision of the shoreline triangulation system used, ±10 m, meant that the positional data were considered too coarse to be used in a proposed novel population estimation technique based on determining population size within foraging areas. PMID:27126719

  8. A comparative study on the uptake and translocation of organochlorines by Phragmites australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Miguel, Angélique; Ravanel, Patrick [Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS n°5553, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Raveton, Muriel, E-mail: muriel.raveton@ujf-grenoble.fr [Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine, UMR CNRS n°5553, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► This study compares uptake/translocation of organochlorine congeners in macrophytes. ► First, root OC uptake was strongly linked with the partitioning/diffusion process. ► With time exposure, bioconcentration increased with OC solubility and volatility. ► Translocation was linked to the combination of water flow and vapor flux transfers. ► The most volatile OCs might be phytovolatilized from foliar surfaces. -- Abstract: Organochlorines (OCs) are persistent chemicals found in various environmental compartments. The differences in the uptake of {sup 14}C-labeled 1,4-dichlorobenzene (DCB), 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γHCH) by Phragmites australis were investigated under hydroponic conditions. The first step in sorption appears to be correlated with the hydrophobic nature of the compounds, since log-linear correlations were obtained between root concentration factor and partition coefficient (LogK{sub ow}). After 7 days of exposure, plant uptake of DCB, TCB, γHCH was significant with bioconcentration factors reaching 14, 19 and 15, respectively. Afterwards, uptake and translocation were seen to be more complex, with a loss of the simple relationship between uptake and LogK{sub ow}. Linear correlations between the bioconcentration/translocation factors and the physico-chemical properties of OCs were shown, demonstrating that translocation from roots to shoots increases with solubility and volatility of the OCs. This suggests that OC-translocation inside plants might result from the combination of two processes, xylem sap flow and vapor fluxes. {sup 14}C-phytovolatilization was measured and was correlated with the volatility of the compounds; the more volatile OCs being most the likely to be phytovolatilized from foliar surfaces (p = 0.0008). Thus, OC-uptake/translocation appears to proceed at a rate that depends mostly on the OCs hydrophobicity, solubility and volatility.

  9. Effect of Plantago australis leaves on different gastric ulcer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Bürger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-ulcerogenic effect of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE of Plantago australis leaves was tested against ethanol-, indomethacin-, and cold restrain-induced stress ulcers. The CEE (500 and 1000 mg/kg reduced the lesion index (LI and the ulcer index in ethanol-induced ulcers, and the dose of 1000 mg/kg increased the amount of mucous. The highest dose of the CEE reduced the LI of cold restraint-induced stress ulcers when compared to the control group. The indomethacin-induced ulcers were not affected by this extract.

  10. The presence of eucalyptol in Artemisia australis validates its use in traditional Hawaiian medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Zant; Daniel; A.Gubler

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify the major organic compounds of Artemisia austeralis(A.australis),a plant used in traditional Hawaiian medicine for the treatment of asthma.Methods:The dichloromethane extract of A.australis was analyzed by gas chromatography—mass spectroscopy and major compounds were identified by a National Institute of Standards and Technology library search and confirmed by peak enhancement Results:The major chemical components of A.australis include eucalyptol.borneol,and caryophyllene.Conclusions:The presence and biological activity of eucalyptol correlate very well with the usage of this plant in traditional Hawaiian medicine.

  11. Soil CO2 efflux in an old-growth southern conifer forest (Agathis australis) - magnitude, components and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Macinnis-Ng, Cate

    2016-08-01

    Total soil CO2 efflux and its component fluxes, autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, were measured in a native forest in northern Aotearoa-New Zealand. The forest is dominated by Agathis australis (kauri) and is on an acidic, clay rich soil. Soil CO2 efflux, volumetric soil water content and soil temperature were measured bi-weekly to monthly at 72 sampling points over 18 months. Trenching and regression analysis was used to partition total soil CO2 efflux into heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration. The effect of tree structure was investigated by calculating an index of local contribution (Ic, based on tree size and distance to the measurement location) followed by correlation analysis between Ic and total soil CO2 efflux, root biomass, litterfall and soil characteristics. The measured mean total soil CO2 efflux was 3.47 µmol m-2 s-1. Autotrophic respiration accounted for 25 % (trenching) or 28 % (regression analysis) of total soil CO2 efflux. Using uni- and bivariate models showed that soil temperature was a poor predictor of the temporal variation in total soil CO2 efflux (soil CO2 efflux, root biomass and mineral soil CN ratio within 5-6 m of the sampling points. Using multiple regression analysis revealed that 97 % of the spatial variability in total soil CO2 efflux in this kauri-dominated stand was explained by root biomass and soil temperature. Our findings suggest that biotic factors such as tree structure should be investigated in soil carbon related studies.

  12. Star counts in southern dark clouds: Corona Australis and Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazza, C. M.; Vilas-Boas, J. W. S.

    1996-03-01

    Star counts technique is used towards southern dark globular filaments situated in the cloud complexes of Corona Australis and Lupus. Tables and maps of the distribution of visual extinction are presented for each filament. Lower limit masses for the filaments and condensations have been estimated and the central coordinates of the condensations are also given. R CrA is the most active star forming region among the filaments studied in this work whereas Lupus 1, with almost the same lower limit of mass, has only a few T Tauri stars and just one young embedded object. The distribution of direction of the magnetic field in the condensations of Lupus, suggests that the condensation morphologies does not have any apparent relation with the magnetic field orientation.

  13. Australis: AMS for ultra sensitive trace element and isotopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1993-12-31

    The accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) at the CSIRO HIAF laboratory is being upgraded to enable in-situ measurements of ultratraces and isotopic-ratios in mineralogical applications. The upgraded system will include a microbeam Cs ion source which is designed to produce better than 50 micrometre diameter Cs beam to enable analyses of monomineralic grains. The Cs primary beam will be mass analysed in order to minimize contamination of the sample. The detection system will be upgraded to enable analyses of elements up to U, at 2 MV terminal voltage for charge states 4 and 5. The system will be known as AUSTRALIS: A.M.S. for Ultra Sensitive TRAce eLement and Isotopic Studies. An overview of the system and the anticipated applications in minerals exploration and mining research are presented. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  14. 2MASS wide-field extinction maps. V. Corona Australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, João; Lombardi, Marco; Lada, Charles J.

    2014-05-01

    We present a near-infrared extinction map of a large region (~870 deg2) covering the isolated Corona Australis complex of molecular clouds. We reach a 1-σ error of 0.02 mag in the K-band extinction with a resolution of 3 arcmin over the entire map. We find that the Corona Australis cloud is about three times as large as revealed by previous CO and dust emission surveys. The cloud consists of a 45 pc long complex of filamentary structure from the well known star forming Western-end (the head, N ≥ 1023 cm-2) to the diffuse Eastern-end (the tail, N ≤ 1021 cm-2). Remarkably, about two thirds of the complex both in size and mass lie beneath AV ~ 1 mag. We find that the probability density function (PDF) of the cloud cannot be described by a single log-normal function. Similar to prior studies, we found a significant excess at high column densities, but a log-normal + power-law tail fit does not work well at low column densities. We show that at low column densities near the peak of the observed PDF, both the amplitude and shape of the PDF are dominated by noise in the extinction measurements making it impractical to derive the intrinsic cloud PDF below AK law with index -3, but could also described as the tail of a broad and relatively low amplitude, log-normal PDF that peaks at very low column densities. FITS files of the extinction maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A18

  15. A new benzofuranolignan and a new flavonol derivative from the stem of Morus australis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Jian Zhang; Di Zao Li; Ruo Yun Chen; De Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    A new benzofuranolignan austrafuran A(1)and a new flavonol derivative 5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxy-3-methoxyflavone(2)were isolated from the stem of Morus australis.Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidences.

  16. Influence of salinity on the life table demography of a rare Cladocera Latonopsis australis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haridevan, G.; Jyothibabu, R.; Arunpandi, N.; Jagadeesan, L.; Biju, A.

    the identification of L. australis. This is NIO contribution XXXX. Conflict of Interest: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. References Abrantes, N.,&Gonçalves, F.(2003). The dynamics of Ceriodaphniapulchella (Cladocera) in laboratory...

  17. Sense organs in Spongiobranchaea australis d’Orbigny, 1835 (Gastropoda, Pteropoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoel, van der S.

    1964-01-01

    The sense organs: the labial tentacles, eyes, rhinophores, osphradium and statocysts of Spongiobranchaea australis d’Orbigny, 1835 are described together with their innervation. The descriptions are based on serial sections of three animals.

  18. Potential of Root Exudates from Wetland Plants and Their Potential Role for Denitrification and Allelopathic Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Xu

    Root exudates from wetland plants have both positive and negative interactions among microbe, plants and ecosystems. Wetland species releasing organic carbon into the rhizosphere for providing energy to denitrifying bacteria fuel denitrification for removal nitrogen in subsurface flow constructed...... wetlands. Furthermore, environmental factors such as temperature and light-regime affect the photosynthetic carbon fixation, which continuously influence the compositions and quantity of root exudates released into rhizosphere. Conversely, root exudates from invasive species might contain some phytotoxic...... chemicals to suppress the growth of native species. Phragmites australis is recognized as the most invasive species in wetland ecosystems in North America, and allelopathy has been reported to be involved in the invasion success of the introduced exotic P. australis. The composition of the root exudates may...

  19. Biochemical normalization of trace metals in Arctocephalus australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besnik Baraj

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the heart concentration data does not seem relevant for use as a bioindicator, mainly due to its low concentration level. After applying a normalizing procedure, the heart results were a better Hg bioindicator (preconcentration coefficient 43.1 than those of the kidney (preconcentration coefficient 8.6. Cadmium preconcentration coefficients were 128.1, 195.3 and 5.2 for liver, kidney and heart, respectively, demonstrating the high accumulative capacity especially for the liver and kidneys. Iron is proposed as a normalizing element for the definiton of the regional natural biochemical population of the metals. In general, positive correlation coefficients were found between Fe and other metals.Arctocephalus australis foi usado como organismo indicador para concentrações de metal traço na costa do Rio Grande do Sul. Metais foram analisados em tecidos extraídos do coração, rins e fígado. Os baixos teores encontrados no coração inicialmente poderiam indicar que este órgão não traria resultados relevantes. Porém, mediante a aplicação de um procedimento de normalização, foram encontrados coeficientes de pré-concentração de 43.1 e de 8.6 para o coração e para os rins, respectivamente, indicando o tecido do coração como o melhor bioindicador para Hg. Para Cd, os coeficientes de pré-concentração foram 128.1, 195.3 e 5.2 para fígado, rins e coração, respectivamente, demonstrando alta capacidade acumulativa especialmente para fígado e rins. Foram encontradas altas correlações positivas entre o Fe e os metais Zn, Cu, Cd, Hg, Ag, Mn, Ni, Cr e Pb, indicando ser este elemento normalizante para definição da concentração bioquímica natural de metais na população de Arctocephalus australis no extremo sul do Brasil.

  20. Soil CO2 efflux in an old-growth southern conifer forest (Agathis australis) - magnitude, components and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Macinnis-Ng, Cate

    2016-08-01

    Total soil CO2 efflux and its component fluxes, autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, were measured in a native forest in northern Aotearoa-New Zealand. The forest is dominated by Agathis australis (kauri) and is on an acidic, clay rich soil. Soil CO2 efflux, volumetric soil water content and soil temperature were measured bi-weekly to monthly at 72 sampling points over 18 months. Trenching and regression analysis was used to partition total soil CO2 efflux into heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration. The effect of tree structure was investigated by calculating an index of local contribution (Ic, based on tree size and distance to the measurement location) followed by correlation analysis between Ic and total soil CO2 efflux, root biomass, litterfall and soil characteristics. The measured mean total soil CO2 efflux was 3.47 µmol m-2 s-1. Autotrophic respiration accounted for 25 % (trenching) or 28 % (regression analysis) of total soil CO2 efflux. Using uni- and bivariate models showed that soil temperature was a poor predictor of the temporal variation in total soil CO2 efflux (mineral soil CN ratio within 5-6 m of the sampling points. Using multiple regression analysis revealed that 97 % of the spatial variability in total soil CO2 efflux in this kauri-dominated stand was explained by root biomass and soil temperature. Our findings suggest that biotic factors such as tree structure should be investigated in soil carbon related studies.

  1. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsugeki, Ryuji; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of...

  2. Google Secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Become a Google guru with these effective tips, tricks, and techniques Sure, you use Google. But do you really use Google-and everything it has to offer-in the most effective way possible? Wish you could just sit down with a Google expert who would show you how to take your Google savviness to the next level? With Google Secrets, you can! Tech expert Jerri Ledford reveals the ins, outs, and little-known facts about Google to show you how to sharpen your skills so you can get more done, more efficiently. You may already be familiar with Google's most popular applications, but this indispensable

  3. Transcriptome expression profiling in response to drought stress in Paulownia australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanpeng; Fan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie

    2014-01-01

    The response and adaptation to drought remains poorly understood for Paulownia australis. To investigate this issue, transcriptome profiling of four P. australis accessions (two diploid and the other two autotetraploid) under water stress condition were studied using Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx analysis. The current study aimed to identify genes of P. australis metabolism pathways that might be involved in this plant's response to water deficit. Potted seedlings were subjected to well-watered conditions and drought stress, respectively. More than 290 million raw transcript reads were assembled into 111,660 unigenes, with a mean length of 1013 bp. Clusters of orthologous groups, gene ontology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations analyses were performed on the unigenes. Many differentially expressed genes and several metabolic pathways were identified. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to verify the expression patterns of 14 genes. Our study identified altered gene expression in P. australis induced by drought stress and provided a comprehensive map of drought-responsive genes and pathways in this species. To our knowledge, this is the first publicly available global transcriptome study of P. australis. This study provides a valuable genetic resource for this species. PMID:24642880

  4. Transcriptome Expression Profiling in Response to Drought Stress in Paulownia australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpeng Dong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The response and adaptation to drought remains poorly understood for Paulownia australis. To investigate this issue, transcriptome profiling of four P. australis accessions (two diploid and the other two autotetraploid under water stress condition were studied using Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx analysis. The current study aimed to identify genes of P. australis metabolism pathways that might be involved in this plant’s response to water deficit. Potted seedlings were subjected to well-watered conditions and drought stress, respectively. More than 290 million raw transcript reads were assembled into 111,660 unigenes, with a mean length of 1013 bp. Clusters of orthologous groups, gene ontology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations analyses were performed on the unigenes. Many differentially expressed genes and several metabolic pathways were identified. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to verify the expression patterns of 14 genes. Our study identified altered gene expression in P. australis induced by drought stress and provided a comprehensive map of drought-responsive genes and pathways in this species. To our knowledge, this is the first publicly available global transcriptome study of P. australis. This study provides a valuable genetic resource for this species.

  5. Effects of high Zn and Pb concentrations on Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel: Photosynthetic performance and metal accumulation capacity under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, A; Salvatori, E; Guerrini, V; Fusaro, L; Canepari, S; Manes, F

    2016-01-01

    The response of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel to zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) was studied separately in two hydroponic tests, during a three weeks experiment. The effects on ecophysiology and biomass partitioning were evaluated during the metal treatments and at the recovery, and total metal content and accumulation capacity in different plant organs were assessed. Zn and Pb had different effects on the overall measured parameters, highlighting different mechanism of action. In particular, Zn concentration was higher in roots and, being a micronutrient, it was translocated into leaves, producing a reduction of assimilation rate, stomatal conductance (-71.9 and -81.3% respect to the control plant respectively), and a strong down regulation of photosystems functionality both at PSII and PSI level. Otherwise, Pb was accumulated mainly in the more lignified tissue such as rhizomes, with slightly effect on gas exchange. Chlorophyll a fluorescence highlighted that Pb inhibits the electron transfer process at the PSI donor side, without recovery after the removal of the metal stress. Despite these physiological limitations, P. australis showed a high capacity to accumulate both metals, and only slight reduction of biomass, being therefore a suitable species for phytoremediation interventions. PMID:26114607

  6. Osmotic and ionic effects of NaCl and Na2SO4 salinity on Phragmites australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagter, Majken; Bragato, Claudia; Malagoli, Mario;

    2009-01-01

    Osmotic and ion-specific effects of NaCl and Na2SO4 on Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steud. were investigated in a laboratory experiment by examining effects of iso-osmotic solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4 on growth, osmolality of cell sap, proline content, elemental composition and gas exchange....... Plants were supplied with a control standard nutrient solution (Ψ = -0.09 MPa) or solutions of NaCl or Na2SO4 at water potentials of -0.50, -1.09 or -1.74 MPa. Salt treatments increased root concentrations of Na and S or Cl, whereas P. australis had efficient mechanisms for exclusion of Na and S......-significant photosynthetic depression observed in plants grown at -1.74 MPa was mainly due to osmotically induced stomatal closure. This was supported by decreasing internal CO2 concentrations. Saline conditions increased the intrinsic water use efficiency and did not alter photosynthetic parameters derived from light...

  7. The effects of litter on growth and plasticity of Phragmites australis clones originating from infertile, fertile or eutrophicated habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevering, O.A.

    1999-01-01

    In many European countries a strong decline of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steudel (common reed) has been observed. In some instances this decline has been related to the accumulation of litter. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with P. australis cuttings from different stable and die-b

  8. Preadaptation and post-introduction evolution facilitate the invasion of Phragmites australis in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Compared with non-invasive species, invasive plant species may benefit from certain advantageous traits, for example, higher photosynthesis capacity and resource/energy-use efficiency. These traits can be preadapted prior to introduction, but can also be acquired through evolution following introduction to the new range. Disentangling the origins of these advantageous traits is a fundamental and emerging question in invasion ecology. We conducted a multiple comparative experiment under identical environmental condition with the invasive haplotype M lineage of the wetland grass Phragmites australis and compared the ecophysiological traits of this invasive haplotype M in North America with those of the European ancestor and the conspecific North American native haplotype E lineage, P. australis ssp. americanus. The invasive haplotype M differed significantly from the native North American conspecific haplotype E in several ecophysiological and morphological traits, and the European haplotype M had a more efficient photosynthetic apparatus than the native North American P. australis ssp. americanus. Within the haplotype M lineage, the introduced North American P. australis exhibited different biomass allocation patterns and resource/energy-use strategies compared to its European ancestor group. A discriminant analysis of principal components separated the haplotype M and the haplotype E lineages completely along the first canonical axis, highly related to photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters, photosynthetic energy-use efficiency and payback time. The second canonical axis, highly related to photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and construction costs, significantly separated the introduced P. australis in North America from its European ancestor. Synthesis. We conclude that the European P. australis lineage was preadapted to be invasive prior to its introduction, and that the invasion in North America is further stimulated by rapid post-introduction evolution in

  9. First artificial hybrid of the eel species Anguilla australis and Anguilla anguilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirks Ron P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on artificial hybridization of different Anguilla species were conducted recently, i.e. female A. australis with male A. dieffenbachii, and female A. japonica with male A. anguilla. The existence of these artificial hybrids was however not demonstrated by independent genetic methods. Two species - A. anguilla and A. australis - that are phylogenetically close but have different sexual maturation times (12-25 weeks and 6-8 weeks, respectively, were expected to produce favourable hybrids for reproduction studies. Results A modification of the protocol for the reproduction of Anguilla japonica was used to produce eight-day Anguilla australis larvae, with a success rate of 71.4%. Thus ten out of 14 females produced eggs that could be fertilized, and three batches resulted in mass hatching. Hybrid larvae from female A. australis x male A. Anguilla survived for up to seven days post fertilization (dpf. The early development of the hybrid showed typical characteristics of A. anguilla tail pigmentation at 50 hours post fertilization (hpf, indicating expression of genes derived from the father. Conclusions In this paper we describe the first production of hybrid larvae from male A. anguilla and female A. australis and their survival for up to 7 dpf. A species-specific nucleotide difference in the 18 S rDNA gene confirmed that genes from both A. australis and A. anguilla were present in the hybrids. The developmental stages of the hybrid eel embryos and larvae are described using high resolution images. Video footage also indicated a heart beat in 5-dpf larva.

  10. Changes in body fluids of the cocooning fossorial frog Cyclorana australis in a seasonally dry environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen J; Christian, Keith A; Tracy, Christopher R; Hutley, Lindsay B

    2011-11-01

    We investigated changes in the lymph (equivalent to plasma) and urine of the cocooning frog Cyclorana australis during the dry season in monsoonal northern Australia. Frogs in moist soil for two days were fully hydrated (lymph 220 mOsm kg(-1), urine 49 mOsm kg(-1)). From five weeks onwards the soil was dry (matric potential soil, osmolality increase in C. australis was not severe. Aestivation in a cocoon facilitates survival in shallow burrows, but such a strategy may only be effective in environments with seasonally reliable rainfall. PMID:21777688

  11. SEMI-BATCH OPERATED CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS PLANTED WITH PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS FOR TREATMENT OF DYEING WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    SOON-AN ONG; LI-NGEE HO; DANNY LEONARD DUGIL; YEE-SHIAN WONG; HAFIZAH SAMAD

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the using of constructed wetland under semi-batch operation for the treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) containing wastewater. The emergent plant selected in our study was Phragmites australis. Toxic signs were observed at the Phragmites australis after the addition of AO7 into the wetland reactors but it can adapt to the wastewater as shown in the increase of stem as the operation continue. Our result shows that the artificial aeration and t...

  12. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  13. Roots Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  14. Effects of partial replacing NO3--N with amino acid on yield, quality and root secretion of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L. )%氨基酸部分替代硝态氮对小白菜产量、品质及根际分泌物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹小闯; 吴良欢; 陈贤友; 韩科峰

    2012-01-01

    Effects of partial (20%) replacing NO3--N with Gly, Glu and mixed amino acids in the nutrient solution on biomass, quality and root secretion of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L. ) were studied under the partial sterile hydroponics cultivation. Compared to the single nitrate treatment, the 20% partial replacing NO3--N with amino acids could significantly reduce biomass with decreasing of nitrate and soluble starch content in the edible part of pakchoi after 24 day' s treatment. The nitrate and soluble starch contents in the treatment of 20% replacing of NO3--N by Glu are lowest at 1490. 8 mg/kg and 1.77 mg/g, while the contents of soluble protein, soluble sugar, free amino acid and total N in leaves and roots are improved. The treatments of partial replacing NO3--N could change the root morphology structure and root activity, and the contents of NH4+ -N, free amino acids, total organicC, total N and soluble protein are also significantly increased in the treatments of 20% Gly and 20% of mixed amino acid replacing NO~-N. Compared to the treatment of single nitrate, the ratios of organic nitrogen to total nitrogen in the root secretions are increased by 5.6%, 11.2% and 12. 8% in the treatments of 20% Gly, 20% Glu and 20% of mixed amino acids replacing NO3 -N, respectively. Therefore, partial replacement of NO3 by amino acids could improve the quality of pakchoi, there is a negative relationship between the biomass of pakchoiand the root secretion (0. 7 〈 r 〈0. 83 ,P 〈0. 05 ), and the types of amino acid could significantly affect biomass, root morphology structure and the amount of root secretion.%采用局部无菌水培方法,研究了氨基酸部分替代硝态氮对小白菜产量、品质及根际分泌物的影响。结果表明,与单一硝态氮处理相比,20%氨基酸部分替代硝态氮处理小白菜产量下降,硝酸盐及可溶性淀粉含量也显著降低,其中以20%谷氨酸(Glu)处理最低,分别为1490.8 mg/kg、1.77 mg/g

  15. Phytoremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Pb and V in gas refinery wastewater using common reed (Phragmitis australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Hamidian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastewaters are of the major sources of heavy metal pollution in the environment. In the Middle East, gas and oil industry is the major source of heavy metal pollution and releases significant amounts of metals into the terrestrial and aquatic environment. In this research the capability of the common reed (Phragmitis australis in absorbing heavy metals Cd, Pb and V from the wastewater of a gas refinery plant in Iran was investigated. The plant samples were collected from the vicinity of the Bidboland gas refinery plant in Iran and were used for the treatment of wastewaters collected from the outflow of the refinery plant. The metal concentrations were measured in the roots of the plant species before treatment and after 2, 6 and 10 days of treatment procedure. The heavy metal concentrations were measured after acid digestion and using an ICP-OES instrument. After 10 days of treatment, the concentrations of the metals in plant tissues increased by 2.5, 6.9 and 2.7 times for Cd, Pb and V, respectively. The best treatment time was suggested to be 6 days. The common reed was observed to have a very good capability in removing heavy metals from the gas refinery wastewater.

  16. 铝离子胁迫下大豆根尖柠檬酸的分泌及SGA1基因的表达%Secretion of Citrate from Root Apices and Expression ofSGA1 in Soybean under AlCl3 Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨列耿; 杨曙; 张永先; 唐健; 黎晓峰

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Al3+ on the secretion of organic acids from root apices and the expression ofSGAIgene were investigated by hydroponics to elucidate the characteritics of organic acid secretion and Al3+ stress signal transduction pathway which mediates the secretion of organic acids in soybean Guangzhou bendi 2. The results showed that soybean root apices (in vivo) secreted citrate under Al3+ stress. The secretion of citrate increased with the increase of Al3+ concentrations (25, 50 µmol L–1AlCl3) and the prolongation (2–12 hours) of treatment with Al3+. Citrate was secreted from root apices by pattern II in soybean. The secretion rate was very low within initial four hours after Al3+ treatment but remarkably elevated thereafter. A gap of time between the secretion and Al3+ treatment reached to about six hours. On the other hand, when cholera toxin, an inhibitor of heterotrimeric G-protein, was added to Al3+solution, the amount of citrate secreted decreased by 38.7%. RT-PCR analysis results indicated that Al3+ inducedSGA1 expression. In general, the expression level was elevated with the prolongation of treatment with Al3+ (0.5 to 12 hours). Moreover, Al3+ induced expression ofSGA1 sooner than the secretion of citrate. These results imply that Al3+ induces the secretion of citrate from root apices andSGA1 expression in the soybean, and heterotrimeric G proteins may act as a switch of Al3+ stress signal to be involved in the regulation of citrate secretion from root apices under Al3+ stress.%为揭示铝离子诱导大豆根尖分泌有机酸的特点及介导有机酸分泌的信号途径,采用溶液培养试验方法调查AlCl3对大豆品种(广州本地2号)根尖有机酸分泌及SGA1基因表达的影响。结果表明, AlCl3胁迫下大豆活体根尖分泌柠檬酸,且分泌量随着铝浓度(25、50µmol L–1AlCl3)和处理时间(2~12 h)的增加而增加;大豆根尖以模式II分泌柠檬酸,处理后的前4 h,分泌速率很低,其后显著提升

  17. Nueva cita de Utricularia australis R. Br. en el País Vasco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGLESIAS-CARRASCO, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha descubierto una nueva población de la especie Utricularia australis R. Br., catalogada como “en peligro de extinción” en el Catálogo Vasco de Especies Amenazadas. La población, situada en el Alto Nervión, superará, seguramente, el millar de ejemplares.

  18. STS-45 Earth observation of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-45 Earth observation taken onboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, is of the Aurora Australis or Southern Lights. The STS-45 crewmembers note the interesting spiralling or corkscrew appearance of this particular sighting. Aurorae were observed and photographed throughout the STS-45 nine-day mission.

  19. The functional significance of multiple nest-building in the Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Mathew L.; Beintema, Nienke H.; Welbergen, Justin A.; Komdeur, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The vast majority of bird species build a nest in which to breed. Some species build more than one nest, but the function of most multiple nest-building remains unclear. Here we describe the unusual nest-building behaviour of the Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis, and test experimentall

  20. Effects of litter accumulation and water table on morphology and productivity of Phragmites australis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevering, O.A.

    1998-01-01

    Phragmites australis (Common reed) occurs in the interface between water and land. The water depth gradient from deep water to dry land is inversely related to litter accumulation. Eutrophication can result in an excessive production of litter, which may have a large impact on the occurrence of P. a

  1. Functional linkage between N acquisition strategies and aeration capacities of hydrophytes for efficient oxygen consumption in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Motoka; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Ko

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the specific strategies of hydrophytes for root O(2) consumption in relation to N acquisition and investigated whether the strategies varied depending on the aeration capacity. Aeration capacity of roots is an important factor for determining hypoxia tolerance in plants. However, some hydrophytes possessing quite different aeration capacities often co-occur in wetlands, suggesting that root O(2) consumption also strongly affects hypoxia tolerance. We cultivated Phragmites australis with high aeration capacity and Zizania latifolia with low aeration capacity in hypoxic conditions with NH(4)(+) or NO(3)(-) treatment and compared the growth, N uptake, N assimilation and root respiration between the two species. In Z. latifolia grown with NH(4)(+) treatment, high N uptake activity and restrained root growth led to sufficient N acquisition and decrease in whole-root respiration rate. These characteristics consequently compensated for the low aeration capacity. In contrast, in P. australis, low N uptake activity was compensated by active root growth, but the whole-root respiration rate was high. This high root respiration rate was allowed by the high aeration capacity. The O(2) consumption-related traits of hydrophyte roots were closely correlated with N acquisition strategies, which consequently led to a compensational relationship with the root aeration capacity. It is likely that this functional linkage plays an important role as a core mechanism in the adaptation of plants to hypoxic soils.

  2. Tracking Phragmites Australis Expansion in Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge using AggieAir Aircraft Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, B.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    This research examines the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAV), a cutting edge technology developed at the Utah Water research lab for acquiring airborne imagery using drones for the assessment of abundance of an invasive species Phragmites australis in a wetland vegetation setup. These UAV’s acquire multispectral data in the visible and near-infrared bands with a spatial resolution of 0.5 meters. The study area is the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (MBR) which lies in northern Utah, where the Bear River flows into the northeast arm of the Great Salt Lake. The Refuge protects the marshes found at the mouth of the Bear River; these marshes are the largest freshwater component of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. A common reed, Phragmites australis, is a tall (1.5-4.0 m) coarse perennial grass found primarily in brackish and freshwater wetlands, growing at or above mean high water. The methodology is to build Bayesian statistical supervised classification model using relevance vector machine (RVM) employing the inexpensive and readily available UAV data. The UAV images of the bird refuge are processed to obtain calibrated reflectance imagery. Thereafter, the isodata clustering algorithm is applied to classify the multispectral imagery into different classes. Using ground sampling of the species, pixels containing the Phragmites australis are deduced. The training set for the supervised RVM classification model is prepared using the deduced pixel values. A separate set of ground sampling points containing the Phragmites australis are kept aside for validation. The distribution of Phragmites australis in the study area as obtained from RVM classification model is compared to the validation set. The RVM model results for tracking of Phragmites are encouraging and the new technique has promising real-time implementation for similar applications.

  3. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krehenbrink Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP, a twin-arginine translocase (TAT secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to

  4. Interspecific interactions between Phragmites australis and Spartina alterniflora along a tidal gradient in the Dongtan wetland, Eastern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yuan

    Full Text Available The invasive species Spartina alterniora Loisel was introduced to the eastern coast of China in the 1970s and 1980s for the purposes of land reclamation and the prevention of soil erosion. The resulting interspecific competition had an important influence on the distribution of native vegetation, which makes studying the patterns and mechanisms of the interactions between Spartina alterniora Loisel and the native species Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin ex Steud in this region very important. There have been some researches on the interspecific interactions between P. australis and S. alterniora in the Dongtan wetland of Chongming, east China, most of which has focused on the comparison of their physiological characteristics. In this paper, we conducted a neighbor removal experiment along a tidal gradient to evaluate the relative competitive abilities of the two species by calculating their relative neighbor effect (RNE index. We also looked at the influence of environmental stress and disturbance on the competitive abilities of the two species by comparing interaction strength (I among different tidal zones both for P. australis and S. alterniora. Finally, we measured physiological characteristics of the two species to assess the physiological mechanisms behind their different competitive abilities. Both negative and positive interactions were found between P. australis and S. alterniora along the environmental gradient. When the direction of the competitive intensity index for P. australis and S. alterniora was consistent, the competitive or facilitative effect of S. alterniora on P. australis was stronger than that of P. australis on S. alterniora. The interspecific interactions of P. australis and S. alterniora varied with environmental conditions, as well as with the method used, to measure interspecific interactions.

  5. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  6. Square Root +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  7. Isolation and characterization of collagen from the skin of Brama australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, Alina; Kozłowska, Justyna; Skorupska, Małgorzata; Michalska, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Collagen was extracted from the skin of Brama australis, the fish from warm-water sea. The yield of collagen from skin of B. australis was about 1.5% on a wet weight basis of raw material. The isolated protein was confirmed as collagen by different physico-chemical techniques such as: FTIR, SDS-PAGE, and amino acid analysis. The denaturation temperature (T(d)) of obtained collagen was found to be 24°C, what is promising as an advantage for cosmetic application. According to the electrophoretic pattern, collagen consisted of two different α-chains (α1 and α2) and was classified as type I collagen. Although T(d) of obtained collagen is higher than 20 °C it is still far from T(d) of mammalian collagen. PMID:26193681

  8. Physiological ecology and functional traits of North American native and Eurasian introduced Phragmites australis lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Mozdzer, Thomas J.; Brisson, Jacques; Hazelton, Eric L. G.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological ecology and plant functional traits are often used to explain plant invasion. To gain a better understanding of how traits influence invasion, studies usually compare the invasive plant to a native congener, but there are few conspecific examples in the literature. In North America, the presence of native and introduced genetic lineages of the common reed, Phragmites australis, presents a unique example to evaluate how traits influence plant invasion. We reviewed the literature ...

  9. Efficiency of Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Menka; Tripathi, B D

    2015-02-01

    A cost-effective and promising technology has been demonstrated for the removal of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from urban sewage mixed with industrial effluents within 14 days. With the help of P. australis and T. latifolia grown alone and in combination batch experiments were designed to assess the removal of heavy metals from the wastewater collected from 5 sampling stations. The results revealed that P. australis performed better than T. latifolia for Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn removal, while mixing of the plant species further enhanced the removal of Cu to 78.0±1.2%, Cd to 60.0±1.2%, Cr to 68.1±0.4%, Ni to 73.8±0.6%, Fe to 80.1±0.3%, Pb to 61.0±1.2% and Zn to 61.0±1.2% for wastewater samples from Raj Ghat. Negative correlation coefficients of Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn concentrations in wastewater with the retention time revealed that there was an increase in the heavy metal removal rate with retention time. P. australis showed higher accumulative capacities for Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni and Fe than T. latifolia. P. australis and T. latifolia grown in combination can be used for the removal of Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn from the urban sewage mixed with industrial effluents within 14 days.

  10. Energy and water balance response of a vegetated wetland to herbicide treatment of invasive Phragmites australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykleby, Phillip M.; Lenters, John D.; Cutrell, Gregory J.; Herrman, Kyle S.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Scott, Durelle T.; Twine, Tracy E.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Awada, Tala; Soylu, Mehmet E.; Dong, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The energy and water balance of a Phragmites australis dominated wetland in south central Nebraska was analyzed to assess consumptive water use and the potential for "water savings" as a result of vegetation eradication via herbicide treatment. Energy balance measurements were made at the field site for two growing seasons (treated and untreated), including observations of net radiation, heat storage, and sensible heat flux, which was measured using a large-aperture scintillometer. Latent heat flux was calculated as a residual of the energy balance, and comparisons were made between the two growing seasons and with model simulations to examine the relative impacts of vegetation removal and climate variability. Observed ET rates dropped by roughly 32% between the two growing seasons, from a mean of 4.4 ± 0.7 mm day-1 in 2009 (with live vegetation) to 3.0 ± 0.8 mm day-1 in 2010 (with dead P. australis). These results are corroborated by the Agro-IBIS model simulations, and the reduction in ET implies a total "water savings" of 245 mm over the course of the growing season. The significant decreases in ET were accompanied by a more-than-doubling of sensible heat flux, as well as a ∼60% increase in heat storage due to decreased LAI. Removal of P. australis was also found to cause measurable changes in the local micrometeorology at the wetland. Consistent with the observed increase in sensible heat flux during 2010, warmer, drier, windier conditions were observed in the dead, P. australis section of the wetland, compared to an undisturbed section of live, native vegetation. Modeling results suggest that the elimination of transpiration in 2010 was partially offset by an increase in surface evaporation, thereby reducing the subsequent water savings by roughly 60%. Thus, the impact of vegetation removal depends on the local climate, depth to groundwater, and management decisions related to regrowth of vegetation.

  11. The functional significance of multiple nest-building in the Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Mathew L.; Beintema, Nienke H.; Welbergen, Justin A.; Komdeur, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The vast majority of bird species build a nest in which to breed. Some species build more than one nest, but the function of most multiple nest-building remains unclear. Here we describe the unusual nest-building behaviour of the Australian Reed Warbler Acrocephalus australis, and test experimentally the hypotheses that multiple nest-building is related to individual condition or territory quality, and plays a role in mate assessment. Australian Reed Warblers built two types of nest structure...

  12. Anatomy of nasal complex in the southern right whale, Eubalaena australis (Cetacea, Mysticeti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Mónica R; Fernández, Marta S; Fordyce, R Ewan; Reidenberg, Joy S

    2015-01-01

    The nasal region of the skull has undergone dramatic changes during the course of cetacean evolution. In particular, mysticetes (baleen whales) conserve the nasal mammalian pattern associated with the secondary function of olfaction, and lack the sound-producing specializations present in odontocetes (toothed whales, dolphins and porpoises). To improve our understanding of the morphology of the nasal region of mysticetes, we investigate the nasal anatomy, osteology and myology of the southern right whale, Eubalaena australis, and make comparisons with other mysticetes. In E. australis external deflection surfaces around the blowholes appear to divert water off the head, and differ in appearance from those observed in balaenopterids, eschrichtiids and cetotherids. In E. australis the blowholes are placed above hypertrophied nasal soft tissues formed by fat and nasal muscles, a pattern also observed in balaenopterids (rorqual mysticetes) and a cetotherid (pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata). Blowhole movements are due to the action of five nasofacial muscles: dilator naris superficialis, dilator naris profundus, depressor alae nasi, constrictor naris, and retractor alae nasi. The dilator naris profundus found in E. australis has not been previously reported in balaenopterids. The other nasofacial muscles have a similar arrangement in balaenopterids, with minor differences. A novel structure, not reported previously in any mysticete, is the presence of a vascular tissue (rete mirabile) covering the lower nasal passage. This vascular tissue could play a role in warming inspired air, or may engorge to accommodate loss of respiratory space volume due to gas compression from increased pressure during diving.

  13. SEMI-BATCH OPERATED CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS PLANTED WITH PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS FOR TREATMENT OF DYEING WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOON-AN ONG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study is to evaluate the using of constructed wetland under semi-batch operation for the treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7 containing wastewater. The emergent plant selected in our study was Phragmites australis. Toxic signs were observed at the Phragmites australis after the addition of AO7 into the wetland reactors but it can adapt to the wastewater as shown in the increase of stem as the operation continue. Our result shows that the artificial aeration and the presence of Phragmites australis had a significant impact on the removal of organic matters, AO7, aromatic amines and NH4-N. The COD removal efficiency in the aerated and non-aerated wetland reactors was 95 and 62%, respectively. The NH4-N removal efficiency in the aerated wetland reactor (86% was significantly higher than the non-aerated wetland reactor (14 %. All wetland reactors show high removal efficiency of AO7 (> 94% but only the aerated wetland reactor perform better in the removal of aromatic amines.

  14. Phenotypic traits of Phragmites australis clones are not related to ploidy level and distribution range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Luciana; Lambertini, Carla; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Phragmites australis is a wetland grass with high genetic variability, augmented by its cosmopolitan distribution, clonal growth form and large variation in chromosome numbers. Different ploidy levels and ecotypes differ in morphology and ecophysiological traits, and may possess different levels of phenotypic variation. The aim of this study was to quantify the natural variation in ecophysiological characteristics of P. australis, and to explore whether differences in ecophysiological traits can be related to ploidy levels or to the geographic origin of the clones. Methodology Fifteen clones of P. australis from Europe and Asia/Australia, representing five ploidy levels (4x, 6x, 8x, 10x and 12x), were grown in a common garden design for 119 days. Plant growth and light-saturated rate of photosynthesis (Pmax), stomatal conductance (gs), water use efficiency (WUE) and concentrations of photosynthetic pigments and mineral ions in the leaves were measured. Principal results The growth of the plants and most ecophysiological parameters differed significantly between clones. The mean maximum shoot height varied from 0.9 to 1.86 m, Pmax from 9.7 to 27 µmol m−2 s−1, gs from 0.22 to 1.41 mol m−2 s−1 and WUE from 13 to 47 µmol mol−1. The concentrations of chlorophylls did not vary significantly between clones, but the chlorophyll a/b ratio and the concentrations of total carotenoids did. The observed differences were not explained either by the ploidy level per se or by the geographic origin or phylogenetic relationships of the clones. Conclusions Phylogeographic relationships in P. australis on a global scale do not mirror the environment where the adaptations have evolved, and high phenotypic variation among and within clones complicates comparative studies. Future studies aimed at explaining differences in plant behaviour between P. australis populations should be careful in the selection of target genotypes and/or populations, and should

  15. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher a

  16. Role of plants in nitrogen and sulfur transformations in floating hydroponic root mats: A comparison of two helophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Rania A B; Kuschk, Peter; Wiessner, Arndt; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Müller, Jochen A; Köser, Heinz

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge about the roles helophytes play in constructed wetlands (CWs) is limited, especially regarding their provision of organic rhizodeposits. Here, transformations of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur were monitored in a CW variety, floating hydroponic root mat (FHRM), treating synthetic wastewater containing low concentration of organic carbon. Two helophytes, Phragmites australis and Juncus effusus, were compared in duplicates. Striking differences were found between the FHRM of the two helophytes. Whereas ammonium was removed in all FHRMs to below detection level, total nitrogen of 1.15 ± 0.4 g m(-2) d(-1) was removed completely only in P. australis systems. The mats with J. effusus displayed effective nitrification but incomplete denitrification as 77% of the removed ammonium-nitrogen accumulated as nitrate. Furthermore, the P. australis treatment units showed on average 3 times higher sulfate-S removal rates (1.1 ± 0.45 g m(-2) d(-1)) than the systems planted with J. effusus (0.37 ± 0.29 g m(-2) d(-1)). Since the influent organic carbon was below the stoichiometric requirement for the observed N and S transformation processes, helophytes' organic rhizodeposits apparently contributed to these transformations, while P. australis provided about 6 times higher bioavailable organic rhizodeposits than J. effusus.

  17. Root cap removal increases root penetration resistance in maize (Zea mays L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Morio; Higuchi, Toshifumi; Barlow, Peter W; Bengough, A Glyn

    2003-09-01

    The root cap assists the passage of the root through soil by means of its slimy mucilage secretion and by the sloughing of its outer cells. The root penetration resistance of decapped primary roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Mephisto) was compared with that of intact roots in loose (dry bulk density 1.0 g cm-3; penetration resistance 0.06 MPa) and compact soil (1.4 g cm-3; penetration resistance 1.0 MPa), to evaluate the contribution of the cap to decreasing the impedance to root growth. Root elongation rate and diameter were the same for decapped and intact roots when the plants were grown in loose soil. In compacted soil, however, the elongation rate of decapped roots was only about half that of intact roots, whilst the diameter was 30% larger. Root penetration resistances of intact and decapped seminal axis were 0.31 and 0.52 MPa, respectively, when the roots were grown in compacted soil. These results indicated that the presence of a root cap alleviates much of the mechanical impedance to root penetration, and enables roots to grow faster in compacted soils.

  18. An investigation into the effects of nitrogen on growth and morphology of stable and die-back populations of Phragmites australis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevering, O.A.

    1998-01-01

    In many European countries a strong decline of Phragmites australis (common reed) populations has been observed during the past two decades. This has become known as die-back or reed regression. A greenhouse growth experiment was performed with P. australis cuttings from stable and die-back populati

  19. Use of gamma irradiation as a quarantine control method for Frankliniella australis (Morgan) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The black flower thrips, Frankliniella australis (Morgan), a Chilean species, causes quarantine rejections of fresh fruits for export. Today, fumigation with CH3Br is efficient to avoid these rejections, but is questioned because it affects the ozone layer, irradiation of foods being an alternative. The effect of gamma irradiation was studied in the laboratory on F. australis adults, at dosages of 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy, followed by storage at 0-5 deg C to simulate shipping conditions. Mortality immediately after irradiation was low (1.5 to 22.3% at 250 and 1000 Gy, respectively), but increased an hour later (15.8, 33.4, 44.5, and 51.7% with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 Gy, respectively). In this evaluation, mortality with the greatest dosage was significantly larger than with 500 and 250 Gy, while results with 750 and 500 Gy were not different between them but different with the smallest dosage. At 24 hours, mortality with all dosages surpassed 91%, although only that at 1000 Gy was significantly greater than at 250 Gy. At day 4th (96 hours) there was at least 98.8% mortality for the irradiation treatments, with significant differences with the control, which then presented only 12.8% mortality. Using logit regression with results up to day 4, a probit 9 (LD99.9968) for adults was estimated at 188 Gy. This dosage is slightly less to those indicated in the literature for control of other thrips, which may be explained because of the combined use of cold storage, although more studies are necessary of this technology under commercial conditions to verify its applicability for quarantine control of F. australis. (author)

  20. [Bud population dynamics of Phragmites australis in heterogeneous habitats of Northeast grassland, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To adapt ecological environment, typical clonal plants can occur continuously by means of buds. The changes in the bud bank and bud flow in the heterogeneous habitats become the foundation for deep understanding the characteristics of vegetative propagation. By sampling soil from the unit area, a comparative analysis was performed for rhizome bud population dynamics of Phragmites australis community in both meadow soil and saline-alkali soil habitats in meadow grassland of Northeast China. The one-age class rhizome buds formed in the current year were used as input, with the other age classes rhizome buds as output, counting the dormancy buds and death buds. The results showed that the storage, input, output, dormancy, death and the input rates of P. australis rhizome bud populations in meadow soil habitat were significantly higher than that in saline-alkali habitat. There was no significant difference in output rate between the two habitats. The dormant rate in saline-alkali habitat was significantly greater than that in meadow soil habitat. The death rates remained at relatively low levels in both, less than 2%. With the going of growing season, the input buds and input rate of bud bank increased in the two habitats, while the output buds remained relatively stable. The output rate increased first and decreased later, the dormancy buds and dormant rate decreased. Bud bank and bud flow were positively related to soil moisture, soil organic matter and soil available nitrogen content. However, they were negatively related to soil pH value and soil available phosphorus content. Bud bank and bud flow had a similar seasonal variation. Constantly for both habitats, P. australis populations generated new rhizome buds supplied to the bud bank and kept a stable output to maintain their vegetative propagation.

  1. Collaborations, research, and adaptive management to address nonnative Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Kurt P.

    2016-06-30

    Phragmites australis, also known as common reed, is a native North American wetland grass that has grown in North America for thousands of years. More recently, a nonnative, invasive variety of Phragmites from Eurasia is rapidly invading wetlands across the continental United States and other parts of North America, where it negatively impacts humans and the environment. U.S. Geological Survey scientists, funded by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, are leading innovative efforts to improve management of nonnative Phragmites in the Great Lakes Basin.

  2. ST Chamaeleontis and BP Coronae Australis: Two Southern Dwarf Novae Confirmed as Z Cam Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Simonsen, Mike; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Stubbings, Rod

    2014-01-01

    Z Camelopardalis (Z Cam) stars are a subset of dwarf novae distinguished by the occurrence of standstills, periods of relative constant brightness one to one and a half magnitudes fainter than maximum brightness. As part of an ongoing observing campaign, the Z CamPaign, the authors focused attention on several Z Cam suspects in the southern hemisphere. Two stars, BP Coronae Australis and ST Chamaeleontis were found to exhibit standstill behavior in 2013, thus confirming them as Z Cam type systems. This adds two more bona fide members to the 19 confirmed Z Cams, bringing the total to 21.

  3. Estudo comparativo entre os sincrânios de Otaria byronia e Arctocephalus australis (Pinnipedia, Otariidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Sanfelice; Jorge Ferigolo

    2008-01-01

    Observou-se grande variabilidade anatômica no sincrânio de Otaria byronia (Blainville, 1820) e de Arctocephalus australis (Zimmerman, 1783), com correspondentes implicações na sistemática dos Otariidae. As principais diferenças observadas entre as duas espécies foram a largura do rostro, exposição (ou não) do etmóide na órbita, vacuidade palatino/pterigóide, extensão do maxilar, concavidade e forma do palato, tamanho/forma da órbita/processo supra-orbital, altura/forma do palato, tamanho/form...

  4. Authentication Without Secrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Lyndon G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  5. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    -an ectodermal tissue layer (Malassez′s epithelium), a middle layer-composed by the collagen-mesodermal tissue layer, and an innermost root-close innervation layer. Abnormalities in one of these tissue layers are thought to cause inflammatory processes in the periodontal membrane comparable to inflammatory...... formerly been demonstrated how demyelinization of the myelin sheaths in the peripheral nerves close to the root provoke resorption. Accordingly, conditions affecting these tissue layers can be associated not only with different morphologies but also with general symptoms and diseases (e.g., ectodermal...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost...

  6. Tubular Secretion in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Laha, Thomas; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Newitt, Rick; Sirich, Tammy L; Meyer, Timothy W; Thummel, Ken E; Yanez, N David; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Weiss, Noel S; Kestenbaum, Bryan R

    2016-07-01

    Renal function generally is assessed by measurement of GFR and urinary albumin excretion. Other intrinsic kidney functions, such as proximal tubular secretion, typically are not quantified. Tubular secretion of solutes is more efficient than glomerular filtration and a major mechanism for renal drug elimination, suggesting important clinical consequences of secretion dysfunction. Measuring tubular secretion as an independent marker of kidney function may provide insight into kidney disease etiology and improve prediction of adverse outcomes. We estimated secretion function by measuring secreted solute (hippurate, cinnamoylglycine, p-cresol sulfate, and indoxyl sulfate) clearance using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assays of serum and timed urine samples in a prospective cohort study of 298 patients with kidney disease. We estimated GFR by mean clearance of creatinine and urea from the same samples and evaluated associations of renal secretion with participant characteristics, mortality, and CKD progression to dialysis. Tubular secretion rate modestly correlated with eGFR and associated with some participant characteristics, notably fractional excretion of electrolytes. Low clearance of hippurate or p-cresol sulfate associated with greater risk of death independent of eGFR (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 4.7; hazard ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 6.1, respectively). Hazards models also suggested an association between low cinnamoylglycine clearance and risk of dialysis, but statistical analyses did not exclude the null hypothesis. Therefore, estimates of proximal tubular secretion function correlate with glomerular filtration, but substantial variability in net secretion remains. The observed associations of net secretion with mortality and progression of CKD require confirmation. PMID:26614381

  7. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  8. Dynamic quantum secret sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we consider quantum secret sharing (QSS) between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications. -- Highlights: ► We consider quantum secret sharing between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). ► In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. ► Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. ► Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. ► Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications.

  9. Inducing gravitropic curvature of primary roots of Zea mays cv Ageotropic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.; Fondren, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of the mutant 'Ageotropic' cultivar of Zea mays are nonresponsive to gravity. Their root caps secrete little or no mucilage and touch the root only at the extreme apex. A gap separates the cap and root at the periphery of the cap. Applying mucilage from normal roots or substances with a consistency similar to that of mucilage to tips of mutant roots causes these roots to become strongly graviresponsive. Gravicurvature stops when these substances are removed. Caps of some mutants secrete small amounts of mucilage and are graviresponsive. These results indicate that (a) the lack of graviresponsiveness in the mutant results from disrupting the transport pathway between the cap and root, (b) movement of the growth-modifying signal from the cap to the root occurs via an apoplastic pathway, and (c) mucilage is necessary for normal communication between the root cap and root in Zea mays cv Ageotropic.

  10. Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marnie L

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation that leads to periodic, and often prolonged, burial events is becoming more common on the world's coastlines as human populations expand and create urbanised marine environments. Different seagrass species react differently to sediment burial but many species in the southern hemisphere are yet to be examined. How seagrasses react to burial has restoration implications. There is a need to critically assess seagrass transplant propagule responses to periodic (pulse) and prolonged (press) burial events before selecting the most appropriate species, transplant propagule, and transplant site. In my study, mesocosm experiments, coupled with field measurements were used to assess how sexual (seedlings) and vegetative (sprigs) propagules of Posidonia australis responded to pulse and press burial events. Seedlings were highly susceptible to burial (both pulse and press), with no survival at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, rhizome growth in vegetative propagules was stimulated by pulse burial, although press burial events resulted in mortality. The implication for Posidonia australis restoration efforts in areas where burial is periodic, was that vegetative propagules are optimal transplant units, in comparison to seedlings. Press burial however, renders a transplant site sub-optimal for both seedling and sprig transplants. PMID:27526020

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on toxicity and immunogenicity of Androctonus australis hector venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abib, L. [Univ. des Sciences et de la Technologie, Lab. de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences Biologiques, Houari Boumedienne, Bab Ezzouar (Algeria); Laraba-Djebari, F. [Univ. des Sciences et de la Technologie, Lab. de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences Biologiques, Houari Boumedienne, Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Institut Pasteur d' Algerie, Lab. de Recherche et de Developpement sur les Venins, Alger (Algeria); E-mail: flaraba@ibnsina.ands.dz

    2003-12-01

    An investigation was made of the radiosensitivity of the toxic and immunological properties of Androctonus australis hector venom. This venom was irradiated with two doses of gamma rays (1 and 2 kGy) from a {sup 60}Co source. The results showed that venom toxicity was abolished for the two radiation doses (1 and 2 kGy) with, respectively, 10 and 25 times its initial LD50 value. However, irradiated venoms were immunogenic, and the antibodies elicited by them were able to recognize the native venom by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antisera raised against these toxoids (1 and 2 kGy) had a higher neutralizing capacity and immunoreactivity against all components of native venom than did the antiserum produced against the native venom. The antiserum of rabbits immunized with 2-kGy-irradiated venom was more efficient than 1-kGy-irradiated toxoid antiserum. Indeed, in vivo protection assays showed that the mice immunized with 2-kGy-irradiated venom resisted lethal doses (i.p.) of A. australis hector venom. (author)

  12. Leaves of Phragmites australis as potential atmospheric biomonitors of Platinum Group Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Giuseppe; Pavone, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    The increasing emissions of Platinum Group Elements (PGEs), namely Pt, Pd and Rh, may pose a significant risk to ecosystem processes and human health. A periodic assessment of PGEs distribution in the environment is thus of the utmost importance for the implementation of timely measures of mitigation. Although several studies have quantified PGEs in different life forms such as mammals, birds, fish, crustaceans, algae, mosses and even human beings, data about vascular plants need further surveys. This study aimed to test the suitability of the grass Phragmites australis (common reed) as a biomonitor of PGEs atmospheric pollution. The results showed that Pd and Pt concentrations in leaves are significantly higher in urban areas. In particular, Pd showed the highest range of values in line with current studies that consider palladium as the main element of traffic-related pollution. Overall, the leaves of Phragmites australis reflected the different gradient of PGEs emissions, and may thus be considered as potential biomonitors of atmospheric pollution. PMID:25596354

  13. Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus australis abundance in poorly known sites: a spatial expansion of colonies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Szteren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe establishment of new pinniped colonies is a consequence of complex dynamics in which some colonies may transform from haul-outs into breeding sites. The aim of this article was to estimate the abundance of Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus australis at two poorly known sites of Uruguay, the easternmost “Isla Verde-Islote Coronilla” (IV-IC and the westernmost “Las Pipas” (LP. From June 2008 to June 2009 count from boats were conducted at LP, and aerial censuses at Isla Verde. At LP both pinniped species were recorded, and the abundance was maximum in July with a total of 202 animals.O. flavescens was present throughout the year, mainly adult males, while A. australis was only observed from June to October. LP is defined as a haul-out structure used as resting area, especially for O. flavescens. At IV-IC between 225 and 521 O. flavescens were recorded. The number of animals increased in Spring and Summer. Females were the most abundant category and pups were recorded in March. According to the age structure and the presence of pups, we propose it would have and incipient reproductive activity. This colony should be monitored in relation with its category as a marine protected area.

  14. Acaricide activity of leaves extracts of Sambucus australis Schltdl. (Caprifoliaceae at 2% on engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe da Silva Krawczak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections caused by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus are responsible for the most of economic losses in producing-cattle countries in tropical and subtropical areas. Indiscriminate uses of chemical acaricides have contributed with the appearance of tick resistance to many drugs available in the marketplace, and it is a serious problem in the tick control. Flowers of Sambucus australis (South America, called "sabugueiro-from-Brazil", are used on infusions or decoctions forms in the folk medicine with diuretic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and laxative purpose, also employed for treating respiratory diseases in human. The main goal of this study was to evaluate in vitro potential of S. australis leaves extracts as an acaricide agent. Ethanol extract at 70% has been dehydrated and a fraction was suspended in 70% ethanol or in distillated water at final concentration of 2% (0.2mg-1. Using the immersion test of engorged females the efficiency results were obtained in 34% and 66% with the leaves extract diluted in water and 70% ethanol, respectively. This study is the first report on acaricidal activity of S. australis against cattle tick. Further studies to determine the active metabolites in different stages of S. australis could aid to identify suitable extracts to be tested in the R. (B. microplus control.

  15. Comparing the efficiency of Cyperus alternifolius and Phragmites australis in municipal wastewater treatment by subsurface constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Davod Hossein; Eslami, Hadi; Ehrampoosh, Mohamad Hasan; Ebrahimi, Asghar; Ghaneian, Mohamad Taghy; Ayatollah, Shirin; Mozayan, Mohamad Reza

    2013-04-15

    Nowadays, application of natural wastewater treatment systems such as wetland not only reduces economic costs and energy consumption, but also decreases environmental pollution. This study aimed to compare efficiency of Cyperus alternifolius and Phragmites australis in Municipal wastewater treatment by Subsurface Constructed Wetland Method. This is an applied-interventionnal study in which three reactors (control pilot, Cyperus alternifolius (umbrella palm) plant pilot and Phragmites australis (reed) plant pilot were designed by subsurface constructed wetland method. Then 90 samples were taken from input and output of reactors with four-day retention time. These samples were tested and finally the data were analyzed by Paired Sample Test statistical analysis. The results showed that removal efficiency of the parameters such as COD, BOD5, TSS, NO3-N, NH3-N, PO4-P, total coliform and fecal coliform was 74, 73, 84, 40, 36, 70, 33 and 38% in Cyperus alternifolius plant wetland, 44, 34, 77, 15, 0.3, 1, 17 and 26% in control wetland and 59, 54, 73, 6, 3, 10, 93 and 50 in Phragmites australis plant wetland, respectively. This reduction rate in all parameters- except fecal coliform- was statistically significant (p = 0.05). The results of this study showed that Cyperus alternifolius plant had higher efficiency in the removal of chemical parameters, whereas Phragmites australis plant had appropriate efficiency in the removal of microbiological parameters. Therefore, it can be concluded that application of these two plants can be effective in wastewater treatment. PMID:24494519

  16. Incretin secretion: direct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balk-Møller, Emilie; Holst, Jens Juul; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich

    2014-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are secreted from gastro-intestinal K- and L-cells, respectively, and play an important role in post-prandial blood glucose regulation. They do this by direct stimulation of the pancreatic β...... enzyme responsible for incretin degradation (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) is inhibited (drugs are already on the market) while the secretion of endogenous GLP-1 secretion is stimulated at the same time may prove particularly rewarding. In this section we review current knowledge on the mechanisms for direct...

  17. Natural humic substances effects on the life history traits of Latonopsis australis SARS (1888) (Cladocera--Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana Soares de Andrade; Santos, Thirza de Santana; Pestana, Edilene M S; Souza, Fábio Neves; Lage, Vivian Marina Gomes Barbosa; Nunesmaia, Bárbara Janaína Bezerra; Sena, Palloma Thaís Souza; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; da Silva, Eduardo Mendes

    2015-02-01

    Cultivation medium is one of the first aspects to be considered in zooplankton laboratory cultivation. The use of artificial media does not concern to reproduce natural conditions to the cultivations, which may be achieved by using natural organic compounds like humic substances (HS). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a concentrate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the Negro River (NR(1)) and an extraction of humic acids (HA) from humus produced by Eisenia andrei on the life history traits of laboratory-based Latonopsis australis SARS (1888). A cohort life table approach was used to provide information about the effectiveness of NR and HA as supplements for the artificial cultivation of L. australis. Additionally, we seek to observe a maximization of L. australis artificial cultivation fitness by expanding the range of HS concentrations. The first experiment demonstrated that the females of L. australis reared under NR10 (mgDOCL(-1)) may have experienced an acceleration of the population life cycle, as the females have proportionally reproduced more and lived shorter than controls. By contrast, the use of the HA did not improve life history traits considered. The expansion of the concentration range (5, 10, 20 and 50 mgDOCL(-1)) corroborated the patterns observed on the first assay. Results for the fitness estimates combined with shorter lifespans than controls demonstrated trade-offs between reproductive output and female longevity reared under NR conditions, with NR20 been suggested as the best L. australis cultivation medium. This response might be associated with hormone-like effects. PMID:25025739

  18. Root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  19. Les mots du secret

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Cet article analyse les reconfigurations sémantiques du lexique et des mots du secret en usage dans l’Europe du Sud entre le Moyen Âge et l’époque moderne. En partant des approches récentes du secret et de la dissimulation dans un contexte contemporain de revendication d’un « droit au secret », nous analysons comment l’historiographie actuelle des XVIe et XVIIe siècles aborde une histoire longue des régimes de positivité du secret en Europe. En partant de l’époque pré-moderne, nous étudions l...

  20. Phragmites australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Truong Tho; Sorrell, Brian K.; Lambertini, Carla;

    2016-01-01

    −) and transpiration rates increased in introduced versus native groups, whereas differences in SLA, leaf pigment concentrations and assimilation rates were due to phylogeographic origins. Despite intrinsic differences in the allocation of C and N in leaves, shoots and rhizome due to phylogeographic origin...

  1. Risque sécheresse et gestion de l’eau agricole en Australie

    OpenAIRE

    Lefebvre, Marianne; Thoyer, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    L'Australie a choisi d'améliorer l'efficience de l'usage de ses ressources en eau en développement les marchés de l'eau. Ce document décrit comment ces marchés ont été mis en place dans le Murray-Darling Basin et la manière dont s'articulent transferts permanents de droits d'eau et transferts temporaires d'eau dans le secteur agricole. Il montre aussi comment les irrigants peuvent utiliser ces marchés pour se constituer un porfolio de droits avec différents niveaux de sécurité qui leur permet...

  2. Pathology in skeletons of Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis from southern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Analía A; Macnie, Silvina V; Goodall, R Natalie P; Boy, Claudia C

    2016-06-15

    Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis is frequently seen off the coast of southern South America, where it feeds among coastal kelp beds and occasionally strands. We searched for macroscopic evidence of skeletal lesions in 78 specimens of Peale's dolphin from 2 museum collections, which contain almost all of the species' skeletons known in collections worldwide. Thirty-two specimens (41%) had some type of osteological abnormalities. In 21 cases (66%), congenital deformations were the most predominant abnormality found. Acquired lesions included (1) induced trauma: abnormal curvature (n=5 specimens) and fractures (n=2); (2) infectious diseases: spondylo-osteomyelitis (n=3); and (3) degenerative diseases: exostoses (n=8) and spondylosis deformans (n=4). It is noteworthy that all of these animals died incidentally in gillnet entanglement and were presumably healthy at the time of death. The effect that different osseous lesions may have on an animal's quality of life may depend on the area of the spine affected and the number of vertebrae involved.

  3. Crassulacean acid metabolism enhances underwater photosynthesis and diminishes photorespiration in the aquatic plant Isoetes australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, S.M.; Pulido Pérez, Cristina;

    2011-01-01

    Underwater photosynthesis by aquatic plants is often limited by low availability of CO2, and photorespiration can be high. Some aquatic plants utilize crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis. The benefits of CAM for increased underwater photosynthesis and suppression of photorespiration...... were evaluated for Isoetes australis, a submerged plant that inhabits shallow temporary rock pools. • Leaves high or low in malate were evaluated for underwater net photosynthesis and apparent photorespiration at a range of CO2 and O2 concentrations. • CAM activity was indicated by 9.7-fold higher leaf...... malate at dawn, compared with at dusk, and also by changes in the titratable acidity (lmol H+ equivalents) of leaves. Leaves high in malate showed not only higher underwater net photosynthesis at low external CO2 concentrations but also lower apparent photorespiration. Suppression by CAM of apparent...

  4. Sustainable Ethanol Production from Common Reed (Phragmites australis through Simultaneuos Saccharification and Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cotana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phragmites australis (common reed is a perennial grass that grows in wetlands or near inland waterways. Due to its fast-growing properties and low requirement in nutrients and water, this arboreal variety is recognized as a promising source of renewable energy although it is one of the least characterized energy crops. In this experiment, the optimization of the bioethanol production process from Phragmites australis was carried out. Raw material was first characterized according to the standard procedure (NREL to evaluate its composition in terms of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content. Common reed was pretreated by steam explosion process at three different severity factor (R0 values. The pretreatment was performed in order to reduce biomass recalcitrance and to make cellulose more accessible to enzymatic attack. After the pretreatment, a water insoluble substrate (WIS rich in cellulose and lignin and a liquid fraction rich in pentose sugars (xylose and arabinose and inhibitors were collected and analyzed. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF of the WIS was performed at three different solid loadings (SL 10%, 15%, 20% (w/w. The same enzyme dosage, equal to 20% (g enzyme/g cellulose, was used for all the WIS loadings. The efficiency of the whole process was evaluated in terms of ethanol overall yield (g ethanol/100 g raw material. The maximum ethanol overall yields achieved were 16.56 and 15.80 g ethanol/100 g RM dry basis for sample AP10 and sample AP4.4, respectively. The yields were reached working at lower solid loading (10% and at the intermediate LogR0 value for the former and at intermediate solid loading (15% and high LogR0 value for the latter, respectively.

  5. Otolith shape analysis as a tool for stock identification of the southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Leguá

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis (Norman, 1937, is an important demersal resource associated with the slope and continental shelf of southern Chile, Argentina and the Malvinas/Falkland Islands. Recent studies have reported schools of adult fish from Atlantic waters migrating along the southern Chilean coast in mid-winter, moving northwards to spawn in August (47°-51°S, and then returning to Atlantic waters, presumably to feed. The migratory pattern suggests the presence of one or more stock units associated with the South American coast. In the present study, "otolith morphometry" is used to determine the stock structure of M. australis based on applications of basic size descriptors (SDs (area, perimeter and otolith size, shape indices (SIs (circularity, squareness, shape factor, roundness, ellipticity, and normalised elliptical Fourier descriptors (NEFDs. Samples were collected during the winter and spring of 2010, during the reproductive period, in the economic zone of southern Chile (36°-57°S, in the Pacific Ocean and around the Falkland Islands economic zone (50°-52°S in the Atlantic Ocean. Analyses were conducted to include the effects of size, sex and age. A stepwise canonical discriminant analysis showed that fish were successfully discriminated with SDs, SIs and NEFDs. In this analysis, 86.4% and 70.1% of the fish were correctly classified as belonging to the Atlantic and Pacific stocks, respectively. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that the mean values of the NEFDs, SDs, and SIs did not vary significantly between sexes within areas (P > 0.05, but varied significantly between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans (P < 0.05. These results highlighted that otolith shape analysis can be a useful tool to evaluate the potential level of mixing in feeding areas where both stocks, the Pacific and Atlantic units, are expected to co-occur.

  6. Uptake of Carbamazepine by rhizomes and endophytic bacteria of Phragmites australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres eSauvetre

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic and mood-stabilizing drug which is used widely in Europe and North America. In the environment, it is found as a persistent and recalcitrant conta¬mi-nant, being one of the most prominent hazardous pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs in effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. Phragmites australis is one of the species with both, the highest potential of detoxification and phytoremediation. It has been used successfully in the treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater. Recently, the identification of endophytic micro¬organisms from different plant species growing in contaminated sites has provided a list of candidates which could be used as bio-inoculants for bioremediation of difficult compounds. In this study, Phragmites australis plants were exposed to 5 mg/L of carbamazepine. After 9 days the plants had removed 90% of the initial concentration. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from these plants and further characterized. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the majority of these isolates belong to three groups: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Carbamazepine uptake and plant growth promoting (PGP traits were analyzed among the isolates. Ninety percent of the isolates produce indole acetic acid (IAA and all of them possess at least one of the PGP traits tested. One isolate identified as Chryseobacterium taeanense combines good carbamazepine uptake and all of the PGP traits. Rhizobium daejeonense can remove carbamazepine and produces 23 µg/mL of IAA. Diaphorobacter nitroreducens and Achromobacter mucicolens are suitable for carbamazepine removal while both, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas lini show high siderophore production and phosphate solubilization. Alone or in combination, these isolates might be applied as inoculates in constructed wetlands in order to enhance the phyto-remediation of carbamazepine during wastewater

  7. Production of (+)-5-deoxystrigol by Lotus japonicus root culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yukihiro; Ueyama, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Lotus japonicus roots, cultured in a modified B5 medium, produced and secreted germination stimulants that induced Striga hermonthica seed germination. The germination-inducing activity was detected both in the roots and the culture filtrate. Following bioassay-guided purification procedures, an active compound was isolated from hexane extracts of the roots and the culture filtrate. Based on chromatographic behaviour on HPLC, and 1H NMR, UV, MS and CD spectroscopic analyses, the germination stimulant was identified as (+)-5-deoxystrigol.

  8. Bronchial secretion concentrations of tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M R; Schoell, J; Hicklin, G; Kasik, J E; Coleman, D

    1982-02-01

    The mean concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions from patients with pneumonia were almost two times greater than secretions from patients free of lung infection. Mean tobramycin bronchial secretion to serum concentration ratios also were higher when obtained from infected lungs (0.66 versus 0.17) These data suggest that lung infection enhances the concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions. PMID:7065524

  9. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    YOUSOFZADEH, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  10. Monitoring Phragmites australis increases from 1937 to 1976 in the Siyai Lagoon (Natal, South Africa by means of air photo interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Weisser

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available The colonization o f the Siyai Lagoon on the north coast of Natal by Phragmites australis was studied by means of  air photo interpretation. It was possible to locate and estimate P. australis areas for 1957 (0,74 ha, 1965 (1,65 ha, 1969 (1,93 ha and 1976 (2,94 ha. Phragmites australis first inhabited the shores of the middle section o f the lagoon followed by rapid expansion in the lower section. The upper section was colonized only at its lower end by expansion from the middle section. It is suggested that P. australis was unsuccessful in this section because of competition by the  Hibiscus tiliaceus—Barringtonia racemosa  Lagoon Fringe Forest. This same community is shading out  P. australis in some places. The notable increase in the rate of advance of land and littoral vegetation into the Siyai Lagoon was caused by sugar farming activities leading to erosion and sedimentation in the lagoon. A vegetation age gradient was observed from the upper section to the mouth region. The colonization of most of the Siyai Lagoon except the immediate mouth zone by  P. australis Reedswamp and  Hibiscus tiliaceus—Barringtonia racemosa Lagoon Fringe Forest, can be expected before the turn of the century. Dredging and mechanical control of vegetation will become necessary if major open water spaces are to be maintained.

  11. Aluminum-activated Oxalate Secretion does not Associate with Internal Content among Some Oxalate Accumulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li Yang; Lei Zhang; Shao Jian Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Although aluminum (AI)-activated secretion of oxalate has been considered to be an Important AI-exclusion mechanism,whether it is a general response in oxalate accumulators and related to oxalate content in roots are still not clear.Here,we examined the oxalate secretion and oxalate content in some oxalate accumulators,and investigated the role of oxalate secretion in AI resistance.When oxalate content in amaranth roots was decreased by about 50% with the increased ratio of NH4+-N to NO3——N in nutrient solution,the amount of AI-activated oxalate secretion still remained constant.There was no relationship between the content of the water soluble oxalate in four species of oxalate accumulators and the amount of the AI-activated oxalate secretion in roots.Furthermore,oxalate secretion is poorly associated with AI resistance among these species.Based on the above results,we concluded that although all of the oxalate accumulators tested could secrete oxalate rapidly,the density of anion channels in plasma membrane may play a more important role in AI-activated oxalate secretion.Key words: aluminum toxicity; Amaranthus; anion channel; oxalate accumulator; oxalate secretion.

  12. Ovarian tumors secreting insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Chiarelli, Silvia; Trento, Mariangela; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Pasquali, Claudio; De Carlo, Eugenio; Dassie, Francesca; Mioni, Roberto; Rebellato, Andrea; Fallo, Francesco; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Martini, Chiara; Vettor, Roberto; Maffei, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation. PMID:25896552

  13. Parasite body volume and infracommunity patterns in the southern pomfret Brama australis (Pisces: Bramidae) Volumen corporal del parásito y patrones infracomunitarios en la reineta Brama australis (Pisces: Bramidae)

    OpenAIRE

    MARIO GEORGE-NASCIMENTO; FÉLIX GARCÍAS; GABRIELA MUÑOZ

    2002-01-01

    The patterns of infracommunity descriptors (diversity, dominance, abundance) are compared when calculated with the number and body volume of the parasites in a sample of 26 southern pomfrets Brama australis collected in the area off Talcahuano, Chile. No numerical infracommunity descriptor was correlated with its corresponding volumetric descriptor. This single result casts doubts about the general validity of the infracommunity patterns described in the literature so far, because they are al...

  14. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  15. Phytoremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Pb and V) in gas refinery wastewater using common reed (Phragmitis australis)

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Hossein Hamidian; Majid Atashgahi; Nematollah Khorasani

    2014-01-01

    Industrial wastewaters are of the major sources of heavy metal pollution in the environment. In the Middle East, gas and oil industry is the major source of heavy metal pollution and releases significant amounts of metals into the terrestrial and aquatic environment. In this research the capability of the common reed (Phragmitis australis) in absorbing heavy metals Cd, Pb and V from the wastewater of a gas refinery plant in Iran was investigated. The plant samples were collected from the vici...

  16. Potential use of Erica andevalensis and Erica australis in phytoremediation of sulphide mine environments: São Domingos, Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Abreu; M.T Tavares; Batista, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The area around the São Domingos copper mine (Iberian Pyrite Belt) is subject of great environmental concern as acid mine water occurs several kilometres downstream of the mine. In addition thousands of tons of mine waste are present. Erica australis and Erica andevalensis, which are two spontaneous plant species of this area, have been studied with regard to their potential for phytostabilization. Soils and plants from São Domingos and from a reference site (Moreanes) were analys...

  17. Entanglements of right whales, Eubalaena australis (Cetacea, Mysticeti), in the 2010 breeding season in Santa Catarina state, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mônica Pontalti; Mônica Danielski

    2011-01-01

    Right whales (Eubalaena australis) have been suffering with anthropogenic activities such as pollution, marine traffic and entanglement in fishing nets. The entanglement of right whales grows each breeding season on the southern coast of Santa Catarina state, and can cause strands and even death. During the 2010 breeding season, six entanglements among immature and adult whales were recorded. In most of the cases, the whales kept swimming slowly and didn’t want to approximate the whale watchi...

  18. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  19. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  20. Effects of parasitism and environment on shell size of the South American intertidal mud snail Heleobia australis (Gastropoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, Pilar; Bonel, Nicolás; Cazzaniga, Néstor J.; Martorelli, Sergio R.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of parasitism and certain environmental factors on the shell size of Heleobia australis (Hydrobiidae, Cochliopinae). We report sporocysts and metacercariae of Microphallus simillimus (Microphallidae, Trematoda) parasitizing the gonad and digestive gland of H. australis specimens from two sites of Bahía Blanca estuary, Argentina. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher (34.17% in winter and 68.14% in late spring) in snails from the outer estuary at Site 2 than in those from the inner estuary at Site 1 (5.88% and 4.71% respectively). The only known definitive host for this digenean is the white-backed stilt Himantopus melanurus (Recurvirostridae, Aves), most abundant in the estuary during winter. Parasitism by M. simillimus causes variations in the shell dimensions of H. australis, the shells of infected snails being narrower than those of uninfected snails. Snails from Site 2 were found in general to be significantly smaller than those at Site 1, possibly as a result of differences in environmental factors such as the degree of exposure to wave energy, the allocation of energy to reproduction rather than growth (induced by predation and/or parasitic castrators) and anthropogenic stressors.

  1. Genital morphology of the male South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis and biological implications Morfologia dos órgãos genitais do macho do Lobo marinho (Arctocephalus australis e implicações biológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Sander D. Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Male capacity for spreading genes to a great number of descendents and to determine population dynamics depend directly on the genital organs. Morphological studies in pinnipeds are scarce and the functional meaning of some characteristics has never been discussed. We hypothesized that Arctocephalus australis (A. australis shows morphophysiological adaptations in order to guarantee the perpetuation of the species in the unique annual mating season. Seven males, dead from natural causes, had their genital organs collected and fixed for morphological description. Some features differ from other described mammalian males and are closely related to the biology and reproductive cycle of this species, as the scrotal epidermis, absence of glandular portion in the ductus deferens and spermatogenic epithelium suggest a recrudescent testis period. The corona glandis exhibits a singular arrangement: its erectile border looks like a formation of petals and its association with the os penis gives a "lily-flower" form to this region. We propose the name margo petaliformis to this particular erectile border of the corona glandis because of its similarity to a flower corola. The male genital organs of A. australis show morphological features compatible with adaptation to environment requirements and reproductive efficiency.A capacidade do macho de espalhar seus genes a um grande número de descendentes e determinar a dinâmica populacional depende diretamente dos seus órgãos genitais. Estudos morfológicos em pinípedes são escassos e o significado funcional de algumas de suas características ecológicas ainda foi pouco discutido. Nossa hipótese é que Arctocephalus australis (A. australis apresenta adaptações morfofisiológicas em seus órgãos genitais capazes de interagir com o meio e garantir a perpetuação da espécie que apresenta apenas uma época de acasalamento que ocorre uma vez a cada ano. Sete A. australis machos, mortos recentes por causas

  2. Estudo comparativo entre os sincrânios de Otaria byronia e Arctocephalus australis (Pinnipedia, Otariidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sanfelice

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Observou-se grande variabilidade anatômica no sincrânio de Otaria byronia (Blainville, 1820 e de Arctocephalus australis (Zimmerman, 1783, com correspondentes implicações na sistemática dos Otariidae. As principais diferenças observadas entre as duas espécies foram a largura do rostro, exposição (ou não do etmóide na órbita, vacuidade palatino/pterigóide, extensão do maxilar, concavidade e forma do palato, tamanho/forma da órbita/processo supra-orbital, altura/forma do palato, tamanho/forma da órbita/processo supra-orbital, altura/forma do arco zigomático, forma do hâmulo pterigóide, tamanho de processos e cristas em geral, esfenóide e neurocrânio; presença ou não do canal vidiano e transverso; forma do pétreo e proporções do processo angular secundário. Enquanto algumas diferenças (etmóide são bastante incomuns entre espécies contemporâneas pertencentes à mesma família, muitas outras são de natureza alométrica. Algumas diferenças são peramórficas: tamanho do crânio, do palato e das cristas (hipermórficos em O. byronia. Outros caracteres são pedomórficos em O. byronia: forame incisivo, processo maxilar do frontal e canais vidianos. As principais diferenças entre machos e fêmeas de O. byronia, e similiraridades entre os machos desta espécie e A. australis estão relacionadas a modificações no tempo/taxa de desenvolvimento. Alguns caracteres usualmente empregados na sistemática do grupo não foram corroborados, principalmente referentes à fossa naso-labialis, sutura jugo-temporal, meato acústico interno, entotimpânico e extensão do pétreo.

  3. Dispersal and population structure at different spatial scales in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittlein Marcelo J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population genetic structure of subterranean rodent species is strongly affected by demographic (e.g. rates of dispersal and social structure and stochastic factors (e.g. random genetic drift among subpopulations and habitat fragmentation. In particular, gene flow estimates at different spatial scales are essential to understand genetic differentiation among populations of a species living in a highly fragmented landscape. Ctenomys australis (the sand dune tuco-tuco is a territorial subterranean rodent that inhabits a relatively secure, permanently sealed burrow system, occurring in sand dune habitats on the coastal landscape in the south-east of Buenos Aires province, Argentina. Currently, this habitat is threatened by urban development and forestry and, therefore, the survival of this endemic species is at risk. Here, we assess population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal among individuals of this species at different spatial scales using 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Furthermore, we evaluate the relative importance of sex and habitat configuration in modulating the dispersal patterns at these geographical scales. Results Our results show that dispersal in C. australis is not restricted at regional spatial scales (~ 4 km. Assignment tests revealed significant population substructure within the study area, providing support for the presence of two subpopulations from three original sampling sites. Finally, male-biased dispersal was found in the Western side of our study area, but in the Eastern side no apparent philopatric pattern was found, suggesting that in a more continuous habitat males might move longer distances than females. Conclusions Overall, the assignment-based approaches were able to detect population substructure at fine geographical scales. Additionally, the maintenance of a significant genetic structure at regional (~ 4 km and small (less than 1 km spatial scales despite apparently

  4. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  6. Bucarest, Strictement Secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Mihai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available L’émission Bucarest, strictement secret représente un documentaire organisésous la forme d’une série télé, qui dépeint le Bucarest à partir de deux perspectives: de l’histoire, de la conte et du lieu. La valeur d’une cité réside dans l’existence d’une mystique, d’un romantisme abscons, à part et des caractères empruntés de drames de Shakespeare, mystérieux, serrés d’angoisse et des secrets qui assombrissent leur existence. Par conséquence, le rôle du metteur en scène est de dévoiler leur vraie identité et de remettre en place, autant que possible, la vérité.

  7. Adipocytes Secrete Leukotrienes

    OpenAIRE

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Filloux, Chantal; Amghar, Hind; Pons, Catherine; Bourlier, Virginie; Galitzky, Jean; Paul A. Grimaldi; Féral, Chloé C.; Bouloumié, Anne; Obberghen, Emmanuel Van; Neels, Jaap G.

    2012-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and many important aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses are regulated by LTs. Key members of the LT synthesis pathway are overexpressed in adipose tissue (AT) during obesity, resulting in increased LT levels in this tissue. We observed that several mouse adipocyte cell lines and primary adipocytes from mice and humans both can secrete large amounts of LTs. Furthermore, this production increases with a high-fat diet (HFD) and ...

  8. Portillo's State Secrets: Mysteries

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, David

    2015-01-01

    Blog/article commissioned by The National Archives to accompany Episode 4 of the BBC 2 series 'Portillo's State Secrets' (BBC 2, 26 March 2015). The article discusses and places in historical context the contents of Metropolitan Police files on the Jack the Ripper murders; the investigation of the 'Kitchener Coffin Hoax' of WW1 and the Ministry of Defence file on the so-called Rendlesham Forest UFO incident at RAF Woodbridge in 1980.

  9. Studying the molecular gas towards the R Coronae Australis dark cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Paron, S; Ortega, M E; Cunningham, M; Jones, P A; Rubio, M

    2016-01-01

    The R Coronae Australis dark cloud is one of the closest star-forming regions to the Sun. The cloud is known to be very active in star formation, harboring many Herbig-Haro objects (HHs) and Molecular Hydrogen emission-line Objects (MHOs). In this work we present results from molecular observations (a $5.5^{'}\\times5.5^{'}$ map of $^{12}$CO J$=3-2$ and HCO$^{+}$ J$=4-3$, and a single spectrum of N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ J$=4-3$) obtained with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) towards the R CrA dark cloud with an angular and spectral resolution of 22$^{"}$ and 0.11 km s$^{-1}$, respectively. From the $^{12}$CO J$=3-2$ line we found kinematical spectral features strongly suggesting the presence of outflows towards a region populated by several HHs and MHOs. Moreover, most of these objects lie within an HCO$^{+}$ maximum, suggesting that its emission arises from an increasement of its abundance due to the chemistry triggered by the outflow activity. Additionally, we are presenting the first reported de...

  10. An exploration of common reed (Phragmites australis bioenergy potential in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vaičekonytė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In North America, reed (Phragmites australis is typically considered to be a weed although it provides important ecosystem services. Small, sparse, patchy or mixed reedbeds are more suitable as habitat for many species than extensive dense reedbeds, whose habitat functions can be enhanced by the selective removal of biomass. We propose that above-ground reed biomass could be harvested for bioenergy, at the same time improving habitat for biodiversity by thinning or fragmenting the more extensive reedbeds. Biofuel pellets manufactured from reeds harvested at Montréal (Canada had moisture content 6.4 %, energy content 16.9 kJ g-1 (dry mass, ash content 3.44 %, and chloride content 1962 ppm. Thus, reed as a material for fuel pellet manufacture is similar to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, which is commonly cultivated for that purpose and requires higher inputs than harvested wild reed. We discuss these findings in the context of environmental considerations and conclude that the bioenergy potential of reed could most expediently be realised in North America by combining material harvested from the widespread spontaneously occurring reedbeds with organic waste from other sources to create mixed biofuels. However, reeds with high levels of chlorine, sulphur or metals should not be burned to avoid air pollution or equipment damage unless these problems are mitigated by means of appropriate season of harvest, equipment, combustion regime, or use of a mixed feedstock.

  11. Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis) Reproductive Success is Influenced by Krill (Euphausia superba) Density and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyboth, Elisa; Groch, Karina R; Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Reid, Keith; Flores, Paulo A C; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive success of southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) depends on body condition and, therefore, on foraging success. This, in turn, might be affected by climatically driven change in the abundance of the species main prey, krill (Euphausia superba), on the feeding grounds. Annual data on southern right whale number of calves were obtained from aerial surveys carried out between 1997 and 2013 in southern Brazil, where the species concentrate during their breeding season. The number of calves recorded each year varied from 7 to 43 ( = 21.11 ± 11.88). Using cross-correlation analysis we examined the response of the species to climate anomalies and krill densities. Significant correlations were found with krill densities (r = 0.69, p = 0.002, lag 0 years), Oceanic Niño Index (r = -0.65, p = 0.03, lag 6 years), Antarctic Oscillation (r = 0.76, p = 0.01, lag 7 years) and Antarctic sea ice area (r = -0.68, p = 0.002, lag 0 years). Our results suggest that global climate indices influence southern right whale breeding success in southern Brazil by determining variation in food (krill) availability for the species. Therefore, increased frequency of years with reduced krill abundance, due to global warming, is likely to reduce the current rate of recovery of southern right whales from historical overexploitation.

  12. Constraints on photoevaporation models from (lack of) radio emission in the Corona Australis protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Manara, Carlo Felice; Forbrich, Jan; Pascucci, Ilaria; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Goddi, Ciriaco; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Takami, Michihiro; Testi, Leonardo; .,

    2014-01-01

    Photoevaporation due to high-energy stellar photons is thought to be one of the main drivers of protoplanetary disk dispersal. The fully or partially ionized disk surface is expected to produce free-free continuum emission at centimeter (cm) wavelengths that can be routinely detected with interferometers such as the upgraded Very Large Array (VLA). We use deep (rms noise down to 8 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in the field of view center) 3.5 cm maps of the nearby (130 pc) Corona Australis (CrA) star formation (SF) region to constrain disk photoevaporation models. We find that the radio emission from disk sources in CrA is surprisingly faint. Only 3 out of 10 sources within the field of view are detected, with flux densities of order $10^2$ $\\mu$Jy. However, a significant fraction of their emission is non-thermal. Typical upper limits for non-detections are $3\\sigma\\sim 60~\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$. Assuming analytic expressions for the free-free emission from extreme-UV (EUV) irradiation, we derive stringent upper limits to ...

  13. Identification and quantification of phenolics in Australian native mint (Mentha australis R. Br.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kitty S C; Konczak, Izabela; Zhao, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Australian native mints have traditionally been used by the aboriginal people for natural remedies; however, their bioactive components have not been studied. Antioxidant capacity and composition of phenolic compounds of Mentha australis R. Br., Lamiaceae were investigated for the first time. Phenolic compounds were analyzed by HPLC photodiode array detector, liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Aqueous methanolic extract of the mint exhibited comparable antioxidant capacity to the common spearmint. Major compounds identified in the extract were rosmarinic acid (160.4 ± 0.85 μg mg(-1)purified extract), neoponcirin (145.0 ± 0.42 μg gallic acid equivalent(GAE) mg(-1)), narirutin (30.3 ± 0.02 μg GAE mg(-1)), chlorogenic acid (15.4 ± 0.05 μg mg(-1)) and biochanin A (9.6 ± 0.06 μg GAE mg(-1)), while minor compounds were caffeic acid, apigenin, hesperetin and naringenin. Neoponcirin and biochanin A were identified for the first time in the Mentha genus.

  14. Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis) Reproductive Success is Influenced by Krill (Euphausia superba) Density and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyboth, Elisa; Groch, Karina R; Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Reid, Keith; Flores, Paulo A C; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive success of southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) depends on body condition and, therefore, on foraging success. This, in turn, might be affected by climatically driven change in the abundance of the species main prey, krill (Euphausia superba), on the feeding grounds. Annual data on southern right whale number of calves were obtained from aerial surveys carried out between 1997 and 2013 in southern Brazil, where the species concentrate during their breeding season. The number of calves recorded each year varied from 7 to 43 ( = 21.11 ± 11.88). Using cross-correlation analysis we examined the response of the species to climate anomalies and krill densities. Significant correlations were found with krill densities (r = 0.69, p = 0.002, lag 0 years), Oceanic Niño Index (r = -0.65, p = 0.03, lag 6 years), Antarctic Oscillation (r = 0.76, p = 0.01, lag 7 years) and Antarctic sea ice area (r = -0.68, p = 0.002, lag 0 years). Our results suggest that global climate indices influence southern right whale breeding success in southern Brazil by determining variation in food (krill) availability for the species. Therefore, increased frequency of years with reduced krill abundance, due to global warming, is likely to reduce the current rate of recovery of southern right whales from historical overexploitation. PMID:27306583

  15. No allocation trade-offs between flowering and sproutingin the lignotuberous, Mediterranean shrub Erica australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Alberto; Moreno, José M.

    2001-04-01

    Trade-offs between allocation to sexual or vegetative regeneration capacity are well established as a driving force in the life history patterns of plants in fire-prone environments. However, it is not known whether such trade-offs exist in plants which after aboveground removing disturbances, such as fire, may regenerate by sexual (seeding) or asexual (sprouting) mechanisms. We evaluated whether in the fire-recruiting resprouter Erica australis, which after fire can regenerate by seedling establishment or resprouting, a larger investment in flowers and seeds prior to being disturbed by clipping its aboveground parts would decrease subsequent sprouting, that is, its vegetative regeneration capacity. We analysed the relationships between flower and seed production and the ensuing production and growth of sprouts of six plants from thirteen different sites in central-western Spain. We found no significant relationships between measures of sexual reproductive effort and resprout production and growth 6 months after clipping the aboveground parts of the plants. No evidence of trade-offs between sexual and asexual efforts was found. Furthermore, no significant relationship was found between lignotuber total non-structural carbohydrates and sexual reproductive effort. In addition, 2 years after the disturbance, resprout biomass was positively and significantly correlated with sexual reproductive effort prior to the disturbance. This indicates that growth of resprouts was higher at the sites where plants made a greater reproductive effort. The sites that were more favourable to producing flowers and seeds could also be more favourable to resprouting.

  16. Androctonus australis hector venom contributes to the interaction between neuropeptides and mast cells in pulmonary hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaïr-Yousfi, Imène; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima; Hammoudi-Triki, Djelila

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome are frequent symptoms observed in the most severe cases of scorpion envenomation. The uncontrolled transmigration of leukocyte cells into the lung interstitium and alveolar space and pulmonary edema may be the cause of death. Mast cells can release various inflammatory mediators known to be involved in the development of lung edema following scorpion venom injection. The present study was designed to determine the evidence of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and the involvement of mast cell activation to induce pulmonary edema and to increase vascular permeability after Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom administration. To this end, mast cells were depleted using compound 48/80 (C48/80). Furthermore, the involvement of tachykinin NK1 receptors expressed on mast cell membranes was elucidated by their blocking with an antagonist. On the other hand, the ability of Aah venom to increase vascular permeability and to induce edema was also assessed by measuring the amount of Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and in the lungs of mice. Pulmonary edema, as assessed by the levels of EBD extravasation, was completely inhibited in compound 48/80-treated animals. Depletion by stimuli non-immunological C48/80 component markedly reduced induced inflammatory response following the venom administration. The mast cells seem to play an important role in the development of lung injury and the increase of vascular permeability in mice following the subcutaneous administration of Aah scorpion venom through the NK1 receptor. PMID:25601496

  17. Diabody mixture providing full protection against experimental scorpion envenoming with crude Androctonus australis venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Tommaso, Anne; Juste, Matthieu O; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Billiald, Philippe; Aubrey, Nicolas

    2012-04-20

    Androctonus australis is primarily involved in envenomations in North Africa, notably in Tunisia and Algeria, and constitutes a significant public health problem in this region. The toxicity of the venom is mainly due to various neurotoxins that belong to two distinct structural and immunological groups, group I (the AahI and AahIII toxins) and group II (AahII). Here, we report the use of a diabody mixture in which the molar ratio matches the characteristics of toxins and polymorphism of the venom. The mixture consists of the Db9C2 diabody (anti-group I) and the Db4C1op diabody (anti-AahII), the latter being modified to facilitate in vitro production and purification. The effectiveness of the antivenom was tested in vivo under conditions simulating scorpion envenomation. The intraperitoneal injection of 30 μg of the diabody mixture protected almost all the mice exposed to 3 LD(50) s.c. of venom. We also show that the presence of both diabodies is necessary for the animals to survive. Our results are the first demonstration of the strong protective power of small quantities of antivenom used in the context of severe envenomation with crude venom. PMID:22375011

  18. Identification and quantification of phenolics in Australian native mint (Mentha australis R. Br.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kitty S C; Konczak, Izabela; Zhao, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Australian native mints have traditionally been used by the aboriginal people for natural remedies; however, their bioactive components have not been studied. Antioxidant capacity and composition of phenolic compounds of Mentha australis R. Br., Lamiaceae were investigated for the first time. Phenolic compounds were analyzed by HPLC photodiode array detector, liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Aqueous methanolic extract of the mint exhibited comparable antioxidant capacity to the common spearmint. Major compounds identified in the extract were rosmarinic acid (160.4 ± 0.85 μg mg(-1)purified extract), neoponcirin (145.0 ± 0.42 μg gallic acid equivalent(GAE) mg(-1)), narirutin (30.3 ± 0.02 μg GAE mg(-1)), chlorogenic acid (15.4 ± 0.05 μg mg(-1)) and biochanin A (9.6 ± 0.06 μg GAE mg(-1)), while minor compounds were caffeic acid, apigenin, hesperetin and naringenin. Neoponcirin and biochanin A were identified for the first time in the Mentha genus. PMID:26304400

  19. Resource partitioning by two large planktivorous fishes Micromesistius australis and Macruronus magellanicus in the Southwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickle, Paul; Arkhipkin, Alexander I.; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir; Stocks, Andrew; Taylor, Alison

    2009-08-01

    The ontogenetic, seasonal, bathymetric and regional variations in the feeding spectrum of 922 specimens of southern blue whiting Micromesistius australis and 512 specimens of hoki Macruronus magellanicus were studied on the Falkland Islands' shelf (Southwest Atlantic) between November 1999 and April 2003. A total of 49 different prey items were found in the stomach contents of the two species, with the hyperiid Themisto gaudichaudii and Euphausiacea being amongst the most important prey. Although the species composition did not change over fish size, the proportions of individual prey items in their diets did, with an increase in T. gaudichaudii and Euphausiacea with increasing fish size in southern blue whiting. The opposite occurred in hoki. Seasonal variations in the diet were found to mirror the seasonal abundance of prey around the Falkland Islands for the two species. Intra-specific differences in the diet of both predators reflected the distribution of prey, which in turn was determined by the water structure in the two regions sampled, leading to very different diets. In the limited time that the two species occupied the same space there was little or no competition resulting in almost total segregation of their trophic niches in space and time.

  20. Pathology in skeletons of Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis from southern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Analía A; Macnie, Silvina V; Goodall, R Natalie P; Boy, Claudia C

    2016-06-15

    Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis is frequently seen off the coast of southern South America, where it feeds among coastal kelp beds and occasionally strands. We searched for macroscopic evidence of skeletal lesions in 78 specimens of Peale's dolphin from 2 museum collections, which contain almost all of the species' skeletons known in collections worldwide. Thirty-two specimens (41%) had some type of osteological abnormalities. In 21 cases (66%), congenital deformations were the most predominant abnormality found. Acquired lesions included (1) induced trauma: abnormal curvature (n = 5 specimens) and fractures (n = 2); (2) infectious diseases: spondylo-osteomyelitis (n = 3); and (3) degenerative diseases: exostoses (n = 8) and spondylosis deformans (n = 4). It is noteworthy that all of these animals died incidentally in gillnet entanglement and were presumably healthy at the time of death. The effect that different osseous lesions may have on an animal's quality of life may depend on the area of the spine affected and the number of vertebrae involved. PMID:27304866

  1. Discovery of Extremely Embedded X-ray Sources in the R Coronae Australis Star Forming Core

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Petre, R; White, N E; Stelzer, B; Nedachi, K; Kobayashi, N; Tokunaga, A T; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Petre, Rob; White, Nicholas E.; Stelzer, Beate; Nedachi, Ko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2005-01-01

    With the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories, we detected two extremely embedded X-ray sources in the R Corona Australis (R CrA) star forming core, near IRS 7. These sources, designated as XB and XA, have X-ray absorption columns of ~3e23 cm-2 equivalent to AV ~180 mag. They are associated with the VLA centimeter radio sources 10E and 10W, respectively. XA is the counterpart of the near-infrared source IRS 7, whereas XB has no K-band counterpart above 19.4 mag. This indicates that XB is younger than typical Class I protostars, probably a Class 0 protostar or in an intermediate phase between Class 0 and Class I. The X-ray luminosity of XB varied between 29

  2. Impact of harvesting and fire on Phragmites australis reed quality in Tembe Elephant Park, Maputaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.W. van Rooyen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In Maputaland, South Africa, the common reed (Phragmites australis is used extensively for hut building, fencing, craftwork and thatching. As a result of over-harvestingmost reed beds in communal areas have been degraded and are no longer producing reeds of the desired quality. At present the most productive reed beds are all found inconservation areas. The KwaMsomi area of the Muzi Swamp in the Tembe Elephant Park has been allocated to the Sibonisweni community for harvesting purposes. Thiscommunity has recently requested Ezemvelo KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife for additional areas for harvesting on the grounds that the current site was no longer yielding reeds of suitable quality. The main objective of this study was therefore to determine whether there was a decline in reed quality in the KwaMsomi harvested area. The results of thisstudy suggest that harvested areas contained more thin, short reeds than unharvested areas. Fire can be used to increase reed diameter in harvested areas, but will not significantly affect reed height. Ideally, reeds should only be harvested after the active growth period, when most of the nutrient reserves have been translocated to the rhizomes andthe buds are still dormant. To improve reed quality a three-year rotational harvesting programme should be implemented to allow the reeds to recover fully before being harvested again.

  3. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO2, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14C acetate and 14C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  4. Lipids in airway secretions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O' Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO/sub 2/, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors /sup 14/C acetate and /sup 14/C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway.

  5. Response of Phragmites australis Morphostructure to the Different Habitats in the Yellow River Delta%芦苇形态结构对黄河三角洲不同生境的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩鹏; 吴耿; 吴勇泉; 项俊; 余龙江

    2011-01-01

    Plant morphological structures always adapts to the environment.The anatomical characteristics of leaves and roots of Phragmites australis in estuary and inland area of the Yellow River Delta were observed with light microscope and the reed leaf epidermis structure was observed by scanning electron microscope.The results showed that the leaves of Phragmites australis in two regions were identical in general structure,which had many bulliform cells on the upper surface of leaves,and a mass of sunken stoma on the lower surface.For the reed leaves in estuary,the vascular bundle sheath cells spread closely to upper epidermis and some vascular bundle sheath cells break through lower epidermis.In addition,wax ornamentation was presenton the surface of the leaves.While the vascular bundle sheath cells of reed leaves in inland were bigger in size and some had two double cells.For the reed roots in estuary,mediopellis cells differentiate into aerenchyma and casparian strip was formed on endoderm.The characteristics of the reed roots and leaves reflected the ecological adaptation to the habitats in which the plants grow.%植物的形态结构总是与环境相适应。采用光学显微技术和环境扫描电镜技术对黄河三角洲新生湿地河口区和内陆区两种生境下芦苇(Phragmites australis)根解剖结构、叶片解剖和超微结构进行了对比分析。研究结果表明,芦苇叶片和根的形态结构与生态环境有关;两种生境下,芦苇叶片上表皮均有明显泡状细胞群分布,芦苇上下表皮均有气孔分布,且下陷;在河口区,芦苇叶片维管束鞘细胞近上表皮处有较大程度延伸,下表皮处常延伸至近表皮,呈开放状态,叶片表面常有蜡质覆盖;在内陆区,芦苇叶片维管束鞘细胞较大,有的为两层;此外,河口区芦苇根的中皮层细胞分化为明显的通气组织,内皮层凯氏带明显,而内陆区芦苇根的中皮层细胞排列规则,呈

  6. Afrokoko Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Give us a little background information about Afrokoko Roots.How long have you been performing together?It's an international Afrobeat outfit that I founded in Beijing three years ago.I founded it in order to show Chinese people that Africa is beyond what they see and hear on TV.For the purpose of cultural exchange,I hope it can help the Chinese learn about African culture,music,fashion,history and much more.Our band features two dancers,two backup singers,two percussionists,four brass players,a keyboard player,a guitar player and a drummer- and me as the lead vocal,drummer and dancer,which makes for live performances that are equally exciting sonically as they are visually.We have been traveling around,and so far,we have toured and performed in many Chinese cities such as Dalian (Liaoning Province),Hohhot (Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region) and Haikou (Hainan Province).

  7. Effects of sediment burial disturbance on macro and microelement dynamics in decomposing litter of Phragmites australis in the coastal marsh of the Yellow River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigao; Mou, Xiaojie

    2016-03-01

    From April 2008 to November 2009, a field decomposition experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of sediment burial on macro (C, N) and microelement (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Mn) variations in decomposing litter of Phragmites australis in the coastal marsh of the Yellow River estuary. Three one-off sediment burial treatments [no sediment burial (0 mm year(-1), S0), current sediment burial (100 mm year(-1), S10), and strong sediment burial (200 mm year(-1), S20)] were laid in different decomposition sites. Results showed that sediment burials showed significant influence on the decomposition rate of P. australis, in the order of S10 (0.001990 day(-1)) ≈ S20 (0.001710 day(-1)) > S0 (0.000768 day(-1)) (p macro and microelement in decomposing litters of the three burial depths exhibited different temporal variations except for Cu, Zn, and Ni. No significant differences in C, N, Pb, Cr, Zn, and Mn concentrations were observed among the three burial treatments except for Cu and Ni (p > 0.05). With increasing burial depth, N, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations generally increased, while C, Pb, and Zn concentrations varied insignificantly. Sediment burial was favorable for C and N release from P. australis, and, with increasing burial depth, the C release from litter significantly increased, and the N in litter shifted from accumulation to release. With a few exceptions, Pb, Cr, Zn, and Mn stocks in P. australis in the three treatments evidenced the export of metals from litter to environment, and, with increasing burial depth, the export amounts increased greatly. Stocks of Cu and Ni in P. australis in the S10 and S20 treatments were generally positive, evidencing incorporation of the two metals in most sampling times. Except for Ni, the variations of C, N, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Mn stocks in P. australis in the S10 and S20 treatments were approximated, indicating that the strong burial episodes (S20) occurred in P. australis marsh in the future

  8. Dynamic secrets in communication security

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Sheng; Towsley, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic secrets are constantly generated and updated from messages exchanged between two communication users. When dynamic secrets are used as a complement to existing secure communication systems, a stolen key or password can be quickly and automatically reverted to its secret status without disrupting communication. 'Dynamic Secrets in Communication Security' presents unique security properties and application studies for this technology. Password theft and key theft no longer pose serious security threats when parties frequently use dynamic secrets. This book also illustrates that a dynamic

  9. Pattern of aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids differs between rye and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X F; Ma, J F; Matsumoto, H

    2000-08-01

    Al-Induced secretion of organic acids from the roots has been considered as a mechanism of Al tolerance, but the processes leading to the secretion of organic acids are still unknown. In this study, the secretion pattern and alteration in the metabolism of organic acids under Al stress were examined in rye (Secale cereale L. cv King) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Atlas 66). Al induced rapid secretion of malate in the wheat, but a lag (6 and 10 h for malic and citric acids, respectively) between the exposure to Al and the secretion of organic acids was observed in the rye. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malate dehydrogenase were not affected by Al in either plant. The activity of citrate synthase was increased by the exposure to Al in the rye, but not in the wheat. The secretion of malate was not suppressed at low temperature in the wheat, but that of citrate was stopped in the rye. The Al-induced secretion of citrate from roots of the rye was inhibited by the inhibitors of a citrate carrier, which transports citrate from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. All of these results suggest that alteration in the metabolism of organic acids is involved in the Al-induced secretion of organic acids in rye, but only activation of an anion channel seems to be responsible for the rapid secretion of malate in the wheat.

  10. Windows 8 secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Thurrott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tips, tricks, treats, and secrets revealed on Windows 8 Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way to learn all its ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. Regardless of your level of knowledge, you'll discover little-known facts about how things work, what's new and different, and h

  11. MONA Implementation Secrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Nils; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    a period of six years. Compared to the first naive version, the present tool is faster by several orders of magnitude. This speedup is obtained from many different contributions working on all levels of the compilation and execution of formulas. We present a selection of implementation "secrets" that have......The MONA tool provides an implementation of the decision procedures for the logics WS1S and WS2S. It has been used for numerous applications, and it is remarkably efficient in practice, even though it faces a theoretically non-elementary worst-case complexity. The implementation has matured over...

  12. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Yakabi; Junichi Kawashima; Shingo Kato

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-in-duced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric add secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  13. Testing two potential fates for coastal marshes: Greenhouse gas emissions from native, Phragmites australis-invaded, and permanently inundated zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Martin, R.; Tang, J.; Morkeski, K.; China, I.; Brannon, E.; Watson, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Global changes such as biological invasions and sea level rise can significantly affect GHG emissions from coastal wetlands by changing plant community composition and/or environmental conditions. To first characterize GHG fluxes across major plant-defined marsh zones, CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes were compared between S. patens- dominated high marsh and S. alterniflora low marsh during 2012 and 2013 growing seasons in 3 New England marshes. To test how these fluxes may change in response to biological invasions and sea level rise, GHG fluxes were then compared between native, P.australis- invaded, and permanently inundated marsh zones at these sites in 2013 and 2014. GHG emissions were analyzed simultaneously from marsh ecosystems using infrared-based spectrometers connected to static flux chambers. Daytime CO2 uptake rates (ranging on average between -2 and -21 μmol CO2 m-2s-1) were generally greater in S. alterniflora low marsh zones than in S. patens high marsh among all 3 sites. Methane fluxes were generally low in both native marsh zones (marsh zone. In contrast, permanently inundated marsh soils had similar GHG emissions to native marsh zones. . Though large, the P. australis CH4 emissions are estimated to offset less than 5% of observed CO2 uptake rates based on a global warming potential of 25 (100 years). These results suggest that two alternative fates for coastal marshes in the future- conversion to P. australis marshes or to standing water with sea level rise- will substantially affect CO2 and CH4 emissions. Net impacts on climatic forcing of these ecosystems will depend on how long term C sequestration is affected as these emissions shift.

  14. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Fan, Guoqiang; Xu, Enkai; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4) genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2) and 10,712,733 (PA4) clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia. PMID:25198709

  15. Transcriptome/Degradome-wide discovery of microRNAs and transcript targets in two Paulownia australis genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Niu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Most of the miRNAs that have been identified in model plants are well characterized, but till now, no reports have previously been published concerning miRNAs in Paulownia australis. In order to investigate miRNA-guided transcript target regulation in P. australis, small RNA libraries from two P. australis (diploids, PA2; and autotetraploids, PA4 genotypes were subjected to Solexa sequencing. As a result, 10,691,271 (PA2 and 10,712,733 (PA4 clean reads were obtained, and 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 15 families, and 31 potential novel miRNAs candidates were identified. Compared with their expression levels in the PA2 plants, 26 miRNAs were up-regulated and 15 miRNAs were down-regulated in the PA4 plants. The relative expressions of 12 miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Using the degradome approach, 53 transcript targets were identified and annotated based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. These targets were associated with development, stimulus response, metabolism, signaling transduction and biological regulation. Among them, 11 targets, including TCP transcription factors, auxin response factors, squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, scarecrow-like proteins, L-type lectin-domain containing receptor kinases and zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein, cleaved by four known miRNA family and two potentially novel miRNAs were found to be involved in regulating plant development, biotic and abiotic stresses. The findings will be helpful to facilitate studies on the functions of miRNAs and their transcript targets in Paulownia.

  16. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on two phylogeographically distinct clones of common reed (Phragmites australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nguyen, Loc Xuan; Achenbach, Luciana; Brix, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aboveground growth, physiological and biochemical parameters of two clones of the cosmopolitan wetland grass Phragmites australis, grown at four treatment combinations of temperature and CO2, were investigated to elucidate whether their climate response differed due to inherent differences in their ecological adaptation. The two phylogeographically distinct P. australis clones (DK clone, European genetic background; ALG clone, Mediterranean genetic background) were grown for 151 days in phytotrons at 19/12 °C (day/night temperature) and 390 ppm CO2, and at elevated temperature (+5 °C) and CO2 (700 ppm) with treatment factors alone or in combination. The ALG clone had 2–4 times higher aboveground biomass, higher light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Pmax), maximum electron transport rates (ETRmax) and Rubisco activity, and higher photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency than the DK clone. The DK clone, however, produced more shoots, leaves and side-shoots, and had 9–51 % higher specific leaf area and 15–39 % higher leaf nitrogen concentration than the ALG clone. Although elevated atmospheric CO2 alone barely affected the aboveground growth of the two P. australis clones, simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2 stimulated growth and aboveground biomass. Overall, elevated CO2 stimulated photosynthesis, but the clones responded differently to a concomitant increase in CO2 and temperature, depending on the phylogeographic background of the plant. The DK clone showed overall stronger responses, and can be considered the more plastic of the two clones with respect to CO2 and temperature. Thus, the DK clone may be better adapted to climate change than the ALG clone, at least in the short term.

  17. Comparison of mercury contamination in live and dead dolphins from a newly described species, Tursiops australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Monk

    Full Text Available Globally it is estimated that up to 37% of all marine mammals are at a risk of extinction, due in particular to human impacts, including coastal pollution. Dolphins are known to be at risk from anthropogenic contaminants due to their longevity and high trophic position. While it is known that beach-cast animals are often high in contaminants, it has not been possible to determine whether levels may also be high in live animals from the same populations. In this paper we quantitatively assess mercury contamination in the two main populations of a newly described dolphin species from south eastern Australia, Tursiops australis. This species appear to be limited to coastal waters in close proximity to a major urban centre, and as such is likely to be vulnerable to anthropogenic pollution. For the first time, we were able to compare blubber mercury concentrations from biopsy samples of live individuals and necropsies of beach-cast animals and show that beach-cast animals were highly contaminated with mercury, at almost three times the levels found in live animals. Levels in live animals were also high, and are attributable to chronic low dose exposure to mercury from the dolphin's diet. Measurable levels of mercury were found in a number of important prey fish species. This illustrates the potential for low dose toxins in the environment to pass through marine food webs and potentially contribute to marine mammal deaths. This study demonstrates the potential use of blubber from biopsy samples to make inferences about the health of dolphins exposed to mercury.

  18. Stable Isotopes Indicate Population Structuring in the Southwest Atlantic Population of Right Whales (Eubalaena australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vighi, Morgana; Borrell, Asunción; Crespo, Enrique A.; Oliveira, Larissa R.; Simões-Lopes, Paulo C.; Flores, Paulo A. C.; García, Néstor A.; Aguilar, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    From the early 17th century to the 1970s southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, were subject to intense exploitation along the Atlantic coast of South America. Catches along this coast recorded by whalers originally formed a continuum from Brazil to Tierra del Fuego. Nevertheless, the recovery of the population has apparently occurred fragmentarily, and with two main areas of concentration, one off southern Brazil (Santa Catarina) and another off central Argentina (Peninsula Valdés). This pattern suggests some level of heterogeneity amongst the population, which is apparently contradicted by records that traced individuals moving throughout the whole geographical extension covered by the species in the Southwest Atlantic. To test the hypothesis of the potential occurrence of discrete subpopulations exploiting specific habitats, we investigated N, C and O isotopic values in 125 bone samples obtained from whaling factories operating in the early 1970s in southern Brazil (n = 72) and from contemporary and more recent strandings occurring in central Argentina (n = 53). Results indicated significant differences between the two sampling areas, being δ13C and δ18O values significantly higher in samples from southern Brazil than in those from central Argentina. This variation was consistent with isotopic baselines from the two areas, indicating the occurrence of some level of structure in the Southwest Atlantic right whale population and equally that whales more likely feed in areas commonly thought to exclusively serve as nursing grounds. Results aim at reconsidering of the units currently used in the management of the southern right whale in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In the context of the current die-off affecting the species in Peninsula Valdés, these results also highlight the necessity to better understand movements of individuals and precisely identify their feeding areas. PMID:24598539

  19. Diversity of fungal endophytes in non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Keith; Shearin, Zachery; Bourke, Kimberly; Bickford, Wesley A.; Kowalski, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–microbial interactions may play a key role in plant invasions. One common microbial interaction takes place between plants and fungal endophytes when fungi asymptomatically colonize host plant tissues. The objectives of this study were to isolate and sequence fungal endophytes colonizing non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes region to evaluate variation in endophyte community composition among three host tissue types and three geographical regions. We collected entire ramets from multiple clones and populations, surface sterilized plant tissues, and plated replicate tissue samples from leaves, stems, and rhizomes on corn meal agar plates to culture and isolate fungal endophytes. Isolates were then subjected to Sanger sequencing of the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Sequences were compared to fungal databases to define operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were analyzed statistically for community composition. In total, we obtained 173 endophyte isolates corresponding to 55 OTUs, 39 of which were isolated only a single time. The most common OTU corresponded most closely to Sarocladium strictum and comprised 25 % of all fungal isolates. More OTUs were found in stem tissues, but endophyte diversity was greatest in rhizome tissues. PERMANOVA analyses indicated significant differences in endophyte communities among tissue types, geographical regions, and the interaction between those factors, but no differences among individual ramets were detected. The functional role of the isolated endophytes is not yet known, but one genus isolated here (Stagonospora) has been reported to enhance Phragmites growth. Understanding the diversity and functions of Phragmites endophytes may provide targets for control measures based on disrupting host plant/endophyte interactions.

  20. Stable isotopes indicate population structuring in the southwest Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Vighi

    Full Text Available From the early 17th century to the 1970s southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, were subject to intense exploitation along the Atlantic coast of South America. Catches along this coast recorded by whalers originally formed a continuum from Brazil to Tierra del Fuego. Nevertheless, the recovery of the population has apparently occurred fragmentarily, and with two main areas of concentration, one off southern Brazil (Santa Catarina and another off central Argentina (Peninsula Valdés. This pattern suggests some level of heterogeneity amongst the population, which is apparently contradicted by records that traced individuals moving throughout the whole geographical extension covered by the species in the Southwest Atlantic. To test the hypothesis of the potential occurrence of discrete subpopulations exploiting specific habitats, we investigated N, C and O isotopic values in 125 bone samples obtained from whaling factories operating in the early 1970s in southern Brazil (n=72 and from contemporary and more recent strandings occurring in central Argentina (n=53. Results indicated significant differences between the two sampling areas, being δ13C and δ18O values significantly higher in samples from southern Brazil than in those from central Argentina. This variation was consistent with isotopic baselines from the two areas, indicating the occurrence of some level of structure in the Southwest Atlantic right whale population and equally that whales more likely feed in areas commonly thought to exclusively serve as nursing grounds. Results aim at reconsidering of the units currently used in the management of the southern right whale in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In the context of the current die-off affecting the species in Peninsula Valdés, these results also highlight the necessity to better understand movements of individuals and precisely identify their feeding areas.

  1. Mapping an invasive plant, Phragmites australis, in coastal wetlands using the EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengra, B.W.; Johnston, C.A.; Loveland, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    Mapping tools are needed to document the location and extent of Phragmites australis, a tall grass that invades coastal marshes throughout North America, displacing native plant species and degrading wetland habitat. Mapping Phragmites is particularly challenging in the freshwater Great Lakes coastal wetlands due to dynamic lake levels and vegetation diversity. We tested the applicability of Hyperion hyperspectral satellite imagery for mapping Phragmites in wetlands of the west coast of Green Bay in Wisconsin, U.S.A. A reference spectrum created using Hyperion data from several pure Phragmites stands within the image was used with a Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM) algorithm to create a raster map with values ranging from 0 to 1, where 0 represented the greatest similarity between the reference spectrum and the image spectrum and 1 the least similarity. The final two-class thematic classification predicted monodominant Phragmites covering 3.4% of the study area. Most of this was concentrated in long linear features parallel to the Green Bay shoreline, particularly in areas that had been under water only six years earlier when lake levels were 66??cm higher. An error matrix using spring 2005 field validation points (n = 129) showed good overall accuracy-81.4%. The small size and linear arrangement of Phragmites stands was less than optimal relative to the sensor resolution, and Hyperion's 30??m resolution captured few if any pure pixels. Contemporary Phragmites maps prepared with Hyperion imagery would provide wetland managers with a tool that they currently lack, which could aid attempts to stem the spread of this invasive species. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Persistent anosmia and olfactory bulb atrophy after mulga (Pseudechis australis) snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Moksh; Cook, Mark; Winkel, Kenneth D

    2016-07-01

    Loss of sense of smell is an intriguing yet under-recognised complication of snakebite. We report olfactory function testing and neuroimaging of the olfactory bulbs in a 30-year-old man with anosmia persisting for more than 1year after mulga (Pseudechis australis) snakebite. This problem was first noted by the patient 1week after being definitely bitten in Queensland, Australia. He had then presented to a regional hospital where his envenomation was considered mild enough to not warrant antivenom administration. A week later the patient noted a reduction of sense of smell, which progressed to complete inability to smell over the ensuing weeks. On clinical review the patient's neurologic and rhinologic examination did not reveal any structural cause for anosmia. Formal olfactory testing was performed using ''sniffin' sticks" and the patient scored 17 on this test, indicating severe hyposmia (functional anosmia 30.3 for men aged 16-35years). MRI of the brain showed no abnormalities. The olfactory bulb volumes were then measured on a volumetric T2-weighted MRI that demonstrated significantly reduced volume of both bulbs, with the right 34.86mm(3) and left 36.25mm(3) (normal volume ⩾58mm(3), 10th centile). The current patient represents a rare instance of a definite, untreated, elapid (mulga snake) envenomation with an intriguing disjunction between the mildness of the systemic features and the severity of the olfactory lesion. It is also unclear if early antivenom use attenuates this condition, and due to the delayed manifestation of the symptoms, awareness of this phenomenon may be lacking amongst physicians. PMID:26896910

  3. Experimental transplanting of Posidonia australis seagrass in Port Hacking, Australia, to assess the feasibility of restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Alexander J; West, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, about one-third of the original area of the seagrass Posidonia australis has been lost from Port Hacking (Australia) due to anthropogenic impacts. To assess the feasibility of restoring these seagrass meadows, healthy Posidonia rhizomes were transplanted to four impact sites and one control site. Survival rates of transplanted shoots were monitored in situ bi-monthly for 16 months and, at the end of the experiment, rhizome growth, shoot growth, shoot production and growth architecture were assessed by harvesting tagged rhizomes. A total of 575 shoots were transplanted and after 16 months 650 shoots were present. Four of the five sites exhibited high survival rates in the short term (less than six months) but only two impact sites, Burraneer Bay (BB) and Red Jacks Point (RJP), and the control site (CS) survived to the end of the experiment. Total number of shoots increased by 61% at CS, tripled at BB, but decreased by 22% at RJP. Rhizome growth varied significantly between site, from 22.3 +/- 1.4 cm yr(-1) at BB to 9.1 +/- 1.0 cm yr(-1) at RJP. Shoot growth did not vary significantly between sites and was approximately 2-3 cm yr(-1). At BB and CS there was substantial colonisation of the surrounding substrate, with new rhizomes, orthotropic shoots and transitional shoots produced. Survival of transplants appeared to depend on whether the factors that had caused the original loss of Posidonia were still operating in the study area. PMID:11883680

  4. Freshwater wetlands: fertile grounds for the invasive Phragmites australis in a climate change context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas-Tellier, Marie-Andrée; Morin, Jean; Hatin, Daniel; Lavoie, Claude

    2015-08-01

    Climate change will likely affect flooding regimes, which have a large influence on the functioning of freshwater riparian wetlands. Low water levels predicted for several fluvial systems make wetlands especially vulnerable to the spread of invaders, such as the common reed (Phragmites australis), one of the most invasive species in North America. We developed a model to map the distribution of potential germination grounds of the common reed in freshwater wetlands of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada) under current climate conditions and used this model to predict their future distribution under two climate change scenarios simulated for 2050. We gathered historical and recent (remote sensing) data on the distribution of common reed stands for model calibration and validation purposes, then determined the parameters controlling the species establishment by seed. A two-dimensional model and the identified parameters were used to simulate the current (2010) and future (2050) distribution of germination grounds. Common reed stands are not widespread along the St. Lawrence River (212 ha), but our model suggests that current climate conditions are already conducive to considerable further expansion (>16,000 ha). Climate change may also exacerbate the expansion, particularly if river water levels drop, which will expose large bare areas propitious to seed germination. This phenomenon may be particularly important in one sector of the river, where existing common reed stands could increase their areas by a factor of 100, potentially creating the most extensive reedbed complex in North America. After colonizing salt and brackishwater marshes, the common reed could considerably expand into the freshwater marshes of North America which cover several million hectares. The effects of common reed expansion on biodiversity are difficult to predict, but likely to be highly deleterious given the competitiveness of the invader and the biological richness of freshwater

  5. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools and surface flux under different brackish marsh vegetation types, common reed (Phragmites australis) and salt hay (Spartina patens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The current expansion of Phragmites australis into the high marsh shortgrass (Spartina patens, Distichlis spicata) communities of eastern U.S. salt marshes provided an opportunity to identify the influence of vegetation types on pools and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Two brackish tidal marshes of the National Estuarine Research Reserve system were examined, Piermont Marsh of the Hudson River NERR in New York and Hog Island in the Jacques Coustaeu NERR of New Jersey. Pools of DIN in porewater and rates of DIN surface flux were compared in replicated pairs of recently-expanded P. australis and neighboring S. patens-dominated patches on the high marsh surface. Both marshes generally imported nitrate (NO3-) and exported ammonium (NH4+), such that overall DIN was exported. No differences in surface exchange of NO3- or NH4+ were observed between vegetation types. Depth-averaged porewater NH4+ concentrations over the entire growing season were 56% lower under P. australis than under S. patens (average 1.4 vs. 3.2 mg NH4+ L-1) with the most profound differences in November. Porewater profiles showed an accumulation of NH4+ at depth in S. patens and constant low concentrations in P. australis from the soil surface to 50 cm depth, with no significant differences in porewater salinity. Despite these profound differences in porewater, NH 4+ diffusion from soils of P. australis and S. patens were not measurably different, were similar to other published rates, and were well below estimated rates based on passive diffusion alone. Rapid adsorption and uptake by litter and microbes in surface soils of both communities may buffer NH4+ loss to flooding tides in both communities, thereby reducing the impact of P. australis invasion on NH4+ flux to flooding waters. ?? Springer 2005.

  6. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  7. Entanglements of right whales, Eubalaena australis (Cetacea, Mysticeti, in the 2010 breeding season in Santa Catarina state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Pontalti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Right whales (Eubalaena australis have been suffering with anthropogenic activities such as pollution, marine traffic and entanglement in fishing nets. The entanglement of right whales grows each breeding season on the southern coast of Santa Catarina state, and can cause strands and even death. During the 2010 breeding season, six entanglements among immature and adult whales were recorded. In most of the cases, the whales kept swimming slowly and didn’t want to approximate the whale watching boat. Fishing activities in the area during the right whale breeding season need to be regularized to avoid conflicts and injuries to the whales.

  8. Chemical and Physical Conditions in Molecular Cloud Core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis

    OpenAIRE

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.; Sipila, O.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Hotzel, S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C18O(J=2-1,1-0) and N2H+(J=1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct...

  9. A Corona Australis cloud filament seen in NIR scattered light II: Comparison with sub-millimeter data

    OpenAIRE

    Juvela, Mika; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Porceddu, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    We study a northern part of the Corona Australis molecular cloud that consists of a filament and a dense sub-millimetre core inside the filament. Our aim is to measure dust temperature and sub-mm emissivity within the region. We also look for confirmation that near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness can be used to study the structure of even very dense clouds. We extend our previous NIR mapping south of the filament. The dust colour temperatures are estimated using Spitzer 160um and APEX/Laboc...

  10. Rhizosecretion of The Recombinant Antimicrobial Peptide Ranalexin from Transgenic Tobacco Hairy Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Abou Aleinein; Holger Schäfer; Michael Wink

    2015-01-01

    Rhizosecretion of functional recombinant proteins from in vitro cultured roots into the hydroponic medium offers an attractive technology to simplify down-stream purification procedures. Aim of the present study was the production and secretion of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) ranalexin from Nicotiana tabacum hairy roots which were transformed by agroinfection. A His-tagged ranalexin was expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter and directed into the plant secretion pathway by fusing...

  11. Use of biological indexes of the common reed (Phragmites australis) seed progeny in the environmental safety of radioactive contaminated water bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavnyuk, A. [National Aviation University, Kiev (Ukraine); Shevtsova, N.; Gudkov, D. [Institute of Hydrobiology of the National Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental protection requires effective monitoring system of radionuclide contamination and radiobiological effects as well as development of their prevention and minimizing measures for humans and biota. There is a majority of conventional techniques for living organisms' habitat quality assessment. One of the most widespread, convenient and accessible ones, is the seed progeny analysis, for example of conifers, cereals and wild herbaceous plants. Availability of vitality, growth, mutability indexes and abnormalities of vascular plant germs for environment quality express assessment was discussed in numerous publications. However, this point is studied insufficiently concerning aquatic vascular plants, forming communities playing significant role in radionuclides distribution in contaminated water bodies. Common reed (Phragmites australis (Trin) Ex. Steud) is a widespread species mostly dominating in air-aquatic vascular plant communities of freshwater bodies; it is a first-order {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr accumulating species. To assess the common reed germs growth indexes availability, seeds were sampled in polygon water bodies of different radionuclide contamination levels and 0.7-22 mcGy h{sup -1} total absorbed dose range, within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. In water bodies with background level of radionuclide contamination, for comparison, total absorbed dose varied in range of 0.03-0.3 mcGy h{sup -1}. Series of seeds germination experiments was carried out in laboratory conditions. Complex of germs indexes was investigated, conditionally divided into three groups: (1) Vitality indexes. In course of experiment series, vitality was assessed via germinating energy, germinating ability indexes, germination period (first and last germ appearance) and survivability study; (2) Growth indexes. Root and leaf length, occurrence of plant groups with different vegetative organs length were determined for germs growth speed assessment; (3) Teratological

  12. Parasite body volume and infracommunity patterns in the southern pomfret Brama australis (Pisces: Bramidae Volumen corporal del parásito y patrones infracomunitarios en la reineta Brama australis (Pisces: Bramidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIO GEORGE-NASCIMENTO

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The patterns of infracommunity descriptors (diversity, dominance, abundance are compared when calculated with the number and body volume of the parasites in a sample of 26 southern pomfrets Brama australis collected in the area off Talcahuano, Chile. No numerical infracommunity descriptor was correlated with its corresponding volumetric descriptor. This single result casts doubts about the general validity of the infracommunity patterns described in the literature so far, because they are almost exclusively based on the number of parasite individuals per individual host, restricting communication with ecologists that use density or other measures of ecological abundanceLos patrones de los descriptores infracomunitarios (diversidad, dominancia, abundancia son comparados cuando son calculados en base a los números o al volumen corporal de los parásitos en una muestra de 26 reinetas Brama australis recolectadas en el área de Talcahuano, Chile. Ningún descriptor infracomunitario calculado con el número de parásitos estuvo correlacionado con los basados en el volumen corporal de los parásitos. Este resultado siembra dudas acerca de la validez general que pueden tener los patrones infracomunitarios registrados en la literatura ya que están casi exclusivamente calculados con el número de parásitos por individuo hospedador, lo que dificulta aún más la comunicación con los ecólogos, que usan la densidad u otras medidas de abundancia ecológica

  13. Root canal irrigants

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are...

  14. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  15. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  16. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  17. Dense Cores of Dark Clouds. XII. 13CO and C18O in Lupus, Corona Australis, Vela, and Scorpius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, J. W. S.; Myers, P. C.; Fuller, G. A.

    2000-04-01

    More than 110 dense condensations of the dark clouds in Lupus, Corona Australis, Norma, Vela, and Scorpius were observed in the 13CO and C18O (J=1-0) transitions. The condensations of dark clouds with high star formation activity like the Ophiuchus, Taurus, and Cepheus have average C18O and H2 column densities of 1.8x1015 and 1.1x1022 cm-2. If we take the average size of the condensations to be 0.2 pc, a condensation must have average H2 volumetric densities >=2x104 cm-3 in order to be a good candidate to form stars. The four Lupus filaments have similar radial velocities and velocity dispersions, suggesting that they originated from the same parental cloud. Among these filaments, Lupus 1 is unique in having recent star formation activity, despite the high number of T Tauri stars observed toward the others. Lupus 1 also shows a complex velocity gradient along its main axis. The distribution of radial velocities of the condensations observed toward Scorpius are in good agreement with the hypothesis that they are in a region with expansion velocity smaller than or equal to 18 km s-1. The Corona Australis cloud has velocity gradients ranging from -0.5 km s-1 pc-1 at one extreme to 0.1 km s-1 pc-1 at the other.

  18. Effects of sorption, sulphate reduction, and Phragmites australis on the removal of heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, E; Rousseau, D P L; Van de Moortel, A; Tack, F M G; De Pauw, N; Verloo, M G

    2007-01-01

    The removal of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn from synthetic industrial wastewater was studied in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms filled with gravel or a gravel/straw mixture. Half of the microcosms were planted with Phragmites australis and half were left unplanted. All microcosms received low-strength wastewater (1 mg L(-1) of Co, Ni, and Zn, 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu, 2,000mg L(-1) SO4) during seven 14-day incubation batches. The pore water was regularly monitored at two depths for heavy metals, sulphate, organic carbon and redox potential. Sorption properties of gravel and straw were assessed in a separate experiment. A second series of seven incubation batches with high-strength wastewater (10 mg L(-1) of each metal, 2,000 mg L(-1) SO4) was then applied to saturate the substrate. Glucose was added to the gravel microcosms together with the high-strength wastewater. Sorption processes were responsible for metal removal during start-up, with the highest removal efficiencies in the gravel microcosms. The lower initial efficiencies in the gravel/straw microcosms were presumably caused by the decomposition of straw. However, after establishment of anaerobic conditions (Eh approximately -200 mV), precipitation as metal sulphides provided an additional removal pathway in the gravel/straw microcosms. The addition of glucose to gravel microcosms enhanced sulphate reduction and metal removal, although Phragmites australis negatively affected these processes in the top-layer of all microcosms.

  19. Uptake and Bioaccumulation of Pentachlorophenol by Emergent Wetland Plant Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Cadmium Co-contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechmi, Nejla; Ben Aissa, Nadhira; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies on phytoremediation of soils contaminated with either heavy metals or organics, little information is available on the effectiveness of phytoremediation of co-occurring metal and organic pollutants especially by using wetland species. Phragmites australis is a common wetland plant and its potential for phytoremediation of cadmium pentachlorophenol (Cd-PCP) co-contaminated soil was investigated. A greenhouse study was executed to elucidate the effects of Cd (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1)) without or with PCP (0, 50, and 250 mg kg(-1)) on the growth of the wetland plant P. australis and its uptake, accumulation and removal of pollutant from soils. After 75 days, plant biomass was significantly influenced by interaction of Cd and PCP and the effect of Cd on plant growth being stronger than that of PCP. Coexistence of PCP at low level lessened Cd toxicity to plants, resulting in improved plant growth and increased Cd accumulation in plant tissues. The dissipation of PCP in soils was significantly influenced by interactions of Cd, PCP and plant presence or absence. As an evaluation of soil biological activities after remediation soil enzyme was measured.

  20. Isolation of a Seawater Tolerant Leptospira spp. from a Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Grune Loffler

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world. It is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira spp. and is maintained in nature through chronic renal infection of carrier animals. Rodents and other small mammals are the main reservoirs. Information on leptospirosis in marine mammals is scarce; however, cases of leptospirosis have been documented in pinniped populations from the Pacific coast of North America from southern California to British Columbia. We report the isolation of a Leptospira spp. strain, here named Manara, from a kidney sample obtained from a Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis calf, which stranded dead in Playa Manara, Península Valdés, Argentina. This strain showed motility and morphology typical of the genus Leptospira spp. under dark-field microscopy; and grew in Ellinghausen-McCullough-Johnson-Harris (EMJH medium and Fletcher medium after 90 days of incubation at 28°C. Considering the source of this bacterium, we tested its ability to grow in Fletcher medium diluted with seawater at different percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10% v/v. Bacterial growth was detected 48 h after inoculation of Fletcher medium supplemented with 5% sea water, demonstrating the halophilic nature of the strain Manara. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed this novel strain within the radiation of the pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira spp., with sequence similarities within the range 97-100%, and closely related to L. interrogans. Two different PCR protocols targeting genus-specific pathogenic genes (G1-G2, B64I-B64II and LigB gave positive results, which indicates that the strain Manara is likely pathogenic. Further studies are needed to confirm this possibility as well as determine its serogroup. These results could modify our understanding of the epidemiology of this zoonosis. Until now, the resistance and ability to grow in seawater for long periods of time had been proven

  1. Growth and Physiological Response of Organs of Phragmites australis to Different Water Compensation in Degraded Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiaoyu; LIUXingtu; LIXiujun; LINJixiang; WENBolong

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of different water compensation on growth and physiology of reed in degraded wetlands,three water treatments in the field were conducted to test the height and photosynthesis of reed,the ions and soluble sugar contents of different organs.In the controls (without extra water compensation for 10 years),the height of reed was only 50 cm,the net photosynthetic rate,stomatal conductance,the intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were very low.The contents of Na + and Cl- in rhizome were higher than those in other organs.Discontinuous water compensation (continuous for 8 years,then stopped for 2 years) increased the height (2.1-fold),the net photosynthetic rate (41.8%),stomatal conductance (1.8-fold),transpiration rate (1.3-fold) of reed (Phragmites australis),and decreased the content of Na+ (62.3%) and Cl- (71.1%) of rhizome significantly.Continuous water compensation (continuous for 10 years) increased the height (3.2-fold),the net photosynthetic rate (104%),stomatal conductance (2.4-fold),transpiration rate (1.5-fold) of reed,and decreased Na+ (82.5%) and Cl- (64.7%) contents in rhizome,then accumulated the K+,H2PO4,SO42- and soluble sugar contents significantly in rhizome.Interrupting water compensation led to the decrease of height (25.3%),the net photosynthetic rate (30.7%),stomatal conductance (17.3%)and increase of Na+ (1.16-fold) in rhizome when comparing to the continuous water compensation.These results showed that recovering the degraded reed wetlands needed continuous water compensation yearly to promote reed growth.The organs of reed had corresponding physiological response characteristic to the different water compensation condition.Under long-time dry and waterlogging condition,the rhizomes both helped reed to adapt located environment,by enriching the ions such as Na+,Cl-,and K+,H2PO4,SO42-,respectively.

  2. Isolation of a Seawater Tolerant Leptospira spp. from a Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Virginia; Uhart, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonotic disease in the world. It is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira spp. and is maintained in nature through chronic renal infection of carrier animals. Rodents and other small mammals are the main reservoirs. Information on leptospirosis in marine mammals is scarce; however, cases of leptospirosis have been documented in pinniped populations from the Pacific coast of North America from southern California to British Columbia. We report the isolation of a Leptospira spp. strain, here named Manara, from a kidney sample obtained from a Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis) calf, which stranded dead in Playa Manara, Península Valdés, Argentina. This strain showed motility and morphology typical of the genus Leptospira spp. under dark-field microscopy; and grew in Ellinghausen-McCullough-Johnson-Harris (EMJH) medium and Fletcher medium after 90 days of incubation at 28°C. Considering the source of this bacterium, we tested its ability to grow in Fletcher medium diluted with seawater at different percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10% v/v). Bacterial growth was detected 48 h after inoculation of Fletcher medium supplemented with 5% sea water, demonstrating the halophilic nature of the strain Manara. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed this novel strain within the radiation of the pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira spp., with sequence similarities within the range 97–100%, and closely related to L. interrogans. Two different PCR protocols targeting genus-specific pathogenic genes (G1-G2, B64I-B64II and LigB) gave positive results, which indicates that the strain Manara is likely pathogenic. Further studies are needed to confirm this possibility as well as determine its serogroup. These results could modify our understanding of the epidemiology of this zoonosis. Until now, the resistance and ability to grow in seawater for long periods of time had been proven for the strain

  3. Egg discrimination in the Australian reed warbler (Acrocephalus australis) : rejection response toward model and conspecific eggs depending on timing and mode of artificial parasitism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welbergen, J; Komdeur, J; Kats, R; Berg, M

    2001-01-01

    In a coevolutionary arms race between an interspecific brood parasite and its host species, bath are expected to evolve adaptations and counteradaptations. We studied egg discrimination in the Australian warbler (Acrocephalus australis). This species is currently not significantly parasitized by the

  4. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  5. Low soil water and nutrient availability below New Zealand kauri ( Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindl.) trees increase the relative fitness of kauri seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, E.; Berendse, F.; Gardner, R.O.

    2007-01-01

    Tree species can affect the soil they are growing on and this might influence their fitness. The New Zealand gymnosperm tree species kauri (Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindl.) which grows in mixed angiosperm¿gymnosperm forests has a substantial effect upon the soil. We studied the hypotheses that: (1

  6. Ergodic Secret Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassily, Raef

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce two new achievable schemes for the fading multiple access wiretap channel (MAC-WT). In the model that we consider, we assume that perfect knowledge of the state of all channels is available at all the nodes in a causal fashion. Our schemes use this knowledge together with the time varying nature of the channel model to align the interference from different users at the eavesdropper perfectly in a one-dimensional space while creating a higher dimensionality space for the interfering signals at the legitimate receiver hence allowing for better chance of recovery. While we achieve this alignment through signal scaling at the transmitters in our first scheme (scaling based alignment (SBA)), we let nature provide this alignment through the ergodicity of the channel coefficients in the second scheme (ergodic secret alignment (ESA)). For each scheme, we obtain the resulting achievable secrecy rate region. We show that the secrecy rates achieved by both schemes scale with SNR as 1/2log(SNR...

  7. Multiparty Quantum Secret Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Fu-Guo; LI Xi-Han; LI Chun-Yan; ZHOU Ping; LIANG Yu-Jie; ZHOU Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A multiparty quantum secret report scheme is proposed with quantum encryption. The boss Alice and her M agents first share a sequence of (M + 1)-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states that only Alice knows which state each (M + 1)-particle quantum system is in. Each agent exploits a controlled-not (CNot) gate to encrypt the travelling particle by using the particle in the GHZ state as the control qubit. The boss Alice decrypts the travelling particle with a CNot gate after performing a σx operation on her particle in the GHZ state or not.After the GHZ states (the quantum key) are used up, the parties check whether there is a vicious eavesdropper,say Eve, monitoring the quantum line, by picking out some samples from the GHZ states shared and measuring them with two measuring bases. After confirming the security of the quantum key, they use the remaining GHZ states repeatedly for the next round of quantum communication. This scheme has the advantage of high intrinsic efficiency for the qubits and total efficiency.

  8. Pheochromocytomas and secreting paragangliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimenez-Roqueplo Anne-Paule

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Catecholamine-producing tumors may arise in the adrenal medulla (pheochromocytomas or in extraadrenal chromaffin cells (secreting paragangliomas. Their prevalence is about 0.1% in patients with hypertension and 4% in patients with a fortuitously discovered adrenal mass. An increase in the production of catecholamines causes symptoms (mainly headaches, palpitations and excess sweating and signs (mainly hypertension, weight loss and diabetes reflecting the effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine on α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamine-producing tumors mimic paroxysmal conditions with hypertension and/or cardiac rhythm disorders, including panic attacks, in which sympathetic activation linked to anxiety reproduces the same signs and symptoms. These tumors may be sporadic or part of any of several genetic diseases: familial pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, neurofibromatosis 1 and von Hippel-Lindau disease. Familial cases are diagnosed earlier and are more frequently bilateral and recurring than sporadic cases. The most specific and sensitive diagnostic test for the tumor is the determination of plasma or urinary metanephrines. The tumor can be located by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. Treatment requires resection of the tumor, generally by laparoscopic surgery. About 10% of tumors are malignant either at first operation or during follow-up, malignancy being diagnosed by the presence of lymph node, visceral or bone metastases. Recurrences and malignancy are more frequent in cases with large or extraadrenal tumors. Patients, especially those with familial or extraadrenal tumors, should be followed-up indefinitely.

  9. Root Graded Lie Superalgebras

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    We define root graded Lie superalgebras and study their connection with centerless cores of extended affine Lie superalgebras; our definition generalizes the known notions of root graded Lie superalgebras.

  10. Using Square Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  11. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith IV, Amos M [ORNL; Evans, Philip G [ORNL; Lawrie, Benjamin J [ORNL; Legre, Matthieu [ID Quantique, Inc.; Lougovski, Pavel [ORNL; Ray, William R [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL; Qi, Bing [ORNL; Grice, Warren P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  12. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  13. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  14. The Root Canal Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der L.W.M.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Chávez de Paz, E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root cana

  15. Root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van der Sluis; C. Boutsioukis; L.M. Jiang; R. Macedo; B. Verhaagen; M. Versluis

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root cana

  16. The exogenous particles of heavy metals and/or radionuclide interaction with cellular organelles in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Steudel leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneanu, Gabriel; Corneanu, Mihaela; Craciun, Constantin; Tripon, Septimiu

    2013-04-01

    Phragmites australis (Cav.) Steudel (reed), is a phytoremediatory species, meet in the swampy areas, being a hypperaccumulator for chromium (Calheiros et al., 2008; Ait Ali et al., 2004, a/o). In nature there are cytotypes with a different somatic chromosome number (6x - 16x), with a good adaptation at various environmental conditions. Weis and Weis (2004) consider that reed is an invasive species, sequester more metals than some native species and recommended to use it, in wetlands, for phytoremediation and marsh restoration. Researches performed by Hakmaoui et al. (2007) regarding the ultrastructural effect of cadmium and cooper on reed, evidenced the presence of the ferritin aggregates in the chloroplast stroma, as well as some reversible modifications in chloroplast. In this paper, the ultrastructural features of the leaf in three Phragmites australis genotypes, from the Middle Jiu river valley (Gorj county, Romania), were analyzed: Control (Ţânţăreni village); a population from neighbourhood of TEPP-Turceni; and other population developed at the basis a sterile waste dump of 40 years-old (near Cocoreni village). The heavy metal and radionuclide content of the soil was different in the three sites, with the lowest values in Control and the highest values for many heavy metals (Zn, Mn, Ni, Co, Cd) and radionuclide's (U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Bi-214, Pb-214, U-235, Ac-228, Pb-212, Cs-137) on the sterile waste dump. The analysis of the ultrastructural features of the leaf in mature plants revealed some differences between the three Phragmites australis genotypes. The ultrastructural investigations underlined the adaptation of this species against the stress factors (heavy metals and radionuclides). The exogenous particles penetrated the foliar tissue through the epidermis and stomata, being spread in the cells, at the plasmodesmata level, through endoplasmic reticulum, and through the vascular system. The exogenous particles were present on the endoplasmic

  17. Temperature, energy acquisition and energy use in the Chilean silverside Basilichthys australis Eigenmann (Atherinopsidae Temperatura, adquisición de energía y uso de energía en el pejerrey chileno Basilichthys australis Eigenmann (Atherinopsidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEOPOLDO FUENTES

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the influence of water temperature (Tw on the energy acquisition and use in the chilean silverside Basilichthys australis (Eigenmann 1927, an endemic species inhabiting freshwater ecosystems in Chile. We tested the effect of Tw (11.5, 14.0, 18.0, 22.0 and 26.0 °C on food intake, digestibility, food transit time and metabolic rate. As expected, this study demonstrated that many physiological variables under study were significantly affected by Tw, as well as the net energy balance of this species. Nevertheless, the net energy balance was not strictly related to the range of Tws evaluated. At Tws lower than 14 °C the energy budget was depressed, because food intake was lower than at Tws between 14 and 26 °C, where food intake was higher and independent of Tw. Consequently, at these temperatures the energy balance was positive and also independent of Tw. Physiologically, B. australis appears to be a tolerant species with respect to the wide range of water temperature in habitats at different depths. Thus, its distributions may extend through the entire profile of lakes and rivers, even in systems characterised by spatial and temporal thermal variabilityEn este trabajo evaluamos la influencia de la temperatura del agua (Ta en la adquisición de energía y su uso por parte del pejerrey chileno Basilichthys australis (Eigenmann 1927, una especie endémica que habita los ecosistemas dulceacuícolas de Chile. Investigamos el efecto de Ta (11,5, 14,0, 18,0, 22,0 y 26,0 °C en la ingesta de alimento, digestibilidad, tiempo de transito del alimento y tasa metabólica. De acuerdo a lo esperado, este estudio demostró que varias de las variables fisiológicas bajo estudio fueron significativamente afectadas por Ta, así como el balance energético de esta especie. Sin embargo, el balance neto de energía no estuvo estrictamente relacionado al rango de Tas evaluadas. En Tas inferiores a 14 °C el presupuesto de energía fue deprimido, debido a

  18. Secret Key Generation From Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Gungor, Onur; Koksal, C Emre

    2011-01-01

    We consider secret key generation from relative localization information of a pair of nodes in a mobile wireless network in the presence of a mobile eavesdropper. Our scheme consists of two phases: in the first phase, legitimate node pair exchanges beacon signals to establish localization information based on noisy observations of these beacons; in the second phase, nodes generate secret key bits via a public discussion. Our problem can be categorized under the source models of information theoretic secrecy, where the distance between the legitimate nodes acts as the observed common randomness. We characterize the achievable secret key bit rate in terms of the observation noise variance at the legitimate nodes and the eavesdropper. This work provides a framework that combines information theoretic secrecy and wireless localization, and proves that the localization information provides a significant additional resource for secret key generation in mobile wireless networks.

  19. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system t...

  20. Echolocation in sympatric Peale's dolphins (Lagenorhynchus australis) and Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) producing narrow-bandhigh-frequency clicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Line Anker; Jensen, Frants Havmand; Beedholm, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    -element hydrophone array from wild Peale's (Lagenorhynchus australis) and Commerson's (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) dolphins off the Falkland Islands. The centroid frequency was different between Commerson's (133±2kHz) and Peale's (129±3kHz) dolphins. The r.m.s. bandwidth was 12±3kHz for both species. The source...... level was higher for Peale's dolphin (185±6dB re 1 uPa p.-p.) than for Commerson's(177±5 dB re 1 uPa p.-p.). The mean directivity indexes were 25dB for both species. The relatively low source levels in combination with the high directivity index may be an adaptation to reduce clutter when foraging...

  1. Les condamnés de Nouvelle-Calédonie en Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Henri Zaidman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On sait que l’Australie fut d’abord pour la Couronne britannique une terre de bagne, une gigantesque prison à ciel ouvert. Les premiers immigrants depuis 1788, date de l’arrivée du premier vaisseau de bagnards à Botany Bay jusqu’à la moitié du XIXe siècle furent essentiellement des déportés (droits communs, républicains irlandais, prostituées accompagnés de l’encadrement militaire et de quelques gros colons ayant tout de suite compris l’intérêt de trouver une main-d’œuvre à bon marché. De 17...

  2. Structure-function relationships in scorpion neurotoxins. Identification of the supperreactive lysine residue in toxin I of Androctonus australis Hector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, F; Habersetzer-Rochat, C

    1978-07-21

    In a previous article (Habersetzer-Rochat, C. and Sampieri, R. (1976) Biochemistry 15, 2254--2261) it was demonstrated that the toxin I of the North African Scorpion Androctonus australis Hector was inactivated after reaction with iodoacetate; the toxicity loss in mice was correlated with the carboxymethylation of one superreactive residue. In the present work, alkylation of toxin I was performed with iodo[14C]-acetate. Hence, it was possible, after reduction, S-methylation and chymotryptic hydrolysis of this toxin, to isolate the peptide containing the labelled lysine residue. By automatic Edman degradation, this residue was identified as being the penultimate lysine at position 56 in the primary sequence. Comparison of three primary structures of scorpion neurotoxins and comparison in different kinds of activity seem to indicate that this lysine residue is mainly important for toxicity in mice.

  3. Accumulation patterns of organochlorines in juveniles of Arctocephalus australis found stranded along the coast of Southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the specific distributions of organochlorine (OC) compounds in various tissues and organs of juveniles of the South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) found stranded on beaches in southern Brazil. The OC residue concentrations occurred in the following order: PCBs > DDTs > CHLs > HCHs > HCB. OC concentrations in blubber were higher than other tissues (e.g. PCBs, 2480 ng g-1 wet weight; DDTs, 660 ng g-1 wet weight) indicating a positive association with lipid content (except for HCB). However, the poor nutritional status of these animals, possibly following a starvation period, is likely to have allowed the remobilization of organochlorines stored in lipids to other tissues throughout the body, increasing their vulnerability to toxic effects and possibly affecting their survival capability. - Analysis of tissues of juveniles of the South American fur seal suggests organochlorines are remobilized during their poor nutritional status, increasing their vulnerability to toxic effects

  4. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  5. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  6. A new dolphin species, the Burrunan Dolphin Tursiops australis sp. nov., endemic to southern Australian coastal waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Charlton-Robb

    Full Text Available Small coastal dolphins endemic to south-eastern Australia have variously been assigned to described species Tursiops truncatus, T. aduncus or T. maugeanus; however the specific affinities of these animals is controversial and have recently been questioned. Historically 'the southern Australian Tursiops' was identified as unique and was formally named Tursiops maugeanus but was later synonymised with T. truncatus. Morphologically, these coastal dolphins share some characters with both aforementioned recognised Tursiops species, but they also possess unique characters not found in either. Recent mtDNA and microsatellite genetic evidence indicates deep evolutionary divergence between this dolphin and the two currently recognised Tursiops species. However, in accordance with the recommendations of the Workshop on Cetacean Systematics, and the Unified Species Concept the use of molecular evidence alone is inadequate for describing new species. Here we describe the macro-morphological, colouration and cranial characters of these animals, assess the available and new genetic data, and conclude that multiple lines of evidence clearly indicate a new species of dolphin. We demonstrate that the syntype material of T. maugeanus comprises two different species, one of which is the historical 'southern form of Tursiops' most similar to T. truncatus, and the other is representative of the new species and requires formal classification. These dolphins are here described as Tursiops australis sp. nov., with the common name of 'Burrunan Dolphin' following Australian aboriginal narrative. The recognition of T. australis sp. nov. is particularly significant given the endemism of this new species to a small geographic region of southern and south-eastern Australia, where only two small resident populations in close proximity to a major urban and agricultural centre are known, giving them a high conservation value and making them susceptible to numerous anthropogenic

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to 1991-10-27 (NODC Accession 0116370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116370 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to...

  8. 崇明东滩湿地芦苇和互花米草非结构性碳水化合物质量分数的时空动态特征%Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Non-structural Carbohydrates Contents of Phragmites australis and Spartina alterniflora at Chongming Dongtan Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕媛媛; 李德志; 徐洁; 许丽丽; 高锦瑾; 潘宇; 赵美霞; 程立丽; 王浩

    2013-01-01

    The populations of the exotic plant species Spartina alterniflora competed with native plant species Phragmites australis in the intertidal habitats of Dongtan wetland, Chongming, Shanghai. The spatial and temporal characteristics of non-structural carbohydrates ( NSC) contents of different parts of P. australis and S. alternijlora plants were studied. The results showed that NSC contents of P. australis are almost always higher than those of S. alterniflora at every growth stage, every tidal level and every part of plants. The NSC contents in both species increase with the decrease of tidal levels, especially for S. alterniflora, which might be helpful to improve their salt tolerance. NSC contents in both species increase from the early growth stage to rapid growth stage and to the end of growth stage. NSC contents in leaves are higher than those in stems and roots in both species. Total NSC contents in S. alterniflora are lower than those in P. australis, but the proportions of NSC contents in underground parts of P. australis are lower than those in S. alterniflora. NSC contents of S. alterniflora at the stem base are less than those of P. australis, implying that the growth of roots and rhizomes, resistance ability to disturbance and basal tillering ability for S. alterniflora may be stronger than those of P. australis. The proportions of NSC contents in underground parts of both species decrease with the increase of tidal levels, showing the change trend from NSC content dominance in underground parts to aboveground parts in two species.%在上海崇明东滩湿地,外来植物互花米草种群和本土植物芦苇种群在潮间带生境形成竞争态势.文中对2种植物体内各部分的非结构性贮藏碳水化合物(NSC)质量分数的时空变化特征进行了研究,结果表明:在各生长发育时期、各个潮位生境以及植株各部位,几乎总是芦苇体内的NSC质量分数多于互花米草,且随着潮间带高程的降低,芦苇

  9. Security of audio secret sharing scheme encrypting audio secrets with bounded shares

    OpenAIRE

    鷲尾, 槙也; 渡邊, 曜大

    2014-01-01

    Secret sharing is a method of encrypting a secret into multiple pieces called shares so that only qualified sets of shares can be employed to reconstruct the secret. Audio secret sharing (ASS) is an example of secret sharing whose decryption can be performed by human ears. This paper examines the security of an audio secret sharing scheme encrypting audio secrets with bounded shares, and optimizes the security with respect to the probability distribution used in its encryption.

  10. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako eMitsumasu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root-parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones (SLs, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant-parasite interactions.

  11. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Seto, Yoshiya; Yoshida, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant-parasite interactions.

  12. The physiology of salivary secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Gordon B

    2016-02-01

    Saliva in the mouth is a biofluid produced mainly by three pairs of major salivary glands--the submandibular, parotid and sublingual glands--along with secretions from many minor submucosal salivary glands. Salivary gland secretion is a nerve-mediated reflex and the volume of saliva secreted is dependent on the intensity and type of taste and on chemosensory, masticatory or tactile stimulation. Long periods of low (resting or unstimulated) flow are broken by short periods of high flow, which is stimulated by taste and mastication. The nerve-mediated salivary reflex is modulated by nerve signals from other centers in the central nervous system, which is most obvious as hyposalivation at times of anxiety. An example of other neurohormonal influences on the salivary reflex is the circadian rhythm, which affects salivary flow and ionic composition. Cholinergic parasympathetic and adrenergic sympathetic autonomic nerves evoke salivary secretion, signaling through muscarinic M3 and adrenoceptors on salivary acinar cells and leading to secretion of fluid and salivary proteins. Saliva gland acinar cells are chloride and sodium secreting, and the isotonic fluid produced is rendered hypotonic by salivary gland duct cells as it flows to the mouth. The major proteins present in saliva are secreted by salivary glands, creating viscoelasticity and enabling the coating of oral surfaces with saliva. Salivary films are essential for maintaining oral health and regulating the oral microbiome. Saliva in the mouth contains a range of validated and potential disease biomarkers derived from epithelial cells, neutrophils, the microbiome, gingival crevicular fluid and serum. For example, cortisol levels are used in the assessment of stress, matrix metalloproteinases-8 and -9 appear to be promising markers of caries and periodontal disease, and a panel of mRNA and proteins has been proposed as a marker of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms by which components enter

  13. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ramesh R.; Reddy Anjaneya Prasanna L.; Subbaiah Chinna J.; Kumar Niranjana A.; Prasad Nagendra H.N.; Bhukya Balakishan

    2011-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes) and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant) and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and ...

  14. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots.

  15. Root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandaswamy Deivanayagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ′root canal irrigants′ and ′endodontic irrigants.′ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  16. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  17. Roots and routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte; Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    2011-01-01

    arguing that there is a dynamic interplay between roots and routes in people's lives. The empirical point of departure is narratives about roots and routes by ethnic minorities settled in Aalborg East, an underprivileged neighbourhood in northern Denmark. One of the main findings is a gap between the...... somewhat paradoxical finding is that it appears to be more difficult for transnational migrants to maintain their roots in the country of origin when they go back than it was to establish new roots in the host country...

  18. Roots of Dehn twists

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Darryl; Rajeevsarathy, Kashyap

    2009-01-01

    D. Margalit and S. Schleimer found examples of roots of the Dehn twist about a nonseparating curve in a closed orientable surface, that is, homeomorphisms whose nth power is isotopic to the Dehn twist. Our main theorem gives elementary number-theoretic conditions that describe the values of n for which an nth root exists, given the genus of the surface. Among its applications, we show that n must be odd, that the Margalit-Schleimer roots achieve the maximum value of n among the roots for a gi...

  19. Invasion of Old World Phragmites australis in the New World: precipitation and temperature patterns combined with human influences redesign the invasive niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Li, Xiu-Zhen;

    2013-01-01

    millions of hectares of native plants in inland and tidal wetlands. Another P. australis invasion from the Mediterranean region is simultaneously occurring in the Gulf region of the USA and some countries in South America. Here, we analysed the occurrence records of the two Old World invasive lineages of P....... australis (Haplotype M and Med) in both their native and introduced ranges using environmental niche models (ENMs) to assess (i) whether a niche shift accompanied the invasions in the New World; (ii) the role of biologically relevant climatic variables and human influence in the process of invasion......; and (iii) the current potential distribution of these two lineages. We detected local niche shifts along the East Coast of North America and the Gulf Coast of the USA for Haplotype M and around the Mississippi Delta and Florida of the USA for Med. The new niche of introduced Haplotype M accounts...

  20. On family secrets and -K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  1. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  2. Short-term and long-term effects of tannins on nitrogen mineralisation and litter decomposition in kauri (Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindl.) forests

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, E.; Jongkind, A.G.; Berendse, F.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindl.) occurs naturally in the warm temperate forest of northern New Zealand where it grows mixed with angiosperm tree species. Below mature kauri trees thick organic layers develop in which large amounts of nitrogen are accumulated. This nitrogen seems to be inaccessible to plants. While litter quality can explain the low decomposition rate below kauri, it is not known what causes the accumulation of nitrogen. We hypothesised that kauri tannins reduce nitro...

  3. Effects of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen on the Growth and Production of Domoic Acid by Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis (Bacillariophyceae) in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Jézéquel, Véronique; Calu, Guillaume; Candela, Leo; Amzil, Zouher; Jauffrais, Thierry; Séchet, Véronique; Weigel, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Over the last century, human activities have altered the global nitrogen cycle, and anthropogenic inputs of both inorganic and organic nitrogen species have increased around the world, causing significant changes to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The increasing frequency of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. in estuarine and coastal waters reinforces the need to understand better the environmental control of its growth and domoic acid (DA) production. Here, we document Pseudo-nitzschia spp. growth and toxicity on a large set of inorganic and organic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium, urea, glutamate, glutamine, arginine and taurine). Our study focused on two species isolated from European coastal waters: P. multiseries CCL70 and P. australis PNC1. The nitrogen sources induced broad differences between the two species with respect to growth rate, biomass and cellular DA, but no specific variation could be attributed to any of the inorganic or organic nitrogen substrates. Enrichment with ammonium resulted in an enhanced growth rate and cell yield, whereas glutamate did not support the growth of P. multiseries. Arginine, glutamine and taurine enabled good growth of P. australis, but without toxin production. The highest DA content was produced when P. multiseries grew with urea and P. australis grew with glutamate. For both species, growth rate was not correlated with DA content but more toxin was produced when the nitrogen source could not sustain a high biomass. A significant negative correlation was found between cell biomass and DA content in P. australis. This study shows that Pseudo-nitzschia can readily utilize organic nitrogen in the form of amino acids, and confirms that both inorganic and organic nitrogen affect growth and DA production. Our results contribute to our understanding of the ecophysiology of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and may help to predict toxic events in the natural environment. PMID:26703627

  4. Aspectos de la pesca de la polaca (Micromesistius australis) por parte de la flota argentina en el período 1989 - 1995

    OpenAIRE

    Wöhler, O.C.; Marí, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    Basic aspects concerning southern blue whiting (Micromesistius australis) fishing by the Argentine fleet in the period 1989-1995 are analized. Catch and effort statistics, fleet operation modalities and spatial and temporary characteristics of fishing activities are included. The basic information to perform this analysis was collected from the fishing statistics provided by the Subsecretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería y Pesca of Argentina and from reports of the Observers Program on board of ...

  5. Predominance of clonal reproduction, but recombinant origins of new genotypes in the free-floating aquatic bladderwort Utricularia australis f. tenuicaulis (Lentibulariaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    KAMEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; Ohara, masashi

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic plants are a biological group sharing several adaptations to aquatic conditions. The most striking evolutionary convergence in this group is the extensive reliance on clonal reproduction, which largely determines the patterns and process of evolution in aquatic plants. Utricularia australis f. tenuicaulis is a free-floating aquatic bladderwort that reproduces both sexually via seeds and clonally via turions and shoot fragments. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis was condu...

  6. Effects of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen on the Growth and Production of Domoic Acid by Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis (Bacillariophyceae) in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Jézéquel, Véronique; Calu, Guillaume; Candela, Leo; Amzil, Zouher; Jauffrais, Thierry; Séchet, Véronique; Weigel, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Over the last century, human activities have altered the global nitrogen cycle, and anthropogenic inputs of both inorganic and organic nitrogen species have increased around the world, causing significant changes to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The increasing frequency of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. in estuarine and coastal waters reinforces the need to understand better the environmental control of its growth and domoic acid (DA) production. Here, we document Pseudo-nitzschia spp. growth and toxicity on a large set of inorganic and organic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium, urea, glutamate, glutamine, arginine and taurine). Our study focused on two species isolated from European coastal waters: P. multiseries CCL70 and P. australis PNC1. The nitrogen sources induced broad differences between the two species with respect to growth rate, biomass and cellular DA, but no specific variation could be attributed to any of the inorganic or organic nitrogen substrates. Enrichment with ammonium resulted in an enhanced growth rate and cell yield, whereas glutamate did not support the growth of P. multiseries. Arginine, glutamine and taurine enabled good growth of P. australis, but without toxin production. The highest DA content was produced when P. multiseries grew with urea and P. australis grew with glutamate. For both species, growth rate was not correlated with DA content but more toxin was produced when the nitrogen source could not sustain a high biomass. A significant negative correlation was found between cell biomass and DA content in P. australis. This study shows that Pseudo-nitzschia can readily utilize organic nitrogen in the form of amino acids, and confirms that both inorganic and organic nitrogen affect growth and DA production. Our results contribute to our understanding of the ecophysiology of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and may help to predict toxic events in the natural environment. PMID:26703627

  7. Effects of Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen on the Growth and Production of Domoic Acid by Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis (Bacillariophyceae in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Martin-Jézéquel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last century, human activities have altered the global nitrogen cycle, and anthropogenic inputs of both inorganic and organic nitrogen species have increased around the world, causing significant changes to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. The increasing frequency of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. in estuarine and coastal waters reinforces the need to understand better the environmental control of its growth and domoic acid (DA production. Here, we document Pseudo-nitzschia spp. growth and toxicity on a large set of inorganic and organic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium, urea, glutamate, glutamine, arginine and taurine. Our study focused on two species isolated from European coastal waters: P. multiseries CCL70 and P. australis PNC1. The nitrogen sources induced broad differences between the two species with respect to growth rate, biomass and cellular DA, but no specific variation could be attributed to any of the inorganic or organic nitrogen substrates. Enrichment with ammonium resulted in an enhanced growth rate and cell yield, whereas glutamate did not support the growth of P. multiseries. Arginine, glutamine and taurine enabled good growth of P. australis, but without toxin production. The highest DA content was produced when P. multiseries grew with urea and P. australis grew with glutamate. For both species, growth rate was not correlated with DA content but more toxin was produced when the nitrogen source could not sustain a high biomass. A significant negative correlation was found between cell biomass and DA content in P. australis. This study shows that Pseudo-nitzschia can readily utilize organic nitrogen in the form of amino acids, and confirms that both inorganic and organic nitrogen affect growth and DA production. Our results contribute to our understanding of the ecophysiology of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and may help to predict toxic events in the natural environment.

  8. Elevation as a barrier: genetic structure for an Atlantic rain forest tree (Bathysa australis) in the Serra do Mar mountain range, SE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Talita Soares; Ciampi-Guillardi, Maísa; Bajay, Miklos Maximiliano; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Dos Santos, Flavio Antonio Maës

    2015-05-01

    Distance and discrete geographic barriers play a role in isolating populations, as seed and pollen dispersal become limited. Nearby populations without any geographic barrier between them may also suffer from ecological isolation driven by habitat heterogeneity, which may promote divergence by local adaptation and drift. Likewise, elevation gradients may influence the genetic structure and diversity of populations, particularly those marginally distributed. Bathysa australis (Rubiaceae) is a widespread tree along the elevation gradient of the Serra do Mar, SE Brazil. This self-compatible species is pollinated by bees and wasps and has autochoric seeds, suggesting restricted gene dispersal. We investigated the distribution of genetic diversity in six B. australis populations at two extreme sites along an elevation gradient: a lowland site (80-216 m) and an upland site (1010-1100 m.a.s.l.). Nine microsatellite loci were used to test for genetic structure and to verify differences in genetic diversity between sites. We found a marked genetic structure on a scale as small as 6 km (F ST = 0.21), and two distinct clusters were identified, each corresponding to a site. Although B. australis is continuously distributed along the elevation gradient, we have not observed a gene flow between the extreme populations. This might be related to B. australis biological features and creates a potential scenario for adaptation to the different conditions imposed by the elevation gradient. We failed to find an isolation-by-distance pattern; although on the fine scale, all populations showed spatial autocorrelation until ∼10-20 m. Elevation difference was a relevant factor though, but we need further sampling effort to check its correlation with genetic distance. The lowland populations had a higher allelic richness and showed higher rare allele counts than the upland ones. The upland site may be more selective, eliminating rare alleles, as we did not find any evidence for

  9. Impaired follistatin secretion in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnov, Anders Rasmussen; Plomgaard, Peter; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2016-01-01

    compared to healthy control participants. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: To experimentally increase the glucagon-insulin ratio (mimicking the hormonal effect of exercise), we infused glucagon / somatostatin (to inhibit insulin secretion) and compared the acute follistatin increase in eight male cirrhosis...... compared to healthy controls (27.6 ± 3.8 % versus 34.5 ± 2.9 %, respectively; p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cirrhosis show impaired capacity to acutely secrete follistatin. The decrease in acute follistatin release may contribute to loss of muscle mass in liver cirrhosis....

  10. Histaminergic regulation of prolactin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U P

    1990-01-01

    Histamine (HA), which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, participates in the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin (PRL) secretion. HA has a predominant stimulatory effect which is mediated via H2-receptors following central administration and via H1-receptors following......, while the PRL-inhibitory effect of HA may involve other transmitters than DA. In contrast to its stimulatory effect in men, HA had no effect on basal PRL secretion in women, but enhanced the PRL response to TRH. In rats or in humans the PRL stimulatory effect of HA is not caused by the cardiovascular...

  11. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  12. Molecular identification of a bronopol tolerant strain of Saprolegnia australis causing egg and fry mortality in farmed brown trout, Salmo trutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezinciuc, Svetlana; Sandoval-Sierra, Jose-Vladimir; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    Some species of the genus Saprolegnia, such as Saprolegnia diclina and Saprolegnia ferax are responsible for devastating infections on salmonid eggs. Members of this group cause saprolegniasis, a disease resulting in considerable economic losses in aquaculture. Although both S. diclina and S. ferax have received much attention, the role of other Saprolegnia species in infecting fish eggs is less known. For this purpose, we have investigated the aetiology of chronic egg mortality events occurring in farmed brown trout, Salmo trutta. A total of 48 isolates were obtained from eggs with signs of infection as well as from water samples. A molecular analysis based on nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) operational taxonomic units indicated that the majority of the isolates correspond to Saprolegnia australis. All isolates of S. australis exhibited the same random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) band patterns suggesting that a single strain is implicated in egg infections. The isolates followed Koch postulates using trout eggs and fry. Under standard concentrations of bronopol commonly used in farms, these isolates could grow, but not sporulate. However, both growth and sporulation were recovered when treatment was removed. This study shows that S. australis can infect and kill salmon eggs, and helps in defining oomycetes core pathogens. PMID:25088073

  13. Genetic variation within three populations of Phycella australis (Phil. Ravenna from Biobío Region, Chile, evaluated using ISSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Flores

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phycella australis (Phil. Ravenna is a Chilean plant with high ornamental potential; however, the intensive extraction as a cut flower might be detrimental for the conservational state by ignoring the state of genetic variation. The objective of this investigation was to assess genetic variability within and between three populations of P. australis in the Biobío Region using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers. The evaluated areas correspond to three locations in the province of Concepción, Biobío Region: Desembocadura (36°48' S, 73°10' W, Santa Juana (36°58' S, 72°58' W, and Lipinhue (37°00' S, 72°58' W. Six ISSR primers were used obtaining 51 fragments, from which 72.5% were polymorphic. From the three evaluated sites Santa Juana showed a higher percentage of polymorphic loci (76.47%. From this variability, 83% belong to within population variability and only 17% belong to variability between populations. The dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA method, grouped Lipinhue and Santa Juana sites together, which agrees with the geographic locations. This investigation proved that P. australis has high genetic variability despite the exploitation for economic purposes.

  14. Accumulation of nutrients and heavy metals in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel and Bolboschoenus maritimus (L.) Palla in a constructed wetland of the Venice lagoon watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragato, Claudia [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, University of Padova, Agripolis, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Brix, Hans [Department of Biological Sciences, Plant Biology, University of Aarhus, Ole Worms Alle, Building 1135, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark); Malagoli, Mario [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, University of Padova, Agripolis, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)]. E-mail: mario.malagoli@unipd.it

    2006-12-15

    A recently constructed wetland, located in the Venice lagoon watershed, was monitored to investigate growth dynamics, nutrient and heavy metal shoot accumulation of the two dominating macrophytes: Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus. Investigations were conducted over a vegetative season at three locations with different distance to the inlet point to assess effects on vegetation. The distance from the inlet did not affect either shoot biomass or nutrients (N, P, K and Na) and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu and Zn) shoot content. With the exception of Na, nutrient and heavy metal concentrations were higher in shoots of P. australis than in B. maritimus. Heavy metal concentration in the incoming water and in the soil was not correlated to the plant content of either species. Shoot heavy metal concentrations were similar to those reported in the current literature, but accumulation generally increased towards the end of the growing season. - Heavy metal shoot concentration in Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus increased significantly at the end of the growing season.

  15. Accumulation of nutrients and heavy metals in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel and Bolboschoenus maritimus (L.) Palla in a constructed wetland of the Venice lagoon watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently constructed wetland, located in the Venice lagoon watershed, was monitored to investigate growth dynamics, nutrient and heavy metal shoot accumulation of the two dominating macrophytes: Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus. Investigations were conducted over a vegetative season at three locations with different distance to the inlet point to assess effects on vegetation. The distance from the inlet did not affect either shoot biomass or nutrients (N, P, K and Na) and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu and Zn) shoot content. With the exception of Na, nutrient and heavy metal concentrations were higher in shoots of P. australis than in B. maritimus. Heavy metal concentration in the incoming water and in the soil was not correlated to the plant content of either species. Shoot heavy metal concentrations were similar to those reported in the current literature, but accumulation generally increased towards the end of the growing season. - Heavy metal shoot concentration in Phragmites australis and Bolboschoenus maritimus increased significantly at the end of the growing season

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using PAR Sensor and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS, NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and others in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and others from 1994-01-28 to 2004-07-02 (NODC Accession 0109923)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109923 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS, NOAA Ship DISCOVERER,...

  17. The teacher-disciple tradition and secret teaching in Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solos, Ioannis; Liang, Yuan; Yue, Guang-xin

    2014-01-01

    The ancient teacher-disciple tradition is regarded as one of the most celebrated practices within the Chinese medicine world. Such traditions of secrecy, private wisdom and honor are deeply rooted in the theories of Confucianism. This paper only explores the surface of this ancient culture, by investigating relevant popular ancient texts and common Chinese proverbs, as well as utilizing personal experiences, in order to reflect on how the ancient Chinese perceived such practices within their own society and how secret teaching was passed on from teacher to student, including the revelation of secret formulas and their importance and how that tradition differs from our modern-day perspectives. Various rare manuscripts from the author's personal library are employed in order to provide relative examples of the importance of secret knowledge, and how these secrets applied in the traditional healing. PMID:24126973

  18. Parathyroid hormone receptor signalling in osterix-expressing mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Wanida; Sakagami, Naoko; Nishimori, Shigeki; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Dental root formation is a dynamic process in which mesenchymal cells migrate toward the site of the future root, differentiate and secrete dentin and cementum. However, the identities of dental mesenchymal progenitors are largely unknown. Here we show that cells expressing osterix are mesenchymal progenitors contributing to all relevant cell types during morphogenesis. The majority of cells expressing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) are in the dental follicle and on the root surface, and deletion of its receptor (PPR) in these progenitors leads to failure of eruption and significantly truncated roots lacking periodontal ligaments. The PPR-deficient progenitors exhibit accelerated cementoblast differentiation with upregulation of nuclear factor I/C (Nfic). Deletion of histone deacetylase-4 (HDAC4) partially recapitulates the PPR deletion root phenotype. These findings indicate that PPR signalling in dental mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation, underscoring importance of the PTHrP-PPR system during root morphogenesis and tooth eruption. PMID:27068606

  19. Chromatic roots and hamiltonian paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We present a new connection between colorings and hamiltonian paths: If the chromatic polynomial of a graph has a noninteger root less than or equal to t(n) = 2/3 + 1/3 (3)root (26 + 6 root (33)) + 1/3 (3)root (26 - 6 root (33)) = 1.29559.... then the graph has no hamiltonian path. This result is...

  20. Root exudation of phytochemicals in Arabidopsis follows specific patterns that are developmentally programmed and correlate with soil microbial functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M Chaparro

    Full Text Available Plant roots constantly secrete compounds into the soil to interact with neighboring organisms presumably to gain certain functional advantages at different stages of development. Accordingly, it has been hypothesized that the phytochemical composition present in the root exudates changes over the course of the lifespan of a plant. Here, root exudates of in vitro grown Arabidopsis plants were collected at different developmental stages and analyzed using GC-MS. Principle component analysis revealed that the composition of root exudates varied at each developmental stage. Cumulative secretion levels of sugars and sugar alcohols were higher in early time points and decreased through development. In contrast, the cumulative secretion levels of amino acids and phenolics increased over time. The expression in roots of genes involved in biosynthesis and transportation of compounds represented in the root exudates were consistent with patterns of root exudation. Correlation analyses were performed of the in vitro root exudation patterns with the functional capacity of the rhizosphere microbiome to metabolize these compounds at different developmental stages of Arabidopsis grown in natural soils. Pyrosequencing of rhizosphere mRNA revealed strong correlations (p<0.05 between microbial functional genes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and secondary metabolites with the corresponding compounds released by the roots at particular stages of plant development. In summary, our results suggest that the root exudation process of phytochemicals follows a developmental pattern that is genetically programmed.

  1. FOIA: What's a Trade Secret?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Curtis

    The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was amended in 1974 in order to restrict government control and to facilitate the public's access to information. However, part of the FOIA bans federal officials from disclosing "trade secrets" and commercial or financial information obtained in confidential circumstances. This exemption has resulted in a…

  2. The secret of the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, I.

    The author turns his attention to such questions as: How near is the nearest star? How heavy is the Sun? How does the Doppler effect work? and countless others. In addition, he provides an explanation of how mankind first became engaged in business and commerce, and advances his own unique theory on the secret of the universe.

  3. Raspberry Pi for secret agents

    CERN Document Server

    Sjogelid, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-follow guide with practical examples in each chapter. Suitable for the novice and expert alike, each topic provides a fast and easy way to get started with exciting applications and also guides you through setting up the Raspberry Pi as a secret agent toolbox.

  4. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir L. Katanaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies.

  5. ROOT User Workshop 2013

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Since almost two decades, ROOT has established itself as the framework for HENP data processing and analysis. The LHC upgrade program and the new experiments being designed at CERN and elsewhere will pose even more formidable challenges in terms of data complexity and size. The new parallel and heterogeneous computing architectures that are either announced or already available will call for a deep rethinking of the code and the data structures to be exploited efficiently. This workshop, following from a successful series of such events, will allow you to learn in detail about the new ROOT 6 and will help shape the future evolution of ROOT.

  6. Chemical Characterization and Anti-Oomycete Activity of Laureliopsis philippianna Essential Oils against Saprolegnia parasitica and S. australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Madrid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laureliopsis philippiana (Looser R. Schodde (Monimiaceae is a native tree widespread in the forest areas in the south of Chile and Argentina, known for its medicinal properties and excellent wood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition of L. philippiana leaf and bark essential oils (EOs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and to quantify its anti-oomycete activity, specifically against Saprolegnia parasitica and S. australis. Only six components were identified in leaf EO, 96.92% of which are phenylpropanoids and 3.08% are terpenes. As for bark EO, 29 components were identified, representing 67.61% for phenylpropanoids and 32.39% for terpenes. Leaf EO was characterized mainly by safrole (96.92% and β-phellandrene (1.80%. Bark EO was characterized mainly by isosafrole (30.07%, safrole (24.41%, eucalyptol (13.89%, methyleugenol (7.12%, and eugenol (6.01%. Bark EO has the most promising anti-Saprolegnia activity, with a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC value of 30.0 µg/mL against mycelia growth and a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC value of 50.0 μg/mL against spores; for leaf EO, the MIC and MFC values are 100 and 125 µg/mL, respectively. These findings demonstrate that bark EO has potential to be developed as a remedy for the control of Saprolegnia spp. in aquaculture.

  7. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis - Herschel/PACS observations from the DIGIT key programme

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, Johan E; Green, Joel D; Herczeg, Gregory J; Dionatos, Odysseas; Evans, Neal J; Karska, Agata; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented. The distribution of CO, OH, H2O, [C II], [O I], and continuum emission is investigated. We have developed a deconvolution algorithm which we use to deconvolve the maps, separating the point-source emission from the extended emission. We also construct rotational diagrams of the molecular species. By deconvolution of the Herschel data, we find large-scale (several thousand AU) dust continuum and spectral line emission not associate...

  8. Characterization of the faecal bacterial community of wild young South American (Arctocephalus australis) and Subantarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus tropicalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Aline Weber; Giongo, Adriana; Valdez, Fernanda P; Blaese de Amorin, Derek; Tavares, Maurício; d'Azevedo, Pedro A; Franco, Ana Claudia; Frazzon, Jeverson; Frazzon, Ana P G

    2016-03-01

    The microbiota of wild marine mammals is poorly understood, perhaps due to the migratory habits of some species and the difficulty in obtaining samples. Using high-throughput sequencing, the present study examines the faecal bacterial community of wild young South American (Arctocephalus australis) and Subantarctic fur seals (A. tropicalis). Faecal samples from South American (n = 6) and Subantarctic fur seals (n = 4) found dead along the south coast of Brazil were collected. Sequences were assigned to taxa using the Ribosomal Database Project-Bayesian classifier. Diversity of the microbiota was assessed by categorization of sequence reads into operational taxonomic units. Results indicate that Firmicutes (88.556%-84.016%) was the predominant phylum in South American and Subantarctic fur seals. The distribution of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria varied according to the fur seal species. Fusobacteria and Bacteroidetes represented less than 1% of the sequences. The most abundant order in both fur seals was Clostridiales (88.64% and 87.49%). Individual variable incidences were observed in the composition of family among the fur seals, though the families Lachnospiraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Coriobacteriaceae were more prevalent. This study provides insight into the faecal bacterial community of wild young South American and Subantarctic fur seals. PMID:26880785

  9. Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007

    KAUST Repository

    Schnetzer, Astrid

    2013-06-10

    Harmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  10. First chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin affecting sodium channels: the Aah I toxin of Androctonus australis hector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Fajloun, Ziad; Cestèle, Sandrine; Devaux, Christiane; Mansuelle, Pascal; Mosbah, Amor; Jouirou, Besma; Mantegazza, Massimo; Van Rietschoten, Jurphaas; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Rochat, Hervé; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Sampieri, François

    2004-11-01

    Aah I is a 63-residue alpha-toxin isolated from the venom of the Buthidae scorpion Androctonus australis hector, which is considered to be the most dangerous species. We report here the first chemical synthesis of Aah I by the solid-phase method, using a Fmoc strategy. The synthetic toxin I (sAah I) was renatured in DMSO-Tris buffer, purified and subjected to thorough analysis and comparison with the natural toxin. The sAah I showed physico-chemical (CD spectrum, molecular mass, HPLC elution), biochemical (amino-acid composition, sequence), immunochemical and pharmacological properties similar to those of the natural toxin. The synthetic toxin was recognized by a conformation-dependent monoclonal anti-Aah I antibody, with an IC50 value close to that for the natural toxin. Following intracerebroventricular injection, the synthetic and the natural toxins were similarly lethal to mice. In voltage-clamp experiments, Na(v) 1.2 sodium channel inactivation was inhibited by the application of sAah I or of the natural toxin in a similar way. This work describes a simple protocol for the chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin, making it possible to produce structural analogues in time.

  11. The Spitzer Survey of Interstellar Clouds in the Gould Belt. III. A Multi-Wavelength View of Corona Australis

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Dawn E; Bourke, Tyler L; Forbrich, Jan; Gutermuth, Robert A; Jorgensen, Jes K; Allen, Lori E; Patten, Brian M; Dunham, Michael M; Harvey, Paul M; Merin, Bruno; Chapman, Nicholas L; Cieza, Lucas A; Huard, Tracy L; Knez, Claudia; Prager, Brian; Evans, Neal J

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS observations of a 0.85 deg^2 field including the Corona Australis (CrA) star-forming region. At a distance of 130 pc, CrA is one of the closest regions known to be actively forming stars, particularly within its embedded association, the Coronet. Using the Spitzer data, we identify 51 young stellar objects (YSOs) in CrA which include sources in the well-studied Coronet cluster as well as distributed throughout the molecular cloud. Twelve of the YSOs discussed are new candidates, one of which is located in the Coronet. Known YSOs retrieved from the literature are also added to the list, and a total of 116 candidate YSOs in CrA are compiled. Based on these YSO candidates, the star formation rate is computed to be 12 M_o Myr^-1, similar to that of the Lupus clouds. A clustering analysis was also performed, finding that the main cluster core, consisting of 68 members, is elongated (having an aspect ratio of 2.36), with a circular radius of 0.59 pc and mean surface ...

  12. The reproductive biology of a shallow water morid ( Salilota australis Günther, 1878), around the Falkland Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickle, Paul; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir; Arkhipkin, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    The reproductive biology of a shelf morid, red cod ( Salilota australis) was investigated in the Falkland Islands, in order to expand our knowledge of the reproductive strategy of this relatively unstudied family of fishes. Red cod spawn to the south and south-west of West Falkland between August and October. Length frequency and sex ratio data suggest that females arrive at the spawning grounds first. The greatest spawning activity occurred in early evening and this timing may be an adaptation to reduce predation on eggs. Ripe egg size varied from 0.95 to 1.26 mm and was not dependant on female size. There was no regulative atresia during maturation and the formation of fecundity and fecundity increased with increasing fish total length ( LT) from 300,000 (42-45 cm LT) to 4.5-9.0 million eggs (75-83 cm LT). The fecundity of most of the population was between 2 and 5 million eggs. Red cod releases small batches of eggs over the spawning period. Batch size ranged from 30,000-90,000 (39-42 cm LT) in smaller animals to 400,000-800,000 (>75 cm LT) in larger animals and the batch size of first spawners was significantly higher than for advanced spawners. The study allows us to discuss the evolutionary relationships between the Gadiformes.

  13. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  14. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ramesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and showed significant positive genotypic correlation with yield. Starch-fiber ratio (SFR, determinant of brittle root texture showed strong negative association with root yield. The total alkaloid content had positive genotypic correlation with root yield. So genetic upgradation should aim at optimum balance between two divergent groups of traits i.e. root yield traits (root morphometric traits and crude fiber content and root textural quality traits (starch content and SFR to develop superior genotypes with better yield and quality.

  15. Developmental characteristics and aluminum resistance of root border cells in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, MiaoZhen; Zhang, ShuNa; Xing, ChengHua; Wang, FangMei; Ning, Wang; Lei, Zhu

    2011-05-01

    The developmental characteristics of root border cells (RBCs) and their role in protection of root apices of rice seedling from Al toxicity were evaluated in two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars differing in Al tolerance. Root elongation and RBCs viability were used as indicators for Al effects. The formation of RBCs and the emergence of the root tip occurred almost simultaneously. Treatment of the root with Al inhibited root elongation and increased Al accumulation in the root tips. Physical removal of RBCs from root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation and a higher Al accumulation in the root tips. These effects were more pronounced in the Al-sensitive rice cultivar (II You 6216) than that in the Al-tolerant rice cultivar (II You 838). The relative viability of attached and detached RBCs decreased with increasing Al concentrations. Al also induced a thicker mucilage layer surrounding attached RBCs of both cultivars, and detached RBCs did not. Maintaining the abundant live RBCs encapsulated root tip and enhancing their mucilage secretion, appear to be important in alleviating Al toxicity and in allowing exclusion of Al from the rice root apex.

  16. Some Economics of Trade Secret Law

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, David D; William M. Landes; Posner, Richard A

    1991-01-01

    Despite the practical importance of trade secrets to the business community, the law of trade secrets is a neglected orphan in economic analysis. This paper sketches an approach to the economics of trade secret law that connects it more closely both to other areas of intellectual property and to broader issues in the positive economic theory of the common law.

  17. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  18. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  19. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  20. Unconventional secretion by autophagosome exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2010-01-01

    In this issue, Duran et al. (2010. J. Cell Biol. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200911154) and Manjithaya et al. (2010. J. Cell Biol. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200911149) use yeast genetics to reveal a role for autophagosome intermediates in the unconventional secretion of an acyl coenzyme A (CoA)–binding protein that lacks an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence. Medium-chain acyl CoAs are also required and may be important for substrate routing to this pathway.

  1. Modeling root reinforcement using root-failure Weibull survival function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schwarz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root networks contribute to slope stability through complicated interactions that include mechanical compression and tension. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of root distribution and the dynamic of root turnover, the quantification of root reinforcement on steep slope is challenging and consequently the calculation of slope stability as well. Although the considerable advances in root reinforcement modeling, some important aspect remain neglected. In this study we address in particular to the role of root strength variability on the mechanical behaviors of a root bundle. Many factors may contribute to the variability of root mechanical properties even considering a single class of diameter. This work presents a new approach for quantifying root reinforcement that considers the variability of mechanical properties of each root diameter class. Using the data of laboratory tensile tests and field pullout tests, we calibrate the parameters of the Weibull survival function to implement the variability of root strength in a numerical model for the calculation of root reinforcement (RBMw. The results show that, for both laboratory and field datasets, the parameters of the Weibull distribution may be considered constant with the exponent equal to 2 and the normalized failure displacement equal to 1. Moreover, the results show that the variability of root strength in each root diameter class has a major influence on the behavior of a root bundle with important implications when considering different approaches in slope stability calculation. Sensitivity analysis shows that the calibration of the tensile force and the elasticity of the roots are the most important equations, as well as the root distribution. The new model allows the characterization of root reinforcement in terms of maximum pullout force, stiffness, and energy. Moreover, it simplifies the implementation of root reinforcement in slope stability models. The realistic quantification of root

  2. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  3. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  4. 辽河口芦苇湿地蒸散试验研究%Experimental study of evapotranspiration from Phragmites Australis wetland in Liaohe Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 郑西来; 伍成成; 张淑慧

    2011-01-01

    To study the evapotranspiration regularity over the Phragmites Australis wetland, the field experiments were carried out in a test field of the Liaohe Estuary. The evaporation container with water supply was installed to measure the evapotranspiration from the Phragmites Australis wetland, and the transpiration was measured using A PM-5 porometer. Evaporations from water surface and bare soil are compared. The results shows that the water depth is 10 cm above the soil surface, the transpiration rate presents a single-peak curve pattern with the peak value occurring at around 14:00. While with the time progress, the transpiration rate decreases if Phragmites Australis is submerged in the water for a long time. When the water depth is below the soil surface, the transpiration rate will show a double peak pattern. The diurnal variation of transpiration exhibits a noon break phenomena at noon time (12:00) due to stoma closing. The water depth has a complicate influence on the ratio of evaporation and evapotranspiration. When the groundwater depth is about -20 to -40 cm, the ratio would be the smallest. The evapotranspiration is enhanced when the Phragmites Australis is planted in the wetland. The ratio of evapotranspiration from the open water surface with Phragmites Australis and evaporation of that without Phragmites Australis is about 2. When the water depth is below the soil surface, the ratio of evapotranspiration from the land with Phragmites Australis and from the bare soil will be in the range of 3 to 3.5. The daily evapotranspiration from the Phragmites Australis wetland varies significantly due to changing meteorological conditions. The Phragmites Australis evapotranspiration can be well correlated to climatic factors, such as the daily average of photosynthetic active radiation, the daily average air temperature and daily average relative humidity. The corresponding correlation equation can be established. The evapotranspiration from the Phragmites Australis

  5. Plant-Microbe Communication Enhances Auxin Biosynthesis by a Root-Associated Bacterium, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Nan; Li, Zunfeng; Zhang, Guishan; Xu, Yu; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2016-04-01

    Mechanisms by which beneficial rhizobacteria promote plant growth include tryptophan-dependent indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) synthesis. The abundance of tryptophan in the rhizosphere, however, may influence the level of benefit provided by IAA-producing rhizobacteria. This study examined the cucumber-Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 system and found that SQR9, a bacterium previously shown to enhance the growth of cucumber, increased root secretion of tryptophan by three- to fourfold. Using a split-root system, SQR9 colonization of roots in one chamber not only increased tryptophan secretion from the noninoculated roots but also increased the expression of the cucumber tryptophan transport gene but not the anthranilate synthesis gene in those roots. The increased tryptophan in isolated rhizosphere exudates was sufficient to support increased IAA production by SQR9. Moreover, SQR9 colonization of roots in one chamber in the split-root system resulted in sufficient tryptophan production by the other roots to upregulate SQR9 IAA biosynthesis genes, including a 27-fold increase in the indole-3-acetonitrilase gene yhcX during subsequent colonization of those roots. Deletion of yhcX eliminated SQR9-mediated increases in root surface area, likely by reducing IAA-stimulated lateral root growth. This study demonstrates a chemical dialogue between B. amyloliquefaciens and cucumber in which this communication contributes to bacteria-mediated plant-growth enhancement.

  6. Cheater identifiable visual secret sharing scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhi; Chen Kefei

    2005-01-01

    The visual secret sharing scheme proposed by Naor and Shamir provides a way to encrypt a secret black-white image into shares. A qualified group of participants can recover the secret message without using any cryptographic computation. But the original scheme can easily be corrupted by malicious participant. We propose an extension of VSS(visual secret sharing) to identify cheaters before the secret is recovered. Without the need for any additional information and cryptographic computation, every participant can verify the validity of shares of other participants, thus the security of VSS is enhanced.

  7. 石羊河中游河岸芦苇(Phragmites australis)群落空间格局%Spatial Distribution Pattern and Spatial Association of Phragmites australis in the Middle Reaches of Shiyanghe River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹花; 刘世增; 纪永福; 刘虎俊; 李发明; 李银科

    2016-01-01

    以石羊河中游典型河岸植物芦苇(Phragmites australis)为对象,采用点格局分析法研究了以芦苇为优势种或伴生种群落中芦苇的空间分布格局特征,并对芦苇和沙蒿(Artemisia desertorum)、梭梭(Haloxylon ammodendron)、变异黄耆(Astragalus variabilis)及蓼子朴(Inula salsoloides)的种间关联性进行了分析,揭示了芦苇的空间分布格局和种间关联性与河岸距离的关系.结果表明:在5m的一系列空间尺度上,以芦苇为优势种的群落中,距河岸近的芦苇呈随机分布,而距河岸远的芦苇在小尺度上为集群分布,较大尺度上变为随机分布;以芦苇为伴生种的群落中,芦苇均表现出集群分布特征,且距离河岸近的芦苇聚集程度大于距离河岸远的芦苇.芦苇和沙蒿在较大尺度上具有正关联关系,距离河岸越远,芦苇和沙蒿呈正关联的尺度越小,关联程度越强.芦苇和变异黄耆在4.1~5 m尺度上具有负关联关系,和蓼子朴在1.5~4.6m尺度上具有正关联关系.

  8. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  9. Acaricide activity of leaves extracts of Sambucus australis Schltdl. (Caprifoliaceae at 2% on engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus Atividade acaricida de extratos de folhas de Sambucus australis Schltdl (Caprifoliaceae a 2% sobre teleóginas de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe da Silva Krawczak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections caused by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus are responsible for the most of economic losses in producing-cattle countries in tropical and subtropical areas. Indiscriminate uses of chemical acaricides have contributed with the appearance of tick resistance to many drugs available in the marketplace, and it is a serious problem in the tick control. Flowers of Sambucus australis (South America, called "sabugueiro-from-Brazil", are used on infusions or decoctions forms in the folk medicine with diuretic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and laxative purpose, also employed for treating respiratory diseases in human. The main goal of this study was to evaluate in vitro potential of S. australis leaves extracts as an acaricide agent. Ethanol extract at 70% has been dehydrated and a fraction was suspended in 70% ethanol or in distillated water at final concentration of 2% (0.2mg-1. Using the immersion test of engorged females the efficiency results were obtained in 34% and 66% with the leaves extract diluted in water and 70% ethanol, respectively. This study is the first report on acaricidal activity of S. australis against cattle tick. Further studies to determine the active metabolites in different stages of S. australis could aid to identify suitable extracts to be tested in the R. (B. microplus control.A infestação por Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus é responsável por grandes perdas econômicas em países produtores de bovinos nas áreas tropicais e subtropicais. Usos indiscriminados de acaricidas químicos têm contribuído para o aparecimento da resistência dos ixodídeos a múltiplas drogas, representando um sério problema no controle de carrapatos. As flores da planta Sambucus australis, conhecidas pelo nome popular de sabugueiro do Brasil, são usadas, na forma de infusão ou emplastros, na medicina popular como diurético, antipirético, antiinflamatório e laxativo; também empregado no tratamento de doen

  10. Phosphate DIstribution and Movement in Soil—Root Interface Zone:Ⅲ.Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMING-GANG; ZHANGYI-PING; 等

    1995-01-01

    The depletion rate of phosphate in the soil-root interface zone increased along with growth and phosphate uptske of wheat or maize,which indicated that the phosphate distribution in soil near the root surface agreed well with the phosphate movement in rhizosphere and phosphate uptake by plant,The relative accumulation zone of phosphate within 0.5mm apart from the root surface developed at the 15th day or so after cultivating wheat or maize since the root phosphate secretion increased gradually in this stage.The phosphate distribution in the soil-root interface zone against the growing time(t)and the distance from the root plane(x) could be described by the non-linear regression equation with the third powers of x and t.

  11. Secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zhenjun; Meng Fanzhen

    2006-01-01

    To assure the shareholders can look for their "legal" attorneys to renew the secret, once the secret sharing scheme is initialized, a secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic is constructed. In this scheme, each shareholder can produce a new share by his algorithm, which is equivalent to the primary one. Together with other shares, the primary secret can be renewed. Since this scheme is constructed not by replacing the primary share with a new share produced by the dealer in his primitive secret sharing scheme, so no matter how much shares the shareholder produces, these shares can not be gathered together to renew the secret in this scheme. Compared with the existing secret sharing schemes, this scheme provides more agility for the shareholders by investing each of them a function but not affect its security.

  12. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit pancreatic secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Tozzi, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which pancreas secretes high HCO3- has not been fully resolved. This alkaline secretion, formed in pancreatic ducts, can be achieved by transporting HCO3- from serosa to mucosa or by moving H+ in the opposite direction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether H...... localizations in duct cell monolayers (Capan-1) and human pancreas, and notably the gastric pumps are localized on the luminal membranes. In Capan-1 cells, PPIs inhibited recovery of intracellular pH from acidosis. Furthermore, in rats treated with PPIs, pancreatic secretion was inhibited but concentrations...... of major ions in secretion follow similar excretory curves in control and PPI treated animals. In addition to HCO3-, pancreas also secretes K+. In conclusion, this study calls for a revision of the basic model for HCO3- secretion. We propose that proton transport is driving secretion, and that in addition...

  13. LcrG secretion is not required for blocking of Yops secretion in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matson Jyl S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LcrG, a negative regulator of the Yersinia type III secretion apparatus has been shown to be primarily a cytoplasmic protein, but is secreted at least in Y. pestis. LcrG secretion has not been functionally analyzed and the relevance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function is unknown. Results An LcrG-GAL4AD chimera, originally constructed for two-hybrid analyses to analyze LcrG protein interactions, appeared to be not secreted but the LcrG-GAL4AD chimera retained the ability to regulate Yops secretion. This result led to further investigation to determine the significance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function. Additional analyses including deletion and substitution mutations of amino acids 2–6 in the N-terminus of LcrG were constructed to analyze LcrG secretion and LcrG's ability to control secretion. Some changes to the N-terminus of LcrG were found to not affect LcrG's secretion or LcrG's secretion-controlling activity. However, substitution of poly-isoleucine in the N-terminus of LcrG did eliminate LcrG secretion but did not affect LcrG's secretion controlling activity. Conclusion These results indicate that secretion of LcrG, while observable and T3SS mediated, is not relevant for LcrG's ability to control secretion.

  14. Root development under drought stress

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Leemhuis, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Serving as interfaces between plant and the soil, roots are much more exposed to drought stress than the upper plant parts. Therefore, the root system can be as affected, or even more affected, than the aerial parts of the plant for drought stress (Franco et al., 2011). Nevertheless, the influence of this stress on root activity and development has been much less studied. Undoubtedly, this is due to limitations on accessibility for root observations; being studies on root system dynamics espe...

  15. Proteins among the polysaccharides: a new perspective on root cap slime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-09-01

    Charles Darwin recognized the power of the root cap as a model for plant signalling and behavior, and used it to explore the ways plants sense and respond to diverse stimuli. Over ensuing decades, various groups have reported tantalizing clues regarding the role of a complex extracellular matrix that ensheaths the tip region housing the apical and root cap meristems. In the course of characterizing root tip resistance to infection and injury and the role border cells play in this phenomenon, we confirmed and extended early- and mid-20(th) century studies reporting enzyme activities secreted from the root cap. Multidimensional protein analysis revealed, in fact, that >100 proteins are actively synthesized and secreted from the root cap and border cells. This 'root cap secretome' appears to be a critical component of root tip resistance to infection. We have developed a microscopic assay to quantify the protein-based extracellular response to dynamic changes in environmental conditions including hydroponic culture, and present the results here. This tool provides a simple, direct measure that can be used to explore the ways border cells may function in the manner of white blood cells to trap, immobilize and neutralize threats to the growing root tip.

  16. Transcriptome and Degradome of microRNAs and Their Targets in Response to Drought Stress in the Plants of a Diploid and Its Autotetraploid Paulownia australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Niu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in plant growth, development, and stress response. Increasing numbers of studies aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in plants are being reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on the expression of miRNAs and their targets in plants of a diploid and derived autotetraploid Paulownia australis. Four small RNA (sRNA libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from diploid and autotetraploid P. australis plants treated with either 75% or 25% relative soil water content. A total of 33 conserved and 104 novel miRNAs (processing precision value > 0.1 were identified, and 125 target genes were identified for 36 of the miRNAs by using the degradome sequencing. Among the identified miRNAs, 54 and 68 were differentially expressed in diploid and autotetraploid plants under drought stress (25% relative soil water content, respectively. The expressions of miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the relative expression trends of the randomly selected miRNAs were similar to the trends predicted by Illumina sequencing. And the correlations between miRNAs and their target genes were also analyzed. Furthermore, the functional analysis showed that most of these miRNAs and target genes were associated with plant development and environmental stress response. This study provided molecular evidence for the possible involvement of certain miRNAs in the drought response and/or tolerance in P. australis, and certain level of differential expression between diploid and autotetraploid plants.

  17. Transcriptome and Degradome of microRNAs and Their Targets in Response to Drought Stress in the Plants of a Diploid and Its Autotetraploid Paulownia australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Wang, Yuanlong; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Lin; Yang, Lu; Fan, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in plant growth, development, and stress response. Increasing numbers of studies aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in plants are being reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on the expression of miRNAs and their targets in plants of a diploid and derived autotetraploid Paulownia australis. Four small RNA (sRNA) libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from diploid and autotetraploid P. australis plants treated with either 75% or 25% relative soil water content. A total of 33 conserved and 104 novel miRNAs (processing precision value > 0.1) were identified, and 125 target genes were identified for 36 of the miRNAs by using the degradome sequencing. Among the identified miRNAs, 54 and 68 were differentially expressed in diploid and autotetraploid plants under drought stress (25% relative soil water content), respectively. The expressions of miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the relative expression trends of the randomly selected miRNAs were similar to the trends predicted by Illumina sequencing. And the correlations between miRNAs and their target genes were also analyzed. Furthermore, the functional analysis showed that most of these miRNAs and target genes were associated with plant development and environmental stress response. This study provided molecular evidence for the possible involvement of certain miRNAs in the drought response and/or tolerance in P. australis, and certain level of differential expression between diploid and autotetraploid plants. PMID:27388154

  18. Transcriptome and Degradome of microRNAs and Their Targets in Response to Drought Stress in the Plants of a Diploid and Its Autotetraploid Paulownia australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Suyan; Wang, Yuanlong; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Lin; Yang, Lu; Fan, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in plant growth, development, and stress response. Increasing numbers of studies aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in plants are being reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on the expression of miRNAs and their targets in plants of a diploid and derived autotetraploid Paulownia australis. Four small RNA (sRNA) libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from diploid and autotetraploid P. australis plants treated with either 75% or 25% relative soil water content. A total of 33 conserved and 104 novel miRNAs (processing precision value > 0.1) were identified, and 125 target genes were identified for 36 of the miRNAs by using the degradome sequencing. Among the identified miRNAs, 54 and 68 were differentially expressed in diploid and autotetraploid plants under drought stress (25% relative soil water content), respectively. The expressions of miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the relative expression trends of the randomly selected miRNAs were similar to the trends predicted by Illumina sequencing. And the correlations between miRNAs and their target genes were also analyzed. Furthermore, the functional analysis showed that most of these miRNAs and target genes were associated with plant development and environmental stress response. This study provided molecular evidence for the possible involvement of certain miRNAs in the drought response and/or tolerance in P. australis, and certain level of differential expression between diploid and autotetraploid plants. PMID:27388154

  19. Composting Phragmites australis Cav. plant material and compost effects on soil and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumpeli, Anna; Pavlatou-Ve, Athina K; Kostopoulou, Sofia K; Mamolos, Andreas P; Siomos, Anastasios S; Kalburtji, Kiriaki L

    2013-10-15

    Composting organic residues is a friendly to the environment alternative to producing fertilizer. This research was carried out to study the process of composting Phragmites australis Cav. plant material alone or with animal manure on a pilot-scale, to evaluate firstly the quality of the composts produced and secondly, using a pot experiment, the effects of their application on soil physicochemical characteristics and tomato plants development. For the compost production a randomized complete block design was used with five treatments (five compost types) and four replications. For the pot experiment, a completely randomized design was used with 17 treatments (plain soil, soil with synthetic fertilizer and the application of five compost types, at three rates each) and five replications. Compost N increased with composting time, while C/N ratio decreased significantly and by the end it ranged from 43.3 for CM to 22.6 for CY. Compost pH became almost neutral, ranging from 6.73 for CY to 7.21 for CM3Y3AM4 by the end. Compost combinations CY7AM3 and CM7AM3 had a more positive influence on the soil physicochemical characteristics than the others. Soil N, P, Ca and Mg concentrations and the reduction of clay dispersion were the highest when CM7AM3 compost was added. The macro-aggregate stability was the highest for CY7AM3, which also sustained plant growth. The latter compost combination improved most of the soil physicochemical characteristics and plant growth especially, when the application rate was 4% (w/w), which equals to 156 Mg ha(-1).

  20. Increased Wounding of Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis Calves by Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina F Marón

    Full Text Available At least 626 southern right whale (Eubalaena australis calves died at the Península Valdés calving ground, Argentina, between 2003 and 2014. Intense gull harassment may have contributed to these deaths. In the 1970s, Kelp Gulls (Larus dominicanus began feeding on skin and blubber pecked from the backs of living right whales at Valdés. The frequency of gull attacks has increased dramatically over the last three decades and mother-calf pairs are the primary targets. Pairs attacked by gulls spend less time nursing, resting and playing than pairs not under attack. In successive attacks, gulls open new lesions on the whales' backs or enlarge preexisting ones. Increased wounding could potentially lead to dehydration, impaired thermoregulation, and energy loss to wound healing. The presence, number and total area of gull-inflicted lesions were assessed using aerial survey photographs of living mother-calf pairs in 1974-2011 (n = 2680 and stranding photographs of dead calves (n = 192 in 2003-2011. The percentage of living mothers and calves with gull lesions increased from an average of 2% in the 1970s to 99% in the 2000s. In the 1980s and 1990s, mothers and calves had roughly equal numbers of lesions (one to five, but by the 2000s, calves had more lesions (nine or more covering a greater area of their backs compared to their mothers. Living mother-calf pairs and dead calves in Golfo Nuevo had more lesions than those in Golfo San José in the 2000s. The number and area of lesions increased with calf age during the calving season. Intensified Kelp Gull harassment at Península Valdés could be compromising calf health and thereby contributing to the high average rate of calf mortality observed in recent years, but it cannot explain the large year-to-year variance in calf deaths since 2000.

  1. SURVEY FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE SOUTH AMERICAN FUR SEAL (ARCTOCEPHALUS AUSTRALIS) POPULATION AT PUNTA SAN JUAN, PERU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Gwen; Adkesson, Michael J; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Cárdenas-Alayza, Susana; Majluf, Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The Peruvian population of the South American fur seal ( Arctocephalus australis ) is a distinct evolutionarily significant unit that is endangered. One of the largest rookeries for this species in Peru is located within the Punta San Juan marine protected area (15°22'S, 75°12'W). To better understand the current health status of this population, exposure to 10 pinniped pathogens was evaluated in adult female fur seals (n=29) via serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in November 2010. The results suggest this population is naïve to canine and phocine distemper viruses (serum neutralization test), five Leptospira interrogans serovars (microscopic agglutination test), and Brucella canis (card test). Indirect fluorescent antibody testing for Toxoplasma gondii , Neospora caninum , and Sarcocystis neurona was also uniformly negative. PCR testing of nasal swabs using previously described Mycoplasma spp. primers was positive in 37.9% (11/29) of samples. One animal was positive via card test for Brucella abortus , whereas 53.7% (15/28) were positive or suspect using a marine Brucella competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody to phocine herpesvirus-1 (PHV-1) was identified in 85.7% (24/28) of the sampled population by serum neutralization testing. Overall, exposure to Mycoplasma spp., Brucella spp., and PHV-1 was observed, but results demonstrated low to no exposure to many key pinniped pathogens. The expansion of human populations, agriculture, and industry along the Peruvian coast may lead to increased pathogen exposure from human, domestic, and wild animal sources. The naïve nature of this key population of South American fur seals raises concerns about potential risk for disease outbreaks. PMID:26056875

  2. Anomalous colour in Neotropical mammals: a review with new records for Didelphis sp. (Didelphidae, Didelphimorphia) and Arctocephalus australis (Otariidae, Carnivora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, M S L; Machado, R; Barbieri, F; Freitas, N S; Oliveira, L R

    2013-02-01

    Anomalous colourations occur in many tropical vertebrates. However, they are considered rare in wild populations, with very few records for the majority of animal taxa. We report two new cases of anomalous colouration in mammals. Additionally, we compiled all published cases about anomalous pigmentation registered in Neotropical mammals, throughout a comprehensive review of peer reviewed articles between 1950 and 2010. Every record was classified as albinism, leucism, piebaldism or eventually as undetermined pigmentation. As results, we report the new record of a leucistic specimen of opossum (Didelphis sp.) in southern Brazil, as well as a specimen of South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) with piebaldism in Uruguay. We also found 31 scientific articles resulting in 23 records of albinism, 12 of leucism, 71 of piebaldism and 92 records classified as undetermined pigmentation. Anomalous colouration is apparently rare in small terrestrial mammals, but it is much more common in cetaceans and michrochiropterans. Out of these 198 records, 149 occurred in cetaceans and 30 in bats. The results related to cetaceans suggest that males and females with anomolous pigmentation are reproductively successful and as a consequence their frequencies are becoming higher in natural populations. In bats, this result can be related to the fact these animals orient themselves primarily through echolocation, and their refuges provide protection against light and predation. It is possible that anomalous colouration occurs more frequently in other Neotropical mammal orders, which were not formally reported. Therefore, we encourage researchers to publish these events in order to better understand this phenomenon that has a significant influence on animal survival. PMID:23644801

  3. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUD CORE DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) IN CORONA AUSTRALIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E.; Whittet, D. C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Harju, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500, Piikkioe (Finland); Juvela, M.; Sipilae, O. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Hotzel, S., E-mail: hardee@rpi.edu [Observatory, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-01-20

    Chemical reactions in starless molecular clouds are heavily dependent on interactions between gas phase material and solid phase dust and ices. We have observed the abundance and distribution of molecular gases in the cold, starless core DC 000.4-19.5 (SL42) in Corona Australis using data from the Swedish ESO Submillimeter Telescope. We present column density maps determined from measurements of C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1, 1-0) and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0) emission features. Herschel data of the same region allow a direct comparison to the dust component of the cloud core and provide evidence for gas phase depletion of CO at the highest extinctions. The dust color temperature in the core calculated from Herschel maps ranges from roughly 10.7 to 14.0 K. This range agrees with the previous determinations from Infrared Space Observatory and Planck observations. The column density profile of the core can be fitted with a Plummer-like density distribution approaching n(r) {approx} r {sup -2} at large distances. The core structure deviates clearly from a critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Instead, the core appears to be gravitationally bound and to lack thermal and turbulent support against the pressure of the surrounding low-density material: it may therefore be in the process of slow contraction. We test two chemical models and find that a steady-state depletion model agrees with the observed C{sup 18}O column density profile and the observed N(C{sup 18}O) versus A{sub V} relationship.

  4. Factors affecting post-control reinvasion by seed of an invasive species, Phragmites australis, in the central Platte River, Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatowitsch, Susan M.; Larson, Diane L.; Larson, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plants, such as Phragmites australis, can profoundly affect channel environments of large rivers by stabilizing sediments and altering water flows. Invasive plant removal is considered necessary where restoration of dynamic channels is needed to provide critical habitat for species of conservation concern. However, these programs are widely reported to be inefficient. Post-control reinvasion is frequent, suggesting increased attention is needed to prevent seed regeneration. To develop more effective responses to this invader in the Central Platte River (Nebraska, USA), we investigated several aspects of Phragmites seed ecology potentially linked to post-control reinvasion, in comparison to other common species: extent of viable seed production, importance of water transport, and regeneration responses to hydrology. We observed that although Phragmites seed does not mature until very late in the ice-free season, populations produce significant amounts of viable seed (>50 % of filled seed). Most seed transported via water in the Platte River are invasive perennial species, although Phragmites abundances are much lower than species such as Lythrum salicaria, Cyperus esculentus and Phalaris arundinacea. Seed regeneration of Phragmites varies greatly depending on hydrology, especially timing of water level changes. Flood events coinciding with the beginning of seedling emergence reduced establishment by as much as 59 % compared to flood events that occurred a few weeks later. Results of these investigations suggest that prevention of seed set (i.e., by removal of flowering culms) should be a priority in vegetation stands not being treated annually. After seeds are in the seedbank, preventing reinvasion using prescribed flooding has a low chance of success given that Phragmites can regenerate in a wide variety of hydrologic microsites.

  5. Photochemical Alternation of Phragmites australis Plant Litter: New Insight into the Chemical Evolution of Particulate Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, A. J.; Gelfond, C. E.; Kocar, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The photolysis of natural organic matter (NOM) is a potential pathway for the alteration of material that is not easily biodegraded. Irradiation can alter the physical state of organic matter by facilitating the cycling between the particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) pools. However, a detailed understanding of the underlying chemical changes to the material in both phases is lacking. Here, we use a suspension of particles derived from Phragmites australis, a common marsh reed with high lignin content, as our model "recalcitrant" POM substrate. The solution was irradiated for three weeks with regular sampling, and the composition of the POM and the photo-produced DOM were measured separately using a suite of mass spectrometric and spectroscopic techniques. The chemical composition of individual molecules was measured by coupling soft ionization techniques (electrospray (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI) to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Structural information, including the distribution of the major carbon containing functional groups, was obtained using a combination of FTIR for bulk analyses and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) for spatially resolved chemistry. Results are discussed in the context of differences in chemical composition and structure with increased irradiation time for both organic matter pools. We observed a general shift in the mass spectra of POM towards lower molecular weight masses and an increase in the abundance of ions in DOM as a function of irradiation time- hence the larger POM matrix is likely fragmenting into smaller species that are more soluble. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that the abundance of acidic and alcohol functionalities increased with irradiation in both carbon pools. These complementary approaches provide new detailed information about how the chemical composition of recalcitrant NOM evolves as it is exposed to sunlight.

  6. Growth and nutrient accumulation of Phragmites australis in relation to water level variation and nutrient loadings in a shallow lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhao; Xinghui Xia; Zhifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Shallow lake eutrophication is a global environmental issue.This study investigated the effects of water level variation and nutrient loadings on the growth and nutrient accumulation of Phragmites australis (reed) by field samplings in Baiyangdian Lake,the largest shallow lake of northern China.The field samplings were conducted in two sites of different nutrient loadings during the whole growth period of reeds,and three types of zones with different water depths were chosen for each site,including the terrestrial zone with water level below the ground,the ecotone zone with the water level varying from belowground to aboveground,and the submerged zone with water level above the ground.The result showed that reed growth was more limited by water level variation than nutrient loadings.The average stem lengths and diameters in terrestrial zones were about 26.3%-27.5% and 7.2%-12.0% higher than those in submerged zones,respectively.Similarly,the terrestrial status increased the aboveground biomass of reeds by 36.6%-51.8% compared with the submerged status.Both the nutrient concentrations and storages in the aboveground reeds were mainly influenced by the nutrient loadings in surface water and sediment rather than the water level variation of the reed growth environment,and the nutrient storages reached their maxima in late August or early September.It was observed that the maximum nitrogen storage occurred in the terrestrial zone with higher nutrient loadings,with the value of 74.5 g/m2.This study suggested that water level variation and nutrient loadings should be considered when using reeds to control and remediate eutrophication of shallow lakes.

  7. Abundance estimates of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in Bahía San Antonio, Patagonia, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, E

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) was estimated by the means of aerial line-transect surveys for the area of Bahía San Antonio, a bay located in the north-western region of the San Matías Gulf (40°50’S 64°50’W), Rio Negro, Patagonia Argentina. In total, seven aerial surveys were conducted in the first week of August and September 2009, September, October and November 2010, and August, September 2011. Survey effort equalled a total flight time of 12.4h, during which ...

  8. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  9. Weegee’s City Secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan TRACHTENBERG

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En tant que photographe indépendant de meurtres, d’accidents, d’incendies, mais aussi de moments de loisirs dans la ville — de scènes de violence et de plaisir — Weegee travaillait essentiellement la nuit et utilisait un flash puissant associé à son appareil-photo de presse. Ses « secrets pour réaliser des photographies avec un flash » consistent à donner des conseils pratiques et techniques pour débutants. Mais au cœur de la rhétorique de ses « secrets » se trouvent des réflexions subtiles et convaincantes révélant la relation entre la lumière et l’obscurité, et plus particulièrement la manière dont la lumière du flash permet de rendre visible l’obscurité. Dans le récit de Weegee, le flash confère à la photographie le pouvoir d’écrire — d’écrire avec la lumière, un mode de représentation singulièrement approprié pour enregistrer des instants de vie dans les rues nocturnes de la ville.As a freelance photographer of crime, accidents, fires, and also of the recreational life of the city—scenes of violence and of pleasure—Weegee worked mainly at night and employed a powerful photoflash attachment to his press camera. His "secrets of shooting with photoflash" consist of practical technical advice for beginners. But within the rhetoric of his "secrets" there lie cogent and subtle reflections on the relation of light to darkness, especially on the way the flash of light makes darkness visible. In Weegee’s account, the photoflash gives photography the power of writing—writing with light, a mode of picturing uniquely suited to recording instants of life on city streets at night.

  10. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Samudrala

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates--effector proteins--are not. We have used a novel computational approach to confidently identify new secreted effectors by integrating protein sequence-based features, including evolutionary measures such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, G+C content, amino acid composition, and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and validated on a set of effectors from the animal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. We show that this approach can predict known secreted effectors with high specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, by considering a large set of effectors from multiple organisms, we computationally identify a common putative secretion signal in the N-terminal 20 residues of secreted effectors. This signal can be used to discriminate 46 out of 68 total known effectors from both organisms, suggesting that it is a real, shared signal applicable to many type III secreted effectors. We use the method to make novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. Typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated. We also apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, identifying the majority of known secreted proteins in addition to providing a number of novel predictions. This approach provides a new way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  11. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussis toxin from B. pertussis may be more generally valid than previously anticipated. Secretion and modification of toxins from H. pylori and L. pneumophila profoundly affect host cell metabolism, thus entering the discipline of cellular microbiology. Finally, results from genome sequencing projects revealed the presence of up to three TFSS in a single organism, and the analysis of their interplay and adaptation to different functions will be a future challenge. TFSS-carrying plasmids were discovered in different ecosystems, suggesting that genetic exchange may speed up their evolution and adaptation to different cell-cell interactions. PMID:11918819

  12. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  13. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epi...

  14. Removal of Duodenum Elicits GLP-1 Secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mezza, Teresa; Prioletta, Annamaria;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the effect of removal of the duodenum on the complex interplay between incretins, insulin, and glucagon in nondiabetic subjects.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSFor evaluation of hormonal secretion and insulin sensitivity, 10 overweight patients without type 2 diabetes (age 61 ± 19...... and a remarkable increase in GLP-1 levels, which was not translated into increased insulin secretion. Rather, the hypoinsulinemia may have caused an increase in glucagon secretion....

  15. Comparative effects of auxin and abscisic acid on growth, hydrogen ion efflux and gravitropism in primary roots of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the idea that auxin action on root growth may be mediated by H(+) movement, the correlation of auxin action on growth and H(+) movement in roots was examined along with changes in H(+) efflux patterns associated with the asymmetric growth which occurs during gravitropism. The effects of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (AbA) on growth, H(+) secretion, and gravitropism in roots were compared. Results show a close correlation existent between H(+) efflux and growth in maize roots. In intact roots there is strong H(+) efflux from the elongation zone. Growth-promoting concentrations of IAA stimulate H(+) efflux. During gravitropism the H(+) efflux from the elongation zone becomes asymmetric; the evidence indicates that auxin redistribution contributes to the development of acid efflux asymmetry. That AbA stimulates root growth is reflected in its ability to stimulate H(+) efflux from apical root segments.

  16. Rhizosecretion of The Recombinant Antimicrobial Peptide Ranalexin from Transgenic Tobacco Hairy Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Abou Aleinein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosecretion of functional recombinant proteins from in vitro cultured roots into the hydroponic medium offers an attractive technology to simplify down-stream purification procedures. Aim of the present study was the production and secretion of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP ranalexin from Nicotiana tabacum hairy roots which were transformed by agroinfection. A His-tagged ranalexin was expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter and directed into the plant secretion pathway by fusing its N terminus to the ER signal peptide of calreticulin. The maximal accumulation of ranalexin in hairy root tissue after 20-25 days of culture accounted for about 3.36% of the total soluble protein. Secreted ranalexin reached a concentration of 0.28 mg/L in the medium on day 25. Extracellular ranalexin level could be increased to 1.64 mg/L by the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone to the culture medium. The secreted ranalexin is active against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria including strains which are multiresistant against antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus VRE, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumanii as well as clinical MRSA isolates. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of plant tissue cultures especially tobacco hairy roots as an alternative production system of ranalexin and other antimicrobial peptides.

  17. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  18. Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Wei Tsun; Bhandari, Bhesh; Jackson, Louise; James, Peter

    2016-07-30

    Rhipicephalus australis (formerly Boophilus microplus) is a one host tick responsible for major economic loss in tropical and subtropical cattle production enterprises. Control is largely dependent on the application of acaricides but resistance has developed to most currently registered chemical groups. Repellent compounds that prevent initial attachment of tick larvae offer a potential alternative to control with chemical toxicants. The repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (TTO) emulsions and two β-cyclodextrin complex formulations, a slow release form (SR) and a modified faster release form (FR), were examined in a series of laboratory studies. Emulsions containing 4% and 5% TTO applied to cattle hair in laboratory studies completely repelled ascending tick larvae for 24h whereas 2% and 3% formulations provided 80% protection. At 48h, 5% TTO provided 78% repellency but lower concentrations repelled less than 60% of larvae. In a study conducted over 15 days, 3% TTO emulsion applied to cattle hair provided close to 100% repellency for 2 days, but then protection fell to 23% by day 15. The FR formulation gave significantly greater repellency than the emulsion and the SR formulation from day 3 until the end of the study (P<0.05), providing almost complete repellency at day 3 (99.5%), then decreasing over the period of the study to 49% repellency at day 15. Proof of concept is established for the use of appropriately designed controlled-release formulations to extend the period of repellency provided by TTO against R. australis larvae. PMID:27369582

  19. Extracts from Cladiella australis, Clavularia viridis and Klyxum simplex (Soft Corals are Capable of Inhibiting the Growth of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey-Horng Wang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biomedical products have already been obtained from marine organisms. In order to search more therapeutic drugs against cancer, this study demonstrates the cytotoxicity effects of Cladiella australis, Clavularia viridis and Klyxum simplex extractson human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC4, SCC9 and SCC25 cells using cell adhesion and cell viability assay. The morphological alterations in SCCs cells after treatment with three extracts, such as typical nuclear condensation, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic bodies of cells were demonstrated by Hoechst stain. Flow cytometry indicated that three extracts sensitized SCC25 cells in the G0/G1 and S-G2/M phases with a concomitant significantly increased sub-G1 fraction, indicating cell death by apoptosis. This apoptosis process was accompanied by activation of caspase-3 expression after SCC25 cells were treated with three extracts. Thereby, it is possible that extracts of C. australis, C. viridis and K. simplex cause apoptosis of SCCs and warrant further research investigating the possible anti-oral cancer compounds in these soft corals.

  20. Primary structure, conformation in aqueous solution, and intestinal immunomodulating activity of fucoidan from two brown seaweed species Sargassum crassifolium and Padina australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuguchi, Yoshiaki; Tran, Van Thi Thanh; Bui, Ly Minh; Takebe, Shizuka; Suzuki, Shiho; Nakajima, Nobukazu; Kitamura, Shinichi; Thanh, Thuy Thi Thu

    2016-08-20

    We studied the structure of fucoidans extracted from two brown seaweed species, Sargassum crassifolium and Padina australis, and their intestinal immunomodulating activity via Peyer's patch cells of C3H/HeJ mice. ESI-MS analysis indicated that the dominant structure of both fucoidans has a backbone of α-(1→4)-linked and α-(1→3)-linked l-fucose residues and sulfate groups are attached at the C-2 and C-4 positions; branches of fucoidan from S. crassifolium are galactose residues with (1→4)- linkage and branching points are at C-4 of fucose, while fucoidan from P. australis, branches are sulfated galactose-fucose disaccharides and sulfated galactose monosaccharides attached to the main chain through (1→3)- or (1→4)- linkages. According to small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, the two fucoidans have a branched structure. We simulated them with molecular models based on our proposed primary structure. These fucoidan samples have the ability to stimulate intestinal immunological activity via Peyer's patch cells. PMID:27178910

  1. Hábitos tróficos de la reineta Brama australis (Pisces: Bramidae durante el periodo estival frente a Chile central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Santa Cruz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available La reineta Brama australis es un importante recurso pesquero artesanal en la zona central chilena, incorporado en los programas de seguimiento biológico, pero con escasas evaluaciones de sus aspectos tróficos. Para actualizar el estado del conocimiento, se analizó su dieta durante el verano austral época de mayor disponibilidad de este recurso en la zona central de Chile, mediante el análisis del contenido gástrico de 300 ejemplares capturados entre noviembre 2011 y marzo 2012. Se identificó una dieta dominada por Euphausia mucronata (IIR = 92,33, aunque a escala mensual se identificó una dieta mixta de E. mucronata durante noviembre, diciembre 2011 y marzo 2012, además de Pterygosquilla armata y anfípodos hipéridos durante enero y marzo 2012. No se encontró diferencias significativas entre ambos sexos (P > 0,01. Estos resultados demuestran y corroboran que B. australis es un depredador pelágico con un reducido espectro trófico en el litoral de Chile central.

  2. Maximal stomatal conductance to water and plasticity in stomatal traits differ between native and invasive introduced lineages of Phragmites australis in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhovnikoff, V; Taylor, S H; Hazelton, E L G; Smith, C M; O'Brien, J

    2016-01-01

    The fitness costs of reproduction by clonal growth can include a limited ability to adapt to environmental and temporal heterogeneity. Paradoxically, some facultatively clonal species are not only able to survive, but colonize, thrive and expand in heterogeneous environments. This is likely due to the capacity for acclimation (sensu stricto) that compensates for the fitness costs and complements the ecological advantages of clonality. Introduced Phragmites australis demonstrates great phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature, nutrient availability, geographic gradient, water depths, habitat fertility, atmospheric CO2, interspecific competition and intraspecific competition for light. However, no in situ comparative subspecies studies have explored the difference in plasticity between the non-invasive native lineage and the highly invasive introduced lineage. Clonality of the native and introduced lineages makes it possible to control for genetic variation, making P. australis a unique system for the comparative study of plasticity. Using previously identified clonal genotypes, we investigated differences in their phenotypic plasticity through measurements of the lengths and densities of stomata on both the abaxial (lower) and adaxial (upper) surfaces of leaves, and synthesized these measurements to estimate impacts on maximum stomatal conductance to water (gwmax). Results demonstrated that at three marsh sites, invasive lineages have consistently greater gwmax than their native congeners, as a result of greater stomatal densities and smaller stomata. Our analysis also suggests that phenotypic plasticity, determined as within-genotype variation in gwmax, of the invasive lineage is similar to, or exceeds, that shown by the native lineage. PMID:26819257

  3. Single cell gel electrophoresis as a tool to assess genetic damage in Heleobia cf. australis (Mollusca: Gastropoda as sentinel for industrial and domestic pollution in Montevideo bay (Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Villar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in aquatic organisms in polluted areas is an important issue because contamination may alter their health at sublethal levels. Although molluscs have been widely used to monitor water pollution, there are no records of in vivo genotoxicity studies. Heleobia cf. australis, is distributed in almost all Uruguayan coastal ecosystems, including highly polluted sites. The comet assay is a damage genetic biomarker based on the migration of negatively charged DNA fragments produced by mutagenic agents in individual cells. Live individuals were collected in the Montevideo Bay (impacted area and Laguna Garzón (control to analyze the presence of mutagenic agents in the former site through comet assay. Cells from organisms of the impacted area showed significantly higher levels of genetic damage than those obtained in the control population, measured by percentage of DNA in the tail. Although preliminary, this approach supports the idea that H. cf. australis could be used as a sentinel to evaluate the presence of mutagenic agents in estuarine environments, alerting to the impact of contamination in its early stages.

  4. Root Effect of Three Vegetation Types on Shoreline Stabilization of Chongming Island, Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Qin; ZHONG Qi-Cheng; WANG Kai-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Coastal erosion is currently a major problem along the southern coast of Chongming Island, Shanghai. To enhance the erosion protection ability of coastal shelterbelts, two woody tree species, Taxodium ascendens and Salix babylonica, were planted separately into Phragmites australis + Scirpus mariqueter communities in 2006. Two years later, we investigated whether either of these experiments reduced erosion and increased stability in the native herbaceous plant community. We also examined soil stability and root length density under T. ascendens added, S. babylonica added and native herbaceous vegetation conditions along an intertidal gradient from the soil surface to a depth of 40 cm in each experiment, thus to determine the capacity of T. ascendens and S. babylonica to contribute to shoreline stabilization. Topsoil under the native vegetation had greater stability at the middle and higher intertidal zones because its soil stability index and root length density were significantly higher than in the T. ascendens or S. babylonica planted communities. The effect of T.ascendens on soil stability was not generally better than that of the native vegetation. Only at the 20-30 cm soil depth of the middle intertidal zone and in the 10-20 cm layer of the higher intertidal zone the soil stability index and root length densities under the T. ascendens added condition were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the native vegetation.The S. babylonica planted soil had greater stability in the deeper soil layer than the soil under either the native vegetation or the T. ascendens added condition, and its soil stability index and root length density were significant higher (P < 0.05) than those of other vegetation conditions at the 30-40 cm soil depth for the lower intertidal zone and at the 20-40 cm layer for middle and higher intertidal zones.

  5. Lipochito-oligosaccharides re-initiate root hair tip growth in Vicia sativa with high calcium and spectrin-like antigen at the tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Rook, M.B.; Bisseling, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Lipochitooligosaccharides, Nod factors secreted by Rhizobium bacteria, are signal molecules that induce deformation of root hairs of their host plant. A bioassay was used for deformation, and the cytological changes induced by specific lipochitooligosaccharides in root hairs of Vicia sativa L. (vetc

  6. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  7. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  8. DYNAMIC AND VERIFIABLE SECRET SHARING AMONG WEIGHTED PARTICIPANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanshuo ZHANG; Zhuojun LIU

    2007-01-01

    A secret sharing scheme permits a secret to be shared among participants in such a way that only qualified subsets of participants can recover the secret. Secret sharing is useful in management of cryptographic keys. Based on identity, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants. Then we present a dynamic scheme about secret sharing among weighted participants. At last, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants, which can make all weighted participants verifiable and dynamic.

  9. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  10. Advances in root reinforcement experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Niedda, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    Root reinforcement is considered in many situations an important effect of vegetation for slope stability. In the past 20 years many studies analyzed root reinforcement in laboratory and field experiments, as well as through modeling frameworks. Nearby the important contribution of roots to shear strength, roots are recognized to impart stabilization also through lateral (parallel to slope) redistribution of forces under tension. Lateral root reinforcement under tensile solicitations (such as in the upper part of a shallow landslide) was documented and discussed by some studies. The most common method adopted to measure lateral root reinforcement are pullout tests where roots (single or as bundle) are pulled out from a soil matrix. These conditions are indeed representative for the case where roots within the mass of a landslide slip out from the upper stable part of the slope (such in a tension crack). However, there is also the situation where roots anchored at the upper stable part of the slope slip out from the sliding soil mass. In this last case it is difficult to quantify root reinforcement and no study discussed this mechanism so far. The main objective of this study is to quantify the contribution of roots considering the two presented cases of lateral root reinforcement discussed above - roots slipping out from stable soil profile or sliding soil matrix from anchored roots-, and discuss the implication of the results for slope stability modeling. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments for both roots pullout and soil sliding mechanisms using a tilting box with a bundle of 15 roots. Both Douglas (Pseudotsuga menziesii) roots and soil were collected from the study area in Sardinia (Italy), and reconstructed in laboratory, filling the root and soil layer by layer up to 0.4 meter thickness. The results show that the ratio between pullout force and force transferred to the root during soil sliding range from 0.5 to 1. This results indicate that

  11. Isolation and characterization of 4-tert-butylphenol-utilizing Sphingobium fuliginis strains from Phragmites australis rhizosphere sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tadashi; Momotani, Naonori; Ogata, Yuka; Miyamori, Yuji; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Mori, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Shintaro; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-10-01

    We isolated three Sphingobium fuliginis strains from Phragmites australis rhizosphere sediment that were capable of utilizing 4-tert-butylphenol as a sole carbon and energy source. These strains are the first 4-tert-butylphenol-utilizing bacteria. The strain designated TIK-1 completely degraded 1.0 mM 4-tert-butylphenol in basal salts medium within 12 h, with concomitant cell growth. We identified 4-tert-butylcatechol and 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone as internal metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When 3-fluorocatechol was used as an inactivator of meta-cleavage enzymes, strain TIK-1 could not degrade 4-tert-butylcatechol and 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone was not detected. We concluded that metabolism of 4-tert-butylphenol by strain TIK-1 is initiated by hydroxylation to 4-tert-butylcatechol, followed by a meta-cleavage pathway. Growth experiments with 20 other alkylphenols showed that 4-isopropylphenol, 4-sec-butylphenol, and 4-tert-pentylphenol, which have alkyl side chains of three to five carbon atoms with α-quaternary or α-tertiary carbons, supported cell growth but that 4-n-alkylphenols, 4-tert-octylphenol, technical nonylphenol, 2-alkylphenols, and 3-alkylphenols did not. The rate of growth on 4-tert-butylphenol was much higher than that of growth on the other alkylphenols. Degradation experiments with various alkylphenols showed that strain TIK-1 cells grown on 4-tert-butylphenol could degrade 4-alkylphenols with variously sized and branched side chains (ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, n-butyl, sec-butyl, tert-butyl, n-pentyl, tert-pentyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, tert-octyl, n-nonyl, and branched nonyl) via a meta-cleavage pathway but not 2- or 3-alkylphenols. Along with the degradation of these alkylphenols, we detected methyl alkyl ketones that retained the structure of the original alkyl side chains. Strain TIK-1 may be useful in the bioremediation of environments polluted by 4-tert-butylphenol and various other 4-alkylphenols.

  12. The Gaudi Framework and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, B; Clemencic, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gaudi framework, at the core of LHCb applications, relies on many features of ROOT, from the Mathematical libraries, to the tools for reflection and persistency. While Gaudi's architecture is under review in order to fulfill the LHCb computing requirements after LS1 and upgrade, significant changes are also announced for ROOT 6. This talk will review the usage of ROOT within Gaudi and LHCb applications, in order to present the features needed by LHCb to migrate to the new ROOT.

  13. Root canal retained restorations: 3. Root-face attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummer, P M; Edmunds, D H; Gidden, J R

    1990-10-01

    It has been common practice for many years to use retained roots to provide support and stability for partial or full dentures. The retention of such overdentures is greatly enhanced if the remaining roots are modified and restored with posts and root-face attachments. The final article in this series on root canal retained restorations classifies and describes some of the root-face attachments currently available, and also describes a number of prefabricated post systems with integral overdenture attachments. Guidelines for clinical and laboratory procedures are given. PMID:2097234

  14. Negative phototropism of rice root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@It is often believed that the stem of higher plants has characteristics of positive phototropism, and the root shows no phototropism or no sensitivity to light though the root of Arabdopsis was reported possessing characteristics of negative phototropism. In this study, a distinct negative phototropism of the root system of rice seedlings was observed.

  15. Diagravitropism in corn roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, A. C.; Wettlaufer, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The diagravitropic behavior of Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots grown in darkness provides an opportunity for comparison of two qualitatively different gravitropic systems. As with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism is shown to require the presence of the root cap, have a similar time course for the onset of curvature, and a similar presentation time. In contrast with positive gravitropism, diagravitropism appears to have a more limited requirement for calcium, for it is insensitive to the elution of calcium by EGTA and insensitive to the subsequent addition of a calcium/EGTA complex. These results are interpreted as indicating that whereas the same sensing system is shared by the two types of gravitropism, separate transductive systems are involved, one for diagravitropism, which is relatively independent of calcium, and one for positive gravitropism, which is markedly dependent on calcium.

  16. Roots of Financial Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Kouwenberg, Roy; Menkhoff, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Our study aims to uncover the roots of financial literacy. Better financial literacy predicts more informed savings and borrowing decisions in our sample, covering the urban middle-class in an emerging economy. We then test education at school, family background, parental teaching, and childhood experiences with money as potential determinants of financial literacy. In addition to risk tolerance and having basic numeracy skills, we find that family variables matter most, in particular better ...

  17. Mental Roots of Terror

    OpenAIRE

    Saruhan, Müfit Selim

    2004-01-01

    In this article, I deal with mental and terror relationship. Mental roots of terror are being examined. Religion has nothing to do with terrorism. Terrorist tries to misuse religion. Mental with prejudice and lack of knowledge occupies the personality of individual and his ability to judge. Purification of mind from any external and internal prejudices is the unique solution of terrorism. Only within extensive education we can overcome terrorism. Terrorism could not apply to a religion or a n...

  18. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas for stimulating…

  19. On Secret Sharing with Nonlinear Product Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cascudo Pueyo, Ignacio; Cramer, Ronald; Mirandola, Diego;

    2015-01-01

    Multiplicative linear secret sharing is a fundamental notion in the area of secure multiparty computation and, since recently, in the area of two-party cryptography as well. In a nutshell, this notion guarantees that the product of two secrets is obtained as a linear function of the vector consis...

  20. Decrypted secrets methods and maxims of cryptology

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Friedrich L

    2006-01-01

    A reference work on cryptology offering technical and biographical details. This book reviews secret codes and their uses - the foundations of cryptography. It also deals with the process of covertly decrypting a secret code - cryptanalysis, and gives particular advice on assessing methods.

  1. Cortactin enhances exosome secretion without altering cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoda, Lahiru; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-07-18

    The role of cortactin, a regulator of late endosomal trafficking, in the biogenesis and secretion of exosomes is poorly understood. In this issue, Sinha et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601025) elucidate the role of cortactin as a positive regulator of late endosomal docking and exosome secretion. PMID:27432895

  2. Entanglement Enhances Security in Secret Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; De, Aditi Sen; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We analyze tolerable quantum bit error rates in secret sharing protocols, and show that using entangled encoding states is advantageous in the case when the eavesdropping attacks are local. We also provide a criterion for security in secret sharing -- a parallel of the Csiszar-Korner criterion in single-receiver cryptography.

  3. Screening of foliar-applied herbicides for controlling Acalypha australis in soybean fields%防除大豆田铁苋菜的茎叶处理除草剂筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何付丽; 代丽婷; 曲春鹤; 刘培福; 赵长山

    2011-01-01

    The population and damage of Acalypha australis L. are increasing in soybean fields in Heilongjiang Province, and farmers regard it as the troublesome weed. Pot experiments were conducted to screen postemergence herbicides for controlling A. australis. The results showed that bentazone, thifensulfuron, clomazone or imazetha-pyr could not control 2-leaf through 6-leaf A. australis. Two-leaf A. australis could be controlled by formesafen with an application rate of 300 g/hmz, lactofen with an application rate of 90 g/hm2 or fluoroglycofen-ethyl with an application rate of 60 g/hm2. To control 4-leaf A. australis, the application rate of formesafen should be more than 300 g/hm2, and that of fluoroglycofen more than 90 g/hm2. Six-leaf A. australis could only be controlled by formesafen with an application rate of more than 300 g/hm2.%铁苋菜(Acalypha australis L.)在黑龙江省大豆田的种群数量及其危害日益严重,农民已将其列为难防杂草.采用盆栽试验方法,筛选了防治铁苋菜的茎叶处理除草剂.结果表明,灭草松、噻吩磺隆、异噁草松、咪唑乙烟酸对2~6叶期铁苋菜无防除效果;防除2叶期铁苋菜,可以施用氟磺胺草醚300 g/hm2、乳氟禾草灵90 g/hrn2、乙羧氟草醚60 g/hm2;防除4叶期铁苋菜,氟磺胺草醚施药量需高于300 g/hm2,乙羧氟草醚的施药量需高于90 g/hm2;防除6叶期铁苋菜,仅能施用氟磺胺草醚,且施药量需高于300 g/hm2.

  4. Radioimmunoassay in the detection of insulin secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some antihypertensive drugs have been shown to cause clinically significant alteration in the endocrine function. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of a new antihypertensive drug, rilmenidine on insulin secretion, which is an important determinant for glucose metabolism. In-vitro method was used to study the direct effect of rilmenidine on glucose induced insulin secretion using isolated rat pancreas. Insulin was assayed using radioimmunoassay. Concentrations of rilmenidine used were based on the peak plasma concentration achieved with an oral standard dose of 1 mg. This study showed that rilmenidine at low concentration was able to stimulate insulin secretion whereas at higher concentration inhibited the insulin secretion. This probably was due to its effect on the imidazoline receptor and the alpha2 adrenoceptor known to induce and inhibit insulin secretion respectively. (Author)

  5. Pancreatic bicarbonate secretion involves two proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Henriksen, Katrine L.;

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas secretes fluid rich in digestive enzymes and bicarbonate. The alkaline secretion is important in buffering of acid chyme entering duodenum and for activation of enzymes. This secretion is formed in pancreatic ducts, and studies to date show that plasma membranes of duct epithelium express...... and non-gastric H(+)-K(+)-ATPases. We measured intracellular pH and secretion in small ducts isolated from rat pancreas and showed their sensitivity to H(+)-K(+) pump inhibitors and ion substitutions. Gastric and non-gastric H(+)-K(+) pumps were demonstrated on RNA and protein levels, and pumps were...... localized to the plasma membranes of pancreatic ducts. Quantitative analysis of H(+)/HCO(3)(-) and fluid transport shows that the H(+)-K(+) pumps can contribute to pancreatic secretion in several species. Our results call for revision of the bicarbonate transport physiology in pancreas, and most likely...

  6. Toxins and Secretion Systems of Photorhabdus luminescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Rodou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae.Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs, the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir proteins, the “makes caterpillars floppy” (Mcf toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC; the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  7. Do roots mind the gap?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Carminati; Vetterlein, D; Koebernick, N.; Blaser, S; Weller, U; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Roots need to be in good contact with the soil to take up water and nutrients. However, when the soil dries and roots shrink, air-filled gaps form at the root-soil interface. Do gaps actually limit the root water uptake, or do they form after water flow in soil is already limiting?Four white lupins were grown in cylinders of 20 cm height and 8 cm diameter. The dynamics of root and soil structure were recorded using X-ray CT at regular intervals during one drying/wetting cycle. Tensiometers we...

  8. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausbøll Anders

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online.

  9. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  10. Polarized secretion of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernallis Ann B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The direction of cytokine secretion from polarized cells determines the cytokine's cellular targets. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF belongs to the interleukin-6 (IL-6 family of cytokines and signals through LIFR/gp130. Three factors which may regulate the direction of LIF secretion were studied: the site of stimulation, signal peptides, and expression levels. Stimulation with IL-1β is known to promote IL-6 secretion from the stimulated membrane (apical or basolateral in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2. Since LIF is related to IL-6, LIF secretion was also tested in Caco-2 following IL-1β stimulation. Signal peptides may influence the trafficking of LIF. Two isoforms of murine LIF, LIF-M and LIF-D, encode different signal peptides which have been associated with different locations of the mature protein in fibroblasts. To determine the effect of the signal peptides on LIF secretion, secretion levels were compared in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK clones which expressed murine LIF-M or LIF-D or human LIF under the control of an inducible promoter. Low and high levels of LIF expression were also compared since saturation of the apical or basolateral route would reveal specific transporters for LIF. Results When Caco-2 was grown on permeable supports, LIF was secreted constitutively with around 40% secreted into the apical chamber. Stimulation with IL-1β increased LIF production. After treating the apical surface with IL-1β, the percentage secreted apically remained similar to the untreated, whereas, when the cells were stimulated at the basolateral surface only 20% was secreted apically. In MDCK cells, an endogenous LIF-like protein was detected entirely in the apical compartment. The two mLIF isoforms showed no difference in their secretion patterns in MDCK. Interestingly, about 70% of murine and human LIF was secreted apically from MDCK over a 400-fold range of expression levels within clones and a 200

  11. Overexpression of a Foreign Bt Gene in Cotton Affects the Low-Molecular-Weight Components in Root Exudates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei-Dong; SHI Wei-Ming; LI Bao-Hai; ZHANG Min

    2007-01-01

    Most research in the past using genetically modified crops (GM crops) has focused on the ecological safety of foreign gene (i.e., the gene flow), gene products (for example, Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) protein), and the safety of transgenic food for humans. In this study, changes in both the species and amounts of low-molecular-weight components in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) root exudates after foreign Bt gene overexpression were investigated under different nutritional conditions. Transgenic cotton containing Bt (Bt-cotton), supplemented with all the mineral nutrients, secreted more organic acids than the wild-type cotton (WT). When nitrogen was removed from the full-nutrient solution, the amount of organic acids secretion of Bt-cotton was lesser than that of WT. The roots of the transgenic cotton secreted lesser amounts of amino acids and soluble sugars than the WT roots in the full-nutrient solution. Deficiencies of P and K caused a large increase in the total amino acid and soluble sugar secretions of both Bt-cotton and WT, with larger increases observed in Bt-cotton. Because transferring the foreign Bt gene into cotton can result in alterations in the components of the root exudates, with the effect varying depending on the nutritional status, the cultivation of genetically modified crops, such as Bt-cotton, in soil environments should be more carefully assessed, and the possible effects as a result of the alterations in the root exudate components should be considered.

  12. The Roots of Beowulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  13. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  14. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF ROOT EXTRACT OF SOLANUM MELONGENA LINN ROOT

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava Ashish; Sanjay Yadav

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at Pharmacognostic study and biological evaluation of analgesic activity of plants roots. The roots of plants were studies for Pharmacognostic characteristics namely, morphology, microscopy, physicochemical parameters, which can be of utilized in identification/authentication of the plant and/or its roots in crude drug form. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the dry residue was carried out by the chemical test and thin layer chromatographic method. The p...

  15. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  16. Perennial roots to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation. PMID:24563283

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor gene profiles of Enterococcus spp. isolates from wild Arctocephalus australis (South American fur seal) and Arctocephalus tropicalis (Subantarctic fur seal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santestevan, Naiara Aguiar; de Angelis Zvoboda, Dejoara; Prichula, Janira; Pereira, Rebeca Inhoque; Wachholz, Guilherme Raffo; Cardoso, Leonardo Almansa; de Moura, Tiane Martin; Medeiros, Aline Weber; de Amorin, Derek Blaese; Tavares, Maurício; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Franco, Ana Claudia; Frazzon, Jeverson; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2015-12-01

    Enterococci are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tracts in humans and animals. Epidemiological data suggest that enterococci are important reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant genes that may be transmitted from other bacterial species The aim of this study was to investigate the species composition, antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in enterococci recovered from fecal samples of wild Arctocephalus australis and A. tropicalis found dead along the South Coast of Brazil. From a total of 43 wild fur seals, eleven were selected for this study. Phenotypic and genotypic characterizations were used to classify Enterococcus species. Strains were tested for susceptibility to 10 antibiotics, presence of ace, gelE, asa, cylA, tet(L), tet(M) and erm(B) genes by PCR, and genetic variability using RAPD-PCR. Among the 50 enterococci isolated, 40% were Enterococcus faecalis, 40% E. hirae, 12% E. casseliflavus and 8 % other enterococcal species. Resistance profiles were observed to erythromycin, nitrofurantoin, tetracycline, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The prevalence of virulence genes was ace (68%), gelE (54%), asa (22%) and cylA (4%). In erythromycin- and tetracycline strains, erm(B) and tet(M) were detected, respectively. The RAPD-PCR demonstrated a close phylogenetic relationship between the enterococci isolated from A. australis and A. tropicalis. In conclusion, different enterococcus species showing antimicrobial resistance and virulence determinates were isolated from fecal samples of fur seals. Antibiotic resistant strains in these animals could be related within food chain and aquatic pollutants or linked to environmental resistome, and demonstrates the potential importance of these animals as reservoirs and disseminators of such determinants in marine environmental.

  18. ROOT Tutorial for Summer Students

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    ROOT is a "batteries-included" tool kit for data analysis, storage and visualization. It is widely used in High Energy Physics and other disciplines such as Biology, Finance and Astrophysics. This event is an introductory tutorial to ROOT and comprises a front lecture and hands on exercises. IMPORTANT NOTE: The tutorial is based on ROOT 6.04 and NOT on the ROOT5 series.  IMPORTANT NOTE: if you have ROOT 6.04 installed on your laptop, you will not need to install any virtual machine. The instructions showing how to install the virtual machine on which you can find ROOT 6.04 can be found under "Material" on this page.

  19. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-12-13 to 1995-02-01 (NODC Accession 0115020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115020 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  1. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, PAR Sensor and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2012-01-05 to 2012-02-12 (NCEI Accession 0143949)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143949 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South)...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-01-04 to 2011-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0143947)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143947 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  3. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, PAR Sensor and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-16 to 2008-01-27 (NCEI Accession 0143932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143932 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2003-01-03 to 2003-03-17 (NCEI Accession 0143930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143930 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South)...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from 1998-02-28 to 1998-04-01 (NODC Accession 0115154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115154 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2004-12-23 to 2005-02-17 (NODC Accession 0108076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108076 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South)...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean and others from 1992-10-19 to 2001-12-12 (NODC Accession 0115153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115153 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 2011-01-04 to 2011-11-28 (NODC Accession 0115179)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115179 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2008-03-22 to 2008-04-17 (NODC Accession 0109900)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109900 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2008-03-22...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2006-01-02 to 2006-03-12 (NODC Accession 0109922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109922 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 2013-01-13 to 2013-03-14 (NODC Accession 0117696)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117696 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 1993-04-04 to 1993-05-09 (NODC Accession 0115004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115004 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2001-10-29 to 2001-12-13 (NODC Accession 0108158)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108158 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 2001-10-29 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1996-08-22 to 1996-09-21 (NODC Accession 0113761)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113761 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1995-07-17 to 1995-09-02 (NCEI Accession 0144339)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144339 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South)...

  16. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready. PMID:24110653

  17. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV. Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better management of bronchial secretion in patient undergone to the use of in-ex suflator machine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV expect the use of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST and in-ex suflator machine (cough machine to decrease pulmonary infection thank to a reduction of permanence of bronchial secretions in the lungs .

  18. Cell Secretion: Current Structural and Biochemical Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  19. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  20. Regulation of glucagon secretion by incretins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Christensen, M; Lund, A;

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon secretion plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and elevated fasting and postprandial plasma glucagon concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) contribute to their hyperglycaemia. The reason for the hyperglucagonaemia is unclear, but recent...... studies have shown lack of suppression after oral but preserved suppression after isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, pointing to factors from the gut. Gastrointestinal hormones that are secreted in response to oral glucose include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that strongly inhibits glucagon secretion......, and GLP-2 and GIP, both of which stimulate secretion. When the three hormones are given together on top of isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, glucagon suppression is delayed in a manner similar to that observed after oral glucose. Studies with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin 9-39, suggest...

  1. Comparing Leaf and Root Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Geldenhuys

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two ways of inserting a key into a binary search tree: leaf insertion which is the standard method, and root insertion which involves additional rotations. Although the respective cost of constructing leaf and root insertion binary search trees trees, in terms of comparisons, are the same in the average case, we show that in the worst case the construction of a root insertion binary search tree needs approximately 50% of the number of comparisons required by leaf insertion.

  2. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Tong Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of the world’s total land area and over 50% of the world’s potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a anion channels or transporters, (b internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d temperature, (e root plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase, (f magnesium (Mg, and (e phosphorus (P. Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  3. Roles of organic acid anion secretion in aluminium tolerance of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium (Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  4. Cholecystokinin inhibits gastrin secretion independently of paracrine somatostatin secretion in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Hansen, L; Hilsted, L;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin inhibits the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells, an effect that is speculated to be mediated by D cells secreting somatostatin. The aim of the study was to test directly whether cholecystokinin inhibition of antral gastrin secretion is mediated by somatostatin....... METHODS: The effects of CCK on gastrin and somatostatin secretion were studied in isolated vascularly perfused preparations of pig antrum before and after immunoneutralization brought about by infusion of large amounts of a high affinity monoclonal antibody against somatostatin. RESULTS: CCK infusion...... at 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M decreased gastrin output to 70.5% +/- 7.6% (n = 8) and 76.3% +/- 3.6% (n = 7) of basal output, respectively. CCK at 10(-10) M had no effect (n = 6). Somatostatin secretion was dose-dependently increased by CCK infusion and increased to 268 +/- 38.2% (n = 7) of basal secretion...

  5. Standpoints and protection of business secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Brane Bertoncelj

    2001-01-01

    The human impact on an information system where data bases, containing business secretes, are stored is one of the most unreliable and unforeseeable factors. For this reason, it must not be underestimated. The results of this study indicate a correlation between behavioural intention and protection of business secretes. There is a statistically significant correlation between behavioural intention and behavioural supervision. This means that an increased level of perceived supervision over o...

  6. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Provenzano G.; Petrozzino S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine) associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO).Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better managemen...

  7. Linear multi-secret sharing schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liangliang; LIU Mulan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the linear multi-secret sharing schemes are studied by using monotone span programs. A relation between computing monotone Boolean functions by using monotone span programs and realizing multi-access structures by using linear multisecret sharing schemes is shown. Furthermore, the concept of optimal linear multi-secret sharing scheme is presented and the several schemes are proved to be optimal.

  8. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  9. Feynman Diagrams and Rooted Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Prunotto, A; Czerski, P

    2013-01-01

    The {\\em Rooted Maps Theory}, a branch of the Theory of Homology, is shown to be a powerful tool for investigating the topological properties of Feynman diagrams, related to the single particle propagator in the quantum many-body systems. The numerical correspondence between the number of this class of Feynman diagrams as a function of perturbative order and the number of rooted maps as a function of the number of edges is studied. A graphical procedure to associate Feynman diagrams and rooted maps is then stated. Finally, starting from rooted maps principles, an original definition of the {\\em genus of a Feynman diagram}, which totally differs from the usual one, is given.

  10. On roots of Dehn twists

    CERN Document Server

    Monden, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Margalit and Schleimer constructed nontrivial roots of the Dehn twist about a nonseparating curve. We prove that the conjugacy classes of roots of the Dehn twist about a nonseparating curve correspond to the conjugacy classes of periodic maps with certain conditions. Futhermore, we give data set which determine the conjugacy class of a root. As a consequence, we can find the minimum degree and the maximum degree, and show that the degree must be odd. Also, we give Dehn twist expression of the root of degree 3.

  11. Structure of a type IV secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Harry H; Gubellini, Francesca; Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Braun, Nathalie; Connery, Sarah; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lu, Fang; Redzej, Adam; Fronzes, Rémi; Orlova, Elena V; Waksman, Gabriel

    2014-04-24

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems translocate virulence factors into eukaryotic cells, distribute genetic material between bacteria and have shown potential as a tool for the genetic modification of human cells. Given the complex choreography of the substrate through the secretion apparatus, the molecular mechanism of the type IV secretion system has proved difficult to dissect in the absence of structural data for the entire machinery. Here we use electron microscopy to reconstruct the type IV secretion system encoded by the Escherichia coli R388 conjugative plasmid. We show that eight proteins assemble in an intricate stoichiometric relationship to form an approximately 3 megadalton nanomachine that spans the entire cell envelope. The structure comprises an outer membrane-associated core complex connected by a central stalk to a substantial inner membrane complex that is dominated by a battery of 12 VirB4 ATPase subunits organized as side-by-side hexameric barrels. Our results show a secretion system with markedly different architecture, and consequently mechanism, to other known bacterial secretion systems. PMID:24670658

  12. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  13. Development of secreted proteins as biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin-Debs, Angelika L; Boche, Irene; Gille, Hendrik; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2004-04-01

    As one of the most important classes of proteins, secreted factors account for about one-tenth of the human genome, 3000 - 4000 in total, including factors of signalling pathways, blood coagulation and immune defence, as well as digestive enzymes and components of the extracellular matrix. Secreted proteins are a rich source of new therapeutics and drug targets, and are currently the focus of major drug discovery programmes throughout the industry. Many of the most important novel drugs developed in biotechnology have resulted from the application of secreted proteins as therapeutics. Secreted proteins often circulate throughout the body and, therefore, have access to most organs and tissues. Because of that, many of the factors are themselves therapeutic agents. This paper gives an overview on the features and functions of human secreted proteins and peptides, as well as strategies by which to discover additional therapeutic proteins from the human 'secretome'. Furthermore, a variety of examples are provided for the therapeutic use of recombinant secreted proteins as 'biologicals', including features and applications of recombinant antibodies, erythropoietin, insulin, interferon, plasminogen activators, growth hormone and colony-stimulating factors. PMID:15102604

  14. Improvement of cadmium uptake and accumulation in Sedum alfredii by endophytic bacteria Sphingomonas SaMR12: effects on plant growth and root exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao; Zhang, Yibin; Rafiq, Muhammad Tariq; Khan, Kiran Yasmin; Pan, Fengshan; Yang, Xiaoe; Feng, Ying

    2014-12-01

    Inoculating endophytic bacteria was proven as a promising way to enhance phytoremediation. By a hydroponic experiment, the role of this study was to clarify the effects of inoculating endophytic bacterium Sphingomonas SaMR12 on phytoremediation, with special emphasis on changes of cadmium uptake, plant growth, root morphology, and organic acids secretion at different cadmium treated levels (0, 5, 50, and 100 μM). The results showed that SaMR12 inoculation improved the accumulation of cadmium as well as plant biomass, length of roots, number of root tips, and root surface area. Root secretion of oxalic, citric, and succinic acids was also increased after inoculated, which may alleviate the cadmium toxicity to plant or inhibit the rising trend of oxidative stress of plant. The major finding of this work suggested that in the root, SaMR12 improves cadmium bioavailability and absorption facility by increasing root-soil contact area and root organic acid secretion; and in the shoot, SaMR12 increases cadmium tolerance by alleviating oxidative stress of plant, so as to enhance the capability of cadmium extraction by plant.

  15. Maximal rank root subsystems of hyperbolic root systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tumarkin, P.

    2003-01-01

    A Kac-Moody algebra is called hyperbolic if it corresponds to a generalized Cartan matrix of hyperbolic type. We study root subsystems of root systems of hyperbolic algebras. In this paper, we classify maximal rank regular hyperbolic subalgebras of hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras.

  16. Improvement of Secret Image Invisibility in Circulation Image with Dyadic Wavelet Based Data Hiding with Run-Length Coded Secret Images of Which Location of Codes are Determined with Random Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made for improvement of secret image invisibility in circulation images with dyadic wavelet based data hiding with run-length coded secret images of which location of codes are determined by random number. Through experiments, it is confirmed that secret images are almost invisible in circulation images. Also robustness of the proposed data hiding method against data compression of circulation images is discussed. Data hiding performance in terms of invisibility of secret images which are embedded in circulation images is evaluated with the Root Mean Square difference between the original secret image and extracted one from the circulation images. Mean while the conventional Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA based data hiding is attempted with a variety of parameters, level of MRA and the frequency component location of which secret image is replaced to it and is compared to the proposed method. It is found that the proposed data hiding method is superior to the conventional method. Also the conventional data hiding method is not robust against circulation image processing.

  17. Radiographing roots and shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of seed orientation on germination time and on shoot and root growth patterns is studied. Neutron radiography is used to observe the development of 4 types of plants, maize, greenpea, soya bean and padi. These plants were grown in varying orientations; sand sizes, sand thicknesses, and level of water content. Radiography of the seeds and plants were obtained for time exposure ranging from 3-12 hours and at reactor thermal power level, ranging from 500-750 kilowatts. Results obtained showed that seeds planted in varying orientations need different length of time for shoot emergence. Neutron radiography is now developed to other areas of non-industrial applications in Malaysia. (A.J.)

  18. γ-aminobutyric acid secreted from islet β-cells modulates exocrine secretion in rat pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Deuk Park; Zheng-Yun Cui; Guang Wu; Hyung-Seo Park; Hyoung-Jin Park

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in pancreatic exocrine secretion.METHODS: The isolated, vascularly perfused rat pancreas was employed in this study to eliminate the possible influences of extrinsic nerves and hormones.Cholecystokinin (CCK; 10 pmol/L) was intra-arterially given to stimulate exocrine secretion of the pancreas.RESULTS: Glutamine, a major precursor of GABA, which was given intra-arterially at concentrations of 1, 4 and 10 mmol/L, dose-dependently elevated the CCK-stimulated secretions of fluid and amylase in the normal pancreas.Bicuculline (10 μmol/L), a GABAA receptor antagonist,blocked the enhancing effect of glutamine (4 mmol/L) on the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretions. Glutamine, at concentrations of 1, 4 and 10 mmol/L, dose-dependently increased the GABA concentration in portal effluent of the normal pancreas. The effects of glutamine on the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretion as well as the GABA secretion were markedly reduced in the streptozotocintreated pancreas.CONCLUSION: GABA could be secreted from β-cells into the islet-acinar portal system after administration of glutainine, and could enhance the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretion through GABAA receptors. Thus,GABA in islet β-cells is a hormone modulating pancreatic exocrine secretion.

  19. Secretive expression of Aspergillus fumigatus phytase in tobacco improves phosphorus nutrition in plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Gao Xiaorong; Su Qiao; An Lijia

    2007-01-01

    To generate transgenic plants capable of utilizing exogenous phytate,an Aspersgillus fumigatus phytase gene(fphyA) was constitutively expressed in tobacco and recombinant enzyme was secreted from plant roots into the rhizosphere using the signal sequence from tobacco calretieulin.After 40 days of plant growth in hydroponic media,phytase activities in leaves,stems,roots and growth media of transgenic plants were 8.6-fold,7.4-fold,12.6-fold and 14.3-fold higher than those of wild-type plants.Signifi-cant improvements in plant growth and phosphoms(P)utilization were observed in the transgenic plants.When phytate was supplied as the sole P source.45-day-old transgenic tobaccos accumulated 1.0-fold and 0.5-fold more shoot and root biomass than wild-type tobaccos.with a concomitant of 1.7-fold increase in total P concentration.These results indicate that secretive expression of the A.fumigatus phytase improves acquisition and use of P from phytate in plants.

  20. [The morphological structure of salt gland and salt secretion in Aeluropus littoralis var. sinensis Debeaux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Shi, Li-Ran; Zhao, Ke-Fu

    2006-08-01

    The leaves of Aeluropus littoralis var. sinensis Debeaux were scanned with a scanning electron microscope, it showed that the upper-epidermis had almost the same number of salt glands as the lower-epidermis (Plate I-1, 2), and the salt gland is the typical bicelluar gland, which consists of a large basal cell inlaid into the epidermis and a small cap cell (Plate I-6). These salt glands were distributed mainly on the leaf veins, which favors the rapid collection of salts from the roots. Ion X-ray microanalysis indicated that the salt glands could effectively absorb Na(+) from the epidermal cells and mesophyllous cells (Table 1), then secreted Na(+) from the cap cells (Plate I-4), which would decrease the salinity of plant. After the plants were treated with various salts for 17 d, the ion contents of the leaves and the secretion were measured, and the results implied that salt glands had different selection in absorbing and secreting Na(+) , K(+) and Ca(2+), that is, the plants first selected K(+) when absorbing ions, while first selected Na(+) when sending ions out, but Ca(2+) was fewer in both absorbed and secreted, and the order of secretion of the three ions was found to be Na(+)>K(+)>Ca(2+) (Figs. 1-6). The secretion of Na(+) or three ions were respectively higher than that of leaves within 24 h (Figs. 1, 2, 7, 8), while K(+) situation was completely opposite with them (Figs. 3, 4). At the same time, the total ion content and composition inside the leaves remained more or less constant (Fig. 8). PMID:16957392

  1. Evaluation of the Methanol Extract of Yazd Native Plants on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Proliferation and IL-4 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Jamshidian Tehrani

    2015-09-01

    Results: The different concentrations of root extracts of all plants showed inhibitory effect on PBMCs. There was a significant difference among Echinops lasiolepis extracts in different concentrations(p=0.045. The levels of IL-4 were similar in super natant in control group and different concentrations and the control groups. Conclusions: The results showed that root extracts of Echinops species had inhibitory effect on PBMCs proliferation and in some species with decrease in IL-4 secretion might have immunomedulatory effects. The effect of Echinops extract fractions on PBMC is suggested.

  2. Compensatory Root Water Uptake of Overlapping Root Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, E.; Ivanov, V. Y.; He, L.; Bisht, G.; Shahbaz, P.; Fatichi, S.; Gough, C. M.; Couvreur, V.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models use simplified representations of root water uptake based on biomass distributions and empirical functions that constrain water uptake during unfavorable soil moisture conditions. These models fail to capture the observed hydraulic plasticity that allows plants to regulate root hydraulic conductivity and zones of active uptake based on local gradients. Recent developments in root water uptake modeling have sought to increase its mechanistic representation by bridging the gap between physically based microscopic models and computationally feasible macroscopic approaches. It remains to be demonstrated whether bulk parameterization of microscale characteristics (e.g., root system morphology and root conductivity) can improve process representation at the ecosystem scale. We employ the Couvreur method of microscopic uptake to yield macroscopic representation in a coupled soil-root model. Using a modified version of the PFLOTRAN model, which represents the 3-D physics of variably saturated soil, we model a one-hectare temperate forest stand under natural and synthetic climatic forcing. Our results show that as shallow soil layers dry, uptake at the tree and stand level shift to deeper soil layers, allowing the transpiration stream demanded by the atmosphere. We assess the potential capacity of the model to capture compensatory root water uptake. Further, the hydraulic plasticity of the root system is demonstrated by the quick response of uptake to rainfall pulses. These initial results indicate a promising direction for land surface models in which significant three-dimensional information from large root systems can be feasibly integrated into the forest scale simulations of root water uptake.

  3. Identification of compounds secreted by tomato roots that elicit chemotropic growth in Fusarium oxysporum

    OpenAIRE

    El Ghalid, Mennat

    2015-01-01

    La ruta de la proteína quinasa activada por mitógenos (MAPK) Fmk1 es la cascada de señalización mejor caracterizada en el hongo patógeno F. oxysporum, y regula varios mecanismos esenciales para la infección. Los métodos actualmente disponibles para medir el estado de activación de esta ruta son lentos y laboriosos. El primer objetivo de este trabajo ha sido el desarrollo de un método rápido y reproducible que consiste en la determinación de los niveles de transcripción de genes...

  4. Intestinal Bicarbonate Secretion in Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke LL

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene-targeted disruption of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in mice results in an intestinal disease phenotype that is remarkably similar to bowel disease in cystic fibrosis patients. In the intestinal segment downstream from the stomach (i.e., the duodenum, CFTR plays an important role in bicarbonate secretion that protects the epithelium from acidic gastric effluent. In this report, we examine the role of CFTR in cAMP-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in the murine duodenum and the mechanisms of acid-base transport that are revealed in CFTR knockout (CF mice. Ion substitution, channel blocker and pH stat studies comparing duodena from wild-type and CF mice indicate that CFTR mediates a HCO(3(- conductance across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the presence of a favorable cell-to-lumen HCO(3(- gradient, the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- current accounts for about 80% of stimulated HCO(3(- secretion. Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to acidic pH reveals another role of CFTR in facilitating HCO(3(- secretion via an electroneutral, 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2' disulfonic acid (DIDS sensitive Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange process. In CF duodenum, other apical membrane acid-base transporters retain function, thereby affording limited control of transepithelial pH. Activity of a Cl(--dependent anion exchanger provides near-constant HCO(3(- secretion in CF intestine, but under basal conditions the magnitude of secretion is lessened by simultaneous activity of a Na(+/H(+ exchanger (NHE. During cAMP stimulation of CF duodenum, a small increase in net base secretion is measured but the change results from cAMP inhibition of NHE activity rather than increased HCO(3(- secretion. Interestingly, a small inward current that is sensitive to the anion channel blocker, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropyl amino-benzoate (NPPB, is also activated during cAMP stimulation of the CFTR-null intestine but the identity of the current is yet to be

  5. Influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; McClelen, C. E.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps. The influence of microgravity varied with different stages of cellular differentiation. Overall, microgravity tended to 1) increase relative volumes of hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, 2) decrease the relative volumes of plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and the vacuome, and 3) exert no influence on the relative volume of nuclei in cells comprising the root cap. The reduced allocation of dictyosomal volume in peripheral cells of flight-grown seedlings correlated positively with their secretion of significantly less mucilage than peripheral cells of Earth-grown seedlings. These results indicate that 1) microgravity alters the patterns of cellular differentiation and structures of all cell types comprising the root cap, and 2) the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays is organelle specific.

  6. Properties of Estimated Characteristic Roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Heino Bohn

    Estimated characteristic roots in stationary autoregressions are shown to give rather noisy information about their population equivalents. This is remarkable given the central role of the characteristic roots in the theory of autoregressive processes. In the asymptotic analysis the problems appear...

  7. Project Work on Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devonald, V. G.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of investigating plant root growth developed for research purposes can be adopted for student use. Investigations of the effect of water table level and of ethylene concentration are described, and techniques of measuring root growth are explained. (Author/ML)

  8. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew S.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity. PMID:26191069

  9. Root border-like cells of Arabidopsis. Microscopical characterization and role in the interaction with rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicré, Maïté; Santaella, Catherine; Blanchet, Sandrine; Gateau, Aurélien; Driouich, Azeddine

    2005-06-01

    Plant roots of many species produce thousands of cells that are released daily into the rhizosphere. These cells are commonly termed border cells because of their major role in constituting a biotic boundary layer between the root surface and the soil. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and ultrastructure of such cells in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using light and electron microscopy coupled to high-pressure freezing. The secretion of cell wall molecules including pectic polysaccharides and arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) was examined also using immunofluorescence microscopy and a set of anticarbohydrate antibodies. We show that root tips of Arabidopsis seedlings released cell layers in an organized pattern that differs from the rather randomly dispersed release observed in other plant species studied to date. Therefore, we termed such cells border-like cells (BLC). Electron microscopical results revealed that BLC are rich in mitochondria, Golgi stacks, and Golgi-derived vesicles, suggesting that these cells are actively engaged in secretion of materials to their cell walls. Immunocytochemical data demonstrated that pectins as well as AGPs are among secreted material as revealed by the high level of expression of AGP-epitopes. In particular, the JIM13-AGP epitope was found exclusively associated with BLC and peripheral cells in the root cap region. In addition, we investigated the function of BLC and root cap cell AGPs in the interaction with rhizobacteria using AGP-disrupting agents and a strain of Rhizobium sp. expressing a green fluorescent protein. Our findings demonstrate that alteration of AGPs significantly inhibits the attachment of the bacteria to the surface of BLC and root tip.

  10. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava.

  11. Quantum Ramp Secret Sharing Scheme and Quantum Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Heling; Wang, Huifeng; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of quantum secret sharing, quantum ramp secret sharing schemes were proposed (Ogawa et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032318 [2005]), which had a trade-off between security and coding efficiency. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an intermediate set, which cannot fully reconstruct the secret. This paper revisits the size of a share in the quantum ramp secret scheme based on a relation between the quantum operations and the coherent information. We also propose an optimal quantum ramp secret sharing scheme.

  12. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  13. Meaningful Share Generation for Increased Number of Secrets in Visual Secret-Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ulutas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new scheme for hiding two halftone secret images into two meaningful shares created from halftone cover images. Meaningful shares are more desirable than noise-like (meaningless shares in Visual Secret Sharing because they look natural and do not attract eavesdroppers' attention. Previous works in the field focus on either increasing number of secrets or creating meaningful shares for one secret image. The method outlined in this paper both increases the number of secrets and creates meaningful shares at the same time. While the contrast ratio of shares is equal to that of Extended Visual Cryptography, two secrets are encoded into two shares as opposed to one secret in the Extended Visual Cryptography. Any two natural-looking images can be used as cover unlike the Halftone Visual Cryptography method where one cover should be the negative of the other cover image and can only encode one secret. Effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by an experiment.

  14. Medico-legal aspects of vertical root fractures in root filled teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Tamse, A;

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT).......To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT)....

  15. Incretin hormone secretion over the day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahren, B; Carr, RD; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years. Regulat......The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years....... Regulation of incretin hormone secretion is less well characterized. The main stimulus for incretin hormone secretion is presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, and carbohydrate, fat as well as protein all have the capacity to stimulate GIP and GLP-1 secretion. More recently, it has been established...... that a diurnal regulation exists with incretin hormone secretion to an identical meal being greater when the meal is served in the morning compared to in the afternoon. Finally, whether incretin hormone secretion is altered in disease states is an area with, so far, controversial results in different studies...

  16. Dynamics of protein secretion during adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Muroya, Susumu; Nishimura, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    The major functions of adipocytes include both lipid storage and the production of secretory factors. However, the type of proteins released from mouse 3T3-L1 cells during adipocyte differentiation remains poorly understood. We examined the dynamics of secreted proteins during adipocyte differentiation using mass spectrometry (MS) combined with an iTRAQ (®) labeling method that enables the simultaneous analysis of relative protein expression levels. A total of 215 proteins were identified and quantified from approximately 10 000 MS/MS spectra. Of these, approximately 38% were categorized as secreted proteins based on gene ontology classification. Adipokine secretion levels were increased with the progression of differentiation. By contrast, levels of fibril collagen components, such as subunits of type I and III collagens, were decreased during differentiation. Basement membrane components attained their peak levels at day 4 when small lipid droplets accumulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Simultaneously, peak levels of collagen microfibril components that comprise type V and VI collagen subunits were also observed. Our data demonstrated that extracellular matrix components were predominantly released during the early and middle stages of adipocyte differentiation, with a subsequent increase in the secretion of adipokines. This suggests that 3T3-L1 cells secrete adipokines after their ECM is constructed during adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27516960

  17. Biochemical Methods to Analyze Wnt Protein Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Kathrin; Boutros, Michael; Gross, Julia Christina

    2016-01-01

    Wnt proteins act as potent morphogens in various aspects of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. However, in addition to its physiological importance, aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to the onset and progression of different types of cancer. On the cellular level, the secretion of Wnt proteins involves trafficking of lipid-modified Wnts from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi and further compartments via the Wnt cargo receptor evenness interrupted. Others and we have recently shown that Wnt proteins are secreted on extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as microvesicles and exosomes. Although more details about specific regulation of Wnt secretion steps are emerging, it remains largely unknown how Wnt proteins are channeled into different release pathways such as lipoprotein particles, EVs and cytonemes. Here, we describe protocols to purify and quantify Wnts from the supernatant of cells by either assessing total Wnt proteins in the supernatant or monitoring Wnt proteins on EVs. Purified Wnts from the supernatant as well as total cellular protein content can be investigated by immunoblotting. Additionally, the relative activity of canonical Wnts in the supernatant can be assessed by a dual-luciferase Wnt reporter assay. Quantifying the amount of secreted Wnt proteins and their activity in the supernatant of cells allows the investigation of intracellular trafficking events that regulate Wnt secretion and the role of extracellular modulators of Wnt spreading. PMID:27590148

  18. 南方泡桐二倍体及其四倍体的光合特性研究%Study on Photosynthetic Characteristics of Diploid and Tetraploid Paulownia australis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杨; 张晓申; 邓敏捷; 赵振利; 范国强

    2013-01-01

      以1年生南方泡桐四倍体及其二倍体南方泡桐为材料,采用Li-6400便携式光合作用仪测定其叶片的光合特性。结果表明:南方泡桐四倍体与其二倍体泡桐的光合特性规律一致,不同月份四倍体泡桐的净光合速率( Pn)、气孔导度(Gs)、蒸腾速率(Tr)和胞间二氧化碳浓度(Ci)等均高于其二倍体。四倍体泡桐及其二倍体泡桐的净光合速率、气孔导度、蒸腾速率日变化,在5月、7月、9月和10月为单峰,6月和8月为双峰,胞间二氧化碳浓度为单谷变化。%The photosynthetic characteristics of one -year-old diploid and tetraploid Paulownia australis leaves were deter-mined by Li-6400 portable photosynthesis system .The results indicated that tetraploid Paulownia australis had the same photosyn-thetic rule as diploid Paulownia australis; but the net photosynthetic rate ( Pn ) , stomatal conductance ( Gs ) , transpiration rate (Tr) and intracellular CO2 concentration (Ci) of the former were higher than those of the latter in various months .The diurnal vari-ations in the Pn, Gs and Tr of both diploid and tetraploid Paulownia australis showed single-peak curve in May, July, September and October , but those were bimodal in June and August .The change in Ci revealed a single -valley curve .

  19. Niche differentiation of two sympatric species of Microdochium colonizing the roots of common reed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirsel Stefan GR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungal endophyte communities are often comprised of many species colonizing the same host. However, little is known about the causes of this diversity. On the one hand, the apparent coexistence of closely related species may be explained by the traditional niche differentiation hypothesis, which suggests that abiotic and/or biotic factors mediate partitioning. For endophytes, such factors are difficult to identify, and are therefore in most cases unknown. On the other hand, there is the neutral hypothesis, which suggests that stochastic factors may explain high species diversity. There is a need to investigate to what extent each of these hypotheses may apply to endophytes. Results The niche partitioning of two closely related fungal endophytes, Microdochium bolleyi and M. phragmitis, colonizing Phragmites australis, was investigated. The occurrences of each species were assessed using specific nested-PCR assays for 251 field samples of common reed from Lake Constance, Germany. These analyses revealed niche preferences for both fungi. From three niche factors assessed, i.e. host habitat, host organ and season, host habitat significantly differentiated the two species. M. bolleyi preferred dry habitats, whereas M. phragmitis prevailed in flooded habitats. In contrast, both species exhibited a significant preference for the same host organ, i.e. roots. Likewise the third factor, season, did not significantly distinguish the two species. Differences in carbon utilization and growth temperature could not conclusively explain the niches. The inclusion of three unrelated species of Ascomycota, which also colonize P. australis at the same locations, indicated spatio-temporal niche partitioning between all fungi. None of the species exhibited the same preferences for all three factors, i.e. host habitat, host organ, and time of the season. Conclusions The fungal species colonizing common reed investigated in this study seem to

  20. Gravisensing in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, G.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of gravisensing in higher plants is not yet elucidated. Although, it is generally accepted that the amyloplasts (statoliths) in the root cap cells (statocytes) are responsible for susception of gravity. However, the hypothesis that the whole protoplast acts as gravisusceptor cannot be dismissed. The nature of the sensor that is able to transduce and amplify the mechanical energy into a biochemical factor is even more controversial. Several cell structures could potentially serve as gravireceptors: the endoplasmic reticulum, the actin network, the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton associated with this membrane. The nature of the gravisusceptors and gravisensors is discussed by taking into account the characteristics of the gravitropic reaction with respect to the presentation time, the threshold acceleration, the reciprocity rule, the deviation from the sine rule, the movement of the amyloplasts, the pre-inversion effect, the response of starch free and intermediate mutants and the effects of cytochalasin treatment. From this analysis, it can be concluded that both the amyloplasts and the protoplast could be the gravisusceptors, the former being more efficient than the latter since they can focus pressure on limited areas. The receptor should be located in the plasma membrane and could be a stretch-activated ion channel.

  1. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength we...

  2. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  3. Efficient Fuzzy Extraction of PUF-Induced Secrets: Theory and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Delvaux, Jeroen; Gu, Dawu; Verbauwhede, Ingrid; Hiller, Matthias; Yu, Meng-Day (Mandel)

    2016-01-01

    The device-unique response of a physically unclonable function (PUF) can serve as the root of trust in an embedded cryptographic system. Fuzzy extractors transform this noisy non-uniformly distributed secret into a stable high-entropy key. The overall efficiency thereof, typically depending on error-correction with a binary [n; k; d] block code, is determined by the universal and well-known (n - k) bound on the min-entropy loss. We derive new considerably tighter bounds for PUF-induced di...

  4. Hiding secret data into a carrier image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu COSMA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of steganography is embedding hidden information in an appropriate multimedia carrier, e.g., image, audio, or video. There are several known methods of solving this problem, which operate either in the space domain or in the frequency domain, and are distinguished by the following characteristics: payload, robustness and strength. The payload is the amount of secret data that can be embedded in the carrier without inducing suspicious artefacts, robustness indicates the degree in which the secret data is affected by the normal processing of the carrier e.g., compression, and the strength indicate how easy the presence of hidden data can be detected by steganalysis techniques. This paper presents a new method of hiding secret data into a digital image compressed by a technique based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT [2] and the Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT subband coding algorithm [6]. The proposed method admits huge payloads and has considerable strength.

  5. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored. PMID:21500624

  6. Standpoints and protection of business secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brane Bertoncelj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The human impact on an information system where data bases, containing business secretes, are stored is one of the most unreliable and unforeseeable factors. For this reason, it must not be underestimated. The results of this study indicate a correlation between behavioural intention and protection of business secretes. There is a statistically significant correlation between behavioural intention and behavioural supervision. This means that an increased level of perceived supervision over one's own behaviour is related to behavioural intention. A great majority of participants would not divulge a business secret due to internal moral factors, i.e., they possess the appropriate capabilities to determine the advantages of social moral values over personal values.

  7. 扎龙芦苇湿地生长季的甲烷排放通量%Methane emission flux of Zhalong Phragmites australis wetlands in growth season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄璞祎; 于洪贤; 柴龙会; 柴方营; 张万峰

    2011-01-01

    Static chamber/gas chromatogram method was adopted to measure the methane emission flux of Zhalong Phragmites australis wetlands with different water levels in a growth season from May to October. 2009. aimed to understand the methane emission pattern in natural freshwater P. australis wetland in frigid region. During the observation period, the average methane emission flux of test wetlands ranged from -21.18 to 46.15 mg ·m-2· h-1. with a mean of 7. 67 mg · m-2·h-1.In deep water zone ( average water level 100 cm) and shallow water zone (average water level 25 cm) . the average methane emission flux was 5. 81 and 9. 52 mg· m-2 · h-1 , with a peak in August and July, respectively, and the minimum in October. In summer ( from June to July) , the methane emission flux in deep water zone was significantly lower than that in shallow water zone;while in spring (May) and autumn ( from August to October) . a reversed trend was observed. The methane emission flux had a seasonal pattern of summer > autumn > spring, and a diurnal pattern of being the highest at 12 :00 and 14 :00 and the lowest at 0 :00. Temperature and water level were the major factors affecting the methane emission flux in freshwater P. australis wetlands in frigid region.%为研究高寒地区天然淡水芦苇湿地的甲烷排放特征,采用静态箱-气相色谱法,测定了扎龙不同水位芦苇湿地生长季的甲烷排放通量.结果表明:观测期内,扎龙芦苇湿地甲烷排放通量平均为7.67 mg·m-2·h-1(-21.18~46.15 mg·m-2·h-1),其中深水区(平均水深100cm)和浅水区(平均水深25 cm)的平均甲烷排放通量分别为5.81和9.52 mg·m-2·h-1,排放峰值分别出现在8月和7月,最低值均出现在10月.深水区夏季(6-7月)的甲烷排放通量显著低于浅水区,而春(5月)、秋(8-10月)季节显著高于浅水区.生长季甲烷排放通量的变化为夏季>秋季>春季;昼夜排放量为12:00和14:00最高,0:00最低.温度和水位是高寒

  8. Effect of parameter choice in root water uptake models – the arrangement of root hydraulic properties within the root architecture affects dynamics and efficiency of root water uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Bechmann, M.; Schneider, C; Carminati, A.; Vetterlein, D.; Attinger, S.; Hildebrandt, A

    2014-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional models of root water uptake have become increasingly popular for investigating the process of root water uptake. However, they suffer from a lack of information on important parameters, particularly on the spatial distribution of root axial and radial conductivities, which vary greatly along a root system. In this paper we explore how the arrangement of those root hydraulic properties and branching within the root system affects modelled uptake dynamics, xylem water...

  9. Root pruning reduces root competition in living mulch cropping systems

    OpenAIRE

    Båth, B.; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    In intercropping systems with a cash crop and a living mulch intercrop, competition between the cash crop and the intercrop (the living mulch) often reduces the yield of the cash crop. This project investigated (1) the influence of root pruning of living mulches on aboveground biomass of white cabbage. Below-ground growth and competition were examined by measuring (2) root distribution in minirhizotrons and (3) uptake of 15N placed at different soil depths. Two field experiments were carried ...

  10. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge eVerstraeten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound-induced adventitious root (AR formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LR. In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are

  11. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  12. Towards a multidimensional root trait framework: a tree root review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weemstra, Monique; Mommer, Liesje; Visser, Eric J W; van Ruijven, Jasper; Kuyper, Thomas W; Mohren, Godefridus M J; Sterck, Frank J

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1159 I. 1159 II. 1161 III. 1164 IV. 1166 1167 References 1167 SUMMARY: The search for a root economics spectrum (RES) has been sparked by recent interest in trait-based plant ecology. By analogy with the one-dimensional leaf economics spectrum (LES), fine-root traits are hypothesised to match leaf traits which are coordinated along one axis from resource acquisitive to conservative traits. However, our literature review and meta-level analysis reveal no consistent evidence of an RES mirroring an LES. Instead the RES appears to be multidimensional. We discuss three fundamental differences contributing to the discrepancy between these spectra. First, root traits are simultaneously constrained by various environmental drivers not necessarily related to resource uptake. Second, above- and belowground traits cannot be considered analogues, because they function differently and might not be related to resource uptake in a similar manner. Third, mycorrhizal interactions may offset selection for an RES. Understanding and explaining the belowground mechanisms and trade-offs that drive variation in root traits, resource acquisition and plant performance across species, thus requires a fundamentally different approach than applied aboveground. We therefore call for studies that can functionally incorporate the root traits involved in resource uptake, the complex soil environment and the various soil resource uptake mechanisms - particularly the mycorrhizal pathway - in a multidimensional root trait framework. PMID:27174359

  13. Response and tolerance of root border cells to aluminum toxicity in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miao-Zhen; Wang, Fang-Mei; Li, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Shu-Na; Wang, Ning; Xu, Gen-Di

    2011-07-01

    Root border cells (RBCs) and their secreted mucilage are suggested to participate in the resistance against toxic metal cations, including aluminum (Al), in the rhizosphere. However, the mechanisms by which the individual cell populations respond to Al and their role in Al resistance still remain unclear. In this research, the response and tolerance of RBCs to Al toxicity were investigated in the root tips of two soybean cultivars [Zhechun No. 2 (Al-tolerant cultivar) and Huachun No. 18 (Al-sensitive cultivar)]. Al inhibited root elongation and increased pectin methylesterase (PME) activity in the root tip. Removal of RBCs from the root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation, especially in Huachun No. 18. Increasing Al levels and treatment time decreased the relative percent viability of RBCs in situ and in vitro in both soybean cultivars. Al application significantly increased mucilage layer thickness around the detached RBCs of both cultivars. Additionally, a significantly higher relative percent cell viability of attached and detached RBCs and thicker mucilage layers were observed in Zhechun No. 2. The higher viability of attached and detached RBCs, as well as the thickening of the mucilage layer in separated RBCs, suggest that RBCs play an important role in protecting root apices from Al toxicity.

  14. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of calcium (Ca) in caps of vertically- and horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays was monitored to determine its possible role in root graviresponsiveness. A modification of the antimonate precipitation procedure was used to localize Ca in situ. In vertically-oriented roots, the presumed graviperceptive (i.e., columella) cells were characterized by minimal and symmetric staining of the plasmalemma and mitochondria. No precipitate was present in plasmodesmata or cell walls. Within 5 min after horizontal reorientation, staining was associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell. This asymmetric staining persisted throughout the onset of gravicurvature. No staining of lateral cell walls of columella cells was observed at any stage of gravicurvature, suggesting that a lateral flow of Ca through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots does not occur. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like structures in their cell walls. These results are discussed relative to proposed roles of root-cap Ca in root gravicurvature.

  15. Biologically active constituents of leaves and roots of Aloe arborescens var. natalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, T; Suga, T

    1977-01-01

    Several biologically active substances, such as aloenin (1), magnesium lactate, aloe-emodin (4), barbaloin (5), and succinic acid, were found to be contained in the leaf juice of Aloe arborescens Mill. var. natalensis Berger, which has widely been used in domestic medicines. Aloenin (1) and magnesium lactate were elucidated to exhibit an inhibitory action on the gastric juice secretion of rats. Various constituents other than the above bioactive substances were found in the leaves and the roots of the plant. PMID:145111

  16. Root Elongation, Root Surface Area and Organic Acid by Rice Seedling Under Al3+ and/or H+ Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Azura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Under acidic condition, Al3+ is the most common species in solution. An experiment was conducted to study the effects of Al and/or pH on rice seed germination, root morphology and organic acids release. This study was conducted at ambient temperature in Malaysia. Approach: Two experiments were conducted: (1 Rice seeds undergoing germination were exposed to 0.5 mM CaCl2 solutions containing various concentration of Al (10, 20, 30, 40-50 µM and (2 The seeds were soaked in water taken from an acid sulfate soil area in Malaysia for which the pH was adjusted to a range of values using 0.01 M HCl or NaOH. Results: Root length decreased with increasing Al concentration, while the opposite was true for pH. The trend for the change of root surface area with Al concentration and pH is the same as that of root length. The critical Al concentration for rice growth is 15 µM. This means that rice variety MR 219 grown on 90% of the granary areas in Malaysia is relatively less tolerant compared to other rice varieties. At low pH and high Al concentration, the rice roots secreted citrate and/or oxalate which subsequently formed Alcitrate and Al-oxalate, respectively. This, to a certain extent, had reduced Al toxicity. This is the mechanism of rice tolerance to Al toxicity. Conclusion: Acid sulfate soils in Malaysia allocated for rice production should be limed to increase water pH in the paddy field to 5.0. Then, rice can grow without Al3+ and/or H+ stress.

  17. IAA-producing rhizobacteria from chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) induce changes in root architecture and increase root biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Coronado, Rosario Alicia; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; García-Pérez, Luz María; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Rhizobacteria promote and have beneficial effects on plant growth, making them useful to agriculture. Nevertheless, the rhizosphere of the chickpea plant has not been extensively examined. The aim of the present study was to select indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing rhizobacteria from the rhizosphere of chickpea plants for their potential use as biofertilizers. After obtaining a collection of 864 bacterial isolates, we performed a screen using the Salkowski reaction for the presence of auxin compounds (such as IAA) in bacterial Luria-Bertani supernatant (BLBS). Our results demonstrate that the Salkowski reaction has a greater specificity for detecting IAA than other tested auxins. Ten bacterial isolates displaying a wide range of auxin accumulation were selected, producing IAA levels of 5 to 90 μmol/L (according to the Salkowski reaction). Bacterial isolates were identified on the basis of 16S rDNA partial sequences: 9 isolates belonged to Enterobacter, and 1 isolate was classified as Serratia. The effect of BLBS on root morphology was evaluated in Arabidopsis thaliana. IAA production by rhizobacteria was confirmed by means of a DR5::GFP construct that is responsive to IAA, and also by HPLC-GC/MS. Finally, we observed that IAA secreted by rhizobacteria (i) modified the root architecture of A. thaliana, (ii) caused an increase in chickpea root biomass, and (iii) activated the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene driven by the DR5 promoter. These findings provide evidence that these novel bacterial isolates may be considered as putative plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria modifying root architecture and increasing root biomass. PMID:25231840

  18. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  19. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  20. Root Patterns in Heterogeneous Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dara, A.; Moradi, A. B.; Carminati, A.; Oswald, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Heterogeneous water availability is a typical characteristic of soils in which plant roots grow. Despite the intrinsic heterogeneity of soil-plant water relations, we know little about the ways how plants respond to local environmental quality. Furthermore, increasing use of soil amendments as partial water reservoirs in agriculture calls for a better understanding of plant response to soil heterogeneity. Neutron radiography is a non-invasive imaging that is highly sensitive to water and root distribution and that has high capability for monitoring spatial and temporal soil-plant water relations in heterogeneous systems. Maize plants were grown in 25 x 30 x 1 cm aluminum slabs filled with sandy soil. On the right side of the compartments a commercial water absorbent (Geohumus) was mixed with the soil. Geohumus was distributed with two patterns: mixed homogeneously with the soil, and arranged as 1-cm diameter aggregates (Fig. 1). Two irrigation treatments were applied: sufficient water irrigation and moderate water stress. Neutron radiography started 10 days after planting and has been performed twice a day for one week. At the end of the experiment, the containers were opened, the root were removed and dry root weight in different soil segments were measured. Neutron radiography showed root growth tendency towards Geohumus treated parts and preferential water uptake from Geohumus aggregates. Number and length of fine lateral roots were lower in treated areas compared to the non-treated zone and to control soil. Although corn plants showed an overall high proliferation towards the soil water sources, they decreased production of branches and fine root when water was more available near the main root parts. However there was 50% higher C allocation in roots grown in Geohumus compartments, as derived by the relative dry weight of root. The preferential C allocation in treated regions was higher when plants grew under water stress. We conclude that in addition to the

  1. Roots of unity in orders

    OpenAIRE

    Lenstra Jr., H. W.; Silverberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    We give deterministic polynomial-time algorithms that, given an order, compute the primitive idempotents and determine a set of generators for the group of roots of unity in the order. Also, we show that the discrete logarithm problem in the group of roots of unity can be solved in polynomial time. As an auxiliary result, we solve the discrete logarithm problem for certain unit groups in finite rings. Our techniques, which are taken from commutative algebra, may have further potential in the ...

  2. TARIM DIŞI ALANLARDA KAMIŞA (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steudel) KARŞI GLYPHOSATE VE IMAZAPYR UYGULAMA ETKİNLİKLERİNİN DEĞERLENDİRİLMESİ (EFFICACY EVALUATION OF GLYPHOSATE AND IMAZAPYR TREATMENTS AGAINST COMMON REED ((Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steudel) IN NON-CROP LANDS)

    OpenAIRE

    TURABİ, Taha Semih

    2009-01-01

    Farklı glyphosate (500 ml/da, 750 ml/da, 1000 ml/da ve 500+500 ml/da split) ve imazapyr (200 ml/da, 300 ml/da ve 400 ml/da) uygulamalarının kamışa (Phragmites australis) karşı etkinliklerinin değerlendirilmesi amacıyla, Ankara İli’nde belirlenen iki farklı türden tarım dışı alanda denemeler kurularak Nisan-Eylül 2008 aylarında gözlemlenmiştir. Araştırma sonucunda en etkili uygulamanın glyphosate’nin 500+500 ml/da (split)’ dan elde edildiği, glyphosate’nin 1000 ml/da ve imazapyr’in 400 ml/da d...

  3. Scalable Mechanisms for Rational Secret Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Dani, Varsha; Saia, Jared

    2012-01-01

    We consider the classical secret sharing problem in the case where all agents are selfish but rational. In recent work, Kol and Naor show that, when there are two players, in the non-simultaneous communication model, i.e. when rushing is possible, there is no Nash equilibrium that ensures both players learn the secret. However, they describe a mechanism for this problem, for any number of players, that is an epsilon-Nash equilibrium, in that no player can gain more than epsilon utility by deviating from it. Unfortunately, the Kol and Naor mechanism, and, to the best of our knowledge, all previous mechanisms for this problem require each agent to send O(n) messages in expectation, where n is the number of agents. This may be problematic for some applications of rational secret sharing such as secure multi-party computation and simulation of a mediator. We address this issue by describing mechanisms for rational secret sharing that are designed for large n. Both of our results hold for n > 2, and are Nash equil...

  4. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Allan C; Vandahl, Brian; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia. Several secretion candidates from Chlamydia trachomatis D and Chlamydia pneumoniae were detected by this method. Two protein spots were identified among the candidates. These represent fragments of the 'chlamydial protease- or proteasome-like activity factor' (CPAF) and were clearly present in 2D...... fragments of CPAF exist in C. pneumoniae as well as in C. trachomatis....

  5. Acetylcholine regulates ghrelin secretion in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Broglio (Fabio); E. Ghigo (Ezio); C. Gottero; F. Prodam; S. Destefanis; A. Benso; C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); E. Arvat; A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGhrelin secretion has been reportedly increased by fasting and energy restriction but decreased by food intake, glucose, insulin, and somatostatin. However, its regulation is still far from clarified. The cholinergic system mediates some ghrelin actions, e.g. stimulatio

  6. Kinins as mediators of intestinal secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaginella, T S; Kachur, J F

    1989-01-01

    Kinins are small peptides that have diverse biological actions. Concentrations of kinins in the nanomolar or subnanomolar range induce intestinal smooth muscle contraction and evoke mucosal electrolyte secretion. Hyperkininemia is associated with effects on gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Bradykinin and kallidin are the predominant kinins with effects on the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Bradykinin stimulates chloride ion secretion by the guinea pig and rabbit ileum, rabbit colon, rat colon and monolayers of human HCA-7 cells. Kinins directly or indirectly stimulate phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. Cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (e.g., fibroblasts, mast cells, leukocytes), by liberating cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the kinin response; direct effects on epithelial cells cannot be ruled out, however. Antagonists now exist for kinin receptors. Based on studies with these antagonists in smooth muscle preparations, two subgroups of kinin receptor have been identified. The B2-type receptor appears to be responsible for both the contraction of ileal muscle and ileal secretion. Kinins are probably more important as pathophysiological rather than as physiological mediators. They may amplify the effect of inflammatory products that induce intestinal secretion. The precise involvement of kinins in clinical mucosal secretory states and diarrhea will require quantitative assessment of their levels during each phase of mucosal inflammation. Additional studies on the mechanism of action of kinins will be essential in designing therapy to mitigate the symptoms associated with mucosal inflammation.

  7. The Best Kept Secret in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, James

    2004-01-01

    It is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in educating gifted high school youth, and yet for 45 years, Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) has been going strong, "Motivating Tomorrow's Leaders Today." After spending nine inspirational days in 1958 with Albert Schweitzer (Nobel Prize physician and philosopher) at his clinic in the African jungle,…

  8. Secrets of Mlearning Failures: Confronting Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Having implemented and evaluated over 35 mlearning projects in a variety of contexts in higher education over the past 6 years the researcher is ready to share the untold secret: not all mlearning projects succeed! This article critiques three of the researcher's mlearning projects that can be classed as "failures" and compares them to successful…

  9. An Approach to Hide Secret Speech Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-jun; DUAN Hai-xin; LI Xing

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented an approach to hide secret speech information in code excited linear prediction(CELP)-based speech coding scheme by adopting the analysis-by-synthesis (ABS)-based algorithm of speech information hiding and extracting for the purpose of secure speech communication. The secret speech is coded in 2.4Kb/s mixed excitation linear prediction (MELP), which is embedded in CELP type public speech. The ABS algorithm adopts speech synthesizer in speech coder. Speech embedding and coding are synchronous, i.e. a fusion of speech information data of public and secret. The experiment of embedding 2.4 Kb/s MELP secret speech in G.728 scheme coded public speech transmitted via public switched telephone network (PSTN) shows that the proposed approach satisfies the requirements of information hiding, meets the secure communication speech quality constraints, and achieves high hiding capacity of average 3.2 Kb/s with an excellent speech quality and complicating speakers' recognition.

  10. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  11. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  12. Quince años de sucesión después de corta experimental en brezales de Erica australis L. en la provincia de León (España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo, L.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The response of the woody species to experimental cutting was studied for a period of fifteen years in a shrub community of NW Spain. This treatment represents the disturbance most frequently imposed by humans on these shrub communities throughout history. The dominant species, Erica australis, influences the regeneration patterns of the rest of the species which make up the community. There is a significant increase in the cover values of the woody species until the fourth year and of the herbaceous ones until the third year. Since then Erica australis attains the spatial occupancy and cover values it originally had, removing the herbaceous species and negatively influencing the growth of some woody ones like Halimium umbellatum and H. alyssoides. Both Erica australis and Genistella tridentata sprout after cutting. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi does not recover. Halimium alyssoides, H. umbellatum. Erica umbellata and Calluna vulgaris regenerate by germination. These shrubland communities have a high degree of resilience due to the strong sprouting potential of the component species.

    [fr]
    L'étude porte sur la régénération des espèces ligneuses après coupe, sur une durée de 15 ans, dans une lande dominée par Erica australis. Ce traitement experimental est l'un des plus fréquemment utilisés dans ce type de commimautés. L'espèce dominante Erica australis agit sur les types de régénération des autres espèces. On observe un accroisement significatif des taux de couverture pour les espèces ligneuses jusqu'au 4ème. année et jusqu'au Sème, année pour les herbacées. À partir de ce moment. Erica australis retrouve les valeurs d' origine, en limitant les taux des herbacées et en diminuant la croissance de quelques espèces ligneuses comme Halimium umbellatum et H. alyssoides. La régénération par rejet est le m

  13. Retinal glia promote dorsal root ganglion axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lorber

    Full Text Available Axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS is limited by several factors including a lack of neurotrophic support. Recent studies have shown that glia from the adult rat CNS, specifically retinal astrocytes and Müller glia, can promote regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons. In the present study we investigated whether retinal glia also exert a growth promoting effect outside the visual system. We found that retinal glial conditioned medium significantly enhanced neurite growth and branching of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG in culture. Furthermore, transplantation of retinal glia significantly enhanced regeneration of DRG axons past the dorsal root entry zone after root crush in adult rats. To identify the factors that mediate the growth promoting effects of retinal glia, mass spectrometric analysis of retinal glial conditioned medium was performed. Apolipoprotein E and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC were found to be present in high abundance, a finding further confirmed by western blotting. Inhibition of Apolipoprotein E and SPARC significantly reduced the neuritogenic effects of retinal glial conditioned medium on DRG in culture, suggesting that Apolipoprotein E and SPARC are the major mediators of this regenerative response.

  14. Biogas production improvement and C/N control by natural clinoptilolite addition into anaerobic co-digestion of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lieyu; Xi, Beidou; Sun, Wenjun; Xia, Xunfeng; Zhu, Chaowei; He, Xiaosong; Li, Mingxiao; Yang, Tianxue; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhonglei

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion (A co-D) performance of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste with addition of clinoptilolite (one main kind of zeolite) was investigated to evaluate the improvement of biogas/methane production and internal mechanism of nitrogen and organics control. A better biogas/methane production was observed by 10% clinoptilolite (v/v) than bentonite and diatomite, with the shortest lag phase of 0.070d(-1), the max rate of 15.89L/(kgVSday) and ultimate biogas production of 308.2L/kgVS as the modified Gompertz equation predicted. Accordingly, the content of methane in the biogas was increased from 44.10% to 65.30%. Furthermore, the clinoptilolite inhibited the acidification of digestion liquid (optimum pH 7.0-7.5) and enhanced the VFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid) destruction. Moreover, 10% of clinoptilolite optimally enhanced the microbial utilization of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), controlled the C/N ratio, and improved the biogas production as well as NH3-N/NO3-N inhibition efficiency.

  15. Hematology, Serum Chemistry, and Early Hematologic Changes in Free-Ranging South American Fur Seals ( Arctocephalus australis ) at Guafo Island, Chilean Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguel, Mauricio; Muñoz, Francisco; Keenan, Alessandra; Perez-Venegas, Diego J; DeRango, Eugene; Paves, Hector; Gottdenker, Nicole; Müller, Ananda

    2016-07-01

    The establishment of clinical pathology baseline data is critical to evaluate temporal and spatial changes in marine mammal groups. Despite increased availability of studies on hematology and biochemistry of marine mammals, reference ranges are lacking for many populations, especially among fur seal species. During the austral summers of 2014 and 2015, we evaluated basic hematologic and biochemical parameters in clinically healthy, physically restrained South American fur seal ( Arctocephalus australis ) lactating females and 2-mo-old pups. We also assessed the temporal variation of hematology parameters on the pups during their first 2 mo of life. Reference ranges of lactating females were similar to those previously reported in other fur seal species. In the case of pups, reference ranges are similar to values previously reported in sea lion species. As expected, most biochemical and hematologic values differ significantly between adult females and pups. As in other otariids, South American fur seals pups are born with higher values of total red blood cells, hemoglobin, and packed cell volume, and lower numbers of total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. To the best of our knowledge, data on hematology reference values for South American fur seals has not been previously reported and is useful for continued health monitoring of this species, as well as for comparisons with other otariid groups. PMID:27243331

  16. Characteristics and Feasibility of Trans-Free Plastic Fats through Lipozyme TL IM-Catalyzed Interesterification of Palm Stearin and Akebia trifoliata Variety Australis Seed Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shi-Qiang; Hu, Jiang-Ning; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Bai, Chun-Qing; Peng, Hai-Long; Xiong, Hua; Hu, Ju-Wu; Zhao, Qiang

    2014-03-31

    Akebia trifoliata var. australis seed oil (ASO) was used as an edible oil in China. However, in-depth research studies on ASO have yet to be conducted for production of plastic fats in food industry. In this work, an immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TL IM) was employed to catalyze palm stearin (PS) with different ratios of ASO in a laboratory-scale operation at 60 °C. The physical properties [e.g., fatty acid profile, slip melting point (SMP), solid fat content (SFC), polymorphic form, and microstructure] of physical blends (PBs) were analyzed and compared with those of the interesterified products (IPs). Results showed that SMPs of IPs (33.20-37.60 °C) decreased compared with those of PBs (48.03-49.30 °C). Meanwhile, IPs showed a good SFC range from 16.11% to 28.29% at 25 °C with mostly β' polymorphic forms determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. It should be mentioned that no trans fatty acids (TFAs) were detected in any products, suggesting much more health-benefits of IPs. Texture tests showed that PBs (3318.19 ± 86.67 g) were markedly harder than IPs (557.02 ± 12.75 g). Conclusively, our study demonstrated that ASO can be utilized to produce trans-free plastic fats with good qualities through lipase-catalyzed interesterification. PMID:24655125

  17. In vitro studies with renal proximal tubule cells show direct cytotoxicity of Androctonus australis hector scorpion venom triggered by oxidative stress, caspase activation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidani, Chanez; Hammoudi-Triki, Djelila; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima; Taub, Mary

    2016-09-15

    Scorpion envenomation injures a number of organs, including the kidney. Mechanisms proposed to explain the renal tubule injury include direct effects of venom on tubule epithelial cells, as well as indirect effects of the autonomic nervous system, and inflammation. Here, we report direct effects of Androctonus australis hector (Aah) scorpion venom on the viability of Renal Proximal Tubule (RPT) cells in vitro, unlike distal tubule and collecting duct cells. Extensive NucGreen nuclear staining was observed in immortalized rabbit RPT cells following treatment with Aah venom, consistent with cytotoxicity. The involvement of oxidative stress is supported by the observations that 1) anti-oxidants mitigated the Aah venom-induced decrease in the number of viable RPT cells, and 2) Aah venom-treated RPT cells were intensively stained with the CellROX(®) Deep Red reagent, an indicator of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Relevance to normal RPT cells is supported by the red fluorescence observed in Aah venom treated primary rabbit RPT cell cultures following their incubation with the Flica reagent (indicative of caspase activation and apoptosis), and the green fluorescence of Sytox Green (indicative of dead cells). PMID:27470530

  18. Predominance of clonal reproduction, but recombinant origins of new genotypes in the free-floating aquatic bladderwort Utricularia australis f. tenuicaulis (Lentibulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Yoshiaki; Ohara, Masashi

    2006-07-01

    Aquatic plants are a biological group sharing several adaptations to aquatic conditions. The most striking evolutionary convergence in this group is the extensive reliance on clonal reproduction, which largely determines the patterns and process of evolution in aquatic plants. Utricularia australis f. tenuicaulis is a free-floating aquatic bladderwort that reproduces both sexually via seeds and clonally via turions and shoot fragments. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted on 267 ramets collected from 30 populations in Japan. The genotypic diversity within populations was extremely low, regardless of the geographical distribution range: the mean number of genotypes per population (G) was 1.4 and the mean genotypic diversity (D), including monoclonal populations, was 0.17. In contrast to the predominance of a few clones within populations, many of the populations investigated had different genotypes; a large portion of the genetic variation was explained by variation among populations. Character compatibility analysis clearly revealed that somatic mutations did not contribute to the origin of genotypic diversity in this aquatic bladderwort; instead, rare-to-sporadic sexual reproduction probably generated new genotypes. Thus, future studies should examine the role of sexual reproduction in this species from the viewpoint of long-term evolutionary benefits. PMID:16724164

  19. High-precision dating and correlation of ice, marine and terrestrial sequences spanning Heinrich Event 3: Testing mechanisms of interhemispheric change using New Zealand ancient kauri (Agathis australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Chris S. M.; Palmer, Jonathan; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Hughen, Konrad A.; Staff, Richard A.; Jones, Richard T.; Thomas, Zoë A.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Hogg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Robustly testing hypotheses of geographic synchroneity of abrupt and extreme change during the late Pleistocene (60,000 to 11,650 years ago) requires a level of chronological precision often lacking in ice, marine and terrestrial sequences. Here we report a bidecadally-resolved New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) tree-ring sequence spanning two millennia that preserves a record of atmospheric radiocarbon (14C) during ice-rafted debris event Heinrich Event 3 (HE3) in the North Atlantic and Antarctic Isotope Maximum 4 (AIM4) in the Southern Hemisphere. Using 14C in the marine Cariaco Basin and 10Be preserved in Greenland ice, the kauri 14C sequence allows us to precisely align sequences across this period. We observe no significant difference between atmospheric and marine 14C records during HE3, suggesting no stratification of surface waters and collapse in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Instead our results support recent evidence for a weakened AMOC across at least two millennia of the glacial period. Our work adds to a growing body of literature confirming that Heinrich events are not the cause of stadial cooling and suggests changes in the AMOC were not the primary driver of antiphase temperature trends between the hemispheres. Decadally-resolved 14C in ancient kauri offers a powerful new (and complementary) approach to polar ice core CH4 alignment for testing hypotheses of abrupt and extreme climate change.

  20. Complement system and immunological mediators: Their involvements in the induced inflammatory process by Androctonus australis hector venom and its toxic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkari, Nadjia; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Androctonus australis hector scorpion venom is well known by its high toxicity, it induces massive release of neurotransmitters that lead to pathophysiological disorders in cardiovascular, neuro-hormonal and immune systems. Previous studies have shown the relationship between the severity of scorpion envenoming and immune system activation. This study was assessed to investigate the involvement of complement system and inflammatory mediators after sublethal injection of Aah venom, its toxic fraction (FtoxG50) and its main toxins (AahI and AahII) into NMRI mice. The Activation complement system by the venom is also compared to that induced of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Obtained results showed that seric complement system (CS) is activated by the venom and by its toxic components; this activation is more pronounced into liver tissue when toxic components (FtoxG50, AahI or AahII) are used. Increase of cytokine levels (IL1β, TNFα and ICAM) into hepatic tissue induced by AahI or AahII neurotoxins is correlated with tissue alterations. Aprotinin, a non specific inhibitor of complement system seems to be able to reduce CS consumption and to restore partially the induced tissue damage by venom. The mechanisms by which toxic fraction or LPS induced the activation of complement system seem to be different. Sensitivity of hepatic tissue is more pronounced after FtoxG50 injection; however lung tissue is more sensible to LPS than FoxG50. PMID:25921955

  1. Plant root-microbe communication in shaping root microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareen, Andrew; Burton, Frances; Schäfer, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of research is highlighting the impacts root-associated microbial communities can have on plant health and development. These impacts can include changes in yield quantity and quality, timing of key developmental stages and tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. With such a range of effects it is clear that understanding the factors that contribute to a plant-beneficial root microbiome may prove advantageous. Increasing demands for food by a growing human population increases the importance and urgency of understanding how microbiomes may be exploited to increase crop yields and reduce losses caused by disease. In addition, climate change effects may require novel approaches to overcoming abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity as well as new emerging diseases. This review discusses current knowledge on the formation and maintenance of root-associated microbial communities and plant-microbe interactions with a particular emphasis on the effect of microbe-microbe interactions on the shape of microbial communities at the root surface. Further, we discuss the potential for root microbiome modification to benefit agriculture and food production. PMID:26729479

  2. Plant root-microbe communication in shaping root microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareen, Andrew; Burton, Frances; Schäfer, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of research is highlighting the impacts root-associated microbial communities can have on plant health and development. These impacts can include changes in yield quantity and quality, timing of key developmental stages and tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. With such a range of effects it is clear that understanding the factors that contribute to a plant-beneficial root microbiome may prove advantageous. Increasing demands for food by a growing human population increases the importance and urgency of understanding how microbiomes may be exploited to increase crop yields and reduce losses caused by disease. In addition, climate change effects may require novel approaches to overcoming abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity as well as new emerging diseases. This review discusses current knowledge on the formation and maintenance of root-associated microbial communities and plant-microbe interactions with a particular emphasis on the effect of microbe-microbe interactions on the shape of microbial communities at the root surface. Further, we discuss the potential for root microbiome modification to benefit agriculture and food production.

  3. Activated platelets enhance IL-10 secretion and reduce TNF-α secretion by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Nielsen, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG), Escheric......Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG...... production. Moreover, Ab-mediated blockade of CD40L counteracted the effect of platelets and platelet supernatants on TNF-α production. Monocytes separated into two populations with respect to IL-10 production induced by TG; the high-secreting fraction increased from 0.8 to 2.1% (p ... of activated platelets. Adherence of platelets increased TG- and TT-induced IL-10 secretion by monocytes (p

  4. Review on Mutation in Lateral Root of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xia; ZHANG Da; HAO Zaibin

    2011-01-01

    Rice roots include seminal roots, adventitious roots, lateral roots and root hairs, At present, progresses in the research of rice roots have been achieved in many aspects, such as root morphology, root activity, root reaction to various environmental factors as a contribution of root growth and rice yield, the relationship between root growth and stems/leaves/flowers/rice, genetic laws of root characters, etc. However, there are very few researches on lateral root mutant. This paper reviewed progresses of the lateral root mutant of rice from the perspectives of phytomorphology to plant physiology and biochemistry to the gene mapping, consisting of mechanism of developing lateral root of rice, gene cloning and functional analysis of lateral root development, the relationship between auxin and lateral roots, agronomic traits of lateral roots mutant, structure and morphology of root hairs, gravity anomaly of root, redox metabolism and proteomics researches of the mutation in lateral root of rice.

  5. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  6. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    OpenAIRE

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account ...

  7. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  9. Enhanced hyphal growth of arbuscular mycorrhizae by root exudates derived from high R/FR treated Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Maki; Yamamoto, Naoya; Miyamoto, Taro; Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2016-06-01

    Red/Far Red (R/FR) sensing positively influences the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis of both legume and nonlegume plants through jasmonic acid (JA) and strigolactone signaling. We previously reported that root exudates obtained from high R/FR-grown plants contained more strigolactone than low R/FR-grown plants. To determine whether JA and JA derivatives were secreted from roots, we investigated the expression levels of JA-responsive genes in L. japonicus Miyakojima MG20 plants treated with root exudates prepared from either high or low R/FR light-treated plants. The root exudates from high R/FR light-treated plants were found to enhance the expression levels of JA-responsive genes significantly. Moreover, exogenous JA increased AM fungal hyphal elongation as did the root exudates derived from high R/FR-grown L. japonicus plants. We conclude that increased JA accumulation and secretion into root exudates from high R/FR light-grown plants is the best explanation for increased colonization and enhanced mycorrhization under these conditions. PMID:27191935

  10. Cloning and characterization of a Phragmites australis phytochelatin synthase (PaPCS and achieving Cd tolerance in tall fescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuizhu Zhao

    Full Text Available The production of phytochelatins (PCs provides an important means for plants to achieve tolerance to cadmium (Cd toxicity. A reed gene encoding PC synthase (PaPCS was isolated and its function tested through its heterologous expression in a strain of yeast sensitive to Cd. Subsequently, the Cd sensitive and high biomass accumulating species tall fescue was transformed either with PaPCS or PaGCS (a glutamyl cysteine synthetase gene of reed on their own (single transformants, or with both genes together in the same transgene cassette (double transformant. The single and double transformants showed greater Cd tolerance and accumulated more Cd and PC than wild type plants, and their Cd leaf/root ratio content was higher. The ranking in terms of Cd and PC content for the various transgenic lines was double transformants>PaGCS single transformants>PaPCS single transformants>wild type. Thus PaGCS appears to exert a greater influence than PaPCS over PC synthesis and Cd tolerance/accumulation. The double transformant has interesting potential for phytoremediation.

  11. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  12. MES buffer affects Arabidopsis root apex zonation and root growth by suppressing superoxide generation in root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko eKagenishi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species. MES, 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8. However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone. Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis in root apex.

  13. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  14. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originat

  15. A Secure and Efficient (t, n) Multi- Secret Sharing Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Liao-jun; WANG Yu-min

    2005-01-01

    Based on Shamir' s secret sharing, a (t, n)multi-secret sharing scheme is proposed in this paper. p secrets can be shared among n participants, and t or more participants can co-operate to reconstruct these secrets at the same time, but t-1 or fewer participants can derive nothing about these secrets. Each participant's secret shadow is as short as each secret. Compared with the existing schemes,the proposed scheme is characterized by the lower complexity of the secret reconstruction and less public information. The security of this scheme is the same as that of Shamir' s threshold scheme. Analyses show that this scheme is an efficient, computationally secure scheme.

  16. SECURE VISUAL SECRET SHARING BASED ON DISCRETE WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jyothi Lekshmi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual Cryptography Scheme (VCS is an encryption method to encode secret written materials. This method converts the secret written material into an image. Then encode this secret image into n shadow images called shares. For the recreation of the original secret, all or some selected subsets of shares are needed; individual shares are of no use on their own. The secret image can be recovered simply by selecting some subset of these n shares, makes transparencies of them and stacking on top of each other. Nowadays, the data security has an important role. The shares can be altered by an attacker. So providing security to the shares is important. This paper proposes a method of adding security to cryptographic shares. This method uses two dimensional discrete wavelet transform to hide visual secret shares. Then the hidden secrets are distributed among participants through the internet. All hidden shares are extracted to reconstruct the secret.

  17. Beneficial Bacteria Isolated from Grapevine Inner Tissues Shape Arabidopsis thaliana Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldan, Enrico; Nigris, Sebastiano; Romualdi, Chiara; D'Alessandro, Stefano; Clocchiatti, Anna; Zottini, Michela; Stevanato, Piergiorgio; Squartini, Andrea; Baldan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the potential plant growth-promoting traits of 377 culturable endophytic bacteria, isolated from Vitis vinifera cv. Glera, as good biofertilizer candidates in vineyard management. Endophyte ability in promoting plant growth was assessed in vitro by testing ammonia production, phosphate solubilization, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and IAA-like molecule biosynthesis, siderophore and lytic enzyme secretion. Many of the isolates were able to mobilize phosphate (33%), release ammonium (39%), secrete siderophores (38%) and a limited part of them synthetized IAA and IAA-like molecules (5%). Effects of each of the 377 grapevine beneficial bacteria on Arabidopsis thaliana root development were also analyzed to discern plant growth-promoting abilities (PGP) of the different strains, that often exhibit more than one PGP trait. A supervised model-based clustering analysis highlighted six different classes of PGP effects on root architecture. A. thaliana DR5::GUS plantlets, inoculated with IAA-producing endophytes, resulted in altered root growth and enhanced auxin response. Overall, the results indicate that the Glera PGP endospheric culturable microbiome could contribute, by structural root changes, to obtain water and nutrients increasing plant adaptation and survival. From the complete cultivable collection, twelve promising endophytes mainly belonging to the Bacillus but also to Micrococcus and Pantoea genera, were selected for further investigations in the grapevine host plants towards future application in sustainable management of vineyards. PMID:26473358

  18. Beneficial Bacteria Isolated from Grapevine Inner Tissues Shape Arabidopsis thaliana Roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Baldan

    Full Text Available We investigated the potential plant growth-promoting traits of 377 culturable endophytic bacteria, isolated from Vitis vinifera cv. Glera, as good biofertilizer candidates in vineyard management. Endophyte ability in promoting plant growth was assessed in vitro by testing ammonia production, phosphate solubilization, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and IAA-like molecule biosynthesis, siderophore and lytic enzyme secretion. Many of the isolates were able to mobilize phosphate (33%, release ammonium (39%, secrete siderophores (38% and a limited part of them synthetized IAA and IAA-like molecules (5%. Effects of each of the 377 grapevine beneficial bacteria on Arabidopsis thaliana root development were also analyzed to discern plant growth-promoting abilities (PGP of the different strains, that often exhibit more than one PGP trait. A supervised model-based clustering analysis highlighted six different classes of PGP effects on root architecture. A. thaliana DR5::GUS plantlets, inoculated with IAA-producing endophytes, resulted in altered root growth and enhanced auxin response. Overall, the results indicate that the Glera PGP endospheric culturable microbiome could contribute, by structural root changes, to obtain water and nutrients increasing plant adaptation and survival. From the complete cultivable collection, twelve promising endophytes mainly belonging to the Bacillus but also to Micrococcus and Pantoea genera, were selected for further investigations in the grapevine host plants towards future application in sustainable management of vineyards.

  19. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Je Min, E-mail: jemin@knu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Horticultural Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Jik [Biotechnology Institute, Nongwoo Bio Co, Ltd, Yeoju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Rose, Jocelyn K.C. [Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Yeam, Inhwa [Department of Horticulture and Breeding, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Dong [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. • A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. • The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. • Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  20. Advances in experimental methods for root system architecture and root development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-bang Wang; Xiu-juan Zhang; Chu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots play important roles in acquisition of water and nutrients, storage, anchoring, transport, and symbiosis with soil microorganisms, thus quantitative researches on root developmental processes are essential to understand root functions and root turnover in ecosystems, and at the same time such researches are the most difficult because roots are hidden underground. Therefore, how to investigate efficiently root functions and root dynamics is the core aspect in underground ecology. In this article, we reviewed some experimental methods used in root resear-ches on root development and root system architecture, and summarized the advantages and shortages of these meth-ods. Based on the analyses, we proposed three new ways to more understand root processes: (1) new experimental materials for root development; (2) a new observatory system comprised of multiple components, including many observatory windows installed in field, analysis software, and automatic data transport devices; (3) new techniques used to analyze quantitatively functional roots.