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Sample records for australian state radiation

  1. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  2. A national-wide survey of radon and gamma radiation levels in Australian homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nation-wide survey of Australian homes has been conducted to determine the average annual doses to the Australian population from exposure to radon and gamma radiation. The exposure to radon was measured using solid state track detectors (SSTD) whilst the gamma radiation dose was concurrently determined using thermoluminescent dosimetry. Dosemeters were placed in approximately 3400 randomly distributed homes (representing about 1 in 1400 occupied dwellings) for twelve months. The measured annual average radon concentration in Australian homes is 12 Bq m-3. Using appropriate conversion factors, the annual average effective dose equivalents to the Australian population were determined to be 0.6 mSv and 0.9 mSv for radon and gamma radiation respectively. 20 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  3. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains statutory rules made under the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 defining how specified standards to be observed, practices and procedures to be followed and measures to be taken by controlled persons in relation to activities relating to controlled facilities, as well as in relation to dealings with controlled apparatus or controlled material

  4. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This document contains statutory rules made under the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 defining how specified standards to be observed, practices and procedures to be followed and measures to be taken by controlled persons in relation to activities relating to controlled facilities, as well as in relation to dealings with controlled apparatus or controlled material

  5. Australian national radiation dose register for uranian mining and milling industry workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Agency and the Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism have established the Australian National Radiation Dose Register (ANRDR) as a centralised repository for the radiation dose records of workers engaged in the uranium mining and milling industry in Australia. The ANRDR will receive, consolidate and store radiation dose records for uranium workers as provided by mine operators. Furthermore, it will maintain worker's radiation dose history throughout his/her career in the Australian uranium mining and milling industry. This includes situations where a worker moves between different operations or between different States and Territories. The Register is managed by ARPANSA, and was available from July 2010 for Australian uranium mining and milling operators to upload worker dose data. ARPANSA is responsible for ensuring the privacy of workers is protected and that their personal data is secure. The success of the ANRDR relies on industry to report radiation dose records for uranium workers. The Register was officially launched in June 2011. Workers in the Australian uranium mining and milling industry may now request their dose histories from ARPANSA. The Register will also be used to generate summary statistics and trend data to assist in optimisation of practices. In association with the Register, a Safety Guide has been produced on monitoring and assessing occupational exposures to radiation for mining and mineral processing operations. This Safety guide will promote a national consistent approach to this topic and help with comparability of doses reported by different mining operations. ARPANSA will undertake an assessment of the possible expansion of the Register to include workers in other industries who are occupationally exposed to radiation. This paper provides a status update for the Register as well as outlining some of the issues related to development and implementation.

  6. Characteristics of single vehicle rollover fatalities in three Australian states

    OpenAIRE

    Frechede, Bertrand; McIntosh, Andrew S.; GRZEBIETA, Raphaël; BAMBACH, Michaël

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of 2000-2007 single vehicle rollover fatalities in three Australian states was carried out using data from the Australian National Coroners Information System. In this paper, successive selection criteria were applied to the initial dataset to analyse: - Occupant fatalities in single passenger car crashes (1743 cases), - Occupant fatalities in single passenger car rollovers (474 cases), overall, rollovers accounted for 35% of all occupant fatalities in a single vehicle transport ...

  7. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation. However, most are designated as radiation protection officers as a secondary duty. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A Training Course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasize, basic radiation theory and protection, operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO, an understanding of the Ionising Radiation Safety Manual, day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments, and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved successful, both for the students and the ADO generally. To seek national accreditation of the course through the Australian National Training Authority, as a first step, competency standards have been proposed. (authors)

  8. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian defence organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation, while others may be designated as radiation protection officers in remote units with few duties to perform in this role. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A training course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasise: basic radiation theory and protection; operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO; an understanding of the Safety Manual; day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments; and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved sufficiently successful, both for the students and the ADO generally, to seek national accreditation through the Australian National Training Authority and, as a first step, competency standards have been identified

  9. The State of the Australian Middle Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Hamilton

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a widespread view that the middle class in Australia is doing it tough, that they arefinding it increasingly difficult to maintain a decent standard of living and are suffering frommortgage stress. Indeed, some media reports have announced the end of the middle classdream.This paper tests a number of these popular views against the statistical data. It asks whetherthe typical Australian family can be said to be struggling? Are mortgages creating severeproblems for middle-class families? Is the middle class shrinking? Are families copingfinancially only because wives are going out to work?

  10. Liminality, the Australian State and Asian Nurse Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Willis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades the flow of Asians to Australia through legitimate immigration programs has accelerated. This is particularly the case for Asian nurses coming from countries that were once subjected to European colonisation. The difficulties encountered by nurses from Asian countries mirror those of earlier waves of migrants. These include navigating the language and differences in cultural mores, values, and beliefs, along with the loneliness that may come from leaving strong family ties at home. While racism has been evident for all earlier waves of migrants, Asians face an additional hurdle linked to the uneasy relationship Australians and the Australian state has with Asia. Australia is geographically in Asia, but culturally Anglo and European.  The impact this might have on the working relationships of Asian and Australian born registered nurses is significant given the nature of their work in caring for the sick and elderly. This liminal relationship between the Australian state and Asians provides a theoretical insight into the particular difficulties experienced by Asian nurses and the integration programs that might assist them and their Australian colleagues to develop cohesive working relationships.

  11. Environmental radiation monitoring during visits of nuclear powered warships to Australian ports: requirements, arrangements and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commonwealth Government has determined conditions to be met when nuclear powered warships visit Australian ports. These conditions include a requirement that appropriate State/Territory and Commonwealth authorities provide a radiation monitoring program to determine whether any radioactivity has been discharged or accidently released from a nuclear powered warship in port; to determine actual or potential levels of any consequent exposure to radiation of members of the public; and to provide this information within a timescale that allows remedial action to be taken. Part 1 of this document sets out the requirements of a radiation monitoring program capable of meeting these objectives. The fundamental arrangements and procedures for implementing the requirements are presented at Part 2 and provide a basis for the development of fully detailed, port specific, radiation monitoring programs

  12. Solid cancer risks from radiation exposure for the Australian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are made of the risks to the Australian population as a function of age and gender for mortality or morbidity for all solid cancers after exposure to radiation. Excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models are used. The model coefficients are re-evaluated for radiation doses expressed as effective dose using data from the Japanese Life Span Study. Life-table methods are used throughout and the risk measures studied are: the risk of exposure related death, RERD and the risk of exposure related cancer, RERC. Australian life-table data and the age-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates of Australian males and females are taken from recent published tables. No dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor is applied. Sources of uncertainty used to calculate the confidence regions for the estimated risks include the statistical uncertainties of the model parameters and of the extrapolation of the risks beyond the period supported by the epidemiological data. Summary values of the risks are reported as averages of those calculated from the ERR and the EAR models. For males, the mortality risks per sievert range from 14% for 0-9 year age group, 7% at 30-39 years and 4% at 50-59 years. Corresponding values for females are 20%, 10% and 6%. Incidence risks are higher: for males the estimates are 32% for the 0-9 year group, 12% at 30-39 and 5% at 50-59. Corresponding values for females are 56%, 20% and 8%. The 90% confidence regions are about ± 50% of these values. Estimates are given for the risks from CT whole-body scanning or virtual colonoscopy which could be used for cancer screening. If used at 3 year intervals and the effective dose per procedure is 10 mSv, then the RERD for males beginning screening at 40, 50 and 60 years is 0.4%, 0.3% and 0.1%, respectively and for females, 0.6%, 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. RERD estimates for a 5 year interval between screens are about one-third smaller. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of

  13. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Guide to the Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety licensing framework. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information to Commonwealth entities who may require a license under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 to enable them to posses, have control of, use, operate or dispose of radiation sources. The guide describes to which agencies and what activities require licensing. It also addresses general administrative and legal matters such as appeal procedures, ongoing licensing requirements, monitoring and compliance. Applicants are advised to consult the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and accompanying Regulations when submitting applications

  14. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Guide to the Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety licensing framework; 1. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information to Commonwealth entities who may require a license under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 to enable them to posses, have control of, use, operate or dispose of radiation sources. The guide describes to which agencies and what activities require licensing. It also addresses general administrative and legal matters such as appeal procedures, ongoing licensing requirements, monitoring and compliance. Applicants are advised to consult the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and accompanying Regulations when submitting applications

  15. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA.

  16. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Susan [Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Sale, Charlotte [Radiation Oncology, Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Barwon Health, Geelong, Vic. (Australia); Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Collaboration: Grad Cert Grief & Pall Care Counselling, MIR

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development.

  17. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development

  18. Australian Strategic Approaches to Managing National and State Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesleyanne Hawthorne

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia is a global exemplar of nation-building through government planned and administered skilled, family and humanitarian migration programs. By 2011 26% of the population were immigrants, at a time when extraordinary linguistic, religious, racial and cultural diversity were evident. The federal government’s role since the 1901 establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia has spanned migration policy formation, selection, admission, compliance and naturalization functions. The settlement responsibilities of the eight state and territory governments have also grown – a process facilitated by generally amicable federal – subnational relations. Within this context this article describes contemporary Australian approaches to managing linguistic, religious and artistic diversity, comparing federal and state government roles in a period associated with significant multicultural challenges.

  19. An Australian "Smart State" Serves Up Lessons for a Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, the Australian state of Queensland was famous more for its beaches than for its brain power. Fellow Australians thought of Queenslanders as miners, farmers, or surfers, not as professors or scientists. When Queensland announced in 1998 that it was planning to become a "Smart State," or a knowledge economy, locals quipped that…

  20. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  1. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  2. Defining fitness to practise in Australian radiation therapy: A focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to investigate how Australian radiation therapists define fitness to practise. Method: A qualitative approach was taken to data collection with focus groups being employed to gather the data. Analysis was informed by grounded theory. Following ethics approval, three homogeneous focus groups were conducted comprising a total of 21 participants, with 5-8 participants per group. The discussions were transcribed, verified by the researcher and participants, then unitised, coded and a sample checked by a second coder. Findings: There was no consensus on the definition of fitness to practise. The terms professionalism and competence were used interchangeably in some definitions. Four themes emerged from the data, these were; fitness as a continuum (individual differences and longevity in the profession), fitness as behaviour and conduct (professionalism and competence), fitness as a state of mind (attitudes and intangible elements) and fitness as being qualified (course completion means fitness to practise). Three concepts which were not raised were illegal behaviour, impaired practice and dose errors. Conclusion: There is no consensus among radiation therapists about fitness to practise. There was confusion with how Fitness to practise relates to professionalism and competence with little mention of how impairment is interwoven into the notion of fitness to practise. Without an unambiguous definition and robust criteria, making the 'judgement call' as to whether a practitioners' fitness to practise is impaired will continue to be a challenge for educators, departmental managers and registration boards.

  3. Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety (consequential amendments) Bill 1998. Explanatory memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this Bill is to make consequential changes to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act 1987 (the ANSTO Act) and to provide for transitional arrangements to cover the operation of controlled facilities and the handling of radiation sources while applications for licences to cover these facilities and activities are being made under the proposed Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 (the ARPANS Act) For this purpose, the Bill: (a) repeals Parts VI and VII A of the ANSTO Act under which, respectively, the Safety Review Committee and the Nuclear Safety Bureau are established, as the functions of the Committee and Bureau will be transferred to the CEO of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, established under the ARPANS Act; (b) makes transitional arrangements for the transfer of the assets and liabilities of the Nuclear Safety Bureau to the Commonwealth, and confers on the CEO of ARPANSA the powers of the Director of the Nuclear Safety Bureau in relation to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation during the transitional period before the offenses provisions commence to operate under the ARPANS Act; (c) repeals the Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978. That Act provides for the development and endorsement of Codes of Practice which will be undertaken under the auspices of ARPANSA; (d) provides that Commonwealth entities have a transition period of 6 months after the ARPANS Act commences to apply for a licence to authorize specified activities under that Act

  4. The Western Australian mineral sands industry: radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for radiation protection in the mineral sand industry derives from the production and handling of monazite, a rare earth phosphate which contains 6 to 7% thorium. The purpose of this booklet is to outline the complex and detailed radiation protection surveillance program already in place. It is estimated that the quality of radiation protection has improved in recent years with respect to reporting and recording-keeping dust sampling procedures, analytical determination, training and instruction, as well as to a corporate commitment to implement dust reduction strategies. 15 figs., 2 tabs., ills

  5. Australian Students' Perceptions of Racial Attitudes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Anna M.; Evans, Virden; Evans, Adeline L.

    1998-01-01

    This survey of the perceptions of Australian high school students toward racism in America indicates that a majority knew little about cultural diversity; had various cultural backgrounds; were influenced more by television than other forms of media; and believed African Americans do not have equal access to education, equal opportunity to…

  6. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  7. Fiscal Responsibility and Australian Commonwealth , State and Territory Government Budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Graeme Wines

    2006-01-01

    The government sector in Australia has seen the introduction of accrual accounting principles in recent years. However, this process has been complicated by the presence of two alternative financial reporting frameworks in the form of a) the Government Finance Statistics (GFS) uniform framework and b) the accrual accounting rules specified in Australian professional accounting standards, principally AAS 31. While a variety of cash and accrual based measurements are available pursuant to these...

  8. An Australian survey of current practice regarding radiation treatment records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty one Radiation Oncology Departments were surveyed to assess the structure and content of their external photon beam treatment sheets. A master index of standard data items was compiled from previously published recommendations and the frequency of recording these items was tabulated. A wide variation in practice was observed. The data highlights the need for agreed common data recording for quality assurance, outcome analysis and participation in clinical trials. 4 tabs

  9. A Delphi study on research priorities in radiation therapy: The Australian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapists (RTs) need to engage more in research to establish an evidence base for their daily practice. However, RTs world-wide conduct little research themselves, although positive moves have been made in some countries. This project is the second stage of a Delphi process aimed at prioritising RT areas of research interest. A questionnaire was constructed using responses to a previous questionnaire which identified the research interests of Australian RTs. Fifty-three Research Areas were identified from these responses and grouped into 12 categories such as 'imaging in radiation therapy', 'symptom management', 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment'. The survey was sent to all Australian departments of radiation oncology, and RTs were asked to form interest groups to discuss and prioritise the Research Areas. There was a 50% response rate (18 of 36 departments surveyed). The highest ranked research Category was 'imaging in radiation therapy'. Six of the top 10 ranked Research Areas were within Central RT practice ('imaging in radiation therapy'; 'symptom management'; 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment') and the other four were within broader RT practice ('diversification, recognition and other professional issues'; and 'management and staff issues'). Patient Care was also considered to be an area requiring more research. This prioritization of Research Areas and categories provides a useful list of future research for RTs, which will enable them to decide whether their research ideas are a high priority, and spend less time deciding on a relevant research topic that needs investigation in their own workplaces.

  10. Convergence across a continent: adaptive diversification in a recent radiation of Australian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Mozes P K; Horner, Paul; Moritz, Craig

    2016-06-15

    Recent radiations are important to evolutionary biologists, because they provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms that link micro- and macroevolution. The role of ecological speciation during adaptive radiation has been intensively studied, but radiations can arise from a diversity of evolutionary processes; in particular, on large continental landmasses where allopatric speciation might frequently precede ecological differentiation. It is therefore important to establish a phylogenetic and ecological framework for recent continental-scale radiations that are species-rich and ecologically diverse. Here, we use a genomic (approx. 1 200 loci, exon capture) approach to fit branch lengths on a summary-coalescent species tree and generate a time-calibrated phylogeny for a recent and ecologically diverse radiation of Australian scincid lizards; the genus Cryptoblepharus We then combine the phylogeny with a comprehensive phenotypic dataset for over 800 individuals across the 26 species, and use comparative methods to test whether habitat specialization can explain current patterns of phenotypic variation in ecologically relevant traits. We find significant differences in morphology between species that occur in distinct environments and convergence in ecomorphology with repeated habitat shifts across the continent. These results suggest that isolated analogous habitats have provided parallel ecological opportunity and have repeatedly promoted adaptive diversification. By contrast, speciation processes within the same habitat have resulted in distinct lineages with relatively limited morphological variation. Overall, our study illustrates how alternative diversification processes might have jointly stimulated species proliferation across the continent and generated a remarkably diverse group of Australian lizards. PMID:27306048

  11. Towards Uniformity of Radiation Protection Legislation in a Multi-jurisdictional country- the Australian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia is a federation of nine jurisdictions, each with independent radiation protection legislation. The existing legislative non-uniformity across the jurisdictions has constituted an impediment for operators who must comply with differing legislative requirements in different jurisdictions. To address this issue, a National Competition Policy Review of Radiation Protection Legislation took place in 2000/2001. It has produced 19 Recommendations, which addressed objectives of the legislation, the need to regulate, alternative regulatory approaches, national uniformity, licensing and registration, strict and prescriptive standards, advertising and promotional activities, compliance costs and cost recovery issues. The Review has recommended that jurisdictions should retain the regulatory approach to achieve radiation protection objectives rather than leave them to be decided by market forces. But the approach should be performance-based, i.e. outcome-focused rather than prescriptive. An Implementation Plan of the Recommendations has been created which, by the end of 2004, will produce the National Directory for Radiation Protection. The Directory, which will become a consolidated repository of radiation protection standards, guidelines, codes of practice and administrative principles will provide a uniform national framework for radiation protection legislation in Australia. It will provide guidance for the jurisdictions redrawing their legislations. Because of its central role in shaping future legislation, the Directory will contain only those provisions, which have passed a formal process (process for issue resolution) concluded by an approval by the Australian Health Ministers Conference. Such process will also expedite the uniform adoption nationwide of legislative trends emerging from international radiation protection recommendations and standards. This Australian model might be a viable example for other multi-jurisdictional countries to consider

  12. A Delphi study on research priorities in radiation therapy: The Australian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Jennifer [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.cox@usyd.edu.au; Halkett, Georgia [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care, Curtin University of Technology, Health Research Campus, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)], E-mail: g.halkett@curtin.edu.au; Anderson, Claudia [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: claudia.anderson@usyd.edu.au; Heard, Robert [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: r.heard@staff.usyd.edu.au

    2010-02-15

    Radiation therapists (RTs) need to engage more in research to establish an evidence base for their daily practice. However, RTs world-wide conduct little research themselves, although positive moves have been made in some countries. This project is the second stage of a Delphi process aimed at prioritising RT areas of research interest. A questionnaire was constructed using responses to a previous questionnaire which identified the research interests of Australian RTs. Fifty-three Research Areas were identified from these responses and grouped into 12 categories such as 'imaging in radiation therapy', 'symptom management', 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment'. The survey was sent to all Australian departments of radiation oncology, and RTs were asked to form interest groups to discuss and prioritise the Research Areas. There was a 50% response rate (18 of 36 departments surveyed). The highest ranked research Category was 'imaging in radiation therapy'. Six of the top 10 ranked Research Areas were within Central RT practice ('imaging in radiation therapy'; 'symptom management'; 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment') and the other four were within broader RT practice ('diversification, recognition and other professional issues'; and 'management and staff issues'). Patient Care was also considered to be an area requiring more research. This prioritization of Research Areas and categories provides a useful list of future research for RTs, which will enable them to decide whether their research ideas are a high priority, and spend less time deciding on a relevant research topic that needs investigation in their own workplaces.

  13. Forecast Accuracy and Uncertainty of Australian Bureau of Statistics State and Territory Population Projections

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Errors from past rounds of population projections can provide both diagnostic information to improve future projections as well as information for users on the likely uncertainty of current projections. This paper assesses the forecast accuracy of official Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) population projections for the states and territories of Australia and is the first major study to do so. For the states and territories, it is found that, after 10-year projection durations, absolute p...

  14. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an agent for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is responsible for maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. This standard of measurement has application in radiation therapy dosimetry, which is required for the treatment of cancer patients. This report is the first in a series of reports documenting the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. The Urquhart graphite micro-calorimeters, which is used for the determination of absorbed dose under high energy photon beams, has been now placed under computer control. Accordingly, a complete upgrade of the calorimeter systems was performed to allow operation in the hospital. In this report, control and monitoring techniques have been described, with an assessment of the performance achieved being given for 6 and 18 MeV bremsstrahlung beams. Random errors have been reduced to near negligible proportions, while systematic errors have been minimized by achieving true quasi-adiabatic operation. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs

  15. Fellowship training in radiation oncology: an Australian survey of current teaching and perceived needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology registrars, who were preparing for their final qualifying examinations, were surveyed about their attitudes to their training programmes. While two (7%) indicated that they had no structured tuition whatsoever, the majority 19 (63%) received on average 1-2h per week, which was much less than their perceived need. Other areas of training considered deficient included exposure to curriculum requirements, peer support and access to other hospital specialty meetings. When asked about the concept of job rotation between training centres, 23 (77%) considered it to be potentially advantageous, with a majority preferring one such rotation of 6-12 months duration occurring in their third year, with a return to their base unit prior to final qualifying examinations. Limitations and potential benefits of the job rotation concept are discussed. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Commonalities and challenges: a review of Australian state and territory maternity and child health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Virginia; Donovan, Jenny; Kruske, Sue; Kemp, Lynn; Homer, Caroline; Fowler, Cathrine

    2011-12-01

    Nurses and midwives play a key role in providing universal maternal, child and family health services in Australia. However, the Australian federation of states and territories has resulted in policy frameworks that differ across jurisdictions and services that are fragmented across disciplines and sectors. This paper reports the findings of a study that reviewed and synthesised current Australian service policy or frameworks for maternity and child health services in order to identify the degree of commonality across jurisdictions and the compatibility with international research on child development. Key maternity and child health service policy documents in each jurisdiction were sourced. The findings indicate that current policies were in line with international research and policy directions, emphasising prevention and early intervention, continuity of care, collaboration and integrated services. The congruence of policies suggests the time is right to consider the introduction of a national approach to universal maternal, child health services. PMID:22545909

  17. Washington State environmental radiation standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Health is in the process of establishing new environmental radioactivity cleanup regulations. The scope of these regulations will encompass all radionuclides and will apply to soils, sediments, and groundwater. The requirements of these regulations will be part of license terminations for those nuclear facilities licensed by the state. Non-licensees which leave residual radioactivity in the environment will also be impacted because the requirements of these regulations will be incorporated as applicable, relevant, and appropriate regulations in the Model Toxics Control Act administered by the State Department of Ecology. The motivation for establishing these new regulations is the need for cleanup guidance for a number of sites across the state and, except for uranium mills, the absence of soil, sediment, and groundwater radioactivity cleanup standards. Establishment of these standards will close the only major gaps in environmental radioactivity cleanup regulations and fulfill the Department of Health's statutory requirements to protect public health from environmental radiation exposure. Development of the standard is following the state rule-making process. An Issues Paper was distributed for public comment in November 1994. Current activities include an environmental impact statement, a small business impact statement, and preparation of the draft rule

  18. State Supervision and Control of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 1999-2001 is presented

  19. State Radiation Protection Supervision and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 2002 is presented

  20. Characteristics of single vehicle rollover fatalities in three Australian states (2000-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréchède, B; McIntosh, A S; Grzebieta, R; Bambach, M R

    2011-05-01

    An analysis of 2000-2007 single vehicle rollover fatalities in three Australian states was carried out using data from the Australian National Coroners Information System. In this paper, successive selection criteria were applied to the initial dataset to analyse:overall, rollovers accounted for 35% of all occupant fatalities in a single vehicle transport injury event. For these fatalities, the occupant was ejected or stayed contained in equal proportions. However, results showed strong disparities between the more urban and densely populated states of New South Wales and Victoria, compared to the Northern Territory in terms of crash type distribution and containment of the occupant. Differences were also found in rollover initiation, speed at initiation and number of turns. Overall, the strongest association of fatal neck/thoracic spine injuries with head injuries was found for the contained, restrained occupant. This analysis of single vehicle rollover fatalities is consistent with previous findings. It also shows that in Australia, strategies for rollover injury risk mitigation will need to take into account a broad range of characteristics to be effective. PMID:21376869

  1. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  2. Current state of radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaev, Alexei K.

    1995-06-01

    A review of common trends in the development of modern radiation processing is presented. The sources of ionising radiation and the most important processes practically induced under the influence of this radiation are discussed. It is shown that radiation methods can be used successfully for the modification of materials, for the sterilisation of medical articles, for the solution of ecological problems, for treatment of food products, in radiation engineering, etc. Special attention is paid to processes at the pilot plant and industrial scales. The bibliography includes 548 references.

  3. Introduction to the Australian study of low dose radiation assessing the effects of CT scans in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This project is assessing the effects of low dose radiation in a cohort of young Australians exposed to CT scans and other forms of medical irradiation. De-identified records of Medicare funded services (including CT scans, other radiological and nuclear medicine procedures) allow dose estimates for diagnostic medical radiation for I 1.4 million individuals aged 0-19 years in the period 1985-2005. For example, the data set details 907,905 CT services for 662,479 persons, and over 24 million other radiological and nuclear medicine services. Medical physicists are determining a dose matrix for organ dose and effective dose based on age of individual at scan, year of scan, gender and type of scan. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has made probability-based linkages between the cohort and the national records of cancer registrations and deaths; these outcomes are being linked to the exposure records and to the estimated radiation doses for all individuals in the cohort. Epidemiological models will be fitted to estimate effects on cancer incidence due to age, gender and length of follow-up, as well as any effects due to radiation exposures and dose, age at exposure, and confounding variables such as socioeconomic status. Australia is in a unique position with well documented records of medical irradiation funded through the universal Medicare system. Data integration for the cohort of young Australians exposed from 1985 to 2005 is virtually complete. The most challenging future task is to implement the best methodologies for calculation of individual doses.

  4. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Radiation Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency, 2001-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period analysed ARPANSA contributed to the (then) Health and Aged Care portfolio's 'Outcome 1: Population Health and Safety'. The objective of this outcome was the promotion and protection of the health of all Australians and minimising the incidence of preventable mortality, illness, injury and disability. The main outcomes, as outlined in the reports are: regulation of Commonwealth activities involving radiation sources and nuclear facilities; progress towards the development of a National Directory for Radiation Protection; quality assurance programs in medical radiation and conduct evaluations of individual and population doses; health impact assessment of radiation exposure and methodologies for this assessment, recommendations and guidelines for limiting radiation exposure; progress towards third-party quality assurance certification for the personal radiation monitoring service, radionuclide analysis of gamma ray emitting nuclides, Ultraviolet Protection Factor; assessing radiopharmaceutical testing and the protection dosimeter calibration service; maintenance of a network for monitoring radionuclides in the atmosphere; safety standards and guidance in support of the work of the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The major priorities for ARPANSA in the reporting year, included the assessment of an application to construct the replacement research reactor at ANSTO, implementation of a process for public consultation and participation in the licensing of nuclear facilities and the development of national standards and codes of practice, including a standard for radiofrequency radiation

  5. Silicon solid state devices and radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Claude

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the fundamental principles of interaction between radiation and matter, the principles of working and the operation of particle detectors based on silicon solid state devices. It covers a broad scope with respect to the fields of application of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices from low to high energy physics experiments including in outer space and in the medical environment. This book covers stateof- the-art detection techniques in the use of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices and their readout electronics, including the latest developments on pixelated silicon radiation detector and their application.

  6. The application of national diagnostic reference levels as a metric of radiation protection for the Australian public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of diagnostic imaging using ionizing radiation is steadily increasing. The estimated growth of multi- detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning is approximately 9% per annum. In 2008 the estimated annual caput effective dose to the Australian population was 0.8 mSv, this has increased to an estimated 1.2 mSv in 2010. Diagnostic imaging is required to be undertaken using the constraints of appropriate referral, justification and optimisation strategies to ensure a constructive risk-benefit outcome for the patient. While the radiation insult from the higher dose procedures may entail some limited increase in stochastic risk and the expression of deterministic damage in the highest dose interventions, the additional risk to the patient remains supportable when compared to the risk of not having the investigation(s). However, there may be an impact at the national level contributing to an increase of radiation risk at a population health level Australia does not have a state/territory or national patient medical record. It is therefore very difficult to gain any complete and accurate information on a patient's exposure history as they move across medical institutions. In the absence of this information, one compensatory strategy is to support the imaging practices in ensuring that the doses they deliver are within a reasonable range when compared to their peers. This support can be achieved with the application of diagnostic reference levels at a national level, The ARPANSA national DRL is the 75th percentile (third quartile) of the spread of the median doses of common protocols from a national survey of imaging practices. A local practice reference level (PRL) is defined as the median value of the spread of doses for common protocols surveyed at the local radiology practice for 20 patients. The development of DRLs will be derived from a nationwide survey of local PRLs which, it is assumed, have produced images of acceptable diagnostic quality as defined

  7. Student Teachers' Understanding of Policy Behavioural Directives Concerning the Reporting of Child Sexual Abuse: Findings from One Australian State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; Grimbeek, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background: In the Australian state of Queensland, many Department of Education Policies include behavioural directives for school teachers, whereby "the teacher must..." behave in a certain manner. The introduction of an education policy, such as the mandatory reporting of child sexual abuse by teachers, has significant and wide-ranging…

  8. How safe is Australian Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many incidents and near-incidents are known to occur in Australian radiation oncology departments. The vast majority of incidents are minor in nature; however a small percentage represent major threats to good patient care, administrative structures and public confidence. A small but regular number of incidents result in ad-hoc local and/or State committees of inquiry or Tort actions and inevitably have substantial personal and departmental repercussions. Apart from some local databases on treatment delivery incidents maintained by radiation therapists, no systematic data collection or analysis of treatment incidents exists for radiation oncology in Australia. This paper argues the case for a prospective, systematic approach to the recording and analysis of treatment-related incidents and near incidents. Major barriers to such a scheme, including fear of litigation, misuse of information and lack of understanding on the nature of an incident are discussed. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  9. An Australian discrete choice experiment to value eq-5d health states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Rosalie; Norman, Richard; Brazier, John; Cronin, Paula; King, Madeleine T; Ratcliffe, Julie; Street, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    Conventionally, generic quality-of-life health states, defined within multi-attribute utility instruments, have been valued using a Standard Gamble or a Time Trade-Off. Both are grounded in expected utility theory but impose strong assumptions about the form of the utility function. Preference elicitation tasks for both are complicated, limiting the number of health states that each respondent can value and, therefore, that can be valued overall. The usual approach has been to value a set of the possible health states and impute values for the remainder. Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) offer an attractive alternative, allowing investigation of more flexible specifications of the utility function and greater coverage of the response surface. We designed a DCE to obtain values for EQ-5D health states and implemented it in an Australia-representative online panel (n = 1,031). A range of specifications investigating non-linear preferences with respect to time and interactions between EQ-5D levels were estimated using a random-effects probit model. The results provide empirical support for a flexible utility function, including at least some two-factor interactions. We then constructed a preference index such that full health and death were valued at 1 and 0, respectively, to provide a DCE-based algorithm for Australian cost-utility analyses. PMID:23765787

  10. Fostering eGovernment as State Social Responsibility (SSR: Case Study of an Australian City Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinara Rao Karna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available           Democracies around the world now face Citizen-apathy. This is a concern now more than ever faced by countries around the globe. eGovernment is undoubtedly a platform to deliberate and enable citizens regain confidence and faith in democratic  processes. Citizens now seek Verifiable, Open, Transparent, Empathetic, Responsive and Sensitive Electronic Democracy and Government (VOTERS EDG, Karna, 2012. Similar to corporate world, there are voices stressing on govenments for the need to understand the stakeholders, their involvement, relationships and responsibilities of a state in eGovernance. Citizens everywhere now demand Verifiable, Open, Transparent, Empathetic, Responsive and Sensitive Electronically Democratic Government as a State Social Responsibity (SSR. Peoples movements and outbursts against authorities with the help of Word of Mouse (Karna, 2012 have established that transparent and open governance is the need of the hour. This paper presents findings of the study conducted in an Australian City Council for preparing the city council for ‘City e-readiness’ to initiate e-Government activities. We propose the idea of ‘Centrality of Citizens’ in context of eGovernment. We further build upon the original concept of deeming eGovernment as ‘State Social Responsibility’ (SSR (Karna, 2010, by governments at all levels.  

  11. Radiation Oncologists in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide an extensive and detailed portrait of radiation oncologists, their professional activities, and the practices in which they work. Methods and Materials: We analyzed non-individually identified data from the American College of Radiology's 2003 Survey of Radiation Oncologists, a stratified random sample survey that guaranteed respondents' confidentiality and achieved a 68% response rate, with a total of 472 responses. Responses were weighted to make them representative of all radiation oncologists in the United States. We use two-tailed z tests of percentages and means to compare information from the current survey with those from a similar 1995 survey. Results: The number of posttraining, professionally active radiation oncologists grew from nearly 2900 in 1995 to nearly 3500 in 2003, an increase of approximately 21%. Twenty-three percent of posttraining, professionally active radiation oncologists were women. Among posttraining, professionally active radiation oncologists, 95% were board-certified. Forty-eight percent of radiation oncologists were in nonacademic, radiation-oncology-only private practices; 20% in academic practice; 14% in nonacademic, multispecialty practices; and 11% in solo practice. The largest percentage of radiation oncologists worked in the South (34%). The average annual number of patients treated (curative and palliative) per radiation oncologist was 264. On average, radiation oncologists preferred a 4% increase in their workload. The proportion of radiation oncologists planning a career change decreased from 8% in 1995 to 4% in 2003, and in 2003 34% said they were enjoying radiation oncology more than 5 years earlier, compared with 21% in 1995. Conclusion: Despite concerns in 2003 about lower-than-optimal workload, professional satisfaction, if anything, increased since 1995

  12. The state of the nation: A snapshot of Australian institutional repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Kennan, Mary Anne; Kingsley, Danny A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides the first full description of the status of Australian institutional repositories. Australia presents an interesting case because of the government’s support of institutional repositories and open access. A survey of all 39 Australian universities conducted in September 2008 shows that 32 institutions have active repositories and by end of 2009, 37 should have repositories. The total number of open access items has risen dramatically since January 2006. Five institutions r...

  13. Application of Satellite and Ground-based Data to Investigate the UV Radiative Effects of Australian Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Mills, Franklin P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Anderson, Don

    2007-01-01

    An understanding of the effect of aerosols on biologically- and photochemically-active UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is important for many ongoing climate, biophysical, and air pollution studies. In particular, estimates of the UV characteristics of the most common Australian aerosols will be valuable inputs to UV Index forecasts, air quality studies, and assessments of the impact of regional environmental changes. By analyzing climatological distributions of Australian aerosols we have identified sites where co-located ground-based UV-B and ozone measurements were available during episodes of relatively high aerosol activity. Since at least June 2003, surface UV global irradiance spectra (285-450 nm) have been measured routinely at Darwin and Alice Springs in Australia by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). Using colocated sunphotometer measurements at Darwin and Alice Springs, we identified several episodes of relatively high aerosol activity. Aerosol air mass types were analyzed from sunphotometer-derived angstrom parameter, MODIS fire maps and MISR aerosol property retrievals. To assess aerosol effects we compared the measured UV irradiances for aerosol-loaded and clear-sky conditions with each other and with irradiances simulated using the libRadtran radiative transfer model for aerosol-free conditions. We found that for otherwise similar atmospheric conditions, smoke aerosols over Darwin reduced the surface UV irradiance by as much as 40-50% at 290-300 nm and 20-25% at 320-400 nm near active fires (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 500 nm approximately equal to 0.6). Downwind of fires, the smoke aerosols over Darwin reduced the surface irradiance by 15-25% at 290-300 nm and approximately 10% at 320-350 nm (AOD at 500 nm approximately equal to 0.2). The effect of smoke increased with decrease of wavel strongest in the UV-B. The aerosol attenuation factors calculated for the selected cases suggest smoke over Darwin has an effect on surface 340

  14. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searles Andrew

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora, it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respected process of federal government reimbursement after expert cost-effectiveness evaluation, popularly known as the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme ('PBS'. It remains uncertain what sort of impacts – if any – the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement ('AUSFTA' will have on PBS processes such as reference pricing and their important role in facilitating equitable and affordable access to essential medicines. This is now the field of inquiry for a major three year Australian Research Council ('ARC'-funded study bringing together a team of senior researchers in regulatory theory from the Australian National University and pharmacoeconomics from the University of Newcastle. The project proposes to monitor, assess and analyse the real and potential impacts of the AUSFTA in this area, providing Australian policy-makers with continuing expertise and options. To the extent that the AUSFTA medicines provisions may represent animportant precedent in a global strategy by industry oncost-effectiveness evaluation of pharmaceuticals, the study will also beof great interest to policy makers in other jurisdictions.

  15. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; Doran, Evan; Henry, David; Drahos, Peter; Searles, Andrew; Pekarsky, Brita; Neville, Warwick

    2005-10-01

    On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora), it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respected process of federal government reimbursement after expert cost-effectiveness evaluation, popularly known as the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme ('PBS'). It remains uncertain what sort of impacts--if any--the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement ('AUSFTA') will have on PBS processes such as reference pricing and their important role in facilitating equitable and affordable access to essential medicines. This is now the field of inquiry for a major three year Australian Research Council ('ARC')-funded study bringing together a team of senior researchers in regulatory theory from the Australian National University and pharmacoeconomics from the University of Newcastle. The project proposes to monitor, assess and analyse the real and potential impacts of the AUSFTA in this area, providing Australian policy-makers with continuing expertise and options. To the extent that the AUSFTA medicines provisions may represent an important precedent in a global strategy by industry on cost-effectiveness evaluation of pharmaceuticals, the study will also be of great interest to policy makers in other jurisdictions. PMID:16209703

  16. The first Australian-Asian conference on radiation science and nuclear medicine: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighty two papers and posters presented at the conference covered a wide range of topics in the areas of radiation chemistry, industrial radiation processing, mammalian cells radiosensitivity, biological, chemical and physical radiation effects, radiochemistry. The handbook contains the conference program, the available abstracts, a list of participants and other relevant general information

  17. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 ≤ n ≤ 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving (∼100 μK) 85Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target nl Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition to a higher energy 'monitor state', n'l'. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the nl target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experimental results obtained using a method which is more prone to systematic error, and are also in excellent agreement with theory.

  18. State of Washington radiation guidance for Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleanup of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site is being managed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The participants are the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington, with the Department of Ecology being the lead for the State of Washington. Through a memorandum of understanding the Department of Health is designated as the primary state agency for protection of human health and the environment from ionizing radiation. As part of this responsibility, the Department of Health is developing radiation cleanup guidance for Hanford cleanup. Another reason for developing State guidance is that there are no federal regulations that provide guidance on residual radioactivity on lands that will be released for public use. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency both have prepared draft regulations, but the issuance of these is uncertain. The state guidance is compatible with draft federal guidance and includes numerical guidance for residual contamination, modeling parameters, look-up tables, and land use categories. This guidance will apply until such a time as they are superseded by applicable federal regulations or the state environmental radiation standard

  19. Radiation safety considerations and compliance within equine veterinary clinics: Results of an Australian survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine current knowledge and the level of compliance of radiation safety principles in equine veterinary clinics within Australia. Method: Surveys were sent to equine veterinary surgeons working in Australia. The survey was delivered both online and in hardcopy format; it comprised 49 questions, 15 of these directly related to radiation safety. The participants were asked about their current and previous use of radiation-producing equipment. Information regarding their level of knowledge and application of radiation safety principles and practice standards was collected and analysed. Results: The use of radiation-producing equipment was evident in 94% of responding clinics (a combination of X-ray, CT and/or Nuclear Medicine Cameras). Of those with radiation-producing equipment, 94% indicated that they hold a radiation licence, 78% had never completed a certified radiation safety course and 19% of participants did not use a personal radiation monitor. In 14% of cases, radiation safety manuals or protocols were not available within clinics. Conclusions: The study has shown that knowledge and application of guidelines as provided by the Code of Practice for Radiation Protection in Veterinary Medicine (2009) is poorly adhered to. The importance of compliance with regulatory requirements is pivotal in minimising occupational exposure to ionising radiation in veterinary medicine, thus there is a need for increased education and training in the area. - Highlights: • Application of the Code of Practice for Veterinary Medicine is poorly adhered to. • Majority of veterinary clinics had not completed certified radiation safety course. • One-fifth of participants did not use personal radiation monitoring. • Increased education and training in area of radiation safety and protection required to generate compliance in clinics

  20. Educational Research: The State of Sweden and the Australian 2.2 World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss Lindblad, Rita; Lindblad, Sverker

    2013-01-01

    Current tendencies in educational research in Sweden are presented and compared to Australia. We here refer to; organization of research, research allocation, publication patterns, and assessments of research qualities. Different trajectories of educational research were identified, where Australian research was organized as a field of study,…

  1. School Policies on Bullying and Cyberbullying: Perspectives across Three Australian States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Caitlin; Campbell, Marilyn Anne; Spears, Barbara A; Butler, Des; Cross, Donna; Slee, Phillip; Kift, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite decades of research, bullying in all its forms is still a significant problem within schools in Australia, as it is internationally. Anti-bullying policies and guidelines are thought to be one strategy as part of a whole school approach to reduce bullying. However, although Australian schools are required to have these…

  2. Environmental radiation monitoring in Sao Paulo state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of environmental radiation monitoring that CETESB (Technological Company of Environmental Sanitation of Sao Paulo) does in influence areas of radioactive materials store of Nuclemon Minero-Quimica S.A. in the municipality of Itu, Sao Paulo State, are presented. The data comprises the period of 1983-1990 with information about concentration levels of radium-225 in underground and superficial waters of the region. On March, 1989, was detected contamination in a well near of the stores. The levels observed, its implications in terms of health risks and possible causes of event are discussed too. The goals that CETESB intends to reach in terms of monitoring of environmental radiation in Sao Paulo State are also presented. (C.M.)

  3. The results of an Australian and New Zealand Survey on the current practice of chest immobilisation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine how widely chest immobilisation and 3D planning are currently being used, a survey was sent to each Chief Radiation Therapist of Australia (31) and New Zealand (6) in 2001. Questions were focused to radiation therapy practice when planning and treating patients with lung cancer with curative intent. There was a high response rate of 86 per cent (32/37) from the Radiation Oncology Departments of Australia (26/31) and New Zealand (6/6). 87.5 per cent (28/32) of departments use chest immobilisation (Australia, 22/26; New Zealand, 6/6) and of these, 82.1 per cent (23/28) use a 3D planning system. Furthermore, 78.6 per cent (22/28) practice conformal therapy. There are three main devices for chest immobilisation that are routinely used in Australia and one in New Zealand. The devices comprise: a) Personally contoured chest immobilisation (6/22) such as Vac Fix(Registered Trade Mark). This was the only device used in New Zealand. b) Adjustable chest immobilisation (7/22), consisting of movable shoulder and hand support such as Wing Board (Med-Tec(Registered Trade Mark)) or a device created in the department. c) A device comprised of (a) and (b), utilising the personalised contoured device and adjustable hand and shoulder supports (9/22). The results also showed that 65.6% (21/32) of users of chest immobilisation and no immobilisation reported satisfaction with the devices utilised in their department. Chest immobilisation was routinely used in 90.5% (19/21) of these departments. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  4. The regulatory role of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in relation to spent fuel arising from research reactors in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the approach and role of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) in the regulatory management of spent fuel arising from research reactors in Australia, with particular emphasis on the regulatory oversight of the safe transport of spent fuel arising from the research reactors in Australia, in accordance with the International Atomic Energy Agency Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. (author)

  5. Radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five main areas of radiation regulation considered are radiation exposure in the mining of uranium and other minerals, exposure in the use of uranium in nuclear reactors, risks in the transport of radioactive materials and hazards associated with the disposal of used materials. In Australia these problems are regulated by mines departments, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and radiation control branches in state health departments. Each of these instutional areas of regulation is examined

  6. Radiation doses and associated parameters in the Western Australian mineral sand industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1983 companies involved in the mining and processing of mineral sands in Western Australia have been required to comply with radiation protection provisions contained within codes of practice adopted under the Mines Regulation Act (1976). Since 1986 the Department of Minerals and Energy of Western Australia has been directly administering the provisions of the Commonwealth of Australia publication: Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1987). This Code requires monitoring, assessment and reporting of the radiation doses received by workers. Reports of the results of monitoring and association radiation protection activities are submitted on an annual basis to the Department of Minerals and Energy. This paper summarises those monitoring results and identifies any trends in radiological conditions in the mineral sands industry work environment since 1986. Over the last seven years the number of employees in the industry has increased by 73%; the number of designated employees has decreased by 20% and the collective effective dose equivalent to the designated employee workforce has decreased by 74%. Reasons for this improvement will be described. The parameters and assumptions used in determining radiation doses for employees in this industry are reviewed and the implications of the recently adopted ICRP Task Group Lung Model for intake of thorium dust will be discussed. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Radiation-Hardened Solid-State Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for a radiationhardened (rad-hard) solid-state drive for space mission memory applications by combining rad-hard and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) non-volatile memories (NVMs) into a hybrid architecture. The architecture is controlled by a rad-hard ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) or a FPGA (field programmable gate array). Specific error handling and data management protocols are developed for use in a rad-hard environment. The rad-hard memories are smaller in overall memory density, but are used to control and manage radiation-induced errors in the main, and much larger density, non-rad-hard COTS memory devices. Small amounts of rad-hard memory are used as error buffers and temporary caches for radiation-induced errors in the large COTS memories. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA implements a variety of error-handling protocols to manage these radiation-induced errors. The large COTS memory is triplicated for protection, and CRC-based counters are calculated for sub-areas in each COTS NVM array. These counters are stored in the rad-hard non-volatile memory. Through monitoring, rewriting, regeneration, triplication, and long-term storage, radiation-induced errors in the large NV memory are managed. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA also interfaces with the external computer buses.

  8. Gamma Radiation Facilities at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The used fuel elements from the AAEC experimental reactor HIFAR are to be stored on removal from the reactor for a period of about 40 days in a water-cooled storage cell. During this period, the gamma activity and thermal heating will fall by a factor of about ten. The average gamma activity of each fuel element during storage is about 105 curies. The fuel elements will be stacked vertically during storage in a regular square pattern with a total of 48 positions at 7 in. pitch. The centre position has been substituted by an irradiation thimble 9 in. in diameter. This thimble is closely surrounded by eight symmetrically placed fuel element positions. The storage capacity is somewhat larger than the normal requirement so that there will usually be considerable choice in the arrangement and selection of fuel elements in the position close to the thimble. The experimental irradiation space is a volume about 7 in. in diameter and 2 ft. 6 in. long. Material for irradiation is to be attached to a shielding plug and will be introduced into and moved from the thimble by the reactor vertical handling flask. The shielding plug has a number of access tubes which will permit heating or cooling of the irradiated material, temperature measurement, control of atmosphere and withdrawal of liquid or gaseous reaction products. The extra expense of adding this unit to the storage cell was very small and since it uses the radiation from the fuel elements during compulsory storage, radiation costs are virtually zero. It should also give valuable information on the feasibility of using fuel elements during such storage periods as radiation sources for large scale operations. The paper also describes the radiation facilities available directly from HIFAR and plans for using fuel elements after cropping as a further radiation source. (author)

  9. Radiation monitoring handbook for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, D.A

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to detail the Radiation Monitoring (RMG) roles and procedures, and to provide technical and background information useful to RMG personnel. It has been written on the assumption that all members of the RMG have had appropriate radiation safety (Health Physics) training. Separate standing procedures, for both routine and emergency activities, are required for each port. These are incorporated in Port Safety Plans and specify the routine monitoring requirements for individual berths or anchorages and the procedures to be followed after indication of a reactor accident to a nuclear powered warship. A Visit Operation Order, issued for each Nuclear Powered warships (NPW) visit, presents information specific to that visit. Routine monitoring is performed to confirm normal conditions. The objectives of emergency radiation monitoring are: to provide early detection of a reactor accident of sufficient severity to possibly cause a major release of fission products to the environment; to determine the nature and extent of any fission product release; to provide information to assist in evaluating the accident; to assess the need and extent of required countermeasures; and to determine when the release has terminated and when affected areas have returned to normal Prepared on behalf of the Visiting Ship Panel (Nuclear), Department of Defence; 11 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs.

  10. Radiation monitoring handbook for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this handbook is to detail the Radiation Monitoring (RMG) roles and procedures, and to provide technical and background information useful to RMG personnel. It has been written on the assumption that all members of the RMG have had appropriate radiation safety (Health Physics) training. Separate standing procedures, for both routine and emergency activities, are required for each port. These are incorporated in Port Safety Plans and specify the routine monitoring requirements for individual berths or anchorages and the procedures to be followed after indication of a reactor accident to a nuclear powered warship. A Visit Operation Order, issued for each Nuclear Powered warships (NPW) visit, presents information specific to that visit. Routine monitoring is performed to confirm normal conditions. The objectives of emergency radiation monitoring are: to provide early detection of a reactor accident of sufficient severity to possibly cause a major release of fission products to the environment; to determine the nature and extent of any fission product release; to provide information to assist in evaluating the accident; to assess the need and extent of required countermeasures; and to determine when the release has terminated and when affected areas have returned to normal

  11. The contributions of solar ultraviolet radiation exposure and other determinants to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Australian adults: the AusD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimlin, Michael G; Lucas, Robyn M; Harrison, Simone L; van der Mei, Ingrid; Armstrong, Bruce K; Whiteman, David C; Kricker, Anne; Nowak, Madeleine; Brodie, Alison M; Sun, Jiandong

    2014-04-01

    The Quantitative Assessment of Solar UV [ultraviolet] Exposure for Vitamin D Synthesis in Australian Adults (AusD) Study aimed to better define the relationship between sun exposure and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration. Cross-sectional data were collected between May 2009 and December 2010 from 1,002 participants aged 18-75 years in 4 Australian sites spanning 24° of latitude. Participants completed the following: 1) questionnaires on sun exposure, dietary vitamin D intake, and vitamin D supplementation; 2) 10 days of personal ultraviolet radiation dosimetry; 3) a sun exposure and physical activity diary; and 4) clinical measurements and blood collection for 25(OH)D determination. Our multiple regression model described 40% of the variance in 25(OH)D concentration; modifiable behavioral factors contributed 52% of the explained variance, and environmental and demographic or constitutional variables contributed 38% and 10%, respectively. The amount of skin exposed was the single strongest contributor to the explained variance (27%), followed by location (20%), season (17%), personal ultraviolet radiation exposure (8%), vitamin D supplementation (7%), body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) (4%), and physical activity (4%). Modifiable behavioral factors strongly influence serum 25(OH)D concentrations in Australian adults. In addition, latitude was a strong determinant of the relative contribution of different behavioral factors. PMID:24573539

  12. Carbon prices, institutions, technology and electricity generation firms in two Australian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relationship exists for the liberalised Australian electricity supply industry between institutional structures and technological change. The traditional institutional framework has been based on centralised generation and a regulated vertically integrated monopoly structure. This paper investigates the issues of institutional and technological change using the social cost perspective (including externalities), and focuses on the imperatives of greenhouse gas emission reductions. An Australian context has been chosen for the paper, in light of a proposed price on carbon; be that via an emission trading scheme or carbon tax. The power generation sector is dominated by coal- and gas-fired power plants due to the large reserves of coal and gas available in Australia. If carbon pricing of up to AU$40/tCO2 is introduced then the merit order for dispatch changes but coal-fired power generation sources remain an option. - Research highlights: → We examined two electricity generation regimes, one privatised and one corporatised. → Under private costs a market-based model provides little change in technology. → Under social costs both economic and political incentives for technological change. → Climate change provides generators with economic incentives for technological change. → Institutional and technology change are inter-related in moving to social cost.

  13. From state care to self-care: cancer screening behaviours among Russian-speaking Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Manderson, Lenore H; Markovic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small qualitative scale study with immigrant Russian-speaking Australian women, carers of dependent family members. Drawing on in-depth interviews, we explore women's health-related behaviours, in particular their participation in breast and cervical cancer screening. Differences in preventive health care policies in country of origin and Australia explain their poor participation in cancer screening. Our participants had grown up in the former Soviet Union, where health checks were compulsory but where advice about frequency and timing was the responsibility of doctors. Following migration, women continued to believe that the responsibility for checks was their doctor's, and they maintained that, compared with their experience of preventive medicine in the former Soviet Union, Australian practice was poor. Women argued that if reproductive health screening were important in cancer prevention, then health care providers would take a lead role to ensure that all women participated. Data suggest how women's participation in screening may be improved. PMID:22951044

  14. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within ± 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry

  15. Australian G20 Presidency

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei G. Sakharov; Andrei V. Shelepov; Elizaveta A. Safonkina; Mark R. Rakhmangulov

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Australian presidency took place against the backdrop of multiple challenges in both global economy and international politics, with Ukrainian crisis, Syrian conflict, Islamic State, and Ebola. Thus, despite being an economic forum, the G20 could not avoid addressing these issues, with discussions taking place during the bilateral meetings and on the sidelines of the forum. The article attempts to analyze the Australian G20 Presidency within a functional paradigm, assessing G20 perfo...

  16. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on the conclusions of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome any obstacles before running the full experiment. The modifications to the experimental apparatus are then explained which significantly improved the quality of data collected in the full scale experiment, which was successfully executed in August 2013. At the end first findings of the new experiment are discussed.

  17. Assessing the Invasion Risk of Eucalyptus in the United States Using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doria R. Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many agricultural species have undergone selection for traits that are consistent with those that increase the probability that a species will become invasive. However, the risk of invasion may be accurately predicted for the majority of plant species tested using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment (WRA. This system has been tested in multiple climates and geographies and, on average, correctly identifies 90% of the major plant invaders as having high invasion risk, and 70% of the noninvaders as having low risk. We used this tool to evaluate the invasion risk of 38 Eucalyptus taxa currently being tested and cultivated in the USA for pulp, biofuel, and other purposes. We predict 15 taxa to have low risk of invasion, 14 taxa to have high risk, and 9 taxa to require further information. In addition to a history of naturalization and invasiveness elsewhere, the traits that significantly contribute to a high invasion risk conclusion include having prolific seed production and a short generation time. Selection against these traits should reduce the probability that eucalypts cultivated in the USA will become invasive threats to natural areas and agricultural systems.

  18. The regulatory role of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in relation to spent fuel arising from research reactors in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe the elements and performance of ARPANSA's regulatory management of spent fuel arising in Australia, with particular emphasis on the experience of ensuring compliance with the Code of Practice Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials in relation to in land surface transport of spent fuel within Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is the regulatory authority for Commonwealth entities, such as the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), who operate nuclear installations in Australia.. Nuclear installations that operate under ARPANSA facility licence include research reactors and plants for the storage and management of research reactor fuel. ANSTO is the only operator of nuclear installations in Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is also the competent Authority for inland surface transport. ARPANSA has adopted the IAEA Safety Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials domestically in the form of the ARPANSA Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (RPS 2). s the competent authority ARPANSA approves the shipment and design of a new cask, validate original certificate applying the requirements of the RPS 2. RPANSA's regulatory oversight of compliance with the requirements of its own legislation and the requirements of the Code emphasises assurance of safety in the operation of nuclear installations and the shipment of spent fuel is achieved principally by prior assessment of the operator/consignors safety case, and by compliance monitoring through regular reporting (quarterly and annually), as well as planned and reactive inspections. During the operating life of these facilities for several decades there have been no incidents which have had off-site or significant on-site, consequences. This paper will examine that experience and in particular focus on the regulatory experience of oversight of

  19. Radiation processing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In animal feeding studies, including the huge animal feeding studies on radiation sterilized poultry products irradiated with sterilizing dose of 58 kGy revealed no harmful effects. This finding is corroborated by the very extensive analysis of the radiolytic products, which indicated that the radiolytic products could not in the quantity found in the food be expected to produce any toxic effect. It thus appears to be proven with reasonable certainty that no harm will result from the proposed use of the process. Accordingly, FDA is moving forward with approvals while allowing the required time for hearings and objection. On July 5, 1983 FDA permitted gamma irradiation for control of microbial contamination in dried spices and dehydrated vegetable seasoning at doses up to 10 kGy; on June 19, 1984 the approval was expanded to cover insect infection; and additional seasonings and irradiation of dry or dehydrated enzyme preparations were approved on February 12 and June 4, respectively, 1985. In addition, in July 1985, FDA cleared irradiation of pork products with doses of 0.3 to 1 kGy for eliminating trichinosis. Approvals of other agencies, including Food and Drug Administration, Department of Agriculture, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency, and States and local communities, are usually of a technological nature and can then be obtained if the process is technologically feasible. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  1. Negative Binomial States of Quantized Radiation Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, H C; Fu, Hong-Chen; Sasaki, Ryu

    1996-01-01

    We introduce the negative binomial states with negative binomial distribution as their photon number distribution. They reduce to the ordinary coherent states and Susskind-Glogower phase states in different limits. The ladder and displacement operator formalisms are found and they are essentially the Perelomov's su(1,1) coherent states via its Holstein-Primakoff realisation. These states exhibit strong squeezing effect and they obey the super-Poissonian statistics. A method to generate these states is proposed.

  2. Regulation to create environments conducive to physical activity: understanding the barriers and facilitators at the Australian state government level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Shill

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Policy and regulatory interventions aimed at creating environments more conducive to physical activity (PA are an important component of strategies to improve population levels of PA. However, many potentially effective policies are not being broadly implemented. This study sought to identify potential policy/regulatory interventions targeting PA environments, and barriers/facilitators to their implementation at the Australian state/territory government level. METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted with senior representatives from state/territory governments, statutory authorities and non-government organisations (n = 40 to examine participants': 1 suggestions for regulatory interventions to create environments more conducive to PA; 2 support for preselected regulatory interventions derived from a literature review. Thematic and constant comparative analyses were conducted. RESULTS: POLICY INTERVENTIONS MOST COMMONLY SUGGESTED BY PARTICIPANTS FELL INTO TWO AREAS: 1 urban planning and provision of infrastructure to promote active travel; 2 discouraging the use of private motorised vehicles. Of the eleven preselected interventions presented to participants, interventions relating to walkability/cycling and PA facilities received greatest support. Interventions involving subsidisation (of public transport, PA-equipment and the provision of more public transport infrastructure received least support. These were perceived as not economically viable or unlikely to increase PA levels. Dominant barriers were: the powerful 'road lobby', weaknesses in the planning system and the cost of potential interventions. Facilitators were: the provision of evidence, collaboration across sectors, and synergies with climate change/environment agendas. CONCLUSION: This study points to how difficult it will be to achieve policy change when there is a powerful 'road lobby' and government investment prioritises road infrastructure over PA

  3. Negative Binomial States of Quantized Radiation Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Hong-Chen; Sasaki, Ryu

    1996-01-01

    We introduce the negative binomial states with negative binomial distribution as their photon number distribution. They reduce to the ordinary coherent states and Susskind-Glogower phase states in different limits. The ladder and displacement operator formalisms are found and they are essentially the Perelomov's su(1,1) coherent states via its Holstein-Primakoff realisation. These states exhibit strong squeezing effect and they obey the super-Poissonian statistics. A method to generate these ...

  4. Scleroderma in Australian aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurauskas, J; Beroukas, D; Walker, J G; Smith, M D; Ahern, M J; Roberts-Thomson, P J

    2005-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) has not been reported before in Australian Aborigines. We describe in detail a community middle-aged Aboriginal woman whose diffuse scleroderma terminated fatally with a renal crisis. Moreover, we have identified a further five Aboriginal patients on the South Australian Scleroderma Register (two with diffuse, two with limited and one with overlap scleroderma), a number consistent with that expected from the 2001 census data for our state. However, an analysis of all antinuclear antibody (ANA) requests from the Top End of Australia over a 6-year period revealed only two Aborigines with low titre anticentromere antibody (despite frequent occurrence of ANA with other specificities). Neither of these Aborigines had features of scleroderma. In conclusion, scleroderma does occur in indigenous Australians but further studies are needed to confirm the apparent infrequency of centromere-associated limited scleroderma (which is the commonest form of scleroderma in our Caucasian population). PMID:15667472

  5. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  6. 76 FR 69120 - Regulatory Changes To Implement the United States/Australian Agreement for Peaceful Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... purpose.'' Article 8(2) states that the term ``military purpose'' includes ``military nuclear propulsion... nuclear propulsion; munitions, including depleted uranium munitions; and other direct military non-nuclear... by the Commission on June 30, 1997, and published in the Federal Register on September 3, 1997 (62...

  7. The State of Information Systems in Australian Universities – South Australia Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Koronios

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the status of Information Systems (IS at the University of South Australia (UniSA. On a broad scale this study is part of a larger Case Study regarding the state of the IS Academic Discipline in Australasian Universities but, in view of the face that Information Systems degrees are offered only at one university within the State, the South Australia study, by definition, becomes a study of that university. The paper clarifies the role of IS within UniSA, with particular reference to the degree of professionalism and the impact of local contingencies on IS teaching and research. Data were gathered by means of qualitative surveys with present and former academics of the institution, as well as via statistical information. The results suggest that the State of South Australia’s IS offerings were heavily influenced during the 1990s by the soft systems and critical systems approaches to the discipline, a situation which began to change at the turn of the century; and that the curriculum is depends more heavily on industrial than political factors.

  8. The radiation equation of state and loop quantum gravity corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state for radiation is derived in a canonical formulation of the electromagnetic field. This allows one to include correction terms expected from canonical quantum gravity and to infer implications to the universe evolution in radiation dominated epochs. Corrections implied by quantum geometry can be interpreted in physically appealing ways, relating to the conformal invariance of the classical equations.

  9. Are Australian and United States Farmers Using Soil Information for Soil Health Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lobry de Bruyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil health is an essential requirement of a sustainable, functioning agroecosystem. Tracking soil health to determine sustainability at the local level largely falls to farmers, even though they often lack access to critical information. We examine farmers’ participation in gathering soil information at the farm and paddock scale over the last two decades in Australia and the United States, by reviewing national-level reporting of farmer use of soil testing and farm planning as well as qualitative research on farmer perspectives. The level of participation in soil testing and farm planning has remained stable in the last two decades, with only 25% and 30% of landholders, respectively, participating nationally, in either country. The review revealed national-level reporting has a number of limitations in understanding farmers’ use of soil information and, in particular, fails to indicate the frequency and intensity of soil testing as well as farmer motivation to test soil or what they did with the soil information. The main use of soil testing is often stated as “determining fertilizer requirements”, yet data show soil testing is used less commonly than is customary practice. In Australia and in the United States, customary practice is three and half times more likely for decisions on fertilizer application levels. The rhetoric is heavy on the use of soil testing as a decision tool, and that it guides best practices. However, given that only a quarter of farmers are soil testing, and doing so infrequently and in low densities, the level of information on soil health is poor. While farmers report consistent monitoring of soil conditions, few have consistent records of such. In contrast to the information on the poor state of soil health, there is strong farmer interest in procuring soil health benefits through changes in farm practices such as conservation tillage or cover crops, even if they are unable to demonstrate these soil health

  10. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management. PMID:26666251

  11. State supervision over radiation protection in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is aimed on the organisation of state supervision over radiation protection and some aspects of the execution of state supervision over radiation protection domain. The radiation protection in the Czech Republic has been from its beginning and it is up to now based on the same principles as in the other developed countries. It was concluded that from professional, technical as well as personnel standpoint, it is essentially provided at a relevant level. Due to changes in the economical and political spheres and in the organisational structure of state administration, the system of the Czech Republic Radiation Protection is now in phase of complete re-organisation: (1) new legislative system including ALARA, QA/QC programmes implementation should be introduced into daily practice of ionizing sources users; (2) new, higher quality licensing and inspection system should be completely introduced and strengthened

  12. Australian Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  13. Electretic State and Radiative Absorption of Polyvinyl Chloride Metal Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Krivtsov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Electretic state and radiation absorption of nanocomposites consisting of polymer matrix and metal particles filler obtained in result of electric explosion are investigated. Stable thermoelectrets of polymer metal-filled systems that have better electert properties than traditional polymer materials are obtained. Suggested method of composite polymer system creation enables to obtain shielded materials with better radiative absorption, resistant to external actions, cost-efficient.

  14. Clinical imaging centers: The role of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection is mandated in all 50 states. Regulatory control over naturally occurring and accelerator produced radioactive materials use is exclusively by state government. Although states are independent bodies there are many similarities in their regulatory approaches. Differences in the degree of regulatory control are minimized through use of the Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation and other guidance documents provided by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. This paper discusses the general requirements to obtain a license and/or registration to produce radioactive material in an accelerator, prepare an imaging agent and/or operate an imaging clinic. These requirements include minimum standards for training and experience of all principal users, equipment specifications, facilities design and construction, specific operating and emergency procedures, radiation protection surveys and monitoring of personnel exposures, ongoing training of staff, and a commitment to ALARA (the philosophy of keeping radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable). The nature and frequency of routine inspections to ensure adequate protection of workers and the public is also covered

  15. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Khoo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT for patients with localised prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years. Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus definition (absolute nadir + 2ng/mL. Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate toxicity rates, as well as the risks of bPSA failure, distant metastases, disease-specific and overall survival, at 5 and 8-years post treatment. Results: All patients completed radiotherapy without any treatment breaks. The 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 2 genitourinary (GU and gastrointestinal (GI toxicity were 6.4% and 5.8% respectively, and the 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity were both < 0.05%. The 5 and 8-year freedom from bPSA failure were 76% and 58% respectively. Disease-specific survival at 5 and 8 years were 95% and 91%, respectively, and overall survival at 5 and 8 years were 90% and 71%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm existing international data regarding the safety and efficacy of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer within an Australian setting.

  16. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sia, Joseph; Joon, Daryl Lim; Viotto, Angela; Mantle, Carmel [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Quong, George; Rolfo, Aldo [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Radiation Oncology Victoria, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Wada, Morikatsu; Anderson, Nigel; Rolfo, Maureen [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3053 (Australia); Royal Marsden Hospital & Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus definition (absolute nadir + 2ng/mL). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate toxicity rates, as well as the risks of bPSA failure, distant metastases, disease-specific and overall survival, at 5 and 8-years post treatment. All patients completed radiotherapy without any treatment breaks. The 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were 6.4% and 5.8% respectively, and the 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity were both < 0.05%. The 5 and 8-year freedom from bPSA failure were 76% and 58% respectively. Disease-specific survival at 5 and 8 years were 95% and 91%, respectively, and overall survival at 5 and 8 years were 90% and 71%, respectively. These results confirm existing international data regarding the safety and efficacy of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer within an Australian setting.

  17. All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Havranek

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Requirements of the All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic have been establishedby Regulation No. 319/2002 Sb, and its function and organisation are described in Regulation No. 27/2006Sb. The All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic consists of two components–permanentmonitoring and emergency monitoring. The activity of the whole network is provided by the State Office forNuclear Safety. The selected central authorities of the state administration participate in operation and providingparticular components. There are two different modes of the operation of these components–normal andemergency. The modes of operation are controlled by the State Office for Nuclear Safety. The activity of wholenetwork is focused on continuous monitoring of the radiation situation in the Czech Republic and on earlydetection of radiation accidents in and around the country as well as beyond it. The acquired data shall serveas a basis for adopting urgent and subsequent radiological protection provisions.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(6, pp.728-733, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1700

  18. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency 2005-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report satisfies the annual reporting requirements of the ARPANS Act in addition to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet requirements for annual reporting by Agencies. The report includes: details of the operations of the CEO and details of directions given by the Minister under section 16 at Part 1; details of the operations of ARPANSA at Part 3; details of the operations of the Radiation Health Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee and details of all reports received from the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council on matters related to radiation protection and nuclear safety or the Nuclear Safety Committee on matters related to nuclear safety and the safety of controlled facilities at Part 4; details of any breach of licence conditions by a licensee at Appendix 4; an index of compliance with the annual reporting requirements at Appendix 8

  19. Risk Assessment of Escherichia coli O157 illness from consumption of hamburgers in the United States made from Australian manufacturing beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermeier, Andreas; Jenson, Ian; Sumner, John

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the risk of contracting illness due to the consumption in the United States of hamburgers contaminated with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) of serogroup O157 produced from manufacturing beef imported from Australia. We have used a novel approach for estimating risk by using the prevalence and concentration estimates of E. coli O157 in lots of beef that were withdrawn from the export chain following detection of the pathogen. For the purpose of the present assessment an assumption was that no product is removed from the supply chain following testing. This, together with a number of additional conservative assumptions, leads to an overestimation of E. coli O157-associated illness attributable to the consumption of ground beef patties manufactured only from Australian beef. We predict 49.6 illnesses (95%: 0.0-148.6) from the 2.46 billion hamburgers made from 155,000 t of Australian manufacturing beef exported to the United States in 2012. All these illness were due to undercooking in the home and less than one illness is predicted from consumption of hamburgers cooked to a temperature of 68 °C in quick-service restaurants. PMID:24984959

  20. Using ISCCP Weather States to Decompose Cloud Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Rossow, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will examine the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect CRE (aka "cloud radiative forcing") at the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface of ISCCP weather states (aka "cloud regimes") in three distinct geographical zones, one tropical and two mid-latitude. Our goal is to understand and quantify the contribution of the different cloud regimes to the planetary radiation budget. In the tropics we find that the three most convectively active states are the ones with largest SW, LW and net TOA CRE contributions to the overall daytime tropical CRE budget. They account for 59%, 71% and 55% of the total CRE, respectively. The boundary layer-dominated weather states account for only 34% of the total SW CRE and 41% of the total net CRE, so to focus only on them in cloud feedback studies may be imprudent. We also find that in both the northern and southern midlatitude zones only two weather states, the first and third most convectively active with large amounts of nimbostratus-type clouds, contribute ",40% to both the SW and net TOA CRE budgets, highlighting the fact that cloud regimes associated with frontal systems are not only important for weather (precipitation) but also for climate (radiation budget). While all cloud regimes in all geographical zones have a slightly larger SFC than TOA SW CRE, implying cooling of the surface and slight warming of the atmosphere, their LW radiative effects are more subtle: in the tropics the weather states with plentiful high clouds warm the atmosphere while those with copious amounts of low clouds cool the atmosphere. In both midlatitude zones only the weather states with peak cloud fractions at levels above 440 mbar warm the atmosphere while all the rest cool it. These results make the connection of the contrasting CRE effects to the atmospheric dynamics more explicit - "storms" tend to warm the atmosphere whereas fair weather clouds cool it, suggesting a positive feedback of clouds on weather systems. The

  1. Radiation protection and radiation safety: CERN and its host states to sign a tripartite agreement.

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    On 15 November CERN and its Host States will sign a tripartite agreement that replaces the existing bilateral agreements in matters of radiation protection and radiation safety at CERN. It will provide, for the first time, a single forum where the three parties will discuss how maximum overall safety can best be achieved in the specific CERN context.   CERN has always maintained close collaboration with its Host States in matters of safety. “The aim of this collaboration is especially to ensure best practice in the field of radiation protection and the safe operation of CERN’s facilities”, explains Ralf Trant, Head of the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection (HSE) Unit. Until today, CERN’s collaboration with its Host States was carried out under two sets of bilateral agreements: depending on which side of the French-Swiss border they were being carried out on, a different framework applied to the same activities. This approach has b...

  2. United States Atomic Energy Commission Radiation Processing of Foods Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current progress of the United States Atomic Energy Commission's Radiation Processing of Food Programme, with emphasis on the clearance of such foods for general human consumption, product development, facility design, process conditions and economics, and commercial aspects are discussed. Semi-production processing for a number of products has now become feasible. The goal is to test laboratory data under near-commercial-scale process conditions, and to obtain cost data. Either completed, or nearing completion are semi-production facilities capable of processing various foods in quantities of thousands of pounds per hour. Among them are the Marine Products Development Irradiator, the Mobile Gamma Irradiator and the Grain Products Irradiator, for bulk and packaged grain. Plans for a Hawaiian Development Irradiator are also discussed. Activities in the United States, which are related to the commercialization of radiation processing of foods, including the use of radiation for processing fresh fish and fruits, sterilized meats and other food products, are discussed. For example, a project is under way in which several agencies of the United States Government are attempting to establish a co-operative programme with industry, aimed at the development of a pilot-plant meat irradiator. These efforts are directed towards the establishment of a large facility operated by industry which would: (a) provide necessary radiation-sterilized meats for the armed services; (b) establish process conditions and economics; and (c) introduce some of the product into the civilian economy, for commercial purposes. (author)

  3. Australian Research Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Australian Research Council(ARC) is the Australian Government's main agency for allocating research funding to academics and researchers in Australian universities.Its mission is to deliver policy and programs that advance Australian research and innovation globally and benefit the community.

  4. Are Young Muslims Adopting Australian Values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Nahid Afrose

    2008-01-01

    Recently politicians in Australia have raised concerns that some Muslims are not adopting Australian values to a sufficient extent. In this paper I explore the notion of Australian values with respect to immigrant youth. By analysing interviews with 32 Muslim students who are 15-18 years of age and of diverse backgrounds in two state schools in…

  5. The level of confidence and responsibility accepted by Australian radiation therapists in developing plans and implementing treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to assess (i) how confident Radiation Therapists (RTs) are in developing a series of plans that have increasing levels of difficulty, and (ii) the level of responsibility that they are willing to accept in relation to these treatments being implemented without the Radiation Oncologist (RO) reviewing or countersigning the plan. A self-administered questionnaire was designed around a set of six clinical planning scenarios demonstrating increasing levels of difficulty. Two hundred and three Radiation Therapists returned a completed questionnaire. All RTs indicated that they were confident to complete all the plans regardless of difficulty (p < 0.0001) except for newly qualified RTs in their first year of practice who indicated a lack of confidence with the most difficult case only. Contrary to the high levels of confidence, RTs overall were only willing to accept responsibility for implementing treatment for the two basic level scenarios (p < 0.0001). To gauge the clinical usefulness of this finding a clinical centre audit was conducted that indicated that basic level procedures account for around 30-40% of a department's workload. RTs indicated a number of issues as barriers to accepting responsibility for more advanced work.

  6. A search for narrow states in radiative upsilon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for new states produced in radiative Υ(1S) decays is accomplished by observing the inclusive photon energy spectrum. A narrow resonance in the energy spectrum indicates the existence of a new state X produced by the process Υ → γX. The analysis is based on approximately 0.44 x 106 Υ(1S) events produced at the DORIS II e+e- storage ring. These data were collected with the Crystal Ball detector between April 1983 and May 1986. This analysis finds no evidence for a new state, so upper limits on the branching ratio BR(Υ → γX) are derived, assuming the state X decays primarily to high-multiplicity hadronic final states. In particular, if the state X were a minimal Higgs particle, its primary decay mode would be to the heaviest fermion-antifermion pair energetically available. For the radiative Υ(1S) decays studied here, the heavy fermions would be c anti c or s anti s quark states, over most of the relevant Higgs' mass range. The resulting upper limit for BR(Υ(1S) → γX) is highly energy dependent but for X mass between 1.5 GeV and 8.0 GeV, the 90% confidence level upper limit is better than 8.0 x 10-4. For a Higgs' mass near 5.0 GeV, the upper limit is about 2.0 x 10-4 which is approximately equal to the lowest order calculation for the Wilczek mechanism. The Wilczek calculation with QCD radiative corrections predict branching ratios below the limits set here for all Higgs' masses

  7. A global history of Australian trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Scholars studying the globalization of Australian trees have previously emphasized the rapid natural propagation of Australian trees outside of their native habitats, believing their success to be a reversal of "ecological imperialism" from the "new world" to the "old world." This article argues that the expansion of Australian trees should not be viewed as a biological phenomenon, but as the result of a long-term attempt by powerful states and state-sponsored scientists to select and breed Australian species that could grow in a variety of climates and ecological conditions. Five non-biological factors largely determined the success of these attempts to grow Australian trees: the abundance or paucity of natural forests, state power, the amount of scientific research directed to planting Australian trees, the cost of labor, and the ability to utilize hardwood timbers and bark. This paper compares the use of Australian trees in Australia, India, and South Africa to demonstrate that biology was not the determining factor in the long-term success of many Australian genera and species. PMID:20665086

  8. Solid-state radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses the current solid state material used in advance detectors manufacturing and their pros and cons and how one can tailor them using different techniques, to get the maximum performance. The book is application oriented to radiation detectors for medical, X and gamma rays application, and good reference with in-depth discussion of detector's physics as it relates to medical application tailored for engineers and scientists.

  9. Radiation protection of hyaluronic acid in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of γ irradiation on hyaluronic acid (HA) and its molecular complex with cetyl pyridinium cations have been examined in the solid state. On the basis of the nature of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra, radical yields, and physical chemical data, there is good evidence that protectin of hyaluronic acid occurs when irradiated in a complex with cetyl pyridinium cations. The radiation protection conferred on the polyanion by the cetyl pyridinium cations is discussed in terms of energy transfer processes

  10. Australian radiation therapists' perceptions of the determinants of fitness to practise; a mixed methods focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There is a lack of clarity as to what factors affect practitioners' fitness to practise (FTP). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what radiation therapists perceived to be the key determinants of FTP and to establish the importance that they place on each determinant. Methods: A mixed methods approach using focus groups with a brainstorming activity was used for data collection. Qualitative analysis was informed by grounded theory, where the data was coded and assigned themes. Findings: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 participants. Twenty-one unique determinants of FTP were identified. Professional development, communication, competence, qualifications, ethics and professionalism were common themes in all focus groups. Knowledge, technical and professional skills were most frequently cited by participants as the three most important determinants. Self-awareness, values and ethics featured last on the list. Participants of higher seniority identified a greater variety of determinants with lesser emphasis on technical skills, when compared with junior participants. Nine determinant themes were identified initially and these were spliced to form three primary categories; Impairment, Competence, and Values/Ethics. Conclusion: The most important issues to radiation therapists were associated with technical and clinical competence. This indicates a need to further educate practitioners on the other determinants of FTP, such as values, ethics, probity, trust and criminal activity. Further investigation is required to assess practitioner behavioural responses to deviations from accepted practice and the socio-cultural context of FTP

  11. The current state of science in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualification 'according to the current state of science and technology' is regularly found in radiation protection laws. It is assumed that the state of science and technology is codified in the publications of ICRP and ICRU, the International Comissions on Radiological Protection and - Units respectively, and in the UN publication USCEAR. An investigation is made on the extent the regulations of FRD comply with this requirement. Stochastic and non-stochastic damages are differentiated and the problem of assigning equivalent whole-body doses to exposures of specific body organs is considered. (G.Q.)

  12. Phenomenological approach to introduce damping effects on radiation field states

    CERN Document Server

    D'Almeida, N G; Serra, R M; Moussa, M H Y

    2000-01-01

    In this work we propose an approach to deal with radiation field states which incorporates damping effects at zero temperature. By using some well known results on dissipation of a cavity field state, obtained by standard ab-initio methods, it was possible to infer through a phenomenological way the explicit form for the evolution of the state vector for the whole system: the cavity-field plus reservoir. This proposal turns out to be of extreme convenience to account for the influence of the reservoir over the cavity field. To illustrate the universal applicability of our approach we consider the attenuation effects on cavity-field states engineering. A proposal to maximize the fidelity of the process is presented.

  13. Radiation sterilization of fluoroquinolones in solid state: Investigation of effect of gamma radiation and electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Babita K., E-mail: singhbab2001@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India); Parwate, Dilip V. [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Dassarma, Indrani B. [Jhulelal Institute of Technology, Nagpur (India); Shukla, Sudhir K. [Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The effect of gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co source and 2 MeV electron beam was studied on two fluoroquinolone antibiotics viz norfloxacin and gatifloxacin in the solid state. The changes in reflectance spectrum, yellowness index, vibrational characteristics, thermal behavior, UV spectrum, chemical potency (HPLC) and microbiological potency were investigated. ESR measurement gave the number of free radical species formed and their population. The nature of final radiolytic impurities was assessed by studying the HPLC impurity profile. Both norfloxacin and gatifloxacin were observed to be radiation resistant, and did not show significant changes in their physico-chemical properties. They could be radiation sterilized at a dose of 25 kGy.

  14. RF radiation measurement on the indigenously developed solid state amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Solid State Radio Frequency (RF) Power Amplifier module for 300 W has been developed indigenously around 350 MHz centre frequency. A shielding enclosure for the amplifier has been designed to confine the non- ionizing - radiated and conducted emissions inside the enclosure. This design has been simulated in CST microwave studio and E fields and H fields were monitored around the enclosed amplifier. These simulated results for radiated and conducted fields have been presented here. Then the enclosure has been assembled with the amplifier. For this enclosed assembly, RF radiated and conducted field emissions were monitored outside the enclosure. In this paper, measurement methodology for the radiated and conducted field has been described. These measurements have been done according to established standards for the operating frequency range. Measurements have been carried out using an omenidirectional, frequency selective electromagnetic field measuring instrument. Measured field levels for this assembly have been compared with the ICNIRP defined safety limits for personal and occupational safety hazards. This paper describes in detail, all the measurements and their analysis. (author)

  15. Occupational radiation exposure of Kolar mining workers in Karnataka State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its short lived decay products in dwellings and in atmosphere represent the main source of public exposure from the natural radiation. Radon, thoron and their progeny present in air contribute to nearly 50% of the average effective dose received by human beings from the natural radiation environment. Radon is a radioactive noble gas produced by the decay of uranium and thorium bearing minerals in rocks, soils and building materials having half life 3.82 days. UNSCEAR reported recently indicates that there is a remarkable coherence between the risk estimates developed from epidemiological studies from miners and residential case-control radon studies. The study area is around BGML at K.G.F. The study on the natural background radiation levels from the natural sources is important to evaluate the distribution of terrestrial radionuclides and radiation doses received by the population inhabitating around the study area. The data obtained from such study may be used locally to establish it and where the controls are needed. In the present study the most accurate Solid State Track Detector (SSNTD) method is used to determine the concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny. The maximum concentration of radon of 116.4 Bq.m-3 and gamma exposure rate of 765 n Gyh-1 have been observed in the dwellings at Champion place. The low concentration of radon and gamma exposure have been observed at Robersonpet and BGML nagar. (author)

  16. BOOMERANG - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal has been prepared for the installation in Australia of a national high performance synchrotron light facility called Boomerang. The Boomerang proposal had its origin in the establishment of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) which was one of the seven Major National Research Facilities announced by the Federal Government in December 1995. The ASRP provides the opportunity and funding for Australian researchers to access international synchrotron facilities, specifically two consortia at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA and continued interaction with the Photon Factory at the KEK Laboratory in Japan. The ASRP was the successor to the Australian National Beamline Facility project (ANBF) which began in 1991 following the ASTEC inquiry titled 'Small Country - Big Science'. The Federal Government also provided funding for a Feasibility Study to determine the value of establishing an Australian-based synchrotron radiation facility. The Feasibility Study was completed in August 1998 and endorsed by the institutional members of the ASRP and the research community in general. The study concluded that, on the data available in Australia, there was a strong case for the installation of an Australian-based facility. The study considered several options for an Australian-based facility and recommended that these options and the data supporting the general conclusions receive further investigation. A mission was arranged to a select group of overseas laboratories to explore these questions in detail. The review team included a mix of scientific and industrial experience and also represented the interests of the ASRP and an Industrial Synchrotron Consortium based in Victoria. Based on the conclusions of the overseas mission and incorporating the advice of all international specialists in the design and use of synchrotron facilities consulted during the mission, the most cost-effective option was an extended

  17. Exposures to patients in Australian radiological practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paix, D. (South Australian Inst. of Tech., Adelaide)

    1983-11-01

    The findings of a 1980 Australian Radiation Laboratory study of genetic and bone-marrow doses to the population from medical, dental and chiropractic uses of ionising radiation are discussed. Attention is drawn to the large variability in patient exposure: maximum values were from five to eleven times greater than the means.

  18. Exposures to patients in Australian radiological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The findings of a 1980 Australian Radiation Laboratory study of genetic and bone-marrow doses to the population from medical, dental and chiropractic uses of ionising radiation are discussed. Attention is drawn to the large variability in patient exposure: maximum values were from five to eleven times greater than the means

  19. Intraoperative radiation therapy. State of the art and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)- a medical procedure that uses an electron beam produced by an accelerator to irradiate a cancerous area during surgery, while the patient is still on the operating table- has aroused growing interest in recent years. The use of IORT has been furthered by the development of mobile accelerators, a result due in part to collaboration between ENEA, which provided know-how on accelerators, and Italian industrial concerns. After outlining the evolution of the technologies used in IORT, the article describes the state of the art and compares the systems now on the market, reports the results of clinical applications and delineates possible further developments

  20. Modelling and forecasting Australian domestic tourism

    OpenAIRE

    George Athanasopoulos; Rob J Hyndman

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we model and forecast Australian domestic tourism demand. We use a regression framework to estimate important economic relationships for domestic tourism demand. We also identify the impact of world events such as the 2000 Sydney Olympics and the 2002 Bali bombings on Australian domestic tourism. To explore the time series nature of the data, we use innovation state space models to forecast the domestic tourism demand. Combining these two frameworks, we build innovation state s...

  1. The current state of radiation education in schools and results of the opinion survey on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, a new guideline about radioactivity was added to the government guidelines for teaching junior high school science. Since then people involved with school education have been trying to spread correct information about radioactivity. On the other hand, people's confusion in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident has clearly shown that people do not know much about radioactivity. Considering the situation, the author conducted an investigation about the current state of radiation education and carried out an opinion survey about radioactivity among adults. The investigation about education showed the following: (1) the nature of radiation, such as its permeability, and its uses were described in the government-approved textbooks; (2) basic knowledge, such as what are radiation effects, were described comprehensively in the supplementary reading recommendations made by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology; and (3) locale education committees created teaching materials such as guidance to present topics. The opinion survey had questions to judge: (1) current public understanding of radioactivity; (2) the degree of general information that people collected for themselves; (3) the degree of specific knowledge about radioactivity that people had; and (4) people's attitudes toward various problems with radioactivity in the environment. The results suggested that for radiation education the following items are important: (1) to learn that radioactivity exists in people's daily lives and is used safely in various field; (2) to get basic knowledge and better quantitative understanding of such things as radioactivity units, radiation dose and radiation effects; and (3) to acquire practical experience to use the information effectively. (author)

  2. A review to determine the appropriatness and adequacy of existing provisions for the measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia: proceedings of a workshop held at the National Standards Commission on 13 May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current arrangements for the physical measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia are reviewed. Topics covered include the roles of the National Standards Commission, the National Association of Testing Authorities, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the Australian Radiation Laboratory. Legal units for ionizing radiation and Australia's measurement standards are discussed. The role of the radiologist and industrial radiographer are examined. Existing codes standards and legislation at both Federal and State government levels are briefly outlined

  3. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim K. Turkov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  4. Visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this document is to prescribe the conditions, procedures and responsibilities for the conduct of visits to Australia by United States and Royal Navy nuclear powered warships. The Commonwealth government requires contingency arrangements to be in place at all Australian ports visited and that there be the capability to undertake radiation monitoring of the port environment. Release mechanisms such as the failure or maloperation of radioactive waste control systems within the vessel, or an accident involving the reactor plant are dealt with in the plan

  5. Predicting daily photosynthetically active radiation from global solar radiation in the Contiguous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Relationships between the daily PAR and Rs are explored across the United States. • Ten existing models for the PAR fraction estimation are analyzed by 3 years data. • Validation of all obtained models by four statistical parameters. • Introduce the best model of the daily PAR prediction for seven SURFRAD sites. - Abstract: An investigation on the daily photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) with the global solar radiation (Rs) is conducted at 7 surface radiation budget monitoring stations across the Mainland United States by exploiting a 3 years (2009–2011) data achieve. The clearness index, the diffuse fraction and the skylight brightness along with the dew point temperature and the cosine of solar zenith angle are used to generate empirical relationships for predicting PAR from Rs. Records of 2009 and 2010 are employed for model establishment, while records of 2011 are used for validation. The accuracy of the models’ predictions is evaluated by four statistics parameters, including the coefficient of determination, the root mean square error, the mean percentage error and the relative standard deviation. Results show that the polynomial model taking the clearness index as main parameter plus the cosine of solar zenith angle has the best performance out of ten proposed models. And the clearness index is capable to be the indicator for PAR prediction, as a substitute of the combination of the diffuse fraction and the skylight brightness

  6. Radiation-acoustic system for solid state research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-acoustic system (RAS) is designed for comprehensive investigation of thermoelastic (TE), thermophysical (TP) and thermodynamic (TD) characteristics of structural materials. It operation is based on radiation-acoustic method, which includes probing of investigated materials by pulsed electron beam and registration the exited thermo acoustic stress. The hardware includes a CAMAC crate, an IBM PC computer, a set of sensors, a strobe analog-digital converter, a commutators of analog signals, and drivers of physical parameters. The system allows to process thermo acoustic signals generated in beam-target interaction and to extract information about phase state, TE-, TP-, and TD characteristics of the target materials. The system was used for simultaneous measuring of phase state, TE-, TP-, and TD characteristics and for investigation of kinetics of structural phase transitions in multifunctional materials such as materials with the shape memory effect (CuAlNi, TiNi, TiNiFe, TiNiCu), rare-earth metals (Dy, Gd), high-temperature superconductors YBaCuO, piezoelectric crystals (TiBa, ZrTiPb-ceramics), polymers (PMMA, PTFE, PE) etc

  7. Australian clinical guidelines for radiological event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Health Protection Committee oversees national health protection priorities in: communicable disease outbreaks; chemical, biological or radiological incidents; mass casualty incidents; and deployment of Australian health teams overseas. The Australian Clinical Guidelines for a Radiological Event to complement existing national guidelines on chemical agents, anthrax, and smallpox. Other prompts included the need to revise the ARPANSA Guidance Manual, Medical Management of Individuals Involved in Radiation Accidents, 2000, and the requirement for specific therapeutic information regarding the indications and use of radiological decorporation agents held as part of the National Medical Stockpile. Matters identified by clinicians requiring specific guidance included: basic understanding of radiation; an approach to dose assessment; specific thresholds for initiating decorporation and other therapy; the role of gastric lavage, as contemporary practice considers this ineffective for other toxicological indications. rationale for, and detailed description of pulmonary lavage; advice on prenatal exposure to radiation; protocols for biodosimetry and other laboratory analysis. The objective was to produce a plain language guidance document for Australian clinicians on the diagnosis and management of radiation injury. It was to be based on evaluation of existing Australian documents, a literature review and consultation of appropriate specialists. Content areas included human health effects of radiation, scenario-based risk assessment and risk management, pre-hospital and hospital systems of care, management of specific injury types, radionuclide pathophysiology and decorporation protocols, biodosimetry options, individual psychological support 'and public health information, and Australian responsibilities under the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network, of the World Health Organization. The range of resources utilised in preparing the

  8. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  9. Nature of organic carbon and nitrogen in physically protected organic matter of some Australian soils as revealed by solid-state 13 C and 15 N NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied for characterising the chemical nature of the remaining organic fraction. The 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison of the residues after UV photo-oxidation and the untreated bulk soils revealed a considerable increase in condensed aromatic structures in the residues for 4 of the 5 soils. This behaviour was recently shown to be typical for char-containing soils. In the sample where no char was detectable by NMR spectroscopy, the physically protected carbon consisted of functional groups similar to those observed for the organic matter of the bulk sample, although their relative proportions were altered. The solid-state 15N NMR spectrum from this sample revealed that some peptide structures were able to resist UV photo-oxidation, probably physically protected within the core of micro aggregates. Heterocyclic aromatic nitrogen was not detected in this spectrum, but pyrrolic nitrogen was found to comprise a major fraction of the residues after photo-oxidation of the <53 μm containing soils. Acid hydrolysis of these samples confirmed that some peptide-like material was still present. The identification of a considerable amount of aromatic carbon and nitrogen, assignable to charred material in 4 of the 5 investigated soils, supports previous observations that char largely comprises the inert or passive organic matter pool of many Australian soils. The influence of such material on the carbon and nitrogen dynamics in such soils, however, requires further research. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  10. The current state and prospects of radiation protection in CSSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tasks and the role of radiation protection in the overall nuclear medicine and radiation hygiene system in Czechoslovakia is briefly described. The history of hygiene service and its place in the system of radiation protection is outlined and the mission of radiation protection is shown, namely, care of healthy living conditions vis-a-vis radiation exposure of population and health protection from the effects of the nuclear fuel cycle. (L.O.)

  11. State-selective radiative recombination cross sections of argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The n-, (n,l)- and fine-structure level state-selective radiative recombinations (RR) cross sections of argon ions Ar18+,Ar13+,Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained with the semi-classical Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field (RSCF) method and the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. It is found that for the highly charged ions with few electrons, the cross sections calculated with these three methods are in good agreement with each other. But as the number of electrons increases, the Kramer formula deviates from the RSCF and RCI results. For instance, when the energy of the incident electron is larger than 100 eV, the n-state selective cross sections of Ar7+ calculated from the Kramer formula are underestimated for more than 50%. The RSCF results are in general agreement with the RCI results. However, for the low charged ions, a clear distinction appears due to the strong configuration interaction, especially near the Cooper minimum. The n-resolved (n≤10) and total Maxwellian averaged rate coefficients are calculated, and the analytic fitting parameters are also provided. -- Highlights: ► The RR cross sections of Ar18+, Ar13+, Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained. ► The Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field and RCI methods are used. ► Results from three methods are compared with each other.

  12. Topological nature of bound states in the radiation continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhen, Bo; Lu, Ling; Stone, A Doug; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-01-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are unusual solutions of wave equations describing light or matter: they are discrete and spatially bounded, but exist at the same energy as a continuum of states which propagate to infinity. Until recently, BICs were constructed through fine-tuning parameters in the wave equation or exploiting the separability of the wave equation due to symmetry. More recently, BICs that that are both robust and not symmetry-protected (accidental) have been predicted and experimentally realized in periodic structures; the simplest such system is a periodic dielectric slab, which also has symmetry-protected BICs. Here we show that both types of BICs in such systems are vortex centers in the polarization direction of far-field radiation. The robustness of these BICs is due to the existence of conserved and quantized topological charges, defined by the number of times the polarization vectors wind around the vortex centers. Such charges can only be generated or annihilated by making large c...

  13. Assessment of terrestrial gamma-radiation in Northern State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is primarily conducted at the request of Northern State government to investigate the present of abnormal radioactivity in Northern State as claimed publicly. Activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137Cs in soil samples collected from different locations have been measured using high resolution γ-spectrometry. The average concentration were 19±4 Bg/kg for 238U, 47±11 Bq/kg for 232Th, 317±65 Bq/kg for 40K and 2.26 Bq/kg for 137Cs which means a very little contribution to the total exposure. The obtained results were found to be lower than the corresponding global values reported in the UNSCEAR publication for normal background areas. Absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1m from the ground was calculated using six sets of dose rate conversion factors and corresponding annual effective dose was estimated. On the average, the values obtained were 52.90, 50.43, 50.41, 43.54, 44.07 and 45.85 nGy.h-1 with corresponding annual effective doses of 64.93, 61.89, 61.87, 53.43, 54.08 and 56.27 μSv/y respectively. These values lie with in the worldwide range for normal radiation areas. The results obtained using these different DRCFs, although the approach used for their estimation was different, revealed no remarkable variation. Using Geographical Information System (GIS), prediction maps for concentration of 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs was produced. Also a map for absorbed dose rate in air at a height of one-meter above ground level was produced, which showed a trend of increase form the west towards south-east of the State.(Author)

  14. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  15. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Murat; Hayrabolulu, Hande; Taşkın, Pınar; Torun, Murat; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of ionizing radiation on xanthan gum was investigated. Xanthan samples were irradiated with gamma rays in air at ambient temperature in the solid state at different dose rates and doses. Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. The calculated G(S) values are 0.0151±0.0015, 0.0144±0.0020, 0.0098±0.0010 μmol/J and k values are 1.4×10-8±1.4×10-9, 1.3×10-8±2.0×10-9, 8.7×10-9±1.0×10-9 Gy-1 for 0.1, 3.3 and 7.0 kGy/h dose rates, respectively. It was observed that the dose rate was an important factor controlling the G(S) and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Considering its use in food industry, the effect of irradiation on rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions was also investigated and flow model parameters were determined for all dose rates and doses. Rheological analysis showed that xanthan solution showed non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour and ionizing radiation does not change the non-Newtonian and shear thinning flow behaviour of xanthan gum solutions in concentration ranges of this work. It was determined that, Power Law model well described the flow behaviour of unirradiated and irradiated xanthan solutions.

  16. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy

    OpenAIRE

    Searles Andrew; Drahos Peter; Henry David; Doran Evan; Faunce Thomas; Pekarsky Brita; Neville Warwick

    2005-01-01

    Abstract On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora), it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respec...

  17. Aboriginal Agency and Marginalisation in Australian Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Moore

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is often argued that while state rhetoric may be inclusionary, policies and practices may be exclusionary. This can imply that the power to include rests only with the state. In some ways, the implication is valid in respect of Aboriginal Australians. For instance, the Australian state has gained control of Aboriginal inclusion via a singular, bounded category and Aboriginal ideal type. However, the implication is also limited in their respect. Aborigines are abject but also agents in their relationship with the wider society. Their politics contributes to the construction of the very category and type that governs them, and presses individuals to resist state inclusionary efforts. Aboriginal political elites police the performance of an Aboriginality dominated by notions of difference and resistance. The combined processes of governance act to deny Aborigines the potential of being both Aboriginal and Australian, being different and belonging. They maintain Aborigines’ marginality.

  18. Radiation sterilization of vitamins - studies on the radiolysis and radiation protection of vitamins in aqueous systems and the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization of pharmaceutical products may cause their radiation degradation and loss in their potency. Radiation degradation may even give rise to new products whose effects on the organisms could be different from the parent substances. Extent of radiolytic decomposition of vitamins thiamine, nicotinamide, riboflavine and pyridoxine was studied under controlled conditions so that either only the hydrated electrons (esub(aq)) or only hydrogen atom (H) and hydroxyl radical react with these molecules. Experiments were also conducted in which scavengers for these species were added to reduce radiolytic degradation of the vitamins. It was found that irradiation of vitamins in the frozen aqueous state and with addition of glucose reduces radiolytic degradation and their irradiation in dry solid state causes no detectable damage. The last finding indicates that the best method for radiation sterilization of vitamin preparations may be to irradiate the components in the dry solid state and then compound them together. (M.G.B.)

  19. Moscow State University near-Earth radiation monitoring satellite system: current status and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Radiation measurements using instruments have been designed and manufacturing in the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University and installed onboard different satellites,i.e. LEO -"Meteor", ISS, GPS - GLONASS, GEO - "Electro" are presented as a basis of radiation monitoring system for control of radiation condition with a goal for to decrease radiation risk of spacecraft's damage on different orbits. Development of this system including radiation measurements onboard "Lomonosov"(LEO) satellite will be presented as well together with future project of multispacecraft LEO system for radiation monitoring.

  20. State of the art of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy has a critical role in the treatment of esophageal cancer. To improve the treatment outcome of radiotherapy, not only strengthening the treatment intensity but also decreasing the long term toxicity is needed. To reduce the long term cardiopulmonary toxicity of chemoradiation, JCOG is now running a clinical trial which combines three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and mild irradiation dose. New techniques of radiation therapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or particle therapy are also promising in both treatment intensity and decreased toxicity. (author)

  1. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As we move into the new millennium, it is important that we understand the effect which radiation has on biological tissues. An understanding of the importance of these effects is essential in a number of areas including radiation therapy for cancer treatment and space travel as we attempt to proceed further from Earth for longer periods of time. Nanodosimetry enables the energy deposition of ionizing radiation on a DNA scale to be determined. This is extremely important for not only biological applications but also electronic applications, as the effect of radiation on microelectronics needs to be determined before they are deployed or installed. However, further investigation is required to link the output of the gas nanodosimeter to the actual effect of the radiation on a biological system. The purpose of this research is to conduct nanodosimetric measurements of proton radiation fields at the proton accelerator of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) in an attempt to verify a Monte Carlo simulation system. To achieve this, these measurements will be compared to the output from a Monte Carlo simulation system that is being developed to simulate the nanodosimetric spectra of the LLUMC beamline. Once verified, this Monte Carlo system will provide a very powerful tool with which to measure the effect of radiation fields on a nanoscopic level without submitting humans or expensive electronics to such a potentially damaging environment

  2. Changes in perceptions of radiation with social state's alternation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate changes in college student perceptions of radiation over time, we performed questionnaire surveys in November 1992 and January 2000. The subjects were students of the humanities or social sciences, numbering 290 (19.1±1.1 y) in 1992 and 226 (19.9±2.0 y) in 2000. The questionnaires had two sections. First, the students were asked to list words which they associated with the stimulus word 'radiation'. Next, they performed a ten stage-evaluation (0 to 10 points) of the degree of familiarity', 'danger', 'usefulness', and 'acceptability' with regard to 26 items which included radiation and things related to radiation. In both surveys, the top three responses to the stimulus word 'radiation', were roentgen', 'atomic bomb', and 'nuclear power'. The students in 2000 associated the word 'radiation' with words such as 'Tokaimura' which were related to recent accidents. The evaluation ratings of 'familiarity', usefulness', and 'acceptability' for nuclear power changed significantly between 1992 and 2000 (p<0.01). The 'acceptability' ratings for radiation and X-ray photos were negatively correlated with those of 'danger'. This negative correlation coefficient showed an increase between 1992 and 2000 (p<0.05). In conclusion, it was apparent that the students are now showing greater concern about radiation and nuclear power. (author)

  3. Measurements of external radiation in United States dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a survey of terrestrial gamma radiation levels are reported for the United States. This database represents a total of 1074 measurements in and around 247 different dwellings in several different areas of the country. The absorbed dose rate in air outdoors was found to range between 14 and 118 nGy.h-1 and averaged 46.6. nGy.h-1 , while for indoors it ranged between 12 and 160 nGy.h-1 and averaged 37.6 nGy.h-1. Apart from regional differences in the terrestrial gamma levels, variations of up to a factor of 2 can be seen in the same geographical area. Variations within a house are typically large, with basement living areas averaging 50% higher than second-floor areas. Houses of full brick construction had average indoor levels 50% higher than those for wood frame houses. The material used for interior wall construction was not found to strongly influence the indoor dose rates except for rooms containing brick, cinder block or stone. For wood frame houses, including those of brick veneer exteriors, a linear regression analysis indicates that the average indoor dose rate can be reasonably well predicted based on a constant, which relates to the building contribution, and a shielding factor for the outdoor dose rate. Using the data collected in this survey and the population weighted mean outdoor absorbed dose rate in air reported for the US, the corresponding mean indoor value is estimated to be 37 nGy.h-1. This value is in the low end of the range reported for other countries and is about half the estimated worldwide average of 70 nGy.h-1. (author)

  4. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jepsen

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband) stations (see fig. 1 and table 1). The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  5. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jepsen

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband stations (see fig. 1 and table 1. The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  6. Analysis of microscopic magnitudes of radiative blast waves launched in xenon clusters with collisional-radiative steady-state simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative shock waves play a pivotal role in the transport energy into the stellar medium. This fact has led to many efforts to scale the astrophysical phenomena to accessible laboratory conditions and their study has been highlighted as an area requiring further experimental investigations. Low density material with high atomic mass is suitable to achieve radiative regime, and, therefore, low density xenon gas is commonly used for the medium in which the radiative shocks such as radiative blast waves propagate. In this work, by means of collisional-radiative steady-state calculations, a characterization and an analysis of microscopic magnitudes of laboratory blast waves launched in xenon clusters are made. Thus, for example, the average ionization, the charge state distribution, the cooling time or photon mean free paths are studied. Furthermore, for a particular experiment, the effects of the self-absorption and self-emission in the specific intensity emitted by the shock front and that is going through the radiative precursor are investigated. Finally, for that experiment, since the electron temperature is not measured experimentally, an estimation of this magnitude is made both for the shock shell and the radiative precursor. -- Highlights: •We analyze microscopic magnitudes of plasmas for typical conditions found in laboratory blast waves in clusters of gases. •A particular experiment of blast waves launched in xenon is analyzed. •We perform a collisional-radiative steady-state diagnostics of the temperature of the blast wave. •We study the opacity effects in the kinetics calculations and the intensity in the shock shell of the blast wave. •We analyze self-absorption and self-emission in the radiative precursor

  7. European Radiation Dosimetry Group: History, State of Art, Perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spurný, František

    Bratislava, 2003, s. 1-4. ISBN 80-88806-43-7. [IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe.. Bratislava (SK), 22.09.2003-26.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0151; GA ČR GA202/01/0710 Grant ostatní: EC project(XE) FIGM-CT2000-00068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : history-EURADOS * radiation protection * radiation therapy Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  8. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Selenium is an environmentally relevant trace metal, recognised not only for its role as an essential trace nutrient in living systems, but also for its devastating impacts at elevated concentrations, including fish deformities and death from selenium-laden waters and sediment. There are escalating concerns that the consumption of selenium-contaminated foods (e.g. fish and bivalves) will have an impact on human health. A comprehensive understanding of organic and inorganic selenium tissue concentrations is required if we are to assess the toxic effects of selenium in marine organisms and the flow-on effects to human consumers. Currently, whole sediment bioassays measuring total metal concentration effects are being used to assess the toxicity of metal contaminated sediments. However, for most sediment-dwelling organisms, sediments particles, pore waters and overlying waters, as well as food sources (e.g. algae) may all contribute to the accumulation of metal contaminants. Furthermore, the species of metal (and not the total metal concentration) in each of these compartments will also modify metal toxicity and uptake rates. For most species routinely used in toxicity tests, the relative importance of the different contaminant exposure pathways (overlying waters, sediment, food) has not been evaluated. If we know which compartment(s) induce toxic responses in the test organisms, we can use that knowledge to more effectively manage contaminated environments. The radiotracer 75Se produced in HIFAR was used to determine the uptake routes and accumulation sites in biological organisms. Comparatively, high sensitivity of gamma counter techniques and minimal sample preparation to ICP-MS and AAS provided for a faster and more efficient method to monitor the uptake of selenium. Biodistribution studies evaluating the bioavailability of Se from water, sediment and algae in the endemic Australian marine bivalve Anadara trapezia is presently under investigation and

  9. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Australian yabby Cherax destructor is tolerant of exposure to many trace metals including Zn and Cd. However it is not known if this tolerance is a result of a low rate of uptake of heavy metals by the yabby, increased excretion, or a combination of both. We now report on the use of radioisotopes of two environmental trace metals 65Zn and 109Cd to monitor the uptake by C. destructor of the essential metal Zn and the non-essential metal Cd, at low metal concentrations exposures. Juvenile C. destructor were exposed to three concentrations of Zn with 65Zn as a tracer for up to 48 hours. Yabbies were sampled at specific time intervals and counted live in tubes with freshwater using a gamma scintillation counter. Water was also sampled and counted at the same time intervals. At the end of the uptake phase, yabbies were dissected into the hepatopancreas, exoskeleton, tail muscle and 'the rest' and each body compartment counted individually. The associated radioactivity was used to calculate the proportional compartmentalization of the trace metals within the body tissues. A similar experiment was repeated with various concentrations of Cd and 109Cd used to monitor its uptake at various time intervals. Unlike Zn, where its accumulation only plateaued at 72 hour the rate of uptake of Cd reached a plateau after 24 hours. A competitive study was also conducted with the yabbies. Here the yabbies were exposed to similar concentrations of Cd and Zn simultaneously and yabbies were counted to determine Zn and Cd at various intervals. The estimated rates for C. destructor are compared to those of other freshwater crustaceans in order to deduce whether its tolerance to trace metal toxicants is based on reduced rates of uptake

  10. European radiation dosimetry group: history, state of art, perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) was established in 1981. Working Group operating in connection with EURADOS program are listed. Key milestones of EURADOS activities since the beginning up to now are presented. Future actions of the EURADOS are reviewed

  11. Current state of methodological and decisions for radiation treatment of blood, its components and products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordeev A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents currently used blood transfusion media — components and blood products, therapeutic effects, reactions and complications of blood transfusion, use of radiation treatment for blood transfusion fluids. There had been discussed in detail the practice of radiation processing of blood components and for the prevention of reaction "graft versus host" and studies of plasma radiation treatment for its infectious safety. There was presented the current state of techniques and technical solutions of radiation treatment of transfusion-transmissible environments. There were also considered an alternative to radiation treatment of blood.

  12. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ethylene, propylene and their copolymers have a wide range of applications in the manufacture of medical goods. These items generally require sterilization, which can be done by autoclaving or treatment with ethylene oxide gas. However, these methods can lead either to oxidation of the polymers or inclusion of a carcinogenic gas, so radiation sterilization offers a preferable alternative. Radiolysis of polymers can lead to yellowing and loss of tensile properties, so radiation stabilizers are added to the polymers to avoid these undesirable effects. One the types of stabilizer used is a low molecular weight compound that can scavenge radicals. These are referred to as mobilizers. In this paper the effectiveness of dioctylphthalate, DOP, as mobilizer for a copolymer of ethylene and propylene, produced for the manufacture of medical syringes, will be discussed

  13. Effect of low sensitizing radiation doses on immune state during mammary gland cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of clinical application of preoperational radiotherapy of mammary gland cancer at low sensitizing radiation doses (0.1 Gr) before using the main single dose (1.9 Gr) for modification of tumor radiosensitivity and increase of efficiency of radiotherapy are presented. Small radiation doses are stated to promote decrease of the number of skin radiation reactions, conservation of blood and T-immunosystem parameters within the limits of physiologic oscillations

  14. Evaluation of Background Ionization Radiation Level in some selected Dumpsites in Delta State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Avwiri, O Gregory; Emmanuel, O Esi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of background Ionization radiation level (BIR) in some selected Dumpsites in Uvwie, Udu and Ughelli North Local government area of Delta State, Nigeria. Background ionization radiation measurements were carried out in five Dumpsites. An in- situ measurement was done using a well calibrated nuclear radiation meters Radalert-100 and a geographical positioning system (GPS). Readings were taken once in a week for one month in ten different locations within eac...

  15. Solid state microdosimeter for radiation monitoring in spacecraft and avionics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrument is described which is designed to characterize the complex radiation environments inside spacecraft and airplanes in terms of the risk of SEEs in the present and planned microelectronic systems and in terms of the risk to flight crews and passengers

  16. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1976 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  17. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1979 and 1980 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research estimated. (author)

  18. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1975 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  19. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1978 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research appreciated. (author)

  20. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1974 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in vitro and in vivo, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, the mechanisms of protection of radioprotective agents and the trends in this field of research are described. (author)

  1. Solid-state radiation detectors for active personal dosimetry and radiations source tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the design of the readout electronics using PIN diode radiation detector of 5 mm thickness for nuclear safety and active personal dosimetry. Our effort consisted in designing and fabricating the electronics to reflect the needs of gamma radiations dosimetry and hybrids PIN diode arrays for charged particle detectors. We report results obtained during testing and characterizing the new devices in gamma fields, operating at room temperature. There were determined the energy spectrum resolution, radiation hardness and readout rate. Also, data recording methods and parallel acquisition problems from a transducer matrix are presented. (authors)

  2. Consequences for central nervous system functional state of exposure to ionizing radiation modification with antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: to estimate the pattern of ionizing radiation effects modification by antioxidants using central nervous system functional state indices. The studies were carried out using 84 rats. Beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol were found to significantly improve conditioned activity indices level of the animals exposed to ionizing radiation and emotional-pain stress

  3. Mean annual solar radiation in the United States Pacific Northwest (1991-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent mean annual solar radiation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...

  4. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Methylproamine is the current lead compound of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotectors being developed in the Research Laboratories at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. The salient features of methylproamine are its radioprotective potency and the generic nature of the apparent radioprotective mechanism. Like the 'classic' aminothiol radioprotectors exemplified by amifostine, methylproamine suppresses the initial radiochemical damage induced in DNA by ionising radiation. However, survival curve studies with cultured cells have demonstrated that methylproamine is 100-fold more potent than WR1065, the active metabolite of amifostine. The radioprotective mechanism seems to involve reduction by the DNA-bound drug of transient radiation-induced oxidising species on DNA. This mechanism implies some electron transfer along DNA, from the DNA-bound drug to the oxidising species. In vivo radioprotection of mouse lung, GI tract and bone marrow has been demonstrated following systemic administration of methylproamine to mice. The commercial potential of radioprotectors resides in two distinct arenas. Until recently, most of our efforts have focused on the use of methylproamine to protect normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy patients, but a quite different opportunity arises from the imperative to develop countermeasures to the threat of radiation terrorism. Our prospects in both arenas have been lifted by the results of synthesis and screening of a pilot library of ∼50 methylproamine analogues, promising the emergence of new lead drugs. In particular, although methylproamine is a potent radioprotector, at higher concentrations it becomes cytotoxic, but one member of the pilot library shows a wider efficacy 'window'. We plan to continue this lead optimisation process by synthesis and screening of a much larger library of analogues, and we are seeking the support of a commercial partner

  5. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process is a controlled/'living' free radical polymerisation process that was invented in Australia by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSRIO) group led by Ezio Rizzardo. RAFT polymerisation has proven to be a powerful tool for the synthesis of polymers with predetermined molecular weight and low polydispersity. The RAFT process is capable of effecting living free radical polymerisation control over a great variety of monomers (eg (meth)acrylates, styrenes, acrylamides, vinyl acetate). The RAFT technique uses thiocarbonylthio compounds to mediate the polymerisation via a reversible chain transfer process. This leads to the establishment of an equilibrium under which all the propagating chains have approximately the same chain length at the same instant of time. The RAFT agent typically possesses a thiocarbonylthio group (S=C-S) with substituents R (radical leaving group) and Z (activating/stabilising group), which govern the reaction kinetics and the degree of structural control. In 2001, we reported the synthesis of RAFT agents (phenyl dithio acetates) that can be applied at low/ambient temperatures in the polymerization of alkyl acrylates and styrene. Low/ambient temperature RAFT agents allow the application of γ-radiation as source of initiation. The combination of γ-radiation and ambient temperature RAFT agents allows performing living polymerization at ambient temperature up to high conversions. This technique also opens the possibility to graft narrow polydisperse polymers from existing polymer surfaces. We have applied RAFT polymerization in conjunction with γ-radiation to graft various monomers (e.g. styrene, m-isopropenyl-α,α'-dimethylbenzyl isocyanate (TMI), N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) from solid polypropylene phases that can be used for applications in combinatorial chemistry (eg peptide synthesis and scavenger reactions)

  6. Networked solutions of radiation control of state borders and urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Prevention of illicit trafficking in radioactive and nuclear materials through state borders as well as the disperse of radioactive materials in urban area is a challenging task of national security departments in many countries. To solve this task, appropriate actions of personnel on-site equipped by radiation detectors such as fixed radiation portal monitors or mobile personal radiation detectors are required. However, users of radiation equipment such as Customs, Border Guard and Police Services often perform radiation control as additional responsibility to their main duties. Furthermore, these users have no sufficient expertise in radiation control and need real-time remote expert help to interpret readings of radiation equipment and expert support in decision making process. Polimaster has developed complete solution called Nuclear Protection Network system (NPNET) for high-effective radiation control on State Borders as well as inside a country. NPNET system intended for efficient interaction and on-line data exchange between a user, radiation control instrument, for example a personal radiation detector or radioisotope identifier, and remote Command Center. Availability of such system allows to solve more efficiently tasks of detection, localization and identification of ionizing radiation sources, to properly interpret false alarms (e.g. at detention of a passenger having passed radio-therapy etc.) and effectively prevent illicit trafficking radioactive and nuclear materials. The NPNET system can cover territory as large as city or even a state and provides assistant of infinite number of independent user groups. NPNET has a module structure and could be easily adapted to any specific user's requirements. Thus, the radiation mobile system NPNET is an effective tool for prevention of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials and is recommended for use by Border guards, Customs, Securities and emergency situations services. (author)

  7. [Radiation-induced cancers: state of the art in 1997].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J M

    1997-01-01

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing with radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patients given well-known doses in well-defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of "clusters" of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low doses delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these "high" doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tabacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both in medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonably expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation

  8. Radiation-induced cancers: a 1997 state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing whit radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patient given well-known doses in well defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of 'clusters' of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low does delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these 'high' doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tobacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonable expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation-induced neoplasms

  9. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ilinois (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  10. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members

  11. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  12. Study on the immunity state of mouse exposed to mobile phone radiation during embryonic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of mobile phone radiation on mouse which exposed to radiation during embryonic phase. Methods: Pregnant mice were exposed to mobile phone radiation. The mice's netrophile phage percentage and spleen lymphocyte transformation rate were detected respectively 2 months after birth. Results: The netrophile phage percentage of experimental mice was seemly the same as that of control group, and there was no significant difference (P>0.05), but the spleen transformation rate showed the diverse trend. Conclusion: The specific cellular immunity of mice, which ex- posed to mobile phone radiation during embryonic phase, was seen to be in a state of decreasement. (authors)

  13. Contemporary state of plutonium and americium in the soils of Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: At present, the most important alpha-emitting radionuclides of Chernobyl origin are Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241. They are classified as the most dangerous group of radionuclides in view of the long half-lives and high radiotoxicity. The main part of alpha-emitted radionuclides is located within the Palesse State Radiation-Ecological Reserve. One of the most important factors determining the radioecological situation in the contaminated ecosystems is the physicochemical forms of radionuclides in a soil medium. Radionuclide species determine the radionuclide entrance into the soil solutions, their redistribution in soil profiles and the 'soil - plant' and the 'soil - surface, ground or underground water' systems as well as spreading beyond the contaminated area. The present work is devoted to investigation of state and migration ability of plutonium and americium in soils of the Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve after more than 20 years from the Chernobyl accident. The objects of investigation were mineral and organic soils sampled in 2008 with the step of 5 cm to the depth of 25-30 cm. The forms of plutonium and americium distinguishing by association with the different components of soil and by potential for migration in the soil medium were studied using the method of sequential selective extraction according to the modified Tessier scheme. Activities of Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241 in the samples were determined by the method of radiochemical analysis with alpha-spectrometer radionuclide identification. The dominant part of plutonium and americium in the soils is in immobile forms. Nowadays, radionuclide portions in water soluble and reversibly bound forms do not exceed 9.4 % of radionuclide content in the soil. In mineral soil samples, the radionuclide portions in these fractions exceed the corresponding portions in organic ones. In both mineral and organic soils, the portions of mobile americium are higher than plutonium. The

  14. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cell survival studies can provide important information on the behaviour of various cell lines when exposed to a wide range of different radiations. Such studies are an important feature of microdosimetry and nanodosimetry projects that are currently being conducted in collaboration between LLUMC and the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong. Irradiation with light ions (protons and helium) of low energies requires very thin samples (10μm or less) in order to limit the energy degradation and the resulting spread of linear energy transfer (LET) within the sample. The problem in such studies is to be able to reproducibly produce thin films of cells for irradiations. If cells are allowed to attach to surfaces, they show a wide range of shapes and sizes. In addition, the thickness of the fluid layer surrounding the cell, needed to keep them viable, may vary from sample to sample and is subject to evaporation if the cells are kept at ambient temperatures. Thus, typical techniques used in radiobiology will are subject to random and systematic errors, and a better approach is needed for reproducible track-segment experiments. A test strip has been designed at LLUMC and is currently being implemented into current radiobiology projects. However, before full integration of this system, GEANT4 Monte Carlo studies were conducted in order to assess the change in energy and LET from a range of particles proceeding though the sample in order to assess its suitability to such studies. The design of this system and the results of the Monte Carlo study will be presented here

  15. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a wide band-gap compound semiconductor material used in room temperature radiation detection applications. The relatively high average Z of this material, in comparison to that of silicon or germanium, provides good stopping power for gamma-ray detection with moderate energy resolution characteristics. These properties make the material attractive for use in radiation detection applications where small physical dimensions and reasonable spectral resolution are required. In order to obtain high performing CZT based detectors it is important to select the highest quality CZT material, in terms of the crystallographic purity, for detector fabrication. In this work a variety of characterisation tools were used to analyse substrates of single crystal CZT material for stoichiometry of the crystallographic defects which give rise to deep and shallow energy levels within the bandgap. The energy levels and relative population of the deep levels were characterised showing non-uniformity for the deep levels in single crystal CZT. The charge collection properties of a CZT test structure fabricated from the most defect free material was investigated using the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) with 3 MeV protons. The results show the charge collection properties below and surrounding the perimeter of the junction which result from a combination of drift collection and charge diffusion. The results of this analysis are to be used for an improved simulation using GEANT4 of the charge transport properties in a CZT based Compton suppression spectrometer. GEANT4 is being used to optimise the configuration and new concepts for improvements to the detector design for particular applications

  16. Radiation sterilization of ephedrine in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the e-beam ionising radiation of energy 9.96 MeV in doses 25-800 kGy on the stability of solid ephedrine hydrochloride (1R,2S)-(-)-2-methylamino-1-phenyl-1-propanol hydrochloride) have been studied. These effects have been observed using the following analytical methods: organoleptic (form, colour, smell, clarity of solution), scanning electron microscope SEM, pH measurement, chirality and water content measurement (Karl Fischer method), spectrometric methods (UV, FT-IR, EPR), chromatography (TLC), and combined chromatography (TLC-UV, GC-MS). Even the standard sterilisation dose of 25 kGy has been found to cause a change in colour from white to pale yellow, the appearance of free radicals in the concentration of 3.05 x 1015 spin g-1, and about 1% loss of the content. The effects of higher doses 50-800 kGy have shown that radiodegradation degree of the compound is proportional to the dose applied. The main product of radiodegradation, formed at a yield of G = 17.17 x 10-7 mol J-1, has been identified as 2-methylamino-1 phenyl-1-propanone (methcathinone, ephedrone), a psychoactive compound of the activity similar to that of amphetamine. For the above reasons ephedrine hydrochloride can not be subjected to radiative sterilisation with a dose of 25 kGy, however, assuming sufficiently low microbiological contamination of the initial substance, lower doses could be probably used for sterilisation purposes. Our results have not confirmed the earlier reports from 1970s on the resistance of ephedrine to ionising radiation in doses up to 60 kGy. (authors)

  17. State of radioactive waste management is power reactor facilities and state of radiation exposure of workers who engaged in radiation works in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the summary of the reports on radiation control and others submitted by those who installed practical power reactor facilities based on the relevant law in fiscal 1993. The amounts of release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes were sufficiently smaller than the target value of the yearly release control for attaining the target value of dose that the public around the facilities receive. As to the state of control of radioactive solid waste, the amount of drum generation tended to decrease year by year, and the cumulative amount to be preserved tended to level off. The dose equivalent that the individuals who engaged in radiation works received was smaller than the limit value in all nuclear power stations. The total dose equivalent for those workers in fiscal 1993 was 86.65 man Sv. Hereafter, the automation and remote operation of works, the water quality control for reducing crud and so on will be promoted to reduce radiation exposure. The reference data on the state of control of gaseous, liquid and solid wastes, and the state of control of radiation exposure of workers are attached. (K.I.)

  18. Present state of the combined treatment with radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of malignancies in which the results have been markedly improved by combined treatment with radiation and chemicals for the past decade, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localized in head and neck and intra-oral carcinoma are presented. In the management of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the authors stressed the following: 1) Rappaport's classification has been a help to evaluate the prognosis; 2) lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring should not be included in nodal lymphoma, and also it should be separated from extranodal lymphoma as well, because of different prognosis; 3) It seems that some kinds of chemotherapy would have a role in improving the results of radiotherapy in the management of radiotherapy, even in localized cases. In some types of intra-oral carcinomas, bleomycin was found to be useful in the combined treatment with radiation as follows: 1) A minimum required dose for local control of intra-oral carcinomas could be a combination of 30Gy in 3 weeks and 100mg bleomycin during the same period. 2) Although the end results of patients with carcinoma of tongue or floor of mouth have not been improved by this approach, there was marked improvement in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum. 3) For the treatment, the side effect as limiting factor was mucositis, and none of the cases of the series developed pulmonary complication. In the cases controlled by initial combined treatment, no one developed troubles of the mandible, in the follow-up study for the past 10 years. (author)

  19. Application of solid state nuclear track detectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the current status of the application of nuclear track detectors with emphasis on recent developments in the field of radiation protection. Track etch detectors have been used for the measurements of low level radiation in the environment, fast neutron and radon daughter inhalation dose. Recent developments in the field of dosimetry seem to be promising. In fast neutron dosimetry, track etch detectors can be used without inclusion of fissile materials by using the electrochemical etching technique. These detectors can provide important information in the energy range upto 250 keV. Survey of this range of energy with TLD is difficult because they are extremely energy dependent and over-respond to low energy neutrons. Measurement of radon using track detectors can help to lower the cost of the radon dosimeters. Certain detectors are sensitive to alpha particles from radon and their progeny. Higher sensitivity permits their use in a passive type of personnel dosimeter, which does not require the troublesome aspects of air sampling for the collection of radon daughter samples. (author), 38 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs

  20. Licensing of the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)'s Replacement Research Reactor has been submitted to a comprehensive licensing process of which peer review has been a fundamental part. Following Australian Regulation, an application for a site licence was the first step supported by an Environmental Impact Statement approved by The Minister for the Environment and Heritage, and a Reference Accident Analysis. After the site licence had been granted and the contract awarded to the Designer and Constructor, INVAP S.E:, a 2500 page Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was submitted by ANSTO to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), which conducted its review. ARPANSA requested that the PSAR be also reviewed by an experts mission from the International Atomic Energy Agency. The PSAR was also reviewed by the Argentine Regulatory Body, it was submitted to public examination in Australia and it was reviewed by international experts hired as consultants by several Australian organisations. A public forum was also held in Sydney. The Regulator, the applicant and the Designer-Constructor maintained constant interaction during the whole process, so that questions, comments and observations that arose from the review of the PSAR were fed back to the designers. This process allowed for a robust, safe design enriched by the results of the safety analysis and review process. (author)

  1. Exotic and excited-state meson spectroscopy and radiative transitions from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We discuss recent progress in extracting the excited meson spectrum and radiative transition form factors using lattice QCD. We mention results in the charmonium sector, including the first lattice QCD calculation of radiative transition rates involving excited charmonium states, highlighting results for high spin and exotic states. We present recent results on a highly excited isovector meson spectrum from dynamical anisotropic lattices. Using carefully constructed operators we show how the continuum spin of extracted states can be reliably identified and confidently extract excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers and states of high spin. This spectrum includes the first spin-four state extracted from lattice QCD. We conclude with some comments on future prospects.

  2. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Khoo; Maureen Rolfo; Nigel Anderson; Morikatsu Wada; Aldo Rolfo; George Quong; Carmel Mantle; Angela Viotto; Joseph Sia; Daryl Lim Joon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according t...

  3. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In recent years, we have developed an ion counting nanodosimeter capable of measuring the distribution of radiation-induced ions in a millimetric, wall-less sensitive volume in a low-pressure gas. The sensitive volume models an equivalent nanometric volume of DNA. At Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC), this device has been equipped with a silicon microstrip telescope that tracks the primary particles, allowing correlation of nanodosimetric data with particle position relative to the sensitive volume. Here we report on the design and performance of this tracking nanodosimeter, tested with a broad 250MeV proton beam. We demonstrate that particle coordinate information in the silicon tracker combined with nanodosimetric data can map the ionization pattern of track segments in three dimensions with a resolution of about 5 tissue-equivalent nanometers. The precision tracking capability also enabled us to perform measurements aimed at verification of the wall-less sensitive volume dimensions, for which only simulated data were available. We have seen that the tracking nanodosimetry data and Monte Carlo simulation results agreed well, thus allowing application of this technique to experimental track-structure studies of charged particles

  4. Silicon radiation detectors with oxide charge state compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.; Goulding, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of boron implantation on high resistivity P type silicon before oxide growth to compensate for the presence of charge states in the oxide and oxide/silicon interface. The presence of these charge states on high resistivity P type silicon produces an inversion layer which causes high leakage currents on N(+)P junctions and high surface conductance. Compensating the surface region by boron implantation is shown to result in oxide passivated N(+)P junctions with very low leakage currents and with low surface conductance.

  5. Silicon radiation detectors with oxide charge state compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the use of boron implantation on high resistivity P-type silicon before oxide growth to compensate for the presence of charge states in the oxide and oxide/silicon interface. The presence of these charge states on high resistivity P-type silicon produces an inversion layer which causes high leakage currents on N+P junctions and high surface conductance. Compensating the surface region by boron implantation is shown to result in oxide passivated N+P junctions with very low leakage currents and with low surface conductance

  6. Evaluation of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study an evaluation of radiation safety and protection in interventional orthopedic procedures for the staff in three theatres in Khartoum state was conducted. To evaluate radiation protection program and staff knowledge with regard to radiation protection a questionnaire was designed and distributed among the staff there. Integrity check was conducted on the available radiation tools ( lead aprons) to ensure that they provide optimal protection when positioned appropriately. Also dose rate was measured around the theatre to evaluate the level of leakage radiation. Finally the absorbed dose to orthopedic specialists was measured during several procedures. The study showed the absence of most of the radiation protection and safety procedures that ensure the protection of of workers and lack of radiation protection program. The integrity check conducted on lead aprons showed uncapable crack in about 24% of the checked aprons. And in spite of this, there was no action taken to withdraw those faulty aprons or to replace them due to the acute shortage of the aprons available in the three centers and this will cause unjustified radiation exposure to the staff. The level of radiation around the theatres was found to fall within the acceptable limit according to the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) recommendations that -if implemented -could improve the status of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures. The improve. The important recommendations are to establish a single regulatory authority in Sudan independent from any user or promotion of radiation as well as to conduct periodically training courses for orthopedic staff on radiation protection in orthopedic interventional procedures.(Author)

  7. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy: Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2013-01-01

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes, such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  8. Distribution of radionuclides and radiation levels in some district of Karnataka State, India - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is a form of energy that can be travelled through the medium in the form of waves or particles. The heat, sound and light are different forms of radiations that peoples can feel or see but there are other kinds of radiations that human senses cannot detect. Indeed we are constantly receiving such invisible radiation from the sky, earth crust, air, food and even our own body. Such radiations can be divided into ionizing and non ionizing radiation. The exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation from natural sources is a continuing and inescapable feature of life on earth. Our environment contains natural radionuclides in variable amounts. A large number of natural radioactivity measurements were conducted throughout world, in order to know their distribution and to assess their radiological health hazards. Karnataka state has 30 districts and having 74,051 sq m area and it is having various geological formations. The Archean complex made up of Dharwad schists and granitic gneisses, these cover around 60% of the area of the state and it consists of gneisses, granite and charnockite rocks. Some of the minerals found in this region are dolomite, lime stone, gabbro, quartzite, pyroxenite, manganese and iron ore and metabasalt. In addition the proposed uranium mining region is also present in Googi region of Yadagiri district. In many places Iron and manganese mining activities, crushing and quarrying activities are continuously going on. It is expected that such mining and extraction activities can enhance the natural radiation level in the environment. Hence there is a need to estimate the environmental radiation levels in the habitats of these areas. Our research group along with many researches in the Karnataka state initiated systematic study on the dose received by the population in some district of different environmental matrixes and more data are reported in Karnataka state, which have been reviewed and compiled in this paper. (author)

  9. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2009-04-01

    Land cover and land use (LCLU) change affects Earth surface properties including albedo that impose a radiative forcing on the climate. Recently available satellite derived LCLU change data for the conterminous United States (CONUS) are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 61 ecoregions covering 73% of the CONUS. Mean monthly broadband Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow and snow-free albedo values are derived from decadal Landsat 60m LCLU classification maps located within ecoregions using a stratified random sampling methodology. These data and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis are used to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive radiative forcing due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative radiative forcing due to forest loss, with snow modifying the results. At the ecoregion level this magnitude of radiative forcing is not insignificant, being similar in magnitude to global radiative forcing estimates due to LCLU change during the twentieth century.

  10. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was found to be ∼0.3mm. DISCUSSION and CONCLUSIONS: The use of transmitted dose maps, instead of EPID raw pixel values, is not only able to detect the slight MLC shifts and uncertainties, but also is able to predict the amount of the variation of the delivered dose to the surrounding tissues that are to be protected during the radiation course. The simplicity, accuracy, efficiency and additional information about delivered dose are the advantages of this technique

  11. Radiation monitoring and dose distribution of medical workers in A.P. state 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual monitoring for external ionizing radiation is being conducted for all radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State by TLD Unit located in Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad.The Unit comes under Personnel Monitoring Section of Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai. The aim of monitoring is to confirm that the radiation safety standards are strictly adhered in the institutions and also to investigate excessive exposures, if any. Personnel monitoring also provides data for epidemiological studies. In view of ICRP/AERB recommendations of 100 mSv dose limit for the five years block of 1994-98, the dose distribution among radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State is analyzed for the period 1994-98. In continuation of above work, we have analyzed the data for the year 1999-2000 for various medical diagnostic procedures and these are presented

  12. Radiation source states on-line supervision system design and implementation based on RFID technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It puts forward radiation source states on-line monitoring resolution based on RFID technology. Firstly, the system uses RFID in real-time transmission of the radiation dose rate, and monitors the radiation source states and dose rate of the surrounding environment on-line. Then it adopts regional wireless networking mode to construct enterprise level monitoring network, which resolves long-distance wiring problems. And then it uses GPRS wireless to transport the real-time data to the monitoring center and the government supervision department, By adopting randomly dynamic cording in display update every day, it strengthens the supervision of the radiation source. At last this system has been successful applied to a thickness gauge project, which verifies the feasibility and practicality is good. (authors)

  13. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  14. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, M. J.; W. Hutchinson

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  15. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The electroreduction of a manganese dioxide (MnO2) electrode in an aqueous lithium hydroxide electrolyte has been studied using slow-scan cyclic voltammetry. The electroreduced MnO2 surface was investigated under the electron beam irradiation by means of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopic (FTIR) techniques. Based on the XPS and FTIR results, the reduced material was found to be covered with a thick film of water (O 1s) which acted as a double layer and hence prevented detection of other elements. The electrode was thus irradiated with Ar+ for 60, 120, 240 and 480 min to remove the overlayer composed of a mixture of LiOH and Li2CO3. After the ion bombardment (4.0kV, 2μA, 500μm spot), the presence of reduced state of manganese (Mn 3s) and lithium (Li 1s) is detected in the electrode. The XPS and FTIR spectra reveal that the formation of an insoluble layer of Li2CO3 precedes the process of reduction. From the evidence based on the various techniques used, it is confirmed that lithium is electrochemically inserted into the host framework structure of MnO2 in aqueous solutions

  16. Numerical radiative transfer with state-of-the-art iterative methods made easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Julien; Paletou, Frédéric; Josselin, Eric; Glorian, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an on-line tool and its accompanying software resources for the numerical solution of basic radiation transfer out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). State-of-the-art stationary iterative methods such as Accelerated Λ-iteration and Gauss-Seidel schemes, using a short characteristics-based formal solver are used. We also comment on typical numerical experiments associated to the basic non-LTE radiation problem. These resources are intended for the largest use and benefit, in support to more classical radiation transfer lectures usually given at the Master level.

  17. Operational control of radiation conditions in Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Shugay, Yulia; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of Moscow State University provides mission support for Russian satellites and give operational analysis of radiation conditions in space. SMDC Web-sites (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/ and http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/) give access to current data on the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation state of Earth's magnetosphere and heliosphere in near-real time. For data analysis the models of space environment factors working online have been implemented. Interactive services allow one to retrieve and analyze data at a given time moment. Forecasting applications including solar wind parameters, geomagnetic and radiation condition forecasts have been developed. Radiation dose and SEE rate control are of particular importance in practical satellite operation. Satellites are always under the influence of high-energy particle fluxes during their orbital flight. The three main sources of particle fluxes: the Earth's radiation belts, the galactic cosmic rays, and the solar energetic particles (SEP), are taken into account by SMDC operational services to estimate the radiation dose caused by high-energy particles to a satellite at LEO orbits. ISO 15039 and AP8/AE8 physical models are used to estimate effects of galactic cosmic rays and radiation belt particle fluxes. Data of geosynchronous satellites (GOES or Electro-L1) allow to reconstruct the SEP fluxes spectra at a given low Earth orbit taking into account the geomagnetic cut-off depending on geomagnetic activity level.

  18. Radiation nursery and occupational exposure: state-of-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Documentary research with the aim to reflect on the state of the art in radiological nursing, on the nursing work and occupational hazards they are exposed, from articles produced in Brazil. The survey was conducted in the BVS, the study consisted of seven articles published from 2002 to 2012. Regarding the main variables studied in the articles, issues emerged related to working conditions and biosafety, performance of nurses, legislation, continuing education and difficulties and needs of nursing staff . It was noticed that is recent the interest in the field, but the work of nurses in radiological technologies must be grounded in current scientific knowledge and with proper technique, to the achievement of the desired clinical outcome and to promote their safety, the team and also the patient. (author)

  19. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Langroo, R.; Peggie, J.R. [Australian Radiation Laboratory. Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Lyons, R.G. [University of Auckland, Auckland, (New Zealand). Department of Physics; James, J.M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Chemisty

    1996-02-01

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m{sup -3}. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors) 7 refs., 10 tabs., 2 figs.

  20. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m-3. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors)

  1. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  2. Aboriginal Placenames : Naming and re-naming the Australian landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Hercus, Luise; Koch, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Aboriginal approaches to the naming of places across Australia differ radically from the official introduced Anglo-Australian system. However, many of these earlier names have been incorporated into contemporary nomenclature, with considerable reinterpretations of their function and form. Recently, state jurisdictions have encouraged the adoption of a greater number of Indigenous names, sometimes alongside the accepted Anglo-Australian terms, around Sydney Harbour, for example. In some cases,...

  3. Structure and experiences of the Australian National Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account is given of the history, structure and functions of the Australian Safeguards Office (ASO). Its nuclear materials accounting and control procedures and its research and development programs are discussed. Australia's physical protection policy and the ASO's role in this field are described. The Australian views on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials and the establishment of National Authorities such as the ASO are outlined

  4. Radiation traces in exportation food samples of Parana State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with radioactive traces measurements in foodstuffs produced at the State of Parana, with large export rate and also of nutritious products of some regional trading companies. The measured foods were: sulfite treated sugar, tea, mint candy, soy in grain, soy crumb, gross soy oil, gum free oil and commercial refined soy oil. Six samples of each lot of the analyzed material were prepared, which represent a sampling with 90% of confidence. The samples were sealed in Marinelli beaker of 2.1 L completely filled and kept during 40 days until secular equilibrium was achieved. The counting time for each measure was of 48 hours. Measurements were carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry employing a HPGe detector with 10% of relative efficiency, coupled to standard nuclear electronics and a 8 l multichannel card. The acquisition of the data was accomplished with the software MaestroTM, version 3.2. The energy resolution of the 137 Cs 661.62 keV gamma line was 1.75 keV. The larger intensity gamma lines observed in the spectra were from the following radionuclides: 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 212 Pb of the 232 Th series, 214 Bi and 214 Pb from the 238 U series, 227 Ac from the 235 U series and 40 K. Activities and lower level of detection limits were calculated according to the International Agency of Atomic Energy norms.The detector efficiency was measured using a 152 Eu certified source and IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 certified reference materials. For most of the radionuclides it was possible only the measurement of the minimum activity detectable in the foodstuffs. Self-attenuation corrections were accomplished with support literature results. The most important activity observed was that of 40 K, whose value measured for soy in natura was 745.0 +-9.1 Bq/kg and for the crumb soy 1473 ± 15 Bq/kg.. he measured activities of the several analyzed foods were compatible with the values expected for non contaminated normal environmental samples, except for soy crumb, whose 40 K

  5. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T.

    2016-02-01

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation.

  6. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T

    2016-02-01

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation. PMID:26894699

  7. Modern state of the application of ionizing radiation for protection of environment. 1. Ionizing radiation sources. Purification of natural and drinking water (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of modern state of the application of ionizing radiations for protection of environment and natural and drinking water purification is presented. Building of installations with electron accelerators with summarized power of beam ∼0.6 MW signifies that application of ionizing radiation for ecological needs increase. It is pointed out that extensible application of electron accelerators is explained by their safety and efficiency as compared with gamma-sources. New information about ionizing radiation sources, radiation-chemical purification of polluted natural and drinking water, mechanisms of processes taking place during treatment by ionizing radiations are generalized

  8. Universal method for the synthesis of arbitrary polarization states radiated by a nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Fortuno, Francisco J; Griol, Amadeu; Bellieres, Laurent; Marti, Javier; Martinez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanoantennas efficiently convert confined optical energy into free-space radiation. The polarization of the emitted radiation depends mainly on nanoantenna shape, so it becomes extremely difficult to manipulate it unless the nanostructure is physically altered. Here we demonstrate a simple way to synthetize the polarization of the radiation emitted by a single nanoantenna so that every point on the Poincar\\'e sphere becomes attainable. The nanoantenna consists of a single scatterer created on a dielectric waveguide and fed from its both sides so that the polarization of the emitted optical radiation is controlled by the amplitude and phase of the feeding signals. Our nanoantenna is created on a silicon chip using standard top-down nanofabrication tools, but the method is universal and can be applied to other materials, wavelengths and technologies. This work will open the way towards the synthesis and control of arbitrary polarization states in nano-optics.

  9. Communication strengths and weaknesses of radiation protection professionals in the United States and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective health risk communication may well determine the future of peaceful applications of nuclear technology and the social acceptance of risks from radiation in medicine, research, and industry. However, radiation protection professionals who know how to quantify risks and provide appropriate safeguards have historically encountered great difficulties in communicating their risk perspectives to the concerned public. In the United States, organisations such as the Health Physics Society and the American Nuclear Society have traditionally attributed communication difficulties to the public's lack of technical understanding. This has led to the belief that if the public could be provided sufficient information or education, they would understand radiation issues and their concerns about radiation risks would be resolved. Consequently, these national organisations have established public information programs and speaker bureaus. These programs primarily focus on presentation of technically accurate data and attempt to foster understanding of radiation by analogies with background radiation or other sources of risks commonly accepted by society. This paper shows that such public information programs can at their best reach only about 25% of the general public. These programs could greatly enhance their effectiveness by learning the different ways that radiation professionals and the general public prefer to gather data and make decisions

  10. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron-self Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value $\\dot M \\sim 3\\alpha\\ \\dot M_{\\rm Edd}$, above which cold and de...

  11. The Australian synchrotron project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron to be built at Monash University, is a synchrotron light facility based on a 3-GeV electron storage ring. It is scheduled to be fully operational in 2007. In this paper we describe the accelerator systems that lie at the heart of the facility, and describe the spectral characteristics of the 'light' - ranging from infra-red to hard x-rays - that will be provided from bend magnets, undulators, and wigglers

  12. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Warren

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  13. International responsability of state by the deleterius effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Responsability of State, considering the deleterius effects of ionising radiation on the human being, property, territory and environment which are under other jurisdiction, is focused. Conventional rules, costumary rules, the evolution of ''opinion juris'' as well as the decisions of tribunals related to the subject are analysed. (author)

  14. Radiative Decays of q bar q Chiral States in the U~(12)-Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, T; Oda, M; Ishida, S; Maeda, Tomohito; Yamada, Kenji; Oda, Masuho; Ishida, Shin

    2006-01-01

    The radiative transitions between ground-states (GS) of light q bar q mesons are investigated in the U~(12)-scheme. In this scheme the rich decay-spectra are offered even in transition between GS due to the appearance of chiral states. As a result the radiative decay widths of the ordinary V -> P gamma process are well reproduced, and furthermore, the predicted width of b_{1}(1235) -> pi gamma process (Gamma_{theor}=229 keV), by assigning b_{1}(1235) as a member of the {}^{3}S_{1} chiral states A^{(E)}, is in good agreement with experimental one (Gamma_{exp} =230 +- 60 keV). From this results it is indicated that b_{1}(1235) meson, classified as {}^{1}P_{1} state in conventional non-relativistic (NR) classification scheme, is a good candidate of chiral state in the U~(12)-scheme. The other radiative transition widths of some chiral states are also predicted. Accordingly the predicted values given here, will provide useful insights in their search at BES.

  15. On the feasibility of establishing the provenance of Australian Aboriginal artefacts using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and proton-induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Museums and galleries in Australia have extensive collections of Aboriginal artefacts in their custody. In particular, the National Museum of Australia and the National Gallery of Australia are custodians of works of very considerable significance, in both cultural and financial terms. Art fraud can occur, documentation relating to artefacts can be mislaid, or the artefacts can be incorrectly filed. Because of this, it has become essential to establish protocols for the objective determination of the provenance of artefacts through scientific tests. For the work reported here we are concerned with the comparison of very small quantities of materials, paint scrapings from artefacts. Scrapings from artefacts of unknown provenance are compared with those from artefacts of known provenance, and the database established using an extended set of analytical techniques by Kubik. We describe here our use of synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) to determine the mineral phase compositions of very small amounts of pigment material (<50 μg), and the use of PIXE to give their atomic compositions to a threshold level of 1 ppm for similar masses of material

  16. On the feasibility of establishing the provenance of Australian Aboriginal artefacts using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and proton-induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creagh, D.C. [Division of Health, Design and Science University of Canberra, CANBERRA ACT 2601 (Australia)], E-mail: dcreagh@bigpond.net.au; Kubik, M.E. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University (Australia); Sterns, M. [Department of Chemistry, Australian National University (Australia)

    2007-09-21

    Museums and galleries in Australia have extensive collections of Aboriginal artefacts in their custody. In particular, the National Museum of Australia and the National Gallery of Australia are custodians of works of very considerable significance, in both cultural and financial terms. Art fraud can occur, documentation relating to artefacts can be mislaid, or the artefacts can be incorrectly filed. Because of this, it has become essential to establish protocols for the objective determination of the provenance of artefacts through scientific tests. For the work reported here we are concerned with the comparison of very small quantities of materials, paint scrapings from artefacts. Scrapings from artefacts of unknown provenance are compared with those from artefacts of known provenance, and the database established using an extended set of analytical techniques by Kubik. We describe here our use of synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) to determine the mineral phase compositions of very small amounts of pigment material (<50 {mu}g), and the use of PIXE to give their atomic compositions to a threshold level of 1 ppm for similar masses of material.

  17. On the feasibility of establishing the provenance of Australian Aboriginal artefacts using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and proton-induced X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, D. C.; Kubik, M. E.; Sterns, M.

    2007-09-01

    Museums and galleries in Australia have extensive collections of Aboriginal artefacts in their custody. In particular, the National Museum of Australia and the National Gallery of Australia are custodians of works of very considerable significance, in both cultural and financial terms. Art fraud can occur, documentation relating to artefacts can be mislaid, or the artefacts can be incorrectly filed. Because of this, it has become essential to establish protocols for the objective determination of the provenance of artefacts through scientific tests. For the work reported here we are concerned with the comparison of very small quantities of materials, paint scrapings from artefacts. Scrapings from artefacts of unknown provenance are compared with those from artefacts of known provenance, and the database established using an extended set of analytical techniques by Kubik. We describe here our use of synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) to determine the mineral phase compositions of very small amounts of pigment material (<50 μg), and the use of PIXE to give their atomic compositions to a threshold level of 1 ppm for similar masses of material.

  18. Australian natural gas market outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new study of the Australian natural gas industry by leading Australian economics and policy consultancy ACIL Tasman highlights the significant supply and demand side uncertainties currently facing the industry. The ACIL Tasman 'Australian Gas Market Review and Outlook 2004' study presents modelling results for three supply/demand scenarios in Eastern Australia and two in Western Australia. The results show that, even under moderate assumptions about future levels of gas demand growth, major supply-side investment is likely to be needed over the next ten to fifteen years. The base supply/demand scenario for Eastern Australia and Northern Territory, illustrated in Figure 1, shows that even allowing for substantial new discoveries in existing production basins and major expansion of coal seam methane production, in the absence of a northern gas connection to the eastern states (Timor Sea or PNG Highlands) a significant supply gap will begin to emerge from around 2013. The study identifies several supply-side options for Eastern Australia - new discoveries in the established production provinces in Bass Strait and Central Australia; greenfield developments such as the Otway Basin offshore from Victoria and South Australia; continuing expansion of coal seam methane production in Queensland and New South Wales; and gas from Papua New Guinea, Timor Sea or from the North West Shelf region delivered via a trans-continental pipeline. The study concludes that it is unlikely that any single option will suffice to meet future demand. Almost inevitably, a combination of these sources will be needed if anticipated growth opportunities are to be met. With regard to prices, the study shows that in the short to medium term the outlook is for some real reductions in wholesale prices in most regional markets. This reflects increasing levels of upstream competition and declining real costs of pipeline transportation. However in the longer term, supply-side constraints will tend to

  19. Radiative Decay of Neutron-Unbound Intruder States in $^{19}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Dungan, R; Tripathi, Vandana; Volya, A; Kravvaris, K; Abromeit, B; Caussyn, D D; Morrow, S; Parker, J J; Tai, P -L; VonMoss, J M

    2015-01-01

    The $^{9}$Be($^{14}$C, $\\alpha$$\\gamma$) reaction at E$_{Lab}$=30 and 35 MeV was used to study excited states of $^{19}$O. The Florida State University (FSU) $\\gamma$ detector array was used to detect $\\gamma$ radiation in coincidence with charged particles detected and identified with a silicon $\\Delta$E-E particle telescope. Gamma decays have been observed for the first time from six states ranging from 368 to 2147 keV above the neutron separation energy (S$_{n}$=3962 keV) in $^{19}$O. The $\\gamma$ decaying states are interspersed among states previously observed to decay by neutron emission. The ability of electromagnetic decay to compete successfully with neutron decay is explained in terms of neutron angular momentum barriers and small spectroscopic factors implying higher spin and complex structure for these intruder states. These results illustrate the need for complementary experimental approaches to best illuminate the complete nuclear structure.

  20. Evidence for a narrow massive state in the radiative decays of the Upsilon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is presented for a state, which we call zeta, with a mass M = (8322 +- 8 +- 24) MeV and a line width GAMMA < 80 MeV (90% confidence level) obtained using the Crystal Ball (NaI(Tl) detector at DORIS II. Radiative transitions to this state are observed from about 100,000 UPSILON(1S) decays in two independent sets of data: one in which zeta → multiple hadrons, and one which is strongly biased towards zeta → 2 low multiplicity jets. The branching ratio to this state from the UPSILON(1S) is of order 0.5%

  1. Current state of commercial radiation detection equipment for homeland security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) came the increased concern that terrorist groups would attempt to manufacture and use an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device. As such, a primary mission of DHS is to protect the public against the use of these devices and to assist state and local responders in finding, locating, and identifying these types of devices and materials used to manufacture these devices. This assistance from DHS to state and local responders comes in the form of grant money to procure radiation detection equipment. In addition to this grant program, DHS has supported the development of American National Standards Institute standards for radiation detection equipment and has conducted testing of commercially available instruments. This paper identifies the types and kinds of commercially available equipment that can be used to detect and identify radiological material - for use in traditional search applications as well as primary and secondary screening of personnel, vehicles, and cargo containers. In doing so, key considerations for the conduct of operations are described as well as critical features of the instruments for specific applications. The current state of commercial instruments is described for different categories of detection equipment including personal radiation detectors, radioisotope identifiers, man-portable detection equipment, and radiation portal monitors. In addition, emerging technologies are also discussed, such as spectroscopic detectors and advanced spectroscopic portal monitors

  2. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives

  3. Equilibrium states of Z-pinch with account of radiation and thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem on equilibrium of cylindrically-symmetric radiative Z-pinch is considered. Radiation energy losses are mainly due to heavy impurity in a deuterium gas. Behaviour dependence of the problem solution on two dimensionless parameters: δ and Pboun, characterizing correspondingly thermal conductivity contribution and plasma pressure on the pinch boundary, is investigated. The equilibrium states obtained are important for definition of initial conditions for numerical simulation of the stage of the second compression of the plasma focus and for investigation of the problem on Z-pinch instability

  4. Survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the United States. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutron-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter

  5. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Radiation-induced states in crystals with ionic-covalent bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolontsova, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Based on a review of data in the literature and on the results of a systematic investigation of the effect of various kinds of radiation on a number of crystals with ionic-covalent bonds (ICB crystals), the author describes mechanisms and regularities associated with the creation of radiation-induced structural states. A classification of these states is given, along with their characteristics and models of their behavior. The author proposes a criterion, tested on specially selected compounds, for high-temperature structural instability leading to the realization of a structural state, which in terms of the symmetry and parameters of the unit cell is close to the high-temperature modification of the unirradiated crystal. As a basis for choosing this special class of compounds thermodynamic parameters are adopted which determine the character of their thermal phase transitions. It is shown that, apart from amorphization and decomposition of the original compound, this is the only possible overall change in the structure of ICB crystals which extends throughout their entire volume. The author concludes that for the majority of ICB crystals in which such changes in crystal structure are observed, a decisive role is played by isolated point defects caused by radiation. She also investigates the influence of impurities, growth conditions and conditions of irradiation on the radiation hardness of a structure. In conclusion, she points out factors which determine the structural states of an irradiated ICB crystal, and analyzes the causes of discrepancies in the experimental data of various authors regarding the eifect of radiation on the structure of the same material.

  6. Ionizing radiation sources management in the Commonwealth of Independent States - CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation sources cover a broad band of power: from powerful NPP reactors and research reactors to portable radioisotope ionizing radiation sources applied in medicine, agriculture, industry and in the energy supply systems of remote facilities. At present, scales and use field of radionuclide sources in the CIS have the tendency to increase. In this connection, the issues of ionizing radiation sources management safety at all stages of their life cycle, from production to treatment, have been of a great importance. The materials on ionizing radiation sources inventory and treatment in the CIS (Russia, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Ukraine) are presented in the report. It is shown that in some republics, there is difficulty in ionizing radiation sources accounting and control system; the national regulatory and legal framework bases regulating activity on radioactive sources use, localization and treatment require update. Many problems are connected with the sources beyond state accounting. The problem of ionizing radiation sources use safety is complicated by the growing activity of various terrorist groups. The opportunity to use ionizing radiation sources with terrorism goals requires the application of defined systems of security and physical protection at all stages of their management. For this purpose a collective, with all CIS countries, organization of radioactive sources accounting and control as well as countermeasures on their illegal transportation and use are necessary. In this connection, the information collection regarding situation with providing of ionizing radiation sources safety, conditions of equipment and storage facilities, radioactive materials accounting and control system in the CIS countries is vitally needed

  7. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  8. NPT review conference: Australian statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article contains the text of statement delivered by the leader of the Australian delegation to the Second Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference in Geneva on August 14, 1980. An outline is given of Australian policy regarding nuclear weapons proliferation

  9. Steady-State Microbunching in a Storage Ring for Generating Coherent Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel F.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Synchrotrons and storage rings deliver radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum at high repetition rates, and free electron lasers (FELs) produce radiation pulses with high peak brightness. However, at present few light sources can generate both high repetition rate and high brightness outside the optical range. We propose to create steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring to produce coherent radiation at a high repetition rate or in continuous wave (CW) mode. In this paper we describe a general mechanism for producing SSMB and give sample parameters for EUV lithography and sub-millimeter sources. We also describe a similar arrangement to produce two pulses with variable spacing for pump-probe experiments. With technological advances, SSMB could reach the soft X-ray range (< 10 nm).

  10. Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance. (author)

  11. Steady state ensembles of thermal radiation in a layered media with a constant heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes steady-state ensembles of thermally excited electromagnetic radiation in nano-scale layered media with a constant non-vanishing heat flux across the layers. It is shown that Planck's law of thermal radiation, the principle of equivalence, and the laws of wave propagation in layered media, imply that in order for the ensemble of thermally excited electromagnetic fields to exist in a medium consisting of a stack of layers between two half-space, the net heat flux across the layers must exceed a certain threshold that is determined by the temperatures of the half spaces and by the reflective properties of the entire structure. The obtained results provide a way for estimating the radiative heat transfer coefficient of nano-scale layered structures. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. United States-Russian workshop on the stochastic health effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1988, two years after the Chernobyle accident, the United States and the Soviet Union signed an agreement to sponsor a Joint coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety, (JCCCNRS). The Soviet Union agreed to provide some information on late effects of radiation exposures and to attempt to add some new insights into low dose and low dose rate radiation consequences. At that time, it had just been revealed that significant radiation exposures had occurred in the South Ural Mountains, associated with the early years of operation of the MAYAK nuclear complex. The need to be able to better predict the long term consequences of overexposures, such as occurred with the Chernobyl accident, was a major factor in organizing this workshop. We decided to invite a small number of experts from the Soviet Union, who had direct knowledge of the situation. A small group of American experts was invited to help in a discussion of the state of knowledge of continual low level exposure. The experts and expertise included: Aspects of bask theoretical radiobiological models, studies on experimental animals exposed to chronic or fractionated external or internal radiation, studies on populations exposed to chronic intake and continual exposures, workers exposed to low or high continual levels of radiation. The intent was to begin a dialog on the issue of a better understanding of the dose rate effect in humans. No detailed conclusions could be reached at this first interaction between out two countries, but a model was prepared which seems to support a range of what are known as low dose and dose rate effectiveness factors. A beginning of an evaluation of the role of radiation dose rate on leukemia risk was also accomplished

  13. Solid state radiation chemistry. Features important in basic research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic research of chemical radiation effects has been mostly proceeded in aqueous systems. When one turns from aqueous to the 'dry solute' systems, reactions are running in a very different way. The examined compound, previously the solute, becomes then the only constituent of the system, absorbing all ionising energy. Majority of dosimeters and of radiation processed systems is solid: these are crystalline or rigid substances of high viscosity, sometimes of complicated phase-compositions being no longer homogenous like liquids. Main features of the solid (and rigid) state radiation chemistry is to be discussed in five parts: I. Character of absorption process. Absorption of radiation is in all media heterogenous on the molecular level, i.e. with formation of single- and multi-ionisation spurs. The yield of the latters is 15-25% of the total ionisations, depending on the system, even at low LET radiation. In spite of random distribution of initial ionisations, the single-ionisation spurs can turn rapidly into specifically arranged, temporal localisations. The variety of spur reactions is usually more complicated than that in aqueous systems. II. Character of transients. Intermediates in solid state radiation chemistry exhibit very different transport properties: from free electrons moving fast and far, to electrons changing the position by different physicochemical mechanisms, to easy movable H-atoms, and to practically unmovable, only vibrating, new fragments of a lattice or glass. III. Paramagnetic intermediates. Radicals living for microseconds in liquids, when created and trapped in a solid matrix are usually very stable, e.g. they can have a difference of half-life times of 12 orders of magnitude, however their chemical composition remais identical. (author)

  14. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology

  15. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Awad A. [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Egleston, Brian [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Holliday, Emma [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eastwick, Gary [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology.

  16. Guide and example plan for development of state emergency response plans and systems for transportation: related radiation incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of their responsibilities for control of radiation sources and for minimizing unwarranted human exposures to radiation, State radiation control agencies (also referred to as radiological health agencies in some States) have developed or are in the process of developing plans and procedures for coping with emergency situations which may arise from the use, transport, or disposal of radioactive materials and other radiation sources. This guide and example plan has been prepared as an aid to radiation control agencies, emergency services organizations, and other public institutions which may have primary or supportive roles in radiation emergency response planning. This document focuses on planning, training, and emergency action procedures for such organizations and is directed toward transportation-related radiation incidents

  17. Assessment of public awareness of the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Kontagora, Niger State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the level of public awareness of detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Nigeria, a case study of Federal College of Education Kontagora Niger State. A total of thirty-five (35) lecturers and seventy-five (75) students were randomly selected from the five schools in the College. The instrument used for data collection was a questionnaire. Data obtained from the questionnaire was analysed using simple percentages. The result of the study revealed that 10 (28.6%) out of 35 lecturers and 32 (42.7%) out of 75 students of the sampled population were totally unaware of ionization radiation and its health detriments. Moreover, the remaining percentage of both lecturers and students had limited knowledge about ionizing radiation and its detrimental effects to humans. The research also shows that a significant percentage of both lecturers and students claimed that the topic 'Ionizing radiations and their health detriments' is not relevant to their field of academic inclination. Based on the findings of the research, it was therefore recommended that the government, Nigeria Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NNRA), physicists and concerned individuals should enlighten the general public on ionizing radiations, its health detriment and safety measures through seminars and the mass media.

  18. Measurement of time-like baryon electromagnetic form factors in processes with initial state radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial state radiation processes can be effectively used to measure e+e− annihilation at high luminosity storage rings, such as the B–factory PEP-II in Stanford and the tau-charm factory BEPC-II in Beijing. The BaBar Collaboration has measured with unprecedented accuracy the channels e+e− → p p-bar, produced with initial state radiation at 10.6 GeV. BES-III aims to collect a luminosity of 10 fb−1 at 3.77 GeV in the next years. The measurements of the baryon electromagnetic form factors published by BaBar are summarized here together with the expectations of BES-III for the same channels.

  19. The influence of geology on terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Pahang state, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose (TGRD) rate measurements have been made in Pahang state, Malaysia. Significant variations were found between TGRD measurements and the underlying geological formations. In some cases revealing significant elevations of TGRD. The acid-intrusive geological formation has the highest mean TGRD measurement of 367 nGy/h-1. This is more than six times the world average value of 59 nGy/h-1, while the quaternary geological formation has the lowest mean gamma radiation dose rate of 99 nGy h-1. The annual effective dose equivalent outdoor to the population was 0.216 mSv. The lifetime equivalent dose and relative lifetime cancer risks for an individual living in Pahang state were 81 mSv and 4.7 x 10-3 respectively. These values are more than two times the world average of 34 mSv and 1.95 x 10-3 respectively. (author)

  20. Evaluation of radiation protection parameters in dental radiography in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results obtained in a program for the postal evaluation of radiation protection parameters in dental radiography in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The postal kit contains a radiographic film and two pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters separated by a 3 mm aluminium filter and is accompanied by a questionnaire about equipment characteristics and exposition parameters. The analysis of 2596 equipment in the last three years showed that near half of the examinations produces doses higher than the diagnostic reference level established by the health authorities for this kind of examination. Field diameter is within the acceptable range in 73,5% of the tests and total filtration is higher than 1,5 mm Al equivalent in 86,64% of the cases. Comparing with earlier results this analysis suggests that radiation protection conditions in dental radiography are improving in the state of Rio de Janeiro. (author)

  1. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/psi gamma gamma Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Y K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+e- -> (J/psi gamma gamma) gamma and e+e- -> (J/psi pi- pi+) gamma where the hard photon radiated from an initial e+e- collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/psi gamma gamma we consider J/psi pi0, J/psi eta, chi_{c1} gamma, and chi_{c2} gamma candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e+e- measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/psi gamma gamma channels in the Y(4260) mass region.

  2. Q-PYTHIA: a medium-modified implementation of final state radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Armesto, N.; Cunqueiro, L.; Salgado, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo implementation, within PYTHIA, of medium-induced gluon radiation in the final state branching process. Medium effects are introduced through an additive term in the splitting functions computed in the multiple-soft scattering approximation. The observable effects of this modification are studied for different quantities as fragmentation functions and the hump-backed plateau, and transverse momentum and angular distributions. The anticipated increase of intra-jet multi...

  3. Indirect evidence that ultraviolet-B radiation mitigates multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    This article describes on the relationship of the relative prevalence of persons dying with multiple sclerosis with the latitude of the population centroid of those affected in each of the United States. Regression to zero prevalence occurs at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude where the Sun is at zenith on the summer solstice and where ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is least attenuated. This observation supports UVR as a mitigating force in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26163947

  4. Hadronic Contributions to R and G-2 from Initial-State-Radiation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Denis, 1; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2012-04-06

    I review the recent efforts to improve the precision of the prediction of the anomalous moment of the muon, in particular of the hadronic contribution of the vacuum polarization, which is the contribution with the largest uncertainty. Focus is given to the recent result for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by the BaBar collaboration, obtained using events with radiation in the initial state.

  5. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  6. Analysis on the steady-state coherent synchrotron radiation with strong shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several papers concerning shielding of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by a Gaussian line charge on a circular orbit centered between two parallel conducting plates. Previous asymptotic analyses in the frequency domain show that shielded steady-state CSR mainly arises from harmonics in the bunch frequency exceeding the threshold harmonic for satisfying the boundary conditions at the plates. In this paper the authors extend the frequency-domain analysis into the regime of strong shielding, in which the threshold harmonic exceeds the characteristic frequency of the bunch. The result is then compared to the shielded steady-state CSR power obtained using image charges

  7. Radiative transition probabilities for all vibrational levels in the X 1Sigma(+) state of HF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Warren T.; Stwalley, William C.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Valderrama, Giuseppe L.; Berry, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent analyses have led to an experimentally-based potential energy curve for the ground state of HF which includes nonadiabatic corrections and which joins smoothly to the long-range potential at an accurately determined dissociation limit. Using this potential curve and a new ab initio dipole moment function, accurate radiative transition probabilities among all vibrational levels of the ground state of HF have been calculated for selected rotational quantum numbers. Comparisons of Einstein A spontaneous emission coefficients, dipole moment absorption matrix elements, and Herman-Wallis factors for absorption bands are presented.

  8. The influence of microwave radiation on the state of chromatin in human cells

    CERN Document Server

    Shckorbatov, Y G; Grabina, V A; Kolchigin, N N; Batrakov, D O; Kalashnikov, V V; Ivanchenko, D D; Bykov, V N

    2008-01-01

    Isolated human buccal epithelium cell were irradiated by microwaves at frequency f=35 GHz and surface power density E=30 mcW/cm2. The state of chromatin in human cells was determined by methodsof light and electron microscopy. The state of cell membranes was evaluated by the method of vital indigo carmine staining. The microwave-induced condensation of chromatin in human cells was revealed. Left side circulary polarized waves induced less effect than linearly polarized radiation. The linearly polarized electromagnetic waves induced cell membrane damage revealed by the increase of cell stainability. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the mechanisms of biologica effect of electromagnetic waves.

  9. Facilitating the Learning of All Students: The "Professional Positive" of Inclusive Practice in Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christopher; Scriven, Brooke; Durning, Sara; Downes, Carissa

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the positive aspects of inclusion in Australian primary schools through a historical account of the nation's journey to adopting current policies and practices. The authors suggest that across the different states the picture is positive as there are clear attempts to make Australian schools as inclusive as possible. The…

  10. Sustainability as a Cross-Curricular Priority in the Australian Curriculum: A Tasmanian Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; Hill, Allen; Emery, Sherridan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on an investigation into sustainability education in schools in the Australian state of Tasmania following the implementation of the Australian Curriculum. Sustainability is one of three cross-curriculum priorities in the new national curriculum and is the focus of this research (sustainability cross-curriculum priority…

  11. Representative Democracy in Australian Local Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Hearfield

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In an assessment of representative democracy in Australian local government, this paper considers long-run changes in forms of political representation, methods of vote counting, franchise arrangements, numbers of local government bodies and elected representatives, as well as the thorny question of constitutional recognition. This discussion is set against the background of ongoing tensions between the drive for economic efficiency and the maintenance of political legitimacy, along with more deep-seated divisions emerging from the legal relationship between local and state governments and the resultant problems inherent in local government autonomy versus state intervention.

  12. Environmental radiation monitoring of low-level wastes by the State of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, A.W.; Mooney, R.R.; Erickson, J.L. [Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1989-11-01

    The Washington State Department of Health, as the state`s regulatory agency for radiation, monitors several forms of low-level radioactive wastes. The monitoring is done to assess the potential impact on the environment and on public health. The emphasis of the monitoring program is placed on the solid and liquid wastes from defense activities on the Hanford Reservation, commercial wastes at the site located on leased land at Hanford and uranium mill tailings in Northeastern Washington. Although not classified as low-level waste, monitoring is also periodically conducted at selected landfills and sewage treatment facilities and other licensees, where radioactive wastes are known or suspected to be present. Environmental pathways associated with waste disposal are monitored independently, and/or in conjunction with the waste site operators to verify their results and evaluate their programs. The Department also participates in many site investigations conducted by site operators and other agencies, and conducts it`s own special investigations when deemed necessary. Past investigations and special projects have included allegations of adverse environmental impact of I-129, uranium in ground water, impacts of wastes on the agricultural industry, radioactivity in seeps into the Columbia River from waste sites, identifying lost waste sites at Hanford, differentiating groundwater contamination from defense versus commercial sources, and radioactivity in municipal landfills and sewers. The state`s environmental radiation monitoring program has identified and verified a number of environmental problems associated with radioactive waste disposal, but has, to date, identified no adverse offsite impacts to public health.

  13. Shock-induced solid-state chemical reactivity studies using time-resolved radiation pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved radiation pyrometry has been used to study materials which undergo solid-state chemical reactions due to shock loading. Shock-induced chemical reactivity in solids is fundamentally different than that in high explosives and other energetic materials because, if no volatiles are present, the reaction products end up in the condensed, rather than the vapor, state. Bulk property changes accompanying the solid-state reactions may therefore be too small to be observable with wave profile or shock-velocity measurements. However, some solid-state reactions, such as that between metallic nickel and aluminum, are exothermic enough to give rise to a measurable increase in temperature, so pyrometry can be used to detect the reactions. Unfortunately, these measurements are complicated by the large temperature increases generated by other sources. Possible mechanisms for generation of these high temperatures, and their effect on the chemical reaction, are suggested

  14. Determination of natural radiative lifetimes and Lande factors for highly excited F states in cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radiative lifetimes and Lande gsub(J) factors for several highly excited F states in cesium were measured using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The F states were excited from the 52D5/2 state with a pulse-modulated CW dye layer, and the delayed-coincidence method was employed to record decay curves, which in some experiments exhibited Zeeman quantum beats. A further CW dye laser was used to produce the necessary population in the 52D5/2 state. The lifetimes in the sequence 11-162F7/2 follow a nsup(x) scaling law with x=2.76 and the Lande factors agree with the predicted value, 1.143. (orig.)

  15. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  16. Analysis of modern state of radiation purification technologies of water polluted with oil products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: this work the modern state of methods and technologies on radiation purification of waste and sea water polluted with oil products is analyzed. Technologies based on ultraviolet (UV), electroplasma, magnet and radiation purification are considered. It is shown, that radionuclide - installations have following advantages: 1) for operational personal the specific qualification is not required and personnel quantity may be reduced to minimum (2-3 person for equipment); 2) high penetrability of - radiation; 3) low dose rate = 10 Gy/s (10 Vt/kg). These technologies have also significance economic, ecologic, and other advantages versus to existing traditional methods. It is also shown, that among radiation purification methods of waste and sea water electron-beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: to decrease the concentration of harmful ingredients down to limits. It is also shown that among of technologies of radiation purification of waste and sea water an electron -beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: a) to decrease concentration of harmful ingredients down to limits acceptable purification system; b) to increase of clarity of water by removing of color matters; c) to produce purification without using of additional ingredients. The technology of application of frequency high-current electron beams for purification and disinfection of water also is considered. The advantages of this technology are : simultaneous action on all water parameters; absence of consumed materials; multiple-factor action on all chemical impurities; affection of microorganisms of all types; flexibility and simplicity of operation of purification degree by increasing/decreasing of dose rateIn present work it is also shown that one of perspective directions of radiation purification is interfacial action of radiation and heat. The radiation-thermal method of purification of water from heptanes is considered. It is shown, that at absorbed dose of 2-3 kGy, at a

  17. Analysis of modern state of radiation purification technologies of water polluted with oil products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this work the modern state of methods and technologies on radiation purification of waste and sea water polluted with oil products is analyzed. Technologies based on ultraviolet (UV), electro plasma, magnet and radiation purification are considered. It is shown, that radionuclide γ-installations have following advantages:· for operational personal the specific qualification is not required and personnel quantity may be reduced to minimum (2-3 person for equipment);· high penetrability of γ-radiation;· low dose rate ∼10Gy/s. These technologies have also significance economic, ecologic, and other advantages versus to existing traditional methods. It is also shown, that among radiation purification methods of waste and sea water electron-beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: · to decrease concentration of harmful ingredients down to limits,it is also shown that among of technologies of radiation purification of waste and sea water an electron- beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: ·to decrease concentration to harmful ingredients down to limits acceptable purification system; ·to increase of clarity of water by removing of color matters; ·to produce purification without using of additional ingredients; The technology of application of frequency high-current electron beams for purification and disinfection water also is considered. The advantages of this technology are: · simultaneous on all water parameters; · absence of consumed materials; · multiple-factor action on all chemical impurities; · affection of microorganisms of all types; · flexibility and simplicity of operation of purification degree by increasing/decreasing of dose rate.In present work it is also shown that one of perspective directions of radiation purification is interfacial action of radiation and heat. The radiation-thermal method of purification of water from heptanes is considered. It is shown, that at absorbed dose 2-3 kGy at a temperature

  18. The Australian black coal industry: productivity commission inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    February 1999 saw the release of the final report of the Productivity Commission's inquiry into the Australian black coal industry. The report is a comprehensive examination of the state of play of the Australian coal industry, drawing from the Commission's own research, submissions from a range of stakeholders and the results of a benchmarking study which compared Australia's performance with world's best practice. Essentially, the report finds that recent reforms have improved productivity and some parts of the industry now perform very well. However, the report finds that further changes to federal industry awards and state legislation and regulation could significantly improve the performance of the industry overall

  19. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  20. Environmental radiation hazards around some iron mines and steel plants of Karnataka state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primordial radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) are present in air, food, water, soils, rocks, mineral ores and building materials, are the sources of natural radiation. The sun, stars, rocks, and even our own body emits natural radiation. We live in a sea of natural radioactivity. Work activities involved in naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are potential sources of radiation exposure to workers and members of publics. Iron, Chromite, Uranium, Phosphate and other ores contains higher activity of radionuclides. The iron ore is widely distributed in Bellary, Chitradurga, Tumkur and Chickmagalore districts of Karnataka state. The mining creates a number of environmental problems, that is destructions of important fauna and flora in this affected areas and also this leads various diseases like asthma, leukemia intestine, kidney and liver damage and lung cancer. The environmental γ-radiation levels were measured in this study area using environmental radiation dosimetry. The activity of radionuclides present in the ore samples were estimated by using Hyper Pure Germanium Detector (HPGe). The radon concentration in groundwater and indoor and outdoor concentration were measured by Emanometry and SSNTD techniques. The higher gamma equivalent effective doses were observed at the industrial operation and where the large quantity of iron ore and fines were dumped at the mining sites. The absorbed gamma dose to the workers in study area is slightly higher than the global average. The present work highlights the influence of mining activity, mineral processing and industrial operations are enhanced the fine sized particles, and radon in indoor and outdoor atmosphere is the sources of external radiation dose to the workers and publics. (author)

  1. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history

  2. Marine Biodiversity in the Australian Region

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Alan J.; Rees, Tony; Beesley, Pam; Bax, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    The entire Australian marine jurisdictional area, including offshore and sub-Antarctic islands, is considered in this paper. Most records, however, come from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) around the continent of Australia itself. The counts of species have been obtained from four primary databases (the Australian Faunal Directory, Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota, Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums, and the Australian node of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System),...

  3. Intensity modulated Australian radiation therapy (IMART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Forward and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods will be discussed. IMRT consists of providing a number of differently weighted infield beam segments with the dose from each segment being defined by the multi leaf collimator (MLC) shape and beam weighting. Inverse planned distributions are achieved by the radiotherapy planning computer (RTPC) using an iterative optimisation method to reach a dose solution. With the pinnacle RTPC the number of infield segments to achieve an approximation to the continuous segmented solution can be chosen then the dose is forward computed using these discrete segments. Quality assurance consists of placing the same segmented fields onto a water phantom on the RTPC. Then dose profiles taken at dmax are compared with film maps taken in the same real geometry on the linear accelerator. The film is scanned using a Vidar film scanner and density to dose conversion is achieved by fitting an exponential function to normalisation films. The film dose profiles are then compared with the RTPC dose profiles. A 3% match between film and RTPC has been achieved with the dose profiles provided care is taken with the leaf delivery sequence. There are some leaf delivery non idealities which the dosimetry films show. For example the matchline effect on the Varian 120 leaf MLC has been measured as a 31% hot line which occurs if one leaf drives to where the other leaf was. This effect is mainly due to the rounded leaf ends causing penumbra asymmetry whereby the top of the penumbral profile is slightly different to the bottom. This effect can be reduced by using software offsets of the leaf positions or by simply having a small number of segments with minimal leaf overlap. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  4. Radiative Forcing over the Conterminous United States due to 1973 to 2000 Land Cover Albedo Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data, were used to study the impact of LCLU change on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 84 ecoregions across the conterminous United States. A net continental scale negative radiative forcing of -0.008 Wm-2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested land and increasing developed land. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative (as low as -1.303 Wm-2) due to forest loss and the most positive forcings (up to 0.358 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grassland/shrub. In snow prone ecoregions, where the dominant LCLU transitions were between snow-hiding (e.g., forest) and snow-revealing (e.g., agriculture) LCLU classes, the negative and positive ecoregion forcing estimates were amplified. The results make an important contribution to advancing understanding of the role of LCLU change on the climate system.

  5. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher; Roy, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently available satellite land cover land use (LCLU) and albedo data are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 36 ecoregions covering 43% of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-free broadband albedo values are derived from Landsat LCLU classification maps located using a stratified random sampling methodology to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to LCLU change may be disguised when spatially and temporally explicit data sets are not used. The radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive forcings (up to 0.284 Wm−2) due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative forcings (as low as −0.247 Wm−2) due to forest loss. For the 36 ecoregions considered a small net positive forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.012 Wm−2 is estimated.

  6. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h−1 to 500 nGy h−1. The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h−1. This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h−1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  7. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  8. Results from two workshops: Developing and amending regulations and funding state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first section of this document presents the results of a technical workshop on the process of regulations development and amendment sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This workshop focused on methods for reducing the time it takes to promulgate regulations to help those States that are having difficulty meeting the three-year deadline for adopting new NRC regulations. Workshop participants responded to six questions, reviewed the procedures used by various States for revising and adopting changes to their regulations, and reviewed the time-flow charts used by various States. This workshop was designed to provide guidance to States that are promulgating and revising regulations. The second section of this document summarizes the proceedings of a technical workshop, also sponsored by the NRC, on funding radiation control programs that emphasized fee schedules and effective strategies for the 1990s. This workshop focused on determining the true costs of running a program, on setting realistic fees for the various categories of licenses, and on the most efficient methods for sending invoices, recording receipts, depositing money received, and issuing licenses. Workshop participants responded to seven questions; reviewed the methods various States use to determine true costs; reviewed the procedure that the various States use to produce invoices and licenses; reviewed the procedures that the States are required to abide by when they receive money; and reviewed the method used by the NRC to determine the cost of its various programs

  9. Power reactor services provided by the Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power reactor industry emerged from extensive research and development performed at nonpower reactors (NPRs). As the industry matures, NPRs continue to support and enhance power reactor technology. With the closure of many government and private industry NPRS, there is an increasing call for the 33 universities with operating research reactors to provide the needed services. The Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) includes a 1-MW pool-type pulsing TRIGA reactor, a neutron beam laboratory with real-time neutron radiography equipment, hot cells with master-slave manipulators for remote handling of radioactive materials, a gamma-ray irradiation pool, a low-level radiation monitoring laboratory, and extensive equipment for radiation monitoring, dosimetry, and material properties determination. While equipment is heavily utilized in the instructional and academic research programs, significant time remains available for service work. Cost recovery for service work generates income for personnel, equipment maintenance, and facility improvements. With decreasing federal and state funding for educational programs, it is increasingly important that facilities be fully utilized to generate supplementary revenue. The following are examples of such work performed at the RSEC

  10. The Equation of State and Duration to Radiation Domination After Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozanov, Kaloian D

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the equation of state after inflation and provide an upper bound on the duration before radiation domination by taking the nonlinear dynamics of the fragmented inflaton field into account. A broad class of single-field inflationary models with observationally consistent flattening of the potential at a scale $M$ away from the origin, $V(\\phi)\\propto |\\phi|^{2n}$ near the origin, and where the couplings to other fields are ignored are included in our analysis. We find that the equation of state parameter $w\\rightarrow 0$ for $n=1$ and $w\\rightarrow 1/3$ (after sufficient time) for $n\\gtrsim 1$. We calculate how the number of $e$-folds to radiation domination depends on both $n$ and $M$ when $M\\sim m_{\\rm pl}$, whereas when $M\\ll m_{\\rm pl}$, we find that the duration to radiation domination is negligible. Our results are explained in terms of a linear instability analysis in an expanding universe, scaling arguments, and are supported by detailed 3+1 dimensional lattice simulations. We show how our...

  11. Modeling detector response in solid-state systems for radiation therapy and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order for the many advantageous properties of solid-state dosimeters to be realised in clinic, strategies must be evolved for the calibration of detector systems for an ever expanding range of radiation sources including spectrally complex and mixed radiation fields. Monte Carlo models of the source and detector systems provide a means to account in a precise way for energy absorbed in the detector allowing for primary and secondary radiation processes including multiple scattering. Solid- state dosimeters including Si diodes, MOSFET, diamond detectors and doped optical fibres have been calibrated for dose in monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays in the range 5-50 keV, for quasi monoenergetic X-rays sources from 20-200 keV and for megavoltage X-ray and proton sources, such as are used in radical radiation therapy. With careful consideration of the elemental composition of the detector it is possible to achieve high quality agreement (2-3%) between measurement and Monte Carlo models of the variation of the detector response over a wide energy range. This information is needed in radiation therapy dosimetry where, for large external X-ray beams, detectors see a mixture of high energy primary photons and low energy (e.g. Compton scattered and pair-production-annihilation) photons. Typically, for solid-state detectors, different cavity theories are required for the two energy groups. In addition, high-Z constituents in detectors lead to an enhanced photoelectric absorption, which in the case of pure silicon detectors is up to 8 times greater than the tissue equivalent response. Information from maps of the elemental composition in the detectors, obtained via XRF and PIXE, is used in the models. Monte Carlo models are also being developed for contributions to the response from electron transport, including the microdosimetric response of detectors. Current Monte Carlo codes are able to handle large variations in density that typify tissue equivalent gas

  12. Modular 20 kW solid state RF amplifier for Indus-2 syncrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the design and development of 505.8 MHz modular solid state Radio frequency (RF) amplifier capable of delivering 20 kW continuous RF power. It has been successfully commissioned for serving as the modern RF power source in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source. For this amplifier, design procedure has been formulated for the solid state amplifier modules, radial combiner, divider, directional coupler and overall system architecture, with specifications suited to RF source for particle accelerator. This article describes underlying design principles and indigenous development of this amplifier, consisting of 400 W amplifier modules, 5 kW 16-port radial combiner/divider and directional couplers. Detail performance characterization of amplifier on component level as well as system level serves as useful data for higher power solid state amplifier designers. Simple design, indigenous technology, high efficiency and ease of fabrication, are the main features of this design.

  13. Modular 20 kW solid state RF amplifier for Indus-2 syncrotron radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P. R.; Sharma, D. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Tiwari, A. K.; Lad, M.; Kumar, R.; Badapanda, M. K.; Gupta, P. D.

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the design and development of 505.8 MHz modular solid state Radio frequency (RF) amplifier capable of delivering 20 kW continuous RF power. It has been successfully commissioned for serving as the modern RF power source in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source. For this amplifier, design procedure has been formulated for the solid state amplifier modules, radial combiner, divider, directional coupler and overall system architecture, with specifications suited to RF source for particle accelerator. This article describes underlying design principles and indigenous development of this amplifier, consisting of 400 W amplifier modules, 5 kW 16-port radial combiner/divider and directional couplers. Detail performance characterization of amplifier on component level as well as system level serves as useful data for higher power solid state amplifier designers. Simple design, indigenous technology, high efficiency and ease of fabrication, are the main features of this design.

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy with chemical state selectivity on histidine and acetamide using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering experiments carried out on two model substances: histidine and acetamide using a UV synchrotron radiation source. In the case of aqueous histidine solution each protonated state of histidine tautomers was selectively excited by tuning the incident wavelength and the vibrational state of each protonated state was studied. We also demonstrated that the local pH condition of histidine can be identified directly from the spectra above pH 9. In the case of acetamide, the resonance Raman bands of acetamide with a stronger hydrogen bond at the NH2 site and weaker hydrogen bond at the C=O site were selectively observed. These findings will extend the selectivity and sensitivity of RR spectroscopy that is helpful to understanding protein functionality. (author)

  15. Effect of mitochondrial energetic state on radiation-induced DNA internucleosomal fragmentation in thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the potential effect of energetic state of mitochondria on apoptosis in thymocytes induced by ionizing radiation, the effect of various mitochondria energy potential on DNA internucleosome fragmentation is studied. Thymocytes of rats-males were exposed to radiation of GUPOS installation (137Cs) at 8 Gy dose, dose rate - 1.8 Gy/min. It is shown that the irradiation stimulates the DNA fragmentation during thymocytes incubation, but in case of incubation with mitochondria energy potential inhibitors the amount of dead cells does not exceed the reference level. It is proposed that internucleosome fragmentation suppression by mitochondria energy potential inhibitors is connected with the limitation of energy incoming in the ATP form

  16. Comparative effect of radioactive radiation on roots in coastal and hinterland locations in Akwa Ibom state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of the radiation levels in root crops from Ibeno (an oil producing area) and Uyo, (a non oil producing area) in Akwa Ibom state was carried out. The radioactivity level in cassava, potato, sweet yam and coco yam was investigated. Result shows that the radiation level in root samples in Uyo ranges between 8.58 mBqg''-''1 and 1.06 mBqg''-''1 as compared with those from Ibeno, which ranges between 34.7 mBqg''-''1 and 3.7 mBqg''-''1. Yam and cassava samples from Ibeno have the highest radioactive levels of 34.7 mBqg''-''1 while water yam sample in Uyo has the highest radioactive level of radioactive materials in roots than Uyo. This is probably due to the oil producing activities in the area

  17. Radiative capture of nucleons at astrophysical energies with single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative capture of nucleons at energies of astrophysical interest is one of the most important processes for nucleosynthesis. The nucleon capture can occur either by a compound nucleus reaction or by a direct process. The compound reaction cross sections are usually very small, especially for light nuclei. The direct capture proceeds either via the formation of a single-particle resonance or a non-resonant capture process. In this work we calculate radiative capture cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for nuclei in the mass region A<20 using single-particle states. We carefully discuss the parameter fitting procedure adopted in the simplified two-body treatment of the capture process. Then we produce a detailed list of cases for which the model works well. Useful quantities, such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients, are obtained and compared to published data.

  18. Radiative decays of excited ΛQ baryons in the bound state picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that, in the bound state picture, the Λc(2593)→Λcγ and Λc(2625)→Λcγ decays are severely suppressed. On the other hand, for their bottom counterparts, which are predicted to have masses of 5900 and 5926 MeV, respectively, they may have significant radiative branching ratios. The Λb(5926)→Λbγ mode possibly dominates over the strong decay mode, while the Λb(5900) resonance lies below the strong decay threshold and can only decay radiatively. The isospin allowed ΛQ**→ΣQγ mode is expected to be small. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Nuclear and radiation techniques - state of art and development trends; Techniki jadrowe i radiacyjne - stan obecny oraz kierunki rozwoju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The state of art and development trends of nuclear and radiation techniques in Poland and worldwide have been presented. Among them the radiometric gages, radiation technologies, radiotracer methods and measuring systems for pipeline and vessels, brightness control have been described and their applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection have been shown and discussed. 35 refs, 1 fig.

  20. Relation between basis functional state of spinal cord and morphometrical parameters of neutrons upon local X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relation between CNS functional state and structural changes of neutrons in spinal cord under local exposure to 38 or 76 Gy X-radiation was studied. Morphological analysis show that the peripheral nerves increase stimulation (by hypoxia or barbiturates) reduce the radiation induced destruction of spinal neurons. Use of inhibition mediators as specific CNS radioprotectors is supposed to be possible

  1. The 1998 calibration of Australian secondary standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New calibration factors are reported for several of the ionization chambers maintained at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) as Australian secondary standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose at 60Co. These calibration factors supplement or replace the calibration factors given in earlier reports. Updated 90Sr reference source data are given for the ARL chambers, and for two of the ANSTO chambers. These results confirm the stability of the secondary standards. A re-calibration of the ANSTO reference electrometer is reported. This was carried out using an improved method, which is fully described

  2. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  3. Current status and development perspectives of state nuclear and radiation safety regulation in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state radiation safety regulation in Russia stems from the establishment in 1946 of the state radiation monitoring service (the RNC 'Kurchatov Istitute' nowadays). The nuclear safety was subject to control later. Since 1963 NPP safety was brought under oversight by various organisations. It should be noted that the main emphasis was laid on controlling nuclear safety. Gosatomnadzor of Russia was shaped as it is now in 1991 (first as the State Committee, then - the State Committee under the President of the Russian Federation, then - the Federal Service and finally - the Federal Authority). Gosatomnadzor of Russia has become not only a supervisory, but also regulatory body. The share of competence of Gosatomnadzor of Russia was extended to cover, along with NPPs and nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities and national economy organizations as well as military facilities. Later, by Decrees of the President of the Russian Federation (1993, 1995) the Ministry of Defense and a number of Minatom's facilities and organizations were taken out from the Gosatomnadzor of Russia's oversight. Presently, basic areas of activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia being the state authority for nuclear and radiation safety regulation, spring from the Federal Law on 'Atomic Energy Use' and are defined by the 'Statute of the Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia' approved by the Government of the Russian Federation in 2002. Among these areas are the following: a) Development, approval and enactment of federal rules and regulations in the area of atomic energy use; b) Licensing with the aim of ensuring safety of activities in the area of atomic energy use; Organization of safety expert review of nuclear installations, radiation sources and storage facilities; Oversight for compliance with nuclear and radiation safety rules and regulations as well as license conditions; Conduct of inspections by Gosatomnadzor of Russia's inspection departments with regard to

  4. An Australian Sense of Xenophobia

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Burney

    2009-01-01

    Linda Burney of the Wiradjuri Nation and Minister for Community Services in New South Wales discusses how xenophobia has manifested itself as forms of political and institutional racism in Australian history. She asks us to think of Australia as a giant and beautiful mosaic with over 200 Aboriginal Nations and for the rest of the Australian population to welcome ways to work with all its nation's people.

  5. Learner discipline: An Australian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    STEWART, D.

    2004-01-01

    Australian schools by and large are safe schools. Nonetheless discipline problems do exist – including bullying behaviour. For this kind of problem schools should have management policies in place. As traditional behaviour-management practices – including corporal punishment – are largely prohibited in Australian schools, contemporary practices centre on management through supportive school programmes, including appropriate curricula and school-support structures. This article supports the be...

  6. Chinese Rebalancing and Australian Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese authorities plan to gradually rebalance the composition of Chinese economic growth from investment towards household consumption. This article uses the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) to give a general sense of how this rebalancing might affect Australian exports and economic activity. Dollar for dollar, Chinese investment appears to absorb more than twice as much Australian value-added output as Chinese household consumption. This largely reflects the significant role of resou...

  7. Prospects for Australian uranium exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the focus of this paper is Australian uranium exports, the status of other energy minerals is also discussed briefly. The size of its uranium resources has given Australia the opportunity to become a major exporter; however, it is estimated that any major long-term expansion of uranium production hinges on favourable market conditions and on major changes in the Australian government's policy towards the industry. 4 tabs., ill

  8. The Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert

    2004-03-01

    The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has "space" for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in July 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 7 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries 10contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments.

  9. Mean annual solar radiation in the United States Pacific Northwest (1991-2005) summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent mean annual solar radiation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...

  10. Extracting information about the initial state from the black hole radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lochan, Kinjalk

    2015-01-01

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state, contained in the distortions of the black hole radiation from the thermal spectrum, which can be detected by the asymptotic observers. We identify the class of in-states which can be fully reconstructed from the information contained in the distortions at the semiclassical level. Even for the general in-state, we can uncover a specific amount of information about the initial state. For a large class of initial states, some specific observables defined in the initial Hilbert space are completely determined from the resulting final spectrum. These results suggest that a \\textit{classical} collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantu...

  11. Radiative lifetime and quenching constants of the PF(A3II) state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Raybone, D.; Setser, Donald W.

    1993-06-01

    The radiative lifetime and the quenching rate constants of the PF(A3PI0,1,2) state have been measured using a microwave discharge to generate PF(X3(Sigma) -) in a flow reactor incorporating laser-induced fluorescence. A radiative lifetime of 4.2 +/- 0.2 microsecond(s) has been determined for a 300 K Boltzmann distribution of rotational and spin- orbit states of PF(A,v' equals 0). The two-body quenching rate constants for PF(A3PI) by diatomic and polyatomic molecules and rare gases were determined at 300 K from the pressure dependence of the first-order decay constants. Electronic quenching by He, Ar, CF4 and SF6 is inefficient and upper limits to these deactivation rate constants are 2 - 4 X 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Except for highly fluorinated molecules, the quenching constants for most molecules are in the range of 0.05 - 4.0 X 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The available data suggest that the PF(A3$PI0,1,2) state has some promise as a potential UV laser candidate, providing that an efficient excitation method can be discovered.

  12. Radiation grafting of maleic anhydride onto polypropylene in solid state via ultrafine blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiumin

    2014-05-01

    A novel method to prepare maleic anhydride grafting onto poly (propylene) (PP-g-MAH) was described. It was performed by γ-irradiation in solid state via ultrafine blend in the absence of any initiator and the grafting mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results. First, ultrafine blend of MAH and PP was prepared through ultrasonic initiation in melt state and then cooled rapidly. Second, the blend was radiated by γ-irradiation in the circumstance of atmosphere. Effects of irradiation dose and MAH concentration on the amount of grafted MAH were investigated. Compared with the conventional solid-state radiation grafting method, PP-g-MAH obtained via this method shows a higher graft rate of MAH. This novel method also has the advantages of solventless, energy efficient, low cost and simple operation. Furthermore, it is very easy to get purified products. The molecular structures of grafted copolymer were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscope were used to determine the degree of crystallinity and crystalline structure.

  13. An Ode to Joy...or the Sounds of Silence? An Exploration of Arts Education Policy in Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Bowie, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The arts are an integral and important component of our everyday lives. As such, they need to be a vital part of our children's education. However, this has rarely been the case in Australian state primary schools over the past two hundred years. This article explores the history of the arts in Australian state primary schools since the…

  14. Disentangling the Relationship of the Australian Marsupial Orders Using Retrotransposon and Evolutionary Network Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Gallus, Susanne; Janke, Axel; Kumar, Vikas; Nilsson, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The ancestors to the Australian marsupials entered Australia around 60 (54-72) million years ago from Antarctica, and radiated into the four living orders Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, Diprotodontia and Notoryctemorphia. The relationship between the four Australian marsupial orders has been a long-standing question, because different phylogenetic studies were not able to consistently reconstruct the same topology. Initial in silico analysis of the Tasmanian devil genome and experimental sc...

  15. Entanglement of two-level atoms'quantum states in a strong thermal radiation field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deng-yu; XIE Li-jun; TANG Shi-qing; ZHAN Xiao-gui; GAO Feng

    2008-01-01

    The two-level atom is described by Pauli sign and environment is described by infinite harmonic particle thermal reser-voir.We have studied the entanglement of two-level atoms which are put in the strongly thermal radiation field.The two-level atoms' re-ducible density rectangular array is obtained.We discuss the properties of entanglement by virtue of concurrence.It is shown that the two two-level atoms initially situated in different coherent superposition states,entanglement of atoms have obvious dissimilarity.

  16. Sanitary surveillance of ionizing radiations use in health services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of the Sanitarian Surveillance actions developed at Sao Paulo State, Brazil, concerning the control of ionizing radiation is presented. Aspects such as technical standards, inspection forms, assessment and quality assurance programs, in the fields of medical and dental radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine are discussed. A program is also introduced for sample monitoring of these instruments. A set of protocol with criteria to be used in quality assurance programs, including equipment and procedures is presented. Participation of several societies of specialists and consumer defense organizations in the elaboration of technical regulations has contributed to concrete adoption by health care services

  17. Coherence effects between the initial and final state radiation in a dense QCD medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these proceedings contribution we review our recent results of medium modifications to the coherence pattern between the initial and final state radiation. We study single gluon production off a highly energetic parton that undergoes a hard scattering and subsequently crosses a dense QCD medium of finite size. Multiple scatterings lead to a partial suppression of the interferences between different emitters that opens the phase space for large angle emissions. We briefly discuss the generalization of this setup to describe gluon production in the case of pA collisions by including finite length and energy corrections. The configuration studied here may have phenomenological consequences in high-energy nuclear collisions

  18. Photoionization cross section of the 4p55d[7/2] J=4 state and radiative lifetimes of three states of Kr I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three states in Kr I were studied in a pure Kr discharge at pressures ≤15 mTorr. Two-photon excitation from the metastable 4p55s[3/2] J=2 state produced the 4p55d[7/2] J=4 state whose photoionization cross section and lifetime were measured. The photoionization cross section at λ=1064 nm is 32±5 Mb, and the radiative lifetime is 142±12 ns. One-photon excitation produced the 4p55p[5/2] J=2 and J=3 states of Kr I, whose radiative lifetimes were measured. In contrast to previous lifetime measurements of these two 5p states, this work used both state-specific excitation and low pressures. The pressures were low enough that collisional transfer between these two states was negligible. In a very clean 8-mm-diam cell, the 5p[5/2] J=3 lifetime increased with Kr pressure. This increase is attributed to radiation trapping on the 5s[3/2] J=2 to 5p[5/2] J=3 transition. This radiation trapping by the metastable first excited state of Kr I was observed in a pure Kr discharge at pressures below 4 mTorr

  19. Characterization of radiative properties of Nd2O3 doped phosphate and silicate glasses for solid state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd2O3 doped calcium aluminium phosphate and calcium aluminium silicate glasses prepared to compare their absorption and emission properties. Radiative lifetime of the excited state 4F3/2 derived by Judd-Ofelt theory applied to the absorption spectra. Using the photoluminescence spectrometer the steady state emission and relaxation time from excited energy level recorded under green light excitation. Phosphate glass has higher emission cross-section, higher radiative lifetime but less quantum efficiency due to non-radiative quenching through hydroxyl ions compared to silicate glass for Nd3+:4F3/2→4I9/2 emission

  20. State of discussions on the draft amendment to the Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on the state of procedures to frame an internal opinion on the draft amendment to the Radiation Protection Ordinance, in this connection about principles of radiation protection according to the EURATOM's basic standard of 1980, the introduction of the effective dose equivalent, and the partial body dose limits based on proposals or discussion papers of ICRP and EURATOM, the Radiation Protection Commission, the Federal German Ministry of the Interior, and the European Community. The article furthermore sets out new limiting values being laid down for the protection of the population, the habits of living to be laid down for the reference person, and the revision of the wording of the waste management rules in section 81 and the following sections. It is intended to take into account the new dosimetrical models and data from ICRP 30 for inhalation and ingestion (appendix IV), and, the paper points out, new ideas have emerged after the Chernobyl reactor accident, which should be incorporated where appropriate. (TRV)

  1. Radiation-induced off-state leakage current in commercial power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total dose hardness of several commercial power MOSFET technologies is examined. After exposure to 20 krad(SiO2) most of the n- and p-channel devices examined in this work show substantial (2 to 6 orders of magnitude) increases in off-state leakage current. For the n-channel devices, the increase in radiation-induced leakage current follows standard behavior for moderately thick gate oxides, i.e., the increase in leakage current is dominated by large negative threshold voltage shifts, which cause the transistor to be partially on even when no bias is applied to the gate electrode. N-channel devices biased during irradiation show a significantly larger leakage current increase than grounded devices. The increase in leakage current for the p-channel devices, however, was unexpected. For the p-channel devices, it is shown using electrical characterization and simulation that the radiation-induced leakage current increase is related to an increase in the reverse bias leakage characteristics of the gated diode which is formed by the drain epitaxial layer and the body. This mechanism does not significantly contribute to radiation-induced leakage current in typical p-channel MOS transistors. The p-channel leakage current increase is nearly identical for both biased and grounded irradiations and therefore has serious implications for long duration missions since even devices which are usually powered off could show significant degradation and potentially fail.

  2. Radiation protection knowledge transfer according to the state of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19th summer school of radiation protection took place in 2015 in Berlin. The main topics were effects and hazards of ionizing radiation, trends and legal regulations in radiation protection, dosimetry and measuring techniques, radiation exposure in nuclear medicine, radiation exposure in industry, radiation exposure in the nuclear technology - final disposal and dismantling problems Several case studies covered the issues accident management, personal and environmental dosimetry, skin contamination, modern techniques in medicine, radiation protection for radiography.

  3. Study of the Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar System

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D Dbar events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D Dbar mass spectrum shows clear evidence of the psi(3770) plus other structures near 3.9, 4.1, and 4.4 GeV/c^2. No evidence for Y(4260) -> D Dbar is observed, leading to an upper limit of B(Y(4260) -> D Dbar)/B(Y(4260) -> J/psi pi+ pi-) < 1.0 at 90 % confidence level.

  4. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting. PMID:27072296

  5. Communication dated 14 December 2012 received from the Australian Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 14 December 2012 from the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office, enclosing a paper on behalf of the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network on the fundamentals and good practices of safeguards regulatory authorities. The aforementioned communication and, as requested, the enclosed paper are herewith circulated for the information of Member States.

  6. Australian Mining and Petroleum Law Association yearbook 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowan, B. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    Papers are presented under the following headings: state interest - Gawler Craton; constitutional law; confidential information; long term gas contracts - past, present and future; resource project financing; contracting for electricity; tax on transactions; joint venture issues; recent developments; climate change and the Kyoto Protocol - emissions trading and Australian resource industries; native title and cultural heritage and corporate governance. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  7. Developmental Gender Differences for Overhand Throwing in Aboriginal Australian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jerry R.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Thomas, Katherine T.; Campbell, Amity C.; Elliott, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    In a review of 46 meta-analyses of gender differences, overhand throwing had the largest gender difference favoring boys (ES greater than 3.0). Expectations for gender-specific performances may be less pronounced in female Australian Aborigines, because historical accounts state they threw for defense and hunting. Overhand throwing velocities and…

  8. Australian Curriculum Reform II: Health and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    It is implied by governing organizations that Australia is presently experiencing its first national curriculum reform, when as the title suggests it is the second. However, until now Australian states and territories have been responsible for the education curriculum delivered within schools. The present national curriculum reform promises one…

  9. Logistic support provided to Australian disaster medical assistance teams: results of a national survey of team members

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is likely that calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, the present study was designed to evaluate the Australian DMAT experience and the need for logistic support. Methods: Data were collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Australian DMAT deployme...

  10. The outlook for the world and Australian oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global demand for oil is projected to continue its upward trend to 2000-1, with growth in the transport sector expected to underpin future increases in oil consumption. World oil consumption is projected to be matched by global production, keeping the average annual oil price relatively stable. In many countries, the diversion of oil revenue to other projects is threatening to constrain increases in production capacity, particularly in the OPEC countries. The encouragement of foreign investment in state oil industries is a likely method of easing the constraint. Australian exploration activity is rising steadily with the prospect of stable oil prices, expanding gas markets and the incentives provided by a number of recent discoveries. While the geographical pattern of Australian production has now changed, with Western Australian production exceeding Victoria production, Australia is expected to maintain its position in the world oil market as a significant producer, importer and exporter. (author). 6 figs., 23 refs

  11. Review and state of the art on radiation sterilization of medical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorpema, J. W.

    Review and state of art of radiation sterilization Radiation as a sterilization method was designed in the years 1950-1960. The decade afterwards the application for sterilization of medical products and devices was developped. Extensive studies performed on both the physical, chemical and (micro) biological aspects revealed the requirements for safety and efficacy. These efforts were highly stimulated by the IAEA and resulted in a elegant sterilization method. In product manufacturing, where sterilization represents a final step in the production sequence, radiation has eversince reached its widest application in the field of medical devices. As a spin off it initiated new ideas and approaches towards sterilization in general. Consequently sterility was redefined in terms of a probabilistic concept (10-6) and the bioburden determination method was introduced as a tool for both quality control and potential instrument for dose setting. However these refinements also created controversies, whereby the dose requirements became divided for Europe and North America. Moreover studies recently performed in Europe suggest even a further extension of this opinion gap. Detailed studies, on the clinical effects of low dose treated products (12.5 - 17.5 kGy) are needed to counterbalance the dose suggestions extracted from statistically based dose determinations (> 28 kGy ) and the microbiological resistance determinations ( > 28 - 30 kGy). Dose setting based on risk classification could be considered for distinct product categories. In the mean time a general acceptance of the originally, in the early seventhies, established minimum dose of 25 kGy would seem a reasonable compromise. As the interest for radiation sterilization as the favourable, non polluting and simple method is increasing rapidly over the last five years, both gamma- and beta driven sterilization plants will be needed. Harmonization on sterilization dose therfore requires high priority.

  12. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  13. The phonon density of states measured with synchrotron radiation and nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experiment, we will use synchrotron radiation to measure the density of states of vibrational excitations (phonons.) Each group of students will conduct an experiment at sector 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, the nation's premier synchrotron radiation facility. We provide one support staff per group, i.e., Drs. Michael Hu, Sarvjit Shastri, Wolfgang Sturhahn, and Tom Toellner will help their group to perform the experiment and interpret the data. After data collection (1-2 h per group), the remaining time will be spent with evaluation and interpretation. In addition to your own data, we provide similar sets of data. Computer hardware (iMac running as X-terminals) and software for data manipulation will be provided. It is important that you understand the basic principles of the experimental method. Therefore we strongly recommend that you read the next section and the attached article Phonon Density of States Measured by Inelastic Nuclear Resonant Scattering. You are expected to use this description to familiarize yourself with the experimental setup and its individual components before the start of the experiment. You should be able to solve at least 75% of the quiz correctly. If you have particular questions or a general problem in understanding this document, please contact Dr. W. Sturhahn, Bldg. 431, Rm. D007, tel. 0163

  14. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest

  15. Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office, Annual Report 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the year Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office (ASNO) continued our substantial contribution to the development and strengthening of international verification regimes concerned with weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Domestically, ASNO conducted, or contributed to, review of WMD- related legislation and administration, amending permits to enhance security arrangements, and beginning development of supporting legislative changes. Another major area of work is the replacement research reactor project, where ASNO has been closely involved through safeguards and security aspects. This year has been dominated by the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 on the United States, and ongoing consequences. These events, and the concern that terrorists would use WMD if they were able to acquire them, have served to emphasise the importance of effective counter-proliferation and counter-terrorism measures to complement the non-proliferation regimes. They have also focused attention on the need to deal with non- compliance with WMD treaty commitments. The key achivements reported for the year under review include: 1. All treaty and statutory requirements met in respect of: nuclear material and nuclear items in Australia, Australian uranium exports (Australian Obligated Nuclear Material), chemicals covered by the CWC (Chemical Weapons Convention) and establishment of CTBT(Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) monitoring stations; 2. Effective contribution to strengthening non-proliferation verification regimes and counter terrorism initiatives: ongoing support for IAEA safeguards development, regional outreach on IAEA safeguards, CWC implementation and encouraging CTBT ratification, ANSTO security upgraded; security plan approved for construction of replacement research reactor, review, with other responsible authorities, of security of CWC related chemicals, and radiation sources

  16. Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information on the results of supervision of radiation protection and gives details about radiological situation within the area of the Czech Republic. The new 'Atomic Law' was passed by the Czech Republic Parliament in 1997. Another 10 legislative documents (Decrees) in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection were prepared and issued by the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory authority. (author)

  17. 1997 Report of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legislative basis of the authority of the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory body is outlined, its organizational scheme is presented, and the responsibilities of the various departments are highlighted. The operation of major Czech nuclear facilities, including the Dukovany NPP which is in operation and the Temelin NPP which is under construction, is described with respect to nuclear safety. Since the new Atomic Act extended the Office's responsibilities to radiation protection supervision in the Czech Republic, a survey of ionizing radiation sources and their supervision is given. Other topics include, among other things, nuclear material transport, the state system for nuclear materials accountancy and control, central registries for radiation protection, nuclear waste management, the National Radiation Monitoring Network, personnel qualification and training, emergency planning, legislative activities, international cooperation, and public information. (P.A.)

  18. Report of the State Office for Nuclear Safety on state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legislative basis of the authority of the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory body is outlined, its organizational scheme is presented, and the responsibilities of the various departments are highlighted. The operation of major Czech nuclear facilities, including the Dukovany NPP which is in operation and the Temelin NPP which is under construction, is described with respect to nuclear safety. Since the Office's responsibilities also cover radiation protection in the Czech Republic, a survey of ionizing radiation sources and their supervision is given. Other topics include, among other things, nuclear material transport, the state system for nuclear materials accountancy and control, central registries for radiation protection, nuclear waste management, the National Radiation Monitoring Network, personnel qualification and training, emergency planning, legislative activities, international cooperation, and public information. (P.A.)

  19. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  20. Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection and gives details of the radiological situation within the Czech Republic. Some new responsibilities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety and changes, as reflected in its organisational chart, are shown. (author)

  1. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear installations and contains information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection in 2003 in the Czech Republic. The second part of the report describes new responsibilities of the SUJB in the domain of nuclear, chemical, bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons ban. (author)

  2. Mixing state of aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Radiative forcing and heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.; Ramachandran, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols are a major atmospheric variable which perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiation balance by absorbing and scattering the solar and terrestrial radiation. Aerosols are produced by natural and anthropogenic processes. The presence of different types of aerosol over a location and aerosols transported from long-range can give rise to different mixing states because of aging and interaction among the different aerosol species. Knowledge of the mixing state of aerosols is important for an accurate assessment of aerosols in climate forcing, as assumptions regarding the mixing state of aerosol and its effect on optical properties can give rise to uncertainties in modeling their direct and indirect effects [1]. Seasonal variations in mixing states of aerosols over an urban (Kanpur) and a rural location (Gandhi College) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) are determined using the measured and modeled aerosol optical properties, and the impact of aerosol mixing state on aerosol radiative forcing are investigated. IGP is one of the most populated and polluted river basins in the world, rich in fertile lands and agricultural production. Kanpur is an urban, industrial and densely populated city, and has several large/small scale industries and vehicles, while Gandhi College in IGP is a rural village, located southeast of Kanpur. Aerosol optical properties obtained from Aerosol Robotic Network sun/sky radiometers [2] over these two environmentally distinct locations in Indo-Gangetic Plain are used in the study, along with aerosol vertical profiles obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) lidar observations. Probable mixing state of aerosols is determined utilizing the aerosol optical properties viz., aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter. The coated-sphere Mie calculation requires the refractive index of core and shell species, and the radius of core and shell particles. Core to shell radius

  3. Radiative transition probabilities in the X2Πg state of CO2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ab initio calculated potential energy and electric dipole moment functions, absolute radiative transition probabilities between the rovibronic Renner-Teller states of the electronic ground state X2Πg of CO2+ have been evaluated. The rovibronic eigenstates were obtained (up to 6500cm-1 and J≤(13)/2 ) from variational calculations including the Renner-Teller and spin-orbit angular momentum couplings. The absolute intensities for the rovibrational states of the neutral CO2 electronic ground state, calculated by a similar approach, are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data. For CO2+ the presented results are expected to have similar accuracy. It is found that the overtone intensities of the antisymmetric stretching mode of CO2+ are of similar magnitude as the fundamental transitions, in contrast with CO2. The theoretically generated IR-emission spectrum is compared with the limb spectrum of the Mars atmosphere, measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer on Mars Global Surveyor

  4. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  5. Morphological effects on the radiative properties of soot aerosols in different internally mixing states with sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative properties of soot aerosols largely depend on their mixing state and morphology factors. In this paper, we generated soot aggregates in four mixing states with sulfate, including bare soot, partly coated soot, heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. The number of monomers and fractal dimension of soot were varied in each mixing state while the radius of monomers was fixed at 0.025 μm. Using the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA), we calculated optical parameters relevant for climate forcing simulation at mid-visible wavelength (0.55 μm). Internal mixing results in enhanced absorption, scattering cross sections as well as the single scattering albedo. The enhancement ratio of the absorption is largest for heavily coated soot, which ranges from 1.5 to 1.65 with a soot volume fraction of 0.15 and is larger for soot with larger fractal dimension. The scattering cross section can be dramatically increased by factors larger than 10 when soot is heavily coated. The increasing of both the scattering cross section and the single scattering albedo is larger for soot aggregates with smaller number of monomers and fractal dimension. The asymmetry parameter is insensitive to the fractal dimension for heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. Two simplified models including the homogeneous sphere model (HS) and the core shell sphere model (CS) were examined using the DDA results as references. The performance of the HS and CS model largely depends on the morphology factors and the mixing state of soot. For bare and partly coated soot, both the HS and CS model can introduce relative errors as large as several tens percent. For heavily coated soot, the HS model predicts the absorption with relative errors within 10%, while it overestimates the absorption with relative errors no larger than 20% for soot with inclusion. The HS model predicts the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter with relative errors no larger than 10% for heavily

  6. Dependence of erythemally weighted UV radiation on geographical parameters in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinli; Gao, Wei; Davis, John; Olson, Becky; Janson, George; Slusser, James

    2007-09-01

    The relationship between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface and geographical parameters is helpful in estimating the spatial distribution of UV radiation, which provides useful information to evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced UV levels on human health, agriculture, environment, and ecosystems for sustainable development. Measurements of erythemally weighted UV radiation at the sites of the United States Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVBMRP) monitoring network were analyzed to investigate the geographical distribution and seasonal variations. Twenty nine observation sites, which had continuous measurements during the recent six years, are selected for this study; twenty seven of them are distributed in the United States, including one in Hawaii and one in Alaska, and two of them are located in Canada along the United States border. The measurements were taken using the Yankee Environmental Systems Inc. (YES) UVB-1 ultraviolet pyranometer. This work focuses the data from the recent six years of 2001-2006 and the measurements during summer months (June-August) are emphasized. For each day, the measurements are integrated from sunrise to sunset to produce the daily UV dosage, which is then averaged for different seasons or for the whole year over the six years to generate the average daily UV dosage. A multivariable regression technique is exploited to characterize the dependence of UV dosages on geographical parameters, including latitude and altitude. The results show that, although there are many factors, such as clouds, ozone, aerosols, air pollutants, and haze, that affect the UV radiation intensity at a location, the latitude and altitude of the site are the primary factors that regulate the average daily UV dosage. On average over the last six years in the United States, more than 95% of the variability in averaged daily UV dosages can be explained by the latitude and altitude. Longitude is

  7. Report on the 1999 activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the fields of state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The responsibilities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory body are outlined. State supervision encompassed, in particular, the Dukovany NPP which is in operation and the Temelin NPP which is under construction. The operating patterns for Dukovany (operational events, Limits and Conditions, maintenance, support, ...) and construction progress and licensing of Temelin are described in detail. Other topics dealt with include, among others, ionizing radiation sources and workplaces handling such sources, nuclear material transport, state system for nuclear materials accountancy and control, central registries for radiation protection, nuclear waste management, the National Radiation Monitoring Network, personnel qualification and training, emergency planning, legislative activities, international cooperation, and public information. (P.A.)

  8. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper discusses how this model…

  9. Water metabolism in Australian marsupials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies are discussed in which tritiated water (TOH) has been used to investigate water metabolism in Australian marsupials, particularly arid-zone species. Equilibration of injected TOH in large kangaroos was slower than in smaller marsupials and similar to that in ruminants and camels, presumably because of the high gut water space of all large forestomach fermenters. Loss of TOH in urine, faeces and insensible water during equilibration was also similar to that in ruminants. Total body water (TBW) was similar whether estimated by equilibration or extrapolation. TBW of small marsupial species (16 g to 6.5 kg body weight) was usually in the range found for small eutherian mammals (56 to 68% of body weight). However, in the larger kangaroos TBW ranged from 73 to 78% of body weight, possibly due to the low body fat content and the high ratio of gut contents to total body weight of kangaroos. In general, the water turnover rate of marsupials is about 30% below that of eutherians; this has been related to their lower metabolic rate. Nevertheless, significant differences in water turnover have been found between some species. It has been suggested that there may be a correlation between the water turnover rates measured under ad libitum water availability and the aridity of the animal's habitat. However, this is not always so; differences in behaviour and in the water content of the natural diet explain why some marsupials with high ad libitum water turnovers can survive in desert environments. The physiological state of the animals (e.g. lactation) has also been shown to affect water turnover, both in the laboratory and in the field. (author)

  10. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of zircon: Radiation damage and the metamict state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage and the nature of the metamict state in natural zircons were studied and analysed using reflection and absorption infrared spectroscopy. IR bands of crystalline zircon in the far infrared region remain detectable in highly metamict samples. This suggests that some local order or short-range order persists around Zr atoms in the amorphized phase. Signals due to Si-O-Si linkages, which do not exist in crystalline zircon, were observed in the regions of 500-800 cm-1 and 1000-1300 cm-1. The results suggest the appearance of high-Q species and a complex polymerization state in the metamict state. The dielectric constant (ε=ε'+iε'') and energy loss function (-Im(1/ε)) were obtained through Kramers-Kronig analysis. Radiation damage leads to significant and continuous variations in ε and -Im(1/ε). IR spectra of damaged samples were analysed using the effective-medium approach. It was found that IR signals of damaged zircons consist of two principal components: one with broad spectral features from the amorphized/metamict material and the other with relatively sharp lines from crystalline material with various degrees of structural distortion. The former signals increase in intensity with increasing dose while the latter decrease in intensity. The signals from the amorphized phase have been detected in samples with radiation dose as low as 1.5x1018 α-events g-1. The dose dependence of the fraction of the amorphized phase was extracted. The result confirms earlier analysis in x-ray diffraction and NMR studies. The IR data show a feature that may be due to the existence of an intermediate phase in moderately damaged samples. An extra, sharp IR band near 796 cm-1, which shows no detectable orientation dependence, is observed in all the samples with intermediate degrees of damage and its intensity shows a systematic change with increasing dose - an increase followed by a decrease. This band is absent or very weak in both undamaged and very heavily

  11. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 106 produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi → γπ+π- is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the π+π- final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ππ channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2+ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi → γ rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi → γK+K- is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2+ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0+ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi → γxi(2220))BR(xi(2220) → K+K-) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10-5

  12. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsweiler, K.F.

    1984-05-01

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ..pi pi.. channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K/sup +/K/sup -/ is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi ..-->.. ..gamma..xi(2220))BR(xi(2220) ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -5/.

  13. Patient Experience of Australian General Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ajit; Greco, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The number of data-based research articles focusing on patient sociodemographic profiling and experience with healthcare practices is still relatively small. One of the reasons for this relative lack of research is that categorizing patients into different demographic groups can lead to significant reductions in sample numbers for homogeneous subgroups. The aim of this article is to identify problems and issues when dealing with big data that contains information at two levels: patient experience of their general practice, and scores received by practices. The Practice Accreditation and Improvement Survey (PAIS) consisting of 27 five-point Likert items and 11 sociodemographic questions is a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)-endorsed instrument for seeking patient views as part of the accreditation of Australian general practices. The data were collected during the 3-year period May 2011-July 2014, during which time PAIS was completed for 3734 individual general practices throughout Australia involving 312,334 anonymous patients. This represents over 60% of practices in Australia, and ∼75% of practices that undergo voluntary accreditation. The sampling method for each general practice was convenience sampling. The results of our analysis show how sociodemographic profiles of Australian patients can affect their ratings of practices and also how the location of the practice (State/Territory, remote access area) can affect patient experience. These preliminary findings can act as an initial set of results against which future studies in patient experience trends can be developed and measured in Australia. Also, the methods used in this article provide a methodological framework for future patient experience researchers to use when dealing with data that contain information at two levels, such as the patient and practice. Finally, the outcomes demonstrate that different subgroups can experience healthcare provision differently, especially

  14. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index Martin Thoms, Melissa Parsons, Phil Morley Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. Natural hazard management policy directions in Australia - and indeed internationally - are increasingly being aligned to ideas of resilience. Resilience to natural hazards is the ability of individuals and communities to cope with disturbance and adversity and to maintain adaptive behaviour. Operationalizing the measurement and assessment of disaster resilience is often undertaken using a composite index, but this exercise is yet to be undertaken in Australia. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index is a top-down, national scale assessment of the resilience of communities to natural hazards. Resilience is assessed based on two sets of capacities: coping and adaptive capacities. Coping capacity relates to the factors influencing the ability of a community to prepare for, absorb and recover from a natural hazard event. Adaptive capacity relates to the arrangements and processes that enable adjustment through learning, adaptation and transformation. Indicators are derived under themes of social character, economic capital, infrastructure and planning, emergency services, community capital, information and engagement and governance/leadership/policy, using existing data sets (e.g. census data) or evaluation of policy and procedure (e.g. disaster management planning). A composite index of disaster resilience is then computed for each spatial division, giving national scale coverage. The results of the Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index will be reported in a State of Disaster Resilience report, due in 2018. The index is co-designed with emergency service agencies, and will support policy development, planning, community engagement and emergency management.

  15. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  16. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron-self Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value $\\dot M \\sim 3\\alpha\\ \\dot M_{\\rm Edd}$, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down onto the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenari...

  17. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. Methods and Materials: All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Results: Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the

  18. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  19. Strategies for Washing Australian Coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, W.L.A.; Swanson, A.R. [Downer EDI Engineering Projects Pty. Ltd. QCC, East Maitland, NSW (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    This article represents a distillation of QCC's experience over the last 20 years in developing coal-washing circuits to optimize coal recoveries for a wide range of Australian coals. The article will look at typical washabilities and product types to capture the general washing requirements. The major processing equipment will be reviewed as to their typical usage in the Australian context. From this background the processing circuits and strategies commonly used will be discussed for the relevant coal types, including hard coking coal, semi-hard coking coal, PCI, export thermal, and domestic thermal coal from the major producing regions in NSW and Queensland.

  20. Australian uranium and the election

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international and national complexities of the situation in Australia over the question of mining of the country's large and rich uranium deposits are explored with especial reference to the pending general election. The present position is ironical since access to low cost uranium would give a welcome boost to the nuclear industry which is enthusiastically supported by the Australian prime minister and his colleagues yet the Australian government is unable to promote mining as rapidly as it would like because of the international commitments it has made to provide a justification for its policy. (U.K.)

  1. Conterminous United States Surface Radiative Forcing due to Contemporary Land Cover Land Use Albedo Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Recently available Landsat land cover land use (LCLU) change information for four epochs, 1973-1980, 1980-1986, 1986-1992 and 1992-2000, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo and snow cover data are used to estimate LCLU albedo change surface radiative forcing for the conterminous United States (CONUS) for each epoch and for 1973 to 2000. Landsat 10 × 10 km or 20 × 20 km LCLU classification maps for 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992 and 2000 located using a stratified random sampling methodology with respect to 84 contiguous CONUS ecoregions are used to provide ecoregion and CONUS estimates. A CONUS scale warming (0.0037 Wm-2) due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 is estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested lands and increasing developed and grassland/shrublands. The 1986 to 1992 period had the highest overall CONUS forcing (0.0093 Wm-2) due to agricultural land conversion, attributed primarily to the 1985 Farm Bill that established the Conservation Reserve Program. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative forcings (as low as -0.8630 Wm-2) due to forest loss, and the most positive forcings (up to 0.2640 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grasslands/shrublands. These results make an important contribution to quantifying the role of LCLU change on the climate system, and underscore the need for repeat, wall-to-wall, spatially-explicit national LCLU mapping.

  2. Radiation Pressure and Mass Ejection in Rho-like States of GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, Joseph; Lee, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    We present a unifying scenario to address the physical origin of the diversity of X-ray lightcurves within the rho variability class of the microquasar GRS 1915+105. This 'heartbeat' state is characterized by a bright flare that recurs every ~50-100 seconds, but the profile and duration of the flares varies significantly from observation to observation. Based on a comprehensive, phase-resolved study of heartbeats in the RXTE archive, we demonstrate that very different X-ray lightcurves do not require origins in different accretion processes. Indeed, our detailed comparison of the phase-resolved spectra of a double-peaked oscillation and a single-peaked oscillation shows that different cycles can have basically similar X-ray spectral evolution. We argue that all heartbeat oscillations can be understood as the result of a combination of a thermal-viscous radiation pressure instability, a local Eddington limit in the disk, and a sudden, radiation-pressure-driven evaporation or ejection event in the inner accreti...

  3. Elements of change 1994. Climate-radiation feedbacks: The current state of the science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the details of the Climate-Radiation Feedback summer seminar. Topics include: radiative transfer; radiative properties of clouds; absorption of radiation in the atmosphere due to clouds; global cloud climatology; aerosols; general circulation models; and convection. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  4. Radiation-induced solid state polymerization of oriented ultrathin films of octadecylacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of ultrathin polymeric films was demonstrated by the solid state polymerization of multilayer films of octadecylacrylamide. The films were polymerized with 60Co γ radiation and were studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The structure and the orientation of the multilayer films before and after irradiation were studied by X-ray diffraction, by electron diffraction and by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and the IR spectra of bulk samples were compared with those of multilayer films. It was observed that the molecules deposited to give a head-to-head-tail-to-tail structure and the packing was similar in multilayer films and in bulk. No phase change was observed either in bulk or in multilayer films. The molecules in the film had a definite orientation with respect to the substrate surface. (Auth.)

  5. State independence for tunneling processes through black hole horizons and Hawking radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, Valter

    2010-01-01

    Tunneling processes through black hole horizons have recently been investigated in the framework of WKB theory discovering interesting interplay with the Hawking radiation. In this paper we instead adopt the point of view proper of QFT in curved spacetime, namely, we use a suitable scaling limit technique to obtain the leading order of the correlation function related with some tunneling process through a Killing horizon. The computation is done for certain large class of reference quantum states for scalar fields. In the limit of sharp localization either on the external side or on opposite sides of the horizon, the quantum correlation functions appear to have thermal nature, where in both cases the characteristic temperature is the Hawking one. Our approach is valid for every stationary charged rotating non extremal black hole, however, since the computation is completely local, it covers the case of a Killing horizon which just temporarily exists in some finite region too. These results give a strong suppo...

  6. Synergetic theory of catastrophic failures in the problem of radiation stability of solid-state electronics materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksengendler, B.L., E-mail: oksengendlerbl@yandex.ru [Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Maksimov, S.E. [Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Turaeva, N.N. [Biological Department of Webster University (United States); Djurabekova, F.G. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-05-01

    In some cases, failure of solid-state electronic devices is difficult to explain within the conventional concepts of radiation physics. Using as an example the recent accident that took place on the Russian space station for collecting the soil samples from the Martian moon Phobos, we show the necessity of consideration of synergetic cooperation in radiation damage production between the different phenomena caused by irradiation process.

  7. Evaluation of Various Methods for Estimating Global Solar Radiation in the Southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel O.

    2012-05-01

    Global solar radiation Rg is an important input for crop models to simulate crop responses. Because the scarcity of long and continuous records of Rg is a serious limitation in many countries, Rg is estimated using models. For crop-model application, empirical Rg models that use commonly measured meteorological variables, such as temperature and precipitation, are generally preferred. Although a large number of models of this kind exist, few have been evaluated for conditions in the United States. This study evaluated the performances of 16 empirical, temperature- and/or precipitation-based Rg models for the southeastern United States. By taking into account spatial distribution and data availability, 30 locations in the region were selected and their daily weather data spanning eight years obtained. One-half of the data was used for calibrating the models, and the other half was used for evaluation. For each model, location-specific parameter values were estimated through regressions. Models were evaluated for each location using the root-mean-square error and the modeling efficiency as goodness-of-fit measures. Among the models that use temperature or precipitation as the input variable, the Mavromatis model showed the best performance. The piecewise linear regression based Wu et al. model (WP) performed best not only among the models that use both temperature and precipitation but also among the 16 models evaluated, mainly because it has separate relationships for low and high radiation levels. The modeling efficiency of WP was from ~5% to more than 100% greater than those of the other models, depending on models and locations.

  8. Mapping the radiative and non-radiative local density of states in the near-field of a gold nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, D; Calabrese, M; Pierrat, R; Bardou, N; Collin, S; Carminati, R; Krachmalnicoff, V; De Wilde, Y

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for mapping the radiative and non-radiative decay rate of a fluorescent emitter in the near-field of a nanostructured sample. The approach is based on the simultaneous mapping of the fluorescence intensity and decay rate and on the rigorous application of the reciprocity theorem. Data analysis is based on an analytical calculation which is detailed in the paper. Experimental data are compared with exact numerical simulations and we show a good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment, which proves the validity of the method.

  9. The Australian solar scene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, Paul [IT Power Australia (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This presentation mainly talks about the actions taken by the Australian country concerning the use of renewable energy and the reduction of the peak load in some areas. In the first part, there are found both the geographical aspects as well as the major political, e.g. Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean development and Climate. There are also explained the issues related to peak load growth and it is shown a comparison graphic having information about the most used photovoltaic systems. Then, there are mentioned the communities that are testing one of the model photovoltaic systems in order to: reduce the peak load, use the energy in a properly way, reduce the energy cost, among others. Finally, it is succinctly explained the photovoltaic rebate program as well as the use of the off-grid systems, besides, it is given relevant information about those remote communities of Australia and the benefits of the implementation of Bushlight. [Spanish] Esta presentacion trata primordialmente de las acciones, referentes al uso de energia renovable, tomadas por Australia y creadas con el fin de reducir la maxima demanda en algunas regiones de este pais. En la primera parte, se encuentran tanto los aspectos geograficos como los principales aspectos politicos; por ejemplo, la Sociedad Asia-Pacifico para el Desarrollo no Contaminante y el Clima. Asimismo, se da una explicacion acerca de las cuestiones relacionadas al crecimiento de la maxima demanda; ademas, se muestra un cuadro comparativo, que contiene informacion relacionada con los sistemas fotovoltaicos mas utilizados. Despues, se mencionan aquellas comunidades que tienen en periodo de prueba alguno de los modelos fotovoltaicos con el fin de: reducir la maxima demanda, utilizar eficientemente la energia, reducir el costo de la misma, entre otros aspectos mas. Finalmente, se explica escuetamente el programa de reembolso centrado en el uso de sistemas fotovoltaicos, asi como el uso de sistemas asilados de la red; ademas, se

  10. Charge-exchange x-ray spectra: Evidence for significant contributions from radiative decays of doubly excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Harris, C. L.; Neill, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Charge-exchange collisions of slow Ne+10 ions with He, Ne, and Ar targets were studied with simultaneous x-ray and cold-target recoil-ion-momentum spectroscopy proving the contribution of several mechanisms to the radiative stabilization of apparent (4,4) doubly excited states for He and Ne targets and of (5,6) states for Ar. In particular, the stabilization efficiency of the mechanism of dynamic auto-transfer to Rydberg states is confirmed. Moreover, we present evidence for direct radiative decays of (4,4) states populated in collisions with He, which is an experimental indication of the population of so-called unnatural-parity states in such collisions. These mechanisms lead to the emission of x-rays that have considerably higher energies than those predicted by current spectral models and may explain recent observations of anomalously large x-ray emission from Rydberg levels.

  11. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  12. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  13. The implementation of diagnostic reference levels to Australian radiology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: At the presen time, there is no national surveillance of the increasing ionising radiation dose to the population from diagnostic imaging procedures. As the number of procedures undertaken is increasing, it is expected that the population dose will also increase. A substantial component of that contribution is from multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) systems. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) estimates that the growth in MDCT scans, based on Medicare Benefits Sch due data, is increasing at approximately 9% per annum, with over 2 million DCT scans being performed in 2009. The caput effective dose (mSv) from this modality is expected to be approaching 1.2 mSv per annum. If cu nt dose-detriment models are accurate, the risk of induction of carcinogenic detriment from current MDCT scanning patterns is a significant public health issue that requires a concerted and ongoing response. For the application of ionising radiation in medicine, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends the conservative philosophy of Justification and Optimisation via the measurement of 'Diagnostic Reference Levels' to limit the potential overexposure of patients and decrease the overall population burden. The Australian government has commissioned ARPANSA to survey, calculate and construct representative national diagnostic reference levels for diagnostic imaging modalities that use ionising radiation. This will be achieved in close consultation with the professional organisations who represent the professionals responsible for the use of ionising radiation in diagnostic imaging.

  14. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author's responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A

  15. Radiative observables for linearized gravity on asymptotically flat spacetimes and their boundary induced states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benini, Marco, E-mail: marco.benini@pv.infn.it; Dappiaggi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.dappiaggi@unipv.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universitá degli Studi di Pavia and INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Murro, Simone, E-mail: Simone.Murro@mathematik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the quantization of linearized gravity on globally hyperbolic, asymptotically flat, vacuum spacetimes, and the construction of distinguished states which are both of Hadamard form and invariant under the action of all bulk isometries. The procedure, we follow, consists of looking for a realization of the observables of the theory as a sub-algebra of an auxiliary, non-dynamical algebra constructed on future null infinity ℱ⁺. The applicability of this scheme is tantamount to proving that a solution of the equations of motion for linearized gravity can be extended smoothly to ℱ⁺. This has been claimed to be possible provided that a suitable gauge fixing condition, first written by Geroch and Xanthopoulos [“Asymptotic simplicity is stable,” J. Math. Phys. 19, 714 (1978)], is imposed. We review its definition critically, showing that there exists a previously unnoticed obstruction in its implementation leading us to introducing the concept of radiative observables. These constitute an algebra for which a Hadamard state induced from null infinity and invariant under the action of all spacetime isometries exists and it is explicitly constructed.

  16. Generation of tunable coherent far-infrared radiation using atomic Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A source of tunable far-infrared radiation has been constructed. The system has been operated at 91.6 cm-1 with a demonstrated tunability of .63 cm-1. The system is based on a Rydberg state transition in optically pumped potassium vapor. The transition energy is tuned by the application of an electric field to the excited vapor. The transition wavelength and the shifted wavelength were detected and measured by the use of a Michelson interferometer and a liquid helium cooled Ga:Ge bolometer and the data was reduced using Fast Fourier transform techniques. Extensive spectroscopy was done on the potassium vapor to elucidate the depopulation paths and rates of the excited levels. Both theoretical and experimental results are presented to support the conclusions of the research effort. Additionally, possible alternative approaches to the population of the excited state are explored and recommendations are made for the future development of this source as well as the potential uses of it in molecular spectroscopy

  17. Tripartite conferences on radiation protection: Canada, United Kingdom, United States (1949-1953)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of largely informal contacts between scientists from the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom, it became evident to their governments that, to insure compatible protection practices, closer technical cooperation must be established. This led to a two-day conference between representatives of the three governments at Chalk River, Ontario in September 1949; it was the first of what became known as the Tripartite Conferences. The initial talks led quickly to agreement on the new NCRP proposals for a basic permissible dose for the exposure of workers to external sources of radiation. A second meeting in Harwell, England, during the summer of 1950 reached tentative agreement on the outstanding problems. The third and last Tripartite Conference took place at Harriman, New York, in early spring 1953. This meeting produced the final recommendations, insofar as they involved agreements between the three countries, for new protection standards. Questions regarding the proceedings of the conferences and interpretations of their findings have arisen over the succeeding years; even as recently as 1983. Continued interest and consequent inquiries emphasized the desirability of providing more permanent documentation of those very important conferences. This author, a member of the United States delegation to all three conferences, came into possession of most of the working papers and final reports, hence he has felt the obligation to assemble this material for both technical and historical reference. This report compromises mainly of a brief discussion of the conferences themselves, with some background information leading up to their organization

  18. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  19. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of 226Ra, 232Th, and 238U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 μR/h, with an US average of 8.5 μR/h. The nationwide average concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 238U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively

  20. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  1. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 106 produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi0, chi2, and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10-4, (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10-4 (first errors statistical, second systematic), and -2 (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' → γchi0, chi0 → π0π0 has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi0 has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c2. In addition, the branching ratios of the chi0 and chi2 to π0π0 have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10-3 and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10-3; the branching ratios of the chi0 and chi2 to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10-3 and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10-4. The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 106 produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states γeta, γeta', γtheta, and γf have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment

  2. The effect of recombination radiation on the temperature and ionization state of partially ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Raičević, Milan; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    A substantial fraction of all ionizing photons originate from radiative recombinations. However, in radiative transfer calculations this recombination radiation is often assumed to be absorbed 'on-the-spot' because for most methods the computational cost associated with the inclusion of gas elements as sources is prohibitive. We present a new, CPU and memory efficient implementation for the transport of ionizing recombination radiation in the TRAPHIC radiative transfer scheme. TRAPHIC solves the radiative transfer equation by tracing photon packets at the speed of light and in a photon-conserving manner in spatially adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our new implementation uses existing features of the TRAPHIC scheme to add recombination radiation at no additional cost in the limit in which the fraction of the simulation box filled with radiation approaches 1. We test the implementation by simulating an HII region in photoionization equilibrium and comparing to reference solutions presented...

  3. Radiation oxidation of polypropylene: A solid-state 13C NMR study using selective isotopic labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polypropylene samples, in which the three different carbon atoms along the chain were selectively labeled with carbon-13, were subjected to radiation under inert and air atmospheres, and to post-irradiation exposure in air at various temperatures. By using solid-state 13C NMR measurements at room temperature, we have been able to identify and quantify the oxidation products. The isotopic labeling provides insight into chemical reaction mechanisms, since oxidation products can be traced back to their positions of origin on the macromolecule. The major products include peroxides and alcohols, both formed at tertiary carbon sites along the chain. Other products include methyl ketones, acids, esters, peresters, and hemiketals formed from reaction at the tertiary carbon, together with in-chain ketones and esters from reaction at the secondary chain carbon. No evidence is found of products arising from reactions at the methyl side chain. Significant temperature-dependent differences are apparent; for example much higher yields of chain-end methyl ketones, which are the indicator product of chain scission, are generated for both elevated temperature irradiation and for post-irradiation treatment at elevated temperatures. Time-dependent plots of yields of the various oxidation products have been obtained under a wide range of conditions, including the post-irradiation oxidation of a sample at room temperature in air that has been monitored for 2 years. Radiation-oxidation products of polypropylene are contrasted to products measured for 13C-labeled polyethylene in an earlier investigation: the peroxides formed in irradiated polypropylene are remarkably longer lived, the non-peroxidic products are significantly different, and the overall ratios of oxidation products in polypropylene change relatively little as a function of the extent of oxidation

  4. Radiatively driven relativistic jets with variable adiabatic index equation of state

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Mukesh K.; Kumar, Rajiv; Mandal, Samir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a relativistic fluid jet driven by radiation from a shocked accretion disc around a non-rotating black hole approximated by Paczy\\'nski-Wiita potential. The sub-Keplerian and Keplerian accretion rates control the shock location and therefore, the radiation field around the accretion disc. We compute the radiative moments with full special relativistic transformation. The effect of a fraction of radiation absorbed by the black hole has been approximated, over and above the speci...

  5. Formation of crosslinked PTFE by radiation induced solid state polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) was irradiated with gamma-rays at various temperatures. The thermal properties of product were measured by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and the structure was analyzed by using 19F high speed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR). As the results, the PTFE powder obtained by the solid state polymerization has been made clear to be crosslinked. Introduction: PTFE is usually produced by the catalytic polymerization of TFE, and supplied for market. The molecular structure of the commercialized PTFE is a linear one, neither branched and nor crosslinked. The crystallinity is very high more than 90%. Radiation induced crosslinking of perfluoropolymers at high temperatures near their melting points has been extensively investigated by authors. On the other hand, solid state polymerization of TFE at low temperature was examined by one of the authors many years ago. In this study, the authors have confirmed that crosslinking takes place during the solid state polymerization at low temperature. Experiment: 2ml of TFE monomer (SynQuest Laboratories, Inc.) was freezed by liquid nitrogen, and evacuated to 10-4 torr in a glass ampoule. The glass ampoule was irradiated by 60Co γ-rays, in a dose rate of 2.6 kGy/h and at ambient temperature, 195K and 77 K, respectively. The thermal properties of the obtained PTFE were examined by using a DSC. The molecular structures were analyzed using a 19F NMR spectroscopy. Results: For the PTFE obtained by the solid-state polymerization at 77 K, new signals were observed at -184.7ppm assigned to -CF2-CF(CF2-)-CF2- and at -109.3ppm assigned to -CF2-CF(CF2-)-CF2- in the NMR spectra. The two peaks clearly indicated the branching on tertiary carbon in PTFE. In addition, the melting temperature of the PTFE decreased with increasing dose. All results indicate that the polymerization of TFE in solid state at 77 K takes place and accompany the crosslinking. (authors)

  6. Radiation protection in radionuclide diagnosis: state of the art and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current status and unsolved problems in radiation protection of radionuclide diagnosis, mainly in Russia are analysed. Specific features in assuring radiation protection of patients, personnel, population, and environment during diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals, as well as regulation problems of radiation exposure in radionuclide diagnosis are discussed

  7. The nonequilibrium radiative states in external constant and alternating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy radiation theory in constant and alternating magnetic fields of conducting mediums with one type current carrier is constructed. The analytic expression for radiation expression is obtained. The substance and impedance imaginary part are calculated. The change intervals of electric and magnetic fields are defined. The impedance plot in radiation conditions is constructed

  8. Nursing churn and turnover in Australian hospitals: nurses perceptions and suggestions for supportive strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Angela J; Stasa, Helen; Roche, Michael A; Homer, Caroline S. E.; Duffield, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to reveal nurses’ experiences and perceptions of turnover in Australian hospitals and identify strategies to improve retention, performance and job satisfaction. Nursing turnover is a serious issue that can compromise patient safety, increase health care costs and impact on staff morale. A qualitative design was used to analyze responses from 362 nurses collected from a national survey of nurses from medical and surgical nursing units across 3 Australian States/Ter...

  9. Income inequality in small regions: a study of Australian statistical divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, P; Peter, M

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides "empirical analysis of the nature of the relationship between economic development of regions and income inequality in Australian sub-state regions. It does so in the context of considering the validity of the 'augmented inverted U' hypothesis and the influence of factors such as the business cycle, political issues, and demographic trends, which are likely to cause income inequality to change over time." Data are from the Australian censuses for the years 1976 and 1981. PMID:12315387

  10. Controlling Non-Point Source Pollution in Australian Agricultural Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. GOURLEY; A. RIDLEY

    2005-01-01

    The Australian farming sector is continuing to intensify, particularly within 300 km of the east and southern coastlines.In the future there will be fewer and larger farms, which will use more fertilizer, support more stock, grow more monoculture crops, and utilise more marginal soils. This is likely to increase the major environmental impacts of soil degradation, salt,nutrient and sediment contamination of waterways, and greenhouse gas emissions. Australian national water policy continues to focus on land, stream and groundwater salinity issues, although there is now a greater recognition of the importance of nitrogen and phosphorus losses from agriculture. The general philosophy of policy for dealing with nonpoint source pollution has been towards a voluntary rather than regulatory approach, with state and national governments supporting a range of programs to encourage sustainable agricultural practices. A catchment (watershed) based approach,through the use of integrated catchment management plans, is the primary way that non-point source pollution is addressed at the farm and local level. At an industry level, cotton, grains, meat, sugarcane and dairy amongst others, as well as the Australian fertilizer industry, have responded to non-point source issues by investing in research and development, and developing codes of practice aimed at abating these environmental impacts. Understanding the economic, social, political and cultural contexts of farming as well as the environmental impacts of agriculture are very important in determining the appropriateness of policy responses for Australian farming systems.

  11. Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants and comprises information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection. Details of the radiological situation within the Czech Republic in 2001 are also given. The second part of the report contains results of activities of the SUJB in its new competencies; supervision and control in the field of prohibition of chemical, biological and toxin weapons. (author)

  12. Radiative Corrections to the 2E1 Decay Rate of the 2s-State in Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    1997-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the 2E1 decay width of the 2s-state in the low-Z hydrogen-like system are examined within logarithmic approximation. The correction is found to be 2.025(1) alpha (Z alpha)^2 / pi log(Z alpha)^2 in units of the non-relativistic rate.

  13. The effect of recombination radiation on the temperature and ionization state of partially ionized gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raičević, Milan; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A substantial fraction of all ionizing photons originate from radiative recombinations. However, in radiative transfer calculations this recombination radiation is often assumed to be absorbed `on-the-spot' because for most methods the computational cost associated with the inclusion of gas elements as sources is prohibitive. We present a new, CPU and memory efficient implementation for the transport of ionizing recombination radiation in the TRAPHIC radiative transfer scheme. TRAPHIC solves the radiative transfer equation by tracing photon packets at the speed of light and in a photon-conserving manner in spatially adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our new implementation uses existing features of the TRAPHIC scheme to add recombination radiation at no additional cost in the limit in which the fraction of the simulation box filled with radiation approaches 1. We test the implementation by simulating an H II region in photoionization equilibrium and comparing to reference solutions presented in the literature, finding excellent agreement. We apply our implementation to discuss the evolution of the H II region to equilibrium. We show that the widely used case A and B approximations yield accurate ionization profiles only near the source and near the ionization front, respectively. We also discuss the impact of recombination radiation on the geometry of shadows behind optically thick absorbers. We demonstrate that the shadow region may be completely ionized by the diffuse recombination radiation field and discuss the important role of heating by recombination radiation in the shadow region.

  14. Networked solutions of radiation control of illicit trafficking in radioactive and nuclear materials through State borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation mobile Nuclear Protection Network system (NPNETTM) was developed. The purpose of the system is to facilitate the investigation and decision making process in the case of detection of a radiation source. NPNETTM allows on-line data exchange between a user equipped with radiation detectors, e.g. spectroscopic personal radiation detectors (SPRDs) PM1703GNB, and a remote command centre. NPNETTM is recommended for use by border guards, customs, security and emergency services. The prevention of illicit trafficking in radioactive and nuclear materials as well as the dispersion of radioactive materials in urban areas is a challenging task of national security departments in many countries. To solve this task, appropriate actions of on-site personnel equipped with radiation detectors such as fixed radiation portal monitors or mobile personal radiation detectors are required. However, users of radiation equipment such as customs, border guards and police services often perform radiation control as an additional responsibility to their main duties. Furthermore, these users do not have sufficient expertise in radiation control and need real time remote expert help to interpret readings of radiation equipment and expert support in the decision making process. (author)

  15. Compton suppression system at Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Compton suppression system is used to reduce the contribution of scattered gamma-rays that originate within the HPGe detector to the gamma ray spectrum. The HPGe detector is surrounded by an assembly of guard detectors, usually NaI(Tl). The HPGe and NaI(Tl) detectors are operated in anti-coincidence mode. The NaI(Tl) guard detector detects the photons that Compton scatter within, and subsequently escape from the HPGe detector. Since these photons are correlated with the partial energy deposition within the detector, much of the resulting Compton continuum can be subtracted from the spectrum reducing the unwanted background in gamma-ray spectra. A commercially available Compton suppression spectrometer (CSS) was purchased from Canberra Industries and tested at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center at Penn State University. The PSU-CSS includes a reverse bias HPGe detector, four annulus NaI(Tl) detectors, a NaI(Tl) plug detector, detector shields, data acquisition electronics, and a data processing computer. The HPGe detector is n-type with 54% relative efficiency. The guard detectors form an annulus with 9-inch diameter and 9-inch height, and have a plug detector that goes into/out of the annulus with the help of a special lift apparatus to raise/lower. The detector assembly is placed in a shielding cave. State-of-the-art electronics and software are used. The system was tested using standard sources, neutron activated NIST SRM sample and Dendrochronologically Dated Tree Ring samples. The PSU-CSS dramatically improved the peak-to-Compton ratio, up to 1000 : 1 for the 137Cs source. (author)

  16. Nazi medical experiments on Australian prisoners of war: Commentary on the testimony of an Australian soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M

    2015-12-01

    Archival research reveals that Australian prisoners of war were exposed to non-consensual medical experiments during World War II. This article discusses the first known case of an Australian soldier exposed to German medical experiments. PMID:26939510

  17. Polychromatic solid-state lamps versus tungsten radiator: hue changes of Munsell samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colour-perception differences under illumination by two quadrichromatic solid-state sources of light have been studied with respect to a tungsten radiator with the same correlated colour temperature (2600 K). A virtual RYgCB source (illuminant), which contains red, yellow-green, cyan and blue components with the line width typical of AlGaInP and AlInGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), was fully optimized for the highest value of the general colour-rendering index (CRI) (Ra = 98.3). An implemented RAGB source (lamp) contained commercially available red, amber, green and blue LEDs (Ra 79.4). Colorimetric calculations in the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage 1976 (u',v') colour plane for 40 Munsell colour samples (value 6, chroma/6, hue increment 2.5) revealed the differences in hue discrimination and distortion for both sources in the yellow-green and blue-cyan ranges. These differences were not revealed by the standard analysis of the special CRIs and were lower for the RYgCB illuminant, which contained primary LEDs in the sensitive ranges. A psychophysical experiment on seven subjects was performed using the RAGB lamp stabilized against thermal and ageing drifts. Despite different colour-perception abilities of the subjects under investigation, the experiment confirmed the calculation results. Methods of obtaining composite white light with high subjective ratings are discussed, based on the obtained data

  18. Exotic dense matter states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in the radiation dominant regime

    CERN Document Server

    Colgan, J; Jr.,; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Wagenaars, E; Booth, N; Brown, C R D; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Evans, R G; Gray, R J; Hoarty, D J; Kaempfer, T; Lancaster, K L; McKenna, P; Rossall, A L; Skobelev, I Yu; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Zhidkov, A G; Woolsey, N C

    2012-01-01

    The properties of high energy density plasma are under increasing scrutiny in recent years due to their importance to our understanding of stellar interiors, the cores of giant planets$^{1}$, and the properties of hot plasma in inertial confinement fusion devices$^2$. When matter is heated by X-rays, electrons in the inner shells are ionized before the valence electrons. Ionization from the inside out creates atoms or ions with empty internal electron shells, which are known as hollow atoms (or ions)$^{3,4,5}$. Recent advances in free-electron laser (FEL) technology$^{6,7,8,9}$ have made possible the creation of condensed matter consisting predominantly of hollow atoms. In this Letter, we demonstrate that such exotic states of matter, which are very far from equilibrium, can also be formed by more conventional optical laser technology when the laser intensity approaches the radiation dominant regime$^{10}$. Such photon-dominated systems are relevant to studies of photoionized plasmas found in active galactic ...

  19. Radiations FR of telephone antennas and Public health: the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, mobile telephone is envisioned as one of the most significant innovations in communication. The growing development of this system asks for increasing amounts of antennas, installed in base transceiver stations (BTS) connection mobile stations (MS, hand held phones) to each other and to the conventional telephone network. Depending on the area, antennas are generally mounted in BTS located either on the top of buildings (in urban areas) or in towers (in rural or less populated areas). In both of the cases, the visual impact of BTS is significant for people living or working close to them. This visual evidence, together with some information, usually inconsistent or incomplete, released in media other than the scientific literature, have generated increasing feelings of phobia to alleged detrimental consequences of the uncontrolled exposure to radio waves emitted by the antennas. Such feelings, identified previously in countries where mobile telephony has been used for years in a regular basis, are now significantly growing in Spain and motivate many of the questions asked to information services of public agencies and institutions. The aim of the present article is to address some of the most frequently asked questions on the topic and to review the state of the art of our knowledge on the putative effects of the exposure to the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the aerials. Also, elementary notions are provided on the functioning of mobile telephony that may help the reader to better understand some technical aspects concerning the topic. (Author) 54 refs

  20. Valence state studies of CO2+ and CS2+ by photoionization with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, we describe several types of photoelectron spectroscopy experiments for elucidating certain valence photoionization mechanisms and the spectroscopy of residual ions in the case of two linear triatomic molecules CO2 and CS2. Using synchrotron radiation, we have measured the partial cross section (σ) and angular distribution (β) associated to the ejection of an electron from the 4σg orbital of CO2. These measurements continuously performed between 25 and 55 eV photon energy have shown some evidence of the σu shape resonance. We have suggested that the bending motion may be responsible of the large disagreement between experiment and various theories. The numerous satellite bands which appear in photoelectron spectra of CO2 and CS2 in the region of inner valence ionization (20-40 eV) have been systematically studied at several photon energies and various angles. The β and σ variations have allowed to determine the symmetry of some of excited-ionized states of the ion. A comparison between the experimental and calculated spectra of CO2 and CS2 within a configuration interaction method (CIPSI) shows an excellent agreement and demonstrates the important role of 3 hole-two electrons configurations. In the CS2 case we also show the relationship between the double ionization continua and the structures observed at high binding energy. (author)

  1. Multi-octave supercontinuum generation with IR radiation filamentation in transparent solid-state media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, S. A.; Trunov, V. I.; Leshchenko, V. E.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Supercontinuum generation from the near to far IR during radiation filamentation in solid-state media in an anomalous dispersion region is theoretically investigated. The initial search for appropriate media with the use of an interference model showed that the widest IR spectrum is generated in media with high values of zero group velocity dispersion wavelength with the pump wavelength located not far from it. Halides belong to one of such media groups. The possibility of generation of a very wide supercontinuum in calcium fluoride (0.52-3.35 μm, which corresponds to 2.7 octaves), sodium chloride (0.7-7.6 μm, 3.5 octaves), and potassium iodide (0.66-22 μm, 5.1 octaves) is demonstrated by numerical simulation. Also, pulse self-compression down to 13 fs at the 5-μm central wavelength (about single period) has been observed in potassium iodide. The mechanisms of multi-octave supercontinuum generation are discussed.

  2. Observed aerosol-induced radiative effect on plant productivity in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    We apply satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in conjunction with flux tower-derived estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) to probe the relationship between atmospheric aerosol loading and carbon uptake rate at 10 select sites (4 deciduous broadleaf, 3 cropland, 1 evergreen needle leaf, 1 mixed forest and 1 grassland) on hourly time scales in the growing season in the eastern United States. For deciduous and mixed forests, the aerosol light scattering increases GPP with a maximum effect observed under polluted conditions (AOD >0.6), when diffuse radiation is 40-60%. During midday hours, high AOD conditions (>0.4) enhance plant productivity by ∼13% in deciduous forests. In contrast, we find that high diffuse light fraction does not increase the carbon uptake rate in croplands and grasslands; for these ecosystems, we estimate that high AOD conditions reduce GPP by ∼17% during midday hours. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that have attributed these contrasting response sensitivities to the complex and closed canopy architecture of forests versus crops and grasslands. C4 but not C3 crops may benefit from pollution-induced changes in diffuse and direct light. Further research is needed to investigate the role of local meteorology as a possible confounder in the connection between atmospheric aerosols and plant productivity.

  3. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection and gives details of the radiological situation within the Czech Republic. The 'Atomic Act' No. 18/1997 together with fourteen Decrees are now in force in the Czech Republic and regulate all activities in the nuclear area. The report also gives a general overview of how these legislative documents are implemented in everyday practice. (author)

  4. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2009. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is structured as follows: (1) State Office for Nuclear Safety; (2) Nuclear safety (CEZ utility; Dukovany NPP; Temelin NPP; Research facilities; Other nuclear installations; Technological safety); (3) Spent nuclear safety and radioactive waste handling, decommissioning; (4) Nuclear material transports, physical protection of nuclear installations; (5) Radiation protection; (6) Emergency preparedness; (7) Management of the Czech Radiation Monitoring Network; (8) Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons; (9) International cooperation; (10) Research and development; (11) Information provision in compliance with Czech Act No. 106/1999 on free access to information; (12) Activities of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; and (13) Activities of the National Radiation Protection Institute. (P.A.)

  5. Nuclear techniques in Australian animal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tropical and sub-tropical regions, the production of domestic animals is frequently depressed by the climatic and ecological conditions. These negative effects can be overcome to a great extent by improved methods of animal and land management. In animal research, nuclear techniques are playing an important role in the study of different aspects of nutrition, metabolism, reproduction and health of domestic animals. In response to the need expressed by Member States for more information on these techniques, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture and the IAEA's Division of Technical Assistance organized a study tour to Australia, a country which has developed considerable expertise in agricultural and animal research. The purpose of the study tour was to enable veterinary and animal scientists and administrators from developing countries in Asia and the Far East to observe at first hand the ways in which animal production, particularly meat, milk and wool, can be increased in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Fourteen senior scientists and research directors from seven Asian countries (Bangladesh, India, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand) participated. The counterpart organizations in Australia were the Australian Development Assistance Agency (ADAA) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO). The chief programmer and co-ordinator of the study tour was John E. Vercoe, officer-in-charge of CSIRO's Tropical Cattle Research Centre in Rockhampton, and a former IAEA staff member. The tour was financed by the United Nations Development Programme. The participants visited research facilities of universities, national and state laboratories and commercial cattle producers. The tour started at Sydney and proceeded north along the east coast of Australia to Townsville. On the way, major stops were made in Armidale, Grafton, Wollongbar, Brisbane and Rockhampton. In Rockhampton, a

  6. Research Output of Australian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm Abbot; Hristos Doucouliagos

    2003-01-01

    Research plays an important role in underpinning a country’s economic and social life. Universities are at the centre of the research and human capital generating process. The aim of this paper is to explore the links between research output, research income, academic and non-academic labour and some of the characteristics of Australian universities. The results indicate that research income, academic staff and post-graduates are all positively associated with research output. There are notic...

  7. Radiatively driven relativistic jets with variable adiabatic index equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Mukesh K; Mandal, Samir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a relativistic fluid jet driven by radiation from a shocked accretion disc around a non-rotating black hole approximated by Paczy\\'nski-Wiita potential. The sub-Keplerian and Keplerian accretion rates control the shock location and therefore, the radiation field around the accretion disc. We compute the radiative moments with full special relativistic transformation. The effect of a fraction of radiation absorbed by the black hole has been approximated, over and above the special relativistic transformations. We show that the radiative moments around a super massive black hole are different compared to that around a stellar mass black hole. We show that the terminal speed of jets increases with the mass accretion rates,synchrotron emission of the accretion disc and reduction of proton fraction of the flow composition. To obtain relativistic terminal velocities of jets, both thermal and radiative driving are important. We show for very high accretion rates and pair dominated flow, jets around su...

  8. Time Travel: Australian Tourists and Britain's Past

    OpenAIRE

    Richard White

    2012-01-01

    Across the twentieth century, Britain drew more Australian tourists for longer and more intense experiences than anywhere else, though as early as the 1970s Asia was attracting more Australians than Europe. They found much to admire and to deprecate in Britain but above all they were seduced by Britain’s past, or what they imagined it to be. This paper examines the Australian experience of history in Britain, their admiration for notions of tradition, for an unchanging village life, for fadin...

  9. Immune dysfunction in Australian Aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Thomson, P J; Roberts-Thomson, R A; Nikoloutsopoulos, T; Gillis, D

    2005-12-01

    An examination of the prevalence and phenotype of immune disorders in different ethnic groups may provide important clues to the etiopathogenesis of these disorders. Whilst still conjectural the restricted and somewhat unique polymorphisms of the MHC (and other genetic loci involving host defences) of the Australian Aborigines may provide an explanation for their apparent heightened susceptibility to newly encountered infections and their resistance to many (auto) immune and allergic disorders. In comparison with non-Aboriginal Australians, Australian Aborigines have heightened frequencies of rheumatic fever, systemic lupus erythematosus, various infections and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. In contrast various autoimmune disorders (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, CREST, biliary cirrhosis, coeliac disease, pernicious anaemia, vitiligo), B27 related arthropathies, psoriasis, lymphoproliferative disorders and atopic disorders appear infrequent or absent. Similarly various autoantibodies occur with increased or diminished frequency. With continuing racial admixture, social deprivation and deleterious lifestyles of these people it is likely that further changes in both the frequencies and phenotype of these immune disorders will occur. It is only with a full understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in these immune disorders that meaningful and clinical relevant interventions will be possible. PMID:16572744

  10. Challenges to radiative divertor/mantle operations in advanced, steady-state scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Managing the heat exhaust problem is well recognized to be a major challenge in transforming present successes in magnetic confinement fusion experiments to demonstration of cost-effective, steady-state power generation from fusion [1][2]. One approach is to convert plasma thermal energy, normally directed to isolated surfaces, to isotropic photon emission, distributing exhaust power over a large surface area. Successful demonstrations of this technique on existing short pulse devices are shown, along with the inherent limitations; the collapse of core confinement with excessive radiation from the bulk plasma and restrictions to dissipation in the divertor volume. Feedback control of impurity seeding is discussed, showing recent examples from tokamaks [3]. For steady-state devices, additional constraints on divertor scenarios are driven by long-term plasma material interaction effects, with fuel recycling, net erosion limits and surface morphology changes forcing detached plasma operation where both heat and particle fluxes are substantially reduced. The instability of these detachment layers in standard X-point divertors with impurity seeding is outlined. Achieving these steady-state, high performance scenarios also restricts the divertor solution by requiring it be compatible with current-drive actuators and enhanced core confinement regimes. While ITER will operate with impurity seeding in a conventional tokamak geometry [4], it is not clear that this concept will reliably scale to a reactor and has been identified as a major risk factor in the development of fusion power [2]. Alternatives concepts are discussed, including the snowflake [5] and super-X divertor [6], along with their respective proof of principle experiments. The complications in convincingly scaling these concepts to a reactor are outlined, including challenges in validating numerical simulations of advanced, dissipative divertors. References: [1] Greenwald, M

  11. Estonian experience in establishing the national radiation protection infrastructure in the newly independent State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (ERPC) was established on 4 January 1996 as the regulatory authority for radiation protection and safety of radiation sources. The report explains the ERPC's structure and its main functions and activities, and provides information on the regulations that have been approved or are planned to be adopted. Reference is made to radiological emergency preparedness and, in particular, to the status of development of the system of regulatory control by authorization and inspection of radiation practices in the country. (author)

  12. The energetic state of rat's small intestine mitochondria under exposure to X-ray ionizing radiation with low intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation with single dose (0.055 Gy x min-1) in doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Gy on a metabolic state of the respiratory chain of rat's small intestine mitochondria is investigated. The damage of relations of the oxidative phosphorylation processes in mitochondria, which is expressed in the uncoupling of the processes of respiration and phosphorylation and in a decline of the phosphorylation rate and the activity of ATP-hydrolase reactions, is established. These changes are observed at all time of research and intensified with a growth of the radiation absorbed dose.

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF STRESSED AND DEFORMED STATE OF BODIES HAVING CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY WITH DUE ACCOUNT OF THERMAL AND RADIATION CREEPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kulikov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates peculiar features of the stressed and deformed state of the construction elements in the active zone of nuclear reactors being under action of  high temperatures and neutron irradiation with due account of thermal and radiation creeping and with shells of heat releasing elements having a shape of a thick-walled cylinder taken as an example. Basic relations for a numerical solution of the given problem including thermal and radiation creeping have been obtained in the paper. The paper presents an algorithm for the solution of the derived numerical scheme.

  14. Proposed layout features of an Australian proton treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From a theoretical point of view protons offer the best possible physical dose distribution for many radiotherapy treatment scenarios. However, proton generation of sufficient energy for treatment (about 250MeV) requires a large accelerator and is more expensive than conventional radiotherapy. Therefore the present project aimed at determining the desired configuration for a proton radiotherapy treatment facility in Australia. This is part of a proposal to introduce proton radiotherapy to Australia by the Australian Proton Project Group. It is assumed that a proton centre is build as a dedicated national radiotherapy facility. In this context and to be economically viable it must be large enough to treat well in excess of 1000 patients per year on several treatment stations. When building a proton treatment facility, it is essential to make use of all state-of-the-art features such as spot scanning techniques in order to offer patients a significant improvement in dose distribution compared to advanced conventional treatment techniques such as conformal and/or intensity modulated X-ray radiotherapy. As the potential useful life of a proton treatment unit is of the order of 20 years, it must be designed in a flexible way to allow upgrading as technology advances. The proposed facility includes at least one rotating gantry for isocentric beam delivery and stationary beam lines delivering protons between 70 and 250MeV energy. Features such as proton radiography and in situ PET treatment verification should be considered as a potential upgrade for future expansion. Other commercial activities (eg. radiation hardness testing) which could contribute to the running costs of the facility and scientific research out of the normal treatment hours is to be considered in the final design. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  15. History of radiation hygiene and mission of the State sanitary control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three main stages are outlined in the evolution of radiation hygiene as a science. The first of these is characterized by some underestimation of the radiation factor, particularly as regards potential long-term biological effects. The second stage (1940-1950) coincided historically with the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. With subsequent large-scale atomic weapons testing, the problem arose of radioactive contamination of the biosphere, and the need was recognized for quantifying potential radiation risks thereby incurred. A third stage developed in connection with scientific-technological revolution. Based on better understanding of radiation-related somatic and genetic effects, efforts were made to arrive at a reasonable assessment of hazards involved in peaceful uses of atomic energy. Two main lines of inquiry were followed, namely to (a) gain primary information on radiation exposure levels and (b) acquire better insight into biological effects so as to establish well-grounded regulations. There is a need for studies on natural background radiation in communities and environmental contamination in the vicinity of plants using radioactive materials, as well as for development of radiation control guides and optimization of environmental and occupational minitoring. Conditions are now more favourable for the solution of these problems since many countries, in particular socialist ones, are collaborating in efforts to limit radiation exposure. (A.B.)

  16. State of the art toward defining the role of radiation therapy in the management of small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article with 70 references discusses the state of the art in defining the role of radiotherapy in managing small cell bronchogenic carcinoma (SCBC). It reviews the history of therapeutic approaches to SCBC. Several issues of particular interest to limited disease are discussed. They are: local radiation therapy for limited disease, combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy in limited disease, combination chemotherapy alone for limited disease, and an overview of the treatment of limited disease. A section on extensive disease discusses the role of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, chemotherapy only for extensive disease, and an overview of the treatment of extensive disease. An additional section discusses the use of elective brain irradiation in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

  17. Effects of occupational exposure and non-radiation factors on the structure-functional state of blood cell genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of non-radiation factors (smoking and vitamin therapy) on the structure-functional state of blood cell genome of nuclear professionals (workers of Nuclear Center) exposed to long-term external gamma-neutron radiation (108 persons) and control group (49 workers of Nuclear Center who had no concern to ionizing radiation) have been investigated. It has been shown that: prolonged occupational exposure leads to significant 2-3 fold growth (p≤ 0.001) of cytogenetic disorders; efficiency of cell systems of reparation of induced DNA damage in exposed persons is lower (p≤ 0.05) as compared with control group; frequency of cytogenetic disorders depends on the accumulated absorbed dose. (authors)

  18. Three-Dimensional Elasticity Solutions for Sound Radiation of Functionally Graded Materials Plates considering State Space Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieliang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical study for sound radiation of functionally graded materials (FGM plate based on the three-dimensional theory of elasticity. The FGM plate is a mixture of metal and ceramic, and its material properties are assumed to have smooth and continuous variation in the thickness direction according to a power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of the constituents. Based on the three-dimensional theory of elasticity and state space method, the governing equations with variable coefficients of the FGM plate are derived. The sound radiation of the vibration plate is calculated with Rayleigh integral. Comparisons of the present results with those of solutions in the available literature are made and good agreements are achieved. Finally, some parametric studies are carried out to investigate the sound radiation properties of FGM plates.

  19. ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2008. ASN annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASN is an independent administrative authority tasked, on behalf of the state, with regulating nuclear safety and radiation protection in order to protect workers, patients and the environment from the hazards involved in nuclear activities. It also contributes to informing the public. ASN, run by a five-member commission, regulates the whole of the sector, acting in a completely impartial manner. The ASN Commission presents its report on the state of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2008. Contents: A - Introduction: The year 2008. B - Key topics: 1. ASN actions to promote greater transparency; 2. EDF nuclear power plant ageing and operating life: the conditions for continued operation; 3. The prevention of malicious acts; 4. ASN regulation of the radiotherapy sector; 5. Regulating and monitoring the construction of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor; 6. ASN's international nuclear safety responsibilities; 7. The new nuclear countries; 8. Decommissioning of basic nuclear installations and the low-level, long-lived waste disposal project. C - Overview: 1 - Nuclear activities: ionising radiations and health risks; 2 - Principles and stakeholders in the regulation of nuclear safety and radiation protection; 3 - Regulation; 4 - Regulation of nuclear activities and exposure to ionising radiations; 5 - Environmental protection; 6 - Public information and transparency; 7 - International relations; 8 - Radiological emergencies; 9 - Medical uses of ionising radiations; 10 - Industrial and research activities; 11 - Transport of radioactive materials; 12 - EDF nuclear power plants; 13 - Nuclear fuel cycle installations; 14 - Nuclear research facilities and various nuclear installations; 15 - Safe decommissioning of basic nuclear installations; 16 - Radioactive waste and polluted sites. D - Appendices: List of basic nuclear installations; ASN decisions and opinions published in 2008 in its Official Bulletin; Acronyms, abbreviations and names

  20. Australian HFC, PFC and SF6 emissions: atmospheric verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, P.; Dunse, B.; Krummel, P. B.; Steele, P.; Manning, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    The synthetic greenhouse gases (GHGs: hydrofluorocarbons - HFCs, perfluorocarbons - PFCs, and sulfur hexafluoride - SF6), emitted largely by the refrigeration, aluminium and electricity distribution industries respectively, are currently responsible for less than 2% of Australia's net long-lived GHG emissions (DCCEE, 2011). Nevertheless, they have attracted the attention of policymakers because (1) if their growth in concentrations and emissions continues unabated, particularly HFCs - currently growing at 10% per year - then they could be responsible globally (and in Australia) for more than 10% of the radiative forcing due to long-lived GHGs by 2050 (Velders et al., 2009); and (2) they provide the opportunity for a very cost-effective GHG mitigation strategy, because emissions can be reduced significantly through better engineering to minimize emissions, through a ban on dispersive uses (as solvents for example) and through the use of low GWP (Global Warming Potential) alternatives (for example hydrofluoroethers - HFEs). CSIRO, through its involvement in the AGAGE global program of monitoring non-carbon dioxide GHGs (Prinn et al., 2000), has been making high precision in situ measurements (12 per day) of HFCs, PFCs and SF6 at Cape Grim, Tasmania, since 2004, using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer detector (GC-MSD) fitted with a custom-built cryo-focussing unit (Medusa: Miller et al., 2008). The resultant data have been used to derive Australian emissions by inverse modelling (NAME, TAPM) and interspecies correlation (ISC). The overall agreement between so-called bottom-up estimates of Australian emissions, as reported to the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), and top-down estimates from atmospheric observations, using NAME, TAPM and ISC, is encouraging. Australian UNFCCC reported emissions (DCCEE, 2011) generally agree to within of 10% of emissions calculated from Cape Grim data, scaled on a population basis, with some notable

  1. Characterisation of episodic aerosol types over the Australian continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Classification of Australian continental aerosol types resulting from episodes of enhanced source activity, such as smoke plumes and dust outbreaks, is carried out via cluster analysis of optical properties obtained from inversion of sky radiance distributions at Australian aerosol ground stations using data obtained over the last decade. The cluster analysis distinguishes four significant classes, which are identified on the basis of their optical properties and provenance as determined by satellite imagery and back-trajectory analysis. The four classes are identified respectively as aged smoke, fresh smoke, coarse dust and a super-absorptive aerosol. While the first three classes show similarities with comparable aerosol types identified elsewhere, the super-absorptive aerosol has no obvious foreign prototype. The class identified as coarse dust shows a prominent depression in single scattering albedo in the blue spectral region due to absorption by hematite, which is shown to be more abundant in central Australian dust relative to the "dust belt"of the Northern Hemisphere. The super-absorptive class is distinctive in view of its very low single scattering albedo (~0.7 at 500 nm and variable enhanced absorption at 440 nm. The strong absorption by this aerosol requires a high black carbon content while the enhanced blue-band absorption may derive from organic compounds emitted during the burning of specific vegetation types. This aerosol exerts a positive radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA, with a large deposition of energy in the atmosphere per unit aerosol optical depth. This contrasts to the other three classes where the TOA forcing is negative. Optical properties of the four types will be used to improve the representation of Australian continental aerosol in climate models, and to enhance the accuracy of satellite-based aerosol retrievals over Australia.

  2. Characterisation of episodic aerosol types over the Australian continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Classification of Australian continental aerosol types resulting from episodes of enhanced source activity, such as smoke plumes and dust outbreaks, is carried out via cluster analysis of microphysical properties obtained from inversion of sky radiance distributions at Australian aerosol ground stations using data obtained over the last decade. The cluster analysis distinguishes four significant classes, which are identified on the basis of their optical properties and provenance as determined by satellite imagery and back-trajectory analysis. The four classes are identified respectively as aged smoke, fresh smoke, coarse dust and a super-absorptive aerosol. While the first three classes show similarities with comparable aerosol types identified elsewhere, the super-absorptive aerosol has no obvious foreign prototype. The class identified as coarse dust shows a prominent depression in single scattering albedo in the blue spectral region due to absorption by hematite, which is shown to be more abundant in central Australian dust relative to the "dust belt" of the Northern Hemisphere. The super-absorptive class is distinctive in view of its very low single scattering albedo (~0.7 at 500 nm and variable enhanced absorption at 440 nm. The strong absorption by this aerosol requires a high black carbon content while the enhanced blue-band absorption may derive from organic compounds emitted during the burning of specific vegetation types. This aerosol exerts a positive radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA, with a large deposition of energy in the atmosphere per unit aerosol optical depth. This contrasts to the other three classes where the TOA forcing is negative. Optical properties of the four types will be used to improve the representation of Australian continental aerosol in climate models, and to enhance the accuracy of satellite-based aerosol retrievals over Australia.

  3. Australian diagnostic reference levels for multi detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) is undertaking web based surveys to obtain data to establish national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for diagnostic imaging. The first set of DRLs to be established are for multi detector computed tomography (MDCT). The survey samples MDCT dosimetry metrics: dose length product (DLP, mGy.cm) and volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol, mGy), for six common protocols/habitus: Head, Neck, Chest, AbdoPelvis, ChestAbdoPelvis and Lumbar Spine from individual radiology clinics and platforms. A practice reference level (PRL) for a given platform and protocol is calculated from a compliant survey containing data collected from at least ten patients. The PRL is defined as the median of the DLP/CTDIvol values for a single compliant survey. Australian National DRLs are defined as the 75th percentile of the distribution of the PRLs for each protocol and age group. Australian National DRLs for adult MDCT have been determined in terms of DLP and CTDIvol. In terms of DLP the national DRLs are 1,000 mGy cm, 600 mGy cm, 450 mGy cm, 700 mGy cm, 1,200 mGy cm, and 900 mGy cm for the protocols Head, Neck, Chest, AbdoPelvis, ChestAbdoPelvis and Lumbar Spine respectively. Average dose values obtained from the European survey Dose Datamed I reveal Australian doses to be higher by comparison for four out of the six protocols. The survey is ongoing, allowing practices to optimise dose delivery as well as allowing the periodic update of DRLs to reflect changes in technology and technique.

  4. Achieving professional status: Australian podiatrists' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Wesley

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper explores the notion of professional status from the perspective of a sample of Australian podiatrists; how it is experienced, what factors are felt to affect it, and how these are considered to influence professional standing within an evolving healthcare system. Underpinning sociological theory is deployed in order to inform and contextualise the study. Methods Data were drawn from a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 21 and focus groups (n = 9 with podiatrists from across four of Australia's eastern states (Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Australian Capital Territory, resulting in a total of 76 participants. Semi-structured interview schedules sought to explore podiatrist perspectives on a range of features related to professional status within podiatry in Australia. Results Central to the retention and enhancement of status was felt to be the development of specialist roles and the maintenance of control over key task domains. Key distinctions in private and public sector environments, and in rural and urban settings, were noted and found to reflect differing contexts for status development. Marketing was considered important to image enhancement, as was the cache attached to the status of the universities providing graduate education. Conclusion Perceived determinants of professional status broadly matched those identified in the wider sociological literature, most notably credentialism, client status, content and context of work (such as specialisation and an ideological basis for persuading audiences to acknowledge professional status. In an environment of demographic and workforce change, and the resultant policy demands for healthcare service re-design, enhanced opportunities for specialisation appear evident. Under the current model of professionalism, both role flexibility and uniqueness may prove important.

  5. Australian Nuclear Association David Culley award for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This project follows from the school's development of the principles of stress / strain relationships in materials, Bragg's Law, and the wave and penetration properties of neutrons. It is expected to lead to a set of experiments to be carried out at the HIFAR research reactor facilities of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) using neutron diffraction to demonstrate applied stress and residual stress within examples of engineering structural component sections. Prior to the visit of the students to ANSTO, the topic of radiation safety is to be addressed by staff from ANSTO Health and Safety Division. A report will be provided covering the project's results and calculations

  6. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low

  7. Information and training on radiation protection for trade union representatives from the nine Member States of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its training and information programme on radiation protection, the Directorate-General for Employment and Social Affairs (Health and Safety Directorate) organized for the third and fourth time (in October 1977 and 1978) seminars on radiation protection on behalf of trade union representatives from the nine Member States; the seminars served in particular as a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences. The present volume reproduces the papers read on those occasions, covering the following topics: the independence of radiaton protection units; training and information in radiation protection; analysis of the main innovations in radiological protection concepts emerging from ICRP Publication No 26; the protection of occasionally exposed workers; the work of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation; the concept of optimization; future developments in dosimetry. Although the publication is destined mainly for the participants in the two meetings, the information it contains may also be of use to anyone interested in the problems of radiation protection and the spreading of knowledge in this field

  8. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  9. Four Management Agendas for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In a new mixed economy of higher learning, Australian universities require more strategic management to compete and collaborate sustainably. However, many scholars argue that new modes of university management are at odds with scholarly aims and values. This article examines how Australian universities frame their missions and communicate their…

  10. Recent developments in the Australian housing market

    OpenAIRE

    James Bond

    2003-01-01

    Housing plays an important role in Australia’s economic growth and in the welfare of Australians. This article examines developments in the Australian housing market over recent years. It argues that investors have played an increasingly important role in the housing market for both detached houses and apartments.

  11. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  12. An Australian perspective on developing standards and ensuring compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornber, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Australia is a federation of states and territories, each with their own parliament and animal-welfare laws. Australian animal-welfare legislation imposes a "duty of care" on people responsible for the care and well-being of animals under their management. In the livestock sector, this responsibility is mirrored by the ongoing development of standards, guidelines, and codes of practice to assist people to understand their responsibilities and to meet expectations concerning animal welfare. The Australian Animal Welfare Strategy (AAWS) is the national animal-welfare policy blueprint for sustainable improvements in animal welfare, and one of its key goals is to achieve greater consistency in the development, implementation, and enforcement of animal-welfare standards. Standards, guidelines, and model codes also inform the development of contemporary, evidence-based quality assurance programs for individual livestock industries and provide the basis for competency-based training programs for animal handlers. Australian standards have been developed for pigs and land transport of livestock, and work is progressing on national standards for cattle, sheep, horses, zoo animals, dogs, and cats. Other achievements include the development of requirements for the care and use of animals in research and teaching, guidelines for the welfare of aquatic animals, and codes of practice for the humane killing of pest animals. State and territory governments are developing a framework for consistent regulation and compliance in consultation with industries and welfare organizations. PMID:20378873

  13. Modelling seasonality in Australian building approvals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry M Karamujic

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the impact of seasonal influences on Australian housing approvals, represented by the State of Victoria[1] building approvals for new houses (BANHs. The prime objective of BANHs is to provide timely estimates of future residential building work. Due to the relevance of the residential property sector to the property sector as whole, BANHs are viewed by economic analysts and commentators as a leading indicator of property sector investment and as such the general level of economic activity and employment. The generic objective of the study is to enhance the practice of modelling housing variables. In particular, the study seeks to cast some additional light on modelling the seasonal behaviour of BANHs by: (i establishing the presence, or otherwise, of seasonality in Victorian BANHs; (ii if present, ascertaining is it deterministic or stochastic; (iii determining out of sample forecasting capabilities of the considered modelling specifications; and (iv speculating on possible interpretation of the results. To do so the study utilises a structural time series model of Harwey (1989. The modelling results confirm that the modelling specification allowing for stochastic trend and deterministic seasonality performs best in terms of diagnostic tests and goodness of fit measures. This is corroborated with the analysis of out of sample forecasting capabilities of the considered modelling specifications, which showed that the models with deterministic seasonal specification exhibit superior forecasting capabilities. The paper also demonstrates that if time series are characterized by either stochastic trend or seasonality, the conventional modelling approach[2] is bound to be mis-specified i.e. would not be able to identify statistically significant seasonality in time series.According to the selected modeling specification, factors corresponding to June, April, December and November are found to be significant at five per cent level

  14. Securitization of Migration: an Australian case study of global trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Humphrey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Post September 11 migration has increasingly been framed as a security problem. In the 2010 Australian election campaign migration was connected to security (defense of our borders, terrorism and social cohesion and to related issues of insecurity about the future (population size,sustainability and economic growth. Thisframing of migration as a national security issue overlooks the reality that Australian immigration is part of the global flow of population. Migration is an international issue experienced by states as a national question of border control and sovereignty seeking to manage the consequences of global inequality and mobility. This paper analyses the 'security turn' in migration debates in Australia and the North and the way the securitization of migration signifies the transformation of security from the problem of producing national order to the problem of managing global disorder resulting in the merging of national and international security strategies.

  15. Western Australian Mineral and Petroleum Statistics Digest 2006-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains the most comprehensive statistical information available on the Western Australian minerals and petroleum industry. The statistics in this Digest show that in 2006-07 the value of sales by the State's minerals and petroleum sector set a new record, rising by 25 per cent to reach $53.4 billion. This follows a decade of average annual growth of twelve per cent. This record result was driven by strong overseas demand for our resources and rising commodity prices. Despite the robust nature of the industry, the year produced many challenges and the impressive result was achieved against a background of a strengthening Australian dollar, adverse weather conditions, skills shortages and mining equipment supply constraints

  16. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  17. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000

  18. After the completion of the five-year state program for radiation sanitation of the Ural region: results and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime objectives of the State Programme were as follows: (i) Environmental remediation, social and economic rehabilitation of the radioactively contaminated territories and medical rehabilitation of the exposed population; (ii) Reduction of the risk of new radiation accidents due to accumulation of a huge amount of radioactive waste within the boundary of the Mayak facility. The results achieved and problems which remain to be addressed are highlighted. (P.A.)

  19. Mobile radiation monitoring of Mumbai and it's suburb through various road routes by using state-of-the-art radiation monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring of environmental radiation in different parts of the country is being periodically carried out with an objective to establish the countrywide baseline dose rate data. The task of quick assessment of impact due to any large-scale radiological emergencies in public domain involves reliable and quick monitoring of dose rate levels using mobile monitoring techniques. In order to achieve higher accuracy and more confidence in measured values, various state-of-the-art monitoring systems are used for mapping a large area. It enables collection and processing of data for rapid and correct evaluation of the situation. The evaluation of measured data from the different systems provides comparable results. This paper describes the radiation mapping of Mumbai and its suburbs carried out through different road routes by installing state-of-the art monitoring systems like CARMS, PMGSS, gamma tracers and micro-R survey meters in a light motor vehicle with the objective of assessing the background radiation level of Mumbai city including Mumbai Suburb, Navi Mumbai and Thane, tagging each data with the positional coordinates and also to detect and locate the presence of orphan sources, if any. The average of measured dose rate levels of Mumbai and Mumbai Suburbs, Navi Mumbai and Thane are 53.3±9.1 nGy.h-1, 50.9±10.0 nGy.h-1 and 52.1±10.8 nGy.h-1 respectively with maximum ∼ 160 nGy.h-l due to presence of high concentration of 40K at some locations. (author)

  20. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  1. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of Charge State Distribution by Non-Local Thermodynamic-Equilibrium Spin-Orbit-Split-Array Collisional Radiative Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红; 张继彦; 杨向东; 杨国洪; 郑志坚

    2003-01-01

    A collisional radiative model based on the spin-orbit-split-arrays is used to determine the charge state distribution of gold plasmas. The ab initio atomic structure code of Cowan and the spin-orbit-split-array model were used to calculate all the emission spectra of the different gold species, and a non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium model was coupled to calculate the ion populations at a given plasma density and electron temperature. The charge state distribution and other plasma parameters were determined by comparing the experimental spectra with the theoretical simulated spectra of gold plasmas.

  3. The correlation between radiative surface defect states and high color rendering index from ZnO nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Combined surface, structural and opto-electrical investigations are drawn from the chemically fashioned ZnO nanotubes and its heterostructure with p-GaN film. A strong correlation has been found between the formation of radiative surface defect states in the nanotubes and the pure cool white light possessing averaged eight color rendering index value of 96 with appropriate color temperature. Highly important deep-red color index value has been realized > 95 which has the capability to render and reproduce natural and vivid colors accurately. Diverse types of deep defect states and their relative contribution to the corresponding wavelengths in the broad emission band is suggested.

  4. The Australian Synchrotron Project - Update

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The Australian Synchrotron - a synchrotron light facility based on a 3-GeV electron storage ring is under construction at a site in the Metropolitan District of Melbourne. Building preparation started on a "green-field" site in September 2003 and staff moved in to their new offices in February 2005. Installation of the technical equipment started in April 2005 with all accelerator contracts expected to be completed before April 2006. Storage Ring commissioning with beam will start in June 2006, and project completion is scheduled for March 2007. In this paper we present an overview of the facility and discuss progress to date in meeting this very aggressive schedule.

  5. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2013-01-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  6. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2010-01-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  7. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  8. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  9. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Philip A.

    Australian Aboriginal ethnoastronomical traditions were recorded from a wide variety of sources in different periods. While the corpus of mythology concerning the heavens is diverse, it is unified by beliefs of a Skyworld as land with its own topography, containing plants and animals familiar to those living below. Spirits of the dead reside alongside the Creation Ancestors as celestial bodies in the Skyworld. Aboriginal hunter-gatherers used the regular movement of constellations and planets to measure time and to indicate the season, while unexpected change in the sky was seen as an omen.

  10. United States Land Cover Land Use Change, Albedo and Surface Radiative Forcing 1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    This research responds to the recent recommendations made by the U.S. National Research Council for regional forcing studies to better understand climatic responses to land cover land use change. Surface albedo affects the earth's radiative energy balance, by controlling how much incoming solar radiation is absorbed and reflected. It is well established that Land Cover Land Use (LCLU) change results in changes in the surface albedo which has a radiative forcing effect, however, to date, studies have been limited due to data uncertainties. New spatially explicit satellite derived LCLU change and albedo data for the conterminous U.S. are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing. The methodology and preliminary results for 42% of the U.S. processed to date are presented as spatially explicit maps and summary statistics. The results indicate a negative (cooling) radiative forcing effect due to U.S. LCLU change over the last three decades. Data used include USGS Landsat based decadal land cover maps of the conterminous U.S. located using a stratified sampling methodology across 84 ecoregions, mean 2000-2002 MODIS broadband albedo values extracted in each ecoregion for the 10 mapped LCLU classes, and monthly mean surface incoming solar radiation from the recent European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40 year Reanalysis (ERA40) product.

  11. Radiatively driven relativistic jets with variable adiabatic index equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Mukesh K.; Kumar, Rajiv; Mandal, Samir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2015-11-01

    We investigate a relativistic fluid jet driven by radiation from a shocked accretion disc around a non-rotating black hole approximated by Paczyński-Wiita potential. The sub-Keplerian and Keplerian accretion rates control the shock location and therefore, the radiation field around the accretion disc. We compute the radiative moments with full special relativistic transformation. The effect of a fraction of radiation absorbed by the black hole has been approximated, over and above the special relativistic transformations. We show that the radiative moments around a supermassive black hole are different compared to that around a stellar mass black hole. We show that the terminal speed of jets increases with the mass accretion rates, synchrotron emission of the accretion disc, and reduction of proton fraction of the flow composition. To obtain relativistic terminal velocities of jets, both thermal and radiative driving are important. We show for very high accretion rates and pair dominated flow, jets around supermassive black holes are truly ultrarelativistic, while for jets around stellar mass black holes, terminal Lorentz factor of about 10 is achievable.

  12. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1990 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory -- Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release

  13. Effect of the dynamics of the impurity distribution over the ionization states on the radiative plasma instabilities and shock wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that conventional quasistationary (coronal, or improved coronal) approximation for the energy loss due to the impurity radiation in practice can never be applied to the investigations of the impurity radiation driven instabilities in the edge plasmas due to relatively slow evolution of the impurity population over ionization states. We show that taking into account the effect of the evolution of the impurity population over ionization states results in a very significant change of the growth rates of the radiative driven instabilities and the structure of the shock wave in the radiative plasmas and leads to the strict conditions for the existence of the shock wave. (orig.)

  14. Effectiveness and efficiency of the regulatory body in the Czech Republic (State Office for Nuclear Safety) in the control of manufacturing, export and import of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the Czech regulatory context, general responsibility and competency of the regulatory body in the Czech Republic. State Office for Nuclear Safety is competent for the State administration and supervision of the utilization of nuclear energy and ionizing radiation and in the field of radiation protection. The Office celebrates 10 years anniversary of the establishing this year. During past 10 years a significant progress in the field of the assurance of the radiation protection in the country was achieved. In the paper a summary of the Office role focused on the implementation of internationally recommended radiation protection principles into practices is presented. (author)

  15. Non-classical properties and algebraic characteristics of negative binomial states in quantized radiation fields

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Guang; Pan, Shao-Hua; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonclassical properties and algebraic characteristics of the negative binomial states introduced by Barnett recently. The ladder operator formalism and displacement operator formalism of the negative binomial states are found and the algebra involved turns out to be the SU(1,1) Lie algebra via the generalized Holstein-Primarkoff realization. These states are essentially Peremolov's SU(1,1) coherent states. We reveal their connection with the geometric states and find that they ar...

  16. Australian Expatriates: Who are They?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Calderón Prada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Australia is made up of 20 million people and, interestingly enough, over one million of the total population live overseas. Australians living abroad are known as `expatriates´ and they have a particular profile: highly educated and better skilled than their counterparts at home. Thus, on the one hand, a general division may be established between expatriates and Australians living at home; on the other, a particular division between expatriates themselves, which depends on the individual reasons that push them to leave Australia. At this point, it is important to outline the general reasons that lead expatriates to go overseas. To begin with, in terms of migration, Australia is both historically and contemporarily linked to other countries. Secondly, Australia is geographically isolated and, therefore, far away from the main global markets. Finally, it is quite right to conclude that although the logical assumption of expatriation is distance, expatriates are mentally, and often emotionally, linked to Australia and, therefore, the understanding of their situation is more positive than negative

  17. Learner discipline: An Australian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stewart

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Australian schools by and large are safe schools. Nonetheless discipline problems do exist – including bullying behaviour. For this kind of problem schools should have management policies in place. As traditional behaviour-management practices – including corporal punishment – are largely prohibited in Australian schools, contemporary practices centre on management through supportive school programmes, including appropriate curricula and school-support structures. This article supports the belief that measures such as the exclusion of misbehaving learners should be treated with caution. Measures such as this might not reflect accepted international principles and practices and should only be exercised in the most extreme circumstances. The article also supports the view that it is part of the school’s role to ensure that all learners are aware of the reality that while they have rights, they also have corresponding responsibilities. This awareness is more likely to be achieved in a supportive school culture where each learner is recognised as having unique qualities that can mature and grow in an appropriate learning environment.

  18. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans

  19. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  20. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  1. Modelling the outer radiation belt as a complex system in a self-organised critical state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Crosby

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of the outer electron radiation belt makes this area of geo-space a candidate for the concept of self-organized criticality. It is shown here that frequency distributions of measured outer electron radiation belt data are well-represented by power-laws over two decades. Applying the concept of self-organized criticality to interpret the shape of the distributions suggests another approach to complement existing methods in the interpretation of how this complicated environment works. Furthermore sub-grouping the radiation belt count rate data as a function of spatial location or temporal interval (e.g. L-shell, magnetic local time, solar cycle, ... shows systematic trends in the value of the slope of the power-laws. It is shown that the inner part of the outer radiation belt is influenced in a similar manner to the outer part, but in a less profound way. Our results suggest that the entire outer radiation belt appears to be affected as the sum of its individual parts. This type of study also gives the probability of exceeding a given threshold value over a given time; limiting the size of 'an event'. The average values could then be compared with models used in spacecraft design.

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods

  3. Radiation protection programmes in Australia and the USA - similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aims of a comprehensive radiation protection programme in many working environments, including the Australian states and territories and the United States of America, are similar. However, the means by which the final programme objectives are achieved, may differ. In many cases, this is dictated by specific statutory requirements of the country in question. An opportunity to work in the USA has provided insights into the similarities and differences that exist between the two countries, as they relate to organisational planning and deployment of radiation protection programmes. Examples of variances include: statutory requirements, an organisation's relationship with regulatory authorities, licensing requirements, surveys and monitoring, procedures for receiving and opening packages, waste management, record keeping, role of radiation safety/protection officer, radiation protection training. The importance of the exchange of information, general approach to safety and specific methods in addressing radiation protection can be of significant benefit to both the Australian and the US working environments. Fostering this kind of international collaboration and communication has enormous potential by sharing information and facilitating workplaces in both countries to utilise the most appropriate risk management processes

  4. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of liver metastases: State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver metastases are frequently found in oncologic patients. Chemotherapy is the standard treatment in pluri-metastatic patients, with the possibility to obtain a clear improvement of their prognosis. Local treatment (surgery, radiofrequency, cryo-therapy, radiotherapy, etc.) could be proposed for oligo-metastatic patients, particularly for those with a good prognosis. Historically, radiation therapy has had a limited role in the treatment of liver metastases because of its toxicity when whole liver irradiation was delivered. Improvements in the knowledge of liver radiobiology and radio-pathology as well as technical innovations in delivering radiation therapy are the basis of the modern partial liver irradiation concept. In this historical and therapeutic landscape, extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy is particularly interesting for the treatment of liver metastases. This review summarises published data on stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of liver metastases. (authors)

  5. Current state of studies on radiation structural research at NNC RK (review of the work accomplished)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (NNC RK) was established in January 1993 on the basis of scientific-and-technological institutions of military industrial complex of the former Semipalatinsk Test Site and Institute of Nuclear Physics, the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Kazakhstan (INP AS RK). At that time the Institute of Nuclear Physics remained one of the leading institutes of the former Soviet Union in the field of radiation physics of solid body and radiation structural research. No doubt the creation of NNC RK was of great importance in preserving leading lines by Kazakhstan scientists in the modern radiation structural research. NNC RK consolidated unique experimental facilities, laboratories into one enlarged structure that allowed to set up new complex problems

  6. Radiation-induced degradation of water pollutants - state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getoff, N. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Chemie und Strahlenchemie]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Veterinaermedizinische Endokrinologie, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-04-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of biological resistant pollutants in drinking as well as in wastewater is briefly reviewed. First, some important units, definitions etc., radiation sources, as well as dose-depth curves in water as functions of the electron energy and {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-rays are mentioned. Following is a schematical presentation of water radiolysis and of characteristics of primary free radicals. Then the degradation of some aliphatic and aromatic chlorinated compounds in the presence of air is presented. Some spectroscopic and kinetic data of transients resulting from chlorinated phenols are also quoted in order to illustrate and to explain the rather complicated degradation mechanisms. In this respect the synergistic effect of radiation and oxygen as well as that of ozone is also discussed. Finally, a scheme for technical application of high energy electron beam is presented. (author).

  7. Radiative decays of ground state light vector mesons with non relativistic and relativistic phase spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the present work has been the study of radiative decays of light vector mesons within the framework of NRQM formalism using both non relativistic and relativistic phase spaces. In this work, radiative decay widths of light vector mesons have been obtained using spectroscopic parameters from which the masses of vector and pseudoscalar mesons are obtained. The experimental data on radiative decay rates is understood theoretically in terms of a multipole expansion model. The quality of the calculated results reveal that the non relativistic phase space is not a correct prescription for light vector mesons. Comparison between the photon energy and the mass of the emitting meson reveals that the relativistic phase space is more suited which is seen in the model calculations

  8. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program

  9. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  10. Delayed effects of low-dose radiation on cellular immunity in atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, E T; Akiyama, M; Kusunoki, Y; Makinodan, T

    1987-05-01

    Several parameters of cellular immune function were assessed among persons who survived the 1945 atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki but who now reside in the United States. The subjects in this study were exposed to various low doses (T65D) of radiation at the time of the bomb. More than half received an estimated 0 Gy (S0 group). Of those exposed to more radiation (S+ group), nearly 90% received less than 0.50 Gy (50 rad). Lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of these individuals and were assessed for the following parameters of cellular immunity: mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin, mitogenic response to allogeneic lymphocytes, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), and interferon production. In every case, the response of the S+ group was greater than that of the S0 group, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. Results of studies presently being performed on A-bomb survivors residing in Hiroshima do not confirm this difference. Therefore, it is difficult to say whether the increase in natural cytotoxicity observed among the American and not the Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to very low doses of radiation is a hormetic effect which was modulated by post-radiation environmental conditions or a result of selective migration. PMID:3570796

  11. Novel approach for computing photosynthetically active radiation for productivity modeling using remotely sensed images in the Great Plains, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) is a key indicator of ecosystem performance, and helps in many decision-making processes related to environment. We used the Eddy covariancelight use efficiency (EC-LUE) model for estimating GPP in the Great Plains, United States in order to evaluate the performance of this model. We developed a novel algorithm for computing the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) based on net radiation. A strong correlation (R2=0.94,N=24) was found between daily PAR and Landsat-based mid-day instantaneous net radiation. Though the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based instantaneous net radiation was in better agreement (R2=0.98,N=24) with the daily measured PAR, there was no statistical significant difference between Landsat based PAR and MODIS based PAR. The EC-LUE model validation also confirms the need to consider biological attributes (C3 versus C4 plants) for potential light use efficiency. A universal potential light use efficiency is unable to capture the spatial variation of GPP. It is necessary to use C3 versus C4 based land use/land cover map for using EC-LUE model for estimating spatiotemporal distribution of GPP.

  12. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, I; Lye, J; Alves, A [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Vic (Australia); Lehmann, J [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Kenny, J [Epworth HealthCare, Richmond, VIC (Australia); Dunn, L [Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Instit., Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  13. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  14. Disentangling the relationship of the Australian marsupial orders using retrotransposon and evolutionary network analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallus, Susanne; Janke, Axel; Kumar, Vikas; Nilsson, Maria A

    2015-04-01

    The ancestors to the Australian marsupials entered Australia around 60 (54-72) Ma from Antarctica, and radiated into the four living orders Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, Diprotodontia, and Notoryctemorphia. The relationship between the four Australian marsupial orders has been a long-standing question, because different phylogenetic studies have not been able to consistently reconstruct the same topology. Initial in silico analysis of the Tasmanian devil genome and experimental screening in the seven marsupial orders revealed 20 informative transposable element insertions for resolving the inter- and intraordinal relationships of Australian and South American orders. However, the retrotransposon insertions support three conflicting topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia, indicating that the split between the three orders may be best understood as a network. This finding is supported by a phylogenetic reanalysis of nuclear gene sequences, using a consensus network approach that allows depicting hidden phylogenetic conflict, otherwise lost when forcing the data into a bifurcating tree. The consensus network analysis agrees with the transposable element analysis in that all possible topologies regarding Peramelemorphia, Dasyuromorphia, and Notoryctemorphia in a rooted four-taxon topology are equally well supported. In addition, retrotransposon insertion data support the South American order Didelphimorphia being the sistergroup to all other living marsupial orders. The four Australian orders originated within 3 Myr at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. The rapid divergences left conflicting phylogenetic information in the genome possibly generated by incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization, leaving the relationship among Australian marsupial orders unresolvable as a bifurcating process millions of years later. PMID:25786431

  15. Basic principles of laser radiation protection and the state of regulation in SRJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main hazard from work with lasers is the possibility of eye and skin damage. Secondary hazards consists of ionizing radiation, ozone, pollution of working atmosphere with chemical toxic and biological agents from target and laser, electrical and cryogenic liquid hazard, fire and explosion hazard etc. Basic safety measures are: arrangement of working room, with laser working requirements, permanent laser beam path control. Use of appropriate laser protective eye wears, and all additional protective measures against to secondary laser hazards. Current standards and those which will be issued in our country will in rather good level cover the field of laser radiation protection. (author)

  16. Characterization of several types of solid state detectors for radiation processing dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several undyed and dyed polymer films are commercially available for dosimetry in intense radiation fields, especially for radiation processing of food and sterilisation of medical devices. The effects of temperature during irradiation and post-irradiation stability, on the response of these dosimeters are of importance to operators of irradiation facilities. The present study investigates the effects of temperature during irradiation by 2.2MeV electrons beam accelerator and post irradiation storage on the response of several types of dosimeter films. All dosimeters showed a significant effect of temperature during irradiation and post-irradiation storage. (Author)

  17. The activity at the state organs of Russia in the field for providing radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of reliable, efficient radiation safety of enterprises, research institute and organizations of Minatom of Russian Federation, environmental protection and some other problems have been discussed in this report. It consists of three parts. The first contents the information of the governmental and industrial safety systems on the territory of Russian Federation. The second part comprises the findings distinguishing the safety of the NPPs and the enterprises of nuclear industry. Some problems of the actual researches and application developments including the development of new international nuclear safety standards based on recommendations of International Committee of Radiation Protection have been written in third part. (author)

  18. State and prospects of rehabilitation persons with radiation and chemical injuries in Tatarstan Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary data on complex investigation of 442 patients participating in liquidation of consequences of the Ch NPP accident, and their children, living at the territory of the Tatarstan Republic are presented. The existing system of rehabilitation of persons, injured in rehabilitation of persons, injured in the course of emergency situations, as well as the prospects of its development are considered. Special attention is paid to the program on rehabilitation of the Ch NPP accident and other radiation accident consequences liquidators, The actuality of the program on training and upgrading qualification of medical personnel and social workers, engaged in medical and social-labour rehabilitation of persons with radiation-chemical injuries is noted

  19. Status of Research and Developmental Studies on Radiation Pasteurization of Fish and Shellfish in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the status of research on radiation- pasteurization of fish and shell fish in the United States and describes plans for commercialization of the process. The authors discuss: (a) laboratory studies at universities and governmental research institutions on quality and microbiological aspects of irradiated sea food; (b) developmental investigations on irradiating fish ashore and at sea; and (c) United States clearance of radiation pasteurized sea food and use of the process in the fishing industry. Quality studies indicate that irradiation with cobalt-60 at levels of 150 000 at 450 000 rad can at least double the refrigerated shelf life of 16 species of fish and shell fish, which include the major species marketed as fresh or frozen in the United States. Storage temperature, quality of raw material, and dose level significantly affect product quality and shelf life; packaging is of less significance. Synergistic systems, using bactericidal salts or heat, in conjunction with radiation, effectively destroy bacteria and offer promise in reducing radiation levels and extending product shelf life over that when radiation is used alone. Irradiation at very low levels significantly changes the microbial flora of fish fillets, but interestingly enough this change is no greater than that which occurs when storing the product in an anaerobic environment. In discussing microbiological changes in irradiated and non- irradiated fish, the authors point out that treated fish fillets are as safe and wholesome as the non-treated fish. Work on safety aspects of irradiated fish fillets is discussed in detail. Developmental studies received emphasis with construction and operation of a 250 000 Ci cobalt-60 fish-processing facility at Gloucester, Mass. Tests on packaging and shipping irradiated products under simulated commercial conditions show that pasteurized fish can be handled in the same manner as fresh fish, with a resultant doubling of shelf life for the former

  20. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, David B.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B.; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; MOISSONNIER, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 ...

  1. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa J. Stoneham; Jodie Goodman; Mike Daube

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative...

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  3. Operational accidents and radiation exposure experience within the United States Atomic Energy Commission, 1943--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational injury and fatality experience during 32 years of the development of the atomic energy industry under the direction of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, is reviewed. Data are included on the cause of all accidents, including fires and transportation accidents, and the cost of AEC property damage. Fatalities of AEC and contractor personnel from all causes during the 32-year period totaled 321, of which 184 occurred in construction; 121 in AEC operations such as production, research, and services; and 16 in Government functions. There were 19,225 lost-time injuries attributable to all accidental causes, or a 32-year frequency rate of 2.75 based on the number of injuries per million man-hours. There were six deaths attributable to nuclear causes, thee of which were due to blast and flying missiles and three caused by whole-body radiation exposure. Forty-one workers were involved in lost-time radiation accidents, of whom 26 showed clinical manifestations attributable to radiation, resulting in permanent partial-disability of three workers and the loss of a digit by four workers, while the others did not develop evidence of radiation injury

  4. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982

  5. Electronic states of 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene. A synchrotron radiation linear dichroism investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duy Duc; Jones, Nykola C.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning;

    2012-01-01

    The electronic transitions of 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene (BPEB) were investigated by UV synchrotron radiation linear dichroism (SRLD) spectroscopy in the range 25,000 – 58,000 cm–1 (400 – 170 nm) on molecular samples aligned in stretched polyethylene. The investigation was supported by variable...

  6. Space weather radiation effects on geostationary satellite solid-state power amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeyer, W. Q.; Cahoy, K.

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand and mitigate the effects of space weather on the performance of geostationary (GEO) communications satellites, we analyze 16 years of archived telemetry data from Inmarsat, the UK-based telecommunications company. We compare 665,112 operational hours of housekeeping telemetry from two generations of satellites, designated as Fleet A and Fleet B. Each generation experienced 13 solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) anomalies for a total of 26 anomalies from 1996 to 2012. We compare telemetry from the Inmarsat anomalies with space weather observations, including data from the OMNI2 database, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, the Advanced Composition Explorer Satellite, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) GEO observations; the evolution of the sunspot number; and the Kp index. Most SSPA anomalies for Fleet A occur as solar activity declines; Fleet B has not yet experienced a full solar cycle. For both fleets, the average value of Kp remained < 2 over time periods of 2 days, 3 days, and 2 weeks around the time of anomaly, which suggests that the anomalies occurred at times of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity and that they were probably not solely caused by surface charging. From 1996 to 2009, the average of the 1.8-3.5 MeV electron flux was 1.98 #/(cm2 s st keV). Five of the 26 anomalies, unfortunately, do not have corresponding science observations (specifically, electron flux data in the LANL data set), so part of this study focuses on the 21 anomalies when science observations were available. Six out of 21 anomalies experienced a high-energy electron flux greater than 1.5 standard deviations above the mean of the log10 of the flux between 7 and 14 days prior to the anomaly. By contrast, a Monte Carlo simulation finds that on average, only 2.8 out of 21 (13%) of randomly assigned "anomalies" occur between 7 and 14 days after an electron flux greater than 1.5 standard deviations above the mean. Our observations suggest

  7. Evaluating Junior Secondary Science Textbook Usage in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2016-08-01

    A large body of research has drawn attention to the importance of providing engaging learning experiences in junior secondary science classes, in an attempt to attract more students into post-compulsory science courses. The reality of time and resource constraints, and the high proportion of non-specialist science teachers teaching science, has resulted in an overreliance on more transmissive pedagogical tools, such as textbooks. This study sought to evaluate the usage of junior secondary science textbooks in Australian schools. Data were collected via surveys from 486 schools teaching junior secondary (years 7-10), representing all Australian states and territories. Results indicated that most Australian schools use a science textbook in the junior secondary years, and textbooks are used in the majority of science lessons. The most highly cited reason influencing choice of textbook was layout/colour/illustrations, and electronic technologies were found to be the dominant curricula material utilised, in addition to textbooks, in junior secondary science classes. Interestingly, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their textbooks, although many were keen to stress the subsidiary role of textbooks in the classroom, emphasising the textbook was `one' component of their teaching repertoire. Importantly, respondents were also keen to stress the benefits of textbooks in supporting substitute teachers, beginning teachers, and non-specialist science teachers; in addition to facilitating continuity of programming and staff support in schools with high staff turnover. Implications from this study highlight the need for high quality textbooks to support teaching and learning in Australian junior secondary science classes.

  8. Hawking Radiation-Quasi-Normal Modes Correspondence and Effective States for Nonextremal Reissner-Nordström Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the nonstrictly thermal character of the Hawking radiation spectrum harmonizes Hawking radiation with black hole (BH) quasi-normal modes (QNM). This paramount issue has been recently analyzed in the framework of both Schwarzschild BHs (SBH) and Kerr BHs (KBH). In this assignment, we generalize the analysis to the framework of nonextremal Reissner-Nordström BHs (RNBH). Such a generalization is important because in both Schwarzschild and Kerr BHs an absorbed (emitted) particle has only mass. Instead, in RNBH the particle has charge as well as mass. In doing so, we expose that, for the RNBH, QNMs can be naturally interpreted in terms of quantum levels for both particle emission and absorption. Conjointly, we generalize some concepts concerning the RNBH's “effective states.”

  9. Evaluation of the behavior of a hundred dentists concerning to radiation protection in the city of Aracatuba, Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of 100 dentists concerned to radiation protection in the city of Aracatuba, Sao Paulo State. Each dental office was visited, and a form was filled out by the dentists, with questions regarding the radiation protection of the patient, operator and staff. in the same visit, a radiography was taken using a phantom and processed according to the professionals'routine, to determine its diagnostic accuracy. After data analysis, we concluded that the dentists are not using satisfactorily the radiological sources, and the exposure and processing conditions could be improved. We also concluded that the professionals tend to task the radiographs after the clinical examination of the mouth, to reduce the number of the X-ray/patient ratio. Another conclusion is that the biological hazards from xradiation is not significant because of the small number of dental radiographs taken monthly. (author)

  10. The steady-state solutions of radiatively driven stellar winds for a nonSobolev, pure-absorption model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the principle conclusion of a paper by Poe et al. (1989) are summarized. To the extent that a pure-absorption model is applicable, radiatively driven stellar winds have no well defined steady state. The non-Sobolev pure-absorption radiation force from Owocki et al., leads to the conclusion that the solution topology at the sonic point is a node, not a saddle or x as in the solar case. The number of transonic solutions increases from one unique solution for the x type to a range of solutions for the node-type topology. Thus, in the pure-absorption approximation, line driven winds can have a range of possible mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. 5 refs

  11. Preventing proliferation : the role of Australian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium debate has polarised Australian society for almost a decade. From 1977 until just before it achieved office in 1983 the Australia Labor Party took a position of strong opposition to uranium exports. The Australian Council of Trade Unions, the Australian Democrats, the Nuclear Disarmament Party, and many other organisations and sections of the community continue to oppose uranium mining and exports. Australia's uranium is currently exported for use in the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. But as the nuclear plants which are part of this cycle spread across the world, the risk rises that they will provide the cover and facilities for increasing numbers of countries to move towards nuclear weapons capability

  12. Compliance with Corporate Governance Principles: Australian Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Safari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the association between the level of compliance of Australian listed companies with Australian corporate governance principles, in aggregate, and the level of discretionary accruals using the modified Jones model. It is hypothesised that higher levels of compliance would be associated with lower levels of discretionary accruals. Data from a random sample of 214 Australian listed companies for the years 2009 and 2010 were used to test the hypothesis. The results demonstrate a significant negative relationship indicating that companies with higher levels of compliance engage in lower levels of earnings management via discretionary accruals.

  13. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs

  16. Australian national residue survey – closing the loop on pesticide residue risk management for Australian grain

    OpenAIRE

    Reichstein, I.; Healy, K; James, A.; Murray, B.

    2010-01-01

    Australia exports a major proportion of its agricultural production and is highly dependent on maintaining and developing access to, and competitiveness in, export markets. To preserve Australia’s status as a provider of high quality grain, the majority of Australian primary producers rely on pesticides to protect their crops from pests and diseases, particularly in post-harvest situations. The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) supports Australian agriculture by...

  17. Application of radiation safety principles and criteria in safety reassessment of radioactive waste disposed in near-surface facilities of the radon state corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyses regulatory requirements applied in the design and construction of radioactive waste disposal facilities at sites of the Radon State Corporation and considers approaches on use of radiation safety principles and criteria in their safety reassessment

  18. Integrated impact of radiation in the zone of ChNPP on the auto flora state of the animals' large in testiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of microbiocenosis of large intestines of rats and furae which were exposed to continuous integrated radiation has been studied in the field experiments emergency premises and in the adjacent zone of its impact

  19. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. PMID:22257324

  20. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2011-01-01

    We explore 50 Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarise the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses, showing that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, Elders or medicine men were believed to have the ability to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their role as provider and protector within the community. We also show that many Aboriginal groups understood the motions of the sun-earth-moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the moon blocking the sun.

  1. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-07-01

    We explore about fifty different Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarize the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses. We show that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, elders or medicine men claimed to be able to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their roles as providers and protectors within their communities. We also show that some Aboriginal groups seem to have understood the motions of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the Moon blocking the Sun.

  2. Australians' attitudes to nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a series of surveys of 2900 Australians show that some 80 per cent favour nuclear disarmament. The nuclear disarmament view is broad-based, for example it cuts across differences in age, sex and education. However the view is more common among people towards the left of the political spectrum who view the world as benign rather than hostile and who consider stockpiles can be reduced by small, reciprocated and supervised reductions. Between 2.5 per cent and 5.5 per cent of respondents act to bring about nuclear disarmament. The findings support and extend results from studies outside Australia showing that attitudes favouring nuclear disarmament are distributing themselves widely

  3. REGULATION OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND NATIONAL SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THREE CASE STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; McKenna, Michael; Rayner, Johanna; Hawes, Jazmin

    2016-03-01

    In recent times, Australia's national security concerns have had controversial impacts on regulation of Australian medical practitioners in areas related to immigration detention. This column explores three recent case studies relevant to this issue. The first involves the enactment of the Australian Border Force Act 2015 (Cth), which has a significant impact on the regulation of medical professionals who work with people in immigration detention. The second involves the decision of the High Court of Australia in Plaintiff M68/2015 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2016] HCA 1 that an amendment to Australian federal legislation justified sending children back to immigration detention centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. This legislation was previously heavily criticised by the Australian Human Rights Commissioner. The third concerns the deregistration of Tareq Kamleh, an Australian doctor of German-Palestinian heritage who came to public attention on ANZAC Day 2015 with his appearance online in a propaganda video for the Islamic State terrorist organisation al-Dawla al-Islamyia fil Iraq wa'al Sham, also known as Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) or Daesh. Australia's professional regulatory system should presumptively respect professional virtues, such as loyalty to the relief of individual patient suffering, when dealing with doctors (whether in Australia or ISIS-occupied Syria) working under regimes whose principles appear inconsistent with those of ethics and human rights. PMID:27323633

  4. Aims and present state of the radiation processing of fishes and seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptability of radurized pasteurized by ionizing radiations or radappertized (sterilized by ionizing radiations) fishery products depends on the irradiated fish quality. Though the sensory test is subjective, it allows a correct estimate of the quality. The correlation that exists between the adulteration degree estimated by chemical tests (T.M.A., total volatile bases, total volatil acids) and the organoleptic quality of the product is very variable. Gamma irradiation causes both qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbial flora. Methods actually used for the quality determination are not very fiable: researchs have to be undertaken to improve them. However, it can be assumed that: quality of radurized fish depends on its initial quality, storage duration, preirradiation storage temperature and amount of irradiation absorbed

  5. Evaluation of state of circulation in radiation injury using impedance plethysmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven patients with history of radiation burn were subjected to impedance plethysmographic investigation at Non-invasive Vascular Laboratory, K.E.M. Hospital. Impedance plethysmograms (IPG) were recorded from various locations in both the upper extremities in supine and digits of both the hands in supine as well as on hyper-abduction in sitting position. Control values of Blood Flow Index (BFI) and Differential Pulse Arrival Time (DPAT) were derived from similar data in 15 normal subjects. It was observed that digits having thinning of epidermis of skin recorded marked decrease in value of BFI and significant change in value of DPAT and these observations correlated well with thermography and vascular scintigraphy. Digits recording significant decrease in BFI, which were clinically normal, were found to have changes in the skin during follow up examination. This IPG provided a sensitive modality for detecting ischaemia in early stages in patients with history of radiation injury. (author)

  6. Evaluation of radiation protection conditions in dental offices in Bauru City, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate the behaviour of 145 dentists, in their offices, as far as radiation protection in concerned. Every dental office was visited and the dentist filled out a form with questions regarding to radiation protection of patient, professional and dental assistant. The same visit exposure and processing conditions of intraoral films were checked and a no-screen film was exposed for late measurement of the diameter of x-ray bean. After data analysis it seems fair to conclude that exposure and processing conditions could be improved if the correct exposure and development times according to those suggested by their manufactures were employed. Another reasonable conclusion that could be drawn from the obtained data: the number of dental radiographs taken is small and so the probability of biological damage is not significant at the level of present knowledge. (author). 177 refs., 5 figs., 42 tabs

  7. State changes both lipids peroxide oxidation and antioxidant protection under low radiation doses in experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research actuality of radiation effect of low insensitivity on biological objects and criteria elaboration for estimation of unfavorable factors influences of different levels of bio-object organization shows that there is the increasing the oncological patients in Stepnogorsk, Shantobe and other regions of Akmola oblast during the last time. The goal of ths work is to study the level of lipids peroxide oxidation (LPO) in condition of low radiation doses. Insensitivity of LPO was evaluated by content of malonyl dialdegide as a secondary product of lipids peroxide oxidation and by definition of catalase activity as enzyme of antioxidant protection. The were no reliable changes of LPO content in control groups after 4 weeks and catalase activity in comparison with animal groups after two weeks. We consider that it is necessary to research LPO dynamics in the further period, as well as testing of analysis of superoxides mutase erythrocytes activity and general peroxidation blood activity

  8. Human resources issues and Australian Disaster Medical Assistance Teams: results of a national survey of team members

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) are likely to continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, this study was designed to evaluate Australian DMAT experience in relation to the human resources issues associated with deployment. Methods: Data was collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Austr...

  9. Does time off work after injury vary by jurisdiction? A comparative study of eight Australian workers' compensation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Collie, Alex; Lane, Tyler J; Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz; Thompson, Jason; McLeod, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the jurisdiction in which a work-related injury compensation claim is made is an independent predictor of duration of time off work following work injury, and if so, the magnitude of the effect. Setting Eight Australian state and territory workers' compensation systems, providing coverage for more than 90% of the Australian labour force. Administrative claims data from these systems were provided by government regulatory authorities for the study. Participants ...

  10. High temperature condensation and thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide in solid and liquid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Measuring thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures is very complicated problem from experimental point of view. It is connected with high evaporation of this material at high temperatures. In order to solve this problem with a subsecond laser technique the excess pressure of inert atmosphere is maintained in the working chamber to suppress surface evaporation in the focal area of the sample. In this paper it is shown that in this case the dense vapor phase formed above the investigated sample actively interacts with the sample surface and the laser radiation and distorts the experimental results. The developed polychromatic reflectometer with laser heating enabled one to discover the interesting phenomenon of the interaction of the vapor, liquid and solid phases in cerium dioxide under CO2 laser irradiation. This phenomenon is exhibited in the form of the exothermic peak of the condensation on the cooling curves moreover the temperature level of this transition is regulated by experimental parameters. The possibility of the change of the position of this floating phase transition on the temperature scale permits one to model the interaction of liquid-vapor and solid-vapor to estimate the contribution of the dense vapor phase formed above the sample to the thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures. The experimental data on thermal radiation properties of stoichiometric cerium dioxide in the spectral range 0.4-1.1 μm and in the temperature region 2000-3500 K measured by the method developed are presented. Reflectivity and emissivity measurement error does not exceed ±3 %. The experimental results obtained are compared with the data of other authors and the recommended values for spectral reflectivity and emissivity of cerium dioxide at high temperatures are given. (author)

  11. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  12. Radiation polymerization and crosslinking of N-isopropylacrylamide in aqueous solution and in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels were synthesized by radiation induced simultaneous polymerization and cross-linking. Aqueous monomer solutions and pure monomer, without crosslinker, were irradiated in nitrogen atmosphere at a 60Co gamma source. The conversion from monomer to polymer and cross-linked gel was investigated as a function of temperature and monomer concentration. The swelling behavior of the gels showed clear dependence on the synthesis conditions. (author)

  13. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore (India)

    2013-12-15

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  14. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. Materials and Methods All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions...

  15. Reducing ultraviolet radiation exposure among outdoor workers: State of the evidence and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Buller David B; Saraiya Mona; Glanz Karen

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective Outdoor workers have high levels of exposure to ultraviolet radiation and the associated increased risk of skin cancer. This paper describes a review of: 1) descriptive data about outdoor workers' sun exposure and protection and related knowledge, attitudes, and policies and 2) evidence about the effectiveness of skin cancer prevention interventions in outdoor workplaces. Data sources Systematic evidence-based review. Data synthesis We found variable preventive practices, w...

  16. Aims and present state of radiation processing of fish and seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptability of radurized (pasteurized by ionizing radiation) or radappertized (sterilized by ionizin radiation) fishery products depends on the quality of fish irradiated. Though the organoleptic test is subjective, it allows a correct estimate of the quality. The correlation that exists between the adulteration degree estimated by chemical tests (T.M.A., total volatile bases, total volatile acids) and the organoleptic quality of the product is very variable. Further research is necessary to improve the methods currently used for quality determination. However, it can be assumed that the quality of radurized fish depends on its initial quality, storage time, preirradiation storage temperature and absorbed dose of radiation. Gamma irradiation causes both qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbial flora. Selective reduction in the microbial flora may be favourable to the development of Clostridium botulinum. This microorganism may produce toxins at refrigeration temperatures; radurization cannot eliminate the spores of Clostridium botulinum type E (the most often encountered in fish). Other food infection and food poisoning microorganisms like Salmonella species, Staphylococci and Enterococci survive radurization. Techniques such as irradiation on board, or combining refrigeration and irradiation may increase the storage life

  17. The impact of the coefficient of absorption of solar radiation on the state of stress in heterogeneous masonry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beran, Pavel

    Vol. 1558. United States of America : AIP Publishing LLC, 2013 - (Simos, T.), s. 992-995 ISBN 978-0-7354-1184-5. ISSN 0094-243X. - (AIP Conf. Proc.) [International Conference of Numerical Analysis and Applied Mathematics /11./. Rhodes (GR), 21.09.2013-27.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF12P01OVV018 Keywords : heat transfer * coefficient of absorption of solar radiation * thermal stress * finite element method Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/10.1063/1.4825670

  18. Initial-State Radiation Measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi- Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-01-01

    We study the process e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi-gamma, with a photon emitted from the initial-state electron or positron, using 454.3 fb^-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC, corresponding to approximately 260,000 signal events. We use these data to extract the non-radiative sigma(e+e- ->pi+pi-pi+pi-) cross section in the energy range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gev. The total uncertainty of the cross section measurement in the peak region is less than 3%, higher in precision than the corresponding results obtained from energy scan data.

  19. State supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection during the construction and commissioning of the Temelin-1 reactor unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the nearly twenty years of history and development of state supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection at the Temelin nuclear power plant. The basic principles that have been shaping the regulatory approach are described. The legislative basis, key licensing stages during the plant construction and commissioning, as well as the inspection activities are strictly based on internationally recognized recommendations, and they proved adequate during the actual start-up of the units. Existing experience in conjunction with international third party assessment and evaluations attests to the appropriateness and effectiveness of the regulatory approach adopted. (author)

  20. Observation of e+e- to K+K-J/psi via Initial State Radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, C Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Lin, S W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Nagasaka, Y; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zupanc, A; Zyukova, O

    2007-01-01

    The process e+e- to K+K-J/psi is observed for the first time via initial state radiation. The cross section of e+e- to K+K-J/psi for center-of-mass energies between threshold and 6.0 GeV is measured using 673 fb^{-1} of data collected with the Belle detector on and off the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We also find evidence for e+e- to K_S K_S J/psi in the same energy region.