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Sample records for australian state radiation

  1. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  2. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This document contains statutory rules made under the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 defining how specified standards to be observed, practices and procedures to be followed and measures to be taken by controlled persons in relation to activities relating to controlled facilities, as well as in relation to dealings with controlled apparatus or controlled material

  3. Ionising radiation safety training in the Australian defence organisation (ADO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Training personnel in ionising radiation safety within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) requires addressing some unique features of an organisation employing both military and civilian personnel. Activities may include those of a civil nature (such as industrial and medical radiography), specific military requirements (for training and emergency response) and scientific research and development. Some personnel may be assigned to full-time duties associated with radiation, while others may be designated as radiation protection officers in remote units with few duties to perform in this role. A further complication is that most military personnel are subjected to postings at regular intervals. The ADO's Directorate of Defence Occupational Health and Safety has established an Ionising Radiation Safety Subcommittee to monitor not only the adequacy of the internal Ionising Radiation Safety Manual but also the training requirements. A training course, responding to these requirements, has been developed to emphasise: basic radiation theory and protection; operation of radiation monitors available in the ADO; an understanding of the Safety Manual; day-to-day radiation safety in units and establishments; and appropriate responses to radiation accidents and emergencies. In addition, students are briefed on a limited number of peripheral topics and participate in some site visits. Currently, two Courses are held annually, each with about twenty students. Most of the material is presented by ADO personnel with external contractor support. The three Courses held to date have proved sufficiently successful, both for the students and the ADO generally, to seek national accreditation through the Australian National Training Authority and, as a first step, competency standards have been identified

  4. Environmental radiation monitoring during visits of nuclear powered warships to Australian ports: requirements, arrangements and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commonwealth Government has determined conditions to be met when nuclear powered warships visit Australian ports. These conditions include a requirement that appropriate State/Territory and Commonwealth authorities provide a radiation monitoring program to determine whether any radioactivity has been discharged or accidently released from a nuclear powered warship in port; to determine actual or potential levels of any consequent exposure to radiation of members of the public; and to provide this information within a timescale that allows remedial action to be taken. Part 1 of this document sets out the requirements of a radiation monitoring program capable of meeting these objectives. The fundamental arrangements and procedures for implementing the requirements are presented at Part 2 and provide a basis for the development of fully detailed, port specific, radiation monitoring programs

  5. The State of the Australian Middle Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Hamilton

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a widespread view that the middle class in Australia is doing it tough, that they arefinding it increasingly difficult to maintain a decent standard of living and are suffering frommortgage stress. Indeed, some media reports have announced the end of the middle classdream.This paper tests a number of these popular views against the statistical data. It asks whetherthe typical Australian family can be said to be struggling? Are mortgages creating severeproblems for middle-class families? Is the middle class shrinking? Are families copingfinancially only because wives are going out to work?

  6. Solid cancer risks from radiation exposure for the Australian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates are made of the risks to the Australian population as a function of age and gender for mortality or morbidity for all solid cancers after exposure to radiation. Excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models are used. The model coefficients are re-evaluated for radiation doses expressed as effective dose using data from the Japanese Life Span Study. Life-table methods are used throughout and the risk measures studied are: the risk of exposure related death, RERD and the risk of exposure related cancer, RERC. Australian life-table data and the age-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates of Australian males and females are taken from recent published tables. No dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor is applied. Sources of uncertainty used to calculate the confidence regions for the estimated risks include the statistical uncertainties of the model parameters and of the extrapolation of the risks beyond the period supported by the epidemiological data. Summary values of the risks are reported as averages of those calculated from the ERR and the EAR models. For males, the mortality risks per sievert range from 14% for 0-9 year age group, 7% at 30-39 years and 4% at 50-59 years. Corresponding values for females are 20%, 10% and 6%. Incidence risks are higher: for males the estimates are 32% for the 0-9 year group, 12% at 30-39 and 5% at 50-59. Corresponding values for females are 56%, 20% and 8%. The 90% confidence regions are about ± 50% of these values. Estimates are given for the risks from CT whole-body scanning or virtual colonoscopy which could be used for cancer screening. If used at 3 year intervals and the effective dose per procedure is 10 mSv, then the RERD for males beginning screening at 40, 50 and 60 years is 0.4%, 0.3% and 0.1%, respectively and for females, 0.6%, 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. RERD estimates for a 5 year interval between screens are about one-third smaller. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of

  7. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Guide to the Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety licensing framework. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information to Commonwealth entities who may require a license under the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (ARPANS) Act 1998 to enable them to posses, have control of, use, operate or dispose of radiation sources. The guide describes to which agencies and what activities require licensing. It also addresses general administrative and legal matters such as appeal procedures, ongoing licensing requirements, monitoring and compliance. Applicants are advised to consult the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 and accompanying Regulations when submitting applications

  8. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA.

  9. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Susan [Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Curtin Health Innovative Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia); Sale, Charlotte [Radiation Oncology, Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Barwon Health, Geelong, Vic. (Australia); Radiation Oncology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Collaboration: Grad Cert Grief & Pall Care Counselling, MIR

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development.

  10. Australian radiation therapy – Part two: Reflections of the past, the present, the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Documentation on the history of Australian radiotherapy is limited. This study provides radiation therapists' (RTs) perspectives of the people, workplace, and work practices in Australian radiotherapy centres from 1960 onwards. It provides a follow-up to our previous study: Australian radiation therapy: An overview – Part one, which outlines the history and development of radiotherapy from conception until present day. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted on separate occasions in 2010, one in South Australia and three in Victoria, Australia. Participants who worked in radiotherapy were purposively selected to ensure a range of experience, age, and years of work. Results: From a RT perspective, radiotherapy has evolved from a physically demanding ‘hands-on’ work environment, often with unpleasant sights and smells of disease, to a more technology-driven workplace. Conclusion: Understanding these changes and their subsequent effects on the role of Australian RTs will assist future directions in advanced role development

  11. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  12. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998. Act No 133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    A set of legislation consisting of three Acts in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety was passed by both Houses of Parliament on 10 December 1998 and was proclaimed on 5 February 1999. Act No. 133 - Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act, which is a framework Law, established the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) as the regulatory body for radiation protection and nuclear safety, in place of the Nuclear Safety Bureau. The Chief Executive Officer of ARPANSA, who is appointed by the Governor-General for a term of up to 5 years, is obliged to submit annual and quarterly reports to the Minister on the operations of the Chief Executive Officer, ARPANSA, the Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The Council is a consultative body which examines issues relating to radiation protection and nuclear safety and advises the Chief Executive Officer on these issues as well as on the adoption of recommendations, policies and codes. The Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee are to be established as advisory committees to the Chief Executive Officer or the Council. Both committees should draft national policies, codes and standards in their respective fields and review their effectiveness periodically. The second in this series of legislation, Act No. 134, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (License Charges) Act requires holders of both facility and source licenses to pay an annual charge, to be prescribed by the regulations. The third, Act No. 135 , Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Consequential Amendments) Act repeals those provisions of the 1987 Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Act which concern the Nuclear Safety Bureau, and the 1978 Environment Protection Act as a whole

  13. Australian Strategic Approaches to Managing National and State Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesleyanne Hawthorne

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia is a global exemplar of nation-building through government planned and administered skilled, family and humanitarian migration programs. By 2011 26% of the population were immigrants, at a time when extraordinary linguistic, religious, racial and cultural diversity were evident. The federal government’s role since the 1901 establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia has spanned migration policy formation, selection, admission, compliance and naturalization functions. The settlement responsibilities of the eight state and territory governments have also grown – a process facilitated by generally amicable federal – subnational relations. Within this context this article describes contemporary Australian approaches to managing linguistic, religious and artistic diversity, comparing federal and state government roles in a period associated with significant multicultural challenges.

  14. An Australian "Smart State" Serves Up Lessons for a Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, the Australian state of Queensland was famous more for its beaches than for its brain power. Fellow Australians thought of Queenslanders as miners, farmers, or surfers, not as professors or scientists. When Queensland announced in 1998 that it was planning to become a "Smart State," or a knowledge economy, locals quipped that…

  15. Defining fitness to practise in Australian radiation therapy: A focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to investigate how Australian radiation therapists define fitness to practise. Method: A qualitative approach was taken to data collection with focus groups being employed to gather the data. Analysis was informed by grounded theory. Following ethics approval, three homogeneous focus groups were conducted comprising a total of 21 participants, with 5-8 participants per group. The discussions were transcribed, verified by the researcher and participants, then unitised, coded and a sample checked by a second coder. Findings: There was no consensus on the definition of fitness to practise. The terms professionalism and competence were used interchangeably in some definitions. Four themes emerged from the data, these were; fitness as a continuum (individual differences and longevity in the profession), fitness as behaviour and conduct (professionalism and competence), fitness as a state of mind (attitudes and intangible elements) and fitness as being qualified (course completion means fitness to practise). Three concepts which were not raised were illegal behaviour, impaired practice and dose errors. Conclusion: There is no consensus among radiation therapists about fitness to practise. There was confusion with how Fitness to practise relates to professionalism and competence with little mention of how impairment is interwoven into the notion of fitness to practise. Without an unambiguous definition and robust criteria, making the 'judgement call' as to whether a practitioners' fitness to practise is impaired will continue to be a challenge for educators, departmental managers and registration boards.

  16. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  17. A Delphi study on research priorities in radiation therapy: The Australian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapists (RTs) need to engage more in research to establish an evidence base for their daily practice. However, RTs world-wide conduct little research themselves, although positive moves have been made in some countries. This project is the second stage of a Delphi process aimed at prioritising RT areas of research interest. A questionnaire was constructed using responses to a previous questionnaire which identified the research interests of Australian RTs. Fifty-three Research Areas were identified from these responses and grouped into 12 categories such as 'imaging in radiation therapy', 'symptom management', 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment'. The survey was sent to all Australian departments of radiation oncology, and RTs were asked to form interest groups to discuss and prioritise the Research Areas. There was a 50% response rate (18 of 36 departments surveyed). The highest ranked research Category was 'imaging in radiation therapy'. Six of the top 10 ranked Research Areas were within Central RT practice ('imaging in radiation therapy'; 'symptom management'; 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment') and the other four were within broader RT practice ('diversification, recognition and other professional issues'; and 'management and staff issues'). Patient Care was also considered to be an area requiring more research. This prioritization of Research Areas and categories provides a useful list of future research for RTs, which will enable them to decide whether their research ideas are a high priority, and spend less time deciding on a relevant research topic that needs investigation in their own workplaces.

  18. Convergence across a continent: adaptive diversification in a recent radiation of Australian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Mozes P K; Horner, Paul; Moritz, Craig

    2016-06-15

    Recent radiations are important to evolutionary biologists, because they provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms that link micro- and macroevolution. The role of ecological speciation during adaptive radiation has been intensively studied, but radiations can arise from a diversity of evolutionary processes; in particular, on large continental landmasses where allopatric speciation might frequently precede ecological differentiation. It is therefore important to establish a phylogenetic and ecological framework for recent continental-scale radiations that are species-rich and ecologically diverse. Here, we use a genomic (approx. 1 200 loci, exon capture) approach to fit branch lengths on a summary-coalescent species tree and generate a time-calibrated phylogeny for a recent and ecologically diverse radiation of Australian scincid lizards; the genus Cryptoblepharus We then combine the phylogeny with a comprehensive phenotypic dataset for over 800 individuals across the 26 species, and use comparative methods to test whether habitat specialization can explain current patterns of phenotypic variation in ecologically relevant traits. We find significant differences in morphology between species that occur in distinct environments and convergence in ecomorphology with repeated habitat shifts across the continent. These results suggest that isolated analogous habitats have provided parallel ecological opportunity and have repeatedly promoted adaptive diversification. By contrast, speciation processes within the same habitat have resulted in distinct lineages with relatively limited morphological variation. Overall, our study illustrates how alternative diversification processes might have jointly stimulated species proliferation across the continent and generated a remarkably diverse group of Australian lizards. PMID:27306048

  19. Australian Students' Perceptions of Racial Attitudes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Anna M.; Evans, Virden; Evans, Adeline L.

    1998-01-01

    This survey of the perceptions of Australian high school students toward racism in America indicates that a majority knew little about cultural diversity; had various cultural backgrounds; were influenced more by television than other forms of media; and believed African Americans do not have equal access to education, equal opportunity to…

  20. Towards Uniformity of Radiation Protection Legislation in a Multi-jurisdictional country- the Australian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia is a federation of nine jurisdictions, each with independent radiation protection legislation. The existing legislative non-uniformity across the jurisdictions has constituted an impediment for operators who must comply with differing legislative requirements in different jurisdictions. To address this issue, a National Competition Policy Review of Radiation Protection Legislation took place in 2000/2001. It has produced 19 Recommendations, which addressed objectives of the legislation, the need to regulate, alternative regulatory approaches, national uniformity, licensing and registration, strict and prescriptive standards, advertising and promotional activities, compliance costs and cost recovery issues. The Review has recommended that jurisdictions should retain the regulatory approach to achieve radiation protection objectives rather than leave them to be decided by market forces. But the approach should be performance-based, i.e. outcome-focused rather than prescriptive. An Implementation Plan of the Recommendations has been created which, by the end of 2004, will produce the National Directory for Radiation Protection. The Directory, which will become a consolidated repository of radiation protection standards, guidelines, codes of practice and administrative principles will provide a uniform national framework for radiation protection legislation in Australia. It will provide guidance for the jurisdictions redrawing their legislations. Because of its central role in shaping future legislation, the Directory will contain only those provisions, which have passed a formal process (process for issue resolution) concluded by an approval by the Australian Health Ministers Conference. Such process will also expedite the uniform adoption nationwide of legislative trends emerging from international radiation protection recommendations and standards. This Australian model might be a viable example for other multi-jurisdictional countries to consider

  1. Fiscal Responsibility and Australian Commonwealth , State and Territory Government Budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Graeme Wines

    2006-01-01

    The government sector in Australia has seen the introduction of accrual accounting principles in recent years. However, this process has been complicated by the presence of two alternative financial reporting frameworks in the form of a) the Government Finance Statistics (GFS) uniform framework and b) the accrual accounting rules specified in Australian professional accounting standards, principally AAS 31. While a variety of cash and accrual based measurements are available pursuant to these...

  2. A Delphi study on research priorities in radiation therapy: The Australian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Jennifer [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.cox@usyd.edu.au; Halkett, Georgia [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care, Curtin University of Technology, Health Research Campus, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)], E-mail: g.halkett@curtin.edu.au; Anderson, Claudia [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: claudia.anderson@usyd.edu.au; Heard, Robert [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: r.heard@staff.usyd.edu.au

    2010-02-15

    Radiation therapists (RTs) need to engage more in research to establish an evidence base for their daily practice. However, RTs world-wide conduct little research themselves, although positive moves have been made in some countries. This project is the second stage of a Delphi process aimed at prioritising RT areas of research interest. A questionnaire was constructed using responses to a previous questionnaire which identified the research interests of Australian RTs. Fifty-three Research Areas were identified from these responses and grouped into 12 categories such as 'imaging in radiation therapy', 'symptom management', 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment'. The survey was sent to all Australian departments of radiation oncology, and RTs were asked to form interest groups to discuss and prioritise the Research Areas. There was a 50% response rate (18 of 36 departments surveyed). The highest ranked research Category was 'imaging in radiation therapy'. Six of the top 10 ranked Research Areas were within Central RT practice ('imaging in radiation therapy'; 'symptom management'; 'accuracy of patient positioning' and 'techniques/equipment') and the other four were within broader RT practice ('diversification, recognition and other professional issues'; and 'management and staff issues'). Patient Care was also considered to be an area requiring more research. This prioritization of Research Areas and categories provides a useful list of future research for RTs, which will enable them to decide whether their research ideas are a high priority, and spend less time deciding on a relevant research topic that needs investigation in their own workplaces.

  3. Washington State environmental radiation standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Health is in the process of establishing new environmental radioactivity cleanup regulations. The scope of these regulations will encompass all radionuclides and will apply to soils, sediments, and groundwater. The requirements of these regulations will be part of license terminations for those nuclear facilities licensed by the state. Non-licensees which leave residual radioactivity in the environment will also be impacted because the requirements of these regulations will be incorporated as applicable, relevant, and appropriate regulations in the Model Toxics Control Act administered by the State Department of Ecology. The motivation for establishing these new regulations is the need for cleanup guidance for a number of sites across the state and, except for uranium mills, the absence of soil, sediment, and groundwater radioactivity cleanup standards. Establishment of these standards will close the only major gaps in environmental radioactivity cleanup regulations and fulfill the Department of Health's statutory requirements to protect public health from environmental radiation exposure. Development of the standard is following the state rule-making process. An Issues Paper was distributed for public comment in November 1994. Current activities include an environmental impact statement, a small business impact statement, and preparation of the draft rule

  4. State Supervision and Control of Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 1999-2001 is presented.

  5. State Radiation Protection Supervision and Control

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Radiation Protection Centre is carrying state supervision and control of radiation protection. The main objective of state supervision and control of radiation protection is assessing how licensees comply with requirements of the appropriate legislation and enforcement. Summary of inspections conducted in 2002 is presented.

  6. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  7. The state, the market, and general practice: the Australian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K N

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the development of general practice in the latter half of the 20th century, documenting the issues of concern to both the profession and the state. General practice developed hand in hand with the welfare state in Australia. As the structural changes associated with restructuring of the welfare state have advanced, so have the fortunes of general practice declined, despite significant attempts in the 1970s and 1980s to "save" general practice by both the profession and the state. These structural changes have operated on two fronts, the economic and the cultural. On the economic, changes to the employment of general practitioners clearly indicate ongoing proletarianization, particularly in a changing environment of labor-capital relations. At the cultural level, development of the self-help and the women's movements and the elective affinity of these groups with the individualism of the new right are leading to deprofessionalization. The author advances this argument in a review of general practice over the last 40 years and in a case study of community health services. Theoretically he argues for a combination of the proletarianization and the deprofessionalization theses.

  8. Current state of radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaev, Alexei K.

    1995-06-01

    A review of common trends in the development of modern radiation processing is presented. The sources of ionising radiation and the most important processes practically induced under the influence of this radiation are discussed. It is shown that radiation methods can be used successfully for the modification of materials, for the sterilisation of medical articles, for the solution of ecological problems, for treatment of food products, in radiation engineering, etc. Special attention is paid to processes at the pilot plant and industrial scales. The bibliography includes 548 references.

  9. Silicon solid state devices and radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Claude

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the fundamental principles of interaction between radiation and matter, the principles of working and the operation of particle detectors based on silicon solid state devices. It covers a broad scope with respect to the fields of application of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices from low to high energy physics experiments including in outer space and in the medical environment. This book covers stateof- the-art detection techniques in the use of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices and their readout electronics, including the latest developments on pixelated silicon radiation detector and their application.

  10. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Radiation Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency, 2001-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period analysed ARPANSA contributed to the (then) Health and Aged Care portfolio's 'Outcome 1: Population Health and Safety'. The objective of this outcome was the promotion and protection of the health of all Australians and minimising the incidence of preventable mortality, illness, injury and disability. The main outcomes, as outlined in the reports are: regulation of Commonwealth activities involving radiation sources and nuclear facilities; progress towards the development of a National Directory for Radiation Protection; quality assurance programs in medical radiation and conduct evaluations of individual and population doses; health impact assessment of radiation exposure and methodologies for this assessment, recommendations and guidelines for limiting radiation exposure; progress towards third-party quality assurance certification for the personal radiation monitoring service, radionuclide analysis of gamma ray emitting nuclides, Ultraviolet Protection Factor; assessing radiopharmaceutical testing and the protection dosimeter calibration service; maintenance of a network for monitoring radionuclides in the atmosphere; safety standards and guidance in support of the work of the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The major priorities for ARPANSA in the reporting year, included the assessment of an application to construct the replacement research reactor at ANSTO, implementation of a process for public consultation and participation in the licensing of nuclear facilities and the development of national standards and codes of practice, including a standard for radiofrequency radiation

  11. Introduction to the Australian study of low dose radiation assessing the effects of CT scans in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This project is assessing the effects of low dose radiation in a cohort of young Australians exposed to CT scans and other forms of medical irradiation. De-identified records of Medicare funded services (including CT scans, other radiological and nuclear medicine procedures) allow dose estimates for diagnostic medical radiation for I 1.4 million individuals aged 0-19 years in the period 1985-2005. For example, the data set details 907,905 CT services for 662,479 persons, and over 24 million other radiological and nuclear medicine services. Medical physicists are determining a dose matrix for organ dose and effective dose based on age of individual at scan, year of scan, gender and type of scan. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has made probability-based linkages between the cohort and the national records of cancer registrations and deaths; these outcomes are being linked to the exposure records and to the estimated radiation doses for all individuals in the cohort. Epidemiological models will be fitted to estimate effects on cancer incidence due to age, gender and length of follow-up, as well as any effects due to radiation exposures and dose, age at exposure, and confounding variables such as socioeconomic status. Australia is in a unique position with well documented records of medical irradiation funded through the universal Medicare system. Data integration for the cohort of young Australians exposed from 1985 to 2005 is virtually complete. The most challenging future task is to implement the best methodologies for calculation of individual doses.

  12. Student Teachers' Understanding of Policy Behavioural Directives Concerning the Reporting of Child Sexual Abuse: Findings from One Australian State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; Grimbeek, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background: In the Australian state of Queensland, many Department of Education Policies include behavioural directives for school teachers, whereby "the teacher must..." behave in a certain manner. The introduction of an education policy, such as the mandatory reporting of child sexual abuse by teachers, has significant and wide-ranging…

  13. An Australian discrete choice experiment to value eq-5d health states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Rosalie; Norman, Richard; Brazier, John; Cronin, Paula; King, Madeleine T; Ratcliffe, Julie; Street, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    Conventionally, generic quality-of-life health states, defined within multi-attribute utility instruments, have been valued using a Standard Gamble or a Time Trade-Off. Both are grounded in expected utility theory but impose strong assumptions about the form of the utility function. Preference elicitation tasks for both are complicated, limiting the number of health states that each respondent can value and, therefore, that can be valued overall. The usual approach has been to value a set of the possible health states and impute values for the remainder. Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) offer an attractive alternative, allowing investigation of more flexible specifications of the utility function and greater coverage of the response surface. We designed a DCE to obtain values for EQ-5D health states and implemented it in an Australia-representative online panel (n = 1,031). A range of specifications investigating non-linear preferences with respect to time and interactions between EQ-5D levels were estimated using a random-effects probit model. The results provide empirical support for a flexible utility function, including at least some two-factor interactions. We then constructed a preference index such that full health and death were valued at 1 and 0, respectively, to provide a DCE-based algorithm for Australian cost-utility analyses. PMID:23765787

  14. State of Washington radiation guidance for Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleanup of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site is being managed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The participants are the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington, with the Department of Ecology being the lead for the State of Washington. Through a memorandum of understanding the Department of Health is designated as the primary state agency for protection of human health and the environment from ionizing radiation. As part of this responsibility, the Department of Health is developing radiation cleanup guidance for Hanford cleanup. Another reason for developing State guidance is that there are no federal regulations that provide guidance on residual radioactivity on lands that will be released for public use. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency both have prepared draft regulations, but the issuance of these is uncertain. The state guidance is compatible with draft federal guidance and includes numerical guidance for residual contamination, modeling parameters, look-up tables, and land use categories. This guidance will apply until such a time as they are superseded by applicable federal regulations or the state environmental radiation standard

  15. Fostering eGovernment as State Social Responsibility (SSR: Case Study of an Australian City Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinara Rao Karna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available           Democracies around the world now face Citizen-apathy. This is a concern now more than ever faced by countries around the globe. eGovernment is undoubtedly a platform to deliberate and enable citizens regain confidence and faith in democratic  processes. Citizens now seek Verifiable, Open, Transparent, Empathetic, Responsive and Sensitive Electronic Democracy and Government (VOTERS EDG, Karna, 2012. Similar to corporate world, there are voices stressing on govenments for the need to understand the stakeholders, their involvement, relationships and responsibilities of a state in eGovernance. Citizens everywhere now demand Verifiable, Open, Transparent, Empathetic, Responsive and Sensitive Electronically Democratic Government as a State Social Responsibity (SSR. Peoples movements and outbursts against authorities with the help of Word of Mouse (Karna, 2012 have established that transparent and open governance is the need of the hour. This paper presents findings of the study conducted in an Australian City Council for preparing the city council for ‘City e-readiness’ to initiate e-Government activities. We propose the idea of ‘Centrality of Citizens’ in context of eGovernment. We further build upon the original concept of deeming eGovernment as ‘State Social Responsibility’ (SSR (Karna, 2010, by governments at all levels.  

  16. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    CERN Document Server

    Branden, Drew B; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Vesa, Cristian; Wilson, Roy O; Zheng, Mao; Kortyna, Andrew; Tate, Duncan A

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 < n < 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experime...

  17. Initial State Radiation: A success story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, W.

    2008-09-01

    The investigation of events with Initial State Radiation(ISR) and subsequent Radiative Return has become an impressively successful and guiding tool in low and intermediate energy hadron physics with electron positron colliders: it allows to measure hadronic cross sections and the ratio R from threshold up to the maximum energy of the colliders running at fixed energy, to clarify reaction mechanisms and reveal substructures (intermediate states and their decay mechanisms) and to search for new highly excited mesonic states with J=1. While being discussed since the sixties-seventies ISR became a powerful tool for experimentalists only with the development of EVA-PHOKHARA, a Monte Carlo generator developed over almost 10 years, while increasing its complexity, which is user friendly, flexible and easy to implement into the software of existing detectors.

  18. Application of Satellite and Ground-based Data to Investigate the UV Radiative Effects of Australian Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Mills, Franklin P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Anderson, Don

    2007-01-01

    An understanding of the effect of aerosols on biologically- and photochemically-active UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is important for many ongoing climate, biophysical, and air pollution studies. In particular, estimates of the UV characteristics of the most common Australian aerosols will be valuable inputs to UV Index forecasts, air quality studies, and assessments of the impact of regional environmental changes. By analyzing climatological distributions of Australian aerosols we have identified sites where co-located ground-based UV-B and ozone measurements were available during episodes of relatively high aerosol activity. Since at least June 2003, surface UV global irradiance spectra (285-450 nm) have been measured routinely at Darwin and Alice Springs in Australia by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). Using colocated sunphotometer measurements at Darwin and Alice Springs, we identified several episodes of relatively high aerosol activity. Aerosol air mass types were analyzed from sunphotometer-derived angstrom parameter, MODIS fire maps and MISR aerosol property retrievals. To assess aerosol effects we compared the measured UV irradiances for aerosol-loaded and clear-sky conditions with each other and with irradiances simulated using the libRadtran radiative transfer model for aerosol-free conditions. We found that for otherwise similar atmospheric conditions, smoke aerosols over Darwin reduced the surface UV irradiance by as much as 40-50% at 290-300 nm and 20-25% at 320-400 nm near active fires (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 500 nm approximately equal to 0.6). Downwind of fires, the smoke aerosols over Darwin reduced the surface irradiance by 15-25% at 290-300 nm and approximately 10% at 320-350 nm (AOD at 500 nm approximately equal to 0.2). The effect of smoke increased with decrease of wavel strongest in the UV-B. The aerosol attenuation factors calculated for the selected cases suggest smoke over Darwin has an effect on surface 340

  19. The first Australian-Asian conference on radiation science and nuclear medicine: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighty two papers and posters presented at the conference covered a wide range of topics in the areas of radiation chemistry, industrial radiation processing, mammalian cells radiosensitivity, biological, chemical and physical radiation effects, radiochemistry. The handbook contains the conference program, the available abstracts, a list of participants and other relevant general information

  20. Radiation safety considerations and compliance within equine veterinary clinics: Results of an Australian survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine current knowledge and the level of compliance of radiation safety principles in equine veterinary clinics within Australia. Method: Surveys were sent to equine veterinary surgeons working in Australia. The survey was delivered both online and in hardcopy format; it comprised 49 questions, 15 of these directly related to radiation safety. The participants were asked about their current and previous use of radiation-producing equipment. Information regarding their level of knowledge and application of radiation safety principles and practice standards was collected and analysed. Results: The use of radiation-producing equipment was evident in 94% of responding clinics (a combination of X-ray, CT and/or Nuclear Medicine Cameras). Of those with radiation-producing equipment, 94% indicated that they hold a radiation licence, 78% had never completed a certified radiation safety course and 19% of participants did not use a personal radiation monitor. In 14% of cases, radiation safety manuals or protocols were not available within clinics. Conclusions: The study has shown that knowledge and application of guidelines as provided by the Code of Practice for Radiation Protection in Veterinary Medicine (2009) is poorly adhered to. The importance of compliance with regulatory requirements is pivotal in minimising occupational exposure to ionising radiation in veterinary medicine, thus there is a need for increased education and training in the area. - Highlights: • Application of the Code of Practice for Veterinary Medicine is poorly adhered to. • Majority of veterinary clinics had not completed certified radiation safety course. • One-fifth of participants did not use personal radiation monitoring. • Increased education and training in area of radiation safety and protection required to generate compliance in clinics

  1. Microbiological Safety and Food Handling Practices of Seed Sprout Products in the Australian State of Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Sally; Goldsmith, Paul; Haines, Heather

    2015-07-01

    Seed sprouts have been implicated as vehicles for numerous foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Seed sprouts pose a unique food safety concern because of the ease of microbiological seed contamination, the inherent ability of the sprouting process to support microbial growth, and their consumption either raw or lightly cooked. To examine seed sprout safety in the Australian state of Victoria, a survey was conducted to detect specific microbes in seed sprout samples and to investigate food handling practices relating to seed sprouts. A total of 298 seed sprout samples were collected from across 33 local council areas. Escherichia coli was detected in 14.8%, Listeria spp. in 12.3%, and Listeria monocytogenes in 1.3% of samples analyzed. Salmonella spp. were not detected in any of the samples. A range of seed sprout handling practices were identified as potential food safety issues in some food businesses, including temperature control, washing practices, length of storage, and storage in proximity to unpackaged ready-to-eat potentially hazardous foods.

  2. Radiation-Hardened Solid-State Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for a radiationhardened (rad-hard) solid-state drive for space mission memory applications by combining rad-hard and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) non-volatile memories (NVMs) into a hybrid architecture. The architecture is controlled by a rad-hard ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) or a FPGA (field programmable gate array). Specific error handling and data management protocols are developed for use in a rad-hard environment. The rad-hard memories are smaller in overall memory density, but are used to control and manage radiation-induced errors in the main, and much larger density, non-rad-hard COTS memory devices. Small amounts of rad-hard memory are used as error buffers and temporary caches for radiation-induced errors in the large COTS memories. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA implements a variety of error-handling protocols to manage these radiation-induced errors. The large COTS memory is triplicated for protection, and CRC-based counters are calculated for sub-areas in each COTS NVM array. These counters are stored in the rad-hard non-volatile memory. Through monitoring, rewriting, regeneration, triplication, and long-term storage, radiation-induced errors in the large NV memory are managed. The rad-hard ASIC/FPGA also interfaces with the external computer buses.

  3. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searles Andrew

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora, it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respected process of federal government reimbursement after expert cost-effectiveness evaluation, popularly known as the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme ('PBS'. It remains uncertain what sort of impacts – if any – the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement ('AUSFTA' will have on PBS processes such as reference pricing and their important role in facilitating equitable and affordable access to essential medicines. This is now the field of inquiry for a major three year Australian Research Council ('ARC'-funded study bringing together a team of senior researchers in regulatory theory from the Australian National University and pharmacoeconomics from the University of Newcastle. The project proposes to monitor, assess and analyse the real and potential impacts of the AUSFTA in this area, providing Australian policy-makers with continuing expertise and options. To the extent that the AUSFTA medicines provisions may represent animportant precedent in a global strategy by industry oncost-effectiveness evaluation of pharmaceuticals, the study will also beof great interest to policy makers in other jurisdictions.

  4. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; Doran, Evan; Henry, David; Drahos, Peter; Searles, Andrew; Pekarsky, Brita; Neville, Warwick

    2005-10-01

    On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora), it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respected process of federal government reimbursement after expert cost-effectiveness evaluation, popularly known as the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme ('PBS'). It remains uncertain what sort of impacts--if any--the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement ('AUSFTA') will have on PBS processes such as reference pricing and their important role in facilitating equitable and affordable access to essential medicines. This is now the field of inquiry for a major three year Australian Research Council ('ARC')-funded study bringing together a team of senior researchers in regulatory theory from the Australian National University and pharmacoeconomics from the University of Newcastle. The project proposes to monitor, assess and analyse the real and potential impacts of the AUSFTA in this area, providing Australian policy-makers with continuing expertise and options. To the extent that the AUSFTA medicines provisions may represent an important precedent in a global strategy by industry on cost-effectiveness evaluation of pharmaceuticals, the study will also be of great interest to policy makers in other jurisdictions. PMID:16209703

  5. School Policies on Bullying and Cyberbullying: Perspectives across Three Australian States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Caitlin; Campbell, Marilyn Anne; Spears, Barbara A; Butler, Des; Cross, Donna; Slee, Phillip; Kift, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite decades of research, bullying in all its forms is still a significant problem within schools in Australia, as it is internationally. Anti-bullying policies and guidelines are thought to be one strategy as part of a whole school approach to reduce bullying. However, although Australian schools are required to have these…

  6. Educational Research: The State of Sweden and the Australian 2.2 World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss Lindblad, Rita; Lindblad, Sverker

    2013-01-01

    Current tendencies in educational research in Sweden are presented and compared to Australia. We here refer to; organization of research, research allocation, publication patterns, and assessments of research qualities. Different trajectories of educational research were identified, where Australian research was organized as a field of study,…

  7. Gamma Radiation Facilities at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The used fuel elements from the AAEC experimental reactor HIFAR are to be stored on removal from the reactor for a period of about 40 days in a water-cooled storage cell. During this period, the gamma activity and thermal heating will fall by a factor of about ten. The average gamma activity of each fuel element during storage is about 105 curies. The fuel elements will be stacked vertically during storage in a regular square pattern with a total of 48 positions at 7 in. pitch. The centre position has been substituted by an irradiation thimble 9 in. in diameter. This thimble is closely surrounded by eight symmetrically placed fuel element positions. The storage capacity is somewhat larger than the normal requirement so that there will usually be considerable choice in the arrangement and selection of fuel elements in the position close to the thimble. The experimental irradiation space is a volume about 7 in. in diameter and 2 ft. 6 in. long. Material for irradiation is to be attached to a shielding plug and will be introduced into and moved from the thimble by the reactor vertical handling flask. The shielding plug has a number of access tubes which will permit heating or cooling of the irradiated material, temperature measurement, control of atmosphere and withdrawal of liquid or gaseous reaction products. The extra expense of adding this unit to the storage cell was very small and since it uses the radiation from the fuel elements during compulsory storage, radiation costs are virtually zero. It should also give valuable information on the feasibility of using fuel elements during such storage periods as radiation sources for large scale operations. The paper also describes the radiation facilities available directly from HIFAR and plans for using fuel elements after cropping as a further radiation source. (author)

  8. Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on the conclusions of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome any obstacles before running the full experiment. The modifications to the experimental apparatus are then explained which significantly improved the quality of data collected in the full scale experiment, which was successfully executed in August 2013. At the end first findings of the new experiment are discussed.

  9. Radiation monitoring handbook for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, D.A

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to detail the Radiation Monitoring (RMG) roles and procedures, and to provide technical and background information useful to RMG personnel. It has been written on the assumption that all members of the RMG have had appropriate radiation safety (Health Physics) training. Separate standing procedures, for both routine and emergency activities, are required for each port. These are incorporated in Port Safety Plans and specify the routine monitoring requirements for individual berths or anchorages and the procedures to be followed after indication of a reactor accident to a nuclear powered warship. A Visit Operation Order, issued for each Nuclear Powered warships (NPW) visit, presents information specific to that visit. Routine monitoring is performed to confirm normal conditions. The objectives of emergency radiation monitoring are: to provide early detection of a reactor accident of sufficient severity to possibly cause a major release of fission products to the environment; to determine the nature and extent of any fission product release; to provide information to assist in evaluating the accident; to assess the need and extent of required countermeasures; and to determine when the release has terminated and when affected areas have returned to normal Prepared on behalf of the Visiting Ship Panel (Nuclear), Department of Defence; 11 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs.

  10. Radiation monitoring handbook for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this handbook is to detail the Radiation Monitoring (RMG) roles and procedures, and to provide technical and background information useful to RMG personnel. It has been written on the assumption that all members of the RMG have had appropriate radiation safety (Health Physics) training. Separate standing procedures, for both routine and emergency activities, are required for each port. These are incorporated in Port Safety Plans and specify the routine monitoring requirements for individual berths or anchorages and the procedures to be followed after indication of a reactor accident to a nuclear powered warship. A Visit Operation Order, issued for each Nuclear Powered warships (NPW) visit, presents information specific to that visit. Routine monitoring is performed to confirm normal conditions. The objectives of emergency radiation monitoring are: to provide early detection of a reactor accident of sufficient severity to possibly cause a major release of fission products to the environment; to determine the nature and extent of any fission product release; to provide information to assist in evaluating the accident; to assess the need and extent of required countermeasures; and to determine when the release has terminated and when affected areas have returned to normal

  11. Case Study: The State of Information Systems in Australian Capital Territory Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Gregor

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Information Systems Groups at the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA, The Australian National University (ANU, and the University of Canberra (UC. Each group has a distinctive background that reflects its position in Canberra, Australia’s seat of federal government. ADFA is essentially a private university for the Australian Defence Organization; ANU was set up to be a national research institution; and the UC group for many years focused on meeting the training needs for computing professionals for the federal government. Despite these distinguishing characteristics, the subject matter taught and researched in the three groups has a large degree of commonality and each group regards itself as ‘vibrant’ and happy with what it does. A low degree of professionalisation is perceived, however, relative to older disciplines, as there is a disjunct between what is taught as core knowledge and what is taught as research methods, a lack of social prestige, and a lack of acceptance as a discipline with a unique symbol system.

  12. Negative Binomial States of Quantized Radiation Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, H C; Fu, Hong-Chen; Sasaki, Ryu

    1996-01-01

    We introduce the negative binomial states with negative binomial distribution as their photon number distribution. They reduce to the ordinary coherent states and Susskind-Glogower phase states in different limits. The ladder and displacement operator formalisms are found and they are essentially the Perelomov's su(1,1) coherent states via its Holstein-Primakoff realisation. These states exhibit strong squeezing effect and they obey the super-Poissonian statistics. A method to generate these states is proposed.

  13. The regulatory role of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in relation to spent fuel arising from research reactors in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe the elements and performance of ARPANSA's regulatory management of spent fuel arising in Australia, with particular emphasis on the experience of ensuring compliance with the Code of Practice Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials in relation to in land surface transport of spent fuel within Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is the regulatory authority for Commonwealth entities, such as the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), who operate nuclear installations in Australia.. Nuclear installations that operate under ARPANSA facility licence include research reactors and plants for the storage and management of research reactor fuel. ANSTO is the only operator of nuclear installations in Australia. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency is also the competent Authority for inland surface transport. ARPANSA has adopted the IAEA Safety Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials domestically in the form of the ARPANSA Code of Practice for Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (RPS 2). s the competent authority ARPANSA approves the shipment and design of a new cask, validate original certificate applying the requirements of the RPS 2. RPANSA's regulatory oversight of compliance with the requirements of its own legislation and the requirements of the Code emphasises assurance of safety in the operation of nuclear installations and the shipment of spent fuel is achieved principally by prior assessment of the operator/consignors safety case, and by compliance monitoring through regular reporting (quarterly and annually), as well as planned and reactive inspections. During the operating life of these facilities for several decades there have been no incidents which have had off-site or significant on-site, consequences. This paper will examine that experience and in particular focus on the regulatory experience of oversight of

  14. Negative Binomial States of Quantized Radiation Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Hong-Chen; Sasaki, Ryu

    1996-01-01

    We introduce the negative binomial states with negative binomial distribution as their photon number distribution. They reduce to the ordinary coherent states and Susskind-Glogower phase states in different limits. The ladder and displacement operator formalisms are found and they are essentially the Perelomov's su(1,1) coherent states via its Holstein-Primakoff realisation. These states exhibit strong squeezing effect and they obey the super-Poissonian statistics. A method to generate these ...

  15. Assessing the Invasion Risk of Eucalyptus in the United States Using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doria R. Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many agricultural species have undergone selection for traits that are consistent with those that increase the probability that a species will become invasive. However, the risk of invasion may be accurately predicted for the majority of plant species tested using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment (WRA. This system has been tested in multiple climates and geographies and, on average, correctly identifies 90% of the major plant invaders as having high invasion risk, and 70% of the noninvaders as having low risk. We used this tool to evaluate the invasion risk of 38 Eucalyptus taxa currently being tested and cultivated in the USA for pulp, biofuel, and other purposes. We predict 15 taxa to have low risk of invasion, 14 taxa to have high risk, and 9 taxa to require further information. In addition to a history of naturalization and invasiveness elsewhere, the traits that significantly contribute to a high invasion risk conclusion include having prolific seed production and a short generation time. Selection against these traits should reduce the probability that eucalypts cultivated in the USA will become invasive threats to natural areas and agricultural systems.

  16. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  17. Electretic State and Radiative Absorption of Polyvinyl Chloride Metal Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Krivtsov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Electretic state and radiation absorption of nanocomposites consisting of polymer matrix and metal particles filler obtained in result of electric explosion are investigated. Stable thermoelectrets of polymer metal-filled systems that have better electert properties than traditional polymer materials are obtained. Suggested method of composite polymer system creation enables to obtain shielded materials with better radiative absorption, resistant to external actions, cost-efficient.

  18. Assessing the invasive potential of biofuel species proposed for Florida and the United States using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, D.R. [The Nature Conservancy, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tancig, K.J. [PO Box 116455, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Onderdonk, D.A.; Gantz, C.A. [Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Twelve taxa under exploration as bioenergy crops in Florida and the U.S. were evaluated for potential invasiveness using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment system (WRA) modified for separate assessment at the state and national scales. When tested across a range of geographies, this system correctly identifies invaders 90%, and non-invaders 70% of the time, on average. Predictions for Florida were the same as for the U.S. Arundo donax, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus grandis, Jatropha curcas, Leucaena leucocephala, Pennisetum purpureum, and Ricinus communis were found to have a high probability of becoming invasive, while Miscanthus x giganteus, Saccharum arundinaceum, Saccharum officinarum, and the sweet variety of Sorghum bicolor have a low probability of becoming invasive. Eucalyptus amplifolia requires further evaluation before a prediction is possible. These results are consistent with reports on other tests of these taxa. Given the economic and ecological impacts of invasive species, including the carbon expended for mechanical and chemical control efforts, cultivation of taxa likely to become invasive should be avoided. (author)

  19. Regulation to create environments conducive to physical activity: understanding the barriers and facilitators at the Australian state government level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Shill

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Policy and regulatory interventions aimed at creating environments more conducive to physical activity (PA are an important component of strategies to improve population levels of PA. However, many potentially effective policies are not being broadly implemented. This study sought to identify potential policy/regulatory interventions targeting PA environments, and barriers/facilitators to their implementation at the Australian state/territory government level. METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted with senior representatives from state/territory governments, statutory authorities and non-government organisations (n = 40 to examine participants': 1 suggestions for regulatory interventions to create environments more conducive to PA; 2 support for preselected regulatory interventions derived from a literature review. Thematic and constant comparative analyses were conducted. RESULTS: POLICY INTERVENTIONS MOST COMMONLY SUGGESTED BY PARTICIPANTS FELL INTO TWO AREAS: 1 urban planning and provision of infrastructure to promote active travel; 2 discouraging the use of private motorised vehicles. Of the eleven preselected interventions presented to participants, interventions relating to walkability/cycling and PA facilities received greatest support. Interventions involving subsidisation (of public transport, PA-equipment and the provision of more public transport infrastructure received least support. These were perceived as not economically viable or unlikely to increase PA levels. Dominant barriers were: the powerful 'road lobby', weaknesses in the planning system and the cost of potential interventions. Facilitators were: the provision of evidence, collaboration across sectors, and synergies with climate change/environment agendas. CONCLUSION: This study points to how difficult it will be to achieve policy change when there is a powerful 'road lobby' and government investment prioritises road infrastructure over PA

  20. Clinical imaging centers: The role of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection is mandated in all 50 states. Regulatory control over naturally occurring and accelerator produced radioactive materials use is exclusively by state government. Although states are independent bodies there are many similarities in their regulatory approaches. Differences in the degree of regulatory control are minimized through use of the Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation and other guidance documents provided by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. This paper discusses the general requirements to obtain a license and/or registration to produce radioactive material in an accelerator, prepare an imaging agent and/or operate an imaging clinic. These requirements include minimum standards for training and experience of all principal users, equipment specifications, facilities design and construction, specific operating and emergency procedures, radiation protection surveys and monitoring of personnel exposures, ongoing training of staff, and a commitment to ALARA (the philosophy of keeping radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable). The nature and frequency of routine inspections to ensure adequate protection of workers and the public is also covered

  1. All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Havranek

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Requirements of the All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic have been establishedby Regulation No. 319/2002 Sb, and its function and organisation are described in Regulation No. 27/2006Sb. The All-State Radiation Monitoring Network in the Czech Republic consists of two components–permanentmonitoring and emergency monitoring. The activity of the whole network is provided by the State Office forNuclear Safety. The selected central authorities of the state administration participate in operation and providingparticular components. There are two different modes of the operation of these components–normal andemergency. The modes of operation are controlled by the State Office for Nuclear Safety. The activity of wholenetwork is focused on continuous monitoring of the radiation situation in the Czech Republic and on earlydetection of radiation accidents in and around the country as well as beyond it. The acquired data shall serveas a basis for adopting urgent and subsequent radiological protection provisions.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(6, pp.728-733, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1700

  2. The State of Information Systems in Australian Universities – South Australia Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Koronios

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the status of Information Systems (IS at the University of South Australia (UniSA. On a broad scale this study is part of a larger Case Study regarding the state of the IS Academic Discipline in Australasian Universities but, in view of the face that Information Systems degrees are offered only at one university within the State, the South Australia study, by definition, becomes a study of that university. The paper clarifies the role of IS within UniSA, with particular reference to the degree of professionalism and the impact of local contingencies on IS teaching and research. Data were gathered by means of qualitative surveys with present and former academics of the institution, as well as via statistical information. The results suggest that the State of South Australia’s IS offerings were heavily influenced during the 1990s by the soft systems and critical systems approaches to the discipline, a situation which began to change at the turn of the century; and that the curriculum is depends more heavily on industrial than political factors.

  3. Radiation protection and radiation safety: CERN and its host states to sign a tripartite agreement.

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    On 15 November CERN and its Host States will sign a tripartite agreement that replaces the existing bilateral agreements in matters of radiation protection and radiation safety at CERN. It will provide, for the first time, a single forum where the three parties will discuss how maximum overall safety can best be achieved in the specific CERN context.   CERN has always maintained close collaboration with its Host States in matters of safety. “The aim of this collaboration is especially to ensure best practice in the field of radiation protection and the safe operation of CERN’s facilities”, explains Ralf Trant, Head of the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection (HSE) Unit. Until today, CERN’s collaboration with its Host States was carried out under two sets of bilateral agreements: depending on which side of the French-Swiss border they were being carried out on, a different framework applied to the same activities. This approach has b...

  4. Are Australian and United States Farmers Using Soil Information for Soil Health Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lobry de Bruyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil health is an essential requirement of a sustainable, functioning agroecosystem. Tracking soil health to determine sustainability at the local level largely falls to farmers, even though they often lack access to critical information. We examine farmers’ participation in gathering soil information at the farm and paddock scale over the last two decades in Australia and the United States, by reviewing national-level reporting of farmer use of soil testing and farm planning as well as qualitative research on farmer perspectives. The level of participation in soil testing and farm planning has remained stable in the last two decades, with only 25% and 30% of landholders, respectively, participating nationally, in either country. The review revealed national-level reporting has a number of limitations in understanding farmers’ use of soil information and, in particular, fails to indicate the frequency and intensity of soil testing as well as farmer motivation to test soil or what they did with the soil information. The main use of soil testing is often stated as “determining fertilizer requirements”, yet data show soil testing is used less commonly than is customary practice. In Australia and in the United States, customary practice is three and half times more likely for decisions on fertilizer application levels. The rhetoric is heavy on the use of soil testing as a decision tool, and that it guides best practices. However, given that only a quarter of farmers are soil testing, and doing so infrequently and in low densities, the level of information on soil health is poor. While farmers report consistent monitoring of soil conditions, few have consistent records of such. In contrast to the information on the poor state of soil health, there is strong farmer interest in procuring soil health benefits through changes in farm practices such as conservation tillage or cover crops, even if they are unable to demonstrate these soil health

  5. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management. PMID:26666251

  6. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management.

  7. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency 2005-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report satisfies the annual reporting requirements of the ARPANS Act in addition to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet requirements for annual reporting by Agencies. The report includes: details of the operations of the CEO and details of directions given by the Minister under section 16 at Part 1; details of the operations of ARPANSA at Part 3; details of the operations of the Radiation Health Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee and details of all reports received from the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council on matters related to radiation protection and nuclear safety or the Nuclear Safety Committee on matters related to nuclear safety and the safety of controlled facilities at Part 4; details of any breach of licence conditions by a licensee at Appendix 4; an index of compliance with the annual reporting requirements at Appendix 8

  8. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sia, Joseph; Joon, Daryl Lim; Viotto, Angela; Mantle, Carmel [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Quong, George; Rolfo, Aldo [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Radiation Oncology Victoria, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Wada, Morikatsu; Anderson, Nigel; Rolfo, Maureen [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, 300 Waterdale Road, Heidelberg West, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Victoria 3053 (Australia); Royal Marsden Hospital & Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus definition (absolute nadir + 2ng/mL). Toxicity was scored according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate toxicity rates, as well as the risks of bPSA failure, distant metastases, disease-specific and overall survival, at 5 and 8-years post treatment. All patients completed radiotherapy without any treatment breaks. The 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were 6.4% and 5.8% respectively, and the 8-year risks of ≥ Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity were both < 0.05%. The 5 and 8-year freedom from bPSA failure were 76% and 58% respectively. Disease-specific survival at 5 and 8 years were 95% and 91%, respectively, and overall survival at 5 and 8 years were 90% and 71%, respectively. These results confirm existing international data regarding the safety and efficacy of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer within an Australian setting.

  9. Australian Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  10. A search for narrow states in radiative upsilon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for new states produced in radiative Υ(1S) decays is accomplished by observing the inclusive photon energy spectrum. A narrow resonance in the energy spectrum indicates the existence of a new state X produced by the process Υ → γX. The analysis is based on approximately 0.44 x 106 Υ(1S) events produced at the DORIS II e+e- storage ring. These data were collected with the Crystal Ball detector between April 1983 and May 1986. This analysis finds no evidence for a new state, so upper limits on the branching ratio BR(Υ → γX) are derived, assuming the state X decays primarily to high-multiplicity hadronic final states. In particular, if the state X were a minimal Higgs particle, its primary decay mode would be to the heaviest fermion-antifermion pair energetically available. For the radiative Υ(1S) decays studied here, the heavy fermions would be c anti c or s anti s quark states, over most of the relevant Higgs' mass range. The resulting upper limit for BR(Υ(1S) → γX) is highly energy dependent but for X mass between 1.5 GeV and 8.0 GeV, the 90% confidence level upper limit is better than 8.0 x 10-4. For a Higgs' mass near 5.0 GeV, the upper limit is about 2.0 x 10-4 which is approximately equal to the lowest order calculation for the Wilczek mechanism. The Wilczek calculation with QCD radiative corrections predict branching ratios below the limits set here for all Higgs' masses

  11. Solid-state radiation detectors technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses the current solid state material used in advance detectors manufacturing and their pros and cons and how one can tailor them using different techniques, to get the maximum performance. The book is application oriented to radiation detectors for medical, X and gamma rays application, and good reference with in-depth discussion of detector's physics as it relates to medical application tailored for engineers and scientists.

  12. The current state of science in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualification 'according to the current state of science and technology' is regularly found in radiation protection laws. It is assumed that the state of science and technology is codified in the publications of ICRP and ICRU, the International Comissions on Radiological Protection and - Units respectively, and in the UN publication USCEAR. An investigation is made on the extent the regulations of FRD comply with this requirement. Stochastic and non-stochastic damages are differentiated and the problem of assigning equivalent whole-body doses to exposures of specific body organs is considered. (G.Q.)

  13. Phenomenological approach to introduce damping effects on radiation field states

    CERN Document Server

    D'Almeida, N G; Serra, R M; Moussa, M H Y

    2000-01-01

    In this work we propose an approach to deal with radiation field states which incorporates damping effects at zero temperature. By using some well known results on dissipation of a cavity field state, obtained by standard ab-initio methods, it was possible to infer through a phenomenological way the explicit form for the evolution of the state vector for the whole system: the cavity-field plus reservoir. This proposal turns out to be of extreme convenience to account for the influence of the reservoir over the cavity field. To illustrate the universal applicability of our approach we consider the attenuation effects on cavity-field states engineering. A proposal to maximize the fidelity of the process is presented.

  14. Radiation sterilization of fluoroquinolones in solid state: Investigation of effect of gamma radiation and electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Babita K., E-mail: singhbab2001@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India); Parwate, Dilip V. [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Dassarma, Indrani B. [Jhulelal Institute of Technology, Nagpur (India); Shukla, Sudhir K. [Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The effect of gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co source and 2 MeV electron beam was studied on two fluoroquinolone antibiotics viz norfloxacin and gatifloxacin in the solid state. The changes in reflectance spectrum, yellowness index, vibrational characteristics, thermal behavior, UV spectrum, chemical potency (HPLC) and microbiological potency were investigated. ESR measurement gave the number of free radical species formed and their population. The nature of final radiolytic impurities was assessed by studying the HPLC impurity profile. Both norfloxacin and gatifloxacin were observed to be radiation resistant, and did not show significant changes in their physico-chemical properties. They could be radiation sterilized at a dose of 25 kGy.

  15. Occupational radiation exposure of Kolar mining workers in Karnataka State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its short lived decay products in dwellings and in atmosphere represent the main source of public exposure from the natural radiation. Radon, thoron and their progeny present in air contribute to nearly 50% of the average effective dose received by human beings from the natural radiation environment. Radon is a radioactive noble gas produced by the decay of uranium and thorium bearing minerals in rocks, soils and building materials having half life 3.82 days. UNSCEAR reported recently indicates that there is a remarkable coherence between the risk estimates developed from epidemiological studies from miners and residential case-control radon studies. The study area is around BGML at K.G.F. The study on the natural background radiation levels from the natural sources is important to evaluate the distribution of terrestrial radionuclides and radiation doses received by the population inhabitating around the study area. The data obtained from such study may be used locally to establish it and where the controls are needed. In the present study the most accurate Solid State Track Detector (SSNTD) method is used to determine the concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny. The maximum concentration of radon of 116.4 Bq.m-3 and gamma exposure rate of 765 n Gyh-1 have been observed in the dwellings at Champion place. The low concentration of radon and gamma exposure have been observed at Robersonpet and BGML nagar. (author)

  16. The level of confidence and responsibility accepted by Australian radiation therapists in developing plans and implementing treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to assess (i) how confident Radiation Therapists (RTs) are in developing a series of plans that have increasing levels of difficulty, and (ii) the level of responsibility that they are willing to accept in relation to these treatments being implemented without the Radiation Oncologist (RO) reviewing or countersigning the plan. A self-administered questionnaire was designed around a set of six clinical planning scenarios demonstrating increasing levels of difficulty. Two hundred and three Radiation Therapists returned a completed questionnaire. All RTs indicated that they were confident to complete all the plans regardless of difficulty (p < 0.0001) except for newly qualified RTs in their first year of practice who indicated a lack of confidence with the most difficult case only. Contrary to the high levels of confidence, RTs overall were only willing to accept responsibility for implementing treatment for the two basic level scenarios (p < 0.0001). To gauge the clinical usefulness of this finding a clinical centre audit was conducted that indicated that basic level procedures account for around 30-40% of a department's workload. RTs indicated a number of issues as barriers to accepting responsibility for more advanced work.

  17. The current state of radiation education in schools and results of the opinion survey on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, a new guideline about radioactivity was added to the government guidelines for teaching junior high school science. Since then people involved with school education have been trying to spread correct information about radioactivity. On the other hand, people's confusion in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident has clearly shown that people do not know much about radioactivity. Considering the situation, the author conducted an investigation about the current state of radiation education and carried out an opinion survey about radioactivity among adults. The investigation about education showed the following: (1) the nature of radiation, such as its permeability, and its uses were described in the government-approved textbooks; (2) basic knowledge, such as what are radiation effects, were described comprehensively in the supplementary reading recommendations made by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology; and (3) locale education committees created teaching materials such as guidance to present topics. The opinion survey had questions to judge: (1) current public understanding of radioactivity; (2) the degree of general information that people collected for themselves; (3) the degree of specific knowledge about radioactivity that people had; and (4) people's attitudes toward various problems with radioactivity in the environment. The results suggested that for radiation education the following items are important: (1) to learn that radioactivity exists in people's daily lives and is used safely in various field; (2) to get basic knowledge and better quantitative understanding of such things as radioactivity units, radiation dose and radiation effects; and (3) to acquire practical experience to use the information effectively. (author)

  18. Australian radiation therapists' perceptions of the determinants of fitness to practise; a mixed methods focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There is a lack of clarity as to what factors affect practitioners' fitness to practise (FTP). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what radiation therapists perceived to be the key determinants of FTP and to establish the importance that they place on each determinant. Methods: A mixed methods approach using focus groups with a brainstorming activity was used for data collection. Qualitative analysis was informed by grounded theory, where the data was coded and assigned themes. Findings: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 participants. Twenty-one unique determinants of FTP were identified. Professional development, communication, competence, qualifications, ethics and professionalism were common themes in all focus groups. Knowledge, technical and professional skills were most frequently cited by participants as the three most important determinants. Self-awareness, values and ethics featured last on the list. Participants of higher seniority identified a greater variety of determinants with lesser emphasis on technical skills, when compared with junior participants. Nine determinant themes were identified initially and these were spliced to form three primary categories; Impairment, Competence, and Values/Ethics. Conclusion: The most important issues to radiation therapists were associated with technical and clinical competence. This indicates a need to further educate practitioners on the other determinants of FTP, such as values, ethics, probity, trust and criminal activity. Further investigation is required to assess practitioner behavioural responses to deviations from accepted practice and the socio-cultural context of FTP

  19. Initial State Radiation Studies at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2007-04-16

    We present results from BABAR on events containing a hard radiated photon from the e{sup +}e{sup -} initial state and several exclusive final states. For the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state the cross section is measured for center-of-mass energies from 0.6 to 4.5 GeV. Resonant structures are studied and confirmed to be dominated by the a{sub 1}(1260){pi}, with a contribution from f{sub 2}(1270){rho}(770). Similar studies are shown for {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} from their respective thresholds up to 4.5 GeV. From the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state the products of the branching fractions of the {omega} and {phi} mesons have been obtained and the cross section is measured from 1.05 to 3.00 GeV. In addition the J/{psi} branching fractions to all four final states have been measured.

  20. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V. [ITMO University, 197101 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Rukhlenko, Ivan D. [ITMO University, 197101 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Monash University, Clayton Campus, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  1. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim K. Turkov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  2. Australian Research Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Australian Research Council(ARC) is the Australian Government's main agency for allocating research funding to academics and researchers in Australian universities.Its mission is to deliver policy and programs that advance Australian research and innovation globally and benefit the community.

  3. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  4. A review to determine the appropriatness and adequacy of existing provisions for the measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia: proceedings of a workshop held at the National Standards Commission on 13 May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current arrangements for the physical measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia are reviewed. Topics covered include the roles of the National Standards Commission, the National Association of Testing Authorities, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the Australian Radiation Laboratory. Legal units for ionizing radiation and Australia's measurement standards are discussed. The role of the radiologist and industrial radiographer are examined. Existing codes standards and legislation at both Federal and State government levels are briefly outlined

  5. A global history of Australian trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Scholars studying the globalization of Australian trees have previously emphasized the rapid natural propagation of Australian trees outside of their native habitats, believing their success to be a reversal of "ecological imperialism" from the "new world" to the "old world." This article argues that the expansion of Australian trees should not be viewed as a biological phenomenon, but as the result of a long-term attempt by powerful states and state-sponsored scientists to select and breed Australian species that could grow in a variety of climates and ecological conditions. Five non-biological factors largely determined the success of these attempts to grow Australian trees: the abundance or paucity of natural forests, state power, the amount of scientific research directed to planting Australian trees, the cost of labor, and the ability to utilize hardwood timbers and bark. This paper compares the use of Australian trees in Australia, India, and South Africa to demonstrate that biology was not the determining factor in the long-term success of many Australian genera and species. PMID:20665086

  6. Exposures to patients in Australian radiological practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paix, D. (South Australian Inst. of Tech., Adelaide)

    1983-11-01

    The findings of a 1980 Australian Radiation Laboratory study of genetic and bone-marrow doses to the population from medical, dental and chiropractic uses of ionising radiation are discussed. Attention is drawn to the large variability in patient exposure: maximum values were from five to eleven times greater than the means.

  7. BOOMERANG - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal has been prepared for the installation in Australia of a national high performance synchrotron light facility called Boomerang. The Boomerang proposal had its origin in the establishment of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) which was one of the seven Major National Research Facilities announced by the Federal Government in December 1995. The ASRP provides the opportunity and funding for Australian researchers to access international synchrotron facilities, specifically two consortia at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA and continued interaction with the Photon Factory at the KEK Laboratory in Japan. The ASRP was the successor to the Australian National Beamline Facility project (ANBF) which began in 1991 following the ASTEC inquiry titled 'Small Country - Big Science'. The Federal Government also provided funding for a Feasibility Study to determine the value of establishing an Australian-based synchrotron radiation facility. The Feasibility Study was completed in August 1998 and endorsed by the institutional members of the ASRP and the research community in general. The study concluded that, on the data available in Australia, there was a strong case for the installation of an Australian-based facility. The study considered several options for an Australian-based facility and recommended that these options and the data supporting the general conclusions receive further investigation. A mission was arranged to a select group of overseas laboratories to explore these questions in detail. The review team included a mix of scientific and industrial experience and also represented the interests of the ASRP and an Industrial Synchrotron Consortium based in Victoria. Based on the conclusions of the overseas mission and incorporating the advice of all international specialists in the design and use of synchrotron facilities consulted during the mission, the most cost-effective option was an extended

  8. Topological nature of bound states in the radiation continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhen, Bo; Lu, Ling; Stone, A Doug; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-01-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are unusual solutions of wave equations describing light or matter: they are discrete and spatially bounded, but exist at the same energy as a continuum of states which propagate to infinity. Until recently, BICs were constructed through fine-tuning parameters in the wave equation or exploiting the separability of the wave equation due to symmetry. More recently, BICs that that are both robust and not symmetry-protected (accidental) have been predicted and experimentally realized in periodic structures; the simplest such system is a periodic dielectric slab, which also has symmetry-protected BICs. Here we show that both types of BICs in such systems are vortex centers in the polarization direction of far-field radiation. The robustness of these BICs is due to the existence of conserved and quantized topological charges, defined by the number of times the polarization vectors wind around the vortex centers. Such charges can only be generated or annihilated by making large c...

  9. State-selective radiative recombination cross sections of argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The n-, (n,l)- and fine-structure level state-selective radiative recombinations (RR) cross sections of argon ions Ar18+,Ar13+,Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained with the semi-classical Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field (RSCF) method and the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. It is found that for the highly charged ions with few electrons, the cross sections calculated with these three methods are in good agreement with each other. But as the number of electrons increases, the Kramer formula deviates from the RSCF and RCI results. For instance, when the energy of the incident electron is larger than 100 eV, the n-state selective cross sections of Ar7+ calculated from the Kramer formula are underestimated for more than 50%. The RSCF results are in general agreement with the RCI results. However, for the low charged ions, a clear distinction appears due to the strong configuration interaction, especially near the Cooper minimum. The n-resolved (n≤10) and total Maxwellian averaged rate coefficients are calculated, and the analytic fitting parameters are also provided. -- Highlights: ► The RR cross sections of Ar18+, Ar13+, Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained. ► The Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field and RCI methods are used. ► Results from three methods are compared with each other.

  10. Influence of X-ray radiation on the hot star wind ionization state and on the radiative force

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Hot stars emit large amounts of X-rays, which are assumed to originate in the supersonic stellar wind. Part of the emitted X-rays is subsequently absorbed in the wind and influences its ionization state. Because hot star winds are driven radiatively, the modified ionization equilibrium affects the radiative force. We review the recent progress in modelling the influence of X-rays on the radiative equilibrium and on the radiative force. We focus particularly on single stars with X-rays produced in wind shocks and on binaries with massive components, which belong to the most luminous objects in X-rays.

  11. Influence of X-ray radiation on the hot star wind ionization state and on the radiative force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Hot stars emit large amounts of X-rays, which are assumed to originate in the supersonic stellar wind. Part of the emitted X-rays is subsequently absorbed in the wind and influences its ionization state. Because hot star winds are driven radiatively, the modified ionization equilibrium affects the radiative force. We review the recent progress in modeling the influence of X-rays on the radiative equilibrium and on the radiative force. We focus particularly on single stars with X-rays produced in wind shocks and on binaries with massive components, which belong to the most luminous objects in X-rays.

  12. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Murat; Hayrabolulu, Hande; Taşkın, Pınar; Torun, Murat; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of ionizing radiation on xanthan gum was investigated. Xanthan samples were irradiated with gamma rays in air at ambient temperature in the solid state at different dose rates and doses. Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. The calculated G(S) values are 0.0151±0.0015, 0.0144±0.0020, 0.0098±0.0010 μmol/J and k values are 1.4×10-8±1.4×10-9, 1.3×10-8±2.0×10-9, 8.7×10-9±1.0×10-9 Gy-1 for 0.1, 3.3 and 7.0 kGy/h dose rates, respectively. It was observed that the dose rate was an important factor controlling the G(S) and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Considering its use in food industry, the effect of irradiation on rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions was also investigated and flow model parameters were determined for all dose rates and doses. Rheological analysis showed that xanthan solution showed non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour and ionizing radiation does not change the non-Newtonian and shear thinning flow behaviour of xanthan gum solutions in concentration ranges of this work. It was determined that, Power Law model well described the flow behaviour of unirradiated and irradiated xanthan solutions.

  13. Assessment of terrestrial gamma-radiation in Northern State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is primarily conducted at the request of Northern State government to investigate the present of abnormal radioactivity in Northern State as claimed publicly. Activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137Cs in soil samples collected from different locations have been measured using high resolution γ-spectrometry. The average concentration were 19±4 Bg/kg for 238U, 47±11 Bq/kg for 232Th, 317±65 Bq/kg for 40K and 2.26 Bq/kg for 137Cs which means a very little contribution to the total exposure. The obtained results were found to be lower than the corresponding global values reported in the UNSCEAR publication for normal background areas. Absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1m from the ground was calculated using six sets of dose rate conversion factors and corresponding annual effective dose was estimated. On the average, the values obtained were 52.90, 50.43, 50.41, 43.54, 44.07 and 45.85 nGy.h-1 with corresponding annual effective doses of 64.93, 61.89, 61.87, 53.43, 54.08 and 56.27 μSv/y respectively. These values lie with in the worldwide range for normal radiation areas. The results obtained using these different DRCFs, although the approach used for their estimation was different, revealed no remarkable variation. Using Geographical Information System (GIS), prediction maps for concentration of 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs was produced. Also a map for absorbed dose rate in air at a height of one-meter above ground level was produced, which showed a trend of increase form the west towards south-east of the State.(Author)

  14. Radiation sterilization of vitamins - studies on the radiolysis and radiation protection of vitamins in aqueous systems and the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization of pharmaceutical products may cause their radiation degradation and loss in their potency. Radiation degradation may even give rise to new products whose effects on the organisms could be different from the parent substances. Extent of radiolytic decomposition of vitamins thiamine, nicotinamide, riboflavine and pyridoxine was studied under controlled conditions so that either only the hydrated electrons (esub(aq)) or only hydrogen atom (H) and hydroxyl radical react with these molecules. Experiments were also conducted in which scavengers for these species were added to reduce radiolytic degradation of the vitamins. It was found that irradiation of vitamins in the frozen aqueous state and with addition of glucose reduces radiolytic degradation and their irradiation in dry solid state causes no detectable damage. The last finding indicates that the best method for radiation sterilization of vitamin preparations may be to irradiate the components in the dry solid state and then compound them together. (M.G.B.)

  15. Visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this document is to prescribe the conditions, procedures and responsibilities for the conduct of visits to Australia by United States and Royal Navy nuclear powered warships. The Commonwealth government requires contingency arrangements to be in place at all Australian ports visited and that there be the capability to undertake radiation monitoring of the port environment. Release mechanisms such as the failure or maloperation of radioactive waste control systems within the vessel, or an accident involving the reactor plant are dealt with in the plan

  16. Moscow State University near-Earth radiation monitoring satellite system: current status and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Radiation measurements using instruments have been designed and manufacturing in the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University and installed onboard different satellites,i.e. LEO -"Meteor", ISS, GPS - GLONASS, GEO - "Electro" are presented as a basis of radiation monitoring system for control of radiation condition with a goal for to decrease radiation risk of spacecraft's damage on different orbits. Development of this system including radiation measurements onboard "Lomonosov"(LEO) satellite will be presented as well together with future project of multispacecraft LEO system for radiation monitoring.

  17. Australian clinical guidelines for radiological event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Health Protection Committee oversees national health protection priorities in: communicable disease outbreaks; chemical, biological or radiological incidents; mass casualty incidents; and deployment of Australian health teams overseas. The Australian Clinical Guidelines for a Radiological Event to complement existing national guidelines on chemical agents, anthrax, and smallpox. Other prompts included the need to revise the ARPANSA Guidance Manual, Medical Management of Individuals Involved in Radiation Accidents, 2000, and the requirement for specific therapeutic information regarding the indications and use of radiological decorporation agents held as part of the National Medical Stockpile. Matters identified by clinicians requiring specific guidance included: basic understanding of radiation; an approach to dose assessment; specific thresholds for initiating decorporation and other therapy; the role of gastric lavage, as contemporary practice considers this ineffective for other toxicological indications. rationale for, and detailed description of pulmonary lavage; advice on prenatal exposure to radiation; protocols for biodosimetry and other laboratory analysis. The objective was to produce a plain language guidance document for Australian clinicians on the diagnosis and management of radiation injury. It was to be based on evaluation of existing Australian documents, a literature review and consultation of appropriate specialists. Content areas included human health effects of radiation, scenario-based risk assessment and risk management, pre-hospital and hospital systems of care, management of specific injury types, radionuclide pathophysiology and decorporation protocols, biodosimetry options, individual psychological support 'and public health information, and Australian responsibilities under the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network, of the World Health Organization. The range of resources utilised in preparing the

  18. Analysis of microscopic magnitudes of radiative blast waves launched in xenon clusters with collisional-radiative steady-state simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative shock waves play a pivotal role in the transport energy into the stellar medium. This fact has led to many efforts to scale the astrophysical phenomena to accessible laboratory conditions and their study has been highlighted as an area requiring further experimental investigations. Low density material with high atomic mass is suitable to achieve radiative regime, and, therefore, low density xenon gas is commonly used for the medium in which the radiative shocks such as radiative blast waves propagate. In this work, by means of collisional-radiative steady-state calculations, a characterization and an analysis of microscopic magnitudes of laboratory blast waves launched in xenon clusters are made. Thus, for example, the average ionization, the charge state distribution, the cooling time or photon mean free paths are studied. Furthermore, for a particular experiment, the effects of the self-absorption and self-emission in the specific intensity emitted by the shock front and that is going through the radiative precursor are investigated. Finally, for that experiment, since the electron temperature is not measured experimentally, an estimation of this magnitude is made both for the shock shell and the radiative precursor. -- Highlights: •We analyze microscopic magnitudes of plasmas for typical conditions found in laboratory blast waves in clusters of gases. •A particular experiment of blast waves launched in xenon is analyzed. •We perform a collisional-radiative steady-state diagnostics of the temperature of the blast wave. •We study the opacity effects in the kinetics calculations and the intensity in the shock shell of the blast wave. •We analyze self-absorption and self-emission in the radiative precursor

  19. Changes in perceptions of radiation with social state's alternation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate changes in college student perceptions of radiation over time, we performed questionnaire surveys in November 1992 and January 2000. The subjects were students of the humanities or social sciences, numbering 290 (19.1±1.1 y) in 1992 and 226 (19.9±2.0 y) in 2000. The questionnaires had two sections. First, the students were asked to list words which they associated with the stimulus word 'radiation'. Next, they performed a ten stage-evaluation (0 to 10 points) of the degree of familiarity', 'danger', 'usefulness', and 'acceptability' with regard to 26 items which included radiation and things related to radiation. In both surveys, the top three responses to the stimulus word 'radiation', were roentgen', 'atomic bomb', and 'nuclear power'. The students in 2000 associated the word 'radiation' with words such as 'Tokaimura' which were related to recent accidents. The evaluation ratings of 'familiarity', usefulness', and 'acceptability' for nuclear power changed significantly between 1992 and 2000 (p<0.01). The 'acceptability' ratings for radiation and X-ray photos were negatively correlated with those of 'danger'. This negative correlation coefficient showed an increase between 1992 and 2000 (p<0.05). In conclusion, it was apparent that the students are now showing greater concern about radiation and nuclear power. (author)

  20. Policy Levers Key for Primary Health Care Organizations to Support Primary Care Practices in Meeting Medical Home Expectations: Comparing Leading States to the Australian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes—all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models—3 from the United States and 1 from Australia—with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system. PMID:26636485

  1. The Asian currency crisis and the Australian health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, S

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies linkages between the Australian health industry and the global economy. It discusses some of the consequences of the Asian currency crisis of 1997-98 for the Australian economy and health industry, with special emphasis upon exports. Devaluation of the Australian dollar will increase the cost of most pharmaceutical and medical imports, but may offer competitive advantages to some Australian exporters. The nascent engagement with Asia of many health industry enterprises is likely to be stifled. It is therefore important for Australian governments, as well as the Australian health industry, to provide intelligence and encouragement to those enterprises that wish to continue their engagement with Asia or resume it when economic equilibrium returns. Markets throughout the world must also be further developed. The crisis may therefore provide the stimulus for re-thinking and re-stating Australian health export policy. PMID:10537568

  2. The Asian currency crisis and the Australian health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, S

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies linkages between the Australian health industry and the global economy. It discusses some of the consequences of the Asian currency crisis of 1997-98 for the Australian economy and health industry, with special emphasis upon exports. Devaluation of the Australian dollar will increase the cost of most pharmaceutical and medical imports, but may offer competitive advantages to some Australian exporters. The nascent engagement with Asia of many health industry enterprises is likely to be stifled. It is therefore important for Australian governments, as well as the Australian health industry, to provide intelligence and encouragement to those enterprises that wish to continue their engagement with Asia or resume it when economic equilibrium returns. Markets throughout the world must also be further developed. The crisis may therefore provide the stimulus for re-thinking and re-stating Australian health export policy.

  3. State Register of Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Occupational exposure

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of main tasks of Radiation Protection Centre is to collect, process, systematize, store and provide the data on sources of ionizing radiation and occupational exposures. The number of sources in 2002 is provided and compared with previous year. Distribution of workers according to the type of practice is compared with previous year. Distribution of sealed sources and x-ray machines according their use is presented.

  4. Current state of methodological and decisions for radiation treatment of blood, its components and products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordeev A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents currently used blood transfusion media — components and blood products, therapeutic effects, reactions and complications of blood transfusion, use of radiation treatment for blood transfusion fluids. There had been discussed in detail the practice of radiation processing of blood components and for the prevention of reaction "graft versus host" and studies of plasma radiation treatment for its infectious safety. There was presented the current state of techniques and technical solutions of radiation treatment of transfusion-transmissible environments. There were also considered an alternative to radiation treatment of blood.

  5. Stress in the Indo-Australian plate

    OpenAIRE

    Cloetingh, S. A. P. L.; R. Wortel

    1986-01-01

    We modelled the state of stress in the Indo-Australian plate in order to investigate quantitatively variations observed in tectonic style. The numerical procedure incorporates the dependence of slab pull and ridge push on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Estimates are presented for the average net resistive forces at the Himalayan collision zone, the suction force acting on the overriding Indo-Australian plate segment at the Tonga-Kermadec trench and the drag at the base of the lithosphere...

  6. Evaluation of Background Ionization Radiation Level in some selected Dumpsites in Delta State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Avwiri, O Gregory; Emmanuel, O Esi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of background Ionization radiation level (BIR) in some selected Dumpsites in Uvwie, Udu and Ughelli North Local government area of Delta State, Nigeria. Background ionization radiation measurements were carried out in five Dumpsites. An in- situ measurement was done using a well calibrated nuclear radiation meters Radalert-100 and a geographical positioning system (GPS). Readings were taken once in a week for one month in ten different locations within eac...

  7. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1978 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research appreciated. (author)

  8. State and tendencies of chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers published in 1979 and 1980 in the field of chemical protection against ionizing radiation are reviewed. Protection studies in in-vivo and model systems, the biochemical, pharmacological and toxic effects, and modes of action of radioprotective agents are described and the trends in this field of research estimated. (author)

  9. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Selenium is an environmentally relevant trace metal, recognised not only for its role as an essential trace nutrient in living systems, but also for its devastating impacts at elevated concentrations, including fish deformities and death from selenium-laden waters and sediment. There are escalating concerns that the consumption of selenium-contaminated foods (e.g. fish and bivalves) will have an impact on human health. A comprehensive understanding of organic and inorganic selenium tissue concentrations is required if we are to assess the toxic effects of selenium in marine organisms and the flow-on effects to human consumers. Currently, whole sediment bioassays measuring total metal concentration effects are being used to assess the toxicity of metal contaminated sediments. However, for most sediment-dwelling organisms, sediments particles, pore waters and overlying waters, as well as food sources (e.g. algae) may all contribute to the accumulation of metal contaminants. Furthermore, the species of metal (and not the total metal concentration) in each of these compartments will also modify metal toxicity and uptake rates. For most species routinely used in toxicity tests, the relative importance of the different contaminant exposure pathways (overlying waters, sediment, food) has not been evaluated. If we know which compartment(s) induce toxic responses in the test organisms, we can use that knowledge to more effectively manage contaminated environments. The radiotracer 75Se produced in HIFAR was used to determine the uptake routes and accumulation sites in biological organisms. Comparatively, high sensitivity of gamma counter techniques and minimal sample preparation to ICP-MS and AAS provided for a faster and more efficient method to monitor the uptake of selenium. Biodistribution studies evaluating the bioavailability of Se from water, sediment and algae in the endemic Australian marine bivalve Anadara trapezia is presently under investigation and

  10. Assessing the impact of the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement on Australian and global medicines policy

    OpenAIRE

    Searles Andrew; Drahos Peter; Henry David; Doran Evan; Faunce Thomas; Pekarsky Brita; Neville Warwick

    2005-01-01

    Abstract On 1 January 2005, a controversial trade agreement entered into force between Australia and the United States. Though heralded by the parties as facilitating the removal of barriers to free trade (in ways not achievable in multilateral fora), it also contained many trade-restricting intellectual property provisions and others uniquely related to altering pharmaceutical regulation and public health policy in Australia. The latter appear to have particularly focused on the world-respec...

  11. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  12. Mean annual solar radiation in the United States Pacific Northwest (1991-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent mean annual solar radiation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...

  13. Networked solutions of radiation control of state borders and urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Prevention of illicit trafficking in radioactive and nuclear materials through state borders as well as the disperse of radioactive materials in urban area is a challenging task of national security departments in many countries. To solve this task, appropriate actions of personnel on-site equipped by radiation detectors such as fixed radiation portal monitors or mobile personal radiation detectors are required. However, users of radiation equipment such as Customs, Border Guard and Police Services often perform radiation control as additional responsibility to their main duties. Furthermore, these users have no sufficient expertise in radiation control and need real-time remote expert help to interpret readings of radiation equipment and expert support in decision making process. Polimaster has developed complete solution called Nuclear Protection Network system (NPNET) for high-effective radiation control on State Borders as well as inside a country. NPNET system intended for efficient interaction and on-line data exchange between a user, radiation control instrument, for example a personal radiation detector or radioisotope identifier, and remote Command Center. Availability of such system allows to solve more efficiently tasks of detection, localization and identification of ionizing radiation sources, to properly interpret false alarms (e.g. at detention of a passenger having passed radio-therapy etc.) and effectively prevent illicit trafficking radioactive and nuclear materials. The NPNET system can cover territory as large as city or even a state and provides assistant of infinite number of independent user groups. NPNET has a module structure and could be easily adapted to any specific user's requirements. Thus, the radiation mobile system NPNET is an effective tool for prevention of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials and is recommended for use by Border guards, Customs, Securities and emergency situations services. (author)

  14. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ilinois (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  15. [Radiation-induced cancers: state of the art in 1997].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J M

    1997-01-01

    Scientists now have available a large amount of data dealing with radiation-induced neoplasms. These data went back to anecdotal observations which were made in the very first years of utilization of X-rays and radioactive elements. In fact, it is essentially the strict follow-up of the Japanese populations irradiated by the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing which allowed a more precise evaluation of the carcinogenicity of ionizing radiations. Further refinements came from therapeutical irradiations: it is now possible to study large cohorts of patients given well-known doses in well-defined volumes and followed for more than 20 years. Last but not least, a significant increase in the incidence and mortality of thyroid cancer has been detected in children contaminated by iodine radioisotopes after the Tchernobyl accident. Recently, some data suggested the emergence of "clusters" of leukemias close to some nuclear facilities, but this question remains highly polemical, both in France and in the UK. Other questions are still waiting for a precise answer; of course, the extrapolation of our available data to very low doses delivered at very low dose rates, but also the carcinogenic risk at high doses. For these "high" doses (about 30 to 70 Gy), a competition between mutagenesis and cell killing was expected, so that these dose levels were expected to be less carcinogenic than lower (a few sieverts) doses. Actually, recent data suggest that the carcinogenic risk goes on increasing up to relatively important doses. In addition, carcinogenic factors, such as tabacco, anticancer chemotherapy and individual susceptibility, are found more and more to be closely intricated with ionizing radiation in the genesis of a given cancer. Even if a number of questions are still pending, the already available data allow specialists, both in medicine and radioprotection, to edict strict rules which can be reasonably expected to have significantly reduced the risk of radiation

  16. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members

  17. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  18. Aboriginal Agency and Marginalisation in Australian Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Moore

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is often argued that while state rhetoric may be inclusionary, policies and practices may be exclusionary. This can imply that the power to include rests only with the state. In some ways, the implication is valid in respect of Aboriginal Australians. For instance, the Australian state has gained control of Aboriginal inclusion via a singular, bounded category and Aboriginal ideal type. However, the implication is also limited in their respect. Aborigines are abject but also agents in their relationship with the wider society. Their politics contributes to the construction of the very category and type that governs them, and presses individuals to resist state inclusionary efforts. Aboriginal political elites police the performance of an Aboriginality dominated by notions of difference and resistance. The combined processes of governance act to deny Aborigines the potential of being both Aboriginal and Australian, being different and belonging. They maintain Aborigines’ marginality.

  19. Concentration, physical state, and purity of bacterial endotoxin affect its detoxification by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csako, G.; Tsai, C.M.; Hochstein, H.D.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    Increasing concentrations of a highly purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide preparation, the U.S. Reference Standard Endotoxin, were exposed to increasing doses of ionizing radiation from a 60Co source. At identical radiation doses both the structural change and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) reactivity were progressively smaller with increasing concentrations of the lipopolysaccharide in an aqueous medium. Under the experimental conditions used, there was a linear relationship between the endotoxin concentration and radiation dose for the structural changes. In contrast to endotoxin in aqueous medium, endotoxin irradiated in its dry state showed no decrease in LAL reactivity and rabbit pyrogenicity. Endotoxin exposed to radiation in water in the presence of albumin showed a much smaller decrease in LAL and pyrogenic activities than expected. The results show that the concentration, physical state, and purity of endotoxin influence its structural and functional alteration by ionizing radiation.

  20. Solid-State Photomultiplier Development for Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Stuart [NSTec; Brown, Kristina [NSTec; Curtis, Alden [NSTec; Young, Jason [NSTec; Guise, Ronald [NSTec

    2012-06-12

    We are pursuing the sensitivity of back-thinned silicon (BT Si) with the gain of an SSPM (Baker 2011). Working in collaboration with Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., we are designing and fabricating prototype devices. Our original idea spurred from hybrid designs of advanced image sensors that use the sensitivity of BT Si that is then bump bonded to a CMOS readout device. As shown in the graph below (right), the BT Si has a far superior quantum efficiency (QE) than the standard photocathode response available in photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Collecting as many scintillation photons as possible is the first objective. There has been major concern that the prototype could not deliver the ~105 electronic gain of a PMT. However, recently developed SSPMs do provide the electronic gain needed. We are now pursuing the design of a BTSSPM. With a smaller footprint, the SSPM can potentially lead to a simple, compact deployment package. Because the SSPM can be pixelated and tiled, we foresee developing an imaging detector. Pinhole imaging of radiation sources is a well-exercised technology. Our implementation of the coded aperture (Marks 2010) imager provides a high throughput pinhole imager. We intend to apply miniature coded apertures to minimal pixel count SSPMs to evaluate image quality.

  1. Radiation Sterilization of Anthracycline Antibiotics in Solid State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kaczmarek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ionizing radiation generated by a beam of electrons of 25–400 kGy on the stability of such analogs of anthracycline antibiotics as daunorubicin (DAU, doxorubicin (DOX, and epidoxorubicin (EPI was studied. Based on EPR results, it was established that unstable free radicals decay exponentially with the half-time of 4 days in DAU and DOX and 7 days in EPI after irradiation. Radiation-induced structural changes were analyzed with the use of spectrophotometric methods (UV-Vis and IR and electron microscope imaging (SEM. A chromatographic method (HPLC-DAD was applied to assess changes in the contents of the analogs in the presence of their impurities. The study showed that the structures of the analogs did not demonstrate any significant alterations at the end of the period necessary for the elimination of unstable free radicals. The separation of main substances and related substances (impurities and potential degradation products allowed determining that no statistically significant changes in the content of particular active substances occurred and that their conversion due to the presence of free radicals resulting from exposure to an irradiation of 25 kGy (prescribed to ensure sterility was not observed.

  2. Present state of the combined treatment with radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of malignancies in which the results have been markedly improved by combined treatment with radiation and chemicals for the past decade, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localized in head and neck and intra-oral carcinoma are presented. In the management of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the authors stressed the following: 1) Rappaport's classification has been a help to evaluate the prognosis; 2) lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring should not be included in nodal lymphoma, and also it should be separated from extranodal lymphoma as well, because of different prognosis; 3) It seems that some kinds of chemotherapy would have a role in improving the results of radiotherapy in the management of radiotherapy, even in localized cases. In some types of intra-oral carcinomas, bleomycin was found to be useful in the combined treatment with radiation as follows: 1) A minimum required dose for local control of intra-oral carcinomas could be a combination of 30Gy in 3 weeks and 100mg bleomycin during the same period. 2) Although the end results of patients with carcinoma of tongue or floor of mouth have not been improved by this approach, there was marked improvement in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum. 3) For the treatment, the side effect as limiting factor was mucositis, and none of the cases of the series developed pulmonary complication. In the cases controlled by initial combined treatment, no one developed troubles of the mandible, in the follow-up study for the past 10 years. (author)

  3. Application of solid state nuclear track detectors in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the current status of the application of nuclear track detectors with emphasis on recent developments in the field of radiation protection. Track etch detectors have been used for the measurements of low level radiation in the environment, fast neutron and radon daughter inhalation dose. Recent developments in the field of dosimetry seem to be promising. In fast neutron dosimetry, track etch detectors can be used without inclusion of fissile materials by using the electrochemical etching technique. These detectors can provide important information in the energy range upto 250 keV. Survey of this range of energy with TLD is difficult because they are extremely energy dependent and over-respond to low energy neutrons. Measurement of radon using track detectors can help to lower the cost of the radon dosimeters. Certain detectors are sensitive to alpha particles from radon and their progeny. Higher sensitivity permits their use in a passive type of personnel dosimeter, which does not require the troublesome aspects of air sampling for the collection of radon daughter samples. (author), 38 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs

  4. Interaction between the Kravchuck and Meixner oscillators coherent states and the coherent radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugen Drăgănescu, Gheorghe

    2013-03-01

    To describe a series of phenomena that occur in micro- and nano-systems, we have used the discrete variable Kravchuk and Meixner oscillators for which some sets of coherent states and some squeezed states were established. For a system consisting of molecular oscillators interacting with the coherent radiation field, an oscillatory variation of the refractive index was established.

  5. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2009-04-01

    Land cover and land use (LCLU) change affects Earth surface properties including albedo that impose a radiative forcing on the climate. Recently available satellite derived LCLU change data for the conterminous United States (CONUS) are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 61 ecoregions covering 73% of the CONUS. Mean monthly broadband Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow and snow-free albedo values are derived from decadal Landsat 60m LCLU classification maps located within ecoregions using a stratified random sampling methodology. These data and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis are used to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive radiative forcing due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative radiative forcing due to forest loss, with snow modifying the results. At the ecoregion level this magnitude of radiative forcing is not insignificant, being similar in magnitude to global radiative forcing estimates due to LCLU change during the twentieth century.

  6. Radiation monitoring and dose distribution of medical workers in A.P. state 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual monitoring for external ionizing radiation is being conducted for all radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State by TLD Unit located in Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad.The Unit comes under Personnel Monitoring Section of Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai. The aim of monitoring is to confirm that the radiation safety standards are strictly adhered in the institutions and also to investigate excessive exposures, if any. Personnel monitoring also provides data for epidemiological studies. In view of ICRP/AERB recommendations of 100 mSv dose limit for the five years block of 1994-98, the dose distribution among radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State is analyzed for the period 1994-98. In continuation of above work, we have analyzed the data for the year 1999-2000 for various medical diagnostic procedures and these are presented

  7. Numerical radiative transfer with state-of-the-art iterative methods made easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Julien; Paletou, Frédéric; Josselin, Eric; Glorian, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an on-line tool and its accompanying software resources for the numerical solution of basic radiation transfer out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). State-of-the-art stationary iterative methods such as Accelerated Λ-iteration and Gauss-Seidel schemes, using a short characteristics-based formal solver are used. We also comment on typical numerical experiments associated to the basic non-LTE radiation problem. These resources are intended for the largest use and benefit, in support to more classical radiation transfer lectures usually given at the Master level.

  8. Operational control of radiation conditions in Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Shugay, Yulia; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of Moscow State University provides mission support for Russian satellites and give operational analysis of radiation conditions in space. SMDC Web-sites (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/ and http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/) give access to current data on the level of solar activity, geomagnetic and radiation state of Earth's magnetosphere and heliosphere in near-real time. For data analysis the models of space environment factors working online have been implemented. Interactive services allow one to retrieve and analyze data at a given time moment. Forecasting applications including solar wind parameters, geomagnetic and radiation condition forecasts have been developed. Radiation dose and SEE rate control are of particular importance in practical satellite operation. Satellites are always under the influence of high-energy particle fluxes during their orbital flight. The three main sources of particle fluxes: the Earth's radiation belts, the galactic cosmic rays, and the solar energetic particles (SEP), are taken into account by SMDC operational services to estimate the radiation dose caused by high-energy particles to a satellite at LEO orbits. ISO 15039 and AP8/AE8 physical models are used to estimate effects of galactic cosmic rays and radiation belt particle fluxes. Data of geosynchronous satellites (GOES or Electro-L1) allow to reconstruct the SEP fluxes spectra at a given low Earth orbit taking into account the geomagnetic cut-off depending on geomagnetic activity level.

  9. Radiative lifetimes of Rydberg states of BeⅠ and BeⅢ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Liang; WANG Yong-chang

    2003-01-01

    By using the multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), we have evaluated the energy levels and lifetimes of 2sns 3S1,2snd 3D(n=3-25) of BeⅠ and 1sns 3S1,1snd 3D(n=3-25) of BeⅢ. These energies and lifetimes that we have calculated not only agree with the recent measurements and theoretical calculation of Ref.4 and Ref.3, but also predict the lifetimes of 66 other highly excited states.

  10. Toxicity and Long-Term Outcomes of Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to 74Gy for Localised Prostate Cancer in a Single Australian Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Khoo; Maureen Rolfo; Nigel Anderson; Morikatsu Wada; Aldo Rolfo; George Quong; Carmel Mantle; Angela Viotto; Joseph Sia; Daryl Lim Joon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with localised prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2005, a total of 125 patients with histologically confirmed T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with IMRT to 74Gy at the Austin Health Radiation Oncology Centre. The median follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.5–8.9 years). Biochemical prostate specific antigen (bPSA) failure was defined according t...

  11. Radiation nursery and occupational exposure: state-of-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Documentary research with the aim to reflect on the state of the art in radiological nursing, on the nursing work and occupational hazards they are exposed, from articles produced in Brazil. The survey was conducted in the BVS, the study consisted of seven articles published from 2002 to 2012. Regarding the main variables studied in the articles, issues emerged related to working conditions and biosafety, performance of nurses, legislation, continuing education and difficulties and needs of nursing staff . It was noticed that is recent the interest in the field, but the work of nurses in radiological technologies must be grounded in current scientific knowledge and with proper technique, to the achievement of the desired clinical outcome and to promote their safety, the team and also the patient. (author)

  12. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was found to be ∼0.3mm. DISCUSSION and CONCLUSIONS: The use of transmitted dose maps, instead of EPID raw pixel values, is not only able to detect the slight MLC shifts and uncertainties, but also is able to predict the amount of the variation of the delivered dose to the surrounding tissues that are to be protected during the radiation course. The simplicity, accuracy, efficiency and additional information about delivered dose are the advantages of this technique

  13. Universal method for the synthesis of arbitrary polarization states radiated by a nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Fortuno, Francisco J; Griol, Amadeu; Bellieres, Laurent; Marti, Javier; Martinez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanoantennas efficiently convert confined optical energy into free-space radiation. The polarization of the emitted radiation depends mainly on nanoantenna shape, so it becomes extremely difficult to manipulate it unless the nanostructure is physically altered. Here we demonstrate a simple way to synthetize the polarization of the radiation emitted by a single nanoantenna so that every point on the Poincar\\'e sphere becomes attainable. The nanoantenna consists of a single scatterer created on a dielectric waveguide and fed from its both sides so that the polarization of the emitted optical radiation is controlled by the amplitude and phase of the feeding signals. Our nanoantenna is created on a silicon chip using standard top-down nanofabrication tools, but the method is universal and can be applied to other materials, wavelengths and technologies. This work will open the way towards the synthesis and control of arbitrary polarization states in nano-optics.

  14. Radiation traces in exportation food samples of Parana State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with radioactive traces measurements in foodstuffs produced at the State of Parana, with large export rate and also of nutritious products of some regional trading companies. The measured foods were: sulfite treated sugar, tea, mint candy, soy in grain, soy crumb, gross soy oil, gum free oil and commercial refined soy oil. Six samples of each lot of the analyzed material were prepared, which represent a sampling with 90% of confidence. The samples were sealed in Marinelli beaker of 2.1 L completely filled and kept during 40 days until secular equilibrium was achieved. The counting time for each measure was of 48 hours. Measurements were carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry employing a HPGe detector with 10% of relative efficiency, coupled to standard nuclear electronics and a 8 l multichannel card. The acquisition of the data was accomplished with the software MaestroTM, version 3.2. The energy resolution of the 137 Cs 661.62 keV gamma line was 1.75 keV. The larger intensity gamma lines observed in the spectra were from the following radionuclides: 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 212 Pb of the 232 Th series, 214 Bi and 214 Pb from the 238 U series, 227 Ac from the 235 U series and 40 K. Activities and lower level of detection limits were calculated according to the International Agency of Atomic Energy norms.The detector efficiency was measured using a 152 Eu certified source and IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 certified reference materials. For most of the radionuclides it was possible only the measurement of the minimum activity detectable in the foodstuffs. Self-attenuation corrections were accomplished with support literature results. The most important activity observed was that of 40 K, whose value measured for soy in natura was 745.0 +-9.1 Bq/kg and for the crumb soy 1473 ± 15 Bq/kg.. he measured activities of the several analyzed foods were compatible with the values expected for non contaminated normal environmental samples, except for soy crumb, whose 40 K

  15. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T

    2016-02-01

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation.

  16. Extracting Information about the Initial State from the Black Hole Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Padmanabhan, T

    2016-02-01

    The crux of the black hole information paradox is related to the fact that the complete information about the initial state of a quantum field in a collapsing spacetime is not available to future asymptotic observers, belying the expectations from a unitary quantum theory. We study the imprints of the initial quantum state contained in a specific class of distortions of the black hole radiation and identify the classes of in states that can be partially or fully reconstructed from the information contained within. Even for the general in state, we can uncover some specific information. These results suggest that a classical collapse scenario ignores this richness of information in the resulting spectrum and a consistent quantum treatment of the entire collapse process might allow us to retrieve much more information from the spectrum of the final radiation. PMID:26894699

  17. Stress in the Indo-Australian plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.; Wortel, R.

    1986-01-01

    We modelled the state of stress in the Indo-Australian plate in order to investigate quantitatively variations observed in tectonic style. The numerical procedure incorporates the dependence of slab pull and ridge push on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Estimates are presented for the average ne

  18. Radiative Signatures of Reconnection in X-ray Binary Spectral States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Accreting black holes (BHs) in Galactic X-ray Binary (XRB) systems represent some of the main targets of space-based high-energy observatories such as NASA s RXTE, Chandra, and NuSTAR, as well as the international observatories XMM Newton, INTEGRAL, Suzaku (Astro-E), and Astro-H. The overall radiative energy output (mostly X-rays) is ultimately powered by the conversion of the gravitational potential energy of the matter falling onto a black hole and forming an accretion disk or a hot accretion flow around it. Observationally, these systems are found to cycle between a few discrete spectral states, characterized by different overall X-ray power and spectral hardness: (1) the bright thermal high-soft state, dominated by a soft (1 keV) thermal component attributed to a thin dense accretion disk with a relatively weak corona producing a power-law tail emission to at least 1 MeV; (2) the low-hard state, showing no signs of a thin accretion disk and dominated by a single hard (with index ~ -1.7) power law truncating at about 100 keV; and (3) the bright Steep Power Law state with both a standard thin disk and a powerful coronal power-law (with index about -2.5) emission extending to at least 1 MeV. Explaining the key features of these nonthermal spectra, i.e., their power law indices and high-energy cutoffs, is one of the outstanding problems in high-energy astrophysics. The hard (10keV 1MeV) X-ray emission in these states is believed to be produced by inverse-Compton scattering in relativistically-hot gas, presumably heated by magnetic reconnection processes, and forming either an accretion disk corona or the hot accretion flow itself. Since the radiative cooling time of the energetic electrons in the intense radiation fields found in these systems is very short, the observed non-thermal hard X-ray spectra should directly reflect the instantaneous energy spectra of the electrons accelerated in reconnection events. Recent advances in kinetic simulations of reconnection

  19. International responsability of state by the deleterius effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Responsability of State, considering the deleterius effects of ionising radiation on the human being, property, territory and environment which are under other jurisdiction, is focused. Conventional rules, costumary rules, the evolution of ''opinion juris'' as well as the decisions of tribunals related to the subject are analysed. (author)

  20. Radiative Decays of q bar q Chiral States in the U~(12)-Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, T; Oda, M; Ishida, S; Maeda, Tomohito; Yamada, Kenji; Oda, Masuho; Ishida, Shin

    2006-01-01

    The radiative transitions between ground-states (GS) of light q bar q mesons are investigated in the U~(12)-scheme. In this scheme the rich decay-spectra are offered even in transition between GS due to the appearance of chiral states. As a result the radiative decay widths of the ordinary V -> P gamma process are well reproduced, and furthermore, the predicted width of b_{1}(1235) -> pi gamma process (Gamma_{theor}=229 keV), by assigning b_{1}(1235) as a member of the {}^{3}S_{1} chiral states A^{(E)}, is in good agreement with experimental one (Gamma_{exp} =230 +- 60 keV). From this results it is indicated that b_{1}(1235) meson, classified as {}^{1}P_{1} state in conventional non-relativistic (NR) classification scheme, is a good candidate of chiral state in the U~(12)-scheme. The other radiative transition widths of some chiral states are also predicted. Accordingly the predicted values given here, will provide useful insights in their search at BES.

  1. Effects of radiation on T regulatory cells in normal states and cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Sun, Xiangdong; Luo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Guo, Qing; Song, Yaqi; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation remains an important component of cancer treatment. In addition to inducing tumor cell death through direct cytotoxic effects, radiation can also promote the regression of tumor via augment of immune response. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a unique subpopulation of CD4 positive cells, which are characterized by expression of the forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and high levels of CD25. Mounting evidence has shown that Tregs are implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, which makes Tregs an important target in cancer therapeutics. Generally, lymphocytes are regarded as radiosensitive. However, Tregs have been demonstrated to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy, which is partly mediated by downregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins and upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, radiotherapy can increase the production of Tregs and the recruitment of Tregs to local tumor microenvironment. Tregs can attenuate radiation-induced tumor death, which cause the resistance of tumor to radiotherapy. Recent experimental studies and clinical trails have demonstrated that the combination of radiation with medications that target Tregs is promising in the treatment of several types of neoplasms. In this review, we discussed the effect of radiation on Tregs in physiological states and cancer. Further, we presented an overview of therapies that target Tregs to enhance the efficacy of radiation in cancer therapeutics. PMID:26807310

  2. Controlling Directionality and Dimensionality of Radiation by Perturbing Separable Bound States in the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability. Then we show that by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry such BICs can be turned into resonances that radiate with a tailorable directionality and dimensionality. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs and resonances that can exist in optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such resonances with easily reconfigurable radiation allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, as well systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement. PMID:27641540

  3. Current state of commercial radiation detection equipment for homeland security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) came the increased concern that terrorist groups would attempt to manufacture and use an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device. As such, a primary mission of DHS is to protect the public against the use of these devices and to assist state and local responders in finding, locating, and identifying these types of devices and materials used to manufacture these devices. This assistance from DHS to state and local responders comes in the form of grant money to procure radiation detection equipment. In addition to this grant program, DHS has supported the development of American National Standards Institute standards for radiation detection equipment and has conducted testing of commercially available instruments. This paper identifies the types and kinds of commercially available equipment that can be used to detect and identify radiological material - for use in traditional search applications as well as primary and secondary screening of personnel, vehicles, and cargo containers. In doing so, key considerations for the conduct of operations are described as well as critical features of the instruments for specific applications. The current state of commercial instruments is described for different categories of detection equipment including personal radiation detectors, radioisotope identifiers, man-portable detection equipment, and radiation portal monitors. In addition, emerging technologies are also discussed, such as spectroscopic detectors and advanced spectroscopic portal monitors

  4. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to Hyperfine Splitting in p3/2 States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2008-07-15

    A recent calculation of the one-loop radiative correction to hyperfine splitting (hfs) of p{sub 1/2} states that includes binding corrections to all orders is extended to p{sub 3/2} states. Nuclear structure plays an essentially negligible role for such states, which is highly advantageous, as difficulties in controlling the Bohr-Weisskopf effect complicate the isolation of QED contributions for both s{sub 1/2} and p{sub 1/2} states. Three cases are studied. We first treat the hydrogen isoelectronic sequence, which is completely nonperturbative in Z{alpha} for high Z. Secondly the lowest lying p{sub 3/2} states of the neutral alkalis are treated, and finally lithium-like bismuth, where extensive theoretical and experimental studies of the hfs of 2s and 2p{sub 1/2} states have been made, is addressed.

  5. Radiative Decay of Neutron-Unbound Intruder States in $^{19}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Dungan, R; Tripathi, Vandana; Volya, A; Kravvaris, K; Abromeit, B; Caussyn, D D; Morrow, S; Parker, J J; Tai, P -L; VonMoss, J M

    2015-01-01

    The $^{9}$Be($^{14}$C, $\\alpha$$\\gamma$) reaction at E$_{Lab}$=30 and 35 MeV was used to study excited states of $^{19}$O. The Florida State University (FSU) $\\gamma$ detector array was used to detect $\\gamma$ radiation in coincidence with charged particles detected and identified with a silicon $\\Delta$E-E particle telescope. Gamma decays have been observed for the first time from six states ranging from 368 to 2147 keV above the neutron separation energy (S$_{n}$=3962 keV) in $^{19}$O. The $\\gamma$ decaying states are interspersed among states previously observed to decay by neutron emission. The ability of electromagnetic decay to compete successfully with neutron decay is explained in terms of neutron angular momentum barriers and small spectroscopic factors implying higher spin and complex structure for these intruder states. These results illustrate the need for complementary experimental approaches to best illuminate the complete nuclear structure.

  6. [Radiation-induced changes in structural state of membranes of human blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, E B; Atkarskaia, M V; Fatkullina, L D; Andreev, S G

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced changes in the structural state of the membranes, blood samples of healthy donors were subjected to gamma radiation in the range of small (1-10 cGy) and medium doses (50 cGy-2 Gy). After irradiation, the microviscosity of lipid membranes of red and white blood cells was measured by ESR spin probe method. At doses exceeding 1 cGy, statistically significant changes of the degree of spontaneous erythrocyte hemolysis and of the lymphocyte plasma membrane microviscosity were observed. Under identical irradiation conditions, the stability of lymphocyte membranes was less as compared to erythrocyte membranes.

  7. Survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the United States. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutron-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter

  8. Search for 28Si cluster states through the 12C+16O radiative capture

    CERN Document Server

    Courtin, S; Haas, F; Lebhertz, D; Jenkins, D G; Hutcheon, D A; Davis, C; Ruiz, C

    2012-01-01

    The 12C+16O resonant radiative capture reaction has been studied at 5 bombarding energies between Elab = 15.4 and 21.4 MeV, around the Coulomb barrier, at the Triumf laboratory (Vancouver, Canada) using the Dragon 0{\\deg} spectrometer and the associated BGO array. The most remarquable result is the previously unobserved decay path through 28Si doorway states of energies around 12 MeV leading to the measurement of new capture cross-sections. The feeding of specific, deformed states in 28Si from the resonances is discussed, as well as the selective feeding of 1^+ T=1 states around 11 MeV.

  9. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy: Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2013-01-01

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes, such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  10. Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance. (author)

  11. Steady-State Microbunching in a Storage Ring for Generating Coherent Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel F.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Chao, Alexander W.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Synchrotrons and storage rings deliver radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum at high repetition rates, and free electron lasers (FELs) produce radiation pulses with high peak brightness. However, at present few light sources can generate both high repetition rate and high brightness outside the optical range. We propose to create steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring to produce coherent radiation at a high repetition rate or in continuous wave (CW) mode. In this paper we describe a general mechanism for producing SSMB and give sample parameters for EUV lithography and sub-millimeter sources. We also describe a similar arrangement to produce two pulses with variable spacing for pump-probe experiments. With technological advances, SSMB could reach the soft X-ray range (< 10 nm).

  12. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation.

  13. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives

  14. Guide and example plan for development of state emergency response plans and systems for transportation: related radiation incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of their responsibilities for control of radiation sources and for minimizing unwarranted human exposures to radiation, State radiation control agencies (also referred to as radiological health agencies in some States) have developed or are in the process of developing plans and procedures for coping with emergency situations which may arise from the use, transport, or disposal of radioactive materials and other radiation sources. This guide and example plan has been prepared as an aid to radiation control agencies, emergency services organizations, and other public institutions which may have primary or supportive roles in radiation emergency response planning. This document focuses on planning, training, and emergency action procedures for such organizations and is directed toward transportation-related radiation incidents

  15. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology

  16. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Awad A. [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Egleston, Brian [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Holliday, Emma [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eastwick, Gary [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology.

  17. On the feasibility of establishing the provenance of Australian Aboriginal artefacts using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and proton-induced X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, D. C.; Kubik, M. E.; Sterns, M.

    2007-09-01

    Museums and galleries in Australia have extensive collections of Aboriginal artefacts in their custody. In particular, the National Museum of Australia and the National Gallery of Australia are custodians of works of very considerable significance, in both cultural and financial terms. Art fraud can occur, documentation relating to artefacts can be mislaid, or the artefacts can be incorrectly filed. Because of this, it has become essential to establish protocols for the objective determination of the provenance of artefacts through scientific tests. For the work reported here we are concerned with the comparison of very small quantities of materials, paint scrapings from artefacts. Scrapings from artefacts of unknown provenance are compared with those from artefacts of known provenance, and the database established using an extended set of analytical techniques by Kubik. We describe here our use of synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) to determine the mineral phase compositions of very small amounts of pigment material (<50 μg), and the use of PIXE to give their atomic compositions to a threshold level of 1 ppm for similar masses of material.

  18. Manifestation of topological surface electron states in the photoelectromagnetic effect induced by terahertz laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeeva, A. V.; Egorova, S. G.; Chernichkin, V. I.; Tamm, M. E.; Yashina, L. V.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Plank, H.; Danilov, S. N.; Ryabova, L. I.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that measurements of the photoelectromagnetic effect using terahertz laser radiation may provide a unique opportunity to discriminate between the topological surface states and other highly conductive surface electron states. We performed a case study of mixed (Bi{}1-xIn x )2Se3 crystals undergoing a topological phase transformation due to the transition from the inverse to the direct electron energy spectrum in the crystal bulk at variation of the composition x. We show that for the topological insulator phase, the photoelectromagnetic effect amplitude is defined by the number of incident radiation quanta, whereas for the trivial insulator phase, it depends on the power in a laser pulse irrespective of its wavelength. We assume that such behavior is attributed to a strong damping of the electron–electron interaction in the topological insulator phase compared to the trivial insulator.

  19. Hadronic Contributions to R and G-2 from Initial-State-Radiation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Denis, 1; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2012-04-06

    I review the recent efforts to improve the precision of the prediction of the anomalous moment of the muon, in particular of the hadronic contribution of the vacuum polarization, which is the contribution with the largest uncertainty. Focus is given to the recent result for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by the BaBar collaboration, obtained using events with radiation in the initial state.

  20. Indirect evidence that ultraviolet-B radiation mitigates multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    This article describes on the relationship of the relative prevalence of persons dying with multiple sclerosis with the latitude of the population centroid of those affected in each of the United States. Regression to zero prevalence occurs at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude where the Sun is at zenith on the summer solstice and where ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is least attenuated. This observation supports UVR as a mitigating force in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26163947

  1. Indirect evidence that ultraviolet-B radiation mitigates multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    This article describes on the relationship of the relative prevalence of persons dying with multiple sclerosis with the latitude of the population centroid of those affected in each of the United States. Regression to zero prevalence occurs at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude where the Sun is at zenith on the summer solstice and where ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is least attenuated. This observation supports UVR as a mitigating force in multiple sclerosis.

  2. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  3. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  4. The Australian National University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2007-01-01

    The Australian National University was established by Federal Parliament in 1946 with a mission to bring credit to the nation and to be one of the world’s great universities.It was the country’s only full-time research university at the time,and had no undergraduate teaching responsibilities.

  5. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, M. J.; W. Hutchinson

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  6. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Langroo, R.; Peggie, J.R. [Australian Radiation Laboratory. Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Lyons, R.G. [University of Auckland, Auckland, (New Zealand). Department of Physics; James, J.M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Chemisty

    1996-02-01

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m{sup -3}. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors) 7 refs., 10 tabs., 2 figs.

  7. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m-3. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors)

  8. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  9. The influence of microwave radiation on the state of chromatin in human cells

    CERN Document Server

    Shckorbatov, Y G; Grabina, V A; Kolchigin, N N; Batrakov, D O; Kalashnikov, V V; Ivanchenko, D D; Bykov, V N

    2008-01-01

    Isolated human buccal epithelium cell were irradiated by microwaves at frequency f=35 GHz and surface power density E=30 mcW/cm2. The state of chromatin in human cells was determined by methodsof light and electron microscopy. The state of cell membranes was evaluated by the method of vital indigo carmine staining. The microwave-induced condensation of chromatin in human cells was revealed. Left side circulary polarized waves induced less effect than linearly polarized radiation. The linearly polarized electromagnetic waves induced cell membrane damage revealed by the increase of cell stainability. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the mechanisms of biologica effect of electromagnetic waves.

  10. Radiative transition probabilities for all vibrational levels in the X 1Sigma(+) state of HF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Warren T.; Stwalley, William C.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Valderrama, Giuseppe L.; Berry, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent analyses have led to an experimentally-based potential energy curve for the ground state of HF which includes nonadiabatic corrections and which joins smoothly to the long-range potential at an accurately determined dissociation limit. Using this potential curve and a new ab initio dipole moment function, accurate radiative transition probabilities among all vibrational levels of the ground state of HF have been calculated for selected rotational quantum numbers. Comparisons of Einstein A spontaneous emission coefficients, dipole moment absorption matrix elements, and Herman-Wallis factors for absorption bands are presented.

  11. Environmental radiation monitoring of low-level wastes by the State of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, A.W.; Mooney, R.R.; Erickson, J.L. [Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1989-11-01

    The Washington State Department of Health, as the state`s regulatory agency for radiation, monitors several forms of low-level radioactive wastes. The monitoring is done to assess the potential impact on the environment and on public health. The emphasis of the monitoring program is placed on the solid and liquid wastes from defense activities on the Hanford Reservation, commercial wastes at the site located on leased land at Hanford and uranium mill tailings in Northeastern Washington. Although not classified as low-level waste, monitoring is also periodically conducted at selected landfills and sewage treatment facilities and other licensees, where radioactive wastes are known or suspected to be present. Environmental pathways associated with waste disposal are monitored independently, and/or in conjunction with the waste site operators to verify their results and evaluate their programs. The Department also participates in many site investigations conducted by site operators and other agencies, and conducts it`s own special investigations when deemed necessary. Past investigations and special projects have included allegations of adverse environmental impact of I-129, uranium in ground water, impacts of wastes on the agricultural industry, radioactivity in seeps into the Columbia River from waste sites, identifying lost waste sites at Hanford, differentiating groundwater contamination from defense versus commercial sources, and radioactivity in municipal landfills and sewers. The state`s environmental radiation monitoring program has identified and verified a number of environmental problems associated with radioactive waste disposal, but has, to date, identified no adverse offsite impacts to public health.

  12. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/psi gamma gamma Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Y K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+e- -> (J/psi gamma gamma) gamma and e+e- -> (J/psi pi- pi+) gamma where the hard photon radiated from an initial e+e- collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/psi gamma gamma we consider J/psi pi0, J/psi eta, chi_{c1} gamma, and chi_{c2} gamma candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e+e- measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/psi gamma gamma channels in the Y(4260) mass region.

  13. Analysis of modern state of radiation purification technologies of water polluted with oil products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: this work the modern state of methods and technologies on radiation purification of waste and sea water polluted with oil products is analyzed. Technologies based on ultraviolet (UV), electroplasma, magnet and radiation purification are considered. It is shown, that radionuclide - installations have following advantages: 1) for operational personal the specific qualification is not required and personnel quantity may be reduced to minimum (2-3 person for equipment); 2) high penetrability of - radiation; 3) low dose rate = 10 Gy/s (10 Vt/kg). These technologies have also significance economic, ecologic, and other advantages versus to existing traditional methods. It is also shown, that among radiation purification methods of waste and sea water electron-beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: to decrease the concentration of harmful ingredients down to limits. It is also shown that among of technologies of radiation purification of waste and sea water an electron -beam treatment has specific actuality. It allows: a) to decrease concentration of harmful ingredients down to limits acceptable purification system; b) to increase of clarity of water by removing of color matters; c) to produce purification without using of additional ingredients. The technology of application of frequency high-current electron beams for purification and disinfection of water also is considered. The advantages of this technology are : simultaneous action on all water parameters; absence of consumed materials; multiple-factor action on all chemical impurities; affection of microorganisms of all types; flexibility and simplicity of operation of purification degree by increasing/decreasing of dose rateIn present work it is also shown that one of perspective directions of radiation purification is interfacial action of radiation and heat. The radiation-thermal method of purification of water from heptanes is considered. It is shown, that at absorbed dose of 2-3 kGy, at a

  14. Analysis of microscopic magnitudes of radiative blast waves launched in xenon clusters with collisional-radiative steady-state simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael; Espinosa, G; Gil de la Fe, Juan Miguel; Florido, Ricardo; Garcia Rubiano, Jesus; Mendoza, M. A.; Martel Escobar, Carlos; Mínguez Torres, Emilio; Symes, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Smith, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiative shock waves play a pivotal role in the transport energy into the stellar medium. This fact has led to many efforts to scale the astrophysical phenomena to accessible laboratory conditions and their study has been highlighted as an area requiring further experimental investigations. Low density material with high atomic mass is suitable to achieve radiative regime, and, therefore, low density xenon gas is commonly used for the medium in which the radiative shocks such as radiative bl...

  15. Shock-induced solid-state chemical reactivity studies using time-resolved radiation pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved radiation pyrometry has been used to study materials which undergo solid-state chemical reactions due to shock loading. Shock-induced chemical reactivity in solids is fundamentally different than that in high explosives and other energetic materials because, if no volatiles are present, the reaction products end up in the condensed, rather than the vapor, state. Bulk property changes accompanying the solid-state reactions may therefore be too small to be observable with wave profile or shock-velocity measurements. However, some solid-state reactions, such as that between metallic nickel and aluminum, are exothermic enough to give rise to a measurable increase in temperature, so pyrometry can be used to detect the reactions. Unfortunately, these measurements are complicated by the large temperature increases generated by other sources. Possible mechanisms for generation of these high temperatures, and their effect on the chemical reaction, are suggested

  16. State-Space Realization of the Wave-Radiation Force within FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A.; Alves, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-06-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to find a state-space model for the wave-radiation forces. In this paper, four methods were compared, two in the frequency domain and two in the time domain. The frequency-response function and the impulse response of the resulting state-space models were compared against the ones derived by the numerical code WAMIT. The implementation of the state-space module within the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool was verified, comparing the results against the previously implemented numerical convolution method. The results agreed between the two methods, with a significant reduction in required computational time when using the state-space module.

  17. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history

  18. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  19. Aboriginal Placenames : Naming and re-naming the Australian landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Hercus, Luise; Koch, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Aboriginal approaches to the naming of places across Australia differ radically from the official introduced Anglo-Australian system. However, many of these earlier names have been incorporated into contemporary nomenclature, with considerable reinterpretations of their function and form. Recently, state jurisdictions have encouraged the adoption of a greater number of Indigenous names, sometimes alongside the accepted Anglo-Australian terms, around Sydney Harbour, for example. In some cases,...

  20. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  1. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h−1 to 500 nGy h−1. The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h−1. This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h−1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  2. Radiative Forcing over the Conterminous United States due to 1973 to 2000 Land Cover Albedo Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data, were used to study the impact of LCLU change on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 84 ecoregions across the conterminous United States. A net continental scale negative radiative forcing of -0.008 Wm-2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested land and increasing developed land. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative (as low as -1.303 Wm-2) due to forest loss and the most positive forcings (up to 0.358 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grassland/shrub. In snow prone ecoregions, where the dominant LCLU transitions were between snow-hiding (e.g., forest) and snow-revealing (e.g., agriculture) LCLU classes, the negative and positive ecoregion forcing estimates were amplified. The results make an important contribution to advancing understanding of the role of LCLU change on the climate system.

  3. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher; Roy, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently available satellite land cover land use (LCLU) and albedo data are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 36 ecoregions covering 43% of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-free broadband albedo values are derived from Landsat LCLU classification maps located using a stratified random sampling methodology to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to LCLU change may be disguised when spatially and temporally explicit data sets are not used. The radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive forcings (up to 0.284 Wm−2) due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative forcings (as low as −0.247 Wm−2) due to forest loss. For the 36 ecoregions considered a small net positive forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.012 Wm−2 is estimated.

  4. The Equation of State and Duration to Radiation Domination After Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozanov, Kaloian D

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the equation of state after inflation and provide an upper bound on the duration before radiation domination by taking the nonlinear dynamics of the fragmented inflaton field into account. A broad class of single-field inflationary models with observationally consistent flattening of the potential at a scale $M$ away from the origin, $V(\\phi)\\propto |\\phi|^{2n}$ near the origin, and where the couplings to other fields are ignored are included in our analysis. We find that the equation of state parameter $w\\rightarrow 0$ for $n=1$ and $w\\rightarrow 1/3$ (after sufficient time) for $n\\gtrsim 1$. We calculate how the number of $e$-folds to radiation domination depends on both $n$ and $M$ when $M\\sim m_{\\rm pl}$, whereas when $M\\ll m_{\\rm pl}$, we find that the duration to radiation domination is negligible. Our results are explained in terms of a linear instability analysis in an expanding universe, scaling arguments, and are supported by detailed 3+1 dimensional lattice simulations. We show how our...

  5. Modeling detector response in solid-state systems for radiation therapy and radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugtenburg, R.P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    In order for the many advantageous properties of solid-state dosimeters to be realised in clinic, strategies must be evolved for the calibration of detector systems for an ever expanding range of radiation sources including spectrally complex and mixed radiation fields. Monte Carlo models of the source and detector systems provide a means to account in a precise way for energy absorbed in the detector allowing for primary and secondary radiation processes including multiple scattering. Solid- state dosimeters including Si diodes, MOSFET, diamond detectors and doped optical fibres have been calibrated for dose in monoenergetic synchrotron X-rays in the range 5-50 keV, for quasi monoenergetic X-rays sources from 20-200 keV and for megavoltage X-ray and proton sources, such as are used in radical radiation therapy. With careful consideration of the elemental composition of the detector it is possible to achieve high quality agreement (2-3%) between measurement and Monte Carlo models of the variation of the detector response over a wide energy range. This information is needed in radiation therapy dosimetry where, for large external X-ray beams, detectors see a mixture of high energy primary photons and low energy (e.g. Compton scattered and pair-production-annihilation) photons. Typically, for solid-state detectors, different cavity theories are required for the two energy groups. In addition, high-Z constituents in detectors lead to an enhanced photoelectric absorption, which in the case of pure silicon detectors is up to 8 times greater than the tissue equivalent response. Information from maps of the elemental composition in the detectors, obtained via XRF and PIXE, is used in the models. Monte Carlo models are also being developed for contributions to the response from electron transport, including the microdosimetric response of detectors. Current Monte Carlo codes are able to handle large variations in density that typify tissue equivalent gas

  6. Effect of mitochondrial energetic state on radiation-induced DNA internucleosomal fragmentation in thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the potential effect of energetic state of mitochondria on apoptosis in thymocytes induced by ionizing radiation, the effect of various mitochondria energy potential on DNA internucleosome fragmentation is studied. Thymocytes of rats-males were exposed to radiation of GUPOS installation (137Cs) at 8 Gy dose, dose rate - 1.8 Gy/min. It is shown that the irradiation stimulates the DNA fragmentation during thymocytes incubation, but in case of incubation with mitochondria energy potential inhibitors the amount of dead cells does not exceed the reference level. It is proposed that internucleosome fragmentation suppression by mitochondria energy potential inhibitors is connected with the limitation of energy incoming in the ATP form

  7. Comparative effect of radioactive radiation on roots in coastal and hinterland locations in Akwa Ibom state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of the radiation levels in root crops from Ibeno (an oil producing area) and Uyo, (a non oil producing area) in Akwa Ibom state was carried out. The radioactivity level in cassava, potato, sweet yam and coco yam was investigated. Result shows that the radiation level in root samples in Uyo ranges between 8.58 mBqg''-''1 and 1.06 mBqg''-''1 as compared with those from Ibeno, which ranges between 34.7 mBqg''-''1 and 3.7 mBqg''-''1. Yam and cassava samples from Ibeno have the highest radioactive levels of 34.7 mBqg''-''1 while water yam sample in Uyo has the highest radioactive level of radioactive materials in roots than Uyo. This is probably due to the oil producing activities in the area

  8. Radiative capture of nucleons at astrophysical energies with single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative capture of nucleons at energies of astrophysical interest is one of the most important processes for nucleosynthesis. The nucleon capture can occur either by a compound nucleus reaction or by a direct process. The compound reaction cross sections are usually very small, especially for light nuclei. The direct capture proceeds either via the formation of a single-particle resonance or a non-resonant capture process. In this work we calculate radiative capture cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for nuclei in the mass region A<20 using single-particle states. We carefully discuss the parameter fitting procedure adopted in the simplified two-body treatment of the capture process. Then we produce a detailed list of cases for which the model works well. Useful quantities, such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients, are obtained and compared to published data.

  9. On the Interaction of Extreme-Low-Frequency Radiation with Living Matter's Coherent Spiral States

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, Konstantin

    1996-01-01

    Conventional physics cannot explain bioeffects caused by ELF fields [1]. A (double) resonance interaction of ELF radiation with the highly sub-thermal coherent motion of spiral waves in living matter (LM) is suggested. The (geo)magnetic cyclotron resonance (CR) absorption by the constituent ions can drastically change their non-thermal degrees of freedom in the spiral state, destroying their pattern, which is heuristically assumed to be part of the cell signaling. Combining ELF irradiation with calcium imaging to unravel the suggested mechanism, a new instrument in biomedicine might emerge. These fascinating waves, being part of the bio-machinery, might provide insight in cancer, embryogenesis, etc., as they are affected by ELF radiation in an as yet unknown manner [2-6].

  10. Nuclear and radiation techniques - state of art and development trends; Techniki jadrowe i radiacyjne - stan obecny oraz kierunki rozwoju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The state of art and development trends of nuclear and radiation techniques in Poland and worldwide have been presented. Among them the radiometric gages, radiation technologies, radiotracer methods and measuring systems for pipeline and vessels, brightness control have been described and their applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection have been shown and discussed. 35 refs, 1 fig.

  11. Effect of bound-state dressing in laser-assisted radiative recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert A.; Seipt, Daniel; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    We present a theoretical study on the recombination of a free electron into the ground state of a hydrogenlike ion in the presence of an external laser field. Emphasis is placed on the effects caused by the laser dressing of the residual ionic bound state. To investigate how this dressing affects the total and angle-differential cross section of laser-assisted radiative recombination (LARR) we apply first-order perturbation theory and the separable Coulomb-Volkov continuum ansatz. Using this approach, detailed calculations are performed for low-Z hydrogenlike ions and laser intensities in the range from IL=1012 to 1013W/cm2 . It is seen that the total cross section as a function of the laser intensity is remarkably affected by the bound-state dressing. Moreover, the laser dressing becomes manifest as asymmetries in the angular distribution and the (energy) spectrum of the emitted recombination photons.

  12. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  13. The broad base of radiation processing using cobalt-60 in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, J. A.

    Only recently, an integrated, highly interdependent radiation processing industry based on the use of cobalt-60 has become established in the United States. The principal participants include nearly all the suppliers of disposable medical supplies, several major chemical companies, several privately owned corporations of modest size, the Crown Corporation of a foreign government, and several hundred firms which purchase radiation processing service. The total investment in radiation processing plant and equipment is on the order of fifty million dollars, and the annual retail value of products processed is in the many hundreds of millions of dollars. In all there are twenty-six process irradiators operating in fourteen different states, utilizing nearly twenty million Curies of cobalt-60. Sixteen of these systems are owned and operated by companies which process their own products more or less exclusively. The other ten are owned and operated by six different contract processors who produce and sell little if any product of their own manufacture. The successful efforts of the industry to develop new products and processes are supplemented by the activities of dozens of corporate, government and university research and test facilities located throughout the country. Several firms have designed and constructed viable radiation processing plants, and among the operating medical supply irradiators, there are four different types of conveying mechanism that have proven to be viable. There are two established suppliers of cobalt-60 sources in the megacurie range. Based upon the number of new plants that have been announced, ordered and are under construction, the base appears to be growing at the rate of about 20 percent per year, and many of the existing plants are experiencing increased utilization.

  14. Australian Hackers and Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Warren

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to look at the way hackers act and ways in which society can protect itself. The paper will show the current views and attitudes of hackers in an Australian context. The paper will also include a case study to show how a hacking incident can develop and how technology can be used to protect against hacking.

  15. Current status and development perspectives of state nuclear and radiation safety regulation in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state radiation safety regulation in Russia stems from the establishment in 1946 of the state radiation monitoring service (the RNC 'Kurchatov Istitute' nowadays). The nuclear safety was subject to control later. Since 1963 NPP safety was brought under oversight by various organisations. It should be noted that the main emphasis was laid on controlling nuclear safety. Gosatomnadzor of Russia was shaped as it is now in 1991 (first as the State Committee, then - the State Committee under the President of the Russian Federation, then - the Federal Service and finally - the Federal Authority). Gosatomnadzor of Russia has become not only a supervisory, but also regulatory body. The share of competence of Gosatomnadzor of Russia was extended to cover, along with NPPs and nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities and national economy organizations as well as military facilities. Later, by Decrees of the President of the Russian Federation (1993, 1995) the Ministry of Defense and a number of Minatom's facilities and organizations were taken out from the Gosatomnadzor of Russia's oversight. Presently, basic areas of activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia being the state authority for nuclear and radiation safety regulation, spring from the Federal Law on 'Atomic Energy Use' and are defined by the 'Statute of the Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia' approved by the Government of the Russian Federation in 2002. Among these areas are the following: a) Development, approval and enactment of federal rules and regulations in the area of atomic energy use; b) Licensing with the aim of ensuring safety of activities in the area of atomic energy use; Organization of safety expert review of nuclear installations, radiation sources and storage facilities; Oversight for compliance with nuclear and radiation safety rules and regulations as well as license conditions; Conduct of inspections by Gosatomnadzor of Russia's inspection departments with regard to

  16. Mean annual solar radiation in the United States Pacific Northwest (1991-2005) summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent mean annual solar radiation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...

  17. Macroscopic Degeneracy of Zero-Mode Rotating Surface States in 3D Dirac and Weyl Semimetals under Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, José; Molina, Rafael A

    2016-04-15

    We investigate the development of novel surface states when 3D Dirac or Weyl semimetals are placed under circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. We find that the hybridization between inverted Floquet bands opens, in general, a gap, which closes at so-called exceptional points found for complex values of the momentum. This corresponds to the appearance of midgap surface states in the form of evanescent waves decaying from the surface exposed to the radiation. We observe a phenomenon reminiscent of Landau quantization by which the midgap surface states get a large degeneracy proportional to the radiation flux traversing the surface of the semimetal. We show that all of these surface states carry angular current, leading to an angular modulation of their charge that rotates with the same frequency of the radiation, which should manifest in the observation of a macroscopic chiral current in the irradiated surface. PMID:27127980

  18. Huntington disease in indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, P K; McGrath, F

    2008-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) in indigenous Australians is a poorly analysed and difficult problem. This study addresses the issue of HD in remote indigenous Australian populations in the north-west of Western Australia. Proband identification, clinical assessment, neurogenetic studies and pedigree analysis led to the discovery of HD in the 63-year-old male proband and his family. HD in remote indigenous Australian communities is a challenging diagnostic and management problem compounded by the complexity of distance. PMID:18290828

  19. Radiation grafting of maleic anhydride onto polypropylene in solid state via ultrafine blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiumin

    2014-05-01

    A novel method to prepare maleic anhydride grafting onto poly (propylene) (PP-g-MAH) was described. It was performed by γ-irradiation in solid state via ultrafine blend in the absence of any initiator and the grafting mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results. First, ultrafine blend of MAH and PP was prepared through ultrasonic initiation in melt state and then cooled rapidly. Second, the blend was radiated by γ-irradiation in the circumstance of atmosphere. Effects of irradiation dose and MAH concentration on the amount of grafted MAH were investigated. Compared with the conventional solid-state radiation grafting method, PP-g-MAH obtained via this method shows a higher graft rate of MAH. This novel method also has the advantages of solventless, energy efficient, low cost and simple operation. Furthermore, it is very easy to get purified products. The molecular structures of grafted copolymer were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscope were used to determine the degree of crystallinity and crystalline structure.

  20. Radiative lifetime and quenching constants of the PF(A3II) state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Raybone, D.; Setser, Donald W.

    1993-06-01

    The radiative lifetime and the quenching rate constants of the PF(A3PI0,1,2) state have been measured using a microwave discharge to generate PF(X3(Sigma) -) in a flow reactor incorporating laser-induced fluorescence. A radiative lifetime of 4.2 +/- 0.2 microsecond(s) has been determined for a 300 K Boltzmann distribution of rotational and spin- orbit states of PF(A,v' equals 0). The two-body quenching rate constants for PF(A3PI) by diatomic and polyatomic molecules and rare gases were determined at 300 K from the pressure dependence of the first-order decay constants. Electronic quenching by He, Ar, CF4 and SF6 is inefficient and upper limits to these deactivation rate constants are 2 - 4 X 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Except for highly fluorinated molecules, the quenching constants for most molecules are in the range of 0.05 - 4.0 X 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The available data suggest that the PF(A3$PI0,1,2) state has some promise as a potential UV laser candidate, providing that an efficient excitation method can be discovered.

  1. Electronic Transition Dipole Moment and Radiative Lifetime Calculations of Lithium Dimer Ion-Pair States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanli, Aydin; Beecher, David; Lyyra, Marjatta; Magnier, Sylvie; Ahmed, Ergin

    2016-05-01

    Lithium dimer molecular electronic states exhibit double wells and shoulders due to the interaction with the Li+ + Li- ion-pair configuration. The double well behavior is predominantly observed for higher lying electronic states of 1Σg+ symmetry at larger internuclear distance. The ion-pair character of these potential energy curves makes their lifetimes also interesting because of the unusual behavior of their transition dipole moments which exhibit rapid changes around potential curve shoulders and double wells. In this work we present a computational study of lifetimes and transition dipole moment matrix elements for the lithium dimer ion-pair states. We report here the ab initio calculated electronic transition dipole moments between the n1Σg+ states and the A1Σu+ state, that vary strongly as a function of internuclear distance. In addition, we have calculated the radiative lifetimes, τ, of these ion-pair states and compare them with experimental results from literature when available.

  2. Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.

    2009-05-01

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * in initial-state-radiation events, from e+e- annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D Dmacr , D* Dmacr , and D* Dmacr * mass spectra show clear evidence of several ψ resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260)→D* Dmacr or Y(4260)→D* Dmacr *.

  3. Entanglement of two-level atoms'quantum states in a strong thermal radiation field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deng-yu; XIE Li-jun; TANG Shi-qing; ZHAN Xiao-gui; GAO Feng

    2008-01-01

    The two-level atom is described by Pauli sign and environment is described by infinite harmonic particle thermal reser-voir.We have studied the entanglement of two-level atoms which are put in the strongly thermal radiation field.The two-level atoms' re-ducible density rectangular array is obtained.We discuss the properties of entanglement by virtue of concurrence.It is shown that the two two-level atoms initially situated in different coherent superposition states,entanglement of atoms have obvious dissimilarity.

  4. Coherence effects between the initial and final state radiation in a dense QCD medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these proceedings contribution we review our recent results of medium modifications to the coherence pattern between the initial and final state radiation. We study single gluon production off a highly energetic parton that undergoes a hard scattering and subsequently crosses a dense QCD medium of finite size. Multiple scatterings lead to a partial suppression of the interferences between different emitters that opens the phase space for large angle emissions. We briefly discuss the generalization of this setup to describe gluon production in the case of pA collisions by including finite length and energy corrections. The configuration studied here may have phenomenological consequences in high-energy nuclear collisions

  5. Radiation protection knowledge transfer according to the state of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19th summer school of radiation protection took place in 2015 in Berlin. The main topics were effects and hazards of ionizing radiation, trends and legal regulations in radiation protection, dosimetry and measuring techniques, radiation exposure in nuclear medicine, radiation exposure in industry, radiation exposure in the nuclear technology - final disposal and dismantling problems Several case studies covered the issues accident management, personal and environmental dosimetry, skin contamination, modern techniques in medicine, radiation protection for radiography.

  6. Characterization of radiative properties of Nd2O3 doped phosphate and silicate glasses for solid state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd2O3 doped calcium aluminium phosphate and calcium aluminium silicate glasses prepared to compare their absorption and emission properties. Radiative lifetime of the excited state 4F3/2 derived by Judd-Ofelt theory applied to the absorption spectra. Using the photoluminescence spectrometer the steady state emission and relaxation time from excited energy level recorded under green light excitation. Phosphate glass has higher emission cross-section, higher radiative lifetime but less quantum efficiency due to non-radiative quenching through hydroxyl ions compared to silicate glass for Nd3+:4F3/2→4I9/2 emission

  7. Radiation-induced off-state leakage current in commercial power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total dose hardness of several commercial power MOSFET technologies is examined. After exposure to 20 krad(SiO2) most of the n- and p-channel devices examined in this work show substantial (2 to 6 orders of magnitude) increases in off-state leakage current. For the n-channel devices, the increase in radiation-induced leakage current follows standard behavior for moderately thick gate oxides, i.e., the increase in leakage current is dominated by large negative threshold voltage shifts, which cause the transistor to be partially on even when no bias is applied to the gate electrode. N-channel devices biased during irradiation show a significantly larger leakage current increase than grounded devices. The increase in leakage current for the p-channel devices, however, was unexpected. For the p-channel devices, it is shown using electrical characterization and simulation that the radiation-induced leakage current increase is related to an increase in the reverse bias leakage characteristics of the gated diode which is formed by the drain epitaxial layer and the body. This mechanism does not significantly contribute to radiation-induced leakage current in typical p-channel MOS transistors. The p-channel leakage current increase is nearly identical for both biased and grounded irradiations and therefore has serious implications for long duration missions since even devices which are usually powered off could show significant degradation and potentially fail.

  8. Solar radiation pumped solid state of lasers for Solar Power Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruiyi [New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Laser Solar Power Satellites (L-SPS) is the most promising way to overcome global energy and environmental and economical problems. The purpose was to use the favorable combination of solar radiation, modern lasers and the extremely promising phenomenon Optical Phase Conjugation (OPC). Direct conversion of solar energy to energy of a high-power laser beam has the advantage of high efficiency and precise energy transportation. In this paper, direct solar radiation pumping of the laser is compared with the pumping using the intermediate stage of the conversion of the solar radiation in electrical energy. Possible solid-state lasers that can be used in L-SPS are also discussed (including optical system and cooling system). [Spanish] Los Satelites de Energia Solar Laser (L-SPS) son la forma mas prometedora para contrarrestar los problemas globales de energia, ambientales y problemas economicos. El proposito fue el de usar la combinacion favorable de radiacion solar, laseres modernos y el fenomeno extremadamente prometedor de conjugacion de fase optica (OPC). La conversion directa de energia solar a energia de un rayo laser de alta potencia tiene la ventaja de la alta eficiencia y precision de la transportacion de la energia. En este documento la radiacion solar directa impulsada por el laser se compara con la impulsion usando el estado intermedio de conversion de la radiacion solar en energia electrica. Tambien se analizan los posibles laseres de estado solido que pueden usarse en L-SPS (incluyendo el sistema optico y el sistema de enfriamiento).

  9. Intensity modulated Australian radiation therapy (IMART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Forward and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods will be discussed. IMRT consists of providing a number of differently weighted infield beam segments with the dose from each segment being defined by the multi leaf collimator (MLC) shape and beam weighting. Inverse planned distributions are achieved by the radiotherapy planning computer (RTPC) using an iterative optimisation method to reach a dose solution. With the pinnacle RTPC the number of infield segments to achieve an approximation to the continuous segmented solution can be chosen then the dose is forward computed using these discrete segments. Quality assurance consists of placing the same segmented fields onto a water phantom on the RTPC. Then dose profiles taken at dmax are compared with film maps taken in the same real geometry on the linear accelerator. The film is scanned using a Vidar film scanner and density to dose conversion is achieved by fitting an exponential function to normalisation films. The film dose profiles are then compared with the RTPC dose profiles. A 3% match between film and RTPC has been achieved with the dose profiles provided care is taken with the leaf delivery sequence. There are some leaf delivery non idealities which the dosimetry films show. For example the matchline effect on the Varian 120 leaf MLC has been measured as a 31% hot line which occurs if one leaf drives to where the other leaf was. This effect is mainly due to the rounded leaf ends causing penumbra asymmetry whereby the top of the penumbral profile is slightly different to the bottom. This effect can be reduced by using software offsets of the leaf positions or by simply having a small number of segments with minimal leaf overlap. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  10. Study of the Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar System

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; De La Vaissière, C; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A

    2007-01-01

    A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D Dbar events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D Dbar mass spectrum shows clear evidence of the psi(3770) plus other structures near 3.9, 4.1, and 4.4 GeV/c^2. No evidence for Y(4260) -> D Dbar is observed, leading to an upper limit of B(Y(4260) -> D Dbar)/B(Y(4260) -> J/psi pi+ pi-) < 1.0 at 90 % confidence level.

  11. A Numerical Model for Ion Charge Distribution of Plasmas in Collisional Radiative Steady State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yaoyong; GUO Yonghui; QIU Aici; KUAI Bin

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model for the charge state distribution of plasmas in a collisional ra-diative steady state (CRSS) is established by averaging over the atomic process rate coefficients in universal kinetic equations.It is used to calculate the mean ion charge and ion population for a given temperature and density of the plasmas,ranging from low Z to high Z elements.The comparisons of the calculated results with those of other non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kinetics codes show that this model possesses acceptable precision.Furthermore,the NLTE effects are investigated by virtue of the model,and the differences between CRSS and LTE models for low density plasmas are quite evident.

  12. A conceptual design of the set-up for solid state spectroscopy with free electron laser and insertion device radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Makhov, V N

    2001-01-01

    The set-up for complex solid state spectroscopy with the use of enhanced properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers is proposed. Very high flux and pulsed properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers offer the possibility for the use of such powerful techniques as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for the studies of excited states of electronic excitations or defects in solids. The power density of radiation can become high enough for one more method of exited-state spectroscopy: transient optical absorption spectroscopy. The set-up is supposed to combine the EPR/ODMR spectrometer, i.e. cryostat supplied with superconducting magnet and microwave system, and the optical channels for excitation (by radiation from insertion devices or free electron laser) and detection of luminescence (i.e. primary and secondary monochromators). The set-up can be used both for 'conventional' spectroscopy of solids (reflec...

  13. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano,; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL,

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  14. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest

  15. Radiative charge transfer lifetime of the excited state of (NaCa)$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, O P; Michels, H J; Smith, W W; Makarov, Oleg P.

    2003-01-01

    New experiments were proposed recently to investigate the regime of cold atomic and molecular ion-atom collision processes in a special hybrid neutral-atom--ion trap under high vacuum conditions. The collisional cooling of laser pre-cooled Ca$^+$ ions by ultracold Na atoms is being studied. Modeling this process requires knowledge of the radiative lifetime of the excited singlet A$^1\\Sigma^+$ state of the (NaCa)$^+$ molecular system. We calculate the rate coefficient for radiative charge transfer using a semiclassical approach. The dipole radial matrix elements between the ground and the excited states, and the potential curves were calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent field and M\\"oller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (CASSCF/MP2) with an extended Gaussian basis, 6-311+G(3df). The semiclassical charge transfer rate coefficient was averaged over a thermal Maxwellian distribution. In addition we also present elastic collision cross sections and the spin-exchange cross section. The ra...

  16. Mixing state of aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Radiative forcing and heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.; Ramachandran, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols are a major atmospheric variable which perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiation balance by absorbing and scattering the solar and terrestrial radiation. Aerosols are produced by natural and anthropogenic processes. The presence of different types of aerosol over a location and aerosols transported from long-range can give rise to different mixing states because of aging and interaction among the different aerosol species. Knowledge of the mixing state of aerosols is important for an accurate assessment of aerosols in climate forcing, as assumptions regarding the mixing state of aerosol and its effect on optical properties can give rise to uncertainties in modeling their direct and indirect effects [1]. Seasonal variations in mixing states of aerosols over an urban (Kanpur) and a rural location (Gandhi College) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) are determined using the measured and modeled aerosol optical properties, and the impact of aerosol mixing state on aerosol radiative forcing are investigated. IGP is one of the most populated and polluted river basins in the world, rich in fertile lands and agricultural production. Kanpur is an urban, industrial and densely populated city, and has several large/small scale industries and vehicles, while Gandhi College in IGP is a rural village, located southeast of Kanpur. Aerosol optical properties obtained from Aerosol Robotic Network sun/sky radiometers [2] over these two environmentally distinct locations in Indo-Gangetic Plain are used in the study, along with aerosol vertical profiles obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) lidar observations. Probable mixing state of aerosols is determined utilizing the aerosol optical properties viz., aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter. The coated-sphere Mie calculation requires the refractive index of core and shell species, and the radius of core and shell particles. Core to shell radius

  17. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  18. Dependence of erythemally weighted UV radiation on geographical parameters in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinli; Gao, Wei; Davis, John; Olson, Becky; Janson, George; Slusser, James

    2007-09-01

    The relationship between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface and geographical parameters is helpful in estimating the spatial distribution of UV radiation, which provides useful information to evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced UV levels on human health, agriculture, environment, and ecosystems for sustainable development. Measurements of erythemally weighted UV radiation at the sites of the United States Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (UVBMRP) monitoring network were analyzed to investigate the geographical distribution and seasonal variations. Twenty nine observation sites, which had continuous measurements during the recent six years, are selected for this study; twenty seven of them are distributed in the United States, including one in Hawaii and one in Alaska, and two of them are located in Canada along the United States border. The measurements were taken using the Yankee Environmental Systems Inc. (YES) UVB-1 ultraviolet pyranometer. This work focuses the data from the recent six years of 2001-2006 and the measurements during summer months (June-August) are emphasized. For each day, the measurements are integrated from sunrise to sunset to produce the daily UV dosage, which is then averaged for different seasons or for the whole year over the six years to generate the average daily UV dosage. A multivariable regression technique is exploited to characterize the dependence of UV dosages on geographical parameters, including latitude and altitude. The results show that, although there are many factors, such as clouds, ozone, aerosols, air pollutants, and haze, that affect the UV radiation intensity at a location, the latitude and altitude of the site are the primary factors that regulate the average daily UV dosage. On average over the last six years in the United States, more than 95% of the variability in averaged daily UV dosages can be explained by the latitude and altitude. Longitude is

  19. Morphological effects on the radiative properties of soot aerosols in different internally mixing states with sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative properties of soot aerosols largely depend on their mixing state and morphology factors. In this paper, we generated soot aggregates in four mixing states with sulfate, including bare soot, partly coated soot, heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. The number of monomers and fractal dimension of soot were varied in each mixing state while the radius of monomers was fixed at 0.025 μm. Using the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA), we calculated optical parameters relevant for climate forcing simulation at mid-visible wavelength (0.55 μm). Internal mixing results in enhanced absorption, scattering cross sections as well as the single scattering albedo. The enhancement ratio of the absorption is largest for heavily coated soot, which ranges from 1.5 to 1.65 with a soot volume fraction of 0.15 and is larger for soot with larger fractal dimension. The scattering cross section can be dramatically increased by factors larger than 10 when soot is heavily coated. The increasing of both the scattering cross section and the single scattering albedo is larger for soot aggregates with smaller number of monomers and fractal dimension. The asymmetry parameter is insensitive to the fractal dimension for heavily coated soot and soot with inclusion. Two simplified models including the homogeneous sphere model (HS) and the core shell sphere model (CS) were examined using the DDA results as references. The performance of the HS and CS model largely depends on the morphology factors and the mixing state of soot. For bare and partly coated soot, both the HS and CS model can introduce relative errors as large as several tens percent. For heavily coated soot, the HS model predicts the absorption with relative errors within 10%, while it overestimates the absorption with relative errors no larger than 20% for soot with inclusion. The HS model predicts the single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter with relative errors no larger than 10% for heavily

  20. Facilitating the Learning of All Students: The "Professional Positive" of Inclusive Practice in Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christopher; Scriven, Brooke; Durning, Sara; Downes, Carissa

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the positive aspects of inclusion in Australian primary schools through a historical account of the nation's journey to adopting current policies and practices. The authors suggest that across the different states the picture is positive as there are clear attempts to make Australian schools as inclusive as possible. The…

  1. Sustainability as a Cross-Curricular Priority in the Australian Curriculum: A Tasmanian Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; Hill, Allen; Emery, Sherridan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on an investigation into sustainability education in schools in the Australian state of Tasmania following the implementation of the Australian Curriculum. Sustainability is one of three cross-curriculum priorities in the new national curriculum and is the focus of this research (sustainability cross-curriculum priority…

  2. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. Methods and Materials: All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Results: Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the

  3. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsweiler, K.F.

    1984-05-01

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ..pi pi.. channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K/sup +/K/sup -/ is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi ..-->.. ..gamma..xi(2220))BR(xi(2220) ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -5/.

  4. Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 106 produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi → γπ+π- is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the π+π- final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ππ channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2+ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi → γ rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi → γK+K- is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2+ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0+ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi → γxi(2220))BR(xi(2220) → K+K-) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10-5

  5. Elements of change 1994. Climate-radiation feedbacks: The current state of the science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the details of the Climate-Radiation Feedback summer seminar. Topics include: radiative transfer; radiative properties of clouds; absorption of radiation in the atmosphere due to clouds; global cloud climatology; aerosols; general circulation models; and convection. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  6. Conterminous United States Surface Radiative Forcing due to Contemporary Land Cover Land Use Albedo Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Recently available Landsat land cover land use (LCLU) change information for four epochs, 1973-1980, 1980-1986, 1986-1992 and 1992-2000, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo and snow cover data are used to estimate LCLU albedo change surface radiative forcing for the conterminous United States (CONUS) for each epoch and for 1973 to 2000. Landsat 10 × 10 km or 20 × 20 km LCLU classification maps for 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992 and 2000 located using a stratified random sampling methodology with respect to 84 contiguous CONUS ecoregions are used to provide ecoregion and CONUS estimates. A CONUS scale warming (0.0037 Wm-2) due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 is estimated associated with decreasing agricultural and forested lands and increasing developed and grassland/shrublands. The 1986 to 1992 period had the highest overall CONUS forcing (0.0093 Wm-2) due to agricultural land conversion, attributed primarily to the 1985 Farm Bill that established the Conservation Reserve Program. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative forcings (as low as -0.8630 Wm-2) due to forest loss, and the most positive forcings (up to 0.2640 Wm-2) due to the conversion of grasslands/shrublands. These results make an important contribution to quantifying the role of LCLU change on the climate system, and underscore the need for repeat, wall-to-wall, spatially-explicit national LCLU mapping.

  7. Radiation Pressure and Mass Ejection in Rho-like States of GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, Joseph; Lee, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    We present a unifying scenario to address the physical origin of the diversity of X-ray lightcurves within the rho variability class of the microquasar GRS 1915+105. This 'heartbeat' state is characterized by a bright flare that recurs every ~50-100 seconds, but the profile and duration of the flares varies significantly from observation to observation. Based on a comprehensive, phase-resolved study of heartbeats in the RXTE archive, we demonstrate that very different X-ray lightcurves do not require origins in different accretion processes. Indeed, our detailed comparison of the phase-resolved spectra of a double-peaked oscillation and a single-peaked oscillation shows that different cycles can have basically similar X-ray spectral evolution. We argue that all heartbeat oscillations can be understood as the result of a combination of a thermal-viscous radiation pressure instability, a local Eddington limit in the disk, and a sudden, radiation-pressure-driven evaporation or ejection event in the inner accreti...

  8. The effect of bound state dressing in laser assisted radiative recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Robert Alexander; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical study on the recombination of a free electron into the ground state of a hydrogen-like ion in the presence of an external laser field. Emphasis is placed on the effects caused by the laser dressing of the residual ionic bound state. To investigate how this dressing affects the total and angle-differential cross section of laser assisted radiative recombination (LARR) we apply first-order perturbation theory and the separable Coulomb-Volkov-continuum ansatz. Using this approach detailed calculations were performed for low-$Z$ hydrogen like ions and laser intensities in the range from $I_L=10^{11}\\text{W/cm}^2$ to $I_L=10^{13}\\text{W/cm}^2$. It is seen that the total cross section as a function of the laser intensity is remarkably affected by the bound state dressing. Moreover the laser dressing becomes manifest as asymmetries in the angular distribution and the (energy) spectrum of the emitted recombination photons.

  9. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron-self Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value $\\dot M \\sim 3\\alpha\\ \\dot M_{\\rm Edd}$, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down onto the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenari...

  10. The Australian black coal industry: productivity commission inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    February 1999 saw the release of the final report of the Productivity Commission's inquiry into the Australian black coal industry. The report is a comprehensive examination of the state of play of the Australian coal industry, drawing from the Commission's own research, submissions from a range of stakeholders and the results of a benchmarking study which compared Australia's performance with world's best practice. Essentially, the report finds that recent reforms have improved productivity and some parts of the industry now perform very well. However, the report finds that further changes to federal industry awards and state legislation and regulation could significantly improve the performance of the industry overall

  11. Mapping the radiative and non-radiative local density of states in the near-field of a gold nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, D; Calabrese, M; Pierrat, R; Bardou, N; Collin, S; Carminati, R; Krachmalnicoff, V; De Wilde, Y

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for mapping the radiative and non-radiative decay rate of a fluorescent emitter in the near-field of a nanostructured sample. The approach is based on the simultaneous mapping of the fluorescence intensity and decay rate and on the rigorous application of the reciprocity theorem. Data analysis is based on an analytical calculation which is detailed in the paper. Experimental data are compared with exact numerical simulations and we show a good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment, which proves the validity of the method.

  12. Radiation-induced solid state polymerization of oriented ultrathin films of octadecylacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of ultrathin polymeric films was demonstrated by the solid state polymerization of multilayer films of octadecylacrylamide. The films were polymerized with 60Co γ radiation and were studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The structure and the orientation of the multilayer films before and after irradiation were studied by X-ray diffraction, by electron diffraction and by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction patterns and the IR spectra of bulk samples were compared with those of multilayer films. It was observed that the molecules deposited to give a head-to-head-tail-to-tail structure and the packing was similar in multilayer films and in bulk. No phase change was observed either in bulk or in multilayer films. The molecules in the film had a definite orientation with respect to the substrate surface. (Auth.)

  13. Evaluation of Various Methods for Estimating Global Solar Radiation in the Southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel O.

    2012-05-01

    Global solar radiation Rg is an important input for crop models to simulate crop responses. Because the scarcity of long and continuous records of Rg is a serious limitation in many countries, Rg is estimated using models. For crop-model application, empirical Rg models that use commonly measured meteorological variables, such as temperature and precipitation, are generally preferred. Although a large number of models of this kind exist, few have been evaluated for conditions in the United States. This study evaluated the performances of 16 empirical, temperature- and/or precipitation-based Rg models for the southeastern United States. By taking into account spatial distribution and data availability, 30 locations in the region were selected and their daily weather data spanning eight years obtained. One-half of the data was used for calibrating the models, and the other half was used for evaluation. For each model, location-specific parameter values were estimated through regressions. Models were evaluated for each location using the root-mean-square error and the modeling efficiency as goodness-of-fit measures. Among the models that use temperature or precipitation as the input variable, the Mavromatis model showed the best performance. The piecewise linear regression based Wu et al. model (WP) performed best not only among the models that use both temperature and precipitation but also among the 16 models evaluated, mainly because it has separate relationships for low and high radiation levels. The modeling efficiency of WP was from ~5% to more than 100% greater than those of the other models, depending on models and locations.

  14. Emission and propagation of Saturn kilometric radiation: Magnetoionic modes, beaming pattern, and polarization state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, L.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Schippers, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Mutel, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, D.; Louarn, P.

    2011-04-01

    The Cassini mission crossed the source region of the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) on 17 October 2008. On this occasion, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment detected both local and distant radio sources, while plasma parameters were measured in situ by the magnetometer and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer. A goniopolarimetric inversion was applied to RPWS three-antenna electric measurements to determine the wave vector k and the complete state of polarization of detected waves. We identify broadband extraordinary (X) mode as well as narrowband ordinary (O) mode SKR at low frequencies. Within the source region, SKR is emitted just above the X mode cutoff frequency in a hot plasma, with a typical electron-to-wave energy conversion efficiency of ˜1% (2% peak). The knowledge of the k vector is then used to derive the locus of SKR sources in the kronian magnetosphere, which shows X and O components emanating from the same regions. We also compute the associated beaming angle at the source θ‧ = (k, -B) either from (1) in situ measurements or a model of the magnetic field vector (for local to distant sources) or (2) polarization measurements (for local sources). Obtained results, similar for both modes, suggest quasi-perpendicular emission for local sources, whereas the beaming pattern of distant sources appears as a hollow cone with a frequency-dependent constant aperture angle: θ‧ = 75° ± 15° below 300 kHz, decreasing at higher frequencies to reach θ‧ (1000 kHz) = 50° ± 25°. Finally, we investigate quantitatively the SKR polarization state, observed to be strongly elliptical at the source, and quasi-purely circular for sources located beyond approximately two kronian radii. We show that conditions of weak mode coupling are achieved along the raypath, under which the magnetoionic theory satisfactorily describes the evolution of the observed polarization. These results are analyzed comparatively with the auroral kilometric radiation at

  15. Monte Carlo generator comparisons to ATLAS measurements constraining QCD radiation in top anti-top final states

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Recently the ATLAS collaboration has measured several final state observables that are sensitive to additional parton radiation in top anti-top quark final states produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energies of $sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. These measurements are compared to modern Monte Carlo generators implementing several different models and with systematic model parameter variations. Future measurements to constrain parton radiation are also proposed and the predictions of various Monte Carlo generators are compared.

  16. Radiative observables for linearized gravity on asymptotically flat spacetimes and their boundary induced states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benini, Marco, E-mail: marco.benini@pv.infn.it; Dappiaggi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.dappiaggi@unipv.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universitá degli Studi di Pavia and INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Via Bassi, 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Murro, Simone, E-mail: Simone.Murro@mathematik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the quantization of linearized gravity on globally hyperbolic, asymptotically flat, vacuum spacetimes, and the construction of distinguished states which are both of Hadamard form and invariant under the action of all bulk isometries. The procedure, we follow, consists of looking for a realization of the observables of the theory as a sub-algebra of an auxiliary, non-dynamical algebra constructed on future null infinity ℱ⁺. The applicability of this scheme is tantamount to proving that a solution of the equations of motion for linearized gravity can be extended smoothly to ℱ⁺. This has been claimed to be possible provided that a suitable gauge fixing condition, first written by Geroch and Xanthopoulos [“Asymptotic simplicity is stable,” J. Math. Phys. 19, 714 (1978)], is imposed. We review its definition critically, showing that there exists a previously unnoticed obstruction in its implementation leading us to introducing the concept of radiative observables. These constitute an algebra for which a Hadamard state induced from null infinity and invariant under the action of all spacetime isometries exists and it is explicitly constructed.

  17. Generation of tunable coherent far-infrared radiation using atomic Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A source of tunable far-infrared radiation has been constructed. The system has been operated at 91.6 cm-1 with a demonstrated tunability of .63 cm-1. The system is based on a Rydberg state transition in optically pumped potassium vapor. The transition energy is tuned by the application of an electric field to the excited vapor. The transition wavelength and the shifted wavelength were detected and measured by the use of a Michelson interferometer and a liquid helium cooled Ga:Ge bolometer and the data was reduced using Fast Fourier transform techniques. Extensive spectroscopy was done on the potassium vapor to elucidate the depopulation paths and rates of the excited levels. Both theoretical and experimental results are presented to support the conclusions of the research effort. Additionally, possible alternative approaches to the population of the excited state are explored and recommendations are made for the future development of this source as well as the potential uses of it in molecular spectroscopy

  18. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  19. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of 226Ra, 232Th, and 238U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 μR/h, with an US average of 8.5 μR/h. The nationwide average concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 238U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively

  20. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  1. Study of the Exclusive Initial State RadiationProduction of the D \\bar D System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07

    A study of exclusive production of the D{bar D} system through initial-state radiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where D = D{sup 0} or D{sup +}. The D{sup 0} mesons are reconstructed in the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes. The D{sup +} is reconstructed through the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment. The D{bar D} mass spectrum shows a clear {psi}(3770) signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/c{sup 2} regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to D{bar D}, implying an upper limit {Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} D{bar D})/{Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 7.6 (95% confidence level).

  2. The double radiative annihilation of the heavy-light fermion bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Eeg, Jan O; Picek, I

    2001-01-01

    We consider the double-radiative decays of heavy-light QED and QCD atoms, $\\mu^+ e^- \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\bar{B}^{0}_s \\to \\gamma\\gamma$. Especially, we take under scrutiny contributions coming from operators that vanish on the free-quark mass shell. We show that by field redefinitions these operators are converted into contact terms attached to the bound state dynamics. A net off-shell contribution is suppressed with respect to the effect of the well known flavour-changing magnetic-moment operator by the bound-state binding factor. The negligible off-shellness of the weakly bound QED atoms becomes more relevant for strongly bound QCD atoms. We analyze this off-shellness in model-approaches to QCD, one of them enabling us to keep close contact to the related effect in QED. We also comment on the off-shell effect in the corresponding process $\\bar{B}_d \\to K^* \\gamma$, and discuss possible hindering of the claimed beyond-standard-model discovery in this decay mode.

  3. Generation of tunable coherent far-infrared radiation using atomic Rydberg states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookless, W.

    1980-12-01

    A source of tunable far-infrared radiation has been constructed. The system has been operated at 91.6 cm/sup -1/ with a demonstrated tunability of .63 cm/sup -1/. The system is based on a Rydberg state transition in optically pumped potassium vapor. The transition energy is tuned by the application of an electric field to the excited vapor. The transition wavelength and the shifted wavelength were detected and measured by the use of a Michelson interferometer and a liquid helium cooled Ga:Ge bolometer and the data was reduced using Fast Fourier transform techniques. Extensive spectroscopy was done on the potassium vapor to elucidate the depopulation paths and rates of the excited levels. Both theoretical and experimental results are presented to support the conclusions of the research effort. Additionally, possible alternative approaches to the population of the excited state are explored and recommendations are made for the future development of this source as well as the potential uses of it in molecular spectroscopy.

  4. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 106 produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi0, chi2, and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10-4, (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10-4 (first errors statistical, second systematic), and -2 (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' → γchi0, chi0 → π0π0 has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi0 has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c2. In addition, the branching ratios of the chi0 and chi2 to π0π0 have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10-3 and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10-3; the branching ratios of the chi0 and chi2 to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10-3 and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10-4. The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 106 produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states γeta, γeta', γtheta, and γf have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment

  5. The effect of recombination radiation on the temperature and ionization state of partially ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Raičević, Milan; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    A substantial fraction of all ionizing photons originate from radiative recombinations. However, in radiative transfer calculations this recombination radiation is often assumed to be absorbed 'on-the-spot' because for most methods the computational cost associated with the inclusion of gas elements as sources is prohibitive. We present a new, CPU and memory efficient implementation for the transport of ionizing recombination radiation in the TRAPHIC radiative transfer scheme. TRAPHIC solves the radiative transfer equation by tracing photon packets at the speed of light and in a photon-conserving manner in spatially adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our new implementation uses existing features of the TRAPHIC scheme to add recombination radiation at no additional cost in the limit in which the fraction of the simulation box filled with radiation approaches 1. We test the implementation by simulating an HII region in photoionization equilibrium and comparing to reference solutions presented...

  6. Chinese Rebalancing and Australian Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese authorities plan to gradually rebalance the composition of Chinese economic growth from investment towards household consumption. This article uses the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) to give a general sense of how this rebalancing might affect Australian exports and economic activity. Dollar for dollar, Chinese investment appears to absorb more than twice as much Australian value-added output as Chinese household consumption. This largely reflects the significant role of resou...

  7. An Australian Sense of Xenophobia

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Burney

    2009-01-01

    Linda Burney of the Wiradjuri Nation and Minister for Community Services in New South Wales discusses how xenophobia has manifested itself as forms of political and institutional racism in Australian history. She asks us to think of Australia as a giant and beautiful mosaic with over 200 Aboriginal Nations and for the rest of the Australian population to welcome ways to work with all its nation's people.

  8. An Ode to Joy...or the Sounds of Silence? An Exploration of Arts Education Policy in Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Bowie, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    The arts are an integral and important component of our everyday lives. As such, they need to be a vital part of our children's education. However, this has rarely been the case in Australian state primary schools over the past two hundred years. This article explores the history of the arts in Australian state primary schools since the…

  9. Radiation oxidation of polypropylene: A solid-state 13C NMR study using selective isotopic labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polypropylene samples, in which the three different carbon atoms along the chain were selectively labeled with carbon-13, were subjected to radiation under inert and air atmospheres, and to post-irradiation exposure in air at various temperatures. By using solid-state 13C NMR measurements at room temperature, we have been able to identify and quantify the oxidation products. The isotopic labeling provides insight into chemical reaction mechanisms, since oxidation products can be traced back to their positions of origin on the macromolecule. The major products include peroxides and alcohols, both formed at tertiary carbon sites along the chain. Other products include methyl ketones, acids, esters, peresters, and hemiketals formed from reaction at the tertiary carbon, together with in-chain ketones and esters from reaction at the secondary chain carbon. No evidence is found of products arising from reactions at the methyl side chain. Significant temperature-dependent differences are apparent; for example much higher yields of chain-end methyl ketones, which are the indicator product of chain scission, are generated for both elevated temperature irradiation and for post-irradiation treatment at elevated temperatures. Time-dependent plots of yields of the various oxidation products have been obtained under a wide range of conditions, including the post-irradiation oxidation of a sample at room temperature in air that has been monitored for 2 years. Radiation-oxidation products of polypropylene are contrasted to products measured for 13C-labeled polyethylene in an earlier investigation: the peroxides formed in irradiated polypropylene are remarkably longer lived, the non-peroxidic products are significantly different, and the overall ratios of oxidation products in polypropylene change relatively little as a function of the extent of oxidation

  10. The effect of recombination radiation on the temperature and ionization state of partially ionized gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raičević, Milan; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    A substantial fraction of all ionizing photons originate from radiative recombinations. However, in radiative transfer calculations this recombination radiation is often assumed to be absorbed `on-the-spot' because for most methods the computational cost associated with the inclusion of gas elements as sources is prohibitive. We present a new, CPU and memory efficient implementation for the transport of ionizing recombination radiation in the TRAPHIC radiative transfer scheme. TRAPHIC solves the radiative transfer equation by tracing photon packets at the speed of light and in a photon-conserving manner in spatially adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our new implementation uses existing features of the TRAPHIC scheme to add recombination radiation at no additional cost in the limit in which the fraction of the simulation box filled with radiation approaches 1. We test the implementation by simulating an H II region in photoionization equilibrium and comparing to reference solutions presented in the literature, finding excellent agreement. We apply our implementation to discuss the evolution of the H II region to equilibrium. We show that the widely used case A and B approximations yield accurate ionization profiles only near the source and near the ionization front, respectively. We also discuss the impact of recombination radiation on the geometry of shadows behind optically thick absorbers. We demonstrate that the shadow region may be completely ionized by the diffuse recombination radiation field and discuss the important role of heating by recombination radiation in the shadow region.

  11. Mathematical model of biological order state or syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: based on electromagnetic radiation within the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinxiang; Huang, Jinzhao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, based on the resonator model and exciplex model of electromagnetic radiation within the human body, mathematical model of biological order state, also referred to as syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine, was established and expressed as: "Sy = v/ 1n(6I + 1)". This model provides the theoretical foundation for experimental research addressing the order state of living system, especially the quantitative research syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine.

  12. Radiative Corrections to the 2E1 Decay Rate of the 2s-State in Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    1997-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the 2E1 decay width of the 2s-state in the low-Z hydrogen-like system are examined within logarithmic approximation. The correction is found to be 2.025(1) alpha (Z alpha)^2 / pi log(Z alpha)^2 in units of the non-relativistic rate.

  13. Global Radiation-Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Black Hole Accretion Flow and Outflow: Unified Model of Three States

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsuga, Ken; Mori, Masao; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Black-hole accretion systems are known to possess several distinct modes (or spectral states), such as low/hard state, high/soft state, and so on. Since the dynamics of the corresponding flows is distinct, theoretical models were separately discussed for each state. We here propose a unified model based on our new, global, two-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. By controlling a density normalization we could for the first time reproduce three distinct modes of accretion flow and outflow with one numerical code. When the density is large (model A), a geometrically thick, very luminous disk forms, in which photon trapping takes place. When the density is moderate (model B), the accreting gas can effectively cool by emitting radiation, thus generating a thin disk, i.e., the soft-state disk. When the density is too low for radiative cooling to be important (model C), a disk becomes hot, thick, and faint; i.e., the hard-state disk. The magnetic energy is amplified within the disk up to about tw...

  14. Human Rights and History Education: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge Nina; Buchanan, John; Chodkiewicz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The place of education for and about human rights within the school curriculum remains contested and this paper reports on the first national cross-sectoral investigation of its place in Australian curricula and more specifically in national and state History curriculum documents. Opportunities for the inclusion of human rights based studies were…

  15. Developing Sustainable Language Learning Pathways: An Australian Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Paul; Steigler-Peters, Susi; Moran, Wendy; Piccioli, Maria Teresa

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports some key findings from an external evaluation of an innovative programme for foreign and heritage languages in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW). The programme, entitled the Languages Continuity Initiative (LCI), was funded by the NSW Department of Education and Training and involved over 200 schools in its initial…

  16. Australian Mining and Petroleum Law Association yearbook 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowan, B. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    Papers are presented under the following headings: state interest - Gawler Craton; constitutional law; confidential information; long term gas contracts - past, present and future; resource project financing; contracting for electricity; tax on transactions; joint venture issues; recent developments; climate change and the Kyoto Protocol - emissions trading and Australian resource industries; native title and cultural heritage and corporate governance. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  17. Australian Curriculum Reform II: Health and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    It is implied by governing organizations that Australia is presently experiencing its first national curriculum reform, when as the title suggests it is the second. However, until now Australian states and territories have been responsible for the education curriculum delivered within schools. The present national curriculum reform promises one…

  18. Efficiency of Australian Technical and Further Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieger, Peter; Villano, Renato; Cooksey, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Budgetary constraints on the public purse have led Australian Federal and State governments to focus increasingly on the efficiency of public institutions, including Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutes. In this study, we define efficiency as the relationship between financial and administrative inputs and educational outputs. We…

  19. Logistic support provided to Australian disaster medical assistance teams: results of a national survey of team members

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is likely that calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, the present study was designed to evaluate the Australian DMAT experience and the need for logistic support. Methods: Data were collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Australian DMAT deployme...

  20. Multi-octave supercontinuum generation with IR radiation filamentation in transparent solid-state media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, S. A.; Trunov, V. I.; Leshchenko, V. E.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Supercontinuum generation from the near to far IR during radiation filamentation in solid-state media in an anomalous dispersion region is theoretically investigated. The initial search for appropriate media with the use of an interference model showed that the widest IR spectrum is generated in media with high values of zero group velocity dispersion wavelength with the pump wavelength located not far from it. Halides belong to one of such media groups. The possibility of generation of a very wide supercontinuum in calcium fluoride (0.52-3.35 μm, which corresponds to 2.7 octaves), sodium chloride (0.7-7.6 μm, 3.5 octaves), and potassium iodide (0.66-22 μm, 5.1 octaves) is demonstrated by numerical simulation. Also, pulse self-compression down to 13 fs at the 5-μm central wavelength (about single period) has been observed in potassium iodide. The mechanisms of multi-octave supercontinuum generation are discussed.

  1. Observed aerosol-induced radiative effect on plant productivity in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    We apply satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in conjunction with flux tower-derived estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) to probe the relationship between atmospheric aerosol loading and carbon uptake rate at 10 select sites (4 deciduous broadleaf, 3 cropland, 1 evergreen needle leaf, 1 mixed forest and 1 grassland) on hourly time scales in the growing season in the eastern United States. For deciduous and mixed forests, the aerosol light scattering increases GPP with a maximum effect observed under polluted conditions (AOD >0.6), when diffuse radiation is 40-60%. During midday hours, high AOD conditions (>0.4) enhance plant productivity by ∼13% in deciduous forests. In contrast, we find that high diffuse light fraction does not increase the carbon uptake rate in croplands and grasslands; for these ecosystems, we estimate that high AOD conditions reduce GPP by ∼17% during midday hours. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that have attributed these contrasting response sensitivities to the complex and closed canopy architecture of forests versus crops and grasslands. C4 but not C3 crops may benefit from pollution-induced changes in diffuse and direct light. Further research is needed to investigate the role of local meteorology as a possible confounder in the connection between atmospheric aerosols and plant productivity.

  2. Exotic dense matter states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in the radiation dominant regime

    CERN Document Server

    Colgan, J; Jr.,; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Wagenaars, E; Booth, N; Brown, C R D; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Evans, R G; Gray, R J; Hoarty, D J; Kaempfer, T; Lancaster, K L; McKenna, P; Rossall, A L; Skobelev, I Yu; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Zhidkov, A G; Woolsey, N C

    2012-01-01

    The properties of high energy density plasma are under increasing scrutiny in recent years due to their importance to our understanding of stellar interiors, the cores of giant planets$^{1}$, and the properties of hot plasma in inertial confinement fusion devices$^2$. When matter is heated by X-rays, electrons in the inner shells are ionized before the valence electrons. Ionization from the inside out creates atoms or ions with empty internal electron shells, which are known as hollow atoms (or ions)$^{3,4,5}$. Recent advances in free-electron laser (FEL) technology$^{6,7,8,9}$ have made possible the creation of condensed matter consisting predominantly of hollow atoms. In this Letter, we demonstrate that such exotic states of matter, which are very far from equilibrium, can also be formed by more conventional optical laser technology when the laser intensity approaches the radiation dominant regime$^{10}$. Such photon-dominated systems are relevant to studies of photoionized plasmas found in active galactic ...

  3. Radiatively driven relativistic jets with variable adiabatic index equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Mukesh K; Mandal, Samir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a relativistic fluid jet driven by radiation from a shocked accretion disc around a non-rotating black hole approximated by Paczy\\'nski-Wiita potential. The sub-Keplerian and Keplerian accretion rates control the shock location and therefore, the radiation field around the accretion disc. We compute the radiative moments with full special relativistic transformation. The effect of a fraction of radiation absorbed by the black hole has been approximated, over and above the special relativistic transformations. We show that the radiative moments around a super massive black hole are different compared to that around a stellar mass black hole. We show that the terminal speed of jets increases with the mass accretion rates,synchrotron emission of the accretion disc and reduction of proton fraction of the flow composition. To obtain relativistic terminal velocities of jets, both thermal and radiative driving are important. We show for very high accretion rates and pair dominated flow, jets around su...

  4. Challenges to radiative divertor/mantle operations in advanced, steady-state scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Managing the heat exhaust problem is well recognized to be a major challenge in transforming present successes in magnetic confinement fusion experiments to demonstration of cost-effective, steady-state power generation from fusion [1][2]. One approach is to convert plasma thermal energy, normally directed to isolated surfaces, to isotropic photon emission, distributing exhaust power over a large surface area. Successful demonstrations of this technique on existing short pulse devices are shown, along with the inherent limitations; the collapse of core confinement with excessive radiation from the bulk plasma and restrictions to dissipation in the divertor volume. Feedback control of impurity seeding is discussed, showing recent examples from tokamaks [3]. For steady-state devices, additional constraints on divertor scenarios are driven by long-term plasma material interaction effects, with fuel recycling, net erosion limits and surface morphology changes forcing detached plasma operation where both heat and particle fluxes are substantially reduced. The instability of these detachment layers in standard X-point divertors with impurity seeding is outlined. Achieving these steady-state, high performance scenarios also restricts the divertor solution by requiring it be compatible with current-drive actuators and enhanced core confinement regimes. While ITER will operate with impurity seeding in a conventional tokamak geometry [4], it is not clear that this concept will reliably scale to a reactor and has been identified as a major risk factor in the development of fusion power [2]. Alternatives concepts are discussed, including the snowflake [5] and super-X divertor [6], along with their respective proof of principle experiments. The complications in convincingly scaling these concepts to a reactor are outlined, including challenges in validating numerical simulations of advanced, dissipative divertors. References: [1] Greenwald, M

  5. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF STRESSED AND DEFORMED STATE OF BODIES HAVING CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY WITH DUE ACCOUNT OF THERMAL AND RADIATION CREEPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kulikov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates peculiar features of the stressed and deformed state of the construction elements in the active zone of nuclear reactors being under action of  high temperatures and neutron irradiation with due account of thermal and radiation creeping and with shells of heat releasing elements having a shape of a thick-walled cylinder taken as an example. Basic relations for a numerical solution of the given problem including thermal and radiation creeping have been obtained in the paper. The paper presents an algorithm for the solution of the derived numerical scheme.

  6. The energetic state of rat's small intestine mitochondria under exposure to X-ray ionizing radiation with low intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation with single dose (0.055 Gy x min-1) in doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Gy on a metabolic state of the respiratory chain of rat's small intestine mitochondria is investigated. The damage of relations of the oxidative phosphorylation processes in mitochondria, which is expressed in the uncoupling of the processes of respiration and phosphorylation and in a decline of the phosphorylation rate and the activity of ATP-hydrolase reactions, is established. These changes are observed at all time of research and intensified with a growth of the radiation absorbed dose.

  7. ASA24-Australian Version (Under Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a consortium of Australian Researchers is adapting the ASA24 system to the Australian context to account for variations in food consumed, portion sizes, and nutrient composition.

  8. Stress in the Indo-Australian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloetingh, Sierd; Wortel, Rinus

    1986-12-01

    We modelled the state of stress in the Indo-Australian plate in order to investigate quantitatively variations observed in tectonic style. The numerical procedure incorporates the dependence of slab pull and ridge push on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Estimates are presented for the average net resistive forces at the Himalayan collision zone, the suction force acting on the overriding Indo-Australian plate segment at the Tonga-Kermadec trench and the drag at the base of the lithosphere. Our modelling shows a concentration of compressive stresses of the order of 3-5 kbar in the Ninetyeast Ridge area; the effects of the compressive resistance associated with Himalayan collision and subduction of young lithosphere off the northern part of the Sunda arc are focused in this region. The stress field as calculated gives a consistent explanation for the observed concentration of seismic activity (Stein and Okal, 1978) and significant deformation in the oceanic crust (Weissel et al., 1980; McAdoo and Sandwell, 1985) in the area. The calculated stress field in the area adjacent to the Southeast and Central India ridges is characterized by tension parallel to the spreading axis. This explains the concentration of near-ridge normal faulting seismicity (with T-axes subparallel to the spreading ridge) in the Indian Ocean as recently observed by Bergman et al. (1984) and Wiens and Stein (1984). The regional stress field along the strike of the Sunda arc varies from compression seaward of and parallel to the Sumatra trench segment, to tension perpendicular to the Java-Flores segment. This explains the selective occurrence of well developed grabens seaward off the Java-Flores segment of the trench, observed by Hilde (1983). Our modelling shows that the observed rotation of the stress field (Denham et al., 1979) in the Australian continent is mainly the consequence of its geographic position relative to the surrounding trench segments and the variations of the forces acting

  9. Progress on an Updated National Solar Radiation Data Base for the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S.; Anderberg, M.; George, R.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Renne, D.; Beckman, W.; DeGaetano, A.; Gueymard, C.; Perez, R.; Plantico, M.; Stackhouse, P.; Vignola, F.

    2005-09-01

    In 1992, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB), a 30-year set of hourly solar radiation data. In 2003, NREL undertook an NSRDB update project for the decade of 1991-2000.

  10. History of radiation hygiene and mission of the State sanitary control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three main stages are outlined in the evolution of radiation hygiene as a science. The first of these is characterized by some underestimation of the radiation factor, particularly as regards potential long-term biological effects. The second stage (1940-1950) coincided historically with the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. With subsequent large-scale atomic weapons testing, the problem arose of radioactive contamination of the biosphere, and the need was recognized for quantifying potential radiation risks thereby incurred. A third stage developed in connection with scientific-technological revolution. Based on better understanding of radiation-related somatic and genetic effects, efforts were made to arrive at a reasonable assessment of hazards involved in peaceful uses of atomic energy. Two main lines of inquiry were followed, namely to (a) gain primary information on radiation exposure levels and (b) acquire better insight into biological effects so as to establish well-grounded regulations. There is a need for studies on natural background radiation in communities and environmental contamination in the vicinity of plants using radioactive materials, as well as for development of radiation control guides and optimization of environmental and occupational minitoring. Conditions are now more favourable for the solution of these problems since many countries, in particular socialist ones, are collaborating in efforts to limit radiation exposure. (A.B.)

  11. Australian Cosmic Ray Modulation Research

    CERN Document Server

    Duldig, M L

    2000-01-01

    Australian research into variations of the cosmic ray flux arriving at the Earth has played a pivotal role for more than 50 years. The work has been largely led by the groups from the University of Tasmania and the Australian Antarctic Division and has involved the operation of neutron monitors and muon telescopes from many sites. In this paper the achievements of the Australian researchers are reviewed and future experiments are described. Particular highlights include: the determination of cosmic ray modulation parameters; the development of modelling techniques of Ground Level Enhancements; the confirmation of the Tail-In and Loss-Cone Sidereal anisotropies; the Space Ship Earth collaboration; and the Solar Cycle latitude survey.

  12. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper discusses how this model…

  13. Effects of occupational exposure and non-radiation factors on the structure-functional state of blood cell genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of non-radiation factors (smoking and vitamin therapy) on the structure-functional state of blood cell genome of nuclear professionals (workers of Nuclear Center) exposed to long-term external gamma-neutron radiation (108 persons) and control group (49 workers of Nuclear Center who had no concern to ionizing radiation) have been investigated. It has been shown that: prolonged occupational exposure leads to significant 2-3 fold growth (p≤ 0.001) of cytogenetic disorders; efficiency of cell systems of reparation of induced DNA damage in exposed persons is lower (p≤ 0.05) as compared with control group; frequency of cytogenetic disorders depends on the accumulated absorbed dose. (authors)

  14. Three-Dimensional Elasticity Solutions for Sound Radiation of Functionally Graded Materials Plates considering State Space Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieliang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical study for sound radiation of functionally graded materials (FGM plate based on the three-dimensional theory of elasticity. The FGM plate is a mixture of metal and ceramic, and its material properties are assumed to have smooth and continuous variation in the thickness direction according to a power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of the constituents. Based on the three-dimensional theory of elasticity and state space method, the governing equations with variable coefficients of the FGM plate are derived. The sound radiation of the vibration plate is calculated with Rayleigh integral. Comparisons of the present results with those of solutions in the available literature are made and good agreements are achieved. Finally, some parametric studies are carried out to investigate the sound radiation properties of FGM plates.

  15. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  16. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index Martin Thoms, Melissa Parsons, Phil Morley Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. Natural hazard management policy directions in Australia - and indeed internationally - are increasingly being aligned to ideas of resilience. Resilience to natural hazards is the ability of individuals and communities to cope with disturbance and adversity and to maintain adaptive behaviour. Operationalizing the measurement and assessment of disaster resilience is often undertaken using a composite index, but this exercise is yet to be undertaken in Australia. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index is a top-down, national scale assessment of the resilience of communities to natural hazards. Resilience is assessed based on two sets of capacities: coping and adaptive capacities. Coping capacity relates to the factors influencing the ability of a community to prepare for, absorb and recover from a natural hazard event. Adaptive capacity relates to the arrangements and processes that enable adjustment through learning, adaptation and transformation. Indicators are derived under themes of social character, economic capital, infrastructure and planning, emergency services, community capital, information and engagement and governance/leadership/policy, using existing data sets (e.g. census data) or evaluation of policy and procedure (e.g. disaster management planning). A composite index of disaster resilience is then computed for each spatial division, giving national scale coverage. The results of the Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index will be reported in a State of Disaster Resilience report, due in 2018. The index is co-designed with emergency service agencies, and will support policy development, planning, community engagement and emergency management.

  17. Patient Experience of Australian General Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ajit; Greco, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The number of data-based research articles focusing on patient sociodemographic profiling and experience with healthcare practices is still relatively small. One of the reasons for this relative lack of research is that categorizing patients into different demographic groups can lead to significant reductions in sample numbers for homogeneous subgroups. The aim of this article is to identify problems and issues when dealing with big data that contains information at two levels: patient experience of their general practice, and scores received by practices. The Practice Accreditation and Improvement Survey (PAIS) consisting of 27 five-point Likert items and 11 sociodemographic questions is a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)-endorsed instrument for seeking patient views as part of the accreditation of Australian general practices. The data were collected during the 3-year period May 2011-July 2014, during which time PAIS was completed for 3734 individual general practices throughout Australia involving 312,334 anonymous patients. This represents over 60% of practices in Australia, and ∼75% of practices that undergo voluntary accreditation. The sampling method for each general practice was convenience sampling. The results of our analysis show how sociodemographic profiles of Australian patients can affect their ratings of practices and also how the location of the practice (State/Territory, remote access area) can affect patient experience. These preliminary findings can act as an initial set of results against which future studies in patient experience trends can be developed and measured in Australia. Also, the methods used in this article provide a methodological framework for future patient experience researchers to use when dealing with data that contain information at two levels, such as the patient and practice. Finally, the outcomes demonstrate that different subgroups can experience healthcare provision differently, especially

  18. ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2008. ASN annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASN is an independent administrative authority tasked, on behalf of the state, with regulating nuclear safety and radiation protection in order to protect workers, patients and the environment from the hazards involved in nuclear activities. It also contributes to informing the public. ASN, run by a five-member commission, regulates the whole of the sector, acting in a completely impartial manner. The ASN Commission presents its report on the state of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2008. Contents: A - Introduction: The year 2008. B - Key topics: 1. ASN actions to promote greater transparency; 2. EDF nuclear power plant ageing and operating life: the conditions for continued operation; 3. The prevention of malicious acts; 4. ASN regulation of the radiotherapy sector; 5. Regulating and monitoring the construction of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor; 6. ASN's international nuclear safety responsibilities; 7. The new nuclear countries; 8. Decommissioning of basic nuclear installations and the low-level, long-lived waste disposal project. C - Overview: 1 - Nuclear activities: ionising radiations and health risks; 2 - Principles and stakeholders in the regulation of nuclear safety and radiation protection; 3 - Regulation; 4 - Regulation of nuclear activities and exposure to ionising radiations; 5 - Environmental protection; 6 - Public information and transparency; 7 - International relations; 8 - Radiological emergencies; 9 - Medical uses of ionising radiations; 10 - Industrial and research activities; 11 - Transport of radioactive materials; 12 - EDF nuclear power plants; 13 - Nuclear fuel cycle installations; 14 - Nuclear research facilities and various nuclear installations; 15 - Safe decommissioning of basic nuclear installations; 16 - Radioactive waste and polluted sites. D - Appendices: List of basic nuclear installations; ASN decisions and opinions published in 2008 in its Official Bulletin; Acronyms, abbreviations and names

  19. The implementation of diagnostic reference levels to Australian radiology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: At the presen time, there is no national surveillance of the increasing ionising radiation dose to the population from diagnostic imaging procedures. As the number of procedures undertaken is increasing, it is expected that the population dose will also increase. A substantial component of that contribution is from multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) systems. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) estimates that the growth in MDCT scans, based on Medicare Benefits Sch due data, is increasing at approximately 9% per annum, with over 2 million DCT scans being performed in 2009. The caput effective dose (mSv) from this modality is expected to be approaching 1.2 mSv per annum. If cu nt dose-detriment models are accurate, the risk of induction of carcinogenic detriment from current MDCT scanning patterns is a significant public health issue that requires a concerted and ongoing response. For the application of ionising radiation in medicine, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends the conservative philosophy of Justification and Optimisation via the measurement of 'Diagnostic Reference Levels' to limit the potential overexposure of patients and decrease the overall population burden. The Australian government has commissioned ARPANSA to survey, calculate and construct representative national diagnostic reference levels for diagnostic imaging modalities that use ionising radiation. This will be achieved in close consultation with the professional organisations who represent the professionals responsible for the use of ionising radiation in diagnostic imaging.

  20. Australian uranium and the election

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international and national complexities of the situation in Australia over the question of mining of the country's large and rich uranium deposits are explored with especial reference to the pending general election. The present position is ironical since access to low cost uranium would give a welcome boost to the nuclear industry which is enthusiastically supported by the Australian prime minister and his colleagues yet the Australian government is unable to promote mining as rapidly as it would like because of the international commitments it has made to provide a justification for its policy. (U.K.)

  1. Information and training on radiation protection for trade union representatives from the nine Member States of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its training and information programme on radiation protection, the Directorate-General for Employment and Social Affairs (Health and Safety Directorate) organized for the third and fourth time (in October 1977 and 1978) seminars on radiation protection on behalf of trade union representatives from the nine Member States; the seminars served in particular as a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences. The present volume reproduces the papers read on those occasions, covering the following topics: the independence of radiaton protection units; training and information in radiation protection; analysis of the main innovations in radiological protection concepts emerging from ICRP Publication No 26; the protection of occasionally exposed workers; the work of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation; the concept of optimization; future developments in dosimetry. Although the publication is destined mainly for the participants in the two meetings, the information it contains may also be of use to anyone interested in the problems of radiation protection and the spreading of knowledge in this field

  2. Prediction of Global Solar Radiation Using Angstrom-Page Equation Model for Makurdi Benue State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Kaltiya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Angstrom-Page model was used to predict the Global solar radiation for Makurdi. This was done by measuring, solar radiation, relative humidity, dry and wet bulb temperatures, hours of cloudiness and bright sun-shine at the interval of one hour from 0600hr to 1800hrs daily for a period of six months (February to July, 2011 and the measurements were carried-out within Makurdi metropolis. Sun meter model DS-05 was used to measure the solar radiation, a digital thermo-hygrometer model IT-202 was used to measure relative humidity, wet and dry bulb temperatures. The hours of cloudiness and brightness were determined from the measured solar radiation. Solar radiation intensity <20w/m2 was considered as hours of cloudiness and values 120w/m2 was taken as hours of brightness. The result obtained showed that the mean solar radiation, relative humidity, dry and wet bulb temperatures, hours of cloudiness and bright sun-shine for the location were; 191.64w/m2 , 60.10%, 30.24oC, 28.25oC, 7.72Hrs and 5.28Hrs respectively. The regression constants ‘a’ and ‘b’ in Angstrom-page equation were found to be 0.24 and 0.57 respectively. The performance of the variance between measured and calculated radiation were analysed statistically where Mean Bias Error (MBE and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE were 0.16 and 5.06% respectively. Similarly, there is a strong correlation between calculated and actual global solar radiation. Finally, this model can be used to predict average global solar radiation for Makurdi location.

  3. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low

  4. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  5. Quantifying equation-of-state and opacity errors using integrated supersonic diffusive radiation flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guymer, T. M., E-mail: Thomas.Guymer@awe.co.uk; Moore, A. S.; Morton, J.; Allan, S.; Bazin, N.; Benstead, J.; Bentley, C.; Comley, A. J.; Garbett, W.; Reed, L.; Stevenson, R. M. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Cowan, J.; Flippo, K.; Hamilton, C.; Lanier, N. E.; Mussack, K.; Obrey, K.; Schmidt, D. W.; Taccetti, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    A well diagnosed campaign of supersonic, diffusive radiation flow experiments has been fielded on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments have used the accurate measurements of delivered laser energy and foam density to enable an investigation into SESAME's tabulated equation-of-state values and CASSANDRA's predicted opacity values for the low-density C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl foam used throughout the campaign. We report that the results from initial simulations under-predicted the arrival time of the radiation wave through the foam by ≈22%. A simulation study was conducted that artificially scaled the equation-of-state and opacity with the intended aim of quantifying the systematic offsets in both CASSANDRA and SESAME. Two separate hypotheses which describe these errors have been tested using the entire ensemble of data, with one being supported by these data.

  6. The Australian solar scene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, Paul [IT Power Australia (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This presentation mainly talks about the actions taken by the Australian country concerning the use of renewable energy and the reduction of the peak load in some areas. In the first part, there are found both the geographical aspects as well as the major political, e.g. Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean development and Climate. There are also explained the issues related to peak load growth and it is shown a comparison graphic having information about the most used photovoltaic systems. Then, there are mentioned the communities that are testing one of the model photovoltaic systems in order to: reduce the peak load, use the energy in a properly way, reduce the energy cost, among others. Finally, it is succinctly explained the photovoltaic rebate program as well as the use of the off-grid systems, besides, it is given relevant information about those remote communities of Australia and the benefits of the implementation of Bushlight. [Spanish] Esta presentacion trata primordialmente de las acciones, referentes al uso de energia renovable, tomadas por Australia y creadas con el fin de reducir la maxima demanda en algunas regiones de este pais. En la primera parte, se encuentran tanto los aspectos geograficos como los principales aspectos politicos; por ejemplo, la Sociedad Asia-Pacifico para el Desarrollo no Contaminante y el Clima. Asimismo, se da una explicacion acerca de las cuestiones relacionadas al crecimiento de la maxima demanda; ademas, se muestra un cuadro comparativo, que contiene informacion relacionada con los sistemas fotovoltaicos mas utilizados. Despues, se mencionan aquellas comunidades que tienen en periodo de prueba alguno de los modelos fotovoltaicos con el fin de: reducir la maxima demanda, utilizar eficientemente la energia, reducir el costo de la misma, entre otros aspectos mas. Finalmente, se explica escuetamente el programa de reembolso centrado en el uso de sistemas fotovoltaicos, asi como el uso de sistemas asilados de la red; ademas, se

  7. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  8. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000

  9. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  10. United States Land Cover Land Use Change, Albedo and Surface Radiative Forcing 1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Roy, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    This research responds to the recent recommendations made by the U.S. National Research Council for regional forcing studies to better understand climatic responses to land cover land use change. Surface albedo affects the earth's radiative energy balance, by controlling how much incoming solar radiation is absorbed and reflected. It is well established that Land Cover Land Use (LCLU) change results in changes in the surface albedo which has a radiative forcing effect, however, to date, studies have been limited due to data uncertainties. New spatially explicit satellite derived LCLU change and albedo data for the conterminous U.S. are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing. The methodology and preliminary results for 42% of the U.S. processed to date are presented as spatially explicit maps and summary statistics. The results indicate a negative (cooling) radiative forcing effect due to U.S. LCLU change over the last three decades. Data used include USGS Landsat based decadal land cover maps of the conterminous U.S. located using a stratified sampling methodology across 84 ecoregions, mean 2000-2002 MODIS broadband albedo values extracted in each ecoregion for the 10 mapped LCLU classes, and monthly mean surface incoming solar radiation from the recent European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40 year Reanalysis (ERA40) product.

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1990 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory -- Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release

  12. Radiatively driven relativistic jets with variable adiabatic index equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Mukesh K.; Kumar, Rajiv; Mandal, Samir; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2015-11-01

    We investigate a relativistic fluid jet driven by radiation from a shocked accretion disc around a non-rotating black hole approximated by Paczyński-Wiita potential. The sub-Keplerian and Keplerian accretion rates control the shock location and therefore, the radiation field around the accretion disc. We compute the radiative moments with full special relativistic transformation. The effect of a fraction of radiation absorbed by the black hole has been approximated, over and above the special relativistic transformations. We show that the radiative moments around a supermassive black hole are different compared to that around a stellar mass black hole. We show that the terminal speed of jets increases with the mass accretion rates, synchrotron emission of the accretion disc, and reduction of proton fraction of the flow composition. To obtain relativistic terminal velocities of jets, both thermal and radiative driving are important. We show for very high accretion rates and pair dominated flow, jets around supermassive black holes are truly ultrarelativistic, while for jets around stellar mass black holes, terminal Lorentz factor of about 10 is achievable.

  13. Analysis of Charge State Distribution by Non-Local Thermodynamic-Equilibrium Spin-Orbit-Split-Array Collisional Radiative Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红; 张继彦; 杨向东; 杨国洪; 郑志坚

    2003-01-01

    A collisional radiative model based on the spin-orbit-split-arrays is used to determine the charge state distribution of gold plasmas. The ab initio atomic structure code of Cowan and the spin-orbit-split-array model were used to calculate all the emission spectra of the different gold species, and a non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium model was coupled to calculate the ion populations at a given plasma density and electron temperature. The charge state distribution and other plasma parameters were determined by comparing the experimental spectra with the theoretical simulated spectra of gold plasmas.

  14. The "lessons" of the Australian "heroin shortage"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmour Stuart

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heroin use causes considerable harm to individual users including dependence, fatal and nonfatal overdose, mental health problems, and blood borne virus transmission. It also adversely affects the community through drug dealing, property crime and reduced public amenity. During the mid to late 1990s in Australia the prevalence of heroin use increased as reflected in steeply rising overdose deaths. In January 2001, there were reports of an unpredicted and unprecedented reduction in heroin supply with an abrupt onset in all Australian jurisdictions. The shortage was most marked in New South Wales, the State with the largest heroin market, which saw increases in price, dramatic decreases in purity at the street level, and reductions in the ease with which injecting drug users reported being able to obtain the drug. The abrupt onset of the shortage and a subsequent dramatic reduction in overdose deaths prompted national debate about the causes of the shortage and later international debate about the policy significance of what has come to be called the "Australian heroin shortage". In this paper we summarise insights from four years' research into the causes, consequences and policy implications of the "heroin shortage".

  15. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  16. Austrade Commissioner Tells Australian Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng; Jingjing; Sun; Yongjian

    2005-01-01

      As a large country with 7.69 million sq.km, is Australia a vast market for Chinese products such as cars and some traditional arts and crafts as people expect? With such questions bear in mind, China's Foreign Trade interviewed Mrs.Liu Bing, Commissioner of The Australian Trade Commission (Austrade). Let's hear what she said.……

  17. Austrade Commissioner Tells Australian Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Jingjing; Sun Yongjian

    2005-01-01

    @@ As a large country with 7.69 million sq.km, is Australia a vast market for Chinese products such as cars and some traditional arts and crafts as people expect? With such questions bear in mind, China's Foreign Trade interviewed Mrs.Liu Bing, Commissioner of The Australian Trade Commission (Austrade). Let's hear what she said.

  18. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  19. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  20. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans

  1. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  3. Non-classical properties and algebraic characteristics of negative binomial states in quantized radiation fields

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Guang; Pan, Shao-Hua; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    1999-01-01

    We study the nonclassical properties and algebraic characteristics of the negative binomial states introduced by Barnett recently. The ladder operator formalism and displacement operator formalism of the negative binomial states are found and the algebra involved turns out to be the SU(1,1) Lie algebra via the generalized Holstein-Primarkoff realization. These states are essentially Peremolov's SU(1,1) coherent states. We reveal their connection with the geometric states and find that they ar...

  4. A Cosmological Model Based on a Quadratic Equation of State Unifying Vacuum Energy, Radiation, and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a cosmological model based on a quadratic equation of state (where is the Planck density and is the cosmological density “unifying” vacuum energy, radiation, and dark energy. For , it reduces to leading to a phase of early accelerated expansion (early inflation with a constant density equal to the Planck density  g/m3 (vacuum energy. For , we recover the equation of state of radiation . For , we get leading to a phase of late accelerated expansion (late inflation with a constant density equal to the cosmological density  g/m3 (dark energy. The temperature is determined by a generalized Stefan-Boltzmann law. We show a nice “symmetry” between the early universe (vacuum energy + radiation and the late universe (radiation + dark energy. In our model, they are described by two polytropic equations of state with index and respectively. Furthermore, the Planck density in the early universe plays a role similar to that of the cosmological density in the late universe. They represent fundamental upper and lower density bounds differing by 122 orders of magnitude. We add the contribution of baryonic matter and dark matter considered as independent species and obtain a simple cosmological model describing the whole evolution of the universe. We study the evolution of the scale factor, density, and temperature. This model gives the same results as the standard CDM model for , where is the Planck time and completes it by incorporating the phase of early inflation in a natural manner. Furthermore, this model does not present any singularity at and exists eternally in the past (although it may be incorrect to extrapolate the solution to the infinite past. Our study suggests that vacuum energy, radiation, and dark energy may be the manifestation of a unique form of “generalized radiation.” By contrast, the baryonic and dark matter components of the universe are treated as different species. This is at variance with usual models

  5. Novel approach for computing photosynthetically active radiation for productivity modeling using remotely sensed images in the Great Plains, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) is a key indicator of ecosystem performance, and helps in many decision-making processes related to environment. We used the Eddy covariancelight use efficiency (EC-LUE) model for estimating GPP in the Great Plains, United States in order to evaluate the performance of this model. We developed a novel algorithm for computing the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) based on net radiation. A strong correlation (R2=0.94,N=24) was found between daily PAR and Landsat-based mid-day instantaneous net radiation. Though the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based instantaneous net radiation was in better agreement (R2=0.98,N=24) with the daily measured PAR, there was no statistical significant difference between Landsat based PAR and MODIS based PAR. The EC-LUE model validation also confirms the need to consider biological attributes (C3 versus C4 plants) for potential light use efficiency. A universal potential light use efficiency is unable to capture the spatial variation of GPP. It is necessary to use C3 versus C4 based land use/land cover map for using EC-LUE model for estimating spatiotemporal distribution of GPP.

  6. Delayed effects of low-dose radiation on cellular immunity in atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, E T; Akiyama, M; Kusunoki, Y; Makinodan, T

    1987-05-01

    Several parameters of cellular immune function were assessed among persons who survived the 1945 atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki but who now reside in the United States. The subjects in this study were exposed to various low doses (T65D) of radiation at the time of the bomb. More than half received an estimated 0 Gy (S0 group). Of those exposed to more radiation (S+ group), nearly 90% received less than 0.50 Gy (50 rad). Lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of these individuals and were assessed for the following parameters of cellular immunity: mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin, mitogenic response to allogeneic lymphocytes, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), and interferon production. In every case, the response of the S+ group was greater than that of the S0 group, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. Results of studies presently being performed on A-bomb survivors residing in Hiroshima do not confirm this difference. Therefore, it is difficult to say whether the increase in natural cytotoxicity observed among the American and not the Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to very low doses of radiation is a hormetic effect which was modulated by post-radiation environmental conditions or a result of selective migration. PMID:3570796

  7. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  8. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program

  9. Nursing churn and turnover in Australian hospitals: nurses perceptions and suggestions for supportive strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Angela J; Stasa, Helen; Roche, Michael A; Homer, Caroline S. E.; Duffield, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to reveal nurses’ experiences and perceptions of turnover in Australian hospitals and identify strategies to improve retention, performance and job satisfaction. Nursing turnover is a serious issue that can compromise patient safety, increase health care costs and impact on staff morale. A qualitative design was used to analyze responses from 362 nurses collected from a national survey of nurses from medical and surgical nursing units across 3 Australian States/Ter...

  10. A Solid-State Spark Chamber for Detection of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio ALVES; Smith, Craig; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2014-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sna.2014.05.0150924-4247/ In this article we report on an ionizing radiation detector based on a silicon controlled switch (SCS). An SCS connected to an RC load was exposed to ionizing radiation resulting in the generation of a large voltage pulse for each ionization event. Alpha particles from an Am-241 source were detected with near 100% efficiency. Beta particles from a Cs-137 source were detected us...

  11. The activity at the state organs of Russia in the field for providing radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of reliable, efficient radiation safety of enterprises, research institute and organizations of Minatom of Russian Federation, environmental protection and some other problems have been discussed in this report. It consists of three parts. The first contents the information of the governmental and industrial safety systems on the territory of Russian Federation. The second part comprises the findings distinguishing the safety of the NPPs and the enterprises of nuclear industry. Some problems of the actual researches and application developments including the development of new international nuclear safety standards based on recommendations of International Committee of Radiation Protection have been written in third part. (author)

  12. Controlling Non-Point Source Pollution in Australian Agricultural Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. GOURLEY; A. RIDLEY

    2005-01-01

    The Australian farming sector is continuing to intensify, particularly within 300 km of the east and southern coastlines.In the future there will be fewer and larger farms, which will use more fertilizer, support more stock, grow more monoculture crops, and utilise more marginal soils. This is likely to increase the major environmental impacts of soil degradation, salt,nutrient and sediment contamination of waterways, and greenhouse gas emissions. Australian national water policy continues to focus on land, stream and groundwater salinity issues, although there is now a greater recognition of the importance of nitrogen and phosphorus losses from agriculture. The general philosophy of policy for dealing with nonpoint source pollution has been towards a voluntary rather than regulatory approach, with state and national governments supporting a range of programs to encourage sustainable agricultural practices. A catchment (watershed) based approach,through the use of integrated catchment management plans, is the primary way that non-point source pollution is addressed at the farm and local level. At an industry level, cotton, grains, meat, sugarcane and dairy amongst others, as well as the Australian fertilizer industry, have responded to non-point source issues by investing in research and development, and developing codes of practice aimed at abating these environmental impacts. Understanding the economic, social, political and cultural contexts of farming as well as the environmental impacts of agriculture are very important in determining the appropriateness of policy responses for Australian farming systems.

  13. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, David B.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B.; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; MOISSONNIER, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 ...

  14. Observation of a radiating bulk strain soliton in a solid-state waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiden, G. V.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Khusnutdinova, K. R.

    2011-06-01

    The appearance and propagation of a radiating bulk elastic strain soliton is experimentally detected for the first time in layered nonlinearly elastic waveguides with nonideal contact between the layers. The nature of such waves is explained in terms of a model using coupled Boussinesq equations.

  15. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982

  16. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  17. Operational accidents and radiation exposure experience within the United States Atomic Energy Commission, 1943--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational injury and fatality experience during 32 years of the development of the atomic energy industry under the direction of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, is reviewed. Data are included on the cause of all accidents, including fires and transportation accidents, and the cost of AEC property damage. Fatalities of AEC and contractor personnel from all causes during the 32-year period totaled 321, of which 184 occurred in construction; 121 in AEC operations such as production, research, and services; and 16 in Government functions. There were 19,225 lost-time injuries attributable to all accidental causes, or a 32-year frequency rate of 2.75 based on the number of injuries per million man-hours. There were six deaths attributable to nuclear causes, thee of which were due to blast and flying missiles and three caused by whole-body radiation exposure. Forty-one workers were involved in lost-time radiation accidents, of whom 26 showed clinical manifestations attributable to radiation, resulting in permanent partial-disability of three workers and the loss of a digit by four workers, while the others did not develop evidence of radiation injury

  18. Evaluation of the behavior of a hundred dentists concerning to radiation protection in the city of Aracatuba, Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of 100 dentists concerned to radiation protection in the city of Aracatuba, Sao Paulo State. Each dental office was visited, and a form was filled out by the dentists, with questions regarding the radiation protection of the patient, operator and staff. in the same visit, a radiography was taken using a phantom and processed according to the professionals'routine, to determine its diagnostic accuracy. After data analysis, we concluded that the dentists are not using satisfactorily the radiological sources, and the exposure and processing conditions could be improved. We also concluded that the professionals tend to task the radiographs after the clinical examination of the mouth, to reduce the number of the X-ray/patient ratio. Another conclusion is that the biological hazards from xradiation is not significant because of the small number of dental radiographs taken monthly. (author)

  19. Hawking Radiation-Quasi-Normal Modes Correspondence and Effective States for Nonextremal Reissner-Nordström Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the nonstrictly thermal character of the Hawking radiation spectrum harmonizes Hawking radiation with black hole (BH) quasi-normal modes (QNM). This paramount issue has been recently analyzed in the framework of both Schwarzschild BHs (SBH) and Kerr BHs (KBH). In this assignment, we generalize the analysis to the framework of nonextremal Reissner-Nordström BHs (RNBH). Such a generalization is important because in both Schwarzschild and Kerr BHs an absorbed (emitted) particle has only mass. Instead, in RNBH the particle has charge as well as mass. In doing so, we expose that, for the RNBH, QNMs can be naturally interpreted in terms of quantum levels for both particle emission and absorption. Conjointly, we generalize some concepts concerning the RNBH's “effective states.”

  20. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-05-16

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

  1. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs

  2. Radiation protection programmes in Australia and the USA - similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aims of a comprehensive radiation protection programme in many working environments, including the Australian states and territories and the United States of America, are similar. However, the means by which the final programme objectives are achieved, may differ. In many cases, this is dictated by specific statutory requirements of the country in question. An opportunity to work in the USA has provided insights into the similarities and differences that exist between the two countries, as they relate to organisational planning and deployment of radiation protection programmes. Examples of variances include: statutory requirements, an organisation's relationship with regulatory authorities, licensing requirements, surveys and monitoring, procedures for receiving and opening packages, waste management, record keeping, role of radiation safety/protection officer, radiation protection training. The importance of the exchange of information, general approach to safety and specific methods in addressing radiation protection can be of significant benefit to both the Australian and the US working environments. Fostering this kind of international collaboration and communication has enormous potential by sharing information and facilitating workplaces in both countries to utilise the most appropriate risk management processes

  3. Nazi medical experiments on Australian prisoners of war: Commentary on the testimony of an Australian soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M

    2015-12-01

    Archival research reveals that Australian prisoners of war were exposed to non-consensual medical experiments during World War II. This article discusses the first known case of an Australian soldier exposed to German medical experiments. PMID:26939510

  4. Nazi medical experiments on Australian prisoners of war: Commentary on the testimony of an Australian soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George M

    2015-12-01

    Archival research reveals that Australian prisoners of war were exposed to non-consensual medical experiments during World War II. This article discusses the first known case of an Australian soldier exposed to German medical experiments.

  5. Application of radiation safety principles and criteria in safety reassessment of radioactive waste disposed in near-surface facilities of the radon state corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyses regulatory requirements applied in the design and construction of radioactive waste disposal facilities at sites of the Radon State Corporation and considers approaches on use of radiation safety principles and criteria in their safety reassessment

  6. Australian network of magnetic observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. E.

    Six magnetic observatories are presently operated by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics (BMR), with assistance from various other organizations. Variometer recordings are made of three or more elements of the field at minute intervals, and absolute measurements are made weekly. There are four observatories on the continent (Canberra, Gnangara, Charters Towers, and Learmonth), one on Macquarie Island, and one at Mawson Station in eastern Antarctica (Figure 1). In addition, semiweekly absolute observations of the field (D, H, and F) are made at the other two permanent Australian Antarctic bases (Casey and Davis). A three-axis fluxgate magnetometer (EDA Electronics, Toronto , Canada) is operated independently by the Upper Atmosphere Physics group at Davis. Monthly mean values, K indices, and information about magnetic disturbances are published monthly in the BMR Geophysical Observatory Report.

  7. Nuclear techniques in Australian animal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In tropical and sub-tropical regions, the production of domestic animals is frequently depressed by the climatic and ecological conditions. These negative effects can be overcome to a great extent by improved methods of animal and land management. In animal research, nuclear techniques are playing an important role in the study of different aspects of nutrition, metabolism, reproduction and health of domestic animals. In response to the need expressed by Member States for more information on these techniques, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture and the IAEA's Division of Technical Assistance organized a study tour to Australia, a country which has developed considerable expertise in agricultural and animal research. The purpose of the study tour was to enable veterinary and animal scientists and administrators from developing countries in Asia and the Far East to observe at first hand the ways in which animal production, particularly meat, milk and wool, can be increased in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Fourteen senior scientists and research directors from seven Asian countries (Bangladesh, India, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka and Thailand) participated. The counterpart organizations in Australia were the Australian Development Assistance Agency (ADAA) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO). The chief programmer and co-ordinator of the study tour was John E. Vercoe, officer-in-charge of CSIRO's Tropical Cattle Research Centre in Rockhampton, and a former IAEA staff member. The tour was financed by the United Nations Development Programme. The participants visited research facilities of universities, national and state laboratories and commercial cattle producers. The tour started at Sydney and proceeded north along the east coast of Australia to Townsville. On the way, major stops were made in Armidale, Grafton, Wollongbar, Brisbane and Rockhampton. In Rockhampton, a

  8. Proposed layout features of an Australian proton treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From a theoretical point of view protons offer the best possible physical dose distribution for many radiotherapy treatment scenarios. However, proton generation of sufficient energy for treatment (about 250MeV) requires a large accelerator and is more expensive than conventional radiotherapy. Therefore the present project aimed at determining the desired configuration for a proton radiotherapy treatment facility in Australia. This is part of a proposal to introduce proton radiotherapy to Australia by the Australian Proton Project Group. It is assumed that a proton centre is build as a dedicated national radiotherapy facility. In this context and to be economically viable it must be large enough to treat well in excess of 1000 patients per year on several treatment stations. When building a proton treatment facility, it is essential to make use of all state-of-the-art features such as spot scanning techniques in order to offer patients a significant improvement in dose distribution compared to advanced conventional treatment techniques such as conformal and/or intensity modulated X-ray radiotherapy. As the potential useful life of a proton treatment unit is of the order of 20 years, it must be designed in a flexible way to allow upgrading as technology advances. The proposed facility includes at least one rotating gantry for isocentric beam delivery and stationary beam lines delivering protons between 70 and 250MeV energy. Features such as proton radiography and in situ PET treatment verification should be considered as a potential upgrade for future expansion. Other commercial activities (eg. radiation hardness testing) which could contribute to the running costs of the facility and scientific research out of the normal treatment hours is to be considered in the final design. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  9. Research Output of Australian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm Abbot; Hristos Doucouliagos

    2003-01-01

    Research plays an important role in underpinning a country’s economic and social life. Universities are at the centre of the research and human capital generating process. The aim of this paper is to explore the links between research output, research income, academic and non-academic labour and some of the characteristics of Australian universities. The results indicate that research income, academic staff and post-graduates are all positively associated with research output. There are notic...

  10. Evaluation of radiation protection conditions in dental offices in Bauru City, Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate the behaviour of 145 dentists, in their offices, as far as radiation protection in concerned. Every dental office was visited and the dentist filled out a form with questions regarding to radiation protection of patient, professional and dental assistant. The same visit exposure and processing conditions of intraoral films were checked and a no-screen film was exposed for late measurement of the diameter of x-ray bean. After data analysis it seems fair to conclude that exposure and processing conditions could be improved if the correct exposure and development times according to those suggested by their manufactures were employed. Another reasonable conclusion that could be drawn from the obtained data: the number of dental radiographs taken is small and so the probability of biological damage is not significant at the level of present knowledge. (author). 177 refs., 5 figs., 42 tabs

  11. Dependence of solar radiative forcing of forest fire aerosol on ageing and state of mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fiebig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During airborne in situ measurements of particle size distributions in a forest fire plume originating in Northern Canada, an accumulation mode number mean diameter of 0.34 mm was observed over Lindenberg, Germany on 9 August 1998. Realizing that this is possibly the largest value observed for this property in a forest fire plume, scenarios of plume ageing by coagulation are considered to explain the observed size distribution, concluding that the plume dilution was inhibited in parts of the plume. The uncertainties in coagulation rate and transition from external to internal mixture of absorbing forest fire and non-absorbing background particles cause uncertainties in the plume's solar instantaneous radiative forcing of 20-40% and of a factor of 5-6, respectively. Including information compiled from other studies on this plume, it is concluded that the plume's characteristics are qualitatively consistent with a radiative-convective mixed layer.

  12. Aims and present state of the radiation processing of fishes and seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptability of radurized pasteurized by ionizing radiations or radappertized (sterilized by ionizing radiations) fishery products depends on the irradiated fish quality. Though the sensory test is subjective, it allows a correct estimate of the quality. The correlation that exists between the adulteration degree estimated by chemical tests (T.M.A., total volatile bases, total volatil acids) and the organoleptic quality of the product is very variable. Gamma irradiation causes both qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbial flora. Methods actually used for the quality determination are not very fiable: researchs have to be undertaken to improve them. However, it can be assumed that: quality of radurized fish depends on its initial quality, storage duration, preirradiation storage temperature and amount of irradiation absorbed

  13. Time Travel: Australian Tourists and Britain's Past

    OpenAIRE

    Richard White

    2012-01-01

    Across the twentieth century, Britain drew more Australian tourists for longer and more intense experiences than anywhere else, though as early as the 1970s Asia was attracting more Australians than Europe. They found much to admire and to deprecate in Britain but above all they were seduced by Britain’s past, or what they imagined it to be. This paper examines the Australian experience of history in Britain, their admiration for notions of tradition, for an unchanging village life, for fadin...

  14. High temperature condensation and thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide in solid and liquid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Measuring thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures is very complicated problem from experimental point of view. It is connected with high evaporation of this material at high temperatures. In order to solve this problem with a subsecond laser technique the excess pressure of inert atmosphere is maintained in the working chamber to suppress surface evaporation in the focal area of the sample. In this paper it is shown that in this case the dense vapor phase formed above the investigated sample actively interacts with the sample surface and the laser radiation and distorts the experimental results. The developed polychromatic reflectometer with laser heating enabled one to discover the interesting phenomenon of the interaction of the vapor, liquid and solid phases in cerium dioxide under CO2 laser irradiation. This phenomenon is exhibited in the form of the exothermic peak of the condensation on the cooling curves moreover the temperature level of this transition is regulated by experimental parameters. The possibility of the change of the position of this floating phase transition on the temperature scale permits one to model the interaction of liquid-vapor and solid-vapor to estimate the contribution of the dense vapor phase formed above the sample to the thermal radiation properties of cerium dioxide at high temperatures. The experimental data on thermal radiation properties of stoichiometric cerium dioxide in the spectral range 0.4-1.1 μm and in the temperature region 2000-3500 K measured by the method developed are presented. Reflectivity and emissivity measurement error does not exceed ±3 %. The experimental results obtained are compared with the data of other authors and the recommended values for spectral reflectivity and emissivity of cerium dioxide at high temperatures are given. (author)

  15. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  16. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore (India)

    2013-12-15

    Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions towards the need to spread awareness, and willingness to gain and implement knowledge about radiation hazards and protection. Information regarding each respondent's age, gender, education, and type and duration of practice was collected. Overall, 87 out of 120 practitioners participated in the study. The mean knowledge, attitude, and practice scores were 9.54±2.54, 59.39±7.01, and 5.80±3.19, respectively. Overall, 25.3% of the respondents had undergone training in radiation protection, 98.9% perceived a need to spread awareness, and 94.3% were willing to improve their knowledge. Previous training showed a significant correlation with age, sex, and duration of practice; attitude was significantly correlated with education and type of practice; and knowledge scores showed a significant correlation with type of practice. Although the knowledge and practices of respondents were poor, they had a positive attitude and were willing to improve their knowledge. Age, sex, and duration of practice were associated with previous training; education and type of practice with attitude scores; and type of practice with knowledge scores. The findings of this study suggest a policy is needed to ensure the adherence of dental practitioners to radiation protection guidelines.

  17. Insights into the state of radiation protection among a subpopulation of Indian dental practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Binnal, Almas; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Denny, Ceena; Ahmed, Junaid; Nayak, Vijayendra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiographs is an integral part of patient management in dentistry, despite their detrimental effects. As the literature pertaining to radiation protection among Indian dental practitioners is sparse, exploring such protection is needed. Materials and Methods All private dental practitioners in Mangalore, India were included in the study. A structured, pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was employed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, previous training, perceptions...

  18. Aims and present state of radiation processing of fish and seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptability of radurized (pasteurized by ionizing radiation) or radappertized (sterilized by ionizin radiation) fishery products depends on the quality of fish irradiated. Though the organoleptic test is subjective, it allows a correct estimate of the quality. The correlation that exists between the adulteration degree estimated by chemical tests (T.M.A., total volatile bases, total volatile acids) and the organoleptic quality of the product is very variable. Further research is necessary to improve the methods currently used for quality determination. However, it can be assumed that the quality of radurized fish depends on its initial quality, storage time, preirradiation storage temperature and absorbed dose of radiation. Gamma irradiation causes both qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbial flora. Selective reduction in the microbial flora may be favourable to the development of Clostridium botulinum. This microorganism may produce toxins at refrigeration temperatures; radurization cannot eliminate the spores of Clostridium botulinum type E (the most often encountered in fish). Other food infection and food poisoning microorganisms like Salmonella species, Staphylococci and Enterococci survive radurization. Techniques such as irradiation on board, or combining refrigeration and irradiation may increase the storage life

  19. Initial-State Radiation Measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi- Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-01-01

    We study the process e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi-gamma, with a photon emitted from the initial-state electron or positron, using 454.3 fb^-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC, corresponding to approximately 260,000 signal events. We use these data to extract the non-radiative sigma(e+e- ->pi+pi-pi+pi-) cross section in the energy range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gev. The total uncertainty of the cross section measurement in the peak region is less than 3%, higher in precision than the corresponding results obtained from energy scan data.

  20. Observation of e+e- to K+K-J/psi via Initial State Radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, C Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Lin, S W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Nagasaka, Y; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zupanc, A; Zyukova, O

    2007-01-01

    The process e+e- to K+K-J/psi is observed for the first time via initial state radiation. The cross section of e+e- to K+K-J/psi for center-of-mass energies between threshold and 6.0 GeV is measured using 673 fb^{-1} of data collected with the Belle detector on and off the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We also find evidence for e+e- to K_S K_S J/psi in the same energy region.

  1. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world

  2. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangster, D. R. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world. 27 refs.

  3. Characterisation of episodic aerosol types over the Australian continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Classification of Australian continental aerosol types resulting from episodes of enhanced source activity, such as smoke plumes and dust outbreaks, is carried out via cluster analysis of optical properties obtained from inversion of sky radiance distributions at Australian aerosol ground stations using data obtained over the last decade. The cluster analysis distinguishes four significant classes, which are identified on the basis of their optical properties and provenance as determined by satellite imagery and back-trajectory analysis. The four classes are identified respectively as aged smoke, fresh smoke, coarse dust and a super-absorptive aerosol. While the first three classes show similarities with comparable aerosol types identified elsewhere, the super-absorptive aerosol has no obvious foreign prototype. The class identified as coarse dust shows a prominent depression in single scattering albedo in the blue spectral region due to absorption by hematite, which is shown to be more abundant in central Australian dust relative to the "dust belt"of the Northern Hemisphere. The super-absorptive class is distinctive in view of its very low single scattering albedo (~0.7 at 500 nm and variable enhanced absorption at 440 nm. The strong absorption by this aerosol requires a high black carbon content while the enhanced blue-band absorption may derive from organic compounds emitted during the burning of specific vegetation types. This aerosol exerts a positive radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA, with a large deposition of energy in the atmosphere per unit aerosol optical depth. This contrasts to the other three classes where the TOA forcing is negative. Optical properties of the four types will be used to improve the representation of Australian continental aerosol in climate models, and to enhance the accuracy of satellite-based aerosol retrievals over Australia.

  4. Characterisation of episodic aerosol types over the Australian continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Classification of Australian continental aerosol types resulting from episodes of enhanced source activity, such as smoke plumes and dust outbreaks, is carried out via cluster analysis of microphysical properties obtained from inversion of sky radiance distributions at Australian aerosol ground stations using data obtained over the last decade. The cluster analysis distinguishes four significant classes, which are identified on the basis of their optical properties and provenance as determined by satellite imagery and back-trajectory analysis. The four classes are identified respectively as aged smoke, fresh smoke, coarse dust and a super-absorptive aerosol. While the first three classes show similarities with comparable aerosol types identified elsewhere, the super-absorptive aerosol has no obvious foreign prototype. The class identified as coarse dust shows a prominent depression in single scattering albedo in the blue spectral region due to absorption by hematite, which is shown to be more abundant in central Australian dust relative to the "dust belt" of the Northern Hemisphere. The super-absorptive class is distinctive in view of its very low single scattering albedo (~0.7 at 500 nm and variable enhanced absorption at 440 nm. The strong absorption by this aerosol requires a high black carbon content while the enhanced blue-band absorption may derive from organic compounds emitted during the burning of specific vegetation types. This aerosol exerts a positive radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA, with a large deposition of energy in the atmosphere per unit aerosol optical depth. This contrasts to the other three classes where the TOA forcing is negative. Optical properties of the four types will be used to improve the representation of Australian continental aerosol in climate models, and to enhance the accuracy of satellite-based aerosol retrievals over Australia.

  5. Circular polarisation measurements of the Lα cascade radiation for the 32Dj states of atomic hydrogen, excited by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements are reported for the circular polarisation of the Lα radiation arising from the cascade of the 32Dj states of atomic hydrogen to the 22Pj states detected in coincidence with electrons with n = 3 energy loss. Data for the atomic orientation parameter L perpendicular are presented at incident electron energies of 54.4 and 100 eV and at scattering angles θe of 200 and 250. These data, together with previous measurements for this transition, constitute a determination of the complete parameter set {γ, P1, ρ00, L perpendicular} for 32Dj excitations in this dynamic range. Calculations for P3 and L perpendicular using distorted-wave approximation theory are also performed. The theoretical results are presented and compared with the experimental data. (author)

  6. Search for X(3872) in Untagged gamma gamma Fusion and Initial State Radiation Production with CLEO III

    CERN Document Server

    Metreveli, Z V; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S S; Müller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Credé, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Rosner, J L; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P

    2004-01-01

    We report on an exclusive search for the X(3872) state in the decay pi+ pi- J/Psi, J/psi to l+ l- (l = e, mu) from untagged gamma-gamma fusion and initial state radiation production using a 15.1 fb-1 data sample with the CLEO III detector. By taking advantage of the unique pi+ pi- J/psi decay kinematics, separate measurements for each production process are obtained. No signals are observed and preliminary upper limits have been established as [(2J+1)*Width_gamgam(X(3872))*BR(X(3872) to pi+ pi- J/psi)] < 12.9 eV and [Width_ee(X(3872))*BR(X(3872) to pi+ pi- J/psi)] < 8.0 eV, both at a 90% confidence level.

  7. Measurement of $e^+e^- \\to \\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$ via initial state radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Y L; Yuan, C Z; Shen, C P; Wang, P; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bansal, V; Bhardwaj, V; Biswal, J; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Horiguchi, T; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Kichimi, H; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Lewis, P; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Ostrowicz, W; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Steder, M; Sumihama, M; Tamponi, U; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    The process $e^+e^- \\to \\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$ ($J$=1, 2) is studied via initial state radiation using 980 fb$^{-1}$ of data at and around the $\\Upsilon(nS)$ ($n$=1, 2, 3, 4, 5) resonances collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. No significant signal is observed except from $\\psi(2S)$ decays. Upper limits on the cross sections between $\\sqrt{s}=3.80$ and $5.56~{\\rm GeV}$ are determined at the 90% credibility level, which range from few pb to a few tens of pb. We also set upper limits on the decay rate of the vector charmonium [$\\psi(4040$), $\\psi(4160)$, and $\\psi(4415)$] and charmoniumlike [$Y(4260)$, $Y(4360)$, and $Y(4660)$] states to $\\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$.

  8. State analysis of high power laser induced hot electrons by simulation of x-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou; Utsumi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Neyagawa Office, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    X-ray generation due to hot electrons induced by ultra-short pulse laser irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo Method. Mass attenuation coefficients of photons by scatter, photoelectric effect, or pair production, and stopping powers of hot electrons due to collisions and radiation are shown. The initial distribution of hot electrons is assumed to be Maxwellian, and the x-ray spectrum due to bremsstrahlung and the number of K{sub {alpha}} photons are calculated. As a result, the temperature of hot electrons could be estimated by comparing with the simulation results and the measurements. (author)

  9. Search for electromagnetic transitions between molecular states : results from the radiative capture channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the characterization of the cluster nature of resonances in 12C+12C and 12C+16O by measuring their γ decay. Results from resonant radiative capture measurements in these systems are presented. Spin attributions as well as specificities of the decay pattern are described. For the 12C+12C system, identification of γ transitions within the molecular band are discussed as well as a new method to measure the eventual persistence of the resonant behaviour down to astrophysical energies

  10. Changes in plasma membrane state of thymocytes during spontaneous and radiation-induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in plasma membrane properties characteristic for malignant cells were reviewed. Investigations of spontaneous (in AKR mice) and radiation-induced (in C57Bl) leukemogenesis were carried out; changes in properties of Na+, K+ ATPase and alkaline phosphatase were characterized. On the basis of the results reported a pre-leukemic stage was distinguished, corresponding to the following features at the cellular level: increase in activity of alkaline phosphatase; decrease in relative activity of Na+, K+ ATPase; decrease in efficiency of the Na+ K+ pump; decrease in cAMP content. 473 refs. (author)

  11. Absolute power scaling measurements of Electromagnetic radiation at 2ω /sub uh/ generated by steady state colliding electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space physics data indicate Electromagnetic (EM) emission correlated with the existence of electron beams in solar and planetary sources. The EM power is too large to be produced by linear plasma production mechanisms, suggesting that non-linear beam processes can coherently, enhance the generation of EM radiation. Steady state counterstreaming electron beams are produced in a triple plasma device, where they collide in a filament discharge target plasma. Neutral pressure is low (5 x 10-5 Torr), with background target density, n /sub e/ less than or equal to 1010 cm-3 and electron temperature T /sub e/ less than or equal to 4 eV . Beams are grid extracted from sources and collimated with a small axial magnetic field (B /sub o/ less than or equal to 10 Gauss). Beam density is n /sub b/ less than or equal to 108 cm-3 and beam energy is E /sub b/ < 150 eV. Plasma ions with varying masses such as He+, Ar+, Xe+ are used. Diagnostics are carried out with electrostatic probes and absolutely calibrated single turn Faraday shielded loop antennae. When counterstreaming electron beams are allowed to collide in the target, steady state electrostatic and electromagnetic disturbances are observed respectively at the upper hybrid frequency and the first harmonic. The colliding beam EM radiation power is seen to be greatly enhanced over that of the single beam case

  12. Achieving professional status: Australian podiatrists' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Wesley

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper explores the notion of professional status from the perspective of a sample of Australian podiatrists; how it is experienced, what factors are felt to affect it, and how these are considered to influence professional standing within an evolving healthcare system. Underpinning sociological theory is deployed in order to inform and contextualise the study. Methods Data were drawn from a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 21 and focus groups (n = 9 with podiatrists from across four of Australia's eastern states (Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Australian Capital Territory, resulting in a total of 76 participants. Semi-structured interview schedules sought to explore podiatrist perspectives on a range of features related to professional status within podiatry in Australia. Results Central to the retention and enhancement of status was felt to be the development of specialist roles and the maintenance of control over key task domains. Key distinctions in private and public sector environments, and in rural and urban settings, were noted and found to reflect differing contexts for status development. Marketing was considered important to image enhancement, as was the cache attached to the status of the universities providing graduate education. Conclusion Perceived determinants of professional status broadly matched those identified in the wider sociological literature, most notably credentialism, client status, content and context of work (such as specialisation and an ideological basis for persuading audiences to acknowledge professional status. In an environment of demographic and workforce change, and the resultant policy demands for healthcare service re-design, enhanced opportunities for specialisation appear evident. Under the current model of professionalism, both role flexibility and uniqueness may prove important.

  13. The effect of ionizing radiation on Plantago ovata (Ispaghula husk) in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbal medicine derived from natural raw materials is widely used in pharmaceutical preparations. Our study concerns the radiation decontamination of ispaghula husk (IH). Due to the high polysaccharide content of IH, it gels over wide range of concentrations. During the course of IH intake by patients, it experiences different degradation conditions such as acidic, alkaline and colonic microflora. Our study was designed to mimic this behaviour by carrying out controlled degradation steps using ionizing radiation and to study the effects on the molecular weight distribution in different solvents. Gel permeation chromatography coupled on line to a multi angle laser light detector (GPC-MALLS) was used in this study. We have shown that the water-soluble extract of the IH was increased from 21% to 47% with increasing degradation of the molecular structure whereas the alkaline solubility increased from 60 to 80%). The weight average molecular weight of the soluble control polysaccharide was higher in the water extract (2.3x106) than the material extracted in alkali (1.6x106), but following degradation as a results of irradiation, the material extracted into the two systems showed similar molecular weight profiles (author)

  14. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends in environmental radiation, and to provide such information to the public. It summarizes these activities for calendar year 1983. No radioactivity attributable to NTS activities was detectable offsite by the monitoring networks. Using recorded wind data and Pasquill stability categories, atmospheric dispersion calculations based on reported radionuclide releases yield an estimated dose of 5 x 10-5 man-rem to the population within 80 km of the Nevada Test Site during 1983. World-wide fallout of Kr-85, Sr-90, Cs-137, and Pu-239 detected by the monitoring networks would cause maximum exposure to an individual of less than 0.2 mrem per year. Plutonium and krypton in air were similar to 1982 levels while cesium and strontium in other samples were near the detection limits. An occasional net exposure to offsite residents has been detected by the TLD network. On investigation, the cause of such net exposures has been due to personal habits or occupational activities, not to NTS activities. 29 references, 35 figures, 30 tables

  15. Disorder of Endothelia Vessels' Functional State with Malignant Tumors in Patients Exposed Anthropogenic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Laura; Noso, Yoshihiro; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Anambaeva, Zukhra; Adylkhanov, Tasbolat; Takeichi, Nobuo; Lzhaev, Sayakhat; Aldyngurov, Daniyar; Tuleutayeva, Raikhan; Argynbekova, Ainur; Tanysheva, Gulyash; Zhazykbayeva, Lashyn; Baissalbayeva, Ainur; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the characteristics of endothelial factors and the hemostatic system conditions with malignant neoplasms patients, which were exposed to ionizing radiation. Total number of examined people is 223, 153 of them are patients with gastrointestinal tract oncopathology. The article presents the results of the analysis of numerical indicators of endothelial condition and platelet hemostasis of patients, who had cancer. They lived in the regions of Kazakhstan, subjected to contamination of radionuclides as a result of nuclear weapons tests, which took place in this region from 1949 to 1989. These results then were compared to cancer patients and healthy individuals with no radiation risk. The study revealed the presence of higher levels of endothelial dysfunction and following trigger of the hemostatic system in patients with malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. In particular, the defined high degree of endothelial dysfunction include endothelium- dependent vasodilation, content desquamated endothelial cells in peripheral blood and von Willebrand factor. These indicators have a clear correlation with the degree of disorder of studied parameters of the hemostasis, which can cause the development of thrombotic complications. PMID:26925646

  16. Excited states of aniline by photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 30,000-90,000 cm(-1) region using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, B N; Veeraiah, A; Sunanda, K; Jagatap, B N

    2013-08-14

    The photoabsorption spectrum of aniline (C6H5NH2) in gas phase in the 30,000-90,000 cm(-1) (3.7-11.2 eV) region is recorded at resolution limit of 0.008 eV using synchrotron radiation source for the first time to comprehend the nature of the excited valence and Rydberg states. The first half of the energy interval constitutes the richly structured valence transitions from the ground to excited states up to the first ionization potential (IP) at 8.02 eV. The spectrum in the second half consists of vibrational features up to second IP (9.12 eV) and structureless broad continuum up to the third IP (10.78 eV). The electronic states are assigned mainly to the singlets belonging to π → π* transitions. A few weak initial members of Rydberg states arising from π → 4s, np or nd transitions are also identified. Observed vibrational features are assigned to transitions from the ground state A' to the excited states 1A", 3A', 5A", 6A', and 10A" in C(s) symmetry. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations at B3LYP level of theory are employed to obtain the vertical excitation energies and the symmetries of the excited states in equilibrium configuration. The computed values of the transition energies agree fairly well with the experimental data. Further the calculated oscillator strengths are used to substantiate the assignments of the bands. The work provides a comprehensive picture of the vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of aniline up to its third ionization limit. PMID:23947851

  17. Excited states of aniline by photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 30 000-90 000 cm-1 region using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, B. N.; Veeraiah, A.; Sunanda, K.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2013-08-01

    The photoabsorption spectrum of aniline (C6H5NH2) in gas phase in the 30 000-90 000 cm-1 (3.7-11.2 eV) region is recorded at resolution limit of 0.008 eV using synchrotron radiation source for the first time to comprehend the nature of the excited valence and Rydberg states. The first half of the energy interval constitutes the richly structured valence transitions from the ground to excited states up to the first ionization potential (IP) at 8.02 eV. The spectrum in the second half consists of vibrational features up to second IP (9.12 eV) and structureless broad continuum up to the third IP (10.78 eV). The electronic states are assigned mainly to the singlets belonging to π → π* transitions. A few weak initial members of Rydberg states arising from π → 4s, np or nd transitions are also identified. Observed vibrational features are assigned to transitions from the ground state A' to the excited states 1A″, 3A', 5A,″ 6A', and 10A″ in Cs symmetry. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations at B3LYP level of theory are employed to obtain the vertical excitation energies and the symmetries of the excited states in equilibrium configuration. The computed values of the transition energies agree fairly well with the experimental data. Further the calculated oscillator strengths are used to substantiate the assignments of the bands. The work provides a comprehensive picture of the vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of aniline up to its third ionization limit.

  18. Modelling seasonality in Australian building approvals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry M Karamujic

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the impact of seasonal influences on Australian housing approvals, represented by the State of Victoria[1] building approvals for new houses (BANHs. The prime objective of BANHs is to provide timely estimates of future residential building work. Due to the relevance of the residential property sector to the property sector as whole, BANHs are viewed by economic analysts and commentators as a leading indicator of property sector investment and as such the general level of economic activity and employment. The generic objective of the study is to enhance the practice of modelling housing variables. In particular, the study seeks to cast some additional light on modelling the seasonal behaviour of BANHs by: (i establishing the presence, or otherwise, of seasonality in Victorian BANHs; (ii if present, ascertaining is it deterministic or stochastic; (iii determining out of sample forecasting capabilities of the considered modelling specifications; and (iv speculating on possible interpretation of the results. To do so the study utilises a structural time series model of Harwey (1989. The modelling results confirm that the modelling specification allowing for stochastic trend and deterministic seasonality performs best in terms of diagnostic tests and goodness of fit measures. This is corroborated with the analysis of out of sample forecasting capabilities of the considered modelling specifications, which showed that the models with deterministic seasonal specification exhibit superior forecasting capabilities. The paper also demonstrates that if time series are characterized by either stochastic trend or seasonality, the conventional modelling approach[2] is bound to be mis-specified i.e. would not be able to identify statistically significant seasonality in time series.According to the selected modeling specification, factors corresponding to June, April, December and November are found to be significant at five per cent level

  19. Western Australian Mineral and Petroleum Statistics Digest 2006-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains the most comprehensive statistical information available on the Western Australian minerals and petroleum industry. The statistics in this Digest show that in 2006-07 the value of sales by the State's minerals and petroleum sector set a new record, rising by 25 per cent to reach $53.4 billion. This follows a decade of average annual growth of twelve per cent. This record result was driven by strong overseas demand for our resources and rising commodity prices. Despite the robust nature of the industry, the year produced many challenges and the impressive result was achieved against a background of a strengthening Australian dollar, adverse weather conditions, skills shortages and mining equipment supply constraints

  20. Securitization of Migration: an Australian case study of global trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Humphrey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Post September 11 migration has increasingly been framed as a security problem. In the 2010 Australian election campaign migration was connected to security (defense of our borders, terrorism and social cohesion and to related issues of insecurity about the future (population size,sustainability and economic growth. Thisframing of migration as a national security issue overlooks the reality that Australian immigration is part of the global flow of population. Migration is an international issue experienced by states as a national question of border control and sovereignty seeking to manage the consequences of global inequality and mobility. This paper analyses the 'security turn' in migration debates in Australia and the North and the way the securitization of migration signifies the transformation of security from the problem of producing national order to the problem of managing global disorder resulting in the merging of national and international security strategies.

  1. Australian internet histories: Past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2012-01-01

    This Afterword compares the articles in this issue of Media International Australia to the ‘first wave’ of Australian internet historiography, a field of study established by Australian internet scholars around 2000. After identifying what is new in the present issue, I outline four paths that may...

  2. The sociology of the Australian agricultural environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanclay, F.

    1994-01-01

    Australian agriculture is in crisis, the terms of trade for agriculture are falling, many farmers have negative incomes, and there is massive structural adjustment with government policy assisting the exit of marginal farmers out of agriculture. Australian governments are gripped with the philosophy

  3. Four Management Agendas for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In a new mixed economy of higher learning, Australian universities require more strategic management to compete and collaborate sustainably. However, many scholars argue that new modes of university management are at odds with scholarly aims and values. This article examines how Australian universities frame their missions and communicate their…

  4. Recent developments in the Australian housing market

    OpenAIRE

    James Bond

    2003-01-01

    Housing plays an important role in Australia’s economic growth and in the welfare of Australians. This article examines developments in the Australian housing market over recent years. It argues that investors have played an increasingly important role in the housing market for both detached houses and apartments.

  5. Probing of local electron states by laser terahertz radiation in PbTe(Ga)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorova, S.G.; Chernichkin, V.I. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, L.I. [Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Danilov, S.N. [Faculty of Physics, University of Regensburg, Regensburg D-93040 (Germany); Nicorici, A.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Kishinev MD-2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Khokhlov, D.R., E-mail: khokhlov@mig.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • We report on unusual photoconductivity under terahertz laser pulses in PbTe(Ga). • The kinetics and the sign of the photosignal depend on the photoexcitation level. • This is due to formation of local states in the vicinity of the quasi-Fermi level. • These local electron states may lie only on the background of an allowed energy band. - Abstract: We report on unusual photoconductivity under the action of strong terahertz laser pulses in PbTe(Ga) single crystals at low temperatures. The character and even the sign on the photosignal depends on the level of photoexcitation: the photoconductivity is positive and persistent at high degrees of excitation, whereas it is negative and non-persistent at low levels of excitation. We show that this non-trivial photoelectric behaviour is due to formation of local electron states in the close vicinity of the quasi-Fermi level. These local states may be formed only when the quasi-Fermi level lies on the background of an allowed energy band with a relatively high density of states.

  6. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years

  7. Studies on Possible Activation of Microbial Inulinase Production Using Gamma Radiation Under Solid State Fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    optimization of different parameters affecting productivity of inulinase/invertase enzyme by Penicillium chrysogenum was studied. Optimized media used was Wheat bran: Jerusalem artichoke (4:1) 66% moisture content acidified mineral solution (ph 4.9). spore suspension 1.8 x 107 spores/ml irradiated with 1.00 kGy of gamma radiation. distilled water ph 6 (extracting solvent), corn steep liquor 0.6%, Corn oil, SDS and CaCl2 with incubation temperature 35°C for 72 hr. Immobilization of a partially purified inulinase enzyme from a local gamma irradiated strain of Penicillium chrysogenum on cheap immobilization supports was carried out. Highest inulinase immobilized activity was maintained on Ca- alginate beads. The immobilized enzyme showed a marked enhancement with temperature, ph optima, and thermostability, thus suggesting a promising industrial production of fructose syrup using the immobilized enzyme.

  8. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johore Bahru, Johore, Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2005-12-15

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 {+-} 5 to 378 {+-} 38 nGy h{sup -1}. The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h{sup -1}. The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 {+-} 15, 161 {+-} 16, 160 {+-} 16, 175 {+-} 18 and 176 {+-} 18 nGy h{sup -1}, respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 {+-} 17 nGy h{sup -1}. This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 {+-} 54 nGy h{sup -1}. The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv.

  9. Succession Planning in Australian Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hicks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this paper is that succession planning in Australian farming is under-developed.It may be linked to economic and social change which suggests that farmers need to adapt togenerational change but this is being resisted or ignored. The implications of this are the slowdecline of family farming, a poor transfer of skills and knowledge to subsequent generationsof farmers in some parts of the agricultural sector and the potential for an extension of thefinancial services industry to develop a more effective raft of succession planning measuresto mitigate the effects of a traditional approach to succession in agriculture.

  10. Australian developments in marine science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    2012-07-01

    Australia is an island nation with about two thirds of its jurisdiction underwater. On 25 May 2012, Australia instituted the Seas and Submerged Lands (Limits of Continental Shelf) Proclamation 2012, confirming areas of seabed where Australia has exclusive rights to explore and exploit marine resources. This proclamation follows recommendations by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, a body established under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, confirming Australia's entitlement to extended continental shelf, i.e., that beyond 200 nautical miles from the coastline, of some 2.56 million square kilometers, excluding Australian Antarctic Territory [Symonds et al., 2009] (Figure 1a).

  11. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Philip A.

    Australian Aboriginal ethnoastronomical traditions were recorded from a wide variety of sources in different periods. While the corpus of mythology concerning the heavens is diverse, it is unified by beliefs of a Skyworld as land with its own topography, containing plants and animals familiar to those living below. Spirits of the dead reside alongside the Creation Ancestors as celestial bodies in the Skyworld. Aboriginal hunter-gatherers used the regular movement of constellations and planets to measure time and to indicate the season, while unexpected change in the sky was seen as an omen.

  12. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2010-01-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  13. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  14. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2013-01-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  15. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  16. A comparison of delays in the treatment of cancer with radiation in Canada and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Waiting lists for medical care in Canada have been used as an argument against the single-payer option for health care reform in the United States, but there have been no direct comparisons of access to care in these two health care systems. The objective of this study was to compare how long cancer patients wait for radiotherapy in Canada and the USA. Methods and Materials: Heads of radiation oncology at all cancer centers listed by the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) in Canada and the United States were sent a questionnaire that asked how long their patients waited for radiotherapy, and how long they thought it was acceptable for patients to wait, in six clinical situations. Results: Ninety-two of 97 eligible centers responded (95%). Median waiting times to start of radiotherapy were as follows: carcinoma of the larynx (T2,N0,M0), 29 days in Canada, 10 days in the USA; carcinoma of the lung (Stage IIIb, squamous), 34 days in Canada, 9 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate (Stage B2), 40 days in Canada, 11 days in the USA; carcinoma of the breast (T2,N0,M0) referred 1 month after lumpectomy, 43 days in Canada, 10 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate with painful bone metastases, 17 days in Canada, 5 days in the USA; carcinoma of the prostate with spinal cord compression, < 1 day in Canada, < 1 day in the USA. The differences in waiting times between Canada and the USA were all statistically significant (p < 0.0001), except in the case of emergency treatment for cord compression. The majority of radiation oncologists in both Canada and the USA regarded the delays reported by Canadian departments as medically unacceptable. Conclusions: Patients almost everywhere in Canada wait longer for radiotherapy than they do almost anywhere in the United States

  17. Synchrotron VUV radiation studies of the D^1\\Pi_u State of H_2

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenson, G D; Roudjane, M; de Oliveira, N; Joyeux, D; Nahon, L; Tchang-Brillet, W -Ü L; Glass-Maujean, M; Haar, I; Ehresmann, A; Ubachs, W; 10.1063/1.3502471

    2013-01-01

    The 3p\\pi D^1\\Pi_u state of the H_2 molecule was reinvestigated with different techniques at two synchrotron installations. The Fourier-Transform spectrometer in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range of the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron was used for recording absorption spectra of the D^1\\Pi_u state at high resolution and high absolute accuracy, limited only by the Doppler contribution at 100 K. From these measurements line positions were extracted, in particular for the narrow resonances involving ^1\\Pi_u^- states, with an accuracy estimated at 0.06 cm^{-1} . The new data also closely match MQDT-calculations performed for the \\Pi^- components observed via the narrow Q-lines. The \\Lambda-doubling in the D^1\\Pi_u state was determined up to v=17. The 10 m normal incidence scanning monochromator at the beamline U125/2 of the BESSY II synchrotron, combined with a home built target chamber and equipped with a variety of detectors was used to unravel information on ionization, dissociation and intramo...

  18. Numerical modeling of thermal performance: Natural convection and radiation of solid state lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Zeijl, H.W. van; Werkhoven, R.J.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The increased electrical currents used to drive light emitting diode (LED) cause significant heat generation in the solid state lighting (SSL) system. As the temperature will directly affect the maximum light output, quality, reliability and the life time of the SSL system, thermal management is a k

  19. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, I; Lye, J; Alves, A [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Vic (Australia); Lehmann, J [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Kenny, J [Epworth HealthCare, Richmond, VIC (Australia); Dunn, L [Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Instit., Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  20. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  1. The influence of radiation sterilisation on some {beta}-blockers in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciniec, B. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 6 Gruwaldzka Str., 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Ogrodowczyk, M., E-mail: mogrodo@ump.edu.pl [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 6 Gruwaldzka Str., 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Czajka, B.; Hofman, M. [Department of Cooridinational Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-02-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Six {beta}-blockers (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, propranolol) in solid phase were exposed to the ionising radiation by e-beam in doses from 25 to 400 kGy. {yields} To establish the effects of irradiation on their physico-chemical properties, the compounds were then analysed by DSC, SEM, XRD and FT-IR. {yields} For alprenolol, propranolol and metoprolol linear relations were found between the irradiation dose and the decrease in the melting point (r = 0.9446-0.9864). {yields} No changes were observed in the FT-IR spectra and in the SEM images of the compounds studied. - Abstract: Six derivatives of aryloxyalkylaminopropanol of known {beta}-adrenolytic activity (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, propranolol) in solid phase were exposed to the ionising radiation generated by e-beam of high-energy electrons from an accelerator ({approx}10 MeV) in doses from 25 to 400 kGy. To establish the effects of irradiation on their physico-chemical properties, the compounds were then analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectrometry. The standard sterilisation dose (25 kGy) was found to cause no changes in only one derivative - acebutolol, whereas in the other derivatives the irradiation caused colour changes, differences in X-ray diffraction patterns and in the character of DSC curves, including a decrease in the melting point. For each derivative one clear peak corresponding to the process of melting was observed and its position shifted towards lower temperatures with increasing dose of irradiation. For all compounds studied the value of the shift was between 0.1 and 1.0 {sup o}C. For alprenolol, propranolol and metoprolol linear relations were found between the irradiation dose and the decrease in the melting point, described by the correlation coefficient (between 0.9446 and 0.9864). No changes were observed in

  2. Learner discipline: An Australian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Stewart

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Australian schools by and large are safe schools. Nonetheless discipline problems do exist – including bullying behaviour. For this kind of problem schools should have management policies in place. As traditional behaviour-management practices – including corporal punishment – are largely prohibited in Australian schools, contemporary practices centre on management through supportive school programmes, including appropriate curricula and school-support structures. This article supports the belief that measures such as the exclusion of misbehaving learners should be treated with caution. Measures such as this might not reflect accepted international principles and practices and should only be exercised in the most extreme circumstances. The article also supports the view that it is part of the school’s role to ensure that all learners are aware of the reality that while they have rights, they also have corresponding responsibilities. This awareness is more likely to be achieved in a supportive school culture where each learner is recognised as having unique qualities that can mature and grow in an appropriate learning environment.

  3. Gravitational Radiation from Rotational Core Collapse: Effects of Magnetic Fields and Realistic Equation of States

    CERN Document Server

    Kotake, K; Sato, K; Sumiyoshi, K; Ono, H; Suzuki, H; Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi; Sato, Katsuhiko; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Ono, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2004-01-01

    We perform a series of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the rotational collapse of a supernova core. In order to calculate the waveforms of the gravitational wave, we derive the quadrupole formula including the contributions from the electromagnetic fields. Recent stellar evolution calculations imply that the magnetic fields of the toroidal components are much stronger than those of the poloidal ones at the presupernova stage. Thus, we systematically investigate the effects of the toroidal magnetic fields on the amplitudes and waveforms. Furthermore, we employ the two kinds of the realistic equation of states, which are often used in the supernova simulations. Then, we investigate the effects of the equation of states on the gravitational wave signals. With these computations, we find that the peak amplitudes are lowered by an order of 10% for the models with the strongest toroidal magnetic fields. However, the peak amplitudes are mostly within sensitivity range of laser inter...

  4. Radiation induced diarrhoea - literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced diarrhoea is an acute side effect of radiotherapy treatment to the pelvic area, experienced by nearly all patients. This paper will explore the patho-physiological rationale of diarrhoea, the causes of radiation-induced diarrhoea, the factors that influence the severity and occurrence, and the treatment of diarrhoea in relation to the radiotherapy setting, by analysing the current literature and will conclude by outlining future directions in this field. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  5. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  6. Radiation protection in dentistry: analysis of Faculties of Dentistry from State of Rio de Janeiro in relation to personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to show the need and the importance of the training and formation of the dentist in radioprotection, in accordance with the recent proposal of Technical Regulation Guidelines of Radiation Protection in radiodiagnostic in Medicine and Odontology, from the ministry of Health, which established basic for radioprotection in medicine and odontology, including the principles, limits, obligations and basic controls for protection of man and the environment, against possible improper effects caused by the use of ionizing radiation sources. Departing from results obtained previously by a research about training and Formation of the dentist in Radioprotection, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, a questionnaire was applied to know better the abilities of our dentist. Analysis of programs of disciplines in schools of dentist, in the sate of Rio de Janeiro indicate that they show little or no concern with radiological protection. This was confirmed through a first questionnaire applied to students, dentist teachers, which corroborates with results of the last questionnaire. This work suggests creation or adaptation of existent disciplines, involving radioprotection and quality of images in radiodiagnostic, to improve, complement, and make uniform the formation future dentists. (author)

  7. Size-appropriate radiation doses in pediatric body CT: a study of regional community adoption in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade, there has been a movement in the United States toward utilizing size-appropriate radiation doses for pediatric body CT, with smaller doses given to smaller patients. This study assesses community adoption of size-appropriate pediatric CT techniques. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) in pediatric body scans are compared between community facilities and a university children's hospital that tailors CT protocols to patient size as advocated by Image Gently. We compared 164 pediatric body scans done at community facilities (group X) with 466 children's hospital scans. Children's hospital scans were divided into two groups: A, 250 performed with established pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection; B, 216 performed with addition of iterative reconstruction technique and a 60% reduction in volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). SSDE was calculated and differences among groups were compared by regression analysis. Mean SSDE was 1.6 and 3.9 times higher in group X than in groups A and B and 2.5 times higher for group A than group B. A model adjusting for confounders confirmed significant differences between group pairs. Regional community hospitals and imaging centers have not universally adopted child-sized pediatric CT practices. More education and accountability may be necessary to achieve widespread implementation. Since even lower radiation doses are possible with iterative reconstruction technique than with filtered back projection alone, further exploration of the former is encouraged. (orig.)

  8. Exclusive Production of Ds Ds-, Ds* Ds-, and Ds* Ds*- via e e- Annihilation with Initial-State-Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-10-27

    The authors perform a study of exclusive production of D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, D*{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sub s}{sup -} final states in initial-state-radiation events from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium 1{sup --} states. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 525 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -}, D*{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D*{sub s}{sup +}D*{sub s}{sup -} mass spectra show evidence of the known {psi} resonances. Limits are extracted for the branching ratios of the decays X(4260) {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}.

  9. Study of the Y (4260) resonance in e+e- collisions with initial state radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aoki, K; Arakawa, T; Arinstein, K; Asano, Y; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Barbero, M; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, J H; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dowd, R; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Enari, Y; Epifanov, D A; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Jones, M; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikuchi, N; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, T H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kishimoto, N; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kubota, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, S E; Lee, Y J; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, C Y; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakagawa, T; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Ronga, F J; Root, N; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Saitoh, S; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Sato, N; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Seki, T; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, Y T; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sidorov, V; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takada, N; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanabe, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tsai, Y T; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Wu, C H; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, S; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Heyoung Yang; Yoshino, S; Yuan, Y; Yusa, Y; Zang, S L; Zhang, C C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Ziegler, T; Zupanc, A; Zürcher, D

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of Y(4260) properties using the initial-state radiation process e^+e^- -> gamma_{ISR} Y(4260). The Y(4260) resonance is reconstructed in the pi^+ pi^- J/\\psi decay mode, using data collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB e^+e^- collider. We find a significant signal with a central mass value of (4295 +-10 +10 -3) MeV/c^2 and a width of (133 +-26 +13 -6) MeV/c^2. We find Gamma_{ee}.B(Y(4260) -> pi^+ pi^- J/\\psi) = (8.7 +- 1.1 +0.3 -0.9) eV. These results are preliminary.

  10. Observation of $\\psi(4415)\\to D \\bar D{}^{*}_2(2460)$ decay using initial-state radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhlova, G; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Joshi, N J; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Lin, S W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Miyake, H; Mizuk, R; Mohapatra, D; Moloney, G R; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Park, H; Park, K S; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schwanda, C; Senyo, K; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C H; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-01-01

    We report the first observation of the $\\psi(4415)$ resonance in the reaction $\\e^+e^-\\to D^0 D^-\\pi^+$ and a measurement of its cross section in the center-of-mass energy range $4.0\\mathrm{GeV}$ to $5.0\\mathrm{GeV}$ with initial state radiation. From a study of resonant structure in $\\psi(4415)$ decay we conclude that the $\\psi(4415)\\to D^0 D^-\\pi^+$ decay is dominated by $\\psi(4415)\\to D \\bar D{}^{*}_2(2460)$. We obtain $\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(4415)\\to D^0 D^-\\pi^+_{\\mathrm {non-resonant}})/\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(4415)\\to D \\bar D{}^{*}_2(2460)\\to D^0 D^-\\pi^+)<0.22$ at 90% C.L. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector with an integrated luminosity of 673 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$.

  11. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  12. Economic burden analysis for UV radiation and vitamin D for colorectal cancer in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Cedric F.; Mohr, Sharif B.; Grant, William B.; Holick, Michael F.

    2005-08-01

    Moderate exposure to sunlight is a key factor in maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D sufficiency is associated with reduced incidence of many forms of cancer, osteoporotic fractures, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. However, excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure may be associated with melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. An estimated 50,000-60,000 individuals die prematurely from cancer annually due to insufficient vitamin D in the US. The annual economic burden due to vitamin D insufficiency from inadequate exposure to solar ultraviolet B (UVB) or deficient oral intake is estimated at $46-65 billion, while that for excessive UVR exposure is $5-7 billion (1). Since excessive UVR exposure is not required for adequate vitamin D photosynthesis, increasing national guidelines for vitamin D intake and de-stigmatizing appropriate solar UVB exposure would substantially reduce medical care costs. This report describes an algorithm for estimating the annual number of dollars that could be saved and deaths from colorectal cancer that could be prevented by moderate daily exposure to sunlight or increased oral intake of vitamin D3. If the assumptions of this analysis are valid, moderate exposure to sunlight or adequate oral intake of vitamin D3 would prevent 10 deaths from colorectal cancer for every death from skin cancer that it might induce, and would save $11 billion per year. Reference: (1) Grant WB, Garland CF, Holick MF. Comparisons of estimated economic burdens due to insufficient solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation or vitamin D and excess solar UV irradiation. Photochem Photobiol. In press.

  13. Solid State and Chemical Radiation Dosimetry in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 3-7 October 1966. The meeting was attended by 104 participants from 21 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Solid state dosimetry (17 papers); Chemical dosimetry (10 papers); Invited lectures (2 papers); General aspects and other methods of dosimetry (6 papers); Panel discussion on research and development needed in dosimetry. Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 2 French and 1 Spanish) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language, if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  14. Study of the Exclusive Initial-State Radiation Production of the $D \\bar D$ System

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; van, N; Bakel; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    A study of exclusive production of the $D \\bar D$ system through initial-state r adiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where $D=D^0$ or $D^+$. The $D^0$ mesons are reconstructed in the $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+$, $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^0$, and $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decay modes. The $D^+$ is reconstructed through the $D^+ \\to K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$ decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the BaBar experiment. The $D \\bar D$ mass spectrum shows a clear $\\psi(3770)$ signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/$c^2$ regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to $D \\bar D$, implying an up per limit $\\frac{\\BR(Y(4260)\\to D \\bar D)}{\\BR(Y(4260)\\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} < 7.6$ (95 % confidence level).

  15. GIS predictive mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation in the Northern State, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the evaluation of absorbed dose in air due to gamma-emitting nuclides from 238U and 232Th series, 40K and 137Cs and the corresponding geographical information system (GIS) predictive mapping for the Northern State. Activity concentration of 238U, 232Th , 40K and 137Cs in soil samples collected from different locations have been measured using high resolution gamma spectrometry. On average, activity concentrations were 19±4 (238U), 47±11 (232Th), 317±65 (40K) and 2.26 Bq kg-1 for 137Cs. Absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1 m above ground surface was calculated using seven sets of dose rate conversion factors (DRCFs) and the corresponding annual effective dose was estimated. On average, the values obtained fall within a narrow range of 44 and 53 nGy h-1, indicating that the variation in absorbed dose rate is insignificant for different DRCFs. The corresponding annual effective dose ranged from 53 to 65 μSv y-1. Using GIS, prediction maps for concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were produced. Also, a map for absorbed dose rate in air at a height of 1 m above the ground level was produced, which showed a trend of increasing from the west towards south-east of the State. (authors)

  16. Black holes as self-sustained quantum states and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Micu, Octavian; Orlandi, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    We employ the recently proposed formalism of the "horizon wave function" to investigate the emergence of a horizon in models of black holes as Bose-Einstein condensates of gravitons. We start from the Klein-Gordon equation for a massless scalar (toy graviton) field coupled to a static matter current. The (spherically symmetric) classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, and the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with continuous occupation number. Assuming an attractive self-interaction that allows for bound states, one finds that (approximately) only one mode is allowed, and the system can be confined in a region the size of the Schwarzschild radius. This radius is then shown to correspond to a proper horizon, by means of the horizon wave function of the quantum system, with an uncertainty in size naturally related to the expected typical energy of Hawking modes. In particular, this uncertainty decreases for larger black hole mass (with a larger number of light scalar quanta), in agreement with semiclassical expectations, a result which does not hold for a single very massive particle. We finally speculate that a phase transition should occur during the gravitational collapse of a star (ideally represented by a static matter current and Newtonian potential) that leads to a black hole (again ideally represented by the condensate of toy gravitons), and suggest an effective order parameter that could be used to investigate this transition.

  17. Black holes as self-sustained quantum states, and Hawking radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Casadio, Roberto; Micu, Octavian; Orlandi, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the proposal that black holes are Bose-Einstein condensates of gravitons starting form the Klein-Gordon equation for a massless scalar (graviton) field coupled to a static matter current. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, and the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of graviton modes with continuous occupation number. However, if the source is given by the scalar field state itself, one finds that (approximately) only one mode is allowed, and the gravitons approach a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a region of the size of the Schwarzschild radius of the system. The latter is then shown to represent a proper horizon, by means of the horizon wave-function of this quantum system, with an uncertainty in the horizon radius naturally related with the typical energy of Hawking modes. We finally speculate about the phase transition that might occur during the gravitational collapse of a star, ideally represented by th...

  18. Evaluating Junior Secondary Science Textbook Usage in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2016-08-01

    A large body of research has drawn attention to the importance of providing engaging learning experiences in junior secondary science classes, in an attempt to attract more students into post-compulsory science courses. The reality of time and resource constraints, and the high proportion of non-specialist science teachers teaching science, has resulted in an overreliance on more transmissive pedagogical tools, such as textbooks. This study sought to evaluate the usage of junior secondary science textbooks in Australian schools. Data were collected via surveys from 486 schools teaching junior secondary (years 7-10), representing all Australian states and territories. Results indicated that most Australian schools use a science textbook in the junior secondary years, and textbooks are used in the majority of science lessons. The most highly cited reason influencing choice of textbook was layout/colour/illustrations, and electronic technologies were found to be the dominant curricula material utilised, in addition to textbooks, in junior secondary science classes. Interestingly, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their textbooks, although many were keen to stress the subsidiary role of textbooks in the classroom, emphasising the textbook was `one' component of their teaching repertoire. Importantly, respondents were also keen to stress the benefits of textbooks in supporting substitute teachers, beginning teachers, and non-specialist science teachers; in addition to facilitating continuity of programming and staff support in schools with high staff turnover. Implications from this study highlight the need for high quality textbooks to support teaching and learning in Australian junior secondary science classes.

  19. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa J. Stoneham; Jodie Goodman; Mike Daube

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative...

  20. Compliance with Corporate Governance Principles: Australian Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Safari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the association between the level of compliance of Australian listed companies with Australian corporate governance principles, in aggregate, and the level of discretionary accruals using the modified Jones model. It is hypothesised that higher levels of compliance would be associated with lower levels of discretionary accruals. Data from a random sample of 214 Australian listed companies for the years 2009 and 2010 were used to test the hypothesis. The results demonstrate a significant negative relationship indicating that companies with higher levels of compliance engage in lower levels of earnings management via discretionary accruals.

  1. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs.

  2. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Australian national residue survey – closing the loop on pesticide residue risk management for Australian grain

    OpenAIRE

    Reichstein, I.; Healy, K; James, A.; Murray, B.

    2010-01-01

    Australia exports a major proportion of its agricultural production and is highly dependent on maintaining and developing access to, and competitiveness in, export markets. To preserve Australia’s status as a provider of high quality grain, the majority of Australian primary producers rely on pesticides to protect their crops from pests and diseases, particularly in post-harvest situations. The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) supports Australian agriculture by...

  4. Training, health and functional state of the schoolboys living in regions of radiation contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The psycho physiological feature of a personality of schoolboys of different age groups living on contaminated territories were studied. The children suffer from consequences of the Chernobyl accident more than the adults, because they are more sensitive for action of the various factors of an environment due to a change of an organism reactivity, strengthening of an growing asynchronism of separate systems and functions and etc. As a rule, the people of all surveyed schools have the complaints on increased fatigue, somnolence at the afternoon, head aches, vertigo, irritant, aches in the field of heart, aches in a stomach, bleeding from nose, often common cold, loss of an appetite, low serviceability. All interrogated schoolboys complain on a health state, at the same time the chronic diseases are revealed at 36% of surveyed ones. The observable schoolboys, living on contaminated territories, have significant psycho emotional pressure and suffer from a distortion of a normal mode of life. 9 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Bloch bound states in the radiation continuum in a periodic array of dielectric rods

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N

    2014-01-01

    We consider an infinite periodic array of dielectric rods in vacuum with the aim to demonstrate three types of a Bloch bound states in the continuum (BSC), symmetry protected with a zero Bloch vector, embedded into one diffraction channel with nonzero Bloch vector, and embedded into two and three diffraction channels. The first and second types of the BSC exist in a wide range of material parameters of the rods, while the third occurs only at a specific value of the radius of the rods. We show that the second type supports the power flux along the array. In order to find BSC we put forward an approach based on the expansion over the Hankel functions. We show how the BSC reveals itself in the scattering function when the singular BSC point is approached along a specific path in the parametric space.

  6. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV2+, the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV+; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 109, 7.6 x 109, and 8.5 x 106M-1s-1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV+ to be severely diminished

  7. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations. PMID:22257324

  8. Status of costing hospital nursing work within Australian casemix activity-based funding policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Liza

    2012-02-01

    Australia has a long history of patient level costing initiated when casemix funding was implemented in several states in the early 1990s. Australia includes, to some extent, hospital payment based on nursing intensity adopted within casemix funding policy and the Diagnostic Related Group system. Costing of hospital nursing services in Australia has not changed significantly in the last few decades despite widespread introduction of casemix funding policy at the state level. Recent Commonwealth of Australia National Health Reform presents change to the management of the delivery of health care including health-care costing. There is agreement for all Australian jurisdictions to progress to casemix-based activity funding. Within this context, nurse costing infrastructure presents contemporary issues and challenges. An assessment is made of the progress of costing nursing services within casemix funding models in Australian hospitals. Valid and reliable Australian-refined nursing service weights might overcome present cost deficiencies and limitations.

  9. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2011-01-01

    We explore 50 Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarise the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses, showing that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, Elders or medicine men were believed to have the ability to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their role as provider and protector within the community. We also show that many Aboriginal groups understood the motions of the sun-earth-moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the moon blocking the sun.

  10. Australians' attitudes to nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a series of surveys of 2900 Australians show that some 80 per cent favour nuclear disarmament. The nuclear disarmament view is broad-based, for example it cuts across differences in age, sex and education. However the view is more common among people towards the left of the political spectrum who view the world as benign rather than hostile and who consider stockpiles can be reduced by small, reciprocated and supervised reductions. Between 2.5 per cent and 5.5 per cent of respondents act to bring about nuclear disarmament. The findings support and extend results from studies outside Australia showing that attitudes favouring nuclear disarmament are distributing themselves widely

  11. REGULATION OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND NATIONAL SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THREE CASE STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas; McKenna, Michael; Rayner, Johanna; Hawes, Jazmin

    2016-03-01

    In recent times, Australia's national security concerns have had controversial impacts on regulation of Australian medical practitioners in areas related to immigration detention. This column explores three recent case studies relevant to this issue. The first involves the enactment of the Australian Border Force Act 2015 (Cth), which has a significant impact on the regulation of medical professionals who work with people in immigration detention. The second involves the decision of the High Court of Australia in Plaintiff M68/2015 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2016] HCA 1 that an amendment to Australian federal legislation justified sending children back to immigration detention centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru. This legislation was previously heavily criticised by the Australian Human Rights Commissioner. The third concerns the deregistration of Tareq Kamleh, an Australian doctor of German-Palestinian heritage who came to public attention on ANZAC Day 2015 with his appearance online in a propaganda video for the Islamic State terrorist organisation al-Dawla al-Islamyia fil Iraq wa'al Sham, also known as Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) or Daesh. Australia's professional regulatory system should presumptively respect professional virtues, such as loyalty to the relief of individual patient suffering, when dealing with doctors (whether in Australia or ISIS-occupied Syria) working under regimes whose principles appear inconsistent with those of ethics and human rights. PMID:27323633

  12. Bottomonium spectroscopy and radiative transitions involving the chi_bJ(1P,2P) states at BABAR

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P

    2014-01-01

    We use $(121\\pm1)$ million $\\Upsilon(3S)$ and $(98\\pm1)$ million $\\Upsilon(2S)$ mesons recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II $e^+e^-$ collider at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions involving the $\\chi_{b\\mathrm{J}}(1P,2P)$ states in exclusive decays with $\\mu^+\\mu^-\\gamma\\gamma$ final states. We reconstruct twelve channels in four cascades using two complementary methods. In the first we identify both signal photon candidates in the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC), employ a calorimeter timing-based technique to reduce backgrounds, and determine branching-ratio products and fine mass splittings. These results include the best observational significance yet for the $\\chi_{b0}(2P)\\rightarrow\\gamma\\Upsilon(2S)$ and $\\chi_{b0}(1P)\\rightarrow\\gamma\\Upsilon(1S)$ transitions. In the second method, we identify one photon candidate in the EMC and one which has converted into an $e^+e^-$ pair due to interaction with detector material, and we measure absolute product branching fractions. This metho...

  13. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated $d^6$ ($t_{2g}^6$) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)$_3$]$^{2+}$ and Ir(ppy)$_3$, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, $T_1$, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of $T_1$ and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-revers...

  14. Whole-organism concentration ratios in wildlife inhabiting Australian uranium mining environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirth, Gillian A.; Carpenter, Julia G. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Rd, Yallambie, 3085, Victoria (Australia); Bollhoefer, Andreas [Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, GPO Box 461, Darwin, 0801 Northern Territory (Australia); Johansen, Mathew P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee, DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental impact assessments conducted for Australian mine sites involving naturally occurring radioactive material require an assessment of radiation doses to wildlife. Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo}) are pivotal in these assessments and previous reviews have identified a need for a more complete and consolidated database of Australian-specific CR{sub wo} that could be used. Concern had also been expressed by some stakeholders in Australia about the suitability of the default CR{sub wo} values provided in standard biota dose models (e.g., ERICA Tool, RESRAD-BIOTA, ICRP framework) for Australian wildlife and environmental conditions. In order to address these concerns and support the implementation of best-practice standards in environmental radiological assessment, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), with support from the Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism (RET), undertook an evaluation of existing data relating to wildlife inhabiting Australian uranium mining environments. CR{sub wo} values were calculated using data from a range of original sources. These included scientific journal publications, technical reports from Australian government organisations, site-specific data from mining operators and data from baseline environmental surveys undertaken during the 1970's and 1980's. The Australian data previously included in the international Wildlife Transfer Database (WTD, www.wildlifetransferdatabase.org) were also reviewed and updated. This paper discusses the data analysis process and associated uncertainties. CR{sub wo} values are reported for uranium, thorium, radium-226, lead-210 and polonium-210 for a range of endemic and introduced wildlife, with a focus on plants and animals from both terrestrial and freshwater environments where uranium mining has been proposed or undertaken. This has resulted in the calculation of more than 500 CR{sub wo} values for inclusion in the database

  15. Population and Australian development assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R

    1992-07-01

    Australia's position on international population issues is consistent with the major international statements on population: the World Population Plan of Action (1974), the Mexico City Declaration (1984), and the Amsterdam Declaration (1989). Australia's policy emphasizes the importance of population policies as an integral part of social, economic, and cultural development aimed at improving the quality of life of the people. Factors that would promote smaller families include improving economic opportunities, old-age security, education and health (particularly for women), as well as improving the accessibility and quality of family planning services. The quality of care approach is directly complementary to the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB)'s Women-In-Development Policy and its Health Policy, which stresses the theme of Women And Their Children's Health (WATCH). Australia's support for population programs and activities has increased considerably over the last few years. Total assistance for the year 1990/91 was around $7 million out of a total aid program of $1216 million. In recent years AIDAB has funded family planning activities or health projects with family planning components in a number of countries in the Asia-Pacific region. In the South Pacific region AIDAB has funded a reproductive health video project taking into consideration the cultural sensitivities and customs of the peoples of the region. AIDAB has supported a UN Population Fund project in Thailand that aims to strengthen the capacity of the National Statistical Office to collect population data. The US currently accounts for around 40% of all population-related development assistance to improve the health of women and children through family planning. The other major donors are Japan, the Scandinavian countries, and the Netherlands. Funding for population has been a relatively low percentage of overall development assistance budgets in OECD countries. In the

  16. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with

  17. Does time off work after injury vary by jurisdiction? A comparative study of eight Australian workers' compensation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Collie, Alex; Lane, Tyler J; Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz; Thompson, Jason; McLeod, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the jurisdiction in which a work-related injury compensation claim is made is an independent predictor of duration of time off work following work injury, and if so, the magnitude of the effect. Setting Eight Australian state and territory workers' compensation systems, providing coverage for more than 90% of the Australian labour force. Administrative claims data from these systems were provided by government regulatory authorities for the study. Participants ...

  18. Human resources issues and Australian Disaster Medical Assistance Teams: results of a national survey of team members

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) are likely to continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, this study was designed to evaluate Australian DMAT experience in relation to the human resources issues associated with deployment. Methods: Data was collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Austr...

  19. Responding to Indigenous Australian Sexual Assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janya McCalman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high prevalence of sexual assault, yet a regional sexual assault service found few Indigenous Australians accessed their services. This prompted exploration of how its services might be improved. A resultant systematic search of the literature is reported in this article. Seven electronic databases and seven websites were systematically searched for peer reviewed and gray literature documenting responses to the sexual assault of Indigenous Australians. These publications were then classified by response type and study type. Twenty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. They included studies of legal justice, media, and community-based and mainstream service responses for Indigenous survivors and perpetrators. We located program descriptions, measurement, and descriptive research, but no intervention studies. There is currently insufficient evidence to confidently prescribe what works to effectively respond to Indigenous Australian sexual assault. The study revealed an urgent need for researchers, Indigenous communities, and services to work together to develop the evidence base.

  20. The Australian synchrotron; Le synchrotron australien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhi, R

    2005-06-15

    This document recalls the historical aspects of the Australian Synchrotron which will be implemented in 2007. It presents then the objectives of this program, the specifications of the ring and the light lines. (A.L.B.)

  1. Innovation in Australian Workplaces: An Empirical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The determinants of innovation were examined using data from 698 Australian workplaces. Results suggest that better employee-management communications are associated with more change and that workplaces with higher levels of training undergo more change. (Author/JOW)

  2. China's first Australian Garden opens in Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The opening for the Australian Garden was jointly held by the BHP Billiton China and the CAS South China Botanical Garden (SCBG) in Guangzhou, capital of south China's Guangdong Province on 18 January.

  3. Estimate of radiation doses to workers in underground mines of coal and fluorite in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina and considerations on the optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendants in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentrations of radon in the environment of underground mines above 1000 - 1500 Bq/m3 are internationally considered to require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of the present work were to determine the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consisted in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m3. The inefficiency of the ventilation system and the liberation of radon during the various explosions may have contributed to the high concentrations of radon in these mines since the concentration of radium in the rocks (normal and weathered granites) and in the minerals (green and purple fluorides) that compose the mining environment are not high. The modification of the ventilation system of one of the fluorite mines was sufficient to reduce the radon concentration to levels of the order of 500 Bq/m3. The weathered granite contributes more significantly to the increase of the concentration of Rn-222 in the air than the other rocks here studied, i.e. normal granite as well as green and purple

  4. Estimate of radiation doses to workers in underground mines of coal and fluorite in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina and considerations on the optimisation of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Carlos Eduardo Lima dos; Vignol, Maria Lidia; Conceicao, Rommulo Vieira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias], e-mail: carlos.lima@ufrgs.br; Xavier, Ana Maria; Gouvea, Vandir; Macacini, Jose Flavio [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: axavier@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendants in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentrations of radon in the environment of underground mines above 1000 - 1500 Bq/m{sup 3} are internationally considered to require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of the present work were to determine the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consisted in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m{sup 3}. The inefficiency of the ventilation system and the liberation of radon during the various explosions may have contributed to the high concentrations of radon in these mines since the concentration of radium in the rocks (normal and weathered granites) and in the minerals (green and purple fluorides) that compose the mining environment are not high. The modification of the ventilation system of one of the fluorite mines was sufficient to reduce the radon concentration to levels of the order of 500 Bq/m{sup 3}. The weathered granite contributes more significantly to the increase of the concentration of Rn-222 in the air than the other rocks here studied, i.e. normal granite as well as

  5. Projected Surface Radiative Forcing due to 2000 to 2100 Land Use Land Cover Albedo Change Across the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. A.; Sleeter, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite-derived contemporary land-use land-cover (LULC) change, albedo data, and modeled future LULC changes are used to study potential impacts of LULC change from 2000 to 2100 on surface albedo and radiative forcing across the conterminous United States (CONUS). Downscaled projected LULC change information, consistent with Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES), is provided by incorporating ecoregion-based land use histories, global integrated assessment models, and expert judgment. The downscaled projections span a wide range of future potential socioeconomic conditions across 10 land cover classes and 84 ecoregions. The A2 scenario had the highest overall CONUS forcing (-0.5369 Wm-2) due to projected high demands for developed and agricultural lands, associated with high population growth and low environmental protection. The B1 scenario had the lowest overall CONUS forcing (-0.0114 Wm-2) due primarily to projected low population growth and strong protection of biodiversity. The radiative forcing for individual ecoregions varied geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most negative forcings (as low as -1.8023 Wm-2, A2 scenario) due primarily to the conversion of forest to agriculture, and the most positive forcings (up to 0.9053 Wm-2, B2 scenario) due to the conversion of agriculture to forest. These results make an important contribution to quantifying the potential future role of LULC change on the climate system, and underscore the need for repeat, wall-to-wall, spatially-explicit national land cover mapping.

  6. Radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen in steady-state and transient plasmas at densities beyond the coronal limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a time-dependent, collisional-radiative model to calculate radiative power and electron cooling rates for oxygen at intermediate densities (1016 cm-3 less than or equal to n/sub e/ less than or equal to 1020 cm-3) where the usual coronal approximation is not valid. Large differences from coronal values are predicted. The behavior of the steady-state radiative power loss coefficient, L/sub Z, is investigated as the electron density is increased. Generalized power loss coefficients applicable to transient plasmas are derived and applied to ionizing and recombining oxygen plasmas. Time-dependent effects are found to play a large role both in terms of the total radiated power and the net electron energy loss rate. 41 refs., 11 figs

  7. Cancer incidence in Australian Vietnam veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Horsley, K. [Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs (Australia); Hoek, R. van der [Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel participated in the Vietnam Conflict from 1962 to 1973, involving nearly 60,000 personnel, of whom over 500 died during service and 3131 were severely physically wounded. Service in the Vietnam conflict presented distinct health challenges. Besides the hazards of combat conditions for extended periods, herbicides and other toxic chemicals were used extensively. The United States military sprayed more than 76,000,000L of herbicide over Vietnam in their Air Force Ranch Hand and Operation Trail Dust programs. The most heavily used herbicide was Agent Orange, contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin. Since the Vietnam conflict, ex-Service organisations (ESOs) have maintained that Vietnam service adversely affected the health of veterans. Initial studies showed no excess risk attributable to their service. However, more recent studies have shown that Vietnam veterans have excess incidence and mortality rates from several conditions such as cancers and heart disease. This paper describes the first cancer incidence study for all ADF Vietnam veterans.

  8. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  9. Australian Politics in a Digital Age

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peter John

    2013-01-01

    Information and communications technologies are increasingly important in the Australian political landscape. From the adoption of new forms of electoral campaigning to the use of networking technology to organise social movements, media technology has the potential to radically change the way politics is conducted and experienced in this country. The first comprehensive volume on the impact of digital media on Australian politics, this book examines the way these technologies shape political...

  10. Ownership of Australian Equities and Corporate Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Black; Joshua Kirkwood

    2010-01-01

    Australian financial and non-financial companies tap capital markets – particularly equity and bond markets – to source funds from households, foreign investors and domestic institutional investors. Foreign investors supply around half of these funds, with institutional investors providing most of the remainder; households’ direct holdings are comparatively modest. During the financial crisis, foreign investors’ appetite for Australian assets remained strong, underpinned by the streng...

  11. An overview of Australian Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯静

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes a brief introduction to Australian higher education in the following aspects such as educational ideas, teaching methods and assessment. The author of this paper holds the opinion that it’s necessary to take an overview of Australian higher education into consideration, if you hope that your study in Australia runs smoothly. In brief, this paper makes an attempt to provide a brief idea of higher education in Australia, especially to those who want to study in Australia for reference.

  12. Radiation Environment at LEO in the frame of Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University - recent, current and future missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, Irina; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Bogomolov, Vitaly; Bogomolov, Andrey; Barinova, Vera; Barinov, Oleg; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir; Shugay, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Radiation Environment of Near-Earth space is one of the most important factors of space weather. Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University provides operational control of radiation conditions at Low Earth's Orbits (LEO) of the near-Earth space using data of recent (Vernov, CORONAS series), current (Meteor-M, Electro-L series) and future (Lomonosov) space missions. Internet portal of Space Monitoring Data Center of Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University (SINP MSU) http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ provides possibilities to control and analyze the space radiation conditions in the real time mode together with the geomagnetic and solar activity including hard X-ray and gamma- emission of solar flares. Operational data obtained from space missions at L1, GEO and LEO and from the Earth's magnetic stations are used to represent radiation and geomagnetic state of near-Earth environment. The models of space environment that use space measurements from different orbits were created. Interactive analysis and operational neural network forecast services are based on these models. These systems can automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons of outer Earth's radiation belt using data from GEO and LEO as input. As an example of LEO data we consider data from Vernov mission, which was launched into solar-synchronous orbit (altitude 640 - 83 0 km, inclination 98.4°, orbital period about 100 min) on July 8, 2014 and began to receive scientific information since July 20, 2014. Vernov mission have provided studies of the Earth's radiation belt relativistic electron precipitation and its possible connection with atmosphere transient luminous events, as well as the solar hard X-ray and gamma-emission measurements. Radiation and electromagnetic environment monitoring in the near-Earth Space, which is very important for space weather study, was also realised

  13. Publishing and Australian Literature: Crisis, Decline or Transformation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Bode

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The globalisation and consolidation of book publishing is widely seen as having negative consequences for Australian literature. Some commentators argue that this shift is detrimental to Australian literature as a whole; others identify the growth of multinational publishing conglomerates with a specific decline in Australian literary fiction. This article explores both positions, first identifying and investigating trends in Australian novel publication and comparing these to trends in the publication of novels from other countries as well as other Australian-originated literature (specifically, poetry and auto/biography. It then considers the specific case of Australian literary fiction, before looking in detail at the output of large publishers of Australian novels. This analysis reveals a recent decline in Australian novel and poetry titles, but offers a more complex picture of this trend than dominant expressions of nostalgia and alarm about the fate of Australian literature and publishing would suggest.

  14. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2 budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990–2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP; net ecosystem production (NEP; fire; land use change (LUC; riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial. Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012, a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05° offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011, a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean and 68 ± 15 TgC yr−1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes, which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr−1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr−1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP is 36 ± 29 TgC yr−1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr−1 by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009–2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  15. Estimates of radiation dose and health risks to the United States population following the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of both individual and collective doses received by the United States population following the Chernobyl accident have been made by using the data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System. Radionuclides associated with the debris first were measured in precipitation and surface air particulates at Portland, OR and Olympia, WA on 5 May 1986. Iodine-131 was the most consistently measured nuclide in all media, although several Cs and Ru isotopes also were observed. Strontium and any actinides notably were absent from the samples at the lower level of detection. The highest calculated individual-organ dose due to intake during May and June 1986 was 0.52 mSv to the infant thyroid in the state of Washington. This was predominantly (98%) from the ingestion of milk. The maximum U.S. collective dose equivalent to any organ was calculated to be 3,300 person-Sv to the thyroid. Risk estimates project three excess lung cancer deaths and an additional four deaths due to cancers of thyroid, breast and leukemia in the U.S. population over the next 45 y from exposure during the May-June 1986 interval. The only long-lived radionuclide measured in milk samples following the accident was 137Cs. We estimate 20 excess fatalities from the ingestion of 137Cs in milk during all subsequent years, with six of these due to lung cancer and the majority of the remainder distributed approximately equally among cancers of the thyroid, breast, liver and leukemia. A total of 100 excess fatalities from all dietary components was estimated. Because of the uncertainty of risk estimates from data such as those available for this study, all calculated values carry a range of uncertainty from a minimum of one-half the calculated value to a maximum of two times the calculated value

  16. Measurement of $e^+e^- \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)$ via Initial State Radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X L; Shen, C P; Wang, P; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bonvicini, G; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, K; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Krokovny, P; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Lewis, P; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Moll, A; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Wagner, M N; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yashchenko, S; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2014-01-01

    We report measurement of the cross section of $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)$ between 4.0 and $5.5 {\\rm GeV}$, based on an analysis of initial state radiation events in a $980 \\rm fb^{-1}$ data sample recorded with the Belle detector. The properties of the $Y(4360)$ and $Y(4660)$ states are determined. Fitting the mass spectrum of $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)$ with two coherent Breit-Wigner functions, we find two solutions with identical mass and width but different couplings to electron-positron pairs: $M_{Y(4360)} = (4347\\pm 6\\pm 3) {\\rm MeV}/c^2$, $\\Gamma_{Y(4360)} = (103\\pm 9\\pm 5) {\\rm MeV}$, $M_{Y(4660)} = (4652\\pm10\\pm 8) {\\rm MeV}/c^2$, $\\Gamma_{Y(4660)} = (68\\pm 11\\pm 1) \\rm MeV$; and ${\\cal{B}}[Y(4360)\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)]\\cdot \\Gamma_{Y(4360)}^{e^+e^-} = (10.9\\pm 0.6\\pm 0.7) \\rm eV$ and ${\\cal{B}}[Y(4660)\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)]\\cdot \\Gamma_{Y(4660)}^{e^+e^-} = (8.1\\pm 1.1\\pm 0.5) \\rm eV$ for one solution; or ${\\cal{B}}[Y(4360)\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\psi(2S)]\\cdot \\Gamma_{Y(4360)}^{e^+e^-} = (9.2\\pm 0.6\\pm 0.6) \\rm ...

  17. Using Concept Maps to Show "Connections" in Measurement: An Example from the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Within the "Australian Curriculum: Mathematics" the Understanding proficiency strand states, "Students build understanding when they connect related ideas, when they represent concepts in different ways, when they identify commonalities and differences between aspects of content, when they describe their thinking mathematically and…

  18. The distributional history of Coracina in the Indo-Australian Archipelago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voous, K.H.; Marle, van J.G.

    1949-01-01

    Recently RIPLEY (1941) has prepared a systematic revision of the Indo-Australian members of the genus Coracina (Cuckoo-Shrike), which for a considerable time had been in a state of great confusion. RYPLEY’s new arrangement represents a noteworthy step in the appreciation of the systematics of this d

  19. The Relationship between Domestic Violence and Animal Abuse: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volant, Anne M.; Johnson, Judy A.; Gullone, Eleonora; Coleman, Grahame J.

    2008-01-01

    Several North American studies have found a connection between domestic violence and animal abuse. This article reports on the first Australian research to examine this connection. A group of 102 women recruited through 24 domestic violence services in the state of Victoria and a nondomestic violence comparison group (102 women) recruited from the…

  20. The Intersections of Curriculum Development: Music, ICT and Australian Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcott, Jane; Crawford, Renee

    2011-01-01

    Recently, in Australia both the "National Review of School Music Education" and "The Australian Curriculum" identify the importance of technology in school music education. However, the understanding of music technology, as demonstrated by state and territory curricular guidelines, is limited with technology mostly recognised as a tool. In…

  1. Raising Educational Attainment: How Young People's Experiences Speak Back to the "Compact with Young Australians"

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Riele, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    In the context of international consensus that the knowledge economy requires more highly educated people, the Australian federal, state and territory governments agreed on a set of policies and targets for lifting the minimum level of educational attainment of young people, which are analysed in Part 1 of this paper. This "Compact with young…

  2. "Tone It down a Bit!": Euphemism as a Colonial Device in Australian Indigenous Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    In a previous article discussing the politics of language in Australian Indigenous Studies teaching and learning contexts, the author and her colleague stated their objective in writing that article was to ''instill'' a sense of the importance of the political nature of language to their student body (McGloin and Carlson 2013).…

  3. “Vicious, Aggressive Bird Stalks Cyclist”: The Australian Magpie (Cracticus tibicen) in the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, Kitty; O’Keeffe, Scott; Jones, Darryl N.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary This article explores the role of print media in reporting the conflict between the Australian Magpie (Cracticus tibicen) and human populations in Australia. The results indicate that this issue is primarily covered during the spring “swooping” season in the regional and suburban press. Abstract The Australian Magpie (Cracticus tibicen) is a common bird found in urban Australian environments where its nest defense behavior during spring brings it into conflict with humans. This article explores the role of print media in covering this conflict. Leximancer software was used to analyze newspaper reports about the Australian Magpie from a sample of 634 news stories, letters-to-the editor and opinion pieces, published in newspapers from around Australia between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. The results confirm that stories about these birds are primarily published in the daily regional and weekly suburban press, and that the dominant story frame concerns the risk of “swooping” behavior to cyclists and pedestrians from birds protecting their nests during the spring breeding season. The most prominent sources used by journalists are local and state government representatives, as well as members of the public. The results show that the “swooping season” has become a normal part of the annual news cycle for these publications, with the implication that discourse surrounding the Australian Magpie predominantly concerns the risk these birds pose to humans, and ignores their decline in non-urban environments. PMID:27128947

  4. Influence of climate modes on tropical cyclone formation in the Australian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, A.

    2010-08-01

    Relationships between tropical cyclogenesis (TCG) in the Australian region and modes of various atmospheric and oceanic parameters are investigated for the period 1968-2006. Seven thermal and seven dynamic variables describing the state of moisture transport and wind flow patterns in the atmosphere were analysed. In order to identify the dominant modes of each variable, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) is applied. The three leading modes of each variable were then considered. This study corroborates previous work showing that El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the leading contributor to TCG in the all-Australian, Western and Eastern Australian regions. The ENSO-linked first EOF of the streamfunction at sigma level 0.2101 shows the strongest relationship with TCG variations in the all-Australian and Eastern regions correlating at 0.73 and 0.62, respectively. In the western Australian region, the first EOF of environmental vertical wind shear shows the strongest skill. TCG frequency in the Northern region is mainly affected by the large-scale wind patterns of the subtropics and mid-latitudes such as the subtropical jet and the Rossby wave train.

  5. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of imploding spherical plasma liners with detailed equation-of-state modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, J S; Golovkin, I E; MacFarlane, J J; Cassibry, J T

    2012-01-01

    This work extends the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic imploding spherical argon plasma liner simulations of T. J. Awe et al. [Phys. Plasmas 18, 072705 (2011)] by using a detailed tabular equation-of-state (EOS) model, whereas Awe et al. used a polytropic EOS model. Results using the tabular EOS model give lower stagnation pressures by a factor of 3.9-8.6 and lower peak ion temperatures compared to the polytropic EOS results. Both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS models were used in this work, giving similar results on stagnation pressure. The lower stagnation pressures using a tabular EOS model are attributed to a reduction in the liner's ability to compress arising from the energy sink introduced by ionization and electron excitation, which are not accounted for in a polytropic EOS model. Variation of the plasma liner species for the same initial liner geometry, mass density, and velocity was also explored using the LTE tabular EOS model, showing that the highest stagnation pressu...

  6. Methodology for Analyzing Strain States During In Situ Thermomechanical Cycling in Individual Lead-Free Solder Joints Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Thomas R.; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Liu, Kuo-Chuan

    2009-12-01

    To examine how a lead-free solder joint deforms in a thermal cycling environment, both the elastic and plastic stress and strain behavior must be understood. Methods to identify evolution of the internal strain (stress) state during thermal cycling are described. A slice of a package containing a single row of solder joints was thermally cycled from 0°C to 100°C with a period of about 1 h with concurrent acquisition of transmission Laue patterns using synchrotron radiation. These results indicated that most joints are single crystals, with some being multicrystals with no more than a few Sn grain orientations. Laue patterns were analyzed to estimate local strains in different crystal directions at different temperatures during a thermal cycle. While the strains perpendicular to various crystal planes all vary in a similar way, the magnitude of strain varies. The specimens were subsequently given several hundred additional thermal cycles and measured again to assess changes in the crystal orientations. These results show that modest changes in crystal orientations occur during thermal cycling.

  7. Development of Innovative Radioactive Isotope Production Techniques at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Amanda M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Heidrich, Brenden [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center; Durrant, Chad [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Bascom, Andrew [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Department of mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Center; Unlu, Kenan [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    2013-08-15

    The Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) has produced radioisotopes for research and commercial purposes since 1956. With the rebirth of the radiochemistry education and research program at the RSEC, the Center stands poised to produce a variety of radioisotopes for research and industrial work that is in line with the mission of the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope Development and Production Research and Application Program. The RSEC received funding from the Office of Science in 2010 to improve production techniques and develop new capabilities. Under this program, we improved our existing techniques to provide four radioisotopes (Mn-56, Br-82, Na-24, and Ar-41) to researchers and industry in a safe and efficient manner. The RSEC is also working to develop new innovative techniques to provide isotopes in short supply to researchers and others in the scientific community, specifically Cu-64 and Cu-67. Improving our existing radioisotopes production techniques and investigating new and innovative methods are two of the main initiatives of the radiochemistry research program at the RSEC.

  8. Marine biodiversity in the Australian region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Butler

    Full Text Available The entire Australian marine jurisdictional area, including offshore and sub-Antarctic islands, is considered in this paper. Most records, however, come from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ around the continent of Australia itself. The counts of species have been obtained from four primary databases (the Australian Faunal Directory, Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota, Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums, and the Australian node of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System, but even these are an underestimate of described species. In addition, some partially completed databases for particular taxonomic groups, and specialized databases (for introduced and threatened species have been used. Experts also provided estimates of the number of known species not yet in the major databases. For only some groups could we obtain an (expert opinion estimate of undiscovered species. The databases provide patchy information about endemism, levels of threat, and introductions. We conclude that there are about 33,000 marine species (mainly animals in the major databases, of which 130 are introduced, 58 listed as threatened and an unknown percentage endemic. An estimated 17,000 more named species are either known from the Australian EEZ but not in the present databases, or potentially occur there. It is crudely estimated that there may be as many as 250,000 species (known and yet to be discovered in the Australian EEZ. For 17 higher taxa, there is sufficient detail for subdivision by Large Marine Domains, for comparison with other National and Regional Implementation Committees of the Census of Marine Life. Taxonomic expertise in Australia is unevenly distributed across taxa, and declining. Comments are given briefly on biodiversity management measures in Australia, including but not limited to marine protected areas.

  9. State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" - research activities and scientific advance in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovych, L

    2014-09-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2013 at the State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report. Key points include the research results of XRCC1 and XPD gene polymorphism in thyroid cancer patients, CD38 gene GG genotype as a risk factor for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, frequency of 185delAG and 5382insC mutations in BRCA1 gene in women with breast cancer, cognitive function and TERF1, TERF2, TERT gene expression both with telomere length in human under the low dose radiation exposure. The "source-scattering/shielding structures- man" models for calculation of partial dose values to the eye lens and new methods for radiation risk assessment were developed and adapted. Radiation risks of leukemia including chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the cohort of liquidators were published according to the "case-control" study results after 20 years of survey. Increase of non-tumor morbidity in liquidators during the 1988-2011 with the maximum level 12-21 years upon irradiation was found. Incidence in evacuees appeared being of two-peak pattern i.e. in the first years after the accident and 12 years later. Experimental studies have concerned the impact of radio-modifiers on cellular systems, reproductive function in the population, features of the child nutrition in radiation contamination area were studied. Report also shows the results of scientific and organizational, medical and preventive work, staff training, and implementation of innovations. The NRCRM Annual Report was approved at the Scientific Council meeting of NAMS on March 3, 2014.

  10. Learning from operational experience. Safety of radiation sources in the United States of America in the twentieth century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958, the United States Atomic Energy Commission (USAEC) staff proposed extending the general licence concept to include measuring, gauging and controlling devices. Since then, more than 1.8 million devices containing radioactive sources have been distributed under general licences. These devices are typically used with minimal regulatory oversight. In recent years, there have been an increasing number of reports of radioactive sources and devices appearing in the public domain as a result of inadequate control and disposal of these items. As a result of concerns over these developments, there have been calls for increased regulatory oversight of the users of these sources and devices. Ironically, this is not a new problem. In the 1920s, reports of radium sources entering the public domain in an uncontrolled manner began to appear in the press and in the literature. Additionally, gold jewellery became contaminated by radon daughter products from improper recycling of depleted gold radon seeds. Such contamination occurred as early as 1910. Radium sources are not subject to the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, and for many years radium was distributed and used without government regulatory oversight for safety. In the United States of America in the 1950s, concern over the radiation hazards associated with the improper use, control and disposal of radium led to increased regulatory oversight, primarily by the States but with significant assistance from the US Public Health Service. While this was happening, the USAEC in 1958 approved a rule change to allow distribution of radioactive devices under general licence. This group of users is not routinely inspected and does not otherwise have periodic contacts with the USAEC. In time, problems in this group with control, accountability and disposal emerged, a situation similar to that found with radium users prior to their being regulated. The conclusion to be drawn from this is that periodic contacts by regulators with

  11. Structural state of a radiation-modified Ti50Ni47Fe3 single crystal in the low-temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhomenko, V. D.; Dubinin, S. F.; Maksimov, V. I.

    2010-10-01

    The structural state of a Ti50Ni47Fe3 single crystal irradiated by fast neutrons has been investigated using thermal neutron diffraction at a temperature of 78 K. The current interest expressed in this problem is caused by the search for a radiation-resistant material with the shape memory effect. It has been found that the main structural motif of the crystal exposed to irradiation is retained but martensitic transformations are absent. The radiation resistance of crystals of this class has been evaluated.

  12. Contributions to the genetic and mean bone-marrow doses of the Australian population from radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a national survey of radiological procedures used for diagnosis and therapy in medicine, dentistry and chiropracty are reviewed. Statistical data for the distribution and frequency of various procedures in Australian hospitals and practices are summarised, together with their associated radiation doses. Annual genetically significant and mean bone-marrow doses to the Australian population arising from these procedures are derived for the survey year of 1970. Values of 176 microgray and 651 microgray for the annual (per capita) genetic and mean bone-marrow doses respectively are reported. These compare closely with corresponding estimates in other countries with similar medical practices to those in Australia

  13. Plume radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  14. [Use of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies for the correction of thyroid functional state during stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Tsymbal, A A

    2010-01-01

    The influence of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies (150.176-150.664 Ghz) on the functional activity of rat thyroid gland subjected to acute immobilization stress has been studied. It is shown that terahertz radiation totally normalizes thyroid activity in stressed animals within 30 min after application.

  15. [Use of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies for the correction of thyroid functional state during stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Tsymbal, A A

    2010-01-01

    The influence of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at nitric oxide frequencies (150.176-150.664 Ghz) on the functional activity of rat thyroid gland subjected to acute immobilization stress has been studied. It is shown that terahertz radiation totally normalizes thyroid activity in stressed animals within 30 min after application. PMID:20540354

  16. Transition of radiative recombination channels from delocalized states to localized states in a GaInP alloy with partial atomic ordering: a direct optical signature of Mott transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Z. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Deng, Z.; Wang, X. H.; Xu, S. J.; Wang, R. X.; Lu, S. L.; Dong, J. R.; Yang, H.

    2016-03-01

    Anderson localization is a predominant phenomenon in condensed matter and materials physics. In fact, localized and delocalized states often co-exist in one material. They are separated by a boundary called the mobility edge. Mott transition may take place between these two regimes. However, it is widely recognized that an apparent demonstration of Anderson localization or Mott transition is a challenging task. In this article, we present a direct optical observation of a transition of radiative recombination dominant channels from delocalized (i.e., local extended) states to Anderson localized states in the GaInP base layer of a GaInP/GaAs single junction solar cell by the means of the variable-temperature electroluminescence (EL) technique. It is found that by increasing temperature, we can boost a remarkable transition of radiative recombination dominant channels from the delocalized states to the localized states. The delocalized states are induced by the local atomic ordering domains (InP/GaP monolayer superlattices) while the localized states are caused by random distribution of indium (gallium) content. The efficient transfer and thermal redistribution of carriers between the two kinds of electronic states was revealed to result in both a distinct EL mechanism transition and an electrical resistance evolution with temperature. Our study gives rise to a self-consistent precise picture for carrier localization and transfer in a GaInP alloy, which is an extremely technologically important energy material for fabricating high-efficiency photovoltaic devices.

  17. Socially responsible genetic research with descendants of the First Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Holst Pellekaan Sheila M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aboriginal Australians, one of the world’s indigenous peoples now outnumbered through colonization, are the most under-represented in genetic research because they feel that the benefits do not outweigh the social cost of involvement. Descendants of the First Australians have survived a period of European occupation during which time they were dispossessed of land, language and cultural identity resulting in inequities in health, education, and employment opportunities. Compared to Maori and Native American peoples, the ability to form organizations that help to control their affairs is very recent. The desire to control is understandably strong yet the ‘gate-keeping’ role of some organizations risks shifting the control away from smaller communities and has become increasingly politicized. In the past, research practices by Western scientists were poorly presented and have resulted in resistance to proposals that are perceived to have no beneficial outcomes for participants. In this age of advanced technological expertise in genetics, benefits to all humanity are clear to those carrying out research projects, yet not always to those being asked to participate, presenting extra challenges. Excellent guidelines for ethical conduct in research are available to assist researchers, prospective participants, and ethics committees or review boards that approve and monitor procedures. The essence of these guidelines are that research should be carried out with a spirit of integrity, respect, reciprocity, parity, recognition of survival and protection of social and cultural values, a need for control and shared responsibility. Specific Aboriginal organizations, with which researchers need to work to negotiate partnerships, vary within and between Australian states and will always expect Aboriginal personnel to be involved. People experienced in the consultation process are necessary as part of a team. By working patiently through lengthy

  18. The recent Australian debate about the prohibition on cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W

    1997-09-01

    This paper outlines the ethical arguments used in the Australian debate about whether or not to relax the prohibition on cannabis use by adults. Over the past two decades a rising prevalence of cannabis use in the Australian population has led to proposals for the decriminalization of the personal use of cannabis. Three states and territories have removed criminal penalties for personal use while criminal penalties are rarely imposed in the remaining states. Libertarian arguments for legalization of cannabis use have attracted a great deal of media interest but very little public and political support. Other arguments in favour of decriminalization have attracted more support. One has been the utilitarian argument that prohibition has failed to deter cannabis use and the social costs of its continuation outweigh any benefits that it produces. Another has been the argument from hypocrisy that cannabis is less harmful than alcohol and so, on the grounds of consistency, if alcohol is legally available then so should cannabis. To date public opinion has not favoured legalization, although support for the decriminalization of personal cannabis use has increased. In the long term, the outcome of the debate may depend more upon trends in cannabis use and social attitudes among young adults than upon the persuasiveness of the arguments for a relaxation of the prohibition of cannabis. PMID:9374007

  19. Radiation Ordinance 1983 (No. 58 of 1983) (Australian Capital Territory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Ordinance provides for the safe use, transportation and disposal of radioactive materials and irradiating apparatus. It repeals the Fluoroscopes Ordinance of 1958. Radioactive materials whose radioactivity does not exceed levels as set out in a Schedule to the Ordinance are exempted from application of the Ordinance. (NEA)

  20. Representations of the Japanese in Contemporary Australian Literature and Film

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Smith

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate general contemporary Australian perceptions of the Japanese. I will do this by exploring how Australian contemporary literature (2006- 2007) and Australian contemporary film (1997-2007) depicts Japanese characters. By analysing the representation of the Japanese characters in these areas I will attempt to gather a broad understanding of how Australians represent, perceive and identify the Japanese today.

  1. An expanded prescribing role for pharmacists - an Australian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kreshnik Hoti; Jeffery Hughes; Bruce Sunderland

    2011-01-01

    Expanded pharmacist prescribing is a new professional practice area for pharmacists. Currently, Australian pharmacists’ prescribing role is limited to over-the-counter medications. This review aims to identify Australian studies involving the area of expanded pharmacist prescribing. Australian studies exploring the issues of pharmacist prescribing were identified and considered in the context of its implementation internationally. Australian studies have mainly focused on the attitudes of com...

  2. Projected surface radiative forcing due to 2000--2050 land-cover land-use albedo change over the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-derived contemporary land-cover land-use (LCLU) and albedo data and modeled future LCLU are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 2000 to 2050 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 19 ecoregions in the eastern United States. The modeled 2000–2050 LCLU changes indicate a future decrease in both agriculture and forested land and an increase in developed land that induces ecoregion radiative forcings ranging from −0.175 to 0.432 W m−2 driven predominately by differences in the area and type of LCLU change. At the regional scale, these projected LCLU changes induce a net negative albedo decrease (−0.001) and a regional positive radiative forcing of 0.112 W m−2. This overall positive forcing (i.e., warming) is almost 4 times greater than that estimated for documented 1973–2000 LCLU albedo change published in a previous study using the same methods.

  3. Impact of transpacific aerosol on air quality over the United States: A perspective from aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhining; Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Observations have well established that aerosols from various sources in Asia, Europe, and Africa can travel across the Pacific and reach the contiguous United States (U.S.) at least on episodic bases throughout a year, with a maximum import in spring. The imported aerosol not only can serve as an additional source to regional air pollution (e.g., direct input), but also can influence regional air quality through the aerosol-cloud-radiation (ACR) interactions that change local and regional meteorology. This study assessed impacts of the transpacific aerosol on air quality, focusing on surface ozone and PM2.5, over the U.S. using the NASA Unified Weather Research Forecast model. Based on the results of 3-month (April to June of 2010) simulations, the impact of direct input (as an additional source) of transpacific aerosol caused an increase of surface PM2.5 concentration by approximately 1.5 μg m-3 over the west coast and about 0.5 μg m-3 over the east coast of the U.S. By influencing key meteorological processes through the ACR interactions, the transpacific aerosol exerted a significant effect on both surface PM2.5 (±6 μg m-3) and ozone (±12 ppbv) over the central and eastern U.S. This suggests that the transpacific transport of aerosol could either improve or deteriorate local air quality and complicate local effort toward the compliance with the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  4. Data Convergence - An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. S.; Howell, B.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled numerical physical, biogeochemical and sediment models are increasingly being used as integrators to help understand the cumulative or far field effects of change in the coastal environment. This reliance on modeling has forced observations to be delivered as data streams ingestible by modeling frameworks. This has made it easier to create near real-time or forecasting models than to try to recreate the past, and has lead in turn to the conversion of historical data into data streams to allow them to be ingested by the same frameworks. The model and observation frameworks under development within Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are now feeding into the Australian Ocean Data Network's (AODN's) MARine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) . The sensor, or data stream, brokering solution is centred around the "message" and all data flowing through the gateway is wrapped as a message. Messages consist of a topic and a data object and their routing through the gateway to pre-processors and listeners is determined by the topic. The Sensor Message Gateway (SMG) method is allowing data from different sensors measuring the same thing but with different temporal resolutions, units or spatial coverage to be ingested or visualized seamlessly. At the same time the model output as a virtual sensor is being explored, this again being enabled by the SMG. It is only for two way communications with sensor that rigorous adherence to standards is needed, by accepting existing data in less than ideal formats, but exposing them though the SMG we can move a step closer to the Internet Of Things by creating an Internet of Industries where each vested interest can continue with business as usual, contribute to data convergence and adopt more open standards when investment seems appropriate to that sector or business.Architecture Overview

  5. The management of individuals involved in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author defines the objectives and the coverage of two radiation accident courses presented in 1990 by the US Radiation Emergency Assistance Centre and Training Site of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities together with some Australian Medical institutions. It is estimated that the courses, directed towards physicians, radiotherapists and nurses gave plenty practical advices and details on how to go about radiation accident managements. A manual on handling radiation accidents is also to be prepared after the courses

  6. Assessment of the effect of air pollution controls on trends in shortwave radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from multiple observation networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-M. Gan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long term datasets of all-sky and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW radiation, cloud cover fraction and aerosol optical depth (AOD are analyzed together with surface concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM in the United States (US. Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effects of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to assess the effects of reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2 and nitrogen oxides (NOx over the past 16 yr across the US on trends in SW radiation. The SO2 and NOx emission data show decreasing trends from 1995 to 2010 which indirectly validates the effects of the Clean Air Act (CAA in the US. Meanwhile, the total column AOD and surface total PM2.5 observations also show decreasing trends in the eastern US but slightly increasing trends in the western US. Moreover, measured surface concentrations of several other pollutants (i.e. SO2, SO4 and NOx have the same behavior as the AOD and total PM2.5. First, all-sky downwelling SW radiation is assessed together with the cloud cover. Results of this analysis show strong increasing trends in all-sky downwelling SW radiation with decreasing trends in cloud cover. However, since observations of both all-sky direct and diffuse SW radiation are increasing, there may be other factors contributing to the radiation trends in addition to the decreasing trends in overall cloud cover. To investigate the role of direct radiative effects of aerosols, clear-sky downwelling radiation is analyzed so that cloud effects are eliminated. However, similar increasing trends in clear-sky direct and diffuse SW radiation are observed. While significantly decreasing trends in AOD and surface concentration along with increasing SW radiation (both all-sky and clear-sky in the eastern US during 1995–2010 imply the occurrence of direct aerosol

  7. Are State-Sponsored New Radiation Therapy Facilities Economically Viable in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Niloy R., E-mail: nrdatta@yahoo.com [Centre for Radiation Oncology, KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau (Switzerland); Samiei, Massoud [Consultant, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Bodis, Stephan [Centre for Radiation Oncology, KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau, Aarau, Switzerland and Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The economic viability of establishing a state-funded radiation therapy (RT) infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in accordance with the World Bank definition has been assessed through computation of a return on investment (ROI). Methods and Materials: Of the 139 LMICs, 100 were evaluated according to their RT facilities, gross national income (GNI) per capita, and employment/population ratio. The assumption was an investment of US$5 million for a basic RT center able to treat 1000 patients annually. The national breakeven points and percentage of ROI (%ROI) were calculated according to the GNI per capita and patient survival rates of 10% to 50% at 2 years. It was assumed that 50% of these patients would be of working age and that, if employed and able to work after treatment, they would contribute to the country's GNI for at least 2 years. The cumulative GNI after attaining the breakeven point until the end of the 15-year lifespan of the teletherapy unit was calculated to estimate the %ROI. The recurring and overhead costs were assumed to vary from 5.5% to 15% of the capital investment. Results: The %ROI was dependent on the GNI per capita, employment/population ratio and 2-year patient survival (all P<.001). Accordingly, none of the low-income countries would attain an ROI. If 50% of the patients survived for 2 years, the %ROI in the lower-middle and upper-middle income countries could range from 0% to 159.9% and 11.2% to 844.7%, respectively. Patient user fees to offset recurring and overhead costs could vary from “nil” to US$750, depending on state subsidies. Conclusions: Countries with a greater GNI per capita, higher employment/population ratio, and better survival could achieve a faster breakeven point, resulting in a higher %ROI. Additional factors such as user fees have also been considered. These can be tailored to the patient's ability to pay to cover the recurring costs. Certain pragmatic steps that could

  8. Are State-Sponsored New Radiation Therapy Facilities Economically Viable in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The economic viability of establishing a state-funded radiation therapy (RT) infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in accordance with the World Bank definition has been assessed through computation of a return on investment (ROI). Methods and Materials: Of the 139 LMICs, 100 were evaluated according to their RT facilities, gross national income (GNI) per capita, and employment/population ratio. The assumption was an investment of US$5 million for a basic RT center able to treat 1000 patients annually. The national breakeven points and percentage of ROI (%ROI) were calculated according to the GNI per capita and patient survival rates of 10% to 50% at 2 years. It was assumed that 50% of these patients would be of working age and that, if employed and able to work after treatment, they would contribute to the country's GNI for at least 2 years. The cumulative GNI after attaining the breakeven point until the end of the 15-year lifespan of the teletherapy unit was calculated to estimate the %ROI. The recurring and overhead costs were assumed to vary from 5.5% to 15% of the capital investment. Results: The %ROI was dependent on the GNI per capita, employment/population ratio and 2-year patient survival (all P<.001). Accordingly, none of the low-income countries would attain an ROI. If 50% of the patients survived for 2 years, the %ROI in the lower-middle and upper-middle income countries could range from 0% to 159.9% and 11.2% to 844.7%, respectively. Patient user fees to offset recurring and overhead costs could vary from “nil” to US$750, depending on state subsidies. Conclusions: Countries with a greater GNI per capita, higher employment/population ratio, and better survival could achieve a faster breakeven point, resulting in a higher %ROI. Additional factors such as user fees have also been considered. These can be tailored to the patient's ability to pay to cover the recurring costs. Certain pragmatic steps that could

  9. Topics from Australian Conferences on Teaching Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Brian; Martin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The first OZCOTS conference in 1998 was inspired by papers contributed by Australians to the 5th International Conference on Teaching Statistics. In 2008, as part of the program of one of the first National Senior Teaching Fellowships, the 6th OZCOTS was held in conjunction with the Australian Statistical Conference, with Fellowship keynotes and contributed papers, optional refereeing and proceedings. This venture was so successful that the 7th and 8th OZCOTS were similarly run, conjoined with Australian Statistical Conferences in 2010 and 2012. Authors of papers from these OZCOTS conferences were invited to develop chapters for refereeing and inclusion in this volume. There are sections on keynote topics, undergraduate curriculum and learning, professional development, postgraduate learning, and papers from OZCOTS 2012. Because OZCOTS aim to unite statisticians and statistics educators, the approaches this volume takes are immediately relevant to all who have a vested interest in good teaching practices. Glo...

  10. Time Travel: Australian Tourists and Britain's Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard White

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Across the twentieth century, Britain drew more Australian tourists for longer and more intense experiences than anywhere else, though as early as the 1970s Asia was attracting more Australians than Europe. They found much to admire and to deprecate in Britain but above all they were seduced by Britain’s past, or what they imagined it to be. This paper examines the Australian experience of history in Britain, their admiration for notions of tradition, for an unchanging village life, for fading imperial glory, for sheer antiquity. Some looked for their own ancestors and family but most were satisfied to have their school lessons and imaginative reading validated by being there. The response they had to British history was an intensely emotional one: this article argues that it was a result not of imperial sentiment but of a desire for a deep and meaningful past.

  11. Drama in the Australian National Curriculum: Decisions, Tensions and Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Madonna; Saunders, John Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, the Australian Federal Government endorsed the final version of the Australian Curriculum arts framework a document resulting from nearly seven years of consultation and development. "The Australian Curriculum: The Arts Version 8.0" comprises five subjects: dance, drama, media arts, music and visual arts. This article…

  12. Modelling Choice: Factors Influencing Modes of Delivery in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Ling, Peter; Hill, Doug

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study of Multiple Modes of Delivery in Australian universities that was commissioned by Australian Universities Teaching Committee over the period 2001-2004. The project examined and described the various means of educational delivery deployed by Australian universities. It identified the pedagogical,…

  13. Trinucleon Photo Reactions with ${\\Delta}$-Isobar Excitation Radiative Nucleon-Deuteron Capture and Two-Body Photo Disintegration of the Three-Nucleon Bound State

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, L P; Oelsner, M; Sauer, P U; Fonseca, António C

    2002-01-01

    Radiative nucleon-deuteron capture and photo disintegration of the three-nucleo n bound state with two-body final states are described. The description uses nucleon degrees of freedom extended to include the excitation of a single nucleon to a \\diso. The baryonic interaction and the electromagnetic cu rrent couple nucleonic states and states with a \\diso. Exact solutions of three-p article scattering equations are employed for the initial or final states of the reactions. The current has one-baryon and two-baryon contributions. The role of t he \\diso in the description of the considered photo reactions is discussed and fo und to be moderate. The spin observables $A_{yy}$ and $T_{20}$ at $90^{\\circ}$ la b scattering angle can be calculated model-independently from the $E1$ Siegert te rm in the long-wavelength limit.

  14. Avoiding Treatment Interruptions: What Role Do Australian Community Pharmacists Play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Hasn Abukres

    Full Text Available To explore the reported practice of Australian community pharmacists when dealing with medication supply requests in absence of a valid prescription.Self-administered questionnaire was posted to 1490 randomly selected community pharmacies across all Australian states and territories. This sample was estimated to be a 20% of all Australian community pharmacies.Three hundred eighty five pharmacists participated in the study (response rate achieved was 27.9% (there were 111 undelivered questionnaires. Respondents indicated that they were more likely to provide medications to regular customers without a valid prescription compared to non-regular customers (p<0.0001. However, supply was also influenced by the type of prescription and the medication requested. In the case of type of prescription (Standard, Authority or Private this relates to the complexity/probability of obtaining a valid prescription from the prescriber at a later date (i.e. supply with an anticipated prescription. Decisions to supply and/or not supply related to medication type were more complex. For some cases, including medication with potential for abuse, the practice and/or the method of supply varied significantly according to age and gender of the pharmacist, and pharmacy location (p<0.05.Although being a regular customer does not guarantee a supply, results of this study reinforce the importance for patients having a regular pharmacy, where pharmacists were more likely to continue medication supply in cases of patients presenting without a valid prescription. We would suggest, more flexible legislation should be implemented to allow pharmacists to continue supplying of medication when obtaining a prescription is not practical.

  15. Survey of Australians using cannabis for medical purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Paul

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The New South Wales State Government recently proposed a trial of the medical use of cannabis. Australians who currently use cannabis medicinally do so illegally and without assurances of quality control. Given the dearth of local information on this issue, this study explored the experiences of medical cannabis users. Methods Australian adults who had used cannabis for medical purposes were recruited using media stories. A total of 147 respondents were screened by phone and anonymous questionnaires were mailed, to be returned by postage paid envelope. Results Data were available for 128 participants. Long term and regular medical cannabis use was frequently reported for multiple medical conditions including chronic pain (57%, depression (56%, arthritis (35%, persistent nausea (27% and weight loss (26%. Cannabis was perceived to provide "great relief" overall (86%, and substantial relief of specific symptoms such as pain, nausea and insomnia. It was also typically perceived as superior to other medications in terms of undesirable effects, and the extent of relief provided. However, nearly one half (41% experienced conditions or symptoms that were not helped by its use. The most prevalent concerns related to its illegality. Participants reported strong support for their use from clinicians and family. There was almost universal interest (89% in participating in a clinical trial of medical cannabis, and strong support (79% for investigating alternative delivery methods. Conclusion Australian medical cannabis users are risking legal ramifications, but consistent with users elsewhere, claim moderate to substantial benefits from its use in the management of their medical condition. In addition to strong public support, medical cannabis users show strong interest in clinical cannabis research, including the investigation of alternative delivery methods.

  16. Assessment of multi-decadal WRF-CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-M. Gan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-decadal simulations with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model have been conducted to systematically investigate the changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past 21 years (1990–2010 across the United States (US, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading over North America, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. In particular, this study attempts to determine the consequences of the changes in tropospheric aerosol burden arising from substantial reductions in emissions of SO2 and NOx associated with control measures under the Clean Air Act (CAA especially on trends in solar radiation. Extensive analyses conducted by Gan et al. (2014 utilizing observations (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM over the past 16 years (1995–2010 indicate a shortwave (SW radiation (both all-sky and clear-sky "brightening" in the US. The relationship of the radiation brightening trend with decreases in the aerosol burden is less apparent in the western US. One of the main reasons for this is that the emission controls under the CAA were aimed primarily at reducing pollutants in areas violating national air quality standards, most of which were located in the eastern US while the relatively less populated areas in the western US were less polluted at the beginning of this study period. Comparisons of model results with observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD, aerosol concentration, and radiation demonstrate that the coupled WRF-CMAQ model is capable of replicating the trends well even through it tends to underestimate the AOD. In particular, the sulfate concentration predictions were well matched with the observations. The discrenpancies found in the clear-sky diffuse SW radiation are likely due to several factors such as potential increase of ice particles associated with increasing air traffic, the definition of "clear-sky" in the radiation retrieval methodology and aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be

  17. Assessment of multi-decadal WRF-CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, C.-M.; Pleim, J.; Mathur, R.; Hogrefe, C.; Long, C. N.; Xing, J.; Wong, D.; Gilliam, R.; Wei, C.

    2015-07-01

    Multi-decadal simulations with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model have been conducted to systematically investigate the changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past 21 years (1990-2010) across the United States (US), their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading over North America, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. In particular, this study attempts to determine the consequences of the changes in tropospheric aerosol burden arising from substantial reductions in emissions of SO2 and NOx associated with control measures under the Clean Air Act (CAA) especially on trends in solar radiation. Extensive analyses conducted by Gan et al. (2014) utilizing observations (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) over the past 16 years (1995-2010) indicate a shortwave (SW) radiation (both all-sky and clear-sky) "brightening" in the US. The relationship of the radiation brightening trend with decreases in the aerosol burden is less apparent in the western US. One of the main reasons for this is that the emission controls under the CAA were aimed primarily at reducing pollutants in areas violating national air quality standards, most of which were located in the eastern US while the relatively less populated areas in the western US were less polluted at the beginning of this study period. Comparisons of model results with observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol concentration, and radiation demonstrate that the coupled WRF-CMAQ model is capable of replicating the trends well even through it tends to underestimate the AOD. In particular, the sulfate concentration predictions were well matched with the observations. The discrenpancies found in the clear-sky diffuse SW radiation are likely due to several factors such as potential increase of ice particles associated with increasing air traffic, the definition of "clear-sky" in the radiation retrieval methodology and aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be readily

  18. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use change and sensitivity to snow and interannual albedo variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher A.; Roy, David P.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite-derived land cover land use (LCLU), snow and albedo data, and incoming surface solar radiation reanalysis data were used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 58 ecoregions covering 69% of the conterminous United States. A net positive surface radiative forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.029 Wm-2 due to LCLU albedo change from 1973 to 2000 was estimated. The forcings for individual ecoregions were similar in magnitude to current global forcing estimates, with the most negative forcing (as low as -0.367 Wm-2) due to the transition to forest and the most positive forcing (up to 0.337 Wm-2) due to the conversion to grass/shrub. Snow exacerbated both negative and positive forcing for LCLU transitions between snow-hiding and snow-revealing LCLU classes. The surface radiative forcing estimates were highly sensitive to snow-free interannual albedo variability that had a percent average monthly variation from 1.6% to 4.3% across the ecoregions. The results described in this paper enhance our understanding of contemporary LCLU change on surface radiative forcing and suggest that future forcing estimates should model snow and interannual albedo variation.

  19. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17 957 were due to solid cancers. Study answer and limitations Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. What this study adds The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated

  20. Autumn school. Radiation of medical materials. Actual state and development perspectives, new international regulations. 18-19 November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of medical sterilization methods commercially used has been done. On this base scientific, technical and production aspects of radiation sterilization technology have been discussed. Especially the process control, dosimetric methods used and microbiological problems were described. All legal aspects, Polish and international regulations and licensing procedures for different kinds of medical materials have been also shown. The development of radiation sterilization in Poland in respect to dressings, tissue transplants, cosmetics, tissue transplants, cosmetics, pharmaceutics, packing materials as well as other radiation technologies has been presented

  1. Astronomical Symbolism in Australian Aboriginal Rock Art

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Aboriginal Australian cultures include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition and ceremony. This knowledge has practical navigational and calendrical functions, and sometimes extends to a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky. Here we explore whether this astronomical tradition is reflected in the rock art of Aboriginal Australians. We find several plausible examples of depictions of astronomical figures and symbols, and also evidence that astronomical observations were used to set out stone arrangements. However, we recognise that the case is not yet strong enough to make an unequivocal statement, and describe our plans for further research.

  2. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Ag-like W from Pd-like W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates for [Kr]4d94fnl (n = 4-9), [Kr]4d95l'nl (n = 5-9) and [Kr]4d96l'nl (n = 6-7) states in Ag-like tungsten (W27+) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory method, the multiconfiguration relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code and the Hartree-Fock-relativistic method. Branching ratios relative to the first threshold and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the singly excited [Kr]4d10nl (n = 4-9) states. The total DR rate coefficient is derived as a function of electron temperature. These atomic data are important in the modelling of N-shell radiation spectra of heavy ions generated in various collision as well as plasma experiments. The tungsten data are particularly important for fusion application.

  3. Determination of Cs 137 and Sr 90 content in forests of the Palesse state radiation-ecological reservation using instrumental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of determination of Cs 137 and Sr 90 in the samples of wood and soil taken in some places of the Palesse state radiation-ecological reservation are presented. The beta-gamma-spectrometer MKS AT 1315 was used for instrumental analysis of the samples. It was shown that specific activity of firewood taken in some places is less than sanitary norms accepted in Belarus for Cs 137 but exceeds sanitary norms used in Russia for Sr 90. (authors)

  4. BIM adoption within Australian Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs: an innovation diffusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reza Hosseini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the envisaged benefits of BIM adoption for SMEs, BIM in SMEs has remained an underrepresented area within the available academic literature. This study proposes and draws upon a framework grounded on innovation diffusion theory (IDT to provide an illuminating insight into the current state of BIM and the main barriers to BIM adoption within Australian SMEs. Based on analyses of 135 questionnaires completed by SMEs through partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM and grounded on the proposed framework, the current state of BIM adoption and barriers to BIM adoption for SMEs are discussed. The findings show that currently around 42% of Australian SMEs use BIM in Level 1 and Level 2 with only around 5% have tried Level 3. It comes to light that lack of knowledge within SMEs and across the construction supply chain is not a major barrier for Australian SMEs. In essence, the main barriers stem from the risks associated with an uncertain return on investment (ROI for BIM as perceived by key players in SMEs. The findings also show the validity of the framework proposed for explaining BIM adoption in Australian SMEs.

  5. Annual report on the present state and activities of the Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories in fiscal 2009 (Document on present state of affairs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report summarizes the various activities on radiation control at the nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, which were undertaken by the Radiation Protection Department in fiscal 2009. In the Laboratories, the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotopes and uranium research laboratories have been operated. The Radiation Protection Department is responsible for the radiation control in and around the facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gaseous and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, radiological standards, maintenance of radiation monitoring instruments, quality management, and the related research. In fiscal 2009, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 9.7 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.2 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gaseous and liquid effluents from the TRP to imaginary members of the public around the Laboratories was 1.8×10-4 mSv. The environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. As for the quality management activities, the inspection by the government, the internal audit, and the maintenance to revise the documents have been continued in accordance with the quality management system which had been introduced to safety regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  6. Western Australian food security project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maycock Bruce

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the Western Australian (WA Food Security Project was to conduct a preliminary investigation into issues relating to food security in one region within the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. The first phase of the project involved a food audit in one lower income area that was typical of the region, to identify the range, variety and availability of foods in the region. Methods A comprehensive food audit survey was provided to all food outlet owners/operators in one lower socio-economic region within the City of Mandurah (n = 132 outlets. The purpose of the survey was to investigate the range, variety and availability of foods in the Mandurah region as well as examining specific in-store characteristics such as the types of clientele and in-store promotions offered. Surveys were competed for 99 outlets (response rate = 75%. Results The range of foods available were predominantly pre-prepared with more than half of the outlets pre-preparing the majority of their food. Sandwiches and rolls were the most popular items sold in the outlets surveyed (n = 51 outlets followed by pastries such as pies, sausage rolls and pasties (n = 33 outlets. Outlets considered their healthiest food options were sandwiches or rolls (n = 51 outlets, salads (n- = 50 outlets, fruit and vegetables (n = 40 outlets, seafood (n = 27 outlets, meats such as chicken (n = 26 outlets and hot foods such as curries, soups or quiches (n = 23 outlets. The majority of outlets surveyed considered pre-prepared food including sandwiches, rolls and salads, as healthy food options regardless of the content of the filling or dressings used. Few outlets (n = 28% offered a choice of bread type other than white or wholemeal. High fat pastries and dressings were popular client choices (n = 77% as were carbonated drinks (n = 88% and flavoured milks (n = 46%. Conclusion These findings clearly indicate the need for further investigation of the impact of

  7. Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the ''Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States'' held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 9-11 December 1996. The present activities on nuclear data for radiotherapy are summarized in Member States, the present status of nuclear data for photon, neutron and proton therapy is reviewed and topics which are not presently covered by other institutions are identified. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  8. Research and development in oil spill response: The Australian view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant oil spill events in Australia are, fortunately, infrequent events. In recent years, the 33,000 dwt tonne phosphate carrier Sanko Harvest grounded and broke up losing all of its 740 tonnes of fuel oil bunkers off the small south west port of Esperance. Since that incident only one further casualty has occurred, that of the tanker KIRKI which lost some 18,000 tonnes of its crude oil cargo when the fore part of the vessel broke away and sank in heavy seas and subsequently during the tow to quieter waters off the north west coast of Australia. Whilst public interest in oil spills, when they occur, is understandably high, the national government budget for response to ship sourced marine oil spills is in proportion to assessment of the risk and approximates $Aus 2 million annually. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), is the Federal authority under whose responsibility revenue for the Federal/State arrangement, known as the National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil, is managed. This revenue is obtained directly from the shipping industry in the form of a small tax known as the oil pollution levy. Funds from this source are allocated to the States nationally for purchase of spill response equipment and approved dispersants, production of coastal resource atlases, training programs, maintenance and administration of the National Plan. It will be readily understood that a relatively small budget precludes all but the smallest of R ampersand D programs. Most spills occur in waters over which an Australian state has jurisdiction and are generally managed by state administrations using equipment and decision support resources provided by AMSA

  9. Medical use of cannabis in Australia: "medical necessity" defences under current Australian law and avenues for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The possession of cannabis is an offence in all Australian jurisdictions. No exception is made for medical use under any of the State and Territory Drug Acts, nor the Commonwealth's pharmaceutical regulation scheme. Nevertheless, questions remain about the scope for defences argued on the basis of necessitous medical use. More fundamentally the increasingly favourable light in which the medical use of cannabis is growing to be seen by state and national legislatures overseas raises important questions about the need for reform of Australian drug laws. This article explores those questions. PMID:25087368

  10. Australian Study Cites Low English Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study showing that one-third of all foreign students who studied at Australian universities speak English so poorly that they should never have been granted visas to study in the country in the first place. The study, by Robert Birrell, director of the Centre for Population and Urban Research at Australia's…

  11. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  12. Demands of Training: Australian Tourism and Hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Brett

    Qualitative research was conducted as part of a four-industry project studying operation of training markets, one of which was Australian tourism and hospitality (T&H). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 individuals representing stakeholder groups. Interviews were conducted across Queensland, Victoria, and South Australia and…

  13. Exporting Australian Educational Services to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the deregulation of the overseas student sector that took place in Australia during the mid-1980s. It focuses specifically upon the short-term English- language courses that were sold to students from the People's Republic of China. The article suggests that the Hawke government's policy of encouraging Australian language…

  14. Anglo-Australian Observatory August 2009 newsletter

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbie, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The August 2009 edition of the AAO newsletter contains articles on observations of the lunar impact of the Kaguya satellite, mapping the ISM towards Omega Centauri, early results from the Anglo-Australian Rocky Planet search, details of a new AAOmega observing mode, the new telescope control system and a number of regular features.

  15. Making Space for Multilingualism in Australian Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Marianne; Cross, Russell

    2016-01-01

    In this article we introduce the special issue: Language(s) across the curriculum in Australian schools. The special issue includes a focus on English as an additional language in mainstream classes, Indigenous education, heritage languages and foreign languages, and we give background to these different--though frequently overlapping--contexts.…

  16. Financial Management and Young Australian Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Nicki; Hoiles, Lauren; Corney, Tim; Clark, David

    2008-01-01

    In two studies of young Australian workers, participants generally displayed positive attitudes towards financial management practices; however, a substantial proportion failed to display positive financial management practices, experienced financial problems and dissatisfaction, and reported low rates of seeking financial assistance, particularly…

  17. Developments in Australian Agricultural and Related Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Peter; Rayner, John

    2011-01-01

    While the calm waters metaphor might explain the changes navigated by Australian agricultural education through most of its history, the last 20 or so years have been very turbulent. Now, the new millennium sees agricultural education in both Australia and the Western world facing a different and less certain future. This paper analyses some of…

  18. Australian Education Journals: Quantitative and Qualitative Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddow, Gaby; Genoni, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that applied citation-based measurements to Australian education journals. Citations data were drawn from two sources, Web of Science and Scopus, and these data were used to calculate each journal's impact factor, "h"-index, and diffusion factor. The rankings resulting from these analyses were compared with draft…

  19. Indigenous Australian Artworks in Intercultural Contact Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Eleanore Wildurger

    2009-01-01

    This article comments on Indigenous Australian art from an intercultural perspective. The painting Bush Tomato Dreaming (1998), by the Anmatyerre artist Lucy Ngwarai Kunoth serves as model case for my arg ument that art expresses existential social knowledge. In consequence, I wil l argue that social theory and art theory together provide tools for intercultural und erstanding and competence.

  20. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB...