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Sample records for australian national university

  1. The chlorine-36 dating program at the Australian National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.F.; Ophel, T.R.; Bird, J.R.; Calf, G.E.; Allison, G.B.; Chivas, A.R.

    1987-05-01

    A chlorine-36 dating capability based on the 14UD pelletron accelerator was developed at the Australian National University during 1986 and is now entering the routine measurement phase. It involves a collaboration between the Department of Nuclear Physics, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and CSIRO Division of Soils. The chlorine-36 dating system is described and some early results are presented for samples of chloride from salt lakes in Western Australia and soil profiles in South Australia

  2. Evolution of Photonics Education at the Australian National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John

    2009-06-01

    This paper tracks the evolution of photonics education and training at the Australian National University (ANU) from its tentative beginnings in 1971 in the doctoral and masters postgraduate research arena and in 1989 in the undergraduate teaching arena through to its substantive role in 2009 and onwards. In addition it addresses various offshoots to national and international outreach activities and support for emerging photonics qualifications at other institutions, as well as photonics conference evolution.

  3. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband) stations (see fig. 1 and table 1). The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  4. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jepsen

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband stations (see fig. 1 and table 1. The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  5. Consumer participation in nurse education: a national survey of Australian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Byrne, Louise; Wynaden, Dianne; Martin, Graham; Harris, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Consumers of mental health services have an important role to play in the higher education of nursing students, by facilitating understanding of the experience of mental illness and instilling a culture of consumer participation. Yet the level of consumer participation in mental health nursing programmes in Australia is not known. The aim of the present study was to scope the level and nature of involvement of consumers in mental health nursing higher education in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving an internet survey of nurse academics who coordinate mental health nursing programmes in universities across Australia, representing 32 universities. Seventy-eight percent of preregistration and 75% of post-registration programmes report involving consumers. Programmes most commonly had one consumer (25%) and up to five. Face-to-face teaching, curriculum development, and membership-to-programme committees were the most regular types of involvement. The content was generally codeveloped by consumers and nurse academics (67.5%). The frequency of consumer involvement in the education of nursing students in Australia is surprisingly high. However, involvement is noticeably variable across types of activity (e.g. curriculum development, assessment), and tends to be minimal and ad hoc. Future research is required into the drivers of increased consumer involvement. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Four Management Agendas for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In a new mixed economy of higher learning, Australian universities require more strategic management to compete and collaborate sustainably. However, many scholars argue that new modes of university management are at odds with scholarly aims and values. This article examines how Australian universities frame their missions and communicate their…

  7. Commercial Activities and Copyright in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Marita

    2008-01-01

    With government funding for most Australian universities below 60% and falling a major strategic emphasis for universities has been on securing other sources of operating revenue, including commercial opportunities and partnerships. The implication of increasing commercial activities such as non-award and tailored professional programmes, contract…

  8. The Banality of Exclusion in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The systematic exclusion of asylum seekers from Australian higher education reveals much about present day Australia. This essay begins with a brief context and outline of the international refugee crisis and Australia's reaction. Next, consideration is given to how this nation has identified itself historically and how it has behaved in recent…

  9. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: a Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyono, Bambang Yudi

    2005-01-01

    This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained ...

  10. The Australian National Proton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A.; Bishop, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Protons have been used in the treatment of cancer since 1954 and over 30,000 patients have been treated around the world. Their precise dose distribution allows the treatment of small tumours in critical locations such as the base of skull and orbit and is an alternative to stereotactic radiotherapy in other sites. With the development of hospital-based systems in the 1990's, common tumours such as prostate, breast and lung cancer can now also be treated using simple techniques. The therapeutic ratio is improved as the dose to the tumour can be increased while sparing normal tissues. The well defined high dose region and low integral dose compared with photon treatments is a particular advantage in children and other situations where long-term survival is expected and when used in combination with chemotherapy. In January 2002, the NSW Health Department initiated a Feasibility Study for an Australian National Proton Facility. This Study will address the complex medical, scientific, engineering, commercial and legal issues required to design and build a proton facility in Australia. The Facility will be mainly designed for patient treatment but will also provide facilities for biological, physical and engineering research. The proposed facility will have a combination of fixed and rotating beams with an energy range of 70-250 MeV. Such a centre will enable the conduct of randomised clinical trials and a comparison with other radiotherapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Cost-utility comparisons with other medical treatments will also be made and further facilities developed if the expected benefit is confirmed. When patients are not being treated, the beam will be available for commercial and research purposes. This presentation will summarize the progress of the Study and discuss the important issues that need to be resolved before the Facility is approved and constructed

  11. The napping behaviour of Australian university students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Lovato

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported sleep and napping behaviour of Australian university students and the relationship between napping and daytime functioning. A sample of 280 university first-year psychology students (median age  = 19.00 years completed a 6-item napping behaviour questionnaire, a 12-item Daytime Feelings and Functioning Scale, the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results indicated that 53.6% of students reported napping with 34% napping at least 1-2 times per week, and 17% napping three or more occasions per week. Long naps, those over 30 minutes, were taken by 77% of the napping students. Sixty-one percent of students reported they took long naps during the post-lunch dip period, from 2-4 pm. Students who nap at least once per week reported significantly more problems organizing their thoughts, gaining motivation, concentrating, and finishing tasks than students who did not nap. Students who napped also felt significantly more sleepy and depressed when compared to students who did not nap. The results also indicated that nap frequency increased with daytime sleepiness. The majority of students (51% reported sleeping 6-7 hours per night or less. Overall, the results from this study suggest that among this population of Australian first-year university students habitual napping is common and may be used in an attempt to compensate for the detrimental effects of excessive sleepiness.

  12. Practice education: A snapshot from Australian university programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Louise; Brown, Ted; McKinstry, Carol; Caine, Anne-Maree

    2017-04-01

    Practice education is an integral component of the learning process for occupational therapy students. The dramatic increase in Australian occupational therapy programmes and students enrolled over the last decade is placing exponential demands on universities and practice education providers to meet accreditation and registration requirements. This study aimed to explore practice education from the perspectives of Australian occupational therapy university programmes. A purpose-designed survey was emailed to the heads of all Australian occupational therapy programmes. The survey gathered qualitative and quantitative data on courses offered, number of students, practice education hours and models, practice education administration and funding, and challenges for stakeholders. All data were summarised and are presented descriptively. Responses were received from 21 (95.5%) Australian university occupational therapy programmes, with a total enrolment of 5569 undergraduate and 659 graduate-entry masters students. Practice education hours were predominantly in the later years of study and used an apprenticeship model for supervision. There was a trend for observation, simulation and service-learning experiences to be placed in the early years of programmes. Participants reported that the increasing student numbers presented difficulties within the changing clinical contexts. There was a call to re-examine the 1000-hour requirement for practice education. Practice education is a critical issue for Australian occupational therapy. Increasing student numbers place mounting financial and resource demands on education programmes and practice education providers. There is a need for a national, collaborative approach to develop guidelines and processes to ensure sustainability relating to practice education. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. Redefining & Leading the Academic Discipline in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Damien G.; Healy, Annah H.

    2013-01-01

    Disciplines have emerged as an alternative administrative structure to departments or schools in Australian universities. We presently investigate the pattern of discipline use and by way of case study examine a role for distributed leadership in discipline management. Over forty per cent of Australian universities currently employ disciplines,…

  14. Effective University Teaching: Views of Australian University Students from Low Socio-Economic Status Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia; O'Shea, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As the Australian higher education population further diversifies as a result of federal government policy changes, the collective understanding of effective university teaching in the Australian context will need to evolve to incorporate such shifts. The Australian Government has set clear targets for increased university participation of people…

  15. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained thoroughly, policies on plagiarism are informed to all university academic members, and there are mechanisms to manage cases related to plagiarism. In contrast, not all Indonesian universities treat plagiarism directly. Some universities depend on religious morality and academic ethics in dealing with plagiarism. Accordingly, this article recommends the explicit treatment of plagiarism in Indonesian universities.

  16. Are Australian Universities Promoting Learning and Teaching Activity Effectively? An Assessment of the Effects on Science and Engineering Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretchley, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Federal Government and Australian universities have embarked on a bid to raise the profile of learning and teaching (L&T) in universities. Current strategies include increased funding of competitive grants for L&T projects, a wider range of teaching awards and fellowships and a controversial new national competitive Learning…

  17. Universal National Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crizer, Scott

    2003-01-01

    ...; since the days of George Washington many American leaders have believed universal service was vital to the nature of our country This paper will argue for the reinstatement of a national service...

  18. Commonwealth Infrastructure Funding for Australian Universities: 2004 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Paul; Phillimore, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent trends in the provision of general infrastructure funding by the Commonwealth for Australian universities (Table A providers) over the period 2004 to 2011. It specifically examines general infrastructure development and excludes funding for research infrastructure through the Australian Research Council or…

  19. Australian Early Childhood Educators: From Government Policy to University Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sharon; Trinidad, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Australian Federal Government initiatives in the area of early childhood with regard to the provision of early childhood education and care. These changes have influenced a Western Australian university to develop an innovative birth to 8 years preservice educator education curriculum. Using an ecological…

  20. Mechanics, Problems and Contributions of Tertiary Strategic Alliance: The Case of 22 Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffu, Kojo; Mamman, Aminu

    1999-01-01

    A study of international strategic alliances involving 22 Australian universities indicates that a majority of universities have frameworks for internationalization initiatives, with top institutional management instrumental in initiating joint ventures with overseas institutions despite limited resources. Australian universities believe they…

  1. Telling Stories: Australian Literature in a National English Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Larissa McLean

    2008-01-01

    In the past two years, considerable media and government attention has been directed towards the teaching of Australian literature in secondary schools. This article explores the main themes of this discourse, and considers recent discussions about Australian literature in the National English Curriculum in the context of this debate. By way of…

  2. Aligning IT and Business Strategy: An Australian University Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Alignment with business objectives is considered to be an essential outcome of information technology (IT) strategic planning. This case study examines the process of creating an IT strategy for an Australian university using an industry standard methodology. The degree of alignment is determined by comparing the strategic priorities supported by…

  3. Institutional Breakdown? An Exploratory Taxonomy of Australian University Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; Dollery, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Australian higher education has undergone radical change aimed transforming universities into commercial enterprises less dependent on public funding. Despite some significant successes, including dramatic increases in the numbers of domestic and international students, decreased Commonwealth subsidies, and more private sector finance, there are…

  4. National Statement for Engaging Young Australians with Asia in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Engaging Young Australians with Asia" is a national policy statement which supports "The Adelaide Declaration on National Goals for Schooling in the Twenty-First Century." These goals promote understanding of the value of cultural and linguistic diversity, and possessing the knowledge, skills and understanding to contribute…

  5. Structure and experiences of the Australian National Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bett, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed account is given of the history, structure and functions of the Australian Safeguards Office (ASO). Its nuclear materials accounting and control procedures and its research and development programs are discussed. Australia's physical protection policy and the ASO's role in this field are described. The Australian views on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials and the establishment of National Authorities such as the ASO are outlined

  6. The Slippery Slope to Efficiency? An Australian Perspective on School/University Partnerships for Teacher Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale school/university partnerships for the enhancement of teacher professionalism and teacher professional learning have been part of the teacher development landscape in Australia for the past two decades. This paper takes a historical perspective on Australian school/university partnerships through detailing three national projects over…

  7. Universities and National Laboratories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which have recently marred the happy university life in India are largely the outcome of a sense of frustration ... ruthless suppression of a strike or emphatic refusal to accede to the students' demand,. Excerpts from the .... in most branches of science, it is not necessary for universities to undertake advanced work in science.

  8. Quality Assurance, Open and Distance Learning, and Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C. Reid

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Open and distance education has integrated quality assurance processes since its inception. Recently, the increased use of distance teaching systems, technologies, and pedagogies by universities without a distance education heritage has enabled them to provide flexible learning opportunities. They have done this in addition to, or instead of, face-to-face instruction, yet the practice of quality assurance processes as a fundamental component of distance education provision has not necessarily followed these changes.This paper considers the relationship between notions of quality assurance and open and distance education, between quality assurance and higher education more broadly, and between quality assurance and the implementation of recent quality audits in Australian universities. The paper compares quality portfolios submitted to the Australian Universities Quality Agency by two universities, one involved in distance education, the other not involved. This comparison demonstrates that the relationship is variable, and suggests that reasons for this have more to do with business drivers than with educational rationales.

  9. Australian Alps: Kosciuszko, Alpine and Namadgi National Parks (Second Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Porter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Australian Alps: Kosciuszko, Alpine and Namadgi National Parks (Second Edition By Deidre Slattery. Clayton South, Australia: CSIRO Publishing, 2015. xvii + 302 pp. AU$ 45.00, US$ 35.95. ISBN 978-1-486-30171-3.

  10. Whiteness and National Identity: Teacher Discourses in Australian Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Jessica; Priest, Naomi; Kowal, Emma; White, Fiona; Fox, Brandi; Paradies, Yin

    2018-01-01

    The study examines how white teachers talked to children about national identity and cultural diversity by drawing on qualitative research with eight- to 12-year-old students and their teachers from four Australian primary schools with different racial, ethnic and cultural demographics. Despite a range of explicit and implicit approaches that…

  11. Design and Implementation of the Australian National Data Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Treloar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 This paper will describe the genesis and realisation of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS. It will commence by outlining the context within which ANDS was conceived, both in the international research and Australian research support domains. It will then describe the process that brought about the ANDS vision and the principles that informed the realisation of that vision. The paper will then outline each of the four ANDS programs (Developing Frameworks, Providing Utilities, Seeding the Commons, and Building Capabilities while also discussing particular items of note about the approach ANDS is taking. The paper concludes by briefly examining related work in the UK and US.

  12. The Effectiveness of External Quality Audits: A Study of Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahsood

    2013-01-01

    External quality audits have been introduced in many countries as part of higher education reforms. This article is based on research on 30 Australian universities to assess the extent to which audits by the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) have improved quality assurance in the core and support areas of the universities. The article…

  13. Ad-Hoc Numbers Forming Provision and Policy: Round and Round of Universal Access in an Australian Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millei, Zsuzsa; Gallagher, Jannelle

    2017-01-01

    Australian early childhood education still labours with the achievement of universal access and the production of comprehensive and consistent data to underpin a national evidence base. In this article, we attend to the processes led by numbers whereby new practices of quantification, rationalization and reporting are introduced and mastered in a…

  14. Female Administrative Managers in Australian Universities: Not Male and Not Academic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Michelle; Marchant, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Women make up 65 per cent of the staff in Australian universities who do not perform academic work. While there is a growing body of research on women in senior management and the experiences of female academics in Australian universities, there is less literature on women working in the administrative stream, especially those in middle…

  15. Welcome to 2012: Australian Academic Developers and Student-Driven University Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Peter; Fraser, Kym; Gosling, David

    2013-01-01

    Are there consequences for academic development arising from the move to student-driven funding in the Australian higher education sector from 2012? In a move that has similarities to the UK, Australian government-supported student university funding will, from 2012, attach to students who can select a programme at the university of their choice…

  16. Psychological Distress in Iranian International Students at an Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahidi, Shizar; Blignault, Ilse; Hayen, Andrew; Razee, Husna

    2017-05-03

    This study investigated psychological distress in Iranian international students at UNSW Australia, and explored the psychosocial factors associated with high levels of distress. A total of 180 Iranian international students pursuing undergraduate and postgraduate degrees during 2012/2013 completed an email questionnaire containing socio-demographic items and five standardized and validated scales. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse the predictors of psychological distress. Compared to domestic and international students at two other Australian universities, a significantly smaller proportion of Iranian international students scored as distressed on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Greater levels of psychological distress were associated with being female, poorer physical health, less social support, less religious involvement and spirituality, and negative attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help. Findings from this growing group of international students can help inform culturally competent mental health promotion and service provision in their host countries.

  17. National survey of foodborne viruses in Australian oysters at production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Valeria; Hodgson, Kate; McLeod, Catherine; Tan, Jessica; Malhi, Navreet; Turnbull, Alison

    2018-02-01

    Internationally human enteric viruses, such as norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are frequently associated with shellfish related foodborne disease outbreaks, and it has been suggested that acceptable NoV limits based on end-point testing be established for this high risk food group. Currently, shellfish safety is generally managed through the use of indicators of faecal contamination. Between July 2014 and August 2015, a national prevalence survey for NoV and HAV was done in Australian oysters suitable for harvest. Two sampling rounds were undertaken to determine baseline levels of these viruses. Commercial Australian growing areas, represented by 33 oyster production regions in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, were included in the survey. A total of 149 and 148 samples were collected during round one and two of sampling, respectively, and tested for NoV and HAV by quantitative RT-PCR. NoV and HAV were not detected in oysters collected in either sampling round, indicating an estimated prevalence for these viruses in Australian oysters of viruses in Australian oysters was consistent with epidemiological evidence, with no oyster-related foodborne viral illness reported during the survey period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Course diversity within South Australian secondary schools as a factor of successful transition and retention within Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Wright

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There has long been a disparity in the provision of curriculum within Australian secondary schools. This study aims to evaluate whether diversity within schools alters students’ university experiences. While much of the existing literature focuses on each aspect individually, this paper attempts to clarify a link between these factors by focussing on the transition process. A theoretical analysis of key concepts surrounding a web of inter-related issues, including student satisfaction, interest and motivation frames the quantitative data collection. The methodology employed consists of analysing a balanced sample of South Australian secondary schools, from an array of different locations, SES groupings and sizes, and an acknowledgement of previous studies into the first year experience within Australian Universities. The findings suggest that there is a disparity between learning areas in school curricula and an inherent link has been established with issues such as student attrition and dissatisfaction in universities.

  19. Unhealthy product sponsorship of Australian national and state sports organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macniven, Rona; Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    Marketing of products harmful to the health of children has been found to be prolific, and occurs across multiple media platforms and in several settings, including organised sport, thus potentially undermining the health benefits inherent in sports participation. Through website audits, this study investigated the nature and extent of unhealthy food, beverage, alcohol and gambling sponsorship across peak Australian sporting organisations. A structured survey tool identified and assessed sponsoring companies and products displayed on the websites of the 53 national and state/territory sport governing bodies in Australia receiving government funding. Identified products were categorised as healthy or unhealthy, based on criteria developed by health experts. There was a total of 413 websites operated by the 53 sports, with 1975 company or product sponsors identified. Overall, 39 sports had at least one unhealthy sponsor, and 10% of all sponsors were rated as unhealthy. Cricket had the highest percent of unhealthy sponsors (27%) and the highest number of unhealthy food and beverage sponsors (n=19). Rugby Union (n=16) and Australian Football (n=4) had the highest numbers of alcohol and gambling sponsors respectively. Sponsorship of Australian sport governing bodies by companies promoting unhealthy food and beverage, alcohol and gambling products is prevalent at the state/territory and national level. SO WHAT?: Regulatory guidelines should be established to limit such sponsorship and ensure that it is not translated into promotions that may reach and influence children.

  20. Assessing the Performance of Educational Research in Australian Universities: An Alternative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura B.

    2018-01-01

    This study uses bibliometric data to assess the performance of educational research in Australian universities. It provides an alternative perspective to the Australian government's Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) assessment. ERA results suggest that the performance of educational research is substantially less compared to other…

  1. The Attainability of University Degrees and Their Labour Market Benefits for Young Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    I used data from the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth to investigate the factors associated with the attainment of Australian university degrees and estimate their domestic labour market benefits. I considered vertical and horizontal stratification in education and examined monetary and non-monetary benefits. The…

  2. Going Global? Internationalizing Australian Universities in a Time of Global Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the past decade's internationalization of Australian universities against a backdrop of increasing globalization, particularly the expansion of global capitalism. Examines international student flows, faculty, and programs, assessing the relative presence of internationalization (mutuality and reciprocal cultural relations) versus…

  3. Intoxicated workers: findings from a national Australian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidd, Ken; Roche, Ann M; Buisman-Pijlman, Femke

    2011-09-01

    To identify prevalence of alcohol and drug use and intoxication at work. A total of 9,828 Australian workers ≥14 years old. Australia 2007. Work-place alcohol use and drug use, intoxication at work, industry and occupation of employment. Secondary analysis of a large nationally representative survey involving descriptive and weighted multivariate logistic regressions. Differential patterns were identified by drug type, worker characteristics and occupational setting, controlling for demographic variables. Nearly 9% of workers surveyed (8.7%) usually drank alcohol at work and 0.9% usually used drugs at work. Attending work under the influence of alcohol was more prevalent (5.6%) than attending work under the influence of drugs (2.0%), and significantly more likely among young, male, never married workers with no dependent children. Hospitality industry workers were 3.5 times more likely than other workers to drink alcohol and two to three times more likely to use drugs at work or attend work under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Other high-risk industries and occupations included construction, financial services, tradespersons and unskilled workers. More than one in 20 Australian workers admit to having worked under the influence of alcohol and almost one in 50 report attending work under the influence of psychoactive drugs. The rates are higher for some industries, such as the hospitality industry, than others. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Drama in the Australian National Curriculum: Decisions, Tensions and Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Madonna; Saunders, John Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, the Australian Federal Government endorsed the final version of the Australian Curriculum arts framework a document resulting from nearly seven years of consultation and development. "The Australian Curriculum: The Arts Version 8.0" comprises five subjects: dance, drama, media arts, music and visual arts. This article…

  5. UNIVERSITY LIFE AND AUSTRALIAN HOMES: THREE CASE STUDIES OF INTERNATIONAL MUSLIM STUDENTS IN BRISBANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkeplee Othman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite a significant increase in enrolments of postgraduate international Muslim students within Australian universities, little is known about their perceptions of life within Australian homes while undertaking their studies. The aim of this study is to investigate the ways in which students’ cultural and religious traditions affect their use of domestic spaces within the homes in which they reside. The research found that participants faced some minor difficulties in achieving privacy, maintaining modesty and extending hospitality while able to perform their daily activities in Australian designed homes. The findings suggest that greater research attention needs to be given to the development of Australian home designs that are adaptable to the needs of a multicultural society. Australian society encompasses diverse cultural customs and requirements with respect to home design, and these are yet to be explored.

  6. Australian Government Information Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Provides an overview of Australian Government information resources. Features content from Australian Government agency websites such as the Department of Environment and Energy, Department of Defence, Australian National Maritime Museum, ANZAC Memorial in Sydney, Department of Immigration & Border Protection, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Dept. of Agriculture and Water Resources, Australian Parliament, Australian Treasury, Australian Transport Safety Board, and Australian Parl...

  7. The Emerging Workforce of International University Student Workers: Injury Experience in an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Thamrin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available International university students are a growing section of the workforce and are thought to be at greater risk of injury. Qualitative studies have highlighted vulnerabilities, but there is a shortage of quantitative research exploring the injury experience and associated risk factors of this emerging issue. In this study, a total of 466 university student workers across a range of study programs in a single Australian university completed an online survey, with questions relating to their background, working experience, training and injury experience. Risk factors for injury were explored in a multivariate statistical model. More than half had not received any safety training before they started work, and 10% reported having had a work injury. About half of these injuries occurred after training. Statistically significant risk factors for injury included working more than 20 h per week (adjusted odds ratio 2.20 (95% CI 1.03–4.71 and lack of confidence in discussing safety issues (AOR 2.17; 95% CI 1.13–4.16. The findings suggest the need for a more engaging and effective approach to safety education and a limit on working hours. This situation is a moral challenge for universities, in that they are effectively sponsoring young workers in the community. It is recommended that longitudinal studies of international student workers be conducted.

  8. Eating Disorders among Indian and Australian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostedt, John P.; Schumaker, John F.; Nathawat, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the influx of western-style eating disorders into India, Asia, and the southern Pacific region. Predicted Australian students would have more eating disorder symptoms, but instead, the Indian students showed more symptoms. Concludes substantial evidence of western-style eating disorders appear in the privileged socioeconomic class of…

  9. The Nature of Choice and Value for Services and Amenities in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezdani, Omer

    2015-01-01

    In two decades, Australian university students have accumulated over $25 billion in debt, a figure that is expected to increase dramatically over the next few years. The literature has rarely considered students' attitudes about ancillary services and amenities, despite their importance to the character of university life and substantial…

  10. The Trade Practices Act, Competitive Neutrality and Research Costing: Issues for Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzobs, Tania

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly universities are becoming commercial enterprises and their core activities of teaching and research subject to business imperatives. This paper reviews the research costing methodologies of 17 Australian universities. Tension between Competition Law and Competitive Neutrality exists which could be resolved through improved costing and…

  11. Australian Public Universities: Are They Practising a Corporate Approach to Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on the multi-theoretical approach to governance and a qualitative research method to examine the extent to which the corporate approach is practised in Australian public universities. The findings reveal that in meeting the needs of multiple stakeholders, universities are faced with a number of structural, legalistic, and…

  12. Employees' Perceptions of Email Communication, Volume and Management Strategies in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Lushington, Kurt; Sloan, Jeremy; Buchanan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Despite email playing a central role in university business, little is known about the strategies used by staff to manage email and the factors contributing to email overload. In a mixed method study undertaken in one Australian university comparing academic (n = 193) and professional (n = 278) staff, we found that while email volume was higher in…

  13. Targeted, Timely, Learning Support for International Students: One Australian University's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the approach taken by an Australian University to enhance student study skills, development of academic language, and writing skills. The Curtin Business School (CBS) has the only fully faculty-based student learning support centre at Curtin University in Western Australia. Called the CBS Communication Skills Centre (CSC) it…

  14. Organisational and Occupational Boundaries in Australian Universities: The Hierarchical Positioning of Female Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The effects of gender on organisational structures for professional university staff have been largely overlooked in the literature. Using data from one Australian university, we examine the location of professional female staff in the organisational hierarchy. Our analysis indicated that significant gendered segregation existed within and across…

  15. Academic "Place-Making": Fostering Attachment, Belonging and Identity for Indigenous Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jennifer; Hollinsworth, David; Raciti, Maria; Gilbey, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    Place is a concept used to explore how people ascribe meaning to their physical and social surrounds, and their emotional affects. Exploring the university as a place can highlight social relations affecting Australian Indigenous students' sense of belonging and identity. We asked what university factors contribute to the development of a positive…

  16. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Associated Clinical Features among Australian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Dianna

    2007-01-01

    The current study addressed the frequency of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms among university students and investigated the predictors of dysmorphic concern. Six hundred and nineteen Australian university students completed measures assessing BDD, dysmorphic concern, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, self-oriented and socially…

  17. In Their Own Words: A Qualitative Study of the Reasons Australian University Students Plagiarize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia; Gray, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    The ways in which universities and individual academics attempt to deter and respond to student plagiarism may be based on untested assumptions about particular or primary reasons for this behaviour. Using a series of group interviews, this qualitative study gathered the views of 56 Australian university students on the possible reasons for…

  18. Students Seeking Help for Mental Health Problems: Do Australian University Websites Provide Clear Pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas A.; Fiedler, Brenton A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental health problems in young Australians continue to be a major public health issue. Studying at university can generate social pressures particularly for youth, which have been associated with the onset of a mental illness or a worsening of an existing condition. Many universities provide health services to support students with health…

  19. Hepatitis C in Australian prisons: a national needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael Mokhlis; Herawati, Lilie; Butler, Tony; Lloyd, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) infections are prevalent in custodial settings worldwide, yet provision of antiviral therapies is uncommon. Approximately 30,000 prisoners are held in Australian prisons at any one time, with more than 30 per cent testing positive for HCV antibodies. Prisoners have been identified in the National Hepatitis C Strategy as a priority population for assessment and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the rates of HCV testing and treatment, as well as barriers and opportunities for development of infrastructure for enhanced services. Interviews were conducted with 55 stakeholders from the correctional sector in each state and territory in Australia in two stages: service directors to gather quantitative data regarding rates of testing and treatment; and other stakeholders for qualitative information regarding barriers and opportunities. Of more than 50,000 individuals put in in custody in Australian prisons in 2013, approximately 8,000 individuals were HCV antibody positive, yet only 313 prisoners received antiviral treatment. The barriers identified to assessment and treatment at the prisoner-level included: fear of side effects and the stigma of being identified to custodial authorities as HCV infected and a likely injecting drug user. Prisoners who came forward may be considered unsuitable for treatment because of prevalent mental health problems and ongoing injecting drug use. Provision of specialist hepatitis nurses and consultants were the most frequently recommended approaches to how prison hepatitis services could be improved. Many personal and systems-level barriers relevant to the delivery of HCV treatment services in the custodial setting were identified. Ready access to skilled nursing and medical staff as well as direct acting antiviral therapies will allow the prison-sector to make a major contribution to control of the growing burden of HCV disease.

  20. Learning Strategic Planning from Australian and New Zealand University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anfu

    2014-01-01

    Initiating a strategic development plan is necessary for universities to be managed scientifically; a university's strategic development plan includes both the educational philosophy and development orientation as determined by the university, including the future reallocation of resources and measures for their integration. The development…

  1. The Hidden Topography of Australia's Arts Nation: The Contribution of Universities to the Artistic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    In "Arts Nation" 2015, the Australia Council documented the current landscape of artistic endeavour in Australia, acknowledging that there are still gaps that need to be filled to build a greater public understanding of the arts in Australia. The contribution of Australian universities to the arts is one such lacuna. This paper seeks to…

  2. Online Education Systems in Scandinavian and Australian Universities: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Flate Paulsen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comparative study of online education systems in Norwegian, Swedish, and Australian universities. The online education systems discussed comprise content creation tools and systems for learning management, student management, and accounting. The author of this article arrives at the conclusion that there seems to be a general lack of integration between theses systems in all three countries. Further, there seems to be little focus on standards specifications such as IMS Global Learning Consortium (IMS and Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM in higher education in all three countries. It was found that both Norway and Sweden value the importance of nationally developed learning management systems and student management systems; however, this does not seem to be the case in Australia. There also seems to be much more national coordination and governmental coercion concerning the choice of student management systems used in Sweden and Norway, than is the case in Australia. Finally, with regard to online education, the most striking difference between these three countries is that of economic policy. In Australia, education is considered an important export industry. In Norway and Sweden, however, the export of education does not seem to be an issue for public discussion.

  3. A Comparison of Chinese and Australian University Students' Attitudes towards Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, John; Howard, Steven J.; Mu, Congjun; Bokosmaty, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Student plagiarism is a growing problem within Australian universities and abroad. Potentially exacerbating this situation, research indicates that students' attitudes toward plagiarism are typically more permissive and lenient than the policies of their tertiary institutions. There has been suggestion that this is especially so in Asian countries…

  4. Factors Affecting the Academic and Cultural Adjustment of Saudi International Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahafi, Nisreen; Shin, Seong-Chul

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigate factors affecting Saudi students' educational experiences in Australian universities and their adjustment issues. The data comes from the survey of 100 Saudi international students in Sydney and subsequent interviews. The analysis revealed that language proficiency is the main barrier to Saudi students' academic and social…

  5. Executive Power and Scaled-Up Gender Subtexts in Australian Entrepreneurial Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Jill; Sawers, Naarah

    2015-01-01

    Deputy Vice Chancellor and Pro Vice Chancellor positions have proliferated in response to the global, corporatised university landscape [Scott, G., S. Bell, H. Coates, and L. Grebennikov. 2010. "Australian Higher Education Leaders in Times of Change: The Role of Pro Vice Chancellor and Deputy Vice Chancellor." "Journal of Higher…

  6. Complaints and Troubles Talk about the English Language Skills of International Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    International students have continued to be the focus of simplistic stereotyping in media discourse where they are frequently identified as one of the forces behind declining academic standards in Australian universities. Their English language skills, in particular, have continued to be the focus of debate both in the mainstream media and in…

  7. Benchmarking Work Practices and Outcomes in Australian Universities Using an Employee Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to benchmark a broad range of work practices and outcomes in Australian universities against other industries. Past research suggests occupational stress experienced by academic staff is worse than experienced by employees in other industries. However, no other practices or outcomes can be compared confidently.…

  8. How Learning Designs, Teaching Methods and Activities Differ by Discipline in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the learning designs, teaching methods and activities most commonly employed within the disciplines in six universities in Australia. The study sought to establish if there were significant differences between the disciplines in learning designs, teaching methods and teaching activities in the current Australian context, as…

  9. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  10. Conceptions of Good Teaching by Good Teachers: Case Studies from an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fernanda P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate on what constitutes good teaching in early 21st Century higher education, through an examination of the experience of five outstanding lecturers from a business school in an Australian university. It is based on a qualitative study that explored their perceptions on what constitutes "good teaching".…

  11. Perceptions of Chinese Students in an Australian University: Are We Meeting Their Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Carmela; Smith, Robina

    2012-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study sought to identify the issues faced by a group of international Chinese students undertaking study in an Australian university. While the focus was on educational issues, socio-cultural and personal factors were also examined in an attempt to identify the sorts of strategies students used in settling into a new…

  12. Internal Audit: Does it Enhance Governance in the Australian Public University Sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to confirm if internal audit, a corporate control process, is functioning effectively in Australian public universities. The study draws on agency theory, published literature and best-practice guidelines to develop an internal audit evaluation framework. A survey instrument is thereafter developed from the framework and used as a…

  13. Comorbidity of Anxiety-Depression among Australian University Students: Implications for Student Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence, factor structure and scale item differences in anxiety-depression comorbidity were investigated in a sample of Australian university students defined according to the presence of anxiety and/or depression. The incidence of anxiety-depression comorbidity was over 32%, about four times that for anxiety or depression alone.…

  14. Prestige-Oriented Market Entry Strategy: The Case of Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayar, Mark; Jack, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Through an exploratory case study of four Australian universities this article finds that foreign market entry strategies are shaped by prestige-seeking motivations and a culture of risk aversion. From the market selection, entry mode and higher education literature, a conceptual model, embedded with four propositions, is presented. The model sees…

  15. Friend or Foe? New Managerialism and Technical, Administrative and Clerical Support Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, David; Teo, Stephen; Yeung, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess and conceptualise the effects of new managerialism-related organisational reforms in three Australian public universities on technical, administrative and clerical support staff job stressors and job satisfaction. Using a mixed method approach consisting of a quantitative core component and qualitative…

  16. Engaging International Students: An Analysis of the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Jane; Crossman, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has stimulated interest in the social and academic experiences of international students and their educational outcomes. The Australian Universities Quality Agency's (AUQA)…

  17. Quality and the English Language Question: Is There Really an Issue in Australian Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Carmela

    2011-01-01

    English language proficiency and how it can be improved have been keenly debated issues in Australian universities. The debate has become more intense in the context of the marketing of international education and Australia's increasing share of international students. One reaction has been to raise the minimum English language levels for…

  18. Rates of Student Disciplinary Action in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has been conducted on student misconduct in universities, quantitative data on disciplinary action undertaken by institutions against student transgressions are largely absent from the literature. This paper provides baseline quantitative data on disciplinary action against students in the universities. It is…

  19. Characterisation of the Use of Twitter by Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Universities are now observed using social media communications channels for a variety of purposes, including marketing, student recruitment, student support and alumni communication. This paper presents an investigation into the use of the Twitter social media platform by universities in Australia, using publicly available Twitter data over a…

  20. New Trends in Industrial Relations in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar N.; Travaglione, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Explores the future function to be performed by industrial-relations practitioners in Australia public universities. Each university will be responsible for implementing its own industrial-relations procedures. Industrial- relations practitioners will have a more consultative role in their dealings with local academic staff associations. (MLF)

  1. Music undergraduates' usefulness and importance expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian university perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dominic Harvey; Jane Whitfield Davidson; Chenicheri Sid Nair

    2016-01-01

    AbstractThe Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalised the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialisation. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach,...

  2. The Prevalence of Self-Reported Stroke in the Australian National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Stuart; Foreman, Joshua; Xie, Jing; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    The study aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for self-reported stroke in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. In this national eye study, 1738 Indigenous Australians (41.1% male) aged 40-92 years and 3098 non-Indigenous Australians (46.4% male) aged 50-98 years from 30 randomly selected sites, stratified by remoteness, were recruited and examined. Sociodemographic information and a history of stroke, diabetes, and ocular health were obtained using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The crude prevalence of self-reported stroke was 5.04% (156 of 3098, 95% confidence interval: 4.29%-5.87%) for non-Indigenous Australians and 8.75% (152 of 1738, 95% confidence interval: 7.46%-10.17%) for Indigenous Australians (P self-reported stroke for non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australians was 4.23% and 12.72%, respectively. The prevalence of stroke increased significantly with age for both Indigenous (odds ratio = 1.06 per year, P ≤ .001) and non-Indigenous Australians (odds ratio = 1.04 per year, P ≤ .001), with the Indigenous prevalence being higher than that of the non-Indigenous group at every age. The prevalence of self-reported stroke was 3 times higher in Indigenous Australians than in non-Indigenous Australians. This disparity is consistent with previous reports, highlighting the need for intensified prevention and support services to reduce the burden of stroke on Indigenous Australians. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of Student Ratings to Benchmark Universities: Multilevel Modeling of Responses to the Australian Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Ginns, Paul; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Martin, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently graduated university students from all Australian Universities rate their overall departmental and university experiences (DUEs), and their responses (N = 44,932, 41 institutions) are used by the government to benchmark departments and universities. We evaluate this DUE strategy of rating overall departments and universities rather than…

  4. Time for National Renewal: Australian adult literacy and numeracy as ‘foundation skills’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Black

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Those working in the field of adult literacy and numeracy are currently anticipating changes in the near future as the federal government has flagged the development of a National Foundation Skills Strategy (Australian Government 2010. ‘Foundation skills’ is a term that has recently been suggested as a way of simplifying discussions about literacy and numeracy (Perkins 2009:8, and it has gained traction in various Australian national policy environments (e.g. Gillard 2009, Council of Australian Governments [COAG] Reform Council 2009, Australian Government 2010. Foundation skills appears to encapsulate adult language, literacy and numeracy, and more broadly, it may also include so-called employability skills such as communication and teamwork (Roberts and Wignall 2010:1. In this paper, our main focus is on the adult literacy and numeracy dimensions of what is needed in the policy renewal.

  5. Scale and Scope Economies of Distance Education in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang-Cheng; Worthington, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite compelling qualitative arguments for scale and scope economies in university-level distance education, as distinct from traditional class-based face-to-face instruction, there is little rigorous quantitative evidence in support. In this paper, we explore the scale and scope economies of distance education using a multiplicatively separable…

  6. Is There an Australian Idea of a University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the idea of a university as it exists and is discussed in Australia at the beginning of the 21st century. Australia's history and partly derivative culture provide the relatively unintellectual context for sceptical utilitarianism in relation to a system which has expanded rapidly and is frequently described as being in…

  7. Academic Learning Revisited: Curriculum Innovation in an Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovey, Ken; Green, Jenny; McQueen, Meryl

    2001-01-01

    Explores University of Technology, Sydney's process to transform its program in management of third sector organizations because of the profound social change caused by globalization. Analyzes the nature of the crisis, offers a rationale for the strategic action taken, and evaluates the first-phase implementation, including the politics of…

  8. The United Nations University and Information Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaskovic, Ines Wesley

    1994-01-01

    Describes the role of the United Nations University (UNU) in promoting the effective use of new information technologies in support of science and technology for development. The UNU Information and Decision Systems (INDES) project examines the constraints preventing developing nations from using advances in informatics and from integrating their…

  9. Great Powers, National Interests, and Australian Grand Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    www.economist.com/node/21560893 (accessed 14 May 2013) 21 Figure 1: The Security of Australia Source: Adapted from Barry Busan , Ole Wæver and...into adjacent regions. Asia Source: Adapted from Busan and Wæver. Regions and Powers, 62. Regional Security Complex Theory and Australian

  10. Music Undergraduates' Usefulness and Importance Expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian University Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Dominic G.; Davidson, Jane W.; Nair, Chenicheri S.

    2016-01-01

    The Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalized the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialization. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach, namely: Extensive long-term commitment through focused practical engagement and specialized tuition as prerequisites to achieving musical mastery, especially in performance. Motivation research has shown that the majority of this specialized development in pre-university years would be accessed and reinforced predominantly through private music tuition. Drawing on this contextual literature, commencing university music undergraduates would have expectations of their prospective study founded from two historical influences. The first: How undergraduates had accessed pre-university music tuition. The second: How and in what ways undergraduates' pre-university musical activities were experienced and reinforced. Using usefulness and importance measures, the study observed the expectations of students about to commence music undergraduate studies at three representative Australian university music schools. One of these universities operated the Bologna styled model. No other known Australian study has investigated this implementation for any effects upon music undergraduate expectations. How much commencing music undergraduates would draw on their pre-university music instruction and experiences to predict their usefulness and importance expectations formed the basis for this investigation. Strong relationships between usefulness and importance were found across all units of study. Despite strong correlations across all units of study between usefulness and importance, there was a

  11. Music undergraduates' usefulness and importance expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian university perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Harvey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalised the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialisation. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach, namely: Extensive long-term commitment through focused practical engagement and specialised tuition as prerequisites to achieving musical mastery, especially in performance. Motivation research has shown that the majority of this specialised development in pre-university years would be accessed and reinforced predominantly through private music tuition. Drawing on this contextual literature, commencing university music undergraduates would have expectations of their prospective study founded from two historical influences. The first: How undergraduates had accessed pre-university music tuition. The second: How and in what ways undergraduates’ pre-university musical activities were experienced and reinforced. Using usefulness and importance measures, the study observed the expectations of students about to commence music undergraduate studies at three representative Australian university music schools. One of these universities operated the Bologna styled model. No other known Australian study has investigated this implementation for any effects upon music undergraduate expectations. How much commencing music undergraduates would draw on their pre-university music instruction and experiences to predict their usefulness and importance expectations formed the basis for this investigation. Strong relationships between usefulness and importance were found across all units of study. Despite strong correlations across all units of study between usefulness and

  12. Music Undergraduates' Usefulness and Importance Expectations: The Bologna Process from an Australian University Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Dominic G; Davidson, Jane W; Nair, Chenicheri S

    2016-01-01

    The Bologna Process model of higher education has been introduced into some Australian universities since 2008. This model promoted university study through a liberal arts philosophy that advanced a worldview approach at the undergraduate level. The model generalized the student experience and eliminated undergraduate specialization. An interesting situation for music undergraduate study thus arose. Expertise and expert performance research has argued an opposing educational approach, namely: Extensive long-term commitment through focused practical engagement and specialized tuition as prerequisites to achieving musical mastery, especially in performance. Motivation research has shown that the majority of this specialized development in pre-university years would be accessed and reinforced predominantly through private music tuition. Drawing on this contextual literature, commencing university music undergraduates would have expectations of their prospective study founded from two historical influences. The first: How undergraduates had accessed pre-university music tuition. The second: How and in what ways undergraduates' pre-university musical activities were experienced and reinforced. Using usefulness and importance measures, the study observed the expectations of students about to commence music undergraduate studies at three representative Australian university music schools. One of these universities operated the Bologna styled model. No other known Australian study has investigated this implementation for any effects upon music undergraduate expectations. How much commencing music undergraduates would draw on their pre-university music instruction and experiences to predict their usefulness and importance expectations formed the basis for this investigation. Strong relationships between usefulness and importance were found across all units of study. Despite strong correlations across all units of study between usefulness and importance, there was a

  13. Are Australian Universities Making Good Use of ICT for CSR Reporting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Garde Sánchez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The higher education system in Australia has witnessed various government initiatives that have provided funding to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR issues and thus contribute to the training of professionals with a strong sense of ethics, social values and concern for the repercussions of business activities in society. There are increasing demands from stakeholders for more transparent and more accountable information, including questions related to CSR. This paper analyses the policies and communication strategies regarding CSR information applied in Australian universities and considers whether they are making good use of information and communication technologies (ICT to facilitate interaction with stakeholders. The results show that ICT have not been considered a relevant tool in terms of improving accountability regarding CSR concerns in Australian universities, although they could represent a differentiation factor in the competitive environment of higher education.

  14. Online Education Systems in Scandinavian and Australian Universities: A Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Morten Flate Paulsen

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study of online education systems in Norwegian, Swedish, and Australian universities. The online education systems discussed comprise content creation tools and systems for learning management, student management, and accounting. The author of this article arrives at the conclusion that there seems to be a general lack of integration between theses systems in all three countries. Further, there seems to be little focus on standards specifications such as IM...

  15. Chinese students studying at Australian universities with specific reference to nursing students: a narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Carol Chunfeng; Andre, Kate; Greenwood, Kenneth Mark

    2015-04-01

    To report the current knowledge on the Chinese nursing students' learning at Australian universities. The intent is to provide educators and researchers with a background to the contexts, the methodologies, the emphases of various relevant studies, and to provide recommendations for future research. Attracting international students has become an important part of Australian universities' business and contributes to their cultural diversity. Teaching international students has received considerable attention in the educational research literature. Experiences of international students can vary greatly depending on their country of origin. This paper critically reviews current literature relating to issues for Chinese students and in particular, Chinese nursing students, the biggest single group of international nursing students at Australian universities Narrative literature review. A comprehensive search of seven electronic databases for literature between 2003 and 2014 helped to identify qualitative and quantitative studies that addressed issues of Asian international students with English as a second language (ESL) (included nursing students) studying in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the United States and China. Pertinent websites were also searched. The reference lists and bibliographies of retrieved articles were hand- searched to identify other relevant studies. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The majority of existing literature claimed that there is a range of challenges confronting international students including Chinese nursing students, in assimilation into their host country. These include issues with English language proficiency, cultural barriers, social problems, different learning styles, academic demands, perceived racism, homesickness, lack of assertiveness and financial problems. There is limited research about the Chinese students' study in Australia. In particular, the learning experience of Chinese nursing students

  16. A national-wide survey of radon and gamma radiation levels in Australian homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langaroo, M.K.; Wise, K.N.; Duggleby, J.K.; Kotler, L.H.

    1990-04-01

    A nation-wide survey of Australian homes has been conducted to determine the average annual doses to the Australian population from exposure to radon and gamma radiation. The exposure to radon was measured using solid state track detectors (SSTD) whilst the gamma radiation dose was concurrently determined using thermoluminescent dosimetry. Dosemeters were placed in approximately 3400 randomly distributed homes (representing about 1 in 1400 occupied dwellings) for twelve months. The measured annual average radon concentration in Australian homes is 12 Bq m -3 . Using appropriate conversion factors, the annual average effective dose equivalents to the Australian population were determined to be 0.6 mSv and 0.9 mSv for radon and gamma radiation respectively. 20 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  17. Feasibility of establishing an Australian ACL registry: a pilot study by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkas, Christina; Clarnette, Richard; Graves, Stephen E; Rainbird, Sophia; Parker, David; Lorimer, Michelle; Paterson, Roger; Roe, Justin; Morris, Hayden; Feller, Julian A; Annear, Peter; Forster, Ben; Hayes, David

    2017-05-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common and debilitating injury that impacts significantly on knee function and risks the development of degenerative arthritis. The outcome of ACL surgery is not monitored in Australia. The optimal treatment is unknown. Consequently, the identification of best practice in treating ACL is crucial to the development of improved outcomes. The Australian Knee Society (AKS) asked the Australian Orthopaedic Association (AOA) to consider establishing a national ACL registry. As a first step, a pilot study was undertaken by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) to test the hypothesis that collecting the required information in the Australian setting was possible. Surgeons completed an operative form which provided comprehensive information on the surgery undertaken. Patients provided pre- and post-operative questionnaires including the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Marx Activity Scale (MA Scale). The number of ACL procedures undertaken at each hospital during the recruitment period was compared against State Government Health Department separation data. A total of 802 patients were recruited from October 2011 to January 2013. The overall capture rate for surgeon-derived data was 99%, and the capture rate for the pre-operative patient questionnaire was 97.9%. At 6 months, patient-reported outcomes were obtained from 55% of patients, and 58.5% of patients at 12 months. When checked against State Government Health Department separation data, 31.3% of procedures undertaken at each study hospital were captured in the study. It is possible to collect surgeon-derived and pre-operative patient-reported data, following ACL reconstruction in Australia. The need to gain patient consent was a limiting factor to participation. When patients did consent to participate in the study, we were able to capture nearly 100% of surgical procedures. Patient consent

  18. NATIONAL IDENTITY IN THE VENEZUELAN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nércida Romer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The research had as main purpose to analyze the national identity in the Venezuelan University education. It was descriptive with descriptive transactional design. The population was 250 students of the IX and X semester of education at the UNERMB, Ciudad Ojeda. The results showed: in the objective test, they don’t know details of the national identity; It was detected in the interview that there is a sense of belonging. The recommendation is: in subjects related innovate strategies to give the student knowledge of national identity elements; promote educational and publicity campaigns about the care and conservation of geographical, biological and cultural heritage.

  19. A cross-national analysis of mental toughness and hardiness in elite university rugby league teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The relation between nationality and selected indicators of psychological performance in rugby league football was examined. Mental toughness was assessed using the alternative Psychological Performance Inventory (PPI-A) and hardiness using the Personal Views Survey III-R (PVS III-R). Participants (N = 49, M age = 21.7 yr., SD = 2.3) were male elite-level university rugby league footballers representing Australia and Great Britain. Participants completed the questionnaires in training camp in Sydney, Australia, one week prior to the commencement of an international tournament there in 2006. Multivariate analyses revealed that the Australian Universities players had significantly higher mean scores on Positive Cognition, Visualization, Total Mental Toughness, and Challenge than their opponents from Great Britain. The Australian Universities players were also the tournament winners. The findings concur with previous research indicating superior mental toughness and hardiness are related to successful sport performance. Practical implications focus on the potentiality of ameliorative cultural environments.

  20. Kyoto University-National Taiwan University International Symposium "Social Cognitive Biology on Representation of Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Sponsored by Kyoto University, National Taiwan University; Cosponsored by Unit for Advanced Studies of the Human Mind, Kyoto University, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Supported by Supporting Program for InteRaction-based Initiative Team Studies (SPIRITS), Kyoto University

  1. Demographic and psychosocial predictors of major depression and generalised anxiety disorder in Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Louise M; Gulliver, Amelia; Bennett, Kylie; Fassnacht, Daniel B; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2016-07-15

    Few studies have examined modifiable psychosocial risk factors for mental disorders among university students, and of these, none have employed measures that correspond to clinical diagnostic criteria. The aim of this study was to examine psychosocial and demographic risk factors for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of Australian university students. An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to undergraduate and postgraduate students at a mid-sized Australian university. A range of psychosocial and demographic risk factors were measured, and logistic regression models were used to examine significant predictors of major depression and GAD. A total of 611 students completed the survey. The prevalence of major depression and GAD in the sample was 7.9 and 17.5 %, respectively. In terms of demographic factors, the risk of depression was higher for students in their first year of undergraduate study, and the risk of GAD was higher for female students, those who moved to attend university, and students experiencing financial stress. In terms of psychosocial factors, students with experience of body image issues and lack of confidence were at significantly greater risk of major depression, and feeling too much pressure to succeed, lack of confidence, and difficulty coping with study was significantly associated with risk of GAD. University students experience a range of unique psychosocial stressors that increase their risk of major depression and GAD, in addition to sociodemographic risk factors. It is important to examine psychosocial factors, as these are potentially modifiable and could be the focus of university-specific mental health interventions.

  2. Australian consumer perspectives on dialysis: first national census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Marie J; Lauder, Lydia A; Mathew, Timothy H; Hawley, Carmel M; Fortnum, Debbie

    2012-11-01

    The percentage of people in Australia who undertake home dialysis has steadily decreased over the past 40 years and varies within Australia. Consumer factors related to this decline have not previously been determined. A 78-question survey was developed and piloted in 2008 and 2009. Survey forms were distributed to all adult routine dialysis patients in all Australian states and territories (except Northern Territory) between 2009 and 2010. Of 9223 distributed surveys, 3250 were completed and returned. 49% of respondents indicated they had no choice in the type of dialysis and 48% had no choice in dialysis location. Respondents were twice as likely to receive information about haemodialysis (85%) than APD (39%) or CAPD (41%). The provision of education regarding home modalities differed significantly between states, and decreased with increasing patient age. Additional nursing support and reimbursement of expenses increased the proportion of those willing to commence dialysis at home, from 13% to 34%. State differences in the willingness to consider home dialysis, the degree of choice in dialysis location, the desire to change current dialysis type and/or location, and the provision of information about dialysis were identified. The delivery of pre-dialysis education is variable, and does not support all options of dialysis for all individuals. State variances indicate that local policy and health professional teams significantly influence the operation of dialysis programs. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, I; Lye, J; Alves, A [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Vic (Australia); Lehmann, J [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Kenny, J [Epworth HealthCare, Richmond, VIC (Australia); Dunn, L [Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Instit., Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  4. SU-E-P-03: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, a Bespoke National Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, I; Lye, J; Alves, A; Lehmann, J; Kenny, J; Dunn, L; Kron, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, (ACDS) was a pilot program to enable the Australian Government to determine whether a locally designed audit program was suitable for mitigating dosimetric error risk to radiotherapy patients within Australia. The outcomes from four years of operations will be presented and discussed with a focus why and how the pilot requirements were met. The consequnces of success will be considered, the lessons learnt from the pilot program and how they are impacting the future ACDS design, operation and engagement with stakeholders. Methods: The ACDS was designed over 2010/11 by experts drawn from the three professions in consultation with the national Department of Health. The list of outcomes required over a three year pilot was expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MoU) between Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) which hosted the ACDS. Results: The ACDS has achieved all the MoU requirements. This paper describes how the staff within the ACDS engaged with the professional clinical workforce and provided a successful and functioning audit service. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses within the MoU and the ACDS structure and how the ACDS resolved a number of conflicting issues. It identifies the successes within the ACDS and how these were achieved. It provides details to assist and advise those seeking to design or modify national or regional auditing programs. Finally the paper reviews potential futures for the ACDS. Conclusion: The raw number of audits and outcomes indicate that the ACDS has met the MoU auditing requirements. The reasons for the ACDS’ success are highly dependent on: attracting quality staff who can respond with agility to changing situations, a high level of communication with the professional community, a high level of engagement by the community and an interested and engaged Federal Department. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a

  5. What Are the Capabilities of Graduates Who Study Outdoor Education in Australian Universities? The Case for a Threshold Concepts Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Scott; Thomas, Glyn J.

    2017-01-01

    Research has indicated that some stakeholders in the Australian outdoor education profession are uncertain about the capabilities of students graduating from university outdoor education programmes. Unfortunately, there is currently no formal or informal agreement amongst university programmes regarding the knowledge, skills, and experience that…

  6. The Adoption of Internal Audit as a Governance Control Mechanism in Australian Public Universities--Views from the CEOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on the multi-theoretical approach to governance and the views of university chief executive officers (CEOs) to examine the extent to which internal auditing as a control mechanism is adopted in Australian public universities under an environment of change management. The findings highlight negative consequences of change and their…

  7. Building Commitment: An Examination of Learning Climate Congruence and the Affective Commitment of Academics in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, Amie; Fulop, Liz; Carter, Geoff; Cavanagh, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between learning climate congruence and the affective commitment of university academics. The strategy of inquiry for this research is quantitative, involving a non-experimental design for the survey research. A non-probability sample of 900 academics from a large Australian university was…

  8. A Qualitative Study of HR/OHS Stress Interventions in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Boyd, Carolyn M; Provis, Chris

    2018-01-09

    To enhance the understanding of psychosocial factors and extend research on work stress interventions, we investigated the key human resource (HR)/occupational health and safety (OHS) stress interventions implemented at five Australian universities over a three-year period. Five senior HR Directors completed an online survey to identify the intervention strategies taken at their university in order to reduce stress and enhance employee well-being and morale. We also explored the types of individual-, organization-, and individual/organization-directed interventions that were implemented, and the strategies that were prioritized at each university. Across universities, the dominant interventions were strategies that aimed to balance the social exchange in the work contract between employee-organization with an emphasis on initiatives to: enhance training, career development and promotional opportunities; improve remuneration and recognition practices; and to enhance the fairness of organizational policies and procedures. Strategies to improve work-life balance were also prominent. The interventions implemented were predominantly proactive (primary) strategies focused at the organizational level and aimed at eliminating or reducing or altering work stressors. The findings contribute to the improved management of people at work by identifying university-specific HR/OHS initiatives, specifically leadership development and management skills programs which were identified as priorities at three universities.

  9. A Qualitative Study of HR/OHS Stress Interventions in Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the understanding of psychosocial factors and extend research on work stress interventions, we investigated the key human resource (HR/occupational health and safety (OHS stress interventions implemented at five Australian universities over a three-year period. Five senior HR Directors completed an online survey to identify the intervention strategies taken at their university in order to reduce stress and enhance employee well-being and morale. We also explored the types of individual-, organization-, and individual/organization-directed interventions that were implemented, and the strategies that were prioritized at each university. Across universities, the dominant interventions were strategies that aimed to balance the social exchange in the work contract between employee-organization with an emphasis on initiatives to: enhance training, career development and promotional opportunities; improve remuneration and recognition practices; and to enhance the fairness of organizational policies and procedures. Strategies to improve work-life balance were also prominent. The interventions implemented were predominantly proactive (primary strategies focused at the organizational level and aimed at eliminating or reducing or altering work stressors. The findings contribute to the improved management of people at work by identifying university-specific HR/OHS initiatives, specifically leadership development and management skills programs which were identified as priorities at three universities.

  10. The Australian national standard of measurement for radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    This contribution outlines the activities of the Radiation Standards Group at Ansto which is responsible, under the National Measurement Act 1960, for Australia's national standard of radioactivity measurement. The Group can make absolute measurements of radioactivity using a 4π β-γ coincidence counting system, Solutions standardised by this technique are then used to calibrate a TPA ionisation chamber, this chamber being the national working standard of activity measurement. All of the calibration factors determined for this chamber by direct measurement have been compared internationally through the Bureau International de Poids et Mesures (BIPM). These comparisons were performed either by participating in international intercomparisons organised by the BIPM or by submitting a standardised solution to the Systeme International de Reference. 11 refs

  11. The prevalence of vision loss due to ocular trauma in the Australian National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Foreman, Joshua; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of vision loss due to ocular trauma in Australia. The National Eye Health Survey (NEHS) is a population-based cross-sectional study that examined 3098 non-Indigenous Australians (aged 50-98 years) and 1738 Indigenous Australians (aged 40-92 years) living in 30 randomly selected sites, stratified by remoteness. An eye was considered to have vision loss due to trauma if the best-corrected visual acuity was worse than 6/12 and the main cause was attributed to ocular trauma. This determination was made by two independent ophthalmologists and any disagreements were adjudicated by a third senior ophthalmologist. The sampling weight adjusted prevalence of vision loss due to ocular trauma in non-Indigenous Australians aged 50 years and older and Indigenous Australians aged 40 years and over was 0.24% (95%CI: 0.10, 0.52) and 0.79% (95%CI: 0.56, 1.13), respectively. Trauma was attributed as an underlying cause of bilateral vision loss in one Indigenous participant, with all other cases being monocular. Males displayed a higher prevalence of vision loss from ocular trauma than females in both the non-Indigenous (0.47% vs. 1.25%, p=0.03) and Indigenous populations (0.12% vs. 0.38%, p=0.02). After multivariate adjustments, residing in Very Remote geographical areas was associated with higher odds of vision loss from ocular trauma. We estimate that 2.4 per 1000 non-Indigenous and 7.9 per 1000 Indigenous Australian adults have monocular vision loss due to a previous severe ocular trauma. Our findings indicate that males, Indigenous Australians and those residing in Very Remote communities may benefit from targeted health promotion to improve awareness of trauma prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Food and beverage portion sizes in Australian children: a secondary analysis of 1995 and 2007 national data

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Kate; Watson, Jane F; Collins, Clare E

    2014-01-01

    Background Portion size of foods is reported to contribute to the rise in obesity prevalence. However, evidence of changes in portion size for commonly consumed foods in Australia is lacking. The aim was to evaluate whether Australian child and adolescent portion sizes of selected foods changed from 1995 to 2007. Methods Time-series study, comparing dietary data from two national cross-sectional surveys in nationally representative population survey of Australian households. The dietary data ...

  13. Politician-Turned-Doctoral Student’s Narrative Identity at an Australian University: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhanat Nomnian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the narrative identity of a politician-turned-doctoral student at an Australian university with a particular focus on his academic and social encounters based on his English resources and experiences of learning and living in Australia. This case study is unique in the way that very few Thai politicians would end their political career and join in an academic community because of different philosophies underpinning these political and educational agendas. Drawing upon a narrative inquiry, the 60-year-old former Thai politician who decided to undertake a PhD in Engineering (Water Resources Management found his academic experience positively challenging as he had to familiarize himself with Australian academic discourse such as conducting research, writing his thesis, and taking part in class discussion. Being a competent user of English, he enjoyed living in a multicultural and multilingual society in Australia. This study offers an optimistic outlook at career change through a lens of a politician who became a doctoral student and serves as an example for adults who are transiting their midlife career path and considering stepping out of their comfort zones to venture into something new and exciting. This study hopes to shed new light and hopes on adult education in an era of aging society.

  14. Identification of Australians from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in national health data collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blignault, Ilse; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2005-11-01

    In multicultural Australia, comprehensive and up-to-date information on ethnicity and health is essential to guide policy and service development in the health sector. Data collected for purposes other than research are a potentially important source of information. This study explored the extent to which indicators of cultural and linguistic diversity are currently included in national health and welfare service data collections, and the data standards employed. We identified and reviewed 44 relevant bodies of work: 7 national data dictionaries, 15 national data sets, 10 national health data collections and 12 national surveys. Each of the large data dictionaries (health, community services and housing assistance) contained several ethnicity-related variables. Immigrant Australians were identified (usually by country of birth, sometimes by language, and occasionally by period of residence or year of arrival) in all the major national health and community data sets, health data collections and surveys. Australian Bureau of Statistics standards and classifications relating to cultural and linguistic diversity were widely used. Researchers, health policy makers and planners should fully exploit these secondary data sources, as well as undertaking or commissioning primary research.

  15. New irradiation facilities at the Australian national medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcell, S.K.; Arnott, D.W.; Conard, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two new irradiation facilities have been developed at the National Medical Cyclotron for radionuclide production. The first relocates PET irradiations from the cyclotron vault to a dedicated PET beam room, to improve accessibility and reduce radiation exposures associated with target maintenance. This new facility consists of a beam line to transport 16-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to 1 of 8 PET targets mounted on a target rack. The target rack has increased the number of targets available for production and experimentation. The second is a completely independent solid target irradiation facility for SPECT. This facility consists of a beam line to transport 26-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to a dedicated beam room containing one solid target station. A new pneumatic target transfer system was also developed to transport the solid target to and from the existing chemistry hot cells. The beam line and target components are operated under the control of a dedicated PLC with a PC based user interface. The development and some technical aspects of these new irradiation facilities are discussed here. (author)

  16. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention. PMID:27199817

  17. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Gilbert, Jessica M; Roberts, Lynne D

    2016-01-01

    Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional) was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention.

  18. Infamy after infamy at the National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renán Vega Cantor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a joint maneuver between the Mexican and Colombian governments, on May 22, 2009, Professor Miguel Ángel Beltrán, who was conducting postdoctoral studies at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, was abducted. In a typical action of State terrorism and with the intention of reviving the dark Plan Condor, impelled by the dictatorships of the Southern Cone in the decades of 1970-1980 - which in Argentina has just been classified as “an illicit association for the disappearance of People “and fifteen of its members, including the former president-dictator Benito Bignone of Argentina, were sentenced to between twelve and twenty-five years, the regimes of Álvaro Uribe Vélez and Felipe Calderón proceeded to carry out that kidnapping.

  19. Satellite education: The national technological university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    National Technological University (NTU) was founded to address the wide-ranging educational needs of the employed technical professional. A state-of-the-art satellite delivery system allows nationwide coverage by participating engineering colleges. Established in 1984, NTU is now a nonprofit effort of 24 engineering colleges. The NTU network grew rapidly to its present configuration, and enrollment patterns clearly demonstrate the need and acceptance of the concept. Each member school teaches its own courses (with on-campus students enrolled) over the network and awards its own grades. Receiving sites at NTU are operated by a sponsoring organization (i.e., the employer) in accordance with NTU guidelines. Masters degrees are offered in electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, engineering management, and manufacturing engineering. Several certificate programs are also available. Typically, NTU telecasts 80 credit courses each term. Over 50,000 attend continuing education courses, tutorials, and research teleconferences each year. Newly acquired channels will enable further expansion

  20. An Investigation into the Eating Behaviour of International Students Studying at an Australian University: Should We Be Concerned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomes, Susan; Croft, Amy

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study provides a snapshot of the eating behaviour of more than 300 international students studying across four campuses of an Australian university. It explores what the students are eating and drinking, their knowledge of nutrition, the extent to which they prepare their own food or rely on fast food and if their behaviour is…

  1. Examining the Theoretical Factors That Influence University Students to Adopt Web 2.0 Technologies: The Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Yasser D.; Houghton, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is (1) to examine Australian university students' awareness of the benefits of Web 2.0 technologies and (2) to investigate the factors that influence students to adopt Web 2.0 technologies to supplement in-class learning, using the theoretical foundations of both Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and Decomposed Theory of…

  2. Critical Examination of Internationalisation: A Case Study of a Collaboration between an Australian and a Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Josephine; Nyland, Berenice

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a case study of an international partnership between two universities, one in Australia and the other in China, is presented. The internationalisation of early childhood degree programmes in Australia is reasonably new and there is limited literature on the subject. This study evaluates a Sino-Australian partnership of a joint…

  3. General Academic Difficulties and Reading and Writing Difficulties among Asian ESL Postgraduate Students in TESOL at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakiti, Aek; Li, Lulu

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical study that examines general academic difficulties, and academic reading and writing difficulties among Asian ESL (English as a Second Language) international postgraduate students who are completing a Master's Degree in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) at an Australian university. The…

  4. Impact of National Universities Commission (NUC) Accreditation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    NUC) accreditation exercise on university administrative structure of four selected Nigerian universities between 1995 and 1999. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to 400 staff and 200 students of four Nigerian universities.

  5. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University

    OpenAIRE

    Benino, Diana; Girardi, Antonia; Czarniak, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University.Methods: The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Results: Descriptive stat...

  6. The prevalence of pain and analgesia use in the Australian population: Findings from the 2011 to 2012 Australian National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, April; Sanderson, Kristy; Bruno, Raimondo; Breslin, Monique; Neil, Amanda L

    2017-11-01

    Opioid analgesic use and associated adverse events have increased over the last 15 years, including in Australia. Whether this is associated with increased chronic pain prevalence in the Australian population is unknown. This study aimed to estimate (1) the prevalence of chronic pain and analgesia use in the Australian population by age and sex; (2) the severity of pain in the population with chronic pain by sex; and (3) the distribution of recent pain severity in those using analgesia by age and sex. This study used cross-sectional, nationally representative data collected by the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011 to 2012 National Health Survey. A total of n = 20 426 participants were included with an overall response rate of 84.8%. Weighting procedures were applied to obtain population estimates, confidence intervals, and when testing for statistical significance. The prevalence of chronic and reoccurring pain (over a 6-month period) was 15.4% (2.75 million) for Australians aged ≥15 years. Prevalence increased with age for both sexes. Significantly more females reported moderate-to-very severe pain overall (P issues in Australia. Study estimates of chronic pain and recent pain were no greater than earlier estimates. The acknowledged increase of opioid use in the literature thus appears consistent with changing treatment and/or prescribing patterns over time. Sex differences regarding pain prevalence, severity, and opioid use were apparent. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Stress-reduction interventions in an Australian university: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H

    2015-02-01

    We examined the effects of awareness of stress-reduction interventions on employee well-being and work attitudes using a mixed methods design. Cross-sectional data are presented from 247 employees who completed questionnaires in 2004 at one Australian university. Analyses indicated that employees, who reported that interventions had been undertaken, scored higher on job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, perceived procedural justice and trust in senior management than those who were not aware of the measures, although they did not differ in psychological strain. Details of the stress-reduction interventions implemented by the Occupational Health and Safety department at the university are also reported. Thematic analyses of the perceived causes of both decreases and increases in stress for employees showed that staff reported workload and staffing pressures as key sources of increases in stress. On the other hand, new supervisors and/or management were identified as sources of decreased stress. Areas for consideration in future efforts to develop and refine stress interventions are also discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Operational health and physics service during the maintenance of the Australian National Medical Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    1994-01-01

    Modern Medical Cyclotrons use intense beams of high energy protons or deuterons to produce large activities of short and medium lived radionuclides. After continuous operation for prolonged periods the Cyclotron components become activated through various nuclear interactions therefore, the risk of personal radiation hazard while handling such activated cyclotron components is high. This paper describes all operational aspects of the Health Physics service evolved during the first preventative maintenance program of the Australian National Medical Cyclotron, which took place in June 1993. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  9. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  10. Poor adherence to national and international breastfeeding duration targets in an Australian longitudinal cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis J Hure

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To report on the proportion and characteristics of Australian infants who are fed, and mothers who feed, in accordance with the national and international breastfeeding duration targets of six, 12 and 24 months. Furthermore, to examine the longitudinal breastfeeding duration patterns for women with more than one child. METHODS: Breastfeeding duration data for 9773 children have been self-reported by a national sample of 5091 mothers aged 30-36 years in 2009, participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. RESULTS: Only 60% of infants received the minimum recommended 6 months of breast milk, irrespective of breastfeeding exclusivity. Less than 30% of infants received any breast milk at 12 months, and less than 3% were breastfed to the international target of 24 months. Young, less educated, unmarried or low-income women were at an increased risk of premature breastfeeding cessation. For women with three or more children, nearly 75% of women who breastfed their first child for at least six months reached this breastfeeding duration target for their next two children. CONCLUSION: While national breastfeeding rates are typically evaluated in relation to the infant, a novel component of our study is that we have assessed maternal adherence to breastfeeding duration targets and the longitudinal feeding practices of women with more than one child. Separate evaluations of maternal and infant breastfeeding rates are important as they differ in their implications for public health policy and practice.

  11. Viscosity of thickened fluids that relate to the Australian National Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten Hadde, Enrico; Ann Yvette Cichero, Julie; Michael Nicholson, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, Australia published standardized terminology and definitions for three levels of thickened fluids used in the management of dysphagia. This study examined the thickness of the current Australian National Fluid Standards rheologically (i.e. viscosity, yield stress) and correlated these results with the "fork test", as described in the national standards. Clinicians who prescribe or work with thickened liquids and laypersons were recruited to categorize 15 different thickened fluids of known viscosities using the fork test. The mean apparent viscosity and the yield stress for each fluid category were calculated. Clear responses were obtained by both clinicians and laypersons for very thin fluids ( 1150 mPa.s), but large variations of responses were seen for intermediate viscosities. Measures of viscosity and yield stress were important in allocating liquids to different categories. Three bands of fluid viscosity with distinct intermediate band gaps and associated yield stress measures were clearly identifiable and are proposed as objective complements to the Australian National Standards. The "fork test" provides rudimentary information about both viscosity and yield stress, but is an inexact measure of both variables.

  12. Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: does it work for Indigenous Australians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judith M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population. This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. Methods A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. Results The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating

  13. Job Embeddedness Demonstrates Incremental Validity When Predicting Turnover Intentions for Australian University Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody eHeritage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Job embeddedness is a construct that describes the manner in which employees can be enmeshed in their jobs, reducing their turnover intentions. Recent questions regarding the properties of quantitative job embeddedness measures, and their predictive utility, have been raised. Our study compared two competing reflective measures of job embeddedness, examining their convergent, criterion, and incremental validity, as a means of addressing these questions. Cross-sectional quantitative data from 246 Australian university employees (146 academic; 100 professional was gathered. Our findings indicated that the two compared measures of job embeddedness were convergent when total scale scores were examined. Additionally, job embeddedness was capable of demonstrating criterion and incremental validity, predicting unique variance in turnover intention. However, this finding was not readily apparent with one of the compared job embeddedness measures, which demonstrated comparatively weaker evidence of validity. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings, noting that job embeddedness has a complementary place among established determinants of turnover intention.

  14. Educational preparation for clinical nursing: the satisfaction of students and new graduates from two Australian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton-Wildey, Kathleen; Kenny, Patricia; Parmenter, Glenda; Hall, Jane

    2014-04-01

    Attrition rates among young and newly registered nurses are high; the capacity of nurse education programmes to prepare nurses for their professional role and the extent to which they are supported during the transition from student to registered nurse may be important factors. This paper examines nursing student and recent graduate satisfaction with their education, focusing on their preparation for work. A descriptive cohort design was used, combining qualitative and quantitative methods to measure and interpret satisfaction. Two Australian universities, one urban and one regional. 530 undergraduate nursing students and recent graduates from the Bachelor of Nursing programmes at the two universities. Data were collected via an online survey. Satisfaction with the programmes was measured with closed format questions covering different aspects of the programmes and a single open ended question. Responses were compared between older and younger respondents and between graduates and students at different stages of the programme. Older students were more dissatisfied than younger students with the amount and type of training and their preparation for nursing work. First year students reported the highest levels of satisfaction, and third year students the lowest. The majority of graduates and third year students thought that the programme only partly prepared them for work in nursing. The free text comments particularly highlighted concerns with the amount and quality of clinical education. Programmes need to take account of the learning requirements of students to maximise the integration of theory and skill development in hospital environments with limited staffing and resources. The clinical environment and support received impact on the quality of learning and satisfaction of student nurses. Students who are dissatisfied with their educational and clinical experiences may choose to change their career direction. © 2013.

  15. An exploration of the midwifery continuity of care program at one Australian University as a symbiotic clinical education model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Linda P; Glover, Pauline

    2013-03-01

    This discussion paper analyses a midwifery Continuity of Care program at an Australian University with the symbiotic clinical education model, to identify strengths and weakness, and identify ways in which this new pedagogical approach can be improved. In 2002 a major change in Australian midwifery curricula was the introduction of a pedagogical innovation known as the Continuity of Care experience. This innovation contributes a significant portion of clinical experience for midwifery students. It is intended as a way to give midwifery students the opportunity to provide continuity of care in partnership with women, through their pregnancy and childbirth, thus imitating a model of continuity of care and continuity of carer. A qualitative study was conducted in 2008/9 as part of an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Associate Fellowship. Evidence and findings from this project (reported elsewhere) are used in this paper to illustrate the evaluation of midwifery Continuity of Care experience program at an Australian university with the symbiotic clinical education model. Strengths of the current Continuity of Care experience are the strong focus on relationships between midwifery students and women, and early clinical exposure to professional practice. Improved facilitation through the development of stronger relationships with clinicians will improve learning, and result in improved access to authentic supported learning and increased provision of formative feedback. This paper presents a timely review of the Continuity of Care experience for midwifery student learning and highlights the potential of applying the symbiotic clinical education model to enhance learning. Applying the symbiotic clinical education framework to evidence gathered about the Continuity of Care experience in Australian midwifery education highlights strengths and weaknesses which may be used to guide curricula and pedagogical improvements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Childhood obesity in secondary care: national prospective audit of Australian pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michele; Bryson, Hannah E; Price, Anna M H; Wake, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, pediatricians offer skilled secondary care for children with conditions more challenging than can readily be managed in the primary care sector, but the extent to which this sector engages with the detection and management of obesity remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to audit the prevalence, diagnosis, patient, and consultation characteristics of obesity in Australian pediatric practices. This was a national prospective patient audit in Australia. During the course of 2 weeks, members of the Australian Paediatric Research Network prospectively recorded consecutive outpatient consultations by using a brief standardized data collection form. Measures included height, weight, demographics, child and parent health ratings, diagnoses, referrals, investigations, and consultation characteristics. We compared the prevalence of pediatrician-diagnosed and measured obesity (body mass index ≥95th percentile) and top-ranked diagnoses, patient, and consultation characteristics in (a) obese and nonobese children, and (b) obese children with and without a diagnosis. A total of 198 pediatricians recorded 5466 consultations with 2-17 year olds, with body mass index z-scores calculated for 3436 (62.9%). Of the 12.6% obese children, only one-third received an "overweight/obese" diagnosis. Obese children diagnosed as overweight/obese were heavier, older, and in poorer health than those not diagnosed and incurred more Medicare (government-funded health system) cost and referrals. Obesity is infrequently clinically diagnosed by Australian pediatricians and measurement practices vary widely. Further research could focus on supporting and normalizing clinical obesity activities from which pediatricians and parents could see clear benefits. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for Ethiopia, Uganda, and Zambia. As national health systems in developing countries make progress toward achieving universal health service coverage, many face ethical challenges. In its 2010 World Health Report, the World Health Assembly called on the ...

  18. Developing National Systems of Innovation: University-Industry ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 janv. 2015 ... Developing National Systems of Innovation: University-Industry Interactions in the Global South. Book cover Developing ... of Campinas, Brazil. Glenda Kruss is research director at the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa. Keun Lee is professor at Seoul National University, South Korea.

  19. A comparison of game-play characteristics between elite youth and senior Australian National Rugby League competitions

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, C; Robertson, S; Sinclair, W; Till, KA; Pearce, L; Leicht, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare game-play characteristics between elite youth and senior Australian National Rugby League (NRL) competitions. Design: Longitudinal observational. Methods: The dataset consisted of 12 team performance indicators (e.g., ‘all runs’, ‘offloads’ and ‘tackles’) extracted from all 2016 national under 20 (U20) competition (elite youth; n = 372 observations) and National Rugby League (NRL) (elite senior; n = 378 observations) matches. Data was classified according to competition...

  20. A national study of the availability and use of electrophysical agents by Australian physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipchase, L S; Williams, M T; Robertson, V J

    2009-05-01

    Electrophysical agents (EPAs) are a core part of physiotherapy practice and entry level education. With the increase in the number of EPAs over time, their availability and use in contemporary physiotherapy practice is an important consideration when determining entry level curricula. Thus, the aim of the study was to ascertain the current availability and usage of EPAs in Australian physiotherapy practice. A purpose-designed questionnaire was mailed to all registered physiotherapists in Australia. A response rate of 27% was obtained (n=3,538). Nonresponder analyses indicated that the results were representative of the total population of Australian physiotherapists. Over 70% of respondents had access to ultrasound, cold packs/ice, heat packs, electrical stimulation for sensory stimulation, and interferential therapy. Two main groups of EPAs were used relatively frequently. The first group was used daily or monthly by 60% of respondents (ultrasound, hot packs, and cold packs/ice), and a second group (electromyographic and pressure biofeedback, interferential therapy, and electrical stimulation for sensory stimulation) was used on a daily or monthly basis by between 30% and 45% of the sample. A group of EPAs, including ultraviolet light, microwave, and shortwave diathermy, was not used by over 90% of the sample. The study has provided contemporary national data on EPA availability and use in Australia.

  1. High penetration wind generation impacts on spot prices in the Australian national electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, Nicholas J.; Boerema, Nicholas D.; MacGill, Iain F.; Outhred, Hugh R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores wind power integration issues for the South Australian (SA) region of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) by assessing the interaction of regional wind generation, electricity demand and spot prices over 2 recent years of market operation. SA's wind energy penetration has recently surpassed 20% and it has only a limited interconnection with other regions of the NEM. As such, it represents an interesting example of high wind penetration in a gross wholesale pool market electricity industry. Our findings suggest that while electricity demand continues to have the greatest influence on spot prices in SA, wind generation levels have become a significant secondary influence, and there is an inverse relationship between wind generation and price. No clear relationship between wind generation and demand has been identified although some periods of extremely high demand may coincide with lower wind generation. Periods of high wind output are associated with generally lower market prices, and also appear to contribute to extreme negative price events. The results highlight the importance of electricity market and renewable policy design in facilitating economically efficient high wind penetrations. - Highlights: → In South Australia (SA) wind generation is having an influence on market prices. → Little or no correlation is found between wind generation and demand. → Wind farms in SA are receiving a lower average price than in other States. → The results highlight the importance of appropriate electricity market design.

  2. Can we reduce the burden of depression? The Australian experience with beyondblue: the national depression initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickie, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the Asia Pacific region, there is an urgent need to reduce the burden of depression by increasing depression awareness, reducing stigma and dismantling those social barriers that prevent full participation by people with depression. This paper describes the development and early achievements of the Australian depression initiative, beyondblue. A review of the key priorities of beyondblue and their impacts during the first three years of operation (2001-03). Key achievements include: the degree of national recognition of beyondblue; size and scope of media impact; growth in website utilisation; increased reporting of the community's recognition of people with depression; genuine reforms in life insurance and income protection; development of a new national consumer and carer organisation; establishment of major population-based preventative and early intervention programs; system-wide reform of primary care-based mental health services; national educational program uptake by general practitioners; and, development of key awareness and intervention programs for use in schools and the workplace. In its first three years of operation, beyondblue has had a major impact on depression awareness in Australia and demonstrable gains have been made in reducing stigma and major social barriers. A pre-existing national mental health policy and implementation plan, a substantial funding base and participation by key political, media and community leaders have been essential elements of its short-term success. Its longer-term impact will now depend on more sustainable community and business partnerships as well as the growth of a more influential consumer and carer voice.

  3. Australian university students' attitudes towards the use of prescription stimulants as cognitive enhancers: perceived patterns of use, efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Brad; Bell, Stephanie; Lucke, Jayne; Hall, Wayne

    2013-05-01

    Recent, high profile articles in leading science journals have claimed that the enhancement use of prescription stimulants is a common practice among students worldwide. This study provides empirical data on Australian university students' perceptions of: (i) the prevalence of prescription stimulant use by their peers for cognitive enhancement; (ii) motivations for such use; (iii) efficacy; and (iv) its safety. Participants were 19 Australian university students with an average age of 24 who were recruited through emails lists, notice board posters and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2010 and 2011, recordings transcribed and responses coded using thematic analysis. Participants typically did not believe the use of stimulants for cognitive enhancement was common in Australia. Perceived motivations for use included: (i) 'getting ahead' to perform at high levels; (ii) 'keeping up' as a method of coping; and (iii) 'going out' so that an active social life could be maintained in the face of study demands. Australian students were generally sceptical about the potential benefits of stimulants for cognitive enhancement and they identified psychological dependence as a potential negative consequence. This study is an important first step in understanding the use of stimulants for cognitive enhancement in Australia, amid calls for more widespread use of cognitive enhancing drugs. It is important to conduct further studies of the extent of cognitive enhancement in Australia if we are to develop appropriate policy responses. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  4. Dietary Energy Density in the Australian Adult Population from National Nutrition Surveys 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Amanda Lee; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the observed proliferation of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods globally is an important contributing factor to the development of the obesity epidemic. However, evidence that the population's dietary energy density has increased is sparse. The World Cancer Research Fund recommends that dietary energy density be energy density of the Australian population has changed between 1995 and 2012. A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional Australian national nutrition surveys from 1995 and 2011/2012 was conducted. Participants of the surveys included adults aged 18 years and older (1995 n=10,986 and 2011/2012 n=9,435) completing 24-hour dietary recalls, including a second recall for a subset of the population (10.4% in 1995 and 64.6% in 2011/2012). Outcome measures included the change in dietary energy density (calculated as energy/weight of food [kcal/g] for food only) between surveys. The National Cancer Institute method for "estimating ratios of two dietary components that are consumed nearly every day" was used to determine the usual distribution and the percentage of participants reporting energy density energy density was 1.59 (0.26) kcal/g and 1.64 (0.32) kcal/g (Penergy-density recommendations. For those aged 70 years and older, the percentage with energy density energy density energy density has increased between the two surveys and few people consumed low energy-dense diets in line with recommendations. The change was largely due to increased energy density of older adult's diets, while young adults had high dietary energy density at both time points. These data suggest efforts now focus on the evaluation of the role of modifying energy density of the diet to reduce the risk of weight gain in adults. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sleep health of Australian adults in 2016: results of the 2016 Sleep Health Foundation national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert J; Appleton, Sarah L; Taylor, Anne W; Gill, Tiffany K; Lang, Carol; McEvoy, R Douglas; Antic, Nick A

    2017-02-01

    To measure the prevalence and social impacts of sleep problems in Australia. Cross-sectional national adult online survey. Community-based sample. Australian adults ≥18 years, n=1011. Self-reported inadequate sleep, of either duration or quality, and its daytime consequences affect 33%-45% of adults. Diagnosed sleep apnea is reported by 8%, significant insomnia by 20%, and restless legs by18% of adults. Besides specific clinical sleep disorders, poor sleep habits were common. Average reported sleep time is 7 hours, although 12% sleep less than 5½hours and 8% over 9 hours. Three-quarters (76%) of those who sleep less than 5½hours report frequent daytime impairment or sleep-related symptoms. Frequent, loud snoring is reported by 24% of men and 17% of women. Among these, 70% report daytime impairment or other sleep-related symptoms. Twenty-six percent report Internet use most or every night just before bed and frequent sleep difficulties or daytime impairments. Similarly, 16% of working adults do work just before bed and also have frequent sleep difficulties or daytime sleep-related symptoms. Younger adults (18-34 years) sleep around 1 hour longer before non-work days than working days compared with 18 minutes in older age groups. In the past 3 months, 29% of adults report making errors at work due to sleepiness or sleep problems. Driving while drowsy at least every month is reported by 29% of people, 20% have nodded off while driving, and 5% have had an accident in the past year because they dozed off. Sleep problems and daytime consequences are endemic among Australian adults. A focus on healthy sleep at a policy level as well as increased clinician and public awareness may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 National Sleep Foundation. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatric morbidity in Australian veterans of the United Nations peacekeeping force in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W

    1997-04-01

    Since World War II, an increasing number of soldiers have been deployed in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping forces. However, little is known about the psychiatric impact of such deployments. The present study investigated the nature, prevalence, aetiology and natural history of psychiatric morbidity in Australian veterans of the United Nations peacekeeping force in Somalia. Fifteen months after their return from Somalia, 117 Somalian veterans completed the 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), the Impact of Events Scale (IES), the Combat Exposure Scale (CES), and a checklist of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, completed by veterans 12 months previously as part of an evaluation by the Department of Defence. Seventy-seven non-veteran controls also completed the GHQ-28. Veterans scored significantly higher on the GHQ-28 than controls. Twenty-four-point-eight per cent (24.8%) of veterans were GHQ cases (using 4/5 as a cut-off point) compared to 13.0% of controls. Psychiatric morbidity in veterans was associated with combat exposure and a past psychiatric history. Levels of morbidity reduced over time, although they remained substantial at 15 months following soldiers' return to Australia, with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms being reported by approximately 20% of veterans. At least one-fifth of Australian soldiers who served in Somalia had significant levels of psychiatric morbidity 15 months following their return. This was almost twice that of their non-veteran peers. Risk factors for the development of psychiatric morbidity included combat exposure and past psychiatric history. Levels of psychiatric morbidity were much higher than those reported in previous studies on UN soldiers.

  7. 'Earning and learning' in those with psychotic disorders: the second Australian national survey of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Geoffrey; Saha, Sukanta; Harvey, Carol; Morgan, Vera A; Waterreus, Anna; Bush, Robert; Castle, David; Galletly, Cherrie; Stain, Helen J; Neil, Amanda L; McGorry, Patrick; McGrath, John J

    2012-08-01

    Participation in mainstream education and employment facilitates both the recovery and the social inclusion of people with psychotic disorders. As part of the second Australian survey of psychosis, we assessed labour force activity and participation in formal education among working age adults with psychotic disorders. Data were drawn from a large national community prevalence survey of adults with psychotic disorders. Known as the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP), it was conducted in seven Australian catchment areas during March to December 2010. Current and past year labour force activity, current employment, past year participation in formal education and vocational training, and key clinical and demographic characteristics were examined in a sample of 1825 participants. Only 22.4% of people with psychotic disorders were found to be employed (either full-time or part-time) in the month prior to the survey. In the previous 12 months, 32.7% were employed at some time. Of those in competitive employment, the majority worked part-time (63.9%), while a quarter worked 38 or more hours per week (23.4%). In terms of educational attainment, 18.4% reported difficulties with reading or writing, while 31.9% completed high school, which represents 12 years of formal education. The proportion currently employed has remained stable at 22% since the last national survey in 1997. Policy makers and service providers could do more to ensure people with psychotic disorders obtain access to more effective forms of assistance with respect to both their continuing education and employment. More effective vocational and educational interventions for people with psychotic disorders appear to be urgently needed.

  8. Prevalence and correlates of bullying victimisation and perpetration in a nationally representative sample of Australian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hannah J; Connor, Jason P; Lawrence, David M; Hafekost, Jennifer M; Zubrick, Stephen R; Scott, James G

    2017-09-01

    Bullying prevalence studies are limited by varied measurement methods and a lack of representative samples. This study estimated the national prevalence of bullying victimisation, perpetration and combined victim-perpetration experiences in a representative population-based sample of Australian youth. The relationships between the three types of bullying involvement with a range of mental health symptoms and diagnoses were also examined. A randomly selected nationally representative sample aged 11-17 years ( N = 2967, M age = 14.6 years; 51.6% male) completed the youth component of the Second Australian Child and Adolescent Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (Young Minds Matter). Parents or carers also completed a structured face-to-face interview that asked questions about a single randomly selected child in the household. The youth survey comprised self-reported bullying victimisation and perpetration (Olweus Bully-Victim Questionnaire-adapted), psychological distress (K10), emotional and behavioural problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), as well as self-harm, suicide attempts and substance use. Modules from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV were administered to all youth and parents to assess for mental disorder diagnoses (major depressive disorder, any anxiety disorder and any externalising disorder [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder]). The 12-month prevalence of bullying victimisation was 13.3%, perpetration 1.6% and victim-perpetration 1.9%. Logistic regression models showed all forms of involvement in bullying were associated with increased risk of psychological distress, emotional and behavioural problems, substance use, self-harm and attempted suicide. Victimisation and victim-perpetration were associated with youth-reported major depressive disorder. There were also significant associations between bullying involvement and parent-reported diagnoses of major

  9. Playing by the Rules: Researching, Teaching and Learning Sexual Ethics with Young Men in the Australian National Rugby League

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Kath; Carmody, Moira; Evers, Clifton; Lumby, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Australian National Rugby League (NRL) commissioned the Playing By The Rules research project in response to allegations of sexual assault by members of a professional rugby league team. This article offers an overview of the theoretical and methodological approaches adopted by the team, and the subsequent workplace education…

  10. Food and beverage portion sizes in Australian children: a secondary analysis of 1995 and 2007 national data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kate; Watson, Jane F; Collins, Clare E

    2014-05-28

    Portion size of foods is reported to contribute to the rise in obesity prevalence. However, evidence of changes in portion size for commonly consumed foods in Australia is lacking. The aim was to evaluate whether Australian child and adolescent portion sizes of selected foods changed from 1995 to 2007. Time-series study, comparing dietary data from two national cross-sectional surveys in nationally representative population survey of Australian households. The dietary data was from children aged 2-16 years who participated in the 1995 National Nutrition Survey (n = 2198) and 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (n = 4799). Differences were found across survey years in median portion size of common foods and beverages assessed by 24-hour recalls for age and sex categories. Of the 61 foods items evaluated across the whole population sample, portion size increased in 18 items, decreased in 22, with no change in 20, although the magnitude of change varied by age and sex. Decreases in portion size were detected for most dairy products, breakfast cereal, some packaged snack foods and vegetables, p portion sizes were detected over 12 years in Australian children and adolescents with the degree of change varying by sex, age and food group. Knowledge of usual portion sizes could inform programs targeting appropriate serving sizes selection in children and adolescents.

  11. Education of radioecology at Precarpathian national university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzha, D.D.; Nazarov, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    The teaching programs of radioecology are defined the contents in a higher school educational institutions. The offered program of studies is based on a 10-year's experience of the authors job in Chernobyl exclusive zone, experimental and full-scale radioecological investigation of marine biocenoses in Institute of biology of the southern seas National Academy of Ukraine. (authors)

  12. A cross-sectional investigation of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and health-behavior participation in Australian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Geoff P; Nash, Kim; Sharman, Rachael; Lane, Ben R

    2014-05-06

    Transitioning to university involves a major life change that can have implications for physical and mental health. This study had three objectives: first, assess the mental health and health-behavior participation of Australian university students; second, evaluate clustering of health behaviors; and third, examine how mental health relates to health behaviors. University students (n = 751) enrolled at an Australian regional university completed an online survey containing the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and a health-behavior questionnaire. Over one-third of students reported mild or higher mental illness symptoms and most reported engaging in multiple unhealthy behaviors. Furthermore, mental health was associated with unhealthy behaviors. For males, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast and poor sleep quality. For females, depressive symptoms were associated with skipping breakfast, inadequate vigorous physical activity, and short or long sleep hours. Stress symptoms in females were associated with healthy sleep hours, but poor sleep quality. Future research may consider whether an intervention targeting one or two key health behaviors has utility in improving participation in other health behaviors and mental health. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Disability, and social and economic inclusion: who is in and out of the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme?

    OpenAIRE

    Cebulla, Andreas; Zhu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    A new National Disability Insurance Scheme is being trialled in Australia, following criticism of the fragmented and inequitable nature of existing disability supports (e.g. in the 2009 ‘Shut Out’ report by the National People with Disabilities and Carer Council) and reform recommendations made by the Australian Government's Productivity Commission in 2011. The Insurance Scheme distinguishes between people living with disability who will be eligible for different types of supports: either mai...

  14. Changing Higher Education Policies for Japanese National Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes current debate on changes in Japan's higher education system which involve "corporatizing" all national universities and introducing performance-based contractual funding. Suggests that these changes may be part of a complex game of struggle for control. (EV)

  15. Multilingual universities: A national and international overview | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on language planning and management in higher education, specifically at comprehensive research-oriented universities, with a view to comparing and analysing implementation processes and issues at different national and international institutions. Universities included in the study were the

  16. Adherence to the Australian National Inpatient Medication Chart: the efficacy of a uniform national drug chart on improving prescription error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, Alp

    2013-10-01

    In 2006, the National Inpatient Medication Chart (NIMC) was introduced as a uniform medication chart in Australian public hospitals with the aim of reducing prescription error. The rate of regular medication prescription error in the NIMC was assessed. Data was collected using the NIMC Audit Tool and analyzed with respect to causes of error per medication prescription and per medication chart. The following prescription requirements were assessed: date, generic drug name, route of administration, dose, frequency, administration time, indication, signature, name and contact details. A total of 1877 medication prescriptions were reviewed. 1653 prescriptions (88.07%) had no contact number, 1630 (86.84%) did not have an indication, 1230 and 675 (35.96%) used a drug's trade name. Within 261 medication charts, all had at least one entry, which did not include an indication, 258 (98.85%) had at least one entry, which did not have a contact number and 200 (76.63%) had at least one entry, which used a trade name. The introduction of a uniform national medication chart is a positive step, but more needs to be done to address the root causes of prescription error. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Thoughts on the Italian National University Council (CUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghetti M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Italian National University Council (CUN is an elected body that represents the Italian academic system and formulates proposal and gives advice to the Minister of University. The opinion is expressed that the professors who are appointed to CUN should go on sabbatical leave from their universities over the period they are part of CUN, as an important condition for carrying out better their institutional job and preventing any potential conflict of interest.

  18. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  19. How Does Australian-Based Digital English Resource Stack Up? Chinese University EFL Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yifeng; Shen, Huizhong; Ewing, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    For a long time, Australian English and culture have not been viewed in China as an equal to its American and British counterpart. This is reflected in teachers' choice of destination when it comes to English teaching and learning resources. This paper examines Chinese English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' perceptions of the contents and…

  20. Teaching Teamwork in Australian University Business Disciplines: Evidence from a Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Linda; Girardi, Antonia; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Australian employers continue to indicate that the development of teamwork skills in graduates is as important as mastering technical skills required for a particular career. In Australia, the reporting on the teaching of teamwork skills has emanated across a range of disciplines including health and engineering, with less of a focus on business…

  1. The Communication Patterns of Chinese Students with Their Lecturers in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Chinese students are now the largest group of international students in the Australian higher education sector. The patterns of Chinese communication and education affect the ways that Chinese students engage with their lecturers and manage their learning relationships. A case study of these patterns provides a small window through which to…

  2. Australian University Research Commercialisation: Perceptions of Technology Transfer Specialists and Science and Technology Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Australian governments in recent years have invested substantially in innovation and research commercialisation with the aim of enhancing international economic competitiveness, making research findings more readily available to research users, and supporting economic and social development. Although there have been a number of evaluations of…

  3. The Australian synchrotron research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) was established in 1996 under a 5 year grant from the Australian Government, and is managed by ANSTO on behalf of a consortium of Australian universities and research organisations. It has taken over the operation of the Australian National Beamline Facility (ANBF) at the Photon Factory, and has joined two CATS at the Advanced Photon Source: the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation CAT (SRI-CAT) and the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). The ASRP thus manages a comprehensive range of synchrotron radiation research facilities for Australian science. The ANBF is a general purpose hard X-ray beamline which has been in operation at the Photon Factory since 1993. It currently caters for about 35 Australian research teams per year. The facilities available at the ANBF will be presented and the research program will be summarised. The ASRP facilities at the APS comprise the 5 sectors operated by SRI-CAT, BioCARS and ChemMatCARS. A brief description will be given of the ASRP research programs at the APS, which will considerably broaden the scope of Australian synchrotron science

  4. Financial Analysis of National University Hospitals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides information for decision making of the managers and the staff of national university hospitals. In order to conduct a financial analysis of national university hospitals, this study uses reports on the final accounts of 10 university hospitals from 2008 to 2011. The results of comparing 2008 and 2011 showed that there was a general decrease in total assets, an increase in liabilities, and a decrease in total medical revenues, with a continuous deficit in many hospitals. Moreover, as national university hospitals have low debt dependence, their management conditions generally seem satisfactory. However, some individual hospitals suffer severe financial difficulties and thus depend on short-term debts, which generally aggravate the profit and loss structure. Various indicators show that the financial state and business performance of national university hospitals have been deteriorating. These research findings will be used as important basic data for managers who make direct decisions in this uncertain business environment or by researchers who analyze the medical industry to enable informed decision-making and optimized execution. Furthermore, this study is expected to contribute to raising government awareness of the need to foster and support the national university hospital industry.

  5. Awareness and knowledge of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among Australian gay and bisexual men: results of a national, online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin; Lea, Toby; Kippax, Susan; Kolstee, Johann; Ellard, Jeanne; Velecky, Marlene; Murphy, Dean; de Wit, John

    2016-04-21

    Background: Expanded access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is being actively debated in Australia. Awareness and knowledge of this HIV-prevention method have not been assessed in detail in the primary affected population, gay and bisexual men. Methods: Awareness and knowledge of PrEP were assessed among Australian gay and bisexual men, who were asked to complete a national, anonymous, online survey in 2015. Associations with PrEP awareness were identified with multivariate logistic regression and associations with PrEP knowledge were identified using multivariate linear regression. Results: Among 1251 participants, 954 (77%) were aware of PrEP. The most common sources of information were gay community media, Australian websites and friends. Awareness of PrEP was independently associated with older age, living in a capital city, having a university degree, being tested for HIV, being HIV-positive, having condomless anal intercourse with regular male partners, and ever having taken post-exposure prophylaxis. Men in monogamous relationships were less likely to be aware of PrEP. Among men who were aware of PrEP, the mean PrEP knowledge score was 6.8 out of 13. Relatively few participants knew that taking PrEP involved regular clinical monitoring and that in Australia PrEP was only recommended for people at risk of HIV. Better knowledge was independently associated with living in a capital city, having a university degree, being in full-time employment, being HIV-positive, and ever having taken post-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. Conclusions: To assist in appropriate PrEP uptake, we recommend educating gay and bisexual men about current Australian prescribing guidelines and how PrEP is accessed in Australia.

  6. 78 FR 90 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence... hereby given that a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been...

  7. Ready for university? A cross national study on students' perceived preparedness for university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; van der Meer, J.

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured before students commenced their study at a university in New

  8. Excellent Teacher Training at University of Education, Vietnam National University Hanoi.

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Thi My Loc,

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of excellent teachers, factors which impact on the quality of teacher training in general, teacher training in Vietnam and the model of excellent teacher training at the University of Education, Vietnam National University in Hanoi in particular.

  9. Dealing with Transforming Self/s of Japanese Women Studying in Australian Universities : A Conceptual Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Takae, Ichimoto; Department of European and American Studies, Faculty of International Culture Studies, Tenri University

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the conceptual framework underpinning the study of transforming identities and perceptions of femininity of Japanese women studying in Australian higher education. A feminist, postmodern position on identity and concepts of self is taken, arguing that the self is socially, culturally and historically (re)constructed, unfixed and multi-dimensional. By looking at the seven key themes of the study's theoretical and operational concepts, the article attempts to link globalis...

  10. Mental health first aid responses of the public: results from an Australian national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitchener Betty A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of mental disorders is so high that members of the public will commonly have contact with someone affected. How they respond to that person (the mental health first aid response may affect outcomes. However, there is no information on what members of the public might do in such circumstances. Methods In a national survey of 3998 Australian adults, respondents were presented with one of four case vignettes and asked what they would do if that person was someone they had known for a long time and cared about. There were four types of vignette: depression, depression with suicidal thoughts, early schizophrenia, and chronic schizophrenia. Verbatim responses to the open-ended question were coded into categories. Results The most common responses to all vignettes were to encourage professional help-seeking and to listen to and support the person. However, a significant minority did not give these responses. Much less common responses were to assess the problem or risk of harm, to give or seek information, to encourage self-help, or to support the family. Few respondents mentioned contacting a professional on the person's behalf or accompanying them to a professional. First aid responses were generally more appropriate in women, those with less stigmatizing attitudes, and those who correctly identified the disorder in the vignette. Conclusions There is room for improving the range of mental health first aid responses in the community. Lack of knowledge of mental disorders and stigmatizing attitudes are important barriers to effective first aid.

  11. Disclosure of mental health problems: findings from an Australian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, N J; Morgan, A J; Jorm, A F

    2017-01-11

    The aim of the current study was to carry out a national population-based survey to assess the proportion of people disclosing mental health problems in a variety of settings. A further aim was to explore respondent characteristics associated with disclosure. In 2014, telephone interviews were carried out with 5220 Australians aged 18+, 1381 of whom reported a mental health problem or scored highly on a symptom screening questionnaire. Questions covered disclosure of mental health problems to friends, intimate partners, other family members, supervisors or other colleagues in the workplace, teachers, lecturers or other students in the educational institution, health professionals and others in the community. Other than for intimate partners or supervisors, participants were asked whether or not they told everybody, some people or no one. Multinomial logistic regression was used to model the correlates of disclosure in each setting. For friends and family, respondents were more likely to disclose to some people than to everyone or to no one. In most other domains, non-disclosure was most common, including in the workplace, where non-disclosure to supervisors was more likely than disclosure. Disclosure was associated with having received treatment or with support in all settings except healthcare, while it was only associated with discrimination in two settings (healthcare and education). Disclosure of mental health problems does not appear to be linked to discrimination in most settings, and is typically associated with receiving support. Selective or non-disclosure may be particularly critical in workplaces, education and healthcare settings.

  12. Enhancing the Resilience of the Australian National Electricity Market: Taking a Systems Approach in Policy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Newell

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As the complexity and interconnectedness of present-day social-ecological systems become steadily more apparent, there is increasing pressure on governments, policy makers, and managers to take a systems approach to the challenges facing humanity. However, how can this be done in the face of system complexity and uncertainties? In this paper we briefly discuss practical ways that policy makers can take up the systems challenge. We focus on resilience thinking, and the use of influence diagrams, causal-loop diagrams, and system archetypes. As a case study, set in the context of the climate-energy-water nexus, we use some of these system concepts and tools to carry out an initial exploration of factors that can affect the resilience of the Australian National Electricity Market. We stress the need for the electricity sector to prepare for the impacts of global change by encouraging innovation and diversity, supporting modularity and redundancy, and embracing the need for a policy making approach that takes account of the dynamics of the wider social-ecological system. Finally, taking a longer term view, we conclude by recommending that policy makers work to reduce reliance on conventional market mechanisms, institute continuing cross-sector dialogue, and promote basic education in system dynamics.

  13. Continuous tracking of the Australian National Tobacco Campaign: advertising effects on recall, recognition, cognitions, and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, R J; Boulter, J; Borland, R; Jalleh, G; Carter, O

    2003-09-01

    To relate Australian National Tobacco Campaign advertising to outcome measures such as smokers' awareness of and reaction to the campaign, and indicators of interest in smoking cessation. Continuous tracking was used to survey random cross sectional samples of the target audience via telephone interviews. Baseline measures were collected preceding each advertising phase, whereafter subjects were interviewed on a weekly basis for the entire period of each phase. Changes in outcomes could thus be inferred on a weekly basis allowing variations in advertising intensity to be monitored for effect. Three phases were evaluated variously in Melbourne, Sydney, and Adelaide. A total of 9033 subjects aged 18-40 years were interviewed. Age and sex of the sample were evenly distributed. In general, it was found that the greater the media weight, the greater the recall and recognition mediated by the message of the advertisement and the creative execution-advertisements with a clear figure ground executional format appeared more memorable than those without, and health effects advertisements were more memorable than those encouraging calls to a quitline. The relationship between various communication effects and media weight was limited by the confounding of prior activities in two of the phases. Advertisements with clear figure ground executional formats and those illustrating health effects of smoking have high memorability. Future campaigns that are continuously tracked are recommended to systematically vary media weight, flighting schedules, and advertisement type, so as to maximise information about these variables and their interactions.

  14. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benino D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University.Methods: The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Results: Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. Conclusion: This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.

  15. The rise and fall of Australian physical activity policy 1996 – 2006: a national review framed in an international context

    OpenAIRE

    Bellew, Bill; Schöeppe, Stephanie; Bull, Fiona C; Bauman, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Background This paper provides an historical review of physical activity policy development in Australia for a period spanning a decade since the release of the US Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health in 1996 and including the 2004 WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. Using our definition of 'HARDWIRED' policy criteria, this Australian review is compared with an international perspective of countries with established national physical activity policie...

  16. Transient Relative Age Effects across annual age groups in National level Australian Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, Stephen; Abbott, Shaun; Dogramaci, Sera; Kable, Adam; Salter, James; Hintermann, Mirjam; Romann, Michael

    2017-12-29

    To determine the prevalence, magnitude and transient patterning of Relative Age Effects (RAEs) according to sex and stroke event across all age-groups at the Australian National age swimming Championships. Repeated years of cross-sectional participation data were examined. Participants were 6014 unique male (3185) and female (2829) swimmers (aged 12-18 years) who participated in Freestyle (50, 400m) and/or Breaststroke (100, 200m) at the National age swimming Championships between 2000-2014 (inclusive). RAE prevalence, magnitude and transience were determined using Chi-square tests and Cramer's V estimates for effect size. Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) examined relative age quartile discrepancies. These steps were applied across age-groups and according to sex and each stroke event. Consistent RAEs with large-medium effect sizes were evident for males at 12-15 years of age respectively, and with large-medium effects for females at 12-14 respectively across all four swimming strokes. RAE magnitude then consistently reduced with age across strokes (e.g., Q1 vs. Q4 OR range 16year old males=0.94-1.20; females=0.68-1.41). With few exceptions, by 15-16 years RAEs had typically dissipated; and by 17-18 years, descriptive and significant inverse RAEs emerged, reflecting overrepresentation of relatively younger swimmers. Performance advantages associated with relative age (and thereby likely growth and maturation) are transient. Greater consideration of transient performance and participation in athlete development systems is necessary. This may include revising the emphasis of sport programmes according to developmental stages and delaying forms of athlete selection to improve validity. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alcohol-related victimisation: Differences between sexual minorities and heterosexuals in an Australian national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Alcohol-related violence and other types of victimisation are prevalent, but unevenly distributed across the population. The study investigated the relationship between alcohol-related victimisation and sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, other) in a national sample. The study used cross-sectional data from the 2010 Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of sexual orientation with three types of victimisation (verbal abuse, physical abuse and feeling threatened by a person intoxicated on alcohol in the last 12 months) and controlled for probable confounding variables. Of 24, 858 eligible respondents aged 14 years or older, 26.8% experienced victimisation. Less than 30% of heterosexual men and women suffered victimisation compared with nearly 50% of gay men and bisexual women. Controlling for alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use, age group, mental health, Indigenous status and socioeconomic factors, logistic regression, stratified by gender, found that the odds of both verbal [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.52] and physical abuse (AOR=2.04) were greatest for lesbians, while gay men had the greatest odds (AOR=2.25) of feeling threatened. Across all types of victimisation, some or all sexual minority groups had increased odds of being victimised in the last 12 months compared with their heterosexual counterparts. The pattern of results shows the importance of disaggregating sexual minority status in considering the impact of alcohol-related victimisation and in developing interventions or policies. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. Promotional discourse in the websites of two Australian universities: A discourse analytic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Van Yen Hoang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows how universities represent themselves through the use of language on their institutional websites. Specifically, it compares and contrasts how a long established university, the University of Melbourne and a young university, Macquarie University construct their institutional identities and build up a relationship with potential students. A three-dimensional framework developed by Fairclough is utilised for three stages of discourse analysis. The analysis reveals that the websites of the two universities exhibit a promotional discourse which reflects the impacts of globalisation and the trend of academic marketing on higher education. This type of discourse is utilised by the universities to promote themselves in order attract more students and other resources. A comparison and contrast of the two university websites show that the representation of the two universities is not only determined by the social trends, but also their own tradition and reputation.

  19. Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. Methods The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote regions were compared using data from a 2003–04 Australian national survey of the mental health literacy of 3998 adults. Measures included the perceived helpfulness of a range of professionals, non-professionals and interventions, and the causes, prognosis, and outcomes after treatment for four case vignettes describing depression, depression with suicidal ideation, early schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Participant awareness of Australia's national depression initiative and depression in the media, their symptoms of depression and exposure to the conditions depicted in the vignettes were also compared. Results Mental health literacy was similar across remoteness categories. However, inner regional residents showed superior identification of the disorders depicted in the suicidal ideation and chronic schizophrenia vignettes. They were also more likely to report having heard of Australia's national depression health promotion campaign. Conversely, they were less likely than major city residents to rate the evidence-based treatment of psychotherapy helpful for depression. Both inner regional and outer-remote residents were less likely to rate psychologists as helpful for depression alone. The rural groups were more likely to rate the non-evidence based interventions of drinking and painkillers as helpful for a depression vignette. In addition, outer-remote residents were more likely to identify the evidence based treatment of antipsychotics as harmful for early schizophrenia and less likely to endorse

  20. Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F

    2009-03-27

    Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote) regions were compared using data from a 2003-04 Australian national survey of the mental health literacy of 3998 adults. Measures included the perceived helpfulness of a range of professionals, non-professionals and interventions, and the causes, prognosis, and outcomes after treatment for four case vignettes describing depression, depression with suicidal ideation, early schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Participant awareness of Australia's national depression initiative and depression in the media, their symptoms of depression and exposure to the conditions depicted in the vignettes were also compared. Mental health literacy was similar across remoteness categories. However, inner regional residents showed superior identification of the disorders depicted in the suicidal ideation and chronic schizophrenia vignettes. They were also more likely to report having heard of Australia's national depression health promotion campaign. Conversely, they were less likely than major city residents to rate the evidence-based treatment of psychotherapy helpful for depression. Both inner regional and outer-remote residents were less likely to rate psychologists as helpful for depression alone. The rural groups were more likely to rate the non-evidence based interventions of drinking and painkillers as helpful for a depression vignette. In addition, outer-remote residents were more likely to identify the evidence based treatment of antipsychotics as harmful for early schizophrenia and less likely to endorse psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and general

  1. Gendered Universities and the Wage Gap: Case Study of a Pay Equity Audit in an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Jan; Hill, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    Studies worldwide have found that women's pay lags behind men's in academia. This article describes pay equity policies in Australia and overseas and the use of a pay equity audit as a strategic tool to reduce gender inequities at The University of Western Australia (UWA). As a research-intensive university, UWA resembles similar universities…

  2. Psychological Loneliness among Arab Students at Irbid National University, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kadoumi, Khawla; Sawalha, Abdel Muhdi; Al Momani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of psychological loneliness among Arab students studying at Irbid National University, and to investigate the effect of year of study and gender of students on the level of psychological loneliness. The sample of the study consisted of 149 students, 133 males and 16 females from first, second,…

  3. Survey of antipsychotic medication curriculum content in Australian university nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Paul; Stomski, Norman J; McAllister, Margaret; Wynaden, Dianne; Hungerford, Catherine; Usher, Kim; Maude, Phil; Crowther, Andrew; Batterbee, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Antipsychotic medication has long been one of the first-line interventions for people with serious mental illness, with outcomes including reductions in symptoms and relapse rates. More recently, however, questions have been raised about the efficacy of antipsychotic medications, especially in light of their side-effect profile. Such questions have implications for the nurses administering antipsychotic medications, particularly in relation to their knowledge of the antipsychotic medication, its efficacy, and side-effect profile. Also important is the education of nursing students about antipsychotic medications, their use, and management. The present study reports findings of research that explored current curriculum content concerning psychopharmacological treatment in Australian undergraduate and postgraduate nursing programmes. Using a survey design, the research examined the content and modes of delivery of this content to gauge how well students are prepared for administering antipsychotic medication to people with serious mental illness. Findings of the research suggested the need for improvement in preparing nursing students to administer antipsychotic medication, including indications, contraindications, as well as recognition and management of side-effects. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. The Program Risks of Work-Integrated Learning: A Study of Australian University Lawyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Freudenberg, Brett; Giddings, Jeff; Klopper, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a risky business in higher education. The strategic opportunities that WIL presents for universities cannot be achieved without taking on unavoidable legal risks. University lawyers are involved with managing the legal risks as part of their internal delivery of legal services to universities. It is important to…

  5. Engaging rural Australian communities in National Science Week helps increase visibility for women researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Margaret C; Desselle, Mathilde R

    2017-10-01

    During a week-long celebration of science, run under the federally supported National Science Week umbrella, the Catch a Rising Star: women in Queensland research (CaRS) programme flew scientists who identify as women to nine regional and remote communities in the Australian State of Queensland. The aim of the project was twofold: first, to bring science to remote and regional communities in a large, economically diverse state; and second, to determine whether media and public engagement provides career advancement opportunities for women scientists. This paper focuses on the latter goal. The data show: (i) a substantial majority (greater than 80%) of researchers thought the training and experience provided by the programme would help develop her career as a research scientist in the future, (ii) the majority (65%) thought the programme would help relate her research to end users, industry partners or stakeholders in the future, and (iii) analytics can help create a compelling narrative around engagement metrics and help to quantify influence. During the week-long project, scientists reached 600 000 impressions on one social media platform (Twitter) using a program hashtag. The breadth and depth of the project outcomes indicate funding bodies and employers could use similar data as an informative source of metrics to support hiring and promotion decisions. Although this project focused on researchers who identify as women, the lessons learned are applicable to researchers representing a diverse range of backgrounds. Future surveys will help determine whether the CaRS programme provided long-term career advantages to participating scientists and communities.

  6. Preschooler obesity and parenting styles of mothers and fathers: Australian national population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Melissa; Nicholson, Jan M; Hardy, Pollyanna; Smith, Katherine

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine relationships between BMI status at ages 4 to 5 years and mothers' and fathers' parenting dimensions and parenting styles. Participants were composed of all 4983 of the 4- to 5-year-old children in wave 1 of the nationally representative Longitudinal Study of Australian Children with complete BMI and maternal parenting data. Mothers and fathers self-reported their parenting behaviors on 3 multi-item continuous scales (warmth, control, and irritability) and were each categorized as having 1 of 4 parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and disengaged) using internal warmth and control tertile cut points. Using a proportional odds model, odds ratios for children being in a higher BMI category were computed for mothers and fathers separately and together, after adjustment for factors associated with child BMI, including mothers' and fathers' BMI status. The sample was composed of 2537 boys and 2446 girls with a mean age 56.9 months; 15% were overweight and 5% were obese (International Obesity Task Force criteria). Mothers' parenting behaviors and styles were not associated in any model with higher odds of children being in a heavier BMI category, with or without multiple imputation to account for missing maternal BMI data. Higher father control scores were associated with lower odds of the child being in a higher BMI category. Compared with the reference authoritative style, children of fathers with permissive and disengaged parenting styles had higher odds of being in a higher BMI category. This article is the first, to our knowledge, to examine the parenting of both parents in relation to preschoolers' BMI status while also adjusting for parental BMI status. Fathers' but not mothers' parenting behaviors and styles were associated with increased risks of preschooler overweight and obesity. Longitudinal impacts of parenting on BMI gain remain to be determined.

  7. Receipt and Perceived Helpfulness of Mental Illness Information: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Annette L; Brooker, Joanne; Hasking, Penelope; Clarke, David; Meadows, Graham

    2017-10-20

    The distribution of mental illness information is a crucial element of mental health promotion initiatives. We assessed the receipt and perceived helpfulness of such information in Australia. Data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing indicated that, during the year prior to the survey, 33.7% of Australians received mental illness information; of these, 51.2% found it helpful. Among people with a mental disorder, 46.1% received information; of these, 67.4% found it helpful. Non-English speakers and the socially disadvantaged were less likely to receive mental illness information. Older and less educated respondents were less likely to both receive mental illness information and find it helpful. Mental health service users were more likely to receive mental illness information perceived as helpful than those who had not accessed such services. Better targeted information interventions are required to ensure those most likely to benefit receive mental illness-related information.

  8. Experiences of discrimination and positive treatment in people with mental health problems: Findings from an Australian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2015-10-01

    Stigma and discrimination are central concerns for people with mental health problems. The aim of the study was to carry out a national survey in order to assess experiences of avoidance, discrimination and positive treatment in people with mental health problems. In 2014, telephone interviews were carried out with 5220 Australians aged 18+, 1381 of whom reported a mental health problem or scored highly on a symptom screening questionnaire. Questions covered experiences of avoidance, discrimination and positive treatment by friends, spouse, other family, workplace, educational institution and others in the community. In most domains, respondents reported more positive treatment experiences than avoidance or discrimination. Friends and family were more likely to avoid the person than to discriminate. The results can provide input into the design of anti-discrimination interventions and further empower people with mental health problems as they advocate for change in the area of discrimination. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  9. The Australian national binge drinking campaign: campaign recognition among young people at a music festival who report risky drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacks-Davis Rachel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Government launched a mass media campaign in 2009 to raise awareness of the harms and costs associated risky drinking among young Australians. The aim of this study was to assess if young people attending a music festival who report frequent risky single occasions of drinking (RSOD recognise the key message of the campaign, "Binge drinking can lead to injuries and regrets", compared to young people who report less frequent RSOD. Methods A cross-sectional behavioural survey of young people (aged 16-29 years attending a music festival in Melbourne, Australia, was conducted in January 2009. We collected basic demographics, information on alcohol and other drug use and sexual health and behaviour during the previous 12 months, and measured recognition of the Australian National Binge Drinking Campaign key message. We calculated the odds of recognition of the key slogan of the Australian National Binge Drinking Campaign among participants who reported frequent RSOD (defined as reported weekly or more frequent RSOD during the previous 12 months compared to participants who reported less frequent RSOD. Results Overall, three-quarters (74.7% of 1072 participants included in this analysis recognised the campaign message. In the adjusted analysis, those reporting frequent RSOD had significantly lower odds of recognising the campaign message compared to those not reporting frequent RSOD (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9, whilst females had significantly greater odds of recognising the campaign message compared to males (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.1. Conclusions Whilst a high proportion of the target group recognised the campaign, our analysis suggests that participants that reported frequent RSOD - and thus the most important group to target - had statistically significantly lower odds of recognising the campaign message.

  10. The Australian national binge drinking campaign: campaign recognition among young people at a music festival who report risky drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Caroline; Dietze, Paul; Gold, Judy; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Stoové, Mark; Vally, Hassan; Hellard, Margaret

    2011-06-20

    The Australian Government launched a mass media campaign in 2009 to raise awareness of the harms and costs associated risky drinking among young Australians. The aim of this study was to assess if young people attending a music festival who report frequent risky single occasions of drinking (RSOD) recognise the key message of the campaign, "Binge drinking can lead to injuries and regrets", compared to young people who report less frequent RSOD. A cross-sectional behavioural survey of young people (aged 16-29 years) attending a music festival in Melbourne, Australia, was conducted in January 2009. We collected basic demographics, information on alcohol and other drug use and sexual health and behaviour during the previous 12 months, and measured recognition of the Australian National Binge Drinking Campaign key message. We calculated the odds of recognition of the key slogan of the Australian National Binge Drinking Campaign among participants who reported frequent RSOD (defined as reported weekly or more frequent RSOD during the previous 12 months) compared to participants who reported less frequent RSOD. Overall, three-quarters (74.7%) of 1072 participants included in this analysis recognised the campaign message. In the adjusted analysis, those reporting frequent RSOD had significantly lower odds of recognising the campaign message compared to those not reporting frequent RSOD (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9), whilst females had significantly greater odds of recognising the campaign message compared to males (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.1). Whilst a high proportion of the target group recognised the campaign, our analysis suggests that participants that reported frequent RSOD - and thus the most important group to target - had statistically significantly lower odds of recognising the campaign message.

  11. PERCEPTIONS OF ONLINE LEARNING IN AN AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITY: AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS’ (ASIAN REGION PERSPECTIVE – SUPPORT FOR LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Chew Shiun Yee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Several researchers have reported that cultural and language differences can affect online interactions and communications between students from different cultural backgrounds. Other researchers have asserted that online learning is a tool that can improve teaching and learning skills, but its effectiveness depends on how the tool is used. To delve into these aspects further, this study set out to investigate the kinds of learning difficulties encountered by international students and how they actually coped with online learning. The modified Online Learning Environment Survey (OLES instrument was used to collect data from the sample of 109 international students at a university in Brisbane, Australia. A smaller group of 35 domestic students was also included for comparison purposes. Contrary to assumptions from previous research, the findings revealed that there were only a few differences between the international Asian and Australian students with regards to their perceptions of online learning.

  12. Teaching and Learning through the Eyes of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Postgraduates and Their Lecturers in Australia and Vietnam: Implications for the Internationalisation of Education in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobinson, Toni

    2015-01-01

    International and transnational education has become common place. Australian universities have embraced the rise in international enrolments from students in the Asia-Pacific region. There are many considerations, however, if these courses are to avoid being labelled neo-colonial exercises, not least of which is the necessity for informed…

  13. Student Evaluation to Improve the Student Learning Experience: An Australian University Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice M.

    2013-01-01

    Universities have been collecting student feedback on their experiences in teaching and learning for decades. Their voice is usually captured in surveys, and quantitative and qualitative data are used for quality improvement. Quantitative data are often used to monitor the student experience and used as a key performance measure in universities.…

  14. The Online Presence of Teaching and Learning within Australian University Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else, Fabienne C.; Crookes, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching and Learning as a form of scholarship has struggled for recognition in universities, with one of the biggest hurdles being visibility. As the Internet is now one of the primary sources of visibility, this study examines how Australia's 39 universities present their teaching and learning profiles online. The purpose was to examine the…

  15. A Fair Slice of the Pie? Problematising the Dispersal of Government Funds to Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Troy A.

    2017-01-01

    A common theme in higher education research is the factors that affect university funding. Studies frequently examine how universities cope with funding cuts and the changes that have stemmed from operating in a neoliberal age, a period that now sees institutions commonly functioning on a cost/benefit basis. This paper offers an original…

  16. SKILLS--Structuring Knowledge and Information for Learning and Living of Students in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Gobinda G.

    2009-01-01

    Universities in Australia, like their counterparts abroad, are making available several different kinds of electronic information services for their student communities. University students need different types of information for the frequently entwined purposes of learning and living, and such information may be available from a variety of…

  17. The Monsoon Wedding Phenomenon: Understanding Indian Students Studying in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard; Kumar, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    How does the University sector identify and support the diverse needs of Indian students? This paper reports on a research project carried out on undergraduate students from India enrolled at a Melbourne-based University. The focus is the need to understand why Indian students choose an overseas destination for tertiary study. The intent is to…

  18. Socioeconomic Inequities in Diet Quality and Nutrient Intakes among Australian Adults: Findings from a Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Livingstone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Poor diet may represent one pathway through which lower socioeconomic position (SEP leads to adverse health outcomes. This study examined the associations between SEP and diet quality, its components, energy, and nutrients in a nationally representative sample of Australians. Dietary data from two 24-h recalls collected during the cross-sectional Australian Health Survey 2011-13 (n = 4875; aged ≥ 19 years were analysed. Diet quality was evaluated using the Dietary Guidelines Index (DGI. SEP was assessed by index of area-level socioeconomic disadvantage, education level, and household income. Linear regression analyses investigated the associations between measures of SEP and dietary intakes. Across all of the SEP indicators, compared with the least disadvantaged group, the most disadvantaged group had 2.5–4.5 units lower DGI. A greater area-level disadvantage was associated with higher carbohydrate and total sugars intake. Lower education was associated with higher trans fat, carbohydrate, and total sugars intake and lower poly-unsaturated fat and fibre intake. Lower income was associated with lower total energy and protein intake and higher carbohydrate and trans fat intake. Lower SEP was generally associated with poorer diet quality and nutrient intakes, highlighting dietary inequities among Australian adults, and a need to develop policy that addresses these inequities.

  19. University-Led STEM Outreach Programs: Purposes, Impacts, Stakeholder Needs and Institutional Support at Nine Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Kirsten; Eilam, Efrat; Bigger, Stephen W.; Barry, Fiachra

    2018-01-01

    University-led STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) outreach forms one potential avenue to address the continuing decline of tertiary student enrollments. Yet to-date the impact of these programs is not well understood, due to an historical emphasis on "delivering the goods" that obscures debate on which outreach…

  20. Improving Access to University Education: The Case of the National Open University of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnaka, Chibuogwu V.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has proved to be a significant medium for the socio- economic, political, and technological development of any nation. It is absolutely necessary for equipping individuals with new knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Globally higher education, especially university education is faced with a lot of challenges and difficulties…

  1. Positive strategies men regularly use to prevent and manage depression: a national survey of Australian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Judy; Fogarty, Andrea S; McTigue, Isabel; Nathan, Sally; Whittle, Erin L; Christensen, Helen; Player, Michael J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Wilhelm, Kay

    2015-11-16

    Men are at greater risk than women of dying by suicide. One in eight will experience depression--a leading contributor to suicide--in their lifetime and men often delay seeking treatment. Previous research has focused on men's use of unhelpful coping strategies, with little emphasis on men's productive responses. The present study examines the positive strategies men use to prevent and manage depression. A national online survey investigated Australian men's use of positive strategies, including 26 strategies specifically nominated by men in a previous qualitative study. Data were collected regarding frequency of use or openness to using untried strategies, depression risk, depression symptoms, demographic factors, and other strategies suggested by men. Multivariate regression analyses explored relationships between regular use of strategies and other variables. In total, 465 men aged between 18 and 74 years participated. The mean number of strategies used was 16.8 (SD 4.1) for preventing depression and 15.1 (SD 5.1) for management. The top five prevention strategies used regularly were eating healthily (54.2 %), keeping busy (50.1 %), exercising (44.9 %), humour (41.1 %) and helping others (35.7 %). The top five strategies used for management were taking time out (35.7 %), rewarding myself (35.1 %), keeping busy (35.1 %), exercising (33.3 %) and spending time with a pet (32.7 %). With untried strategies, a majority (58 %) were open to maintaining a relationship with a mentor, and nearly half were open to using meditation, mindfulness or gratitude exercises, seeing a health professional, or setting goals. In multivariate analyses, lower depression risk as measured by the Male Depression Risk Scale was associated with regular use of self-care, achievement-based and cognitive strategies, while lower scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was associated with regular use of cognitive strategies. The results demonstrate that the men in the study currently use, and

  2. TV Format Adaptation in a Trans-national Perpsective. An Australian and Danish Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Majbritt

    internationale formater Hokus Kokus/Ground Force, Huset/The Block, FC Zulu/Nerds FC og Idols/Australian Idol. Metodisk og empirisk er afhandlingen firedelt: •    En komparativ mediesystemanalyse af Danmarks og Australiens mediesystemer •    En komparativ sendefladeanalyse af dansk og australsk primetime gennem...

  3. Life Transitions and Mental Health in a National Cohort of Young Australian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christiana; Gramotnev, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Young adulthood, a time of major life transitions and risk of poor mental health, may affect emotional well-being throughout adult life. This article uses longitudinal survey data to examine young Australian women's transitions across 4 domains: residential independence, relationships, work and study, and motherhood. Changes over 3 years in…

  4. Universities and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Engineering Education is being significantly challenged in the United States. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is is needed to deal with many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the University and National Laboratory Communities cooperate to address these issues. The Universities must increasingly identify challenges facing nuclear power that demand innovative solutions and pursue them. To be drawn into the technology the best students must see a future, a need and identify challenges that they can meet. The University community can provide that vision with help from the National Laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this

  5. How Muslim Students’ Knowledge of Christianity Is Related to Their Attitudes to Mainstream Australia and Australians: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe W. Ata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Outlined below are selected results of a 5-year long national survey which investigated the knowledge, values and attitudes of 430 Year 11 and 12 Muslim students in eight Muslim High schools towards the mainstream Australia and Australians society. The findings reflect a wide spectrum of responses with a strong implication that much work is needed to bring about an appropriate degree of adjustment. Providing awareness sessions to students and parents—both non-Muslims and Muslims—which address critical social, religious and cultural issues including stereotyping and inclusivity, is key.

  6. A national environmental design contest and capstone course for universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhada, Ron K.; Abbas Ghassemi; Deraid Morgan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Waste-management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) of New Mexico has developed and implemented an environmental design contest for competition by universities throughout America. This is the first university environmental design contest anywhere in the world. WERC is a consortium of three universities, a community college, and two national laboratories sponsored by the DOE with the mission of generating resources to address issues associated with environmental management. The contest was structured to give university student groups from all over America an opportunity to exchange information via a national contest for design, development, and testing of an environmental control process. A practical environmental problem was presented to the competing teams. Each team prepared a total plant design for the solution of the environmental problem. They further prepared a working model to demonstrate each solution on a smaller scale. The design stressed not just the technical solution, but also such factors as economics, risk analysis, regulations, public policy and communications. The judging was preformed by experts from academia, industry and government agencies. The awards were based on the written plant design, the small demonstration, as well as presentations by the competing teams. All the criteria noted above(technical excellence, risk analysis, etc.) were weighted in the judging. Seven universities from throughout the United States competed in the first contest held in April 1991. The program fully accomplished its objective of providing a design challenge as well as providing a medium of exchanging information in the environmental area between various regions of the country. Over twenty universities have signed up to compete in next year's contest. In fact many have used the contest problem as part of their capstone design course. This paper presents the experiences of the first design contest and the topic for the second year. (author)

  7. University Transition Challenges for First Year Domestic CALD Students from Refugee Backgrounds: A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eric; Harmsworth, Sarah; Rajaeian, Mohammad Mehdi; Parkes, Geoffrey; Bishop, Sue; AlMansouri, Bassim; Lawrence, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) is used broadly and inclusively to describe communities with diverse language, ethnic background, nationality, dress, traditions, food, societal structures, art and religion characteristics. Domestic CALD people are either refugees or voluntary migrants and have obtained permanent residency or…

  8. Patterns and correlates of self-reported racial discrimination among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, 2008-09: analysis of national survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joan; Paradies, Yin C

    2013-07-01

    There is now considerable evidence that racism is a pernicious and enduring social problem with a wide range of detrimental outcomes for individuals, communities and societies. Although indigenous people worldwide are subjected to high levels of racism, there is a paucity of population-based, quantitative data about the factors associated with their reporting of racial discrimination, about the settings in which such discrimination takes place, and about the frequency with which it is experienced. Such information is essential in efforts to reduce both exposure to racism among indigenous people and the harms associated with such exposure. Weighted data on self-reported racial discrimination from over 7,000 Indigenous Australian adults participating in the 2008-09 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey, a nationally representative survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, were analysed by socioeconomic, demographic and cultural factors. More than one in four respondents (27%) reported experiencing racial discrimination in the past year. Racial discrimination was most commonly reported in public (41% of those reporting any racial discrimination), legal (40%) and work (30%) settings. Among those reporting any racial discrimination, about 40% experienced this discrimination most or all of the time (as opposed to a little or some of the time) in at least one setting. Reporting of racial discrimination peaked in the 35-44 year age group and then declined. Higher reporting of racial discrimination was associated with removal from family, low trust, unemployment, having a university degree, and indicators of cultural identity and participation. Lower reporting of racial discrimination was associated with home ownership, remote residence and having relatively few Indigenous friends. These data indicate that racial discrimination is commonly experienced across a wide variety of settings, with public, legal and work settings identified as

  9. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Australia: The Australian National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Foreman, Joshua; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness among the elderly population globally. Currently, knowledge of the epidemiology of AMD in Australia remains scarce because of a paucity of recent population-based data. To examine the prevalence of AMD in Australia. In this population-based, cross-sectional survey performed from March 11, 2015, to April 18, 2016, a sample of 3098 nonindigenous Australians 50 years and older and 1738 indigenous Australians 40 years and older from 30 geographic areas across Australia were examined. Any AMD, early AMD, intermediate AMD, and late AMD graded according to the Beckman clinical classification system. A total of 4836 individuals were examined, including 3098 nonindigenous Australian (64.1%; 58.9% female vs 41.1% male; age range, 40-92 years; mean [SD] age, 55.0 [10.0] years) and 1738 indigenous Australians (35.9%; 53.6% female vs 46.4% male; age range, 50-98 years; mean [SD] age, 66.6 [9.7] years). A total of 4589 (94.9%, 2946 nonindigenous and 1643 indigenous) participants had retinal photographs in at least 1 eye that were gradable for AMD. The weighted prevalence of early AMD was 14.8% (95% CI, 11.7%-18.6%) and of intermediate AMD was 10.5% (95% CI, 8.3%-13.1%) among nonindigenous Australians. In indigenous Australians, the weighted prevalence of early AMD was 13.8% (95% CI, 9.7%-19.3%) and of intermediate AMD was 5.7% (96% CI, 4.7%-7.0%). Late AMD was found in 0.96% (95% CI, 0.59%-1.55%) of nonindigenous participants (atrophic, 0.72%; neovascular, 0.24%). The prevalence of late AMD increased to 6.7% in participants 80 years or older and was higher in men (1.4% vs 0.61%, P = .02). Only 3 (0.17% [95% CI, 0.04%-0.63%]) indigenous participants had late (atrophic) AMD. Age-related macular degeneration was attributed as the main cause of vision loss (Australia.

  10. Practice and research in Australian massage therapy: a national workforce survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan L; Barnett, Rebecca; Adams, Jon

    2015-06-01

    Massage is the largest complementary medicine profession in Australia, in terms of public utilisation, practitioner distribution, and number of practitioners, and is being increasingly integrated into the Australian health care system. However, despite the increasing importance of massage therapists in Australian health care delivery, or the increased practice and education obligations this may entail, there has been little exploration of practice, research, and education characteristics of the Australian massage therapist workforce. To identify practice, research, and education characteristics among the Australian massage therapist workforce. The Australian massage therapy profession. 301 randomly selected members of the Association of Massage Therapists (Australia). A 15-item, cross-sectional telephone survey. Massage therapists' demographic information, practice characteristics, and education and research characteristics. Most respondents (73.8%) worked 20 hours per week or less practising massage, nearly half of all respondents (46.8%) treated fewer than 10 massage clients per week, and over three-quarters (81.7%) of respondents were self-employed. Massage therapy was the sole source of income for just over half (55.0%) of the study respondents. Only 5.7% of respondents earned over the average wage ($50,000) through their massage activities. Nearly half of all respondents (43.3%) reported regularly exceeding their continuing professional education (CPE) quota mandated by their professional association. However, 21.1% reported struggling to achieve their CPE quota each year. Over one-third of respondents (35.6%) were not interested in acquiring further CPE points beyond minimum requirements. Respondents were significantly more likely to have an active approach to research if they had higher income (p = .015). Multivariate analysis showed factors associated with access to CPE to be the only significant predictors for increased CPE. The massage profession in

  11. Key outcomes from stakeholder workshops at a symposium to inform the development of an Australian national plan for rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molster Caron

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calls have been made for governments to adopt a cohesive approach to rare diseases through the development of national plans. At present, Australia does not have a national plan for rare diseases. To progress such a plan an inaugural Australian Rare Diseases Symposium was held in Western Australia in April 2011. This paper describes the key issues identified by symposium attendees for the development of a national plan, compares these to the content of EUROPLAN and national plans elsewhere and discusses how the outcomes might be integrated for national planning. Methods The symposium was comprised of a series of plenary sessions followed by workshops. The topics covered were; 1 Development of national plans for rare diseases; 2 Patient empowerment; 3 Patient care, support and management; 4 Research and translation; 5 Networks, partnerships and collaboration. All stakeholders within the rare diseases community were invited to participate, including: people affected by rare diseases such as patients, carers, and families; clinicians and allied health practitioners; social and disability services; researchers; patient support groups; industry (e.g. pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies; regulators and policy-makers. Results All of these stakeholder groups were represented at the symposium. Workshop participants indicated the need for a national plan, a national peak body, a standard definition of ‘rare diseases’, education campaigns, lobbying of government, research infrastructure, streamlined whole-of-lifetime service provision, case co-ordination, early diagnosis, support for health professionals and dedicated funding. Conclusions These findings are consistent with frameworks and initiatives being undertaken internationally (such as EUROPLAN, and with national plans in other countries. This implies that the development of an Australian national plan could plausibly draw on frameworks for plan

  12. Absorbing Australian Culture through the Exchange Program at RMIT International University in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Nguyen Ho Phuong

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a case study of four Vietnamese students who have just completed their exchange semester at RMIT University, Melbourne. Results indicate that the students appreciate multiple benefits brought by this experience, including a developing sense of language use, responsibility, dependence, self-awareness, integration, and…

  13. Indigenous Students' Voices: Monitoring Indigenous Student Satisfaction and Retention in a Large Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahsood; Widin, Jacquie

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous student satisfaction with the university learning and teaching experience matters. From a student perspective, retention matters as successful completion of tertiary education improves the life chances of students in relation to employment opportunities, being able to support themselves financially and contributing to the society in…

  14. The Strategic Positioning of Australian Research Universities in the East Asian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Regional tendencies in higher education are increasingly important, for example the common rise of North-East Asian universities in China, Hong Kong SAR, Taiwan and South Korea, and Singapore in South-East Asia, to a major global role, following the prior trajectory of Japan. Though the rapidly modernizing Post-Confucian countries do not…

  15. The Prevalence of Service Excellence and the Use of Business Process Improvement Methodologies in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, Sharone

    2018-01-01

    Service transformation is an increasingly common pursuit in the higher education sector, with university strategic plans frequently featuring a "service excellence" objective and the adoption of leaner and more sustainable service models. Previous studies agree that service excellence is intentional not incidental, and systematic not…

  16. Understanding and Overcoming Barriers: Learning Experiences of Undergraduate Sudanese Students at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gately, Natalie Jane; Ellis, Suzanne; Britton, Katherine; Fleming, Tina

    2017-01-01

    An increase in migration of Sudanese and South Sudanese people to Australia due to civil unrest in their home country has increased the numbers of Sudanese students at university. Migrant experiences, particularly those of English as a second language, can impact negatively on education and learning. Inconsistencies between student scores on…

  17. The Casual Approach to Teacher Education: What Effect Does Casualisation Have for Australian University Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, Christopher J.; Power, Bianca M.

    2014-01-01

    Universities in many countries are struggling to adapt to the competing forces of globalisation, new managerialism, entrepreneurialism and new technologies and quality agenda demands. Diminishing resources caused by restricted funding and an aging and diminishing academic workforce pose barriers. One solution to staffing shortages is the…

  18. Art, Media and Design Research and Practice: Views of Educators in a "New" Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melles, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    During the late 1980s and early 1990s further and higher education in the UK and Australia underwent restructuring, bringing institutional mergers and the transformation of institutes of technology and colleges of education into "new" universities. Vocational fields, including the creative arts and industries of design and film, came…

  19. A Descriptive Study of Professional Staff, and Their Careers, in Australian and UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Professional staff total approximately 23% of staff in universities in the UK, which in 2014/15 was the equivalent of 95,870 individuals (hesa.ac.uk). With their increasing span of responsibility, it is surprising that there has been little research into the careers of these staff. This study, part of a larger careers study, highlights some key…

  20. Going Bush: International Student Perspectives on Living and Studying at an Australian Rural University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgeworth, Kathryn; Eiseman, John

    2007-01-01

    While there is a significant body of literature concerned with the experience of international students arriving to live and study at urban university campuses, very little of this research addresses the issue of overseas students' transition to rural areas. What issues do international students face when they arrive to live and study in rural…

  1. Tertiary Student Attitudes to Bicycle Commuting in a Regional Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whannell, Patricia; Whannell, Robert; White, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide executive management at a regional university with empirical data to justify, or otherwise, a substantial outlay of funds to support bicycle commuting as a viable strategy for the reduction of traffic congestion. Design/methodology/approach: A custom designed questionnaire was completed by 270…

  2. Transcending the National in Australian Studies Bruce Bennett’s Influence on a Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Haag

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There was something peculiar about meeting Bruce Bennett. Chances to see Bruce in Europe were much higher than getting hold of him in Australia. The first time we met was neither in Australia nor in Europe, but in Kolkata, India. This was at the 2008 IASA conference, one of the biennial meetings of the Indian Association for the Study of Australia. Bruce was surrounded by a bevy of Indian scholars, especially students, eager to ask for his advice or simply having a chat about their papers over coffee. Bruce had always had an open ear for everyone. He was interested in talking to students and emerging scholars alike. An eminent authority on Australian literature and culture, Bruce was not only preoccupied with ‘big’ names. He also engaged with young scholars of Australian studies.

  3. Cardiometabolic risk factors in people with psychotic disorders: the second Australian national survey of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletly, Cherrie A; Foley, Debra L; Waterreus, Anna; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; McGrath, John J; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A

    2012-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors in Australian adults with a psychotic disorder. Data were collected during the interview phase of the second Australian survey of psychosis, a population-based survey of Australians aged 18 to 64 years with a psychotic disorder. Body mass index, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured. Participants were asked about diagnoses of relevant medical conditions, medications, smoking and physical activity. Fasting blood samples were analysed for glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was determined using the harmonized criteria developed by the International Diabetes Federation and other bodies. A total of 1087 men (60%) and 738 women (40%) participated. Their mean age was 38.36 (SD 11.16) years; 773 (42%) were aged 18-34 years and 1052 (58%) 35-64 years. Three-quarters were overweight or obese and 82% had abdominal obesity. Almost half were hypertensive. Two-thirds were current smokers and 81% had a lifetime history of smoking. Levels of physical activity were very low. About 30% reported a diagnosis of hypertension or high cholesterol, 20% knew they had diabetes or high blood sugar and 18% had cardiovascular disease. Half of those with self-reported hypertension were taking antihypertensive drugs, and about 40% with hypercholesterolemia or hyperglycaemia were receiving medication for these conditions. Seventy per cent (N = 1286) of participants provided fasting blood samples. Abnormal levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were each found in almost half of participants and almost one-third had elevated fasting glucose. More than half of participants (54.8%) met criteria for metabolic syndrome. Australians living with psychosis have high rates of cardiometabolic risk factors. There are a number of obvious targets for prevention and treatment, including obesity (especially in women), smoking

  4. Leading the Quality Management of Online Learning Environments in Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Dale; Palmer, Stuart; Munro, Judy; Solomonides, Ian; Gosper, Maree; Hicks, Margaret; Sankey, Michael; Allan, Garry; Hollenbeck, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of the first year of a nationally funded Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) project on the quality management of online learning environments by and through distributed leadership. The project is being undertaken by five Australian universities with major commitments to online and distance education.…

  5. Cracking the Code: Assessing Institutional Compliance with the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Suzanne E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of institutional authorship policies as required by the "Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research" (the "Code") (National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the Australian Research Council (ARC) & Universities Australia (UA) 2007), and assesses them for Code compliance.…

  6. Validity of the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator in South Australian glossectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S S; Frauenfelder, C; Wong, D; Edwards, S; Krishnan, S; Ooi, E H

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate selection of tongue cancer patients considering surgery is critical in ensuring optimal outcomes. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program ('ACS-NSQIP') risk calculator was developed to assess patients' 30-day post-operative risk, providing surgeons with information to guide decision making. A retrospective review of 30-day actual mortality and morbidity of tongue cancer patients was undertaken to investigate the validity of this tool for South Australian patients treated from 2005 to 2015. One hundred and twenty patients had undergone glossectomy. Predicted length of stay using the risk calculator was significantly different from actual length of stay. Predicted mortality and other complications were found to be similar to actual outcomes. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator was found to be effective in predicting post-operative complication rates in South Australian tongue cancer patients. However, significant discrepancies in predicted and actual length of stay may limit its use in this population.

  7. The rise and fall of Australian physical activity policy 1996 - 2006: a national review framed in an international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellew, Bill; Schöeppe, Stephanie; Bull, Fiona C; Bauman, Adrian

    2008-07-31

    This paper provides an historical review of physical activity policy development in Australia for a period spanning a decade since the release of the US Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health in 1996 and including the 2004 WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. Using our definition of 'HARDWIRED' policy criteria, this Australian review is compared with an international perspective of countries with established national physical activity policies and strategies (New Zealand, Canada, Brazil, Scotland, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Finland). Methods comprised a literature and policy review, audit of relevant web sites, document searches and surveys of international stakeholders. All these selected countries embraced multi-strategic policies and undertook monitoring of physical activity through national surveys. Few committed to policy of more than three years duration and none undertook systematic evaluation of national policy implementation. This Australian review highlights phases of innovation and leadership in physical activity-related policy, as well as periods of stagnation and decline; early efforts were amongst the best in the world but by the mid-point of this review (the year 2000), promising attempts towards development of a national intersectoral policy framework were thwarted by reforms in the Federal Sport and Recreation sector. Several well received reviews of evidence on good practices in physical activity and public health were produced in the period but leadership and resources were lacking to implement the policies and programs indicated. Latterly, widespread publicity and greatly increased public and political interest in chronic disease prevention, (especially in obesity and type 2 diabetes) have dominated the framework within which Australian policy deliberations have occurred. Finally, a national physical activity policy framework for the Health sector emerged, but not as a policy vision that was

  8. Balancing Study and Paid Work: The Experiences of Construction Undergraduates in an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lingard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire survey was undertaken among third year studentsenrolled in the University of Melbourne’s Bachelor of Property andConstruction (BPC programme. The survey explored students’experiences in balancing paid work with study. Hours spent in paidemployment were at least as long and, in many cases, were inexcess of hours spent at university. While work was not perceivedby students to pose a difficulty for attending lectures and tutorials,students indicated that their paid work made it difficult for them toengage in independent learning activities, such as using libraryresources or preparing for classes by reading beforehand. Twoscales, previously used in other countries to measure students’burnout and engagement, were tested. Both scales were foundto be valid and reliable in that the factorial structures foundin previous studies were confirmed and acceptable internalconsistency reliability coefficients were generated for each of thescales’ component factors. This opens the way for more in-depthmultivariate analysis to determine the linkages between workhours, work-study conflict and students’ burnout or engagementwith university life.

  9. Australian University Students' Coping Strategies and Use of Pharmaceutical Stimulants as Cognitive Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charmaine; Forlini, Cynthia; Partridge, Brad; Hall, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    There are reports that some university students are using prescription stimulants for non-medical 'pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (PCE)' to improve alertness, focus, memory, and mood in an attempt to manage the demands of study at university. Purported demand for PCEs in academic contexts have been based on incomplete understandings of student motivations, and often based on untested assumptions about the context within which stimulants are used. They may represent attempts to cope with biopsychosocial stressors in university life by offsetting students' inadequate coping responses, which in turn may affect their cognitive performance. This study aimed to identify (a) what strategies students adopted to cope with the stress of university life and, (b) to assess whether students who have used stimulants for PCE exhibit particular stress or coping patterns. We interviewed 38 university students (with and without PCE experience) about their experience of managing student life, specifically their: educational values; study habits; achievement; stress management; getting assistance; competing activities and demands; health habits; and cognitive enhancement practices. All interview transcripts were coded into themes and analyzed. Our thematic analysis revealed that, generally, self-rated coping ability decreased as students' self-rated stress level increased. Students used emotion- and problem-focused coping for the most part and adjustment-focused coping to a lesser extent. Avoidance, an emotion-focused coping strategy, was the most common, followed by problem-focused coping strategies, the use of cognition on enhancing substances, and planning and monitoring of workload. PCE users predominantly used avoidant emotion-focused coping strategies until they no longer mitigated the distress of approaching deadlines resulting in the use of prescription stimulants as a substance-based problem-focused coping strategy. Our study suggests that students who choose coping

  10. Australian university students’ coping strategies and use of pharmaceutical stimulants as cognitive enhancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine eJensen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are reports that some university students are using prescription stimulants for non-medical ‘pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (PCE’ to improve alertness, focus, memory, and mood in an attempt to manage the demands of study at university. Purported demand for PCEs in academic contexts have been based on incomplete understandings of student motivations, and often based on untested assumptions about the context within which stimulants are used. They may represent attempts to cope with biopsychosocial stressors in university life by offsetting students’ inadequate coping responses, which in turn may affect their cognitive performance. This study aimed to identify (a what strategies students adopted to cope with the stress of university life and, (b to assess whether students who have used stimulants for PCE exhibit particular stress or coping patterns.Methods: We interviewed 38 university students (with and without PCE experience about their experience of managing student life, specifically their educational values, study habits and achievement, stress management, getting assistance, competing activities and responsibilities, health habits, and cognitive enhancement practices. All interview transcripts were coded into themes and analysed.Results: Our thematic analysis revealed that, generally, self-rated coping ability decreased as students’ self-rated stress level increased. Students used emotion- and problem-focused coping for the most part and adjustment-focused coping to a lesser extent. Avoidance, an emotion-focused coping strategy, was the most common, followed by problem-focused coping strategies, the use of cognition on enhancing substances, and planning and monitoring of workload. PCE users predominantly used avoidant emotion-focused coping strategies until they no longer mitigated the distress of approaching deadlines resulting in the use of prescription stimulants as a substance-based problem-focused coping

  11. Banned prints in the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Švent

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the formation and operation of the D-collection (a special collection of banned prints in the National and University Library (NUL. The functioning of the collection was constantly faced with different complications caused either by legislation or by librarians themselves, due to a too strict adherence to some unwritten rules ("better one more then one less". In the 50-years period, a unique collection of at that tirne banned prints was formed,complemented by over 17000 articles indexed from different periodicals.

  12. Academics as Part-Time Marketers in University Offshore Programs: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, David; Ewan, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Australian universities maintain almost 900 offshore programs delivered to more than 100 000 students, primarily in the nations of Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong (Universities Australia, 2009; IDP, 2009a). Although offshore students comprise an estimated 30 per cent of international student enrolments at Australian universities (IDP,…

  13. How can university and national libraries achieve deeper collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Follett

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Governments are placing great store in "the knowledge economy" as a key engine for economic and social development in a post-manufacturing world. One result is an acceptance for much increased expenditure on research and advanced teaching and there is much debate, at least in the UK, about how these matters should be organised. Since much of the research (excluding defence and virtually all the graduate teaching will be undertaken in the universities it follows that one key question in the UK is just what proportion and number of the 100 UK universities should be truly "research-intensive"? The trend, although it can be exaggerated, is towards greater concentration and last year I estimated (Follett, 2002 that the faculty in about 12 of the universities will spend on average 50% of their working year on research and graduate teaching, and 50% on undergraduate teaching. In another 30 universities faculty will spend about 25% of their annual working year on research and 75% on undergraduate teaching. In the remaining 60 universities the time available for research will be much smaller. A second key question relates to the "research infrastructure" needed to support the researchers. It is my contention that access to world-class "research information resources" - at a reasonable cost - is a pre-requisite for any nation's research base. In parallel, of course, the actual means of providing those "research information resources" is changing rapidly and the existing provision through "local" research libraries in individual universities or research institutes, often set alongside other services from the "national" library, is under both financial and technological strain: · Electronic provision of delivering research information "direct to the desk-top" has inverted the means of delivery. This has been developed most strongly in the natural sciences but is likely to develop in all areas of research. · The generation of primary research data on a

  14. Meeting of the Australian Scanned Probe Microscope Society, University of Sydney, February 16-19, 1999: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brenden J.

    2000-03-01

    In February 1999, the second Scanned Probe Microscopy conference (SPM II) of the Australian Scanned Probe Microscope Society was held in Sydney, Australia, in conjunction with the fifth biennial symposium of the Australian Microbeam Analysis Society (AMAS V). This issue of Microscopy and Microanalysis presents selected full-length papers arising from that meeting.

  15. Alcohol industry sponsorship and alcohol-related harms in Australian university sportspeople/athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Lynott, Dermot; Miller, Peter G

    2013-05-01

    Although there is evidence that alcohol sponsorship in sport is related to greater drinking, there is no empirical research on whether alcohol sponsorship is associated with alcohol-related harms. We examined whether there is an association between receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship, and attendance at alcohol sponsor's drinking establishments (e.g. bars), and alcohol-related aggression and antisocial behaviour in university students who play sport. University sportspeople (n = 652) completed surveys (response rate >80%) assessing receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship, attendance at sponsor's establishments and confounders [i.e. age, gender, sport type, location and alcohol consumption measured by Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test--alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C) scores]. Participants also completed measures assessing displays and receipt of aggressive and antisocial behaviours (e.g. assaults, unwanted sexual advance, vandalism). Logistic regression models including confounders and reported attendance at alcohol sponsor's establishments showed that sportspeople receiving alcohol industry sponsorship were more likely to have been the victim of aggression (adjusted odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.22-5.64). Attending an alcohol sponsor's establishment was not associated with higher rates of other aggressive or antisocial behaviour. However, significant associations where found between AUDIT-C scores and having displayed and received aggression, and having damaged or had property damaged. Male sportspeople were more likely to have displayed and received aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Higher AUDIT-C scores, gender and receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship were associated with alcohol-related aggression/antisocial behaviours in university sportspeople. Sport administrators should consider action to reduce the harms associated with excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol industry sponsorship in sport. © 2012 Australasian Professional

  16. INCUBATORS WITHIN UNIVERSITY AND CLUSTERED CONTEXTS: CASES OF NATIONAL CHIAO TUNG UNIVERSITY (NCTU AND NATIONAL TSING HUA UNIVERSITY (NTHU INCUBATORS IN HSINCHU, TAIWAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Akmaliah Adham

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research literature on business incubators has highlighted the significance of clustered locational contexts and networking as key to an incubator's success. Using the case study approach, this study aimed to test the validity of this framework for explaining the level of success of the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU and National Tsing Hua University (NTHU Incubators in Hsinchu, Taiwan – both of which are highly-networked, cluster-centric and university-based. In-depth interviews were conducted with the managers of both incubators, and these were followed by information gathering on university patents and knowledge transfers from the research and development (R&D office at each university. Analysis found that the incubators' locational contexts determined the degree and manner of their networking, but their profitability and growth potential were influenced by many other factors working in combination. Satisfying their sponsors' requirements and serving their core functions through sound management and strategic planning appeared to be the key to achieving profitability and sustainability, with benefits for all stakeholders. These constructs provide directions for more research on the performance of incubators and other business entities that are located within university and clustered contexts.

  17. 77 FR 32952 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence University. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of...

  18. 78 FR 32241 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the...

  19. Does Living Closer to a University Increase Educational Attainment? A Longitudinal Study of Aspirations, University Entry, and Elite University Enrolment of Australian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Philip D; Jerrim, John; Anders, Jake; Astell-Burt, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Geography remains a critical factor that shapes the development of aspirations, attainment, and choice in young people. We focus on the role of geography on university entry and aspirations due to the increasing requirement in society for a higher education qualification for access to prestigious positions in society. Using a large representative longitudinal database (N = 11,999; 50 % male; 27 % provincial or rural; 2 % Indigenous) of Australia youth we explore the association between distance to a university campus and the critical attainment outcomes of university entry and enrolment in an elite university as well as critical predictors of these outcomes in access to information resources (i.e., university outreach programs) and university aspirations. In doing so, we provide new insight into distance effects, and the extent that these are due to selection, cost, and community influence. Our findings suggest that distance is significantly associated with both university expectations and entrance, with an especially large impact upon young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds. However, we also find little evidence that distance is related to attending a university led information session. Our conclusion is that distance effects cannot be fully explained by selection in terms of academic achievement and socioeconomic status, and that anticipatory decisions and costs are the most likely drivers of the distance effect.

  20. Partnering Healthy@Work: an Australian university-government partnership facilitating policy-relevant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Kim; Venn, Alison; Jarman, Lisa; Seal, Judy; Teale, Brook; Scott, Jennifer; Sanderson, Kristy

    2017-12-01

    Research funding is increasingly supporting collaborations between knowledge users and researchers. Partnering Healthy@Work (pH@W), an inaugural recipient of funding through Australia's Partnership for Better Health Grants scheme, was a 5-year partnership between the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Service (TSS). The partnerships purpose was to evaluate a comprehensive workplace health promotion programme (Healthy@Work) targeting 30 000 public sector employees; generating new knowledge and influencing workplace health promotion policy and decision-making. This mixed methods study evaluates the partnership between policy-makers and academics and identifies strategies that enabled pH@W to deliver key project outcomes. A pH@W document review was conducted, two partnership assessment tools completed and semi-structured interviews conducted with key policy-makers and academics. Analysis of the partnership assessment tools and interviews found that pH@W had reached a strong level of collaboration. Policy-relevant knowledge was generated about the health of TSS employees and their engagement with workplace health promotion. Knowledge exchange of a conceptual and instrumental nature occurred and was facilitated by the shared grant application, clear governance structures, joint planning, regular information exchange between researchers and policy-makers and research student placements in the TSS. Flexibility and acknowledgement of different priorities and perspectives of partner organizations were identified as critical factors for enabling effective partnership working and research relevance. Academic-policy-maker partnerships can be a powerful mechanism for improving policy relevance of research, but need to incorporate strategies that facilitate regular input from researchers and policy-makers in order to achieve this. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  1. The nurses' self-concept instrument (NSCI): a comparison of domestic and international student nurses' professional self-concepts from a large Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Elizabeth; Craven, Rhonda; Denson, Nida

    2012-08-01

    Professional self-concept is a critical driver of job satisfaction. In Australia, as international nursing enrolments rise, nursing is increasingly characterised by a professional body of international nurses who may differ from domestic Australian nurses in their nursing self-concept. At present, little is known about the extent to which domestic and international students nurses' self-concepts may differ. The present study aimed to elucidate and contrast domestic and international nursing students' self-concepts from one large Australian university. A total of 253 domestic (n=218) and international (n=35) undergraduate nursing students from a large public university in Sydney, Australia completed the Nurses' Self-Concept Instrument (NSCI). Multiple-Indicator-Multiple-Indicator-Cause (MIMIC) modelling was used to assess the effects of student group (domestic and international) on the latent self-concept factors of the NSCI. Domestic and international students' professional self-concepts were similarly high. MIMIC modelling demonstrated that domestic students had a higher patient care self-concept in comparison to international students. Results imply that it may be useful for Australian universities to foster strategies that enhance specific domains of self-concepts (e.g., care) which may be underdeveloped for at least some cultural groups within the international nursing student population compared with domestic nursing students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Longitudinal Study of the Predictors of Perceived Procedural Justice in Australian University Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the factors that predict employees' perceptions of procedural justice in university settings. The paper also reviews the ethical aspects of justice and psychological contracts within employment relationships. The study examined the predictors of perceived procedural justice in a two-wave longitudinal sample of 945 employees from 13 universities by applying the Job Demands-Resources theoretical model of stress. The proposed predictors were classified into two categories: Job demands of work pressure and work-home conflict; and job resources of job security, autonomy, trust in senior management, and trust in supervisor. The predictor model also examined job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment, demographic (age, gender, tenure, role) and individual characteristics (negative affectivity, job involvement) as well as Time 1 (T1) perceptions of procedural justice to ensure that tests were rigorous. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that job satisfaction at T1 was the strongest predictor of perceived procedural justice at Time 2. Employees' trust in senior management, and their length of tenure also positively predicted justice perceptions. There were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups, as non-academic employees' level of job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and their length of organizational tenure predicted procedural justice perceptions, whereas for academics, only job satisfaction predicted perceived justice. For the "all staff" category, job satisfaction was a dominant and enduring predictor of justice, and employees' trust in senior management also predicted justice. Results highlight the importance of workplace factors in enhancing fair procedures to encourage reciprocity from employees. As perceived procedural justice is also conceptually linked to the psychological contract between employees-employers, it is possible that employees' levels of job satisfaction and

  3. A Longitudinal Study of the Predictors of Procedural Justice in Australian University Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - This study examined the factors that predict employees’ perceptions of procedural justice in university settings. The paper also reviews the ethical aspects of justice and psychological contracts within employment relationships. Design/Methodology/Approach - The study examined the predictors of perceived procedural justice in a two-wave longitudinal sample of 945 employees from 13 universities by applying the Job Demands-Resources theoretical model of stress. The proposed predictors were classified into two categories: job demands of work pressure and work-home conflict; and job resources of job security, autonomy, trust in senior management, and trust in supervisor. The predictor model also examined job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment, demographic (age, gender, tenure, role and individual characteristics (negative affectivity, job involvement as well as Time 1 (T1 perceptions of procedural justice to ensure that tests were rigorous. Findings - A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that job satisfaction at T1 was the strongest predictor of perceived procedural justice at Time 2. Employees' trust in senior management, and their length of tenure also positively predicted justice perceptions. There were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups, as non-academic employees' level of job satisfaction, trust in senior management and their length of organizational tenure predicted procedural justice perceptions, whereas for academics, only job satisfaction predicted perceived justice. For the all staff category, job satisfaction was a dominant and enduring predictor of justice, and employees' trust in senior management also predicted justice. Research limitations/implications - Results highlight the importance of workplace factors in enhancing fair procedures to encourage reciprocity from employees. As perceived procedural justice is also conceptually linked to the

  4. A Longitudinal Study of the Predictors of Perceived Procedural Justice in Australian University Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H.; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the factors that predict employees' perceptions of procedural justice in university settings. The paper also reviews the ethical aspects of justice and psychological contracts within employment relationships. Design/Methodology/Approach: The study examined the predictors of perceived procedural justice in a two-wave longitudinal sample of 945 employees from 13 universities by applying the Job Demands-Resources theoretical model of stress. The proposed predictors were classified into two categories: Job demands of work pressure and work-home conflict; and job resources of job security, autonomy, trust in senior management, and trust in supervisor. The predictor model also examined job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment, demographic (age, gender, tenure, role) and individual characteristics (negative affectivity, job involvement) as well as Time 1 (T1) perceptions of procedural justice to ensure that tests were rigorous. Findings: A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that job satisfaction at T1 was the strongest predictor of perceived procedural justice at Time 2. Employees' trust in senior management, and their length of tenure also positively predicted justice perceptions. There were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups, as non-academic employees' level of job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and their length of organizational tenure predicted procedural justice perceptions, whereas for academics, only job satisfaction predicted perceived justice. For the “all staff” category, job satisfaction was a dominant and enduring predictor of justice, and employees' trust in senior management also predicted justice. Research limitations/implications: Results highlight the importance of workplace factors in enhancing fair procedures to encourage reciprocity from employees. As perceived procedural justice is also conceptually linked to the psychological contract

  5. STAFF SATISFACTION ESTIMATION SYSTEMS IN RUSSIAN NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Novokreshchenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study practical approaches to the assessment of employee satisfaction in higher education institutions; to identify and determine the maturity level of assessment systems established in the universities.Methods. The methods involve general and special methods of scientific knowledge such as analogy, systemic and structural analysis, content analysis, and comparison method.Results. The paper presents the results of practical research on Russian universities activities on the sphere of the employee satisfaction assessment. 29 Russian national research universities were selected for the analysis. The levels of systems development of a satisfaction assessment of the personnel and approaches to such procedures are designated on the basis of the content of internal university documents. It is noted that development of satisfaction assessment systems of the personnel of high schools, complex revealing both subjective, and its objective indicators will allow the staff to make more well-founded administrative decisions, and to raise interest of employees in evolution of activity of educational institution; expenses reduction by high school of time and intellectual resources can become an economic benefit.Scientific novelty and practical significance. Material, presented in the paper, can be useful to employees of HR and quality control departments of higher educational institutions of Russia; as well as to managers who work in the education system and participate in the work of staff satisfaction evaluation. Theoretical aspects of the paper can become the basis for the formation and development of models of staff satisfaction evaluation systems and the starting point of any research related to the development of guidelines for the satisfaction staff assessment.

  6. A longitudinal study of the implementation experiences of the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme: investigating transformative policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Dickinson, Helen

    2017-08-17

    Internationally there has been a growth in the use of publicly funded service markets as a mechanism to deliver health and social services. This has accompanied the emergence of 'self-directed care' in a number of different policy areas including disability and aged care - often referred to as 'personalisation' (Giaimo and Manow, Comp. Pol Stud 32:967-1000, 1999; Needham, Public Money Manage 30:136-8, 2010; [Hood], [The Idea of Joined-up Government: A Historical Perspective], [2005]; Klijn and Koppenjan, Public Manage 2:437-54, 2000, Greener, Policy Polit 36:93-108, 2008). These reforms are underpinned by an idea that individuals should be placed in control of their own service needs, given funding directly by government and encouraged to exercise choice and control through purchasing their own services. A major challenge for governments in charge of these reforms is determining the best way to structure and govern emerging service markets markets. Given the growing international embrace of market-based reform mechanisms to provide essential services to citizens, finding ways to ensure they promote, and not diminish, people's health and wellbeing is vital. The Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is Australia's first national approach to the use of personalised budgets. The program of research outlined in this paper brings together streams from a range of different studies in order to investigate the implementation of the NDIS longitudinally across different administrative levels of government, service providers and scheme participants. This programme of research will make a contribution to our understanding of the Australian scheme and how individualised funding operates within this context, but will also generate much needed evidence that will have relevance to other jurisdictions and help fill a gap in the evidence base.

  7. Teaching Humanities at the National University of la Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Leopoldo E

    2003-10-01

    In this article the author begins by giving a brief history of medical education in Argentina, then provides some background information on the National University of La Plata. He describes two major initiatives at La Plata: a new and pioneering admission policy (implemented in 1993) and a change in the number of hours and years in the curriculum. He then looks back to the introduction in 1976 of La Plata's medical humanities program. Over its 20 year existence, the program has undergone a number of changes in response both to students' interests and financial concerns. The revised humanities curriculum now consists of four elective courses: medicine and literature, anthropology, history of medicine, and "medical kalology" (which focuses on music and dance). Unfortunately, the program, while it has been well received by both students and faculty and has inspired programs at other Argentinean schools, is threatened by Argentina's economic crisis.

  8. Evaluation of Australian dermatological postoperative patient information leaflets: Should we have a national checklist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, William Tn; O'Sullivan, Niamh-Anna; Donnelly, Alan

    2017-04-20

    Patient information leaflets (PILs) are frequently provided to patients following dermatological surgery to provide advice and reassurance in the community. This evaluation reviewed the guidance specified in postoperative PILs across the 40 Australian dermatology teaching departments and clinics. All 40 departments and clinics were identified and asked to provide their postoperative information leaflets on sutured wound care (preferable) or excision biopsy (September-October 2015). For each PIL, 10 preselected parameters were evaluated. In total, 28/40 (70%) of units responded. From these units, 11/28 (39.3%) stated they do not use a postoperative PIL. Of the 17 units that provided PILs, the mode minimum dressing duration was 24 (6/17; 35.3%) and 48 h (6/17; 35.3%). For haemostatic advice, 12 PILs specified the time to press on a bleeding wound, with the most common advice being 10 (3/12; 25%) and 20 min (3/12; 25%). Of the 14 PILs that provided analgesic advice, the mode information suggested using paracetamol only and avoiding aspirin (4/14, 28.6%). Two or more signs of infection were stated in 11/17 (64.7%) PILs; 7/17 (41.2%) advised applying petroleum jelly to the wound, almost all PILs highlighted the contact for postoperative problems 16/17 (94.1%), and 5/17 (29.4%) leaflets mentioned scarring. Altogether 8/17 (47.1%) of PILs advised on the timeframe until active exercise could resume postoperatively. Guidance provided in Australian postoperative dermatological PILs is heterogeneous. A consensus checklist or template would be beneficial and ensure that advice provided to patients is more consistent; this could be adapted for local factors. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  9. The integration of complementary therapies in Australian general practice: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M; Penman, Stephen; Pirotta, Marie; Da Costa, Cliff

    2005-12-01

    Australian general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes toward and use of a range of complementary therapies (CTs) were determined through a self-administered postal survey sent to a random sample of 2000 Australian GPs. The survey canvassed GPs' opinions as to the harmfulness and effectiveness of CTs; current levels of training and interest in further training; personal use of, and use in practice of, CTs; referrals to CT; practitioners; appropriateness for GPs to practice and for government regulation; perceived patient demand and the need for undergraduate education. The response rate was 33.2%. Based on GPs' responses, complementary therapies could be classified into: nonmedicinal and nonmanipulative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage, meditation, yoga, and hypnosis, that were seen to be highly effective and safe; medicinal and manipulative therapies, including chiropractic, Chinese herbal medicine, osteopathy, herbal medicine, vitamin and mineral therapy, naturopathy, and homeopathy, which more GPs considered potentially harmful than potentially effective; and esoteric therapies, such as spiritual healing, aromatherapy, and reflexology, which were seen to be relatively safe yet also relatively ineffective. The risks of CTs were seen to mainly arise from incorrect, inadequate, or delayed diagnoses and interactions between complementary medications and pharmaceuticals, rather than the specific risks of the therapies themselves. Nonmedicinal therapies along with chiropractic are widely accepted in Australia and can be considered mainstream. GPs are open to training in complementary therapies, and better communication between patients and GPs about use of CTs is required to minimize the risk of adverse events. There is also a need to prioritize and provide funding for further research into the potential adverse events from these therapies and other therapies currently lacking an evidence base.

  10. Assessing Peer and Parental Influence on the Religious Attitudes and Attendance of Young Churchgoers: Exploring the Australian National Church Life Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; Penny, Gemma; Powell, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Drawing on data from the 2011 Australian National Church Life Survey (NCLS), this study was designed to assess peer and parental influence on frequency of church attendance, attitude toward church, and attitude toward Christianity among a sample of 6256 young churchgoers between the ages of eight and 14 years, attending a range of denominations,…

  11. What Counts as Quality in Education? Australian College of Educators (ACE) National Conference Proceedings (Adelaide, Australia, September 11-12, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirelli, Paola S., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Australian College of Educators (ACE) National Conference was held September 11-12 in Adelaide, Australia, with the theme, "What counts as quality in education?" There has been concern with a general downward trend in Australia's performance on international measures of student achievement, but there is equal concern over the…

  12. Retinoblastoma: a recent experience at the National University Hospital, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, LeLe; Chan, Yiong Huak; Yeoh, Eng Juh; Tan, Poh Lin; Quah, Thuan Chong

    2009-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is a very rare disease. There were 30 cases of retinoblastoma diagnosed and treated at National University Hospital (NUH). A retrospective chart review was performed on the medical records of 30 patients who were diagnosed with retinoblastoma between 1995 and 2008 at the Department of Paediatrics, National University Hospital, Singapore. The median age at diagnosis was 1.6 years (range, 0-5.9) with a median follow-up of 1.8 years (range, 0.1 to 11.6). The median time from presenting signs to the time of diagnosis was 5.2 months (range, 0-25.2). Common presenting signs of retinoblastoma were identified; the most common of which were leukocoria (50.0%), squinting (13.3%), poor vision (10.0%), strabismus (6.6%) and unknown (33.3%). Of the 30 patients, 10 were from Singapore whilst the other 20 patients were from the surrounding countries. Twelve patients had bilateral disease at the time of diagnosis, while 18 had unilateral disease. Staging information was available in 27 patients. Enucleation was performed in 25 of 30 patients. Radiation therapy was given in 3 patients in 1995 (bilateral disease), 2001 (bilateral disease) and 2003 (unilateral disease). At the time of analysis, 19 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. Overall 5-year survival for the cohort was 88.1% [95% confidence interval (CI), 88.0-100] and event-free survival for the whole cohort was 74.2% (95% CI, 55.8-92.6). In our limited experience, the importance of collaboration and standardisation of the staging system, raising awareness and education of primary healthcare providers and parents are strongly stressed.

  13. A global partnership in medical education between Duke University and the National University of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R Sanders; Casey, Patrick J; Kamei, Robert K; Buckley, Edward G; Soo, Khee Chee; Merson, Michael H; Krishnan, Ranga K; Dzau, Victor J

    2008-02-01

    Duke University and the National University of Singapore (NUS) have partnered to launch a new medical school that brings the American style of postbaccalaureate medical education to Asia. The new institution, called the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (GMS) and located in Singapore adjacent to the Singapore General Hospital, admitted its inaugural class of students representing citizens of seven nations in August 2007. The project represents an investment of more than $350 million from three ministries of the Singapore government, and a commitment on Duke's part to provide senior leadership and recruit faculty from Duke, from other international locales, and from within Singapore itself. Graduating students who complete the four-year Duke curriculum will receive an MD degree awarded jointly by Duke and NUS, thereby distinguishing this school from medical education in most Asian institutions that award an MBBS degree after a five-year period of study that follows directly from secondary school. The emphasis of the Duke-NUS GMS is to prepare physician-scientists for academic careers, with plans for 20% of each class to complete a combined MD/PhD degree. This article describes events leading up to this partnership and details of the relationship, including curriculum, organizational structure, milestones, and goals.

  14. Successful implementation of diabetes audits in Australia: The Australian National Diabetes Information Audit and Benchmarking (ANDIAB) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Colagiuri, S; Flack, J R

    2018-04-06

    We developed and implemented a national audit and benchmarking programme to describe the clinical status of people with diabetes attending specialist diabetes services in Australia. The Australian National Diabetes Information Audit and Benchmarking (ANDIAB) initiative was established as a quality audit activity. De-identified data on demographic, clinical, biochemical and outcome items were collected from specialist diabetes services across Australia to provide cross-sectional data on people with diabetes attending specialist centres at least biennially during the years 1998 to 2011. In total, 38 155 sets of data were collected over the eight ANDIAB audits. Each ANDIAB audit achieved its primary objective to collect, collate, analyse, audit and report clinical diabetes data in Australia. Each audit resulted in the production of a pooled data report, as well as individual site reports allowing comparison and benchmarking against other participating sites. The ANDIAB initiative resulted in the largest cross-sectional national de-identified dataset describing the clinical status of people with diabetes attending specialist diabetes services in Australia. ANDIAB showed that people treated by specialist services had a high burden of diabetes complications. This quality audit activity provided a framework to guide planning of healthcare services. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns and correlates of self-reported racial discrimination among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, 2008–09: analysis of national survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is now considerable evidence that racism is a pernicious and enduring social problem with a wide range of detrimental outcomes for individuals, communities and societies. Although indigenous people worldwide are subjected to high levels of racism, there is a paucity of population-based, quantitative data about the factors associated with their reporting of racial discrimination, about the settings in which such discrimination takes place, and about the frequency with which it is experienced. Such information is essential in efforts to reduce both exposure to racism among indigenous people and the harms associated with such exposure. Methods Weighted data on self-reported racial discrimination from over 7,000 Indigenous Australian adults participating in the 2008–09 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey, a nationally representative survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, were analysed by socioeconomic, demographic and cultural factors. Results More than one in four respondents (27%) reported experiencing racial discrimination in the past year. Racial discrimination was most commonly reported in public (41% of those reporting any racial discrimination), legal (40%) and work (30%) settings. Among those reporting any racial discrimination, about 40% experienced this discrimination most or all of the time (as opposed to a little or some of the time) in at least one setting. Reporting of racial discrimination peaked in the 35–44 year age group and then declined. Higher reporting of racial discrimination was associated with removal from family, low trust, unemployment, having a university degree, and indicators of cultural identity and participation. Lower reporting of racial discrimination was associated with home ownership, remote residence and having relatively few Indigenous friends. Conclusions These data indicate that racial discrimination is commonly experienced across a wide variety of settings, with public

  16. Logistic support provided to Australian disaster medical assistance teams: results of a national survey of team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background It is likely that calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, the present study was designed to evaluate the Australian DMAT experience and the need for logistic support. Methods Data were collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Australian DMAT deployments from the 2004 Asian Tsunami disaster. Results The response rate for this survey was 50% (59/118). Most of the personnel had deployed to the South East Asian Tsunami affected areas. The DMAT members had significant clinical and international experience. There was unanimous support for dedicated logistic support with 80% (47/59) strongly agreeing. Only one respondent (2%) disagreed with teams being self sufficient for a minimum of 72 hours. Most felt that transport around the site was not a problem (59%; 35/59), however, 34% (20/59) felt that transport to the site itself was problematic. Only 37% (22/59) felt that pre-deployment information was accurate. Communication with local health providers and other agencies was felt to be adequate by 53% (31/59) and 47% (28/59) respectively, while only 28% (17/59) felt that documentation methods were easy to use and reliable. Less than half (47%; 28/59) felt that equipment could be moved easily between areas by team members and 37% (22/59) that packaging enabled materials to be found easily. The maximum safe container weight was felt to be between 20 and 40 kg by 58% (34/59). Conclusions This study emphasises the importance of dedicated logistic support for DMAT and the need for teams to be self sufficient for a minimum period of 72 hours. There is a need for accurate pre deployment information to guide resource prioritisation with clearly labelled pre packaging to assist access on site. Container weights should be restricted to between

  17. Baseline map of organic carbon in Australian soil to support national carbon accounting and monitoring under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A; Webster, Richard; Bui, Elisabeth N; Baldock, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    We can effectively monitor soil condition-and develop sound policies to offset the emissions of greenhouse gases-only with accurate data from which to define baselines. Currently, estimates of soil organic C for countries or continents are either unavailable or largely uncertain because they are derived from sparse data, with large gaps over many areas of the Earth. Here, we derive spatially explicit estimates, and their uncertainty, of the distribution and stock of organic C in the soil of Australia. We assembled and harmonized data from several sources to produce the most comprehensive set of data on the current stock of organic C in soil of the continent. Using them, we have produced a fine spatial resolution baseline map of organic C at the continental scale. We describe how we made it by combining the bootstrap, a decision tree with piecewise regression on environmental variables and geostatistical modelling of residuals. Values of stock were predicted at the nodes of a 3-arc-sec (approximately 90 m) grid and mapped together with their uncertainties. We then calculated baselines of soil organic C storage over the whole of Australia, its states and territories, and regions that define bioclimatic zones, vegetation classes and land use. The average amount of organic C in Australian topsoil is estimated to be 29.7 t ha(-1) with 95% confidence limits of 22.6 and 37.9 t ha(-1) . The total stock of organic C in the 0-30 cm layer of soil for the continent is 24.97 Gt with 95% confidence limits of 19.04 and 31.83 Gt. This represents approximately 3.5% of the total stock in the upper 30 cm of soil worldwide. Australia occupies 5.2% of the global land area, so the total organic C stock of Australian soil makes an important contribution to the global carbon cycle, and it provides a significant potential for sequestration. As the most reliable approximation of the stock of organic C in Australian soil in 2010, our estimates have important applications. They could support

  18. University psychiatry in Italy: organisation and integration of university clinics and the National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Maria Furlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the Italian psychiatric system, community-based care has become increasingly important and widespread since the national reform of 1978. This report aims to provide an overview of the involvement of university medical schools in this process, considering their responsibility for teaching and training specialist practitioners and professionals. METHODS: The study was carried out between early 2010 and February 2011. An 18-items, self-administered, questionnaire was designed to investigate the number of faculty members that are responsible both for running a clinical ward and for providing community-based healthcare. RESULTS: Nine out of 53 faculty members (17% manage a Mental Health Department, 9 (17% manage a University Department, and 2 (3.8% manage both types of department. Less than half of the teachers have full responsibility (hospital and community; however the percentage reaches 73.2% if we include the hospital wards open to the community emergencies. The remaining 26.8% have no responsibility for community psychiatry. Moreover there were undoubtedly still too many universities with specialisation schools that are without an appropriate network of facilities enabling them to offer complex psychiatric training. DISCUSSION: As expected, there were several types of healthcare management that were not uniformly distributed throughout Italy and there were also marked differences between mental health care provision in the North, Centre, and South of Italy. The university involvement in clinical responsibility was great, but at the management level there was a lack of equality in terms of clinical care, which risks being reflected also on the institutional functions of teaching and research.

  19. Anxiety Symptoms in Psychotic Disorders: Results from the Second Australian National Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanac, Peter; Mancuso, Sam G; Castle, David J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of anxiety symptoms among Australians with psychotic disorders was examined as part of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP). A two-phase design was used. Of 7,955 people who were screened positive for psychosis and eligible, there were 1,825 participants (18-34 years and 35-64 years) interviewed. Data were collected on symptomatology, substance use, cognitive ability, functioning, disability, physical health, mental health service utilization, medication use, education, employment and housing. Anxiety symptomatology was divided into generalized anxiety, panic, phobic, social anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The most common ICD-10 diagnoses were schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (63.0%) and bipolar (mania) disorder (17.5%). Overall, 59.8% (n=1,092) of participants reported experiencing anxiety symptoms in the previous twelve months. Female gender was highly associated with all domains of anxiety. Smoking was significantly associated with all domains of anxiety, except generalized anxiety. The presence of any depressive symptoms in the previous twelve months was significantly associated with all anxiety symptoms. Medication side effects were associated with phobic and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Social dysfunction was associated with social anxiety, and less so for obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Anxiety symptoms are common in people with psychotic disorders. Appropriate screening and treatment should be a clinical priority.

  20. Skilling Australians: Lessons from World War II National Workforce Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymock, Darryl; Billett, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Governments are currently mobilising their national workforces to compete effectively in a globalised economy where being export-effective and import-competitive are necessary to secure national economic and social goals. Australia is no exception here. Yet, in this country, as in others, similar mobilisations occurred in earlier times, most…

  1. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  2. Japan's Higher Education Incorporation Policy: A Comparative Analysis of Three Stages of National University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    A number of countries with public higher education systems have implemented privatisation policies. In Japan, the national government introduced the National University Corporation Act (NUCA) in 2004 and changed the legal status of national universities from that of government-owned public institutions to independent administrative agencies. Its…

  3. Australian synchrotron light source - (boomerang)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian National Synchrotron Light Source - (Boomerang) is to be installed at the Monash University in Victoria. This report provides some background to the proposed facility and discusses aspects of a prospective design. Recently, significant effort was devoted to refining the in principle design and a lattice providing an emittance od 18 nm rad was obtained with a distributed dispersion in the straight section of 0.29m. Exhaustive studies have been made of the economic benefits that would accrue to Australia to Australia following the installation of this facility. This design is a refinement of the design concept presented to the SRI -2000, Berlin (Boldeman, Einfeld et al), to the meeting of the 4th Asian Forum and the Preliminary Design Study presented to the Australian Synchrotron Research Program

  4. How Australian nephrologists view home dialysis: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Marie J; George, Charles Rp; Hawley, Carmel M; Mathew, Timothy H; Agar, John Wm; Kerr, Peter G; Lauder, Lydia A

    2011-05-01

    Australia's commitment to home dialysis therapies has been significant. However, there is marked regional variation in the uptake of home haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) suggesting further scope for the expansion of these modalities. Between 1 April and 5 August 2009, Australian nephrologists were invited to complete an online survey. Seventy-six questions were asked covering characteristics of the dialysis units, responders' experience, adequacy of facilities and support structures, attitudes to the use of home HD and PD and issues impeding the increased uptake of home dialysis. Completed surveys were received and analysed from 71 respondents; 27 from Heads of Units (35% response rate) and 44 (16%) from other nephrologists. There was strong agreement that HD with long hours was advantageous and that this was most easily accomplished in the home. PD was not considered to be an inferior therapy. A 'PD first' policy existed in 34% of Renal Units. The most commonly reported impediments to expanding home dialysis services were financial disadvantage for home HD patients, and lack of physical infrastructure for training, support and education. Areas of concern for expanding home dialysis programmes included psychiatry support, access to respite care and home visits, and lack of support from medical administration and government. The majority of nephrologists would recommend home dialysis to more patients if these impediments could be overcome. This survey identified support from nephrologists for the expansion of home dialysis in Australia and highlighted important barriers to improving access to these therapies. © 2011 The Authors. Nephrology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners by older Australians: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Laurann; Jowsey, Tanisha; McRae, Ian S

    2013-04-02

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and CAM practitioners is common, most frequently for the management of musculoskeletal conditions. Knowledge is limited about the use of CAM practitioners by older people, and specifically those with other long term or chronic conditions. In 2011 we conducted an Australia wide survey targeting older adults aged over 50 years (n = 2540). Participants were asked to identify their chronic conditions, and from which health professionals they had 'received advice or treatment from in the last 3 months', including 'complementary health practitioners, e.g. naturopath'. Descriptive analyses were undertaken using SPSS and STATA software. Overall, 8.8% of respondents reported seeing a CAM practitioner in the past three months, 12.1% of women and 3.9% of men; the vast majority also consulting medical practitioners in the same period. Respondents were more likely to report consulting a CAM practitioner if they had musculoskeletal conditions (osteoporosis, arthritis), pain, or depression/anxiety. Respondents with diabetes, hypertension and asthma were least likely to report consulting a CAM practitioner. Those over 80 reported lower use of CAM practitioners than younger respondents. CAM practitioner use in a general older population was not associated with the number of chronic conditions reported, or with the socio-economic level of residence of the respondent. Substantial numbers of older Australians with chronic conditions seek advice from CAM practitioners, particularly those with pain related conditions, but less often with conditions where there are clear treatment guidelines using conventional medicine, such as with diabetes, hypertension and asthma. Given the policy emphasis on better coordination of care for people with chronic conditions, these findings point to the importance of communication and integration of health services and suggest that the concept of the 'treating team' needs a broad interpretation.

  6. Operationalising United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 within the Australian Defence Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Related Sexual Violence: An Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice. New York: United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of...Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice. New York: United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women),. 45 ASKIN, K. 2004. A...UN has a policy on gender equality in peacekeeping,87 and a zero tolerance of sexual exploitation and abuse.88 4.2 Conflict Analysis UNSCR 1889

  7. A view of environmental accounting in Japanese national university corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, A. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the Japanese government has enacted many laws and regulations relating to climate change and environmental conservation. As a part of these trends, the government promulgated the Promotion of Environmental Consideration Law in 2004, and enacted the law on April 1, 2005. The law requires Specified Corporations including 60 National University Corporations (NUCs) to publish environmental reports annually. With the preparation of the environmental report, many NUCs have included environmental accounting information. This paper clarifies the status quo of environmental accounting information disclosed in NUCs' environmental report, and examines future directions of environmental accounting in NUCs. In order to achieve these objectives, firstly, the contents of environmental report by NUCs are overviewed, and the disclosed information of environmental accounting is analyzed. Secondly, the necessity of the introduction of environmental accounting systems into NUCs is examined. Third, we examine the future directions of environmental accounting in NUCs taking UK experiences into account. Fourth, some obstacles of environmental accounting are presented, and finally, some general implications for public service providing organizations are provided based on the lessons learned from the Japanese NUCs practices.

  8. New integrated information system for pusan national university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Hoi; Cho, Kyung-Won; Kim, Hye Sook; Kim, Ju-Sim; Kim, Jung Hyun; Han, Sang Pil; Park, Chun Bok; Kim, Seok; Chae, Young Moon

    2011-03-01

    This study presents the information system for Pusan National University Hospital (PNUH), evaluates its performance qualitatively, and conducts economic analysis. Information system for PNUH was designed by component-based development and developed by internet technologies. Order Communication System, Electronic Medical Record, and Clinical Decision Support System were newly developed. The performance of the hospital information system was qualitatively evaluated based on the performance reference model in order to identify problem areas for the old system. The Information Economics approach was used to analyze the economic feasibility of hospital information system in order to account for the intangible benefits. Average performance scores were 3.16 for input layer, 3.35 for process layer, and 3.57 for business layer. In addition, the cumulative benefit to cost ratio was 0.50 in 2011, 1.73 in 2012, 1.76 in 2013, 1.71 in 2014, and 1.71 in 2015. The B/C ratios steadily increase as value items are added. While overall performance scores were reasonably high, doctors were less satisfied with the system, perhaps due to the weak clinical function in the systems. The information economics analysis demonstrated the economic profitability of the information systems if all intangible benefits were included. The second qualitative evaluation survey and economic analysis were proposed to evaluate the changes in performance of the new system.

  9. The Prevalence and Causes of Vision Loss in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: The National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joshua; Xie, Jing; Keel, Stuart; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Sandhu, Sukhpal Singh; Ang, Ghee Soon; Fan Gaskin, Jennifer; Crowston, Jonathan; Bourne, Rupert; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    To conduct a nationwide survey on the prevalence and causes of vision loss in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Nationwide, cross-sectional, population-based survey. Indigenous Australians aged 40 years or older and non-Indigenous Australians aged 50 years and older. Multistage random-cluster sampling was used to select 3098 non-Indigenous Australians and 1738 Indigenous Australians from 30 sites across 5 remoteness strata (response rate of 71.5%). Sociodemographic and health data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Trained examiners conducted standardized eye examinations, including visual acuity, perimetry, slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure, and fundus photography. The prevalence and main causes of bilateral presenting vision loss (visual acuity Indigenous Australians and 6.5% (95% CI, 5.3-7.9) in non-Indigenous Australians. Vision loss was 2.8 times more prevalent in Indigenous Australians than in non-Indigenous Australians after age and gender adjustment (17.7%, 95% CI, 14.5-21.0 vs. 6.4%, 95% CI, 5.2-7.6, P Indigenous Australians, the leading causes of vision loss were uncorrected refractive error (61.3%), cataract (13.2%), and age-related macular degeneration (10.3%). In Indigenous Australians, the leading causes of vision loss were uncorrected refractive error (60.8%), cataract (20.1%), and diabetic retinopathy (5.2%). In non-Indigenous Australians, increasing age (odds ratio [OR], 1.72 per decade) and having not had an eye examination within the past year (OR, 1.61) were risk factors for vision loss. Risk factors in Indigenous Australians included older age (OR, 1.61 per decade), remoteness (OR, 2.02), gender (OR, 0.60 for men), and diabetes in combination with never having had an eye examination (OR, 14.47). Vision loss is more prevalent in Indigenous Australians than in non-Indigenous Australians, highlighting that improvements in eye healthcare in Indigenous communities are required. The leading causes of

  10. Japanese Approaches to Organizational Internationalization of Universities: A Case Study of Three National University Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Yuki

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop an understanding of the internationalization processes at universities in Japan by exploring a strategic model in internationally oriented universities. Universities in Japan have experienced university reform since the 1990s. The role and system of Japanese universities have been re-examined due to an emerging global…

  11. Engaging Chinese Ideas through Australian Education Research: Using "Chengyu" to Connect Intellectual Projects across "Peripheral" Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael; Han, Jinghe

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of higher degree research students from China in the universities of multicultural Australia as elsewhere has added to the mounting interest in pedagogies of postgraduate supervision. This paper explores the proposition that efforts to articulate Chinese ideas through research in, for and about Australia have to negotiate…

  12. A cross-sectional survey examining the extent to which interprofessional education is used to teach nursing, pharmacy and medical students in Australian and New Zealand universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2012-09-01

    The current status of interprofessional education (IPE) in Australian and New Zealand universities is largely unexamined despite its generally acknowledged benefit. Data are also limited about the use of IPE in teaching medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students. For this reason a web-based cross-sectional survey was used to gather information from Australian and New Zealand universities offering nursing, pharmacy or medical programs. Responses were received from 31 of the 43 (72%) target universities. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that they currently offer IPE experiences, but only 24% of these experiences met the accepted definition of IPE. Of the participants who offer IPE as defined by Center for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education, only 50% use it to teach medication safety. Timetabling restrictions and lack of appropriate teaching and learning resources were identified as the main barriers to implementation of IPE. All participants reported that staff development, multi-media and e-learning resources would be beneficial to IPE initiatives and the teaching of medication safety. Innovative approaches will be needed to overcome the barriers and facilitate the uptake of quality IPE more broadly. Web-based and e-learning options promise a possible way forward, particularly in the teaching of medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students.

  13. Profiling the Australian Consumer of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Secondary Analysis of National Health Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    Background • Consumers' interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has escalated in the past few decades. Some observers argue that the changing needs and expectations of consumers are driving the surge. Although some studies support that notion, much of the research has been limited methodologically. Profiling can provide important insights into the distinct needs of CAM consumers. Objective • The study intended to profile consumers of CAM in Australia. Design • The study was a secondary analysis of 5 Australian National Health Surveys conducted between 1989 and 2008. Outcome Measures • The study measured the differences between CAM users and nonusers in terms of: (1) predisposing factors (ie, the prevailing conditions that predispose an individual to use a health service, such as age); (2) enabling factors (ie, circumstances that facilitate or hinder health service use, such as income); (3) need factors (ie, an actual or perceived need for health services, such as poor health); and (4) personal health practices (ie, behaviors that influence health status, such as alcohol consumption). Results • The 5 surveys provided data for 181 549 Australian adults and children. Predisposing factors associated with CAM use were (1) being aged >40 y, (2) being female, (3) being married, and (4) holding a postsecondary school qualification. Significant enablers of CAM use were (1) high income, (2) private health insurance, and (3) employment. As for personal health practices, CAM users had significantly higher odds of (1) being physically active, (2) being a nonsmoker, and (3) meeting national recommendations for intake of fruits and vegetables. The prevalence of chronic disease and the use of pharmaceutical agents and health services were comparatively high among CAM users. Conclusions • CAM consumers reported relatively healthier lifestyles compared with nonusers, although some data indicated that CAM users might have greater health care needs. The

  14. National Unity and Ethnic Identity in a Vietnamese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Linh T.; Walter, Pierre G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the ways in which Vietnam's educational policies for ethnic minorities are enacted in the bachelor of arts (BA) program in ethnic minority cultures (EMC) at the Hanoi University of Culture (HUC). Hanoi University of Culture is one of only two universities in Vietnam that offer this program. Although the BA is…

  15. Selection Criteria, Skill Sets and Competencies: What Is Their Role in the Appointment of Vice-Chancellors in Australian Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Bernard; Petzall, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The research presented here attempts to identify and analyse the reported selection criteria used in the appointment of Australian vice-chancellors (VCs) and to contrast this with the selection criteria actually used. Design/methodology/approach: Contemporary research into the nature, role and purpose of section criteria in appointment…

  16. Thai PhD Students and Their Supervisors at an Australian University: Working Relationship, Communication, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomnian, Singhanat

    2017-01-01

    PhD supervision is crucial for higher degree research students in western academic contexts. Despite an increasing body of literature regarding the international student-supervisor relationship, Thai students in Australian higher education are under-represented. This qualitative study aims to explore discursive practices that impact on Thai…

  17. National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence: f indings from a dual-frame omnibus survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, N A; Youssef, G J; Jackson, A C; Pennay, D W; Francis, K L; Pennay, A; Lubman, D I

    2016-03-01

    The increase in mobile telephone-only households may be a source of bias for traditional landline gambling prevalence surveys. Aims were to: (1) identify Australian gambling participation and problem gambling prevalence using a dual-frame (50% landline and 50% mobile telephone) computer-assisted telephone interviewing methodology; (2) explore the predictors of sample frame and telephone status; and (3) explore the degree to which sample frame and telephone status moderate the relationships between respondent characteristics and problem gambling. A total of 2000 adult respondents residing in Australia were interviewed from March to April 2013. Participation in multiple gambling activities and Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI). Estimates were: gambling participation [63.9%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 61.4-66.3], problem gambling (0.4%, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8), moderate-risk gambling (1.9%, 95% CI = 1.3-2.6) and low-risk gambling (3.0%, 95% CI = 2.2-4.0). Relative to the landline frame, the mobile frame was more likely to gamble on horse/greyhound races [odds ratio (OR) = 1.4], casino table games (OR = 5.0), sporting events (OR = 2.2), private games (OR = 1.9) and the internet (OR = 6.5); less likely to gamble on lotteries (OR = 0.6); and more likely to gamble on five or more activities (OR = 2.4), display problem gambling (OR = 6.4) and endorse PGSI items (OR = 2.4-6.1). Only casino table gambling (OR = 2.9) and internet gambling (OR = 3.5) independently predicted mobile frame membership. Telephone status (landline frame versus mobile dual users and mobile-only users) displayed similar findings. Finally, sample frame and/or telephone status moderated the relationship between gender, relationship status, health and problem gambling (OR = 2.9-7.6). Given expected future increases in the mobile telephone-only population, best practice in population gambling research should use dual frame sampling

  18. Attitude to the subject of chemistry in undergraduate nursing students at Fiji National University and Federation University, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; Wakeling, Lara; Peck, Blake; Naiker, Mani; Hill, Dolores; Naidu, Keshni

    2015-01-01

    Attitude to the subject of chemistry was quantified in first-year undergraduate nursing students, at two geographically distinct universities. A purpose-designed diagnostic instrument (ASCI) was given to students at Federation University, Australia (n= 114), and at Fiji National University, Fiji (n=160). Affective and cognitive sub-scales within ASCI showed reasonable internal consistency. Cronbach's alpha for the cognitive sub-scale was 0.786 and 0.630, and 0.787 and 0.788 for affective sub-scale for the Federation University and Fiji National University students, respectively. Mean (SD) score for the cognitive sub-scale was 10.5 (5.6) and 15.2 (4.1) for students at Federation University and Fiji National University, respectively (PFiji National University, respectively (P < 0.001, t-test). An exploratory factor analysis (n=274) confirmed a two-factor solution consistent with affective and cognitive sub-scales, each with good internal consistency. Quantifying attitude to chemistry in undergraduate nursing students using ASCI may have utility in assessing the impact of novel teaching strategies used in the education of nursing students in areas of bioscience and chemistry. However, geographically distinct populations of undergraduate nurses may show very different attitudes to chemistry.

  19. Cross-national comparison of medication use in Australian and Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taxis, Katja; Kochen, Sjoerd; Wouters, Hans; Boersma, Froukje; Gerard, Maring Jan; Mulder, Hans; Pavlovic, Jugoslav; Stevens, Gerard; McLachlan, Andrew; Pont, Lisa G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: cross-national comparisons can be used to explore therapeutic areas and identify potential medication issues. Methods: we used cross-sectional pharmacy supply data to explore medication use for nursing home residents in Australia (AU n = 26 homes, 1,560 residents) and the Netherlands (NL

  20. Recall and response of smokers and recent quitters to the Australian National Tobacco Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M; Freeman, J; Donovan, R

    2003-09-01

    To track national population indices of recall and response among smokers and recent quitters to an ongoing national televised anti-smoking campaign in Australia. National cross sectional population telephone surveys of adults. Unprompted recall of advertising; recognition of advertising; campaign attributed encouragement to quit or stay quit; unprompted awareness of smoking related health effects; new learning about smoking and health; and agreement with campaign related attitudes. Campaign advertising continued to be highly memorable over the period of study, with 88% having confirmed recognition in 2000. Campaign advertising was consistently thought by half of smokers who had seen it to make them more likely to quit (49% in 2000). Specific changes between surveys in unprompted awareness of smoking related health effects, new learning about smoking and health, and agreement with campaign related attitudes were observed in relation to the main messages of the advertisements, which were time sensitive according to the year of launch of the advert. The "artery" advertisement was associated with the largest and most consistent positive change in all of these parameters. The proportion of respondents who disagreed that the dangers of smoking had been exaggerated increased significantly from 59% in May 1997 to 68% in November 2000. A national campaign using graphic advertising to emphasise the health risks of smoking can make significant population wide contributions to improving new learning about smoking damage and positively influence attitudes about smoking risks.

  1. Indigenous Peoples and Indicators of Well-Being: Australian Perspectives on United Nations Global Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John

    2008-01-01

    One of the major tasks of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) following its establishment in 2000 has been to establish statistical profiles of the world's Indigenous peoples. As part of this broad task, it has recommended that the Millennium Development Goals and other global reporting frameworks should be assessed…

  2. Electricity market design for facilitating the integration of wind energy. Experience and prospects with the Australian National Electricity Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGill, Iain

    2010-01-01

    Australia has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of both electricity industry restructuring and market-based environmental regulation. The Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) was established in 1999 and Australia also implemented one of the world's first renewable energy target schemes in 2001. With significant recent growth in wind generation, Australia provides an interesting case for assessing different approaches to facilitating wind integration into the electricity industry. Wind project developers in Australia must assess both potential energy market and Tradeable Green Certificate income streams when making investments. Wind-farm energy income depends on the match of its uncertain time varying output with the regional half hourly market price; a price that exhibits daily, weekly and seasonal patterns and considerable uncertainty. Such price signals assist in driving investments that maximize project value to the electricity industry as a whole, including integration costs and benefits for other participants. Recent NEM rule changes will formally integrate wind generation in the market's scheduling processes while a centralized wind forecasting system has also been introduced. This paper outlines experience to date with wind integration in the NEM, describes the evolution of market rules in response and assesses their possible implications for facilitating high future wind penetrations. (author)

  3. Museums, games, and historical imagination: Student responses to a games-based experience at the Australian national maritime museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Rowan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital games feature prominently in discussions concerning the ways museums might reimagine themselves—and best serve their audiences—in an increasingly digital age. Questions are increasingly asked about the opportunities various games might provide to foster historical imagination, and, in this process, contribute to the curation, construction and dissemination of knowledge: goals central to the work of modern museums. This paper reports on the experiences and perceptions of three groups of year 9 students (aged 14-15 as they engaged with one purpose built digital game—called The Voyage—at the Australian National Maritime Museum in 2015. The researchers sought students’ feedback on the strengths, weakness and possibilities associated with using games in museum contexts (rather than at home, or at school. In presenting students’ perspectives and their associated recommendations, the paper provides vital end-user input into considerations about how museums might maximize the potential of digital games, to enhance historical awareness and understanding, build links to formal curriculum, and strengthen partnerships between schools and museums.

  4. Consumer attitudes towards the establishment of a national Australian familial cancer research database by the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Laura; Mitchell, Gillian; Thrupp, Letitia; Petelin, Lara; Richardson, Kate; Mascarenhas, Lyon; Young, Mary-Anne

    2018-01-01

    Clinical genetics units hold large amounts of information which could be utilised to benefit patients and their families. In Australia, a national research database, the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) database, is being established that comprises clinical genetic data held for all carriers of mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Consumer input was sought to establish the acceptability of the inclusion of clinical genetic data into a research database. A qualitative approach using a modified nominal group technique was used to collect data through consumer forums conducted in three Australian states. Individuals who had previously received care from Familial Cancer Centres were invited to participate. Twenty-four consumers participated in three forums. Participants expressed positive attitudes about the establishment of the ICCon database, which were informed by the perceived benefits of the database including improved health outcomes for individuals with inherited cancer syndromes. Most participants were comfortable to waive consent for their clinical information to be included in the research database in a de-identified format. As major stakeholders, consumers have an integral role in contributing to the development and conduct of the ICCon database. As an initial step in the development of the ICCon database, the forums demonstrated consumers' acceptance of important aspects of the database including waiver of consent.

  5. Gender differences in patterns of HIV service use in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Rachel; Grierson, Jeffrey; Pitts, Marian

    2008-05-01

    There have been clear gender differences in the experience of living with HIV in Australia since the start of the epidemic. This paper examines the patterns of health service use and experiences at those services over a period of six years. The results reported here are drawn from the HIV Futures surveys, four consecutive national, cross-sectional Australian surveys of the lives of PLWHA. Women were found to use different medical services to men both for non HIV-related and HIV-related treatment, being more likely to use generalist services and hospital-based HIV specialists. Women also reported higher rates of discrimination at health services, however reports of new incidences of discrimination were found to decrease from 2001 onwards. Although women reported higher levels of unwanted disclosure of HIV status than men, particularly by health care workers, new reports of unwanted disclosure decreased between 2003 and 2005. These data indicate that there are long-term gender differences in medical service use by PLWHA in Australia, and that this has been associated with higher rates of discrimination and loss of confidentiality for women. However the decrease in new reports of discrimination over time indicates that improved education of health service providers has been successful.

  6. The impact of drought on the association between food security and mental health in a nationally representative Australian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Sharon; Berry, Helen; Dinh, Huong; O'Brien, Léan; Walls, Helen L

    2014-10-24

    The association between food insecurity and mental health is established. Increasingly, associations between drought and mental health and drought and food insecurity have been observed in a number of countries. The impact of drought on the association between food insecurity and mental health has received little attention. Population-based study using data from a nationally representative panel survey of Australian adults in which participants report behaviour, health, social, economic and demographic information annually. Exposure to drought was modelled using annual rainfall data during Australia's 'Big Dry'. Regression modelling examined associations between drought and three indicative measures of food insecurity and mental health, controlling for confounding factors. People who reported missing meals due to financial stress reported borderline moderate/high distress levels. People who consumed below-average levels of core foods reported more distress than those who consumed above the average level, while people consuming discretionary foods above the average level reported greater distress than those consuming below the threshold. In all drought exposure categories, people missing meals due to cost reported higher psychological distress than those not missing meals. Compared to drought-unadjusted psychological distress levels, in most drought categories, people consuming higher-than-average discretionary food levels reported higher levels of distress. Exposure to drought moderates the association between measures of food insecurity and psychological distress, generally increasing the distress level. Climate adaptation strategies that consider social, nutrition and health impacts are needed.

  7. Australianness as fairness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plage, Stefanie; Willing, Indigo; Skrbis, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an account of interwoven and often competing repertoires of cosmopolitanism and nationalism on which Australians draw when encountering diversity. Using interview and focus group data the article first explores how the notion of Australianness grounded in civic virtues such ......-go’ principle at times conceptually overlaps with cosmopolitan ethics. However, it also bears the potential to hinder cosmopolitan practices. Ultimately national and cosmopolitan ethical frameworks have to be interrogated simultaneously when applied to micro-level interactions.......This article provides an account of interwoven and often competing repertoires of cosmopolitanism and nationalism on which Australians draw when encountering diversity. Using interview and focus group data the article first explores how the notion of Australianness grounded in civic virtues...

  8. Human papillomavirus prevalence among indigenous and non-indigenous Australian women prior to a national HPV vaccination program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condon John R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous women in Australia have a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer despite a national cervical screening program. Prior to introduction of a national human papilloma virus (HPV vaccination program, we determined HPV genotype prevalence by Indigenous status and residence in remote areas. Methods We recruited women aged 17 to 40 years presenting to community-based primary health services for routine Pap screening across Australia. A liquid-based cytology (LBC cervical specimen was tested for HPV DNA using the AMPLICOR HPV-DNA test and a PGMY09/11-based HPV consensus PCR; positive specimens were typed by reverse hybridization. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence by weighting to relevant population data, and determined predictors of HPV-DNA positivity by age, Indigenous status and area of residence using logistic regression. Results Of 2152 women (655 Indigenous, prevalence of the high-risk HPV genotypes was similar for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women (HPV 16 was 9.4% and 10.5%, respectively; HPV 18 was 4.1% and 3.8%, respectively, and did not differ by age group. In younger age groups, the prevalence of other genotypes also did not differ, but in those aged 31 to 40 years, HPV prevalence was higher for Indigenous women (35% versus 22.5%; P Conclusion Although we found no difference in the prevalence of HPV16/18 among Australian women by Indigenous status or, for Indigenous women, residence in remote regions, differences were found in the prevalence of risk factors and some other HPV genotypes. This reinforces the importance of cervical screening as a complement to vaccination for all women, and the value of baseline data on HPV genotype prevalence by Indigenous status and residence for the monitoring of vaccine impact.

  9. Modelling the incidence and mortality of psychotic disorders: data from the second Australian national survey of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sukanta; Whiteford, Harvey; McGrath, John

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to model estimates related to (a) the incidence of psychotic disorders and (b) the mortality associated with these disorders based on a large, population-based prevalence study. Data were drawn from the second national survey of adults with psychotic disorders conducted in seven Australian catchment areas during March to December 2010. To generate incidence rate estimates, we identified recent onset cases recruited as part of the prevalence study and then imputed population-based incidence rates using a set of conservative assumptions. Similarly, for mortality rates, we identified individuals who had died after being identified as 'screen-positive' for psychosis, but prior to full clinical assessment. Using a set of conservative assumptions, we then used these estimates to infer population-based mortality rates. Based on our models, we estimated that the incidence rate for psychotic disorders was 28 cases per 100,000 population. The rate estimates were significantly higher in males than females, with an overall male:female ratio of 1.57:1. Incidence rate estimates peaked in the youngest age group (18-24 years). The adjusted mortality rate estimated during the whole period of observation was 12.5 per 1000 persons, with a standardised mortality ratio of 5.5. Using treated prevalence data and observed deaths with appropriate algorithms, we were able to impute incidence and mortality rates for psychotic disorders consistent with the published literature. While the second national survey of psychotic disorders was not designed to identify mortality, our estimates provide a stark reminder of the increased mortality associated with these disorders.

  10. Universality, correlations, and rankings in the Brazilian universities national admission examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberto; Lamb, Luis C.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the scores obtained by students who have taken the ENEM examination, The Brazilian High School National Examination which is used in the admission process at Brazilian universities. The average high schools scores from different disciplines are compared through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different school subjects. Even though the students' scores in the ENEM form a Gaussian due to the standardization, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that cannot be used to evaluate and compare students performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and the economic level (based on the average family income) of the students. The ENEM scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance examination from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The analysis of the performance of the same individuals in both tests shows that the two tests not only select different abilities, but also lead to the admission of different sets of individuals. Our results indicate that standardized tests might be an interesting tool to compare performance of individuals over the years, but not of institutions.

  11. Developing National Systems of Innovation: University-Industry ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... Interactions between firms and universities are key building blocks of innovation systems. With a focus on developing countries, this book presents novel comparative research spanning three continents. The result is a more universal and dynamic view of the shaping and reshaping of interactions between ...

  12. Ability to predict the development of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery using the Australian Clinical Risk Index versus the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola-Tejerina, A; Bustamante, E; Tamayo, E; Mestres, C A; Bustamante-Munguira, J

    2017-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major infectious complication that increases mortality, morbidity, and healthcare costs. There are scores attempting to classify patients for calculating SSI risk. Our objectives were to validate the Australian Clinical Risk Index (ACRI) in a European population after cardiac surgery, comparing it against the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived risk index (NNIS) and analyzing the predictive power of ACRI for SSI in valvular patients. All the patients that who underwent cardiac surgery in a tertiary university hospital between 2011 and 2015 were analyzed. The patients were divided into valvular and coronary groups, excluding mixed patients. The ACRI score was validated in both groups and its ability to predict SSI was compared to the NNIS risk index. We analyzed 1,657 procedures. In the valvular patient group (n: 1119), a correlation between the ACRI score and SSI development (p < 0.05) was found; there was no such correlation with the NNIS index. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.64 (confidence interval [CI] 95%, 0.5-0.7) for ACRI and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.5-0.7) for NNIS. In the coronary group (n: 281), there was a correlation between ACRI and SSI but no between NNIS and SSI. The ACRI AUC was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.5-0.8) and the NNIS AUC was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.4-0.7). The ACRI score has insufficient predictive power, although it predicts SSI development better than the NNIS index, fundamentally in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Further studies analyzing determining factors are needed.

  13. Empowering art: reconfiguring narratives of trauma and hope in the Australian national imaginary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Magowan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aboriginal art has been the source of much contention between art curators, gallery owners, art critics and Aboriginal artists themselves. Early aesthetic debates about whether so-called traditional works should be considered ethnographic or artistic have led, at times, to conflicts over the rights of Aboriginal people to have their works exhibited according to the criteria applied to other kinds of Western artworks. This article explores how the dilemmas of troubled ethno-histories are critically embodied and reconfigured in texture and colour. It considers the problems that silenced histories pose for those responsible for their display to the public. As Aboriginal images often conceal troubled intercultural encounters it asks how artworks can be used to provide a counter-polemic to national rhetoric as artists seek to reshape and improve intergenerational futures. This text is published as a counterpart to the contribution to Disturbing Pasts from the artist Heather Kamarra Shearer.

  14. University Interaction with National Development Plans: A Case Study from Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naimi, Taha T.; Al-Nassri, Sabah A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the University of Technology in Baghdad, Iraq, is discussed, illustrating how it has adjusted its work to national needs as expressed in national development plans. As industry in Iraq has broadened its scope, the curriculum in the university has widened. (Author/MLW)

  15. 77 FR 59283 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The founders of our Nation's first colleges and universities for African Americans... path to freedom, independence, and success. More than 150 years later, America's Historically Black...

  16. 77 FR 11140 - Availability of the Draft Supplementary Risk Assessment for the Boston University (BU) National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... the Boston University (BU) National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL); Public Hearing... University National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory and the reader's guide document may be obtained... laboratory. The purpose of the Draft Supplementary Risk Assessment for the NEIDL is to present the human...

  17. The Australian national reactive phosphate rock project - Aims, experimental approach, and site characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Field-based cutting trials were established across Australia in a range of environments to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of 5 phosphate rocks, and 1 partially acidulated phosphate rock, relative to either single super-phosphate or triple superphosphate. The phosphate rocks differed in reactivity, as determined by the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure and solubility of phosphorus present in the fertilizers in 2% formic acid, 2% citric acid and neutral ammonium citrate. Sechura (Bayovar) and North Carolina phosphate rocks were highly reactive (>70% solubility in 2% formic acid), whilst Khouribja (Moroccan) and Hamrawein (Egypt) phosphate rock were moderately reactive. Duchess phosphate rock from Queensland was relatively unreactive ( 2 , from 4.0 to 5.1, and Colwell extractable phosphorus ranged from 3 to 47 μg/g prior to fertilizer application. Two core experiments were established at each site. The first measured the effects of phosphate rock reactivity on agronomic effectiveness, while the second core experiment measured the effects of the degree of water solubility of the phosphorus source on agronomic effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project trials provided the opportunity to confirm the suitability of accepted procedures to model fertilizer response and to develop new approaches for comparing different fertilizer responses. The Project also provided the framework for subsidiary studies such as the effect of fertilizer source on soil phosphorus extractability; cadmium and fluorine concentrations in herbage; evaluation of soil phosphorus tests; and the influence of particle size on phosphate rock effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project presents a valuable model for a large, Australia-wide, collaborative team approach to an important agricultural issue. The use of standard and consistent experimental methodologies at every site ensured that maximum benefit was obtained from data

  18. Socioeconomic disparities in self-reported cardiovascular disease for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adults: analysis of national survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Joan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES and cardiovascular disease (CVD among Indigenous Australians, or whether any such relationship is similar to that in non-Indigenous Australians. Methods Weighted data on self-reported CVD and several SES measures were analyzed for 5,417 Indigenous and 15,432 non-Indigenous adults aged 18-64 years from two nationally representative surveys conducted in parallel by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2004-05. Results After adjusting for age and sex, self-reported CVD prevalence was generally higher among those of lower SES in both the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. The relative odds of self-reported CVD were generally similar in the two populations. For example, the relative odds of self-reported CVD for those who did not complete Year 10 (versus those who did was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-1.8 among Indigenous people and 1.3 (95% CI: 1.2-1.5 among non-Indigenous people. However, Indigenous people generally had higher self-reported CVD levels than non-Indigenous people of the same age and SES group. Although smoking history varied by SES, smoking did not explain the observed relationships between SES and self-reported CVD. Conclusions Socioeconomic disparities in self-reported CVD among Indigenous Australians appear similar in relative terms to those seen in non-Indigenous Australians, but absolute differences remain. As with other population groups, the socioeconomic heterogeneity of the Indigenous population must be considered in developing and implementing programs to promote health and prevent illness. In addition, factors that operate across the SES spectrum, such as racism, stress, dispossession, and grief, must also be addressed to reduce the burden of CVD.

  19. The status of training and education in information and computer technology of Australian nurses: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Robert; Fallon, Tony; Soar, Jeffrey; Buikstra, Elizabeth; Hegney, Desley

    2008-10-01

    A study was undertaken of the current knowledge and future training requirements of nurses in information and computer technology to inform policy to meet national goals for health. The role of the modern clinical nurse is intertwined with information and computer technology and adoption of such technology forms an important component of national strategies in health. The majority of nurses are expected to use information and computer technology during their work; however, the full extent of their knowledge and experience is unclear. Self-administered postal survey. A 78-item questionnaire was distributed to 10,000 Australian Nursing Federation members to identify the nurses' use of information and computer technology. Eighteen items related to nurses' training and education in information and computer technology. Response rate was 44%. Computers were used by 86.3% of respondents as part of their work-related activities. Between 4-17% of nurses had received training in each of 11 generic computer skills and software applications during their preregistration/pre-enrolment and between 12-30% as continuing professional education. Nurses who had received training believed that it was adequate to meet the needs of their job and was given at an appropriate time. Almost half of the respondents indicated that they required more training to better meet the information and computer technology requirements of their jobs and a quarter believed that their level of computer literacy was restricting their career development. Nurses considered that the vast majority of employers did not encourage information and computer technology training and, for those for whom training was available, workload was the major barrier to uptake. Nurses favoured introduction of a national competency standard in information and computer technology. For the considerable benefits of information and computer technology to be incorporated fully into the health system, employers must pay more attention

  20. Epidemiology of polycystic ovary syndrome: a cross sectional study of university students at An-Najah national university-Palestine

    OpenAIRE

    Musmar, Samar; Afaneh, Asma; Mo'alla, Hafsa

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common gynecological endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. Despite its heavy burden on female reproduction and general health, there is no study regarding PCOS prevalence in Palestine. This study aims to establish prevalence of PCOS among female university students at An-Najah National University-Palestine and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on 137 female students using convenien...

  1. The health and well-being of Indigenous drug and alcohol workers: results from a national Australian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Ann M; Duraisingam, Vinita; Trifonoff, Allan; Tovell, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demand for alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment services among the Australian Indigenous population, complex organisational challenges and limitations, and high unemployment rates are likely to negatively impact Indigenous AOD workers' health and well-being. Building the capacity of Indigenous AOD workers is vital, as they play a crucial role in the delivery of treatment services and offer essential support to their communities. A national online survey was conducted to examine organisational, workplace and individual factors that might contribute to levels of stress and well-being among workers who provide services to Indigenous clients. A total of 294 eligible surveys were completed; 184 (63%) from Indigenous and 108 (37%) from non-Indigenous AOD workers. Multiple regression models were conducted to assess the significant predictors of mental health and well-being, job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention. Indigenous AOD workers typically experienced above average levels of job satisfaction and relatively low levels of emotional exhaustion. However, 1 in 10 reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, a key predictor of turnover intention. Indigenous workers also experienced significantly lower levels of mental health and well-being and greater work/family imbalance, which was a significant contributor to emotional exhaustion. The findings highlight the importance of implementing workforce development strategies that focus on achieving culturally appropriate, equitable and supportive organisational conditions for Indigenous AOD workers. Preventing or managing levels of stress, ensuring adequate and equitable salaries and benefits, and providing more opportunities for career and personal growth may increase job satisfaction and reduce turnover intention among Indigenous workers in the drug and alcohol field. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Water and Beverage Consumption: Analysis of the Australian 2011-2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Zhixian; Zheng, Miaobing; Zhang, Man; Rangan, Anna

    2016-10-26

    Water consumption as a vital component of the human diet is under-researched in dietary surveys and nutrition studies. To assess total water and fluid intakes and examine demographic, anthropometric, and dietary factors associated with water consumption in the Australian population. Dietary intake data from the 2011 to 2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used. Usual water, fluid and food and nutrient intakes were estimated from two days of dietary recalls. Total water includes plain drinking water and moisture from all food and beverage sources; total fluids include plain drinking water and other beverages, but not food moisture. The mean (SD) daily total water intakes for children and adolescents aged 2-18 years were 1.7 (0.6) L for males and 1.5 (0.4) L for females, and for adults aged 19 years and over were 2.6 (0.9) L for males and 2.3 (0.7) L for females. The majority of the population failed to meet the Adequate Intake (AI) values for total water intake (82%) and total fluids intake (78%) with the elderly at highest risk (90%-95%). The contributions of plain drinking water, other beverages and food moisture to total water intake were 44%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, among children and adolescents, and 37%, 37% and 25% among adults. The main sources of other beverages were full-fat plain milk and regular soft drinks for children and adolescents, and tea, coffee, and alcoholic drinks for adults. For adults, higher total water intake was associated with lower percent energy from fat, saturated fat, and free sugars, lower sodium and energy-dense nutrient poor food intakes but higher dietary fibre, fruit, vegetable, caffeine, and alcohol intakes. No associations were found between total water consumption and body mass index (BMI) for adults and BMI z -score for children and adolescents. Reported water consumption was below recommendations. Higher water intakes were suggestive of better diet quality.

  3. Hydrographic Service Royal Australian Navy for the Year Ended 30 June 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-30

    Service has four themes: Legislation requires ships to carry charts, and government to provide information, to protect life and property at sea. Economic...Unit, Vanuatu The Librarian, PNG University of Technology 6. Research Organisations and Professional Bodies The Victorian Institute of Marine Science The...Academy (4 copies) Tasmania University of Tasmania Australian Maritime College, Launceston 8. Libraries Parliamentary Library, Canberra National

  4. Climate of the Nation. Australians Attitudes to Climate Change and its Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLIMATE OF THE NATION AUSTRALIANS ATTITUDES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS SOLUTIONS

    2007-03-01

    It comes as no surprise that concern about climate change is at an all time high and the vast majority of people no longer doubt that it is real or that it is caused by greenhouse gases created by human activity. Not only is concern at an all time high, but climate change now ranks as more important to people than a wide range of issues including housing affordability and national security. While many people are still unfamiliar with the more detailed science of climate change, this does not detract from their passion to deal with it. Focus group research shows that people see climate change and weather as interchangeable. As such, drought, water supply and management, and climate change are often linked in the minds of the general public. This is backed up by quantitative polling which has water management and climate change topping people's concerns. A common theme in the research is that people are looking for leadership. They accept there may be a price to pay and they are hungry for decisive action.They are also keen to know more about the problem, and importantly they want to be able to take action which will make a real difference. Support for clean energy solutions like solar and wind is very strong and there is a view that Australia's abundant sunshine is not being put to good use. People also feel strongly about cutting energy waste. Themes that emerged strongly through the research were: growing understanding that climate change is already happening; particular concern about water resources and the impact of water restrictions; a view that Australia should lead and is not yet doing so; concern about our children's future (both jobs and environment). People expressed very strong support for a future in which our children are protected from the worst impacts of climate change and are able to be involved in a new economy built around renewable energy sources. Climate change as an issue is a mixture of economic (including households) management and

  5. Universal Economic Plan Based Law Constitutions of Kingdom and Nations

    OpenAIRE

    Kavak, Mesut

    2017-01-01

    In this work, touched on some social issues whatever the result, and a raising awareness was aimed by some new technological upgrades for vital infrastructures of states, social order and economic plan. The main aim is one world order which has no king and accepts nations as local governances as a requirement of hierarchical order. It is completely based on economic benefits of all nations as there is no alternative to establish a healthy economic order as economic management is directly rela...

  6. Dubna - A University Town Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    On the initiative of the JINR Directorate, which was supported by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, the International University of Nature, Society and Man, was set up in 1991. Then, the JINR University Centre was established, where senior students of the leading Russian Physics institutes finish their education under the supervision of JINR scientists and attend practical studies in the JINR Laboratories. This new JINR development concept envisages a gradual conversion to an international centre which will integrate fundamental science, technological studies and education.

  7. Dubna - A University Town Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    On the initiative of the JINR Directorate, which was supported by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, the International University of Nature, Society and Man, was set up in 1991. Then, the JINR University Centre was established, where senior students of the leading Russian Physics institutes finish their education under the supervision of JINR scientists and attend practical studies in the JINR Laboratories. This new JINR development concept envisages a gradual conversion to an international centre which will integrate fundamental science, technological studies and education.

  8. Managing the Transition: The Role of Optimism and Self-Efficacy for First-Year Australian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Stephen; Mergler, Amanda; Boman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Students making the transition from high school to university often encounter many stressors and new experiences. Many students adjust successfully to university; however, some students do not, often resulting in attrition from the university and mental health issues. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the effects that optimism,…

  9. National Astronomy Day: Bringing the Universe to Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, Jean; Brown, Mark

    2012-01-01

    How do teachers help students realize their place in the universe? How do they teach the relationship among the Earth, Moon, stars, and galaxies during daylight hours? Most teachers assume that astronomy is a difficult subject to teach in the classroom and that without a planetarium little can be learned. In this article, the authors discuss…

  10. Assessment of reading habits of national open university of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 49% of NOUN students read for leisure. A general recommendation was made to the ministry of education in Nigeria to make reading a subject of its own which should be made compulsory and seriously taught from primary school to the university level. In the case of NOUN, seminars and workshops on reading should ...

  11. University Supports for Open Access: A Canadian National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyson, Devon; Vezina, Kumiko; Morrison, Heather; Taylor, Donald; Black, Charlyn

    2009-01-01

    The advent of policies at research-funding organizations requiring grantees to make their funded research openly accessible alters the life cycle of scholarly research. This survey-based study explores the approaches that libraries and research administration offices at the major Canadian universities are employing to support the…

  12. The case of National Open University of Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... technology media on effective distance learning education in Nigeria. It implores the use of ... A Beman planning committee set up in 1981 worked on the establishment of the university. Through the senate ... The following research questions have been made to guide the study;. 1. What impact does the use ...

  13. Understanding Catalan University Dropout from a Cross-National Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, David; Feixas, Mònica; Gairín, Joaquín; Muñoz, José Luís

    2015-01-01

    The dropout rate is an indicator of complex analysis and there is no consensus on its significance. Universities lack systematized, univocal methods for collecting student dropout data, making measurement problematic. In consequence, the formulas applied to analyze this phenomenon differ between countries and it is therefore an immense challenge…

  14. Assessing University Library Print Book Collections and Deselection: A Case Study at the National University of Ireland Maynooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses an assessment and deselection project of the modern print book collections in the John Paul II Library, National University of Ireland Maynooth. Following a contextual introduction and literature review, the article outlines the methodology, presents and discusses the results, and concludes with lessons learned. Although…

  15. Comparison of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization references/standards for height in contemporary Australian children: analyses of the Raine Study and Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ian; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Garnett, Sarah; Bannink, Ellen; Pennell, Craig; Sly, Peter; Leong, Gary M; Cowell, Chris; Ambler, Geoff; Werther, George; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, Wayne; Choong, Catherine S

    2014-11-01

    (i) To compare the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reference and World Health Organization (WHO) standard/reference for height, particularly with respect to short stature and eligibility for growth hormone (GH) treatment by applying them to contemporary Australian children; (ii) To examine the implications for identifying short stature and eligibility for GH treatment. Children from the longitudinal Raine Study were serially measured for height from 1991 to 2005 (2-15-year-old girls (660) and boys (702) from Western Australia). In the cross-sectional Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity survey (2-16-year-old boys (2415) and girls (2379) from all states), height was measured in 2007. Heights were converted to standard deviation scores (SDSs) based on CDC and WHO. Means and standard deviations of height-SDS varied between CDC and WHO definitions and with age and gender within each definition. However, both identified similar frequencies of short stature (standard/reference for height. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Occupational therapy publications by Australian authors: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Gutman, Sharon A; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2018-01-18

    Bibliometrics refers to the collection and measurement of publishing and citation data configurations with the goal of quantifying the influence of scholarly activities. Advantages of bibliometrics include the generation of quantitative indicators of impact, productivity, quality and collaboration. Those parties who benefit from the results of bibliometric analysis include researchers, educators, journal publishers, employers and research funding bodies. A bibliometric analysis was completed of peer-reviewed literature from 1991 to 2015, written by Australian occupational therapists (who were able to be identified as such), and indexed in the Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-Expanded) or the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) databases. "Occupational therapy" and "occupational therapist(s)" were used as keywords to search journal articles' publication title, abstract, author details, keywords and KeyWord Plus. Between 1991 and 2015, 752 peer-reviewed journal articles were published by Australian occupational therapy authors. On average, those articles had 3.7 authors, 35 references, and were nine pages in length. The top four journals in which Australian occupational therapists published were Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, British Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Occupational Therapy, and Physical and Occupational Therapy in Paediatrics. The four Australian institutions that generated the largest number of occupational therapy articles were the University of Queensland, University of Sydney, La Trobe University, and Monash University. The top four countries with whom Australian authors collaborated in manuscript writing were the United Kingdom, United States, Canada and Sweden. The volume of occupational therapy peer-reviewed literature has grown over the last two decades. Australian authors have and continue to make significant contributions to the occupational therapy body of knowledge nationally and internationally. © 2018

  17. Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide bilingual support to Western Pe ... An Interpreted Education: What You Need To Know November 28, 2017 Join Dr. Brenda ... approval or acceptance by the U.S. Department of Education of the findings, ... sex, national origin, religion, age, hearing status, disability, covered ...

  18. Role of Universities in the National Innovation System. Discussion Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years governments have been placing more emphasis on innovation as a source of national competitiveness. Governments now assess their investments across many areas in terms of the contribution that such investments make to increasing innovation. This has been especially significant for education and in particular for the development of…

  19. NATIONALISM APPLYING IN LEARNING CIVIC EDUCATION AS MORAL LEARNING MEDIA IN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Setyowati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research will review about nationalism in university. The first part of this research will introduce the meaning of nationalism and relation with civic education in university. Nationalism is defined as a love of their country and most citizens feel a sense of nationalism. Civic education in the university is required to strengthen the students in shaping the attitude of nationalism. Students are spearheading the future of a country that they have to love their country because the science which is accepted must be applied in their social life. The main mission of civic education is to help students establish the values of their personality, in order to be able to realize the basic values of Pancasila consistently, also their sense of nationalism in developing science, technology and art with morality. The obstacle of applying nationalism in Civic Education is because of too theoretical and not oriented to the practice of students in community. Inculcation of nationalism should not use indoctrination.We need a civic education in students moral fortify until finally embedded as strong nationalism. This paper using library research. Secondary data was collected by identifying the relevan papers, books, and journal. The data was interpretated and analyzed descriptively. The second part: this research will give solution about method to inculcation of nationalism toward higher educational education. The final part : will give conclusion the best method to inculcation of nationalism in higer educational education and give suggestion to further research about inculcation of nationalism.

  20. Music Students’ National Values Cultivation in the Educational Process of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problem of music students’ national values cultivation in the educational process of a university. The author proves that music students’ national values cultivation in the educational process of a university will be efficient if the following pedagogical conditions are realized: the use of forms and methods of education, aimed at the identification of the personally significant qualities of the future music teachers with the national values; involvement of music students in the individual creative activity, focused on the spiritual personality development; implementation of a special course, contributing to music students’ national values cultivation into the educational process

  1. New curriculum at Nuclear Science Department, National University of Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidan bin Radiman; Ismail bin Bahari

    1995-01-01

    A new undergraduate curriculum at the Department of Nuclear Science, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia is discussed. It includes the rational and objective of the new curriculum, course content and expectations due to a rapidly changing job market. The major change was a move to implement only on one Nuclear Science module rather than the present three modules of Radiobiology, Radiochemistry and Nuclear Physics. This will optimise not only laboratory use of facilities but also effectiveness of co-supervision. Other related aspects like industrial training and research exposures for the undergraduates are also discussed

  2. Socioeconomic status and self-reported asthma in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian adults aged 18-64 years: analysis of national survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Joan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is more common among Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australian adults, but little is known about socioeconomic patterning of asthma within the Indigenous population, or whether it is similar to the non-Indigenous population. Methods I analysed weighted data on self-reported current diagnosed asthma and a range of socio-economic and demographic measures for 5,417 Indigenous and 15,432 non-Indigenous adults aged 18-64 years from two nationally representative surveys conducted in parallel by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2004-05. Results Current asthma prevalence was higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people in every age group. After adjusting for age and sex, main language and place of residence were significantly associated with asthma prevalence in both populations. Traditional SES variables such as education, income and employment status were significantly associated with asthma in the non-Indigenous but not the Indigenous population. For example, age-and sex-adjusted relative odds of asthma among those who did not complete Year 10 (versus those who did was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.0-1.5 in the non-Indigenous population versus 1.0 (95% CI 0.8-1.3 in the Indigenous population. Conclusions The socioeconomic patterning of asthma among Indigenous Australians is much less pronounced than for other chronic diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease, and contrasts with asthma patterns in the non-Indigenous population. This may be due in part to the episodic nature of asthma, and the well-known challenges in diagnosing it, especially among people with limited health literacy and/or limited access to health care, both of which are more likely in the Indigenous population. It may also reflect the importance of exposures occurring across the socioeconomic spectrum among Indigenous Australians, such as racism, and discrimination, marginalization and dispossession, chronic stress and exposure to

  3. Water and Beverage Consumption: Analysis of the Australian 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixian Sui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water consumption as a vital component of the human diet is under-researched in dietary surveys and nutrition studies. Aim: To assess total water and fluid intakes and examine demographic, anthropometric, and dietary factors associated with water consumption in the Australian population. Methods: Dietary intake data from the 2011 to 2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used. Usual water, fluid and food and nutrient intakes were estimated from two days of dietary recalls. Total water includes plain drinking water and moisture from all food and beverage sources; total fluids include plain drinking water and other beverages, but not food moisture. Results: The mean (SD daily total water intakes for children and adolescents aged 2–18 years were 1.7 (0.6 L for males and 1.5 (0.4 L for females, and for adults aged 19 years and over were 2.6 (0.9 L for males and 2.3 (0.7 L for females. The majority of the population failed to meet the Adequate Intake (AI values for total water intake (82% and total fluids intake (78% with the elderly at highest risk (90%–95%. The contributions of plain drinking water, other beverages and food moisture to total water intake were 44%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, among children and adolescents, and 37%, 37% and 25% among adults. The main sources of other beverages were full-fat plain milk and regular soft drinks for children and adolescents, and tea, coffee, and alcoholic drinks for adults. For adults, higher total water intake was associated with lower percent energy from fat, saturated fat, and free sugars, lower sodium and energy-dense nutrient poor food intakes but higher dietary fibre, fruit, vegetable, caffeine, and alcohol intakes. No associations were found between total water consumption and body mass index (BMI for adults and BMI z-score for children and adolescents. Conclusion: Reported water consumption was below recommendations. Higher water intakes were suggestive of

  4. Frederick National Laboratory and Georgetown University Launch Research and Education Collaboration | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREDERICK, Md. -- A new collaboration established between Georgetown University and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research aims to expand both institutions’ research and training missions in the biomedical sciences. Representatives f

  5. 76 FR 59379 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-National Universal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Nutrition Service (FNS). FNS provides grant funding and issues regulations which are utilized by WIC State..., Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 directs the Secretary of Agriculture to establish a National Universal...

  6. Understanding the social costs of psychosis: the experience of adults affected by psychosis identified within the second Australian National Survey of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, Helen J; Galletly, Cherrie A; Clark, Scott; Wilson, Jacqueline; Killen, Emily A; Anthes, Lauren; Campbell, Linda E; Hanlon, Mary-Claire; Harvey, Carol

    2012-09-01

    Social inclusion is a key priority of the Fourth National Mental Health Plan for Australia (2009-2014), with strong evidence for its protective impact on mental health. Social integration has been associated with enhanced well-being for people with mental illnesses such as psychosis. To explore the impact of psychosis on an individual's social and community participation. The second Australian national survey of psychosis was conducted across seven Australian sites. Semi-structured interviews with adults living with psychosis assessed mental health status, social and role functioning, life satisfaction and future goals. The cohort comprised 1825 adults with a psychotic illness (59.6% were male; 42.4% were aged 18-34 years; 31.5% had 12 years or more of education) of whom 32.7% had been employed in the past year. Most adults indicated experiencing loneliness (80.1%) and a need for more friends (48.1%). Men were more likely to have never had a long-term relationship (59.4% M, 33.2% F). Even though women were more likely to experience anxiety in social situations [(χ(2)(1) = 8.95, p social activity in the past year [χ(2)(2) = 11.84, p social activity and 43% described stigma as a barrier. Although 63.2% showed significant impairment in social functioning, only 29.5% had received help for this in the last year. Social isolation and loneliness were rated as major challenges by 37.2% of the cohort. Social isolation and dysfunction experienced by people with psychosis have not decreased since the last Australian national survey of people with psychosis. Alongside education and employment, social functioning and participation must be addressed to improve social inclusion for people with psychosis. Programs targeting social opportunities (befriending, peer support), social anxiety and social functioning for all stages of psychosis are warranted.

  7. Documenting Support Needs and Adjustment Gaps for Students with Disabilities: Teacher Practices in Australian Classrooms and on National Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael; Elliott, Stephen N.; Cumming, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Accommodations or adjustments for students with disabilities (SWDs) who need them are required in Australian education law and policy for classroom instruction and assessment, and external educational accountability tests. Drawing upon the structure of the Assessment Accommodations Checklist and more than a decade of accessibility research, the…

  8. Gender Differences in Factor Scores of Anxiety and Depression among Australian University Students: Implications for Counselling Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Chris F.; Melham, Therese C.

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety and depression inventory scores from 200 male and female university students attending a private university in Australia were examined for their factor structure. Once established, the two sets of factors were tested for gender-based differences, revealing that females were more likely than males to report symptomatology associated with…

  9. A Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) Framework to Develop Graduate Skills and Attributes in an Australian University's Accounting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Raymond; Kavanagh, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Universities are being placed under increasing pressure to produce employable work ready graduates who are able to cope in a rapidly changing work environment. This has resulted in universities offering their undergraduate students the opportunity to gain business acumen and real world experience by undertaking work-integrated learning (WIL) as…

  10. Self-Reported Harassment and Bullying in Australian Universities: Explaining Differences between Regional, Metropolitan and Elite Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Timothy C.; Peetz, David; Strachan, Glenda; Whitehouse, Gillian; Bailey, Janis; Broadbent, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    We analyse data from the largest survey of university staff in Australia to determine whether bullying and harassment are more common in regional than metropolitan and Go8 universities, and to what extent any differences could be attributed to other factors. While professional staff showed no difference in harassment rates between regional and…

  11. Internal Control in the National Universities in Japan with Pervasion of the Concept of COSO Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Aiko

    2011-01-01

    The National universities in Japan have become business entities since their incorporation in 2004, adopting different governance and management concepts and styles, which mostly originated in the private sector. The main idea of this paper is to examine if the most accepted concept of internal control, discussed mainly in the private sector, has influenced the governance and management of the national universities in Japan. The concept of internal control has long history beginning in th...

  12. ICT in Education: Evaluating the Concerns of the In-Service Students of Fiji National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Akash D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, most of the developing countries have concentrated themselves on evolving with the help of Information and Communication Technologies, Republic of Fiji being one of them. Fiji National University, one of the leading universities in Fiji has been playing a very important role for the development of the country. In this paper, the…

  13. 10th Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    These proceedings contains abstracts and extended abstracts of 80 lectures and posters presented at the 10th Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis hosted by the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia from 24-26 of November 1997. The conference was divided into sessions on the following topics : ion beam analysis and its applications; surface science; novel nuclear techniques of analysis, characterization of thin films, electronic and optoelectronic material formed by ion implantation, nanometre science and technology, plasma science and technology. A special session was dedicated to new nuclear techniques of analysis, future trends and developments. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual presentation included in this volume.

  14. New ceramic prevents atomic waste leaks, Australian scientists say

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Scientists at the Australian National University say they have invented a material that will safely seal radioactive atomic waste and prevent leaks from occurring for millions for years. Synroc, or synthetic rock, is an advanced ceramic which, when fused with radioactive waste, locks the waste in a crystalline structure, according to a Reuters report. A five kilogram chunk of chemically-inactive synroc is all that is left after 100 litres of radioactive waste is processed. The ceramic was developed in conjunction with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization and a consortium of four mining companies

  15. 10th Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings contains abstracts and extended abstracts of 80 lectures and posters presented at the 10th Australian conference on nuclear techniques of analysis hosted by the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia from 24-26 of November 1997. The conference was divided into sessions on the following topics : ion beam analysis and its applications; surface science; novel nuclear techniques of analysis, characterization of thin films, electronic and optoelectronic material formed by ion implantation, nanometre science and technology, plasma science and technology. A special session was dedicated to new nuclear techniques of analysis, future trends and developments. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual presentation included in this volume

  16. A Cross-Sectional Study of Horse-Related Injuries in Veterinary and Animal Science Students at an Australian University

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher B. Riley; Jessica R. Liddiard; Kirrilly Thompson

    2015-01-01

    Specific estimates of the risk of horse-related injury (HRI) to university students enrolled in veterinary and animal sciences have not been reported. This study aimed to determine the risk of student HRI during their university education, the nature and management of such injuries. A retrospective questionnaire solicited demographic information, data on students’ equine experience prior to and during their educational programs, and on HRI during their program of study. Of 260 respondents, 22...

  17. Strategies for Financing Universal Basic Education for Sustainable National Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, N. J. K.; Abdulkareem, A. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated strategies of financing universal basic education for sustainable national development by school managers in North-Central Zone, Nigeria. Specifically the purpose was to determine the relationship between commercial based income and sustainable national development as well as to examine the relationship between agricultural…

  18. 75 FR 56459 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... America A Proclamation Early in our Nation's history, higher education was not possible for most African... (HBCUs) have been valued resources for our country since their inception before the Civil War... National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, we honor these pillars of higher education in...

  19. 76 FR 58713 - National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... today. During National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, we pay homage to the daring..., and their place in the American narrative. They have produced many of our Nation's leaders in business, government, academia, and the military. Today, we recognize them as the crucibles of learning, where a young...

  20. Explaining Differences in Subjective Well-Being Across 33 Nations Using Multilevel Models: Universal Personality, Cultural Relativity, and National Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Mike W-L; Montasem, Alex

    2016-02-01

    This multinational study simultaneously tested three prominent hypotheses--universal disposition, cultural relativity, and livability--that explained differences in subjective well-being across nations. We performed multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships at both individual and cultural levels in 33 nations. Participants were 6,753 university students (2,215 men; 4,403 women; 135 did not specify), and the average age of the entire sample was 20.97 years (SD = 2.39). Both individual- and cultural-level analyses supported the universal disposition and cultural relativity hypotheses by revealing significant associations of subjective well-being with Extraversion, Neuroticism, and independent self-construal. In addition, interdependent self-construal was positively related to life satisfaction at the individual level only, whereas aggregated negative affect was positively linked with aggregate levels of Extraversion and interdependent self-construal at the cultural level only. Consistent with the livability hypothesis, gross national income (GNI) was related to aggregate levels of negative affect and life satisfaction. There was also a quadratic relationship between GNI and aggregated positive affect. Our findings reveal that universal disposition, cultural self-construal, and national income can elucidate differences in subjective well-being, but the multilevel analyses advance the literature by yielding new findings that cannot be identified in studies using individual-level analyses alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Australian Journalists' Professional and Ethical Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningham, John

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the first comprehensive national study of Australian journalists. Finds that Australian journalists are similar to their United States colleagues in distributions of age, sex, and socioeconomic background, but have less formal education. Shows that Australians have mixed professional and ethical values and are committed both to…

  2. What did you drink yesterday? Public health relevance of a recent recall method used in the 2004 Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Tim; Zhao, Jinhui; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Greenfield, Tom K

    2008-06-01

    To (i) compare the Yesterday method with other methods of assessing alcohol use applied in the 2004 Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) in terms of extent of under-reporting of actual consumption assessed from sales data; and (ii) illustrate applications of the Yesterday method as a means of variously measuring the size of an Australian 'standard drink', the extent of risky/high-risk alcohol use, unrecorded alcohol consumption and beverage-specific patterns of risk in the general population. The homes of respondents who were eligible and willing to participate. A total of 24 109 Australians aged 12 years and over. The 2004 NDSHS assessed drug use, experiences and attitudes using a 'drop and collect' self-completion questionnaire with random sampling and geographic (State and Territory) and demographic (age and gender) stratification. Self-completion questionnaire using quantity-frequency (QF) and graduated-frequency (GF) methods plus two questions about consumption 'yesterday': one in standard drinks, another with empirically based estimates of drink size and strength. The Yesterday method yielded an estimate of 12.8 g as the amount of ethanol in a typical Australian standard drink (versus the official 10 g). Estimated coverage of the 2003-04 age 12+ years per-capita alcohol consumption in Australia (9.33 ml of ethanol) was 69.17% for GF and 64.63% for the QF when assuming a 12.8 g standard drink. Highest coverage of 80.71% was achieved by the detailed Yesterday method. The detailed Yesterday method found that 60.1% of Australian alcohol consumption was above low-risk guidelines; 81.5% for 12-17-year-olds, 84.8% for 18-24-year-olds and 88.8% for Indigenous respondents. Spirit-based drinks and regular strength beer were most likely to be drunk in this way, low- and mid-strength beer least likely. Compared to more widely used methods, the Yesterday method minimizes under-reporting of overall consumption and provides unique data of public health

  3. The Research of the Crisis Pre-Warning Management System under the Particularity of Nationalities Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The nationalities universities and colleges set up the crisis pre-warning management system, not only related to the management of our nationalities universities and colleges and their growth, but also related to the country's national unity plan in some way. However, because of minority students in the particularity of the national cultural…

  4. Using neural networks and extreme value distributions to model electricity pool prices: Evidence from the Australian National Electricity Market 1998–2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, Priya; Martin, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Neural nets are unable to properly capture spiky price behavior found in the electricity market. • We modeled electricity price data from the Australian National Electricity Market over 15 years. • Neural nets need to be augmented with other modeling techniques to capture price spikes. • We fit a Generalized Pareto Distribution to price spikes using a peaks-over-thresholds approach. - Abstract: Competitors in the electricity supply industry desire accurate predictions of electricity spot prices to hedge against financial risks. Neural networks are commonly used for forecasting such prices, but certain features of spot price series, such as extreme price spikes, present critical challenges for such modeling. We investigate the predictive capacity of neural networks for electricity spot prices using Australian National Electricity Market data. Following neural net modeling of the data, we explore extreme price spikes through extreme value modeling, fitting a Generalized Pareto Distribution to price peaks over an estimated threshold. While neural nets capture the smoother aspects of spot price data, they are unable to capture local, volatile features that characterize electricity spot price data. Price spikes can be modeled successfully through extreme value modeling

  5. What do you think overdiagnosis means? A qualitative analysis of responses from a national community survey of Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Ray; Nickel, Brooke; Hersch, Jolyn; Doust, Jenny; Barratt, Alexandra; Beller, Elaine; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Objective Overdiagnosis occurs when someone is diagnosed with a disease that will not harm them. Against a backdrop of growing evidence and concern about the risk of overdiagnosis associated with certain screening activities, and recognition of the need to better inform the public about it, we aimed to ask what the Australian community understood overdiagnosis to mean. Design, setting and participants Content analysis of verbatim responses from a randomly sampled community telephone survey of 500 Australian adults, between January and February 2014. Data were analysed independently by two researchers. Main outcome measures Analysis of themes arising from community responses to open-ended questions about the meaning of overdiagnosis. Results The sample was broadly representative of the Australian population. Forty per cent of respondents thought overdiagnosis meant exaggerating a condition that was there, diagnosing something that was not there or too much diagnosis. Twenty-four per cent described overdiagnosis as overprescribing, overtesting or overtreatment. Only 3% considered overdiagnosis meant doctors gained financially. No respondents mentioned screening in conjunction with overdiagnosis, and over 10% of participants were unable to give an answer. Conclusions Around half the community surveyed had an approximate understanding of overdiagnosis, although no one identified it as a screening risk and a quarter equated it with overuse. Strategies to inform people about the risk of overdiagnosis associated with screening and diagnostic tests, in clinical and public health settings, could build on a nascent understanding of the nature of the problem. PMID:25991454

  6. Ethnic differences in overweight and obesity and the influence of acculturation on immigrant bodyweight: evidence from a national sample of Australian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Menigoz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite growing international migration and documented ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in developed countries, no research has described the epidemiology of immigrant overweight and obesity at a national level in Australia, a country where immigrants comprise 28.1 % of the population. The aim of this study was to examine ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI and overweight/obesity in Australia and the influence of acculturation on bodyweight among Australian immigrants. Methods Data from the national Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA survey were used to examine mean BMI and odds of overweight/obesity comparing immigrants (n = 2 997 with Australian born (n = 13 047. Among immigrants, acculturation differences were examined by length of residence in Australia and age at migration. Data were modelled in a staged approach using multilevel linear and logistic regression, controlling for demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results Relative to Australian born, men from North Africa/Middle East and Oceania regions had significantly higher BMIs, and men from North West Europe, North East Asia and Southern and Central Asia had significantly lower BMIs. Among women, the majority of foreign born groups had significantly lower BMIs compared with Australian born. Male and female immigrants living in Australia for 15 years or more had significantly higher BMIs and increased odds of being overweight/obese respectively, compared with immigrants living in Australia for less than 5 years. Male immigrants arriving as adolescents were twice more likely to be overweight/obese and had significantly higher BMIs than immigrants who arrived as adults. Male and female immigrants who arrived as children (≤11 years had significantly higher odds of adult overweight/obesity and BMIs. Conclusions This study provides evidence of ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in Australia with male

  7. Ethnic differences in overweight and obesity and the influence of acculturation on immigrant bodyweight: evidence from a national sample of Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menigoz, Karen; Nathan, Andrea; Turrell, Gavin

    2016-09-05

    Despite growing international migration and documented ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in developed countries, no research has described the epidemiology of immigrant overweight and obesity at a national level in Australia, a country where immigrants comprise 28.1 % of the population. The aim of this study was to examine ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI) and overweight/obesity in Australia and the influence of acculturation on bodyweight among Australian immigrants. Data from the national Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey were used to examine mean BMI and odds of overweight/obesity comparing immigrants (n = 2 997) with Australian born (n = 13 047). Among immigrants, acculturation differences were examined by length of residence in Australia and age at migration. Data were modelled in a staged approach using multilevel linear and logistic regression, controlling for demographic and socioeconomic variables. Relative to Australian born, men from North Africa/Middle East and Oceania regions had significantly higher BMIs, and men from North West Europe, North East Asia and Southern and Central Asia had significantly lower BMIs. Among women, the majority of foreign born groups had significantly lower BMIs compared with Australian born. Male and female immigrants living in Australia for 15 years or more had significantly higher BMIs and increased odds of being overweight/obese respectively, compared with immigrants living in Australia for less than 5 years. Male immigrants arriving as adolescents were twice more likely to be overweight/obese and had significantly higher BMIs than immigrants who arrived as adults. Male and female immigrants who arrived as children (≤11 years) had significantly higher odds of adult overweight/obesity and BMIs. This study provides evidence of ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in Australia with male immigrants from North Africa/Middle East and Oceania regions being

  8. How Do Students Use Their Mobile Devices to Support Learning? A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Helen; Murphy, Angela; Johnson, Chris; Carter, Brad; Lane, Michael; Midgley, Warren; Hafeez-Baig, Abdul; Dekeyser, Stijn; Koronios, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Though universities are eager to leverage the potential of mobile learning to provide learning flexibly, most balk at the cost of providing students with mobile hardware. The practice of "bring your own device" (BYOD) is often mooted as a cost-effective alternative. This paper provides a snapshot of student ownership of mobile devices at…

  9. A Hangover and a One-Night Stand: Alcohol and Risky Sexual Behaviour among Female Students at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Heidi; Smith, Kylie; Magee, Christopher A.; Jones, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption and heavy episodic drinking is increasingly common among female university students. This trend is concerning given that excessive alcohol consumption and binge drinking have several adverse effects, including increased levels of risky sexual behaviour. The findings presented here are the first step in establishing an…

  10. Self-reported harassment and bullying in Australian universities: explaining differences between regional, metropolitan and elite institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, Timothy C.; Peetz, David; Strachan, Glenda

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Association for Tertiary Education Management and the LH Martin Institute for Tertiary Education Leadership and Management. We analyse data from the largest survey of university staff in Australia to determine whether bullying and harassment are more common in regional than metropolitan...

  11. Review of Indigenous Health Curriculum in Nutrition and Dietetics at One Australian University: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M.; Mehta, Kaye; Miller, Jacqueline; Yaxley, Alison; Thomas, Jolene; Jackson, Kathryn; Wray, Amanda; Miller, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a review undertaken in 2012-2013 by Nutrition and Dietetics, Flinders University, to assess the Indigenous health curriculum of the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (BND) and Masters of Nutrition and Dietetics (MND). An action research framework was used to guide and inform inquiry. This involved four stages, each of…

  12. VET Teacher Education in Australian Universities: Who Are the Students and What Are Their Views about Their Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Hodge, Steven; Yasukawa, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, the question of the level and nature of qualifications for vocational education and training (VET) teachers is a highly contested and political topic. VET teachers are only required to have a pre-university, certificate level pedagogical qualification, the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment. They possess substantially…

  13. Tertiary Education: An Investigation of Location Selection Criteria and Preferences by International Students--The Case of Two Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Binta; Shanka, Tekle; Muuka, Gerry Nkombo

    2010-01-01

    This paper identifies and analyzes factors that influence international student selection of universities and the role that education marketing plays in the process. The research for the paper was inspired by work done by Canterbury on education marketing, published in the "Journal of Marketing for Higher Education". The study…

  14. Nexus of Learning Style with Satisfaction and Success of Accounting Students: A Cross-Cultural Study at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Jesmin; Rahman, Azizur; Boland, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the associations of cultural factors and learning styles with the satisfaction and success of undergraduate accounting students in Australia. Using a structured questionnaire, responses from 189 students were collected randomly from domestic and international students enrolled in an accounting programme at the University of…

  15. Sustainability in Higher Education's Annual Reports: An Empirical Study on Australian and Austrian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela Maria; Ossmann, Stefan F.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Higher education institutions are regarded as forerunners and pioneers of sustainability. However, it is to question whether they actually fulfill their role model function. This paper aims to reveal whether selected universities in Australia and Austria meet the reporting expectations about their activities on sustainability in very…

  16. The concept of 'intent' within Australian coronial data: factors affecting the National Coronial Information System's classification of mortality attributable to intentional self-harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Leonie; Robinson, Kerin M; Daking, Leanne; Paul, Lindsay

    Within Australia all unexpected deaths are investigated by the Coroners Court; specifically, the coroner investigates the identity of the deceased and the cause and circumstances of death. This 'unexpected death' category inevitably includes cases of self-harm and suicide. Concerns regarding the accurate reporting of national suicide statistics resulted in a review of the coding process undertaken by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), which produces the national statistics, and a formal Commonwealth Government Senate Inquiry in 2009. This article reflects data and opinions collected prior to the Senate Inquiry or the adjustment of the ABS coding processes, and explores the role of the Coroner in determining the intent of the deceased person and the role the National Coronial Information System (NCIS) 1 database plays in the provision of this information. At the Case Notification and Case Closure stages of the coronial process, administrative coders abstract from the coronial file the 'intent' of the deceased and enter the data into relevant administrative systems (which upload to the NCIS). The relevant intent code in the NCIS is 'Intentional Self-Harm', which incorporates deliberate actions of self-harm and suicide. A mixed-method study was employed to investigate anecdotal reports of a problematic coronial coding process surrounding this category of cases. A sample of Australian coroners (n=16), and of the national population of NCIS coders (n=36), were surveyed using separate instruments, and an unobtrusive case review of sampled NCIS cases (n=127) reflecting nine key mechanisms-of-death, was undertaken. Each Australian state and territory has its own Coroners Act, none of which provides legislative direction regarding the determination of intent by the coroner. Neither the coroner-respondents nor the coders favoured a standard proforma to record 'intent'. In order to inform their classificatory decision-making regarding the deceased's 'intent', the

  17. Mental health-related quality of life and the timing of motherhood: a 16-year longitudinal study of a national cohort of young Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Libby; Hockey, Richard; Ware, Robert S; Lee, Christina

    2018-01-16

    We examine timing of motherhood in a longitudinal cohort of young Australian women, and its relationship with mental health-related quality of life (SF-36 MHI-5), and with sociodemographic, health behaviour and health-related variables. We analysed longitudinal self-report data from a nationally representative cohort of 10,332 Australian women born 1973-1978, surveyed 6 times between 1996 (aged 18-23) and 2012 (aged 34-39). Group-based trajectory modelling identified four groups. Normative Mothers (46%, mean age at motherhood 30.5 years) made the transition to motherhood close to the Australian median age. Early Mothers (25%, 25.2 years) and Very Early Mothers (7%, 20.0 years) made this transition earlier; Not Mothers (22%) had not given birth. Generalised linear mixed models showed that all groups improved mean MHI-5 scores over time. Patterns of group differences were complex: Normative and Early Mothers scored consistently highest; Very Early Mothers scored lowest at most surveys; Not Mothers' scores increased relative to others over time. Most effects disappeared after adjustment for confounders. Early and Very Early Mothers showed multiple indicators of social disadvantage, while Not Mothers had very low rates of marriage. Timing of motherhood is embedded in sociodemographic and personal contexts. Women with socioeconomic advantages were characterised by higher mental health-related quality of life and later transition to motherhood, but adjustment for relative advantage attenuated differences in mental health-related quality of life. The overall findings suggest a pattern of positive adaptation to circumstances, with mental health-related quality of life improving through early adulthood regardless of timing of motherhood.

  18. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Larkin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  19. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-07-15

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  20. Social Networking Sites Use and Cross Cultural Adaptation of Muslim Indonesian Students in Australian Universities: Valuing Cultural Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Nuraryo, Imam

    2016-01-01

    Muslim Asian students have diverse specific needs when undertaking education in western country universities. Many international students use social networking sites as media for distance communication and helping in their adjustment.This study attempts to investigate the impact of using new social networking sites on the cross cultural adaptation process. Qualitative methodology was used for the study. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted for data collection. The study investigates ...

  1. Awareness of stress-reduction interventions on work attitudes: the impact of tenure and staff group in Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees’ reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1 perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2 job satisfaction for employees with 0–19 years of tenure; (3 trust in senior management for employees with 6–19 years of tenure; and (4 affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6–10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20–38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual

  2. Awareness of Stress-Reduction Interventions on Work Attitudes: The Impact of Tenure and Staff Group in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA) and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees' reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1) perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2) job satisfaction for employees with 0-19 years of tenure; (3) trust in senior management for employees with 6-19 years of tenure; and (4) affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6-10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20-38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual issues in organizational

  3. Auditing ultrasound assessment of fetal nuchal translucency thickness: a review of Australian National Data 2002-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Debbie L; Robertson, Ann C; Schluter, Philip J; McLennan, Andrew C; Hyett, Jon A

    2010-10-01

    Nuchal translucency (NT) measurement is the ultrasound component of first trimester combined screening for Down syndrome. In 2002, a NT ultrasound education and monitoring program was established in Australia. Between 2002 and 2008, a total of 728,502 NT scans were audited through this process. OVERALL AIM: To audit the availability and performance of certified operators measuring NT following implementation of the Australian education and monitoring program in 2002. Retrospective review of the central database that is used to monitor performance of individuals and practices performing NT scans in both public and private practice settings throughout Australia between 2002 and 2008. The performance of operators was assessed by a widely used international standard - that 40-60% of NT measurements should be above the median value for gestational age. The number of certified operators has increased (from 184 in 2002 to 477 in 2008). There is wide variation between states in the number of operators per birth. The percentage of certified operators with a measurement distribution meeting the international standard has increased from 40% in 2002 to 55% in 2008. Greatest improvement has been seen in operators performing 30-199 scans per year. There has been no overall improvement in performance over the last three audit cycles. The number of operators certified to perform the NT scan has increased since 2002, although availability in some states remains low. An initial improvement in performance of operators appears to have reached a plateau. It is time to become more proactive in engaging operators in the audit cycle. © 2010 The Authors. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Evolution of National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology competition in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Liu, XiangDong; Wang, XiaoPing; Zheng, XiaoDong; Lin, YuanFang; Wang, Kaiwei

    2017-08-01

    The goal of National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology Competition (NUSOSTC) is to provide a nation-wide platform for students from the colleges and universities, which have majors in the field of optics and photonics, to communicate and learning each other. Meanwhile, it works on pushing forward the popularity of optoelectronic knowledge, cultivating the students' teamwork and innovation ability, promoting higher education personnel training mode and practice teaching reform, and then improving the quality of talent training. The founding, organizational structure development and overall organizational arrangements of NUSOSTC were introduced in this paper. Besides, the competition logo, theme, title, final date, numbers of participating universities, undertaking universities and cities of the five NUSOSTCs held during 2008 to 2016 and the progress had been made were given in detail.

  5. The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) is a joint venture between the Australian mining industry through the Australian Mineral Industries Research Association Ltd. (AMIRA) and three of the organizations working most actively in this area in Australia: CSIRO Minesite Rehabilitation Research Program; University of Queensland Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation; and Curtin University Mulga Research Centre. The ACMRR was established in July 1993 to provide a national framework to conduct Strategic Research into minesite rehabilitation. It is an industry led and funded initiative. The Goals of the Centre include: to conduct strategic research into minesite rehabilitation to provide sustainable environmental solutions which are acceptable to industry, government and the community; to be recognized as a center of excellence undertaking commissioned research on minesite rehabilitation in an independent and thorough manner; to provide scientific and technological foundations to facilitate industry and government in setting acceptable standards; to act as networking and communications focus; and to enhance education and training in minesite rehabilitation. Strategic Research Programs in: Water Systems--downstream surface and groundwater quality; Land--the long-term behavior and stability of constructed landforms; Ecosystems--the long-term sustainability of constructed landforms; Waste--the long-term treatment and disposal of waste products; will allow the ACMRR to achieve these goals through specific research projects in these areas, developed with industry sponsors. This paper will discuss their progress to date, research projects underway, and plans for the future

  6. The relationship between cannabis use, depression and anxiety among Australian adults: findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, L; Hall, W; Lynskey, M

    2001-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the patterns of association between cannabis use, and anxiety and affective disorders, in the general population. Data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being, a representative survey of Australians aged 18 years and over, were analysed to address the following questions: (1) is there an association between cannabis use, DSM-IV abuse and dependence, and DSM-IV affective and anxiety disorders; (2) if so, is it explained by: demographic characteristics, levels of neuroticism, or other drug use; and (3) does the presence of a comorbid affective or anxiety disorder affect the likelihood of treatment seeking among cannabis users? There was a moderate univariate association between involvement with cannabis use in the past 12 months and the prevalence of affective and anxiety disorders. Among those with DSM-IV cannabis dependence, 14% met criteria for an affective disorder, compared to 6% of non-users; while 17% met criteria for an anxiety disorder, compared to 5% of non-users. These associations did not remain significant after including demographics, neuroticism and other drug use in multiple regressions. Cannabis use did not appear to be directly related to depression or anxiety when account was taken of other drug use. However, the association between heavier involvement with cannabis use and affective and anxiety disorders has implications for the treatment of persons with problematic cannabis use.

  7. A Cross-Sectional Study of Horse-Related Injuries in Veterinary and Animal Science Students at an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Riley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific estimates of the risk of horse-related injury (HRI to university students enrolled in veterinary and animal sciences have not been reported. This study aimed to determine the risk of student HRI during their university education, the nature and management of such injuries. A retrospective questionnaire solicited demographic information, data on students’ equine experience prior to and during their educational programs, and on HRI during their program of study. Of 260 respondents, 22 (8.5% reported HRI (27 incidents. Including concurrent injuries the most commonly injured body parts were the foot or ankle (nine of 32 injures, the upper leg or knee (eight of 32, and hands (three of 32. Trampling and being kicked by a hind limb were each associated with 30.4% of HRI, and 13% with being bitten. Bruising (91.3% of respondents and an open wound (17.4% were most commonly described. No treatment occurred for 60.9% of incidents; professional medical treatment was not sought for the remainder. Most incidents (56.5% occurred during program-related work experience placements. Although injury rates and severity were modest, a proactive approach to injury prevention and reporting is recommended for students required to handle horses as part of their education. Student accident and injury data should be monitored to ensure effective evaluation of risk-reduction initiatives. The risk and nature of university student horse-related injury (HRI was studied. Of 260 students, 22 (8.5% reported HRI (27 incidents. Including multiple injuries, reports described involvement of the foot or ankle (nine of 32 injures, upper leg or knee (eight of 32, and hands (three of 32. Trampling (30.4% and being kicked (30.4% accounted for most HRI. The injuries were usually bruising (91.3% or an open wound (17.4%. Most (60.9% injuries were untreated; professional medical treatment was not sought for the rest. Most incidents (56.5% occurred during program-related off

  8. A Cross-Sectional Study of Horse-Related Injuries in Veterinary and Animal Science Students at an Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher B; Liddiard, Jessica R; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2015-09-25

    Specific estimates of the risk of horse-related injury (HRI) to university students enrolled in veterinary and animal sciences have not been reported. This study aimed to determine the risk of student HRI during their university education, the nature and management of such injuries. A retrospective questionnaire solicited demographic information, data on students' equine experience prior to and during their educational programs, and on HRI during their program of study. Of 260 respondents, 22 (8.5%) reported HRI (27 incidents). Including concurrent injuries the most commonly injured body parts were the foot or ankle (nine of 32 injures), the upper leg or knee (eight of 32), and hands (three of 32). Trampling and being kicked by a hind limb were each associated with 30.4% of HRI, and 13% with being bitten. Bruising (91.3% of respondents) and an open wound (17.4%) were most commonly described. No treatment occurred for 60.9% of incidents; professional medical treatment was not sought for the remainder. Most incidents (56.5%) occurred during program-related work experience placements. Although injury rates and severity were modest, a proactive approach to injury prevention and reporting is recommended for students required to handle horses as part of their education. Student accident and injury data should be monitored to ensure effective evaluation of risk-reduction initiatives. The risk and nature of university student horse-related injury (HRI) was studied. Of 260 students, 22 (8.5%) reported HRI (27 incidents). Including multiple injuries, reports described involvement of the foot or ankle (nine of 32 injures), upper leg or knee (eight of 32), and hands (three of 32). Trampling (30.4%) and being kicked (30.4%) accounted for most HRI. The injuries were usually bruising (91.3%) or an open wound (17.4%). Most (60.9%) injuries were untreated; professional medical treatment was not sought for the rest. Most incidents (56.5%) occurred during program-related off

  9. The Roots and Evolution of the Royal Australian Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Relationships with the United States, Indonesia and New Zealand, (Canberra: Australian National University, 2006), 14-15; Nancy Viviani, “The Sharp...carrier. 32 quick study, Prime Minister Fraser (Liberal Party) announced that Invincible would be purchased and renamed HMAS Australia. PMS 308...increase the frequency and reach of bilateral military relations. Currently, China’s and Australia’s spheres of influence overlap in the South

  10. The Politics Are Personal: "The Australian" vs the Australian Curriculum in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tony; Collins, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between the conservative newspaper "The Australian" and the development of a national history curriculum in Australia. The lead author surveyed the major Australian press in the five-year period between 2007 and 2012 and found clear patterns of difference between "The Australian" and other…

  11. Globalisation, Transnational Academic Mobility and the Chinese Knowledge Diaspora: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Welch, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The master discourses of economic globalisation and the knowledge economy each cite knowledge diasporas as vital "trans-national human capital". Based on a case study of a major Australian university, this article examines the potential to deploy China's large and highly-skilled diaspora in the service of Chinese and Australian…

  12. Management of radioisotope, radiation generator and fuel materials for independent administrative corporations of national university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    This report states the situation, problems and proposal of management of radioisotope, radiation generator and fuel materials by independent administrative corporations of national universities. Four proposals are stated as followings; 1) in order to improve management of radioisotope, radiation generator, fuel materials and X-ray in the universities, organization and definition of the control department in each university and accident measures have to be decided. The middle object and plan should be needed. An appropriate management for proceeding researches should be discussed by closer connection of universities in the country. 2) The budget for safety control has to be identified at distribution of budget of each national university corporations. The insurance method is needed to be discussed. 3) The department in the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) should be enriched to support researches and safety control of the staff and students. 4) The system, which carries out treatment and disposal of disuse materials and keeps them under the responsibility of the nation, is necessary. (S.Y.)

  13. Academic substance and location: The national technical university of Athens' five-year program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spyrou, Kostas J.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2014-01-01

    The National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) established a small Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering in 1969, within the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Today, it is organized in four divisions, ship design and maritime transport, ship and marine...

  14. University Clinics as Field Placements in School Psychology Training: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Benson, A. Jerry

    Although many school psychology programs use university-based clinics as field placements for school psychology students, there is little information in the literature on how these clinics are organized, administered, and funded or on the nature, duration, and sequencing of clinic field experiences. A national telephone survey of 71 directors of…

  15. The University of California and the mobilization of science for national defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1992-03-01

    The discovery of fission gave new urgency to the mobilization of science in World War II. In particular, its potential for an explosive release of subatomic energy gave pause to the scientists who organized the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) and its successor, the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). These organizations were responsible for placing the scientific talent of the nation in the service of national defense, for at that time the vast majority of scientists were employed in private industry and private and public academic institutions. One of the largest academic institutions to be mobilized was the University of California, which provided the research and development for the electromagnetic method of uranium isotope separation for the first atomic bomb, and operated a new laboratory for the design of nuclear weapons at Los Alamos. The mobilization of the University of California had far-reaching consequences. The University has operated Los Alamos for almost 50 years, and Livermore ever since it was recreated as a second weapons laboratory in 1952. In what follows, I hope to indicate how the partnership between the government and the University was created, and how this affected national security decision-making in the war and post-war eras.

  16. Teaching and Assessment Practices at the National University of Lesotho: Some Critical Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlali, Tebello; Jacobs, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the teaching and assessment practices of some lecturers at the National University of Lesotho in view of the negative perception that was created in the press and also suggested in limited research findings about quality-related issues. We adopted a qualitative approach and drew from Constructivism's theoretical lens to…

  17. Investigating Learning English Strategies and English Needs of Undergraduate Students at the National University of Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriyavongsa, Thongma; Abidin, Mohamad Jafre Zainol; Sam, Rany; Mei, Leong Lai; Aloysius, Ithayaraj Britto

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate learning English strategies and the requirement of English needs of the undergraduate students at the National University of Laos (NUOL). The study employed a survey design which involved in administering questionnaires of rating scales, and adapting the items from (Barakat, 2010; Chengbin, 2008; Kathleen A, 2010;…

  18. DOD Future Energy Resources. Proceedings of Workshops Held at the National Defense University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    .... In response to concerns about U.S. and global depletion of cheap petroleum resources and the particular impact of this on future DOD energy resource needs, a series of workshops were held during 2002 and 2003 at National Defense University...

  19. A Case Study of MOOCs Design and Administration at Seoul National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheolil; Kim, Sunyoung; Kim, Mihwa; Han, Songlee; Seo, Seungil

    2014-01-01

    This research, based on the case study of edX at Seoul National University, which is running Korea's first Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), discussed and proposed the roles of principal facilitators, the process, and the relationships among various facilitators in selecting, designing, opening and administrating MOOCs classes. Researches on…

  20. Project for a multipurpose irradiation plant by the National University of the South

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, C.A.; Sastre, M.S.P. de; Curzio, O.A.

    1989-01-01

    A proyect supported by the National University of the South and CNEA (ARGENTINA) for a multiporpose irradiation plant is described and analysed. Potential demand of irradiation technology and economic impact of irradiation of onions are discussed and a general description of the facility and the importance of its geographic settlement also considered. (Author) [es

  1. Establishment of the Slovenian Universities' Repositories and of the National Open Science Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Ojsteršek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe paper presents the legal, organisational and technical perspectives regarding the implementation of the Slovenian national open access infrastructure for electronic theses and dissertations as well as for research publications. The infrastructure consists of four institutional repositories and a national portal that aggregates content from the university repositories and other Slovenian archives in order to provide a common search engine, recommendation of similar publications, and similar text detection. We have developed the software which is integrated with the universities' information and authentication systems and with the COBISS.SI. During the project the necessary legal background was defined and processes for mandatory submission of electronic theses and dissertations as well as of research publications were designed. The processes for data exchange between the institutional repositories and the national portal, and the processes for similar text detection and recommendation system were established. Bilingual web and mobile applications, a recommendation system and the interface suitable for persons with disabilities are provided to the users from around the world. The repositories are an effective promotion tool for universities and their researchers. It is expected that they will improve the recognition of Slovenian universities in the world. The complex national open access infrastructure with similar text detection support and integration with other systems will enable the storage of almost eighty percent of peer-reviewed scientific papers, annually published by Slovenian researchers. The majority of electronic theses and dissertations yearly produced at the Slovenian higher education institutions will also be accessible.

  2. Reluctant Partners in Modernization: The National Autonomous University of Mexico and Its Links with Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanos-Lomnitz, Heriberta

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes interviews with 44 Mexicans representative of industry, government, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico concerning modernization, industrialization, and technology transfer in the context of higher education. Although all supported an active role for higher education in technology transfer in public statements, they were…

  3. Analytical Study of E-Learning Resources in National Open University of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajegbomogun, Fredrick Olatunji; Okunlaya, Rifqah Olufunmilayo Afolake; Alawiye, Mariam Kehinde

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses e-learning resources in the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) using Abeokuta study center. Survey research method was adopted for this study. A questionnaire was designed and used to collect data for this study. A sample of 150 respondents was randomly selected from the final year students in the six schools of the…

  4. The Role of Ethiopia's Public Universities in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Ethiopian government has embarked on an ambitious agriculture development strategy aimed at raising Ethiopia to the status of a middle-income-level country by 2025. Encouraged by the international development push behind the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the rapid expansion of public universities has…

  5. Internationalization of Higher Education in University Institution Rankings: The Influence of National Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Márquez, Blanca L.; Hurtado-Torres, Nuria E.; Bondar, Yaroslava

    2012-01-01

    Internationalization constitutes a widespread concept in the management literature and has recently begun to be applied to higher education institutions. While previous research has analyzed the relationship between national culture and corporate profit-oriented behavior, in this study, we focus on university institutions to investigate the…

  6. Student Expectations of Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the Fiji National University (FNU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shana Nigar

    2012-01-01

    Education is a human right and Fiji's tertiary education board recently declared that all tertiary institutions in Fiji must abide by the framework in order to meet student-customers' needs. The Fiji National University's (FNU's) destiny to be Fiji's leading higher education provider could be a reality if students and staff's expectations are…

  7. Information-Seeking Behaviour of Prospective Geography Teachers at the National University of Lesotho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitso, Constance; Fourie, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports a study on information-seeking behaviour of prospective geography teachers at the National University of Lesotho based on their experiences during teaching practice. It is part of a larger doctoral study on information needs and information-seeking patterns of secondary level geography teachers in Lesotho. Method:…

  8. Policy Analyses on the Effectiveness of the National University Corporation Act: What Has Changed since 2004?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Kensuke; Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    (Purpose) While numerous data and research indicate that the fiscal practice of institutions has been influenced by National University Corporation Act (NUCA), what exactly the effect NUCA has had on institutions is not known beyond anecdotal experiences and stories. The contribution of this paper is to provide hard evidence on such institutional…

  9. National Laboratories and Universities: Building New Ways to Work Together--Report of a Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a report of a workshop held in 2003 to address best practices and remaining challenges with respect to national laboratory-university collaborations. The following are appended: (1) Committee Member Biographies; (2) Workshop Agenda; (3) Workshop Participants; (4) Glossary of Acronyms; and (5) Major Benefits and Challenges. [This…

  10. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  11. The National Energy Policy Institute (NEPI) at The University of Tulsa (F INAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, Roger [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2013-10-31

    NEPI, a non-profit organization located at The University of Tulsa (TU), was established to develop and disseminate national energy policy recommendations. Research under this grant covered a wide variety of projects, including research into the future of nuclear power, oil market pricing, and the feasibility of biofuels.

  12. Quality of helping behaviours of members of the public towards a person with a mental illness: a descriptive analysis of data from an Australian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Alyssia; Jorm, Anthony F; Reavley, Nicola J

    2014-01-18

    Courses such as Mental Health First Aid equip members of the public to perform appropriate helping behaviours towards people experiencing a mental illness or mental health crisis. However, studies investigating the general public's knowledge and skills in relation to assisting a person with a mental illness are rare. This study assesses the quality of mental health first aid responses by members of the Australian public using data from a national survey. Participants in a national survey of mental health literacy were assigned one of six vignettes (depression, depression with suicidal thoughts, early schizophrenia, chronic schizophrenia, social phobia or post-traumatic stress disorder) and asked an open-ended question about how they would help the character in the vignette. The 6,019 respondents were also asked if and how they had helped a person in real life with a similar problem. Responses to these questions were scored using a system based on an action plan developed from expert consensus guidelines on mental health first aid. The quality of responses overall was poor, with participants scoring an average of 2 out of 12. The most commonly reported actions for both questions were listening to the person, providing support and information and encouraging them to seek appropriate professional help. Actions such as assessing and assisting with crisis were rarely mentioned, even for the depression with suicidal thoughts vignette. The quality of the Australian public's mental health first aid knowledge and skills requires substantial improvement. Particular attention should be given to helping people recognise that anxiety disorders such as social phobia require professional help and to improving responses to a suicidal person.

  13. A profile of social, separation and generalized anxiety disorders in an Australian nationally representative sample of children and adolescents: Prevalence, comorbidity and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Susan H; Zubrick, Stephen R; Lawrence, David

    2017-11-01

    To examine (1) the 12-month prevalence of social anxiety disorder (SOC), separation anxiety disorder (SEP) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a large, nationally representative sample of Australian youth; (2) patterns of comorbidity between these disorders; (3) demographic and socio-environmental correlates and (4) the psychosocial impact and service use associated with each condition. Data are from the 2013/2014 Australian national, face-to-face household Young Minds Matter survey of mental health and wellbeing. Informants were parents or carers reporting on 6310, 4- to 17-year-olds (55% of eligible households). The presence of each of the three anxiety disorders was determined based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Version IV. In the past 12 months, 6.6% of youth had experienced at least one of SOC, SEP or GAD, with rates of 2.3% for SOC, 4.3% for SEP and 2.3% for GAD. Rates did not differ by gender but were significantly higher for SOC and GAD and lower for SEP in 12- to 17-year-olds than 4- to 11-year-olds. Comorbidity between these disorders was high, although lower for SEP. Having SOC, SEP or GAD was associated with not living with both biological parents, having a parent with a mental health problem, elevated negative family events, low carer employment and peer victimization. The association with family risk factors was greater for SEP than for SOC and GAD. Although the majority of anxious youth had received professional help, this was less likely in the younger cohort. Social, separation and generalized anxiety disorders in young people are relatively common and impairing, with a high level of comorbidity. There are both commonalities and differences in socio-environmental correlates. The majority of anxious youth received some form of professional assistance, although the rate was lower among children compared to adolescents.

  14. The first year of the Australian Seismometers in Schools Network: Inspiring Students to follow careers in science by participating in a national science experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first year of The Australian Seismometers in Schools program (AuSIS) has been filled with excitement as we completed installing pilot instruments in schools, launched the program nationally and received over 70 "Expressions of Interest" from schools around Australia. The data quality has exceeded expectations with schools recording local earthquakes down to magnitude 1, and large distant earthquakes. Some students participate in the program by looking up earthquake locations on maps and learning about geography, while other more advanced students have been investigating the frequency characteristics and sources of noise at their school. Both students and the schools are particularly proud that their instrument is contributing to the global scientific community and are actively incorporating seismology into the school curriculum. AuSIS is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System. Over the next four years we will build a network of 40 seismometers in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. This program is unique to other seismometers in schools programs as it uses professional seismometers to provide research quality data to the seismological community. The AuSIS project's educational aims are to: raise community awareness of earthquakes; raise awareness of seismology and geoscience, as a field of study; promote science as a possible career; and, provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments and will be stored at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. Data collected during the pilot program have provided clear recordings of

  15. General Practitioner Management of Shoulder Pain in Comparison with Rheumatologist Expectation of Care and Best Evidence: An Australian National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Staples, Margaret P.; Shanahan, E. Michael; Roos, Juliana F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether current care for common shoulder problems in Australian general practice is in keeping with rheumatologist expectations and the best available evidence. Methods We performed a mailed survey of a random sample of 3500 Australian GPs and an online survey of all 270 rheumatologists in Australia in June 2009. Each survey included four vignettes (first presentation of shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy, acute rotator cuff tear in a 45 year-old labourer and early and later presentation of adhesive capsulitis). For each vignette, GPs were asked to indicate their management, rheumatologists were asked to indicate appropriate primary care, and we determined best available evidence from relevant Cochrane and other systematic reviews and published guidelines. Results Data were available for at least one vignette for 614/3500 (17.5%) GPs and 64 (23.8%) rheumatologists. For first presentation of rotator cuff tendinopathy, 69% and 82% of GPs and 50% and 56% rheumatologists would order a shoulder X-ray and ultrasound respectively (between group comparisons P = 0.004 and Padhesive capsulitis, significantly more rheumatologists recommended treatments of known benefit (e.g. glucocorticoid injection (56% versus 14%, P<0.0001), short course of oral glucocorticoids (36% versus 6%, p<0.0001) and arthrographic distension of the glenohumeral joint (41% versus 19%, P<0.0001). Conclusions There is a mismatch between the stated management of common shoulder problems encountered in primary care by GPs, rheumatologist expectations of GP care and the available evidence. PMID:23613818

  16. General practitioner management of shoulder pain in comparison with rheumatologist expectation of care and best evidence: an Australian national survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Buchbinder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether current care for common shoulder problems in Australian general practice is in keeping with rheumatologist expectations and the best available evidence. METHODS: We performed a mailed survey of a random sample of 3500 Australian GPs and an online survey of all 270 rheumatologists in Australia in June 2009. Each survey included four vignettes (first presentation of shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy, acute rotator cuff tear in a 45 year-old labourer and early and later presentation of adhesive capsulitis. For each vignette, GPs were asked to indicate their management, rheumatologists were asked to indicate appropriate primary care, and we determined best available evidence from relevant Cochrane and other systematic reviews and published guidelines. RESULTS: Data were available for at least one vignette for 614/3500 (17.5% GPs and 64 (23.8% rheumatologists. For first presentation of rotator cuff tendinopathy, 69% and 82% of GPs and 50% and 56% rheumatologists would order a shoulder X-ray and ultrasound respectively (between group comparisons P = 0.004 and P<0001. Only 66% GPs and 60% rheumatologists would refer to an orthopaedic surgeon for the acute rotator cuff tear. For adhesive capsulitis, significantly more rheumatologists recommended treatments of known benefit (e.g. glucocorticoid injection (56% versus 14%, P<0.0001, short course of oral glucocorticoids (36% versus 6%, p<0.0001 and arthrographic distension of the glenohumeral joint (41% versus 19%, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: There is a mismatch between the stated management of common shoulder problems encountered in primary care by GPs, rheumatologist expectations of GP care and the available evidence.

  17. A place to live: housing needs for people with psychotic disorders identified in the second Australian National Survey of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Carol; Killackey, Eoin; Groves, Aaron; Herrman, Helen

    2012-09-01

    Access to adequate housing consistent with personal preferences and needs is a human right and supports recovery from psychosis. This study aimed to: (1) describe people with psychosis living in different housing types, and their preferences and needs; (2) explore selected demographic and social inclusion correlates in relation to housing; and (3) compare two subgroups - participants living in supported group accommodation and supported housing - on key demographic, functional, clinical and social inclusion variables. Current housing, preferences, needs and assistance, and housing-related social inclusion variables were assessed in a two-phase prevalence survey conducted within seven catchment areas across five Australian states. Two supported housing models were compared: supported group accommodation and supported housing (rental accommodation with in-reach support). Descriptive statistics were used. Of the total participants (n = 1825), one half were living in public or private rented housing (48.6%) and 22.7% were waiting for public housing. Despite being the preferred form of housing, only 13.1% were living in their own home. One in 20 participants (5.2%) was currently homeless; 12.8% had been homeless in the previous 12 months. Residents of supported group accommodation felt safer in their locality than those in supported housing, but experienced less privacy and choice. Although fewer participants were homeless compared with the first Australian survey of psychosis, the proportion remains high. Housing difficulties are experienced by people with psychoses living in various accommodation and concern housing adequacy and safety as well as autonomy and choice. Access to public housing is restricted compared with the identified need. Since residents of supported group accommodation felt safer in their locality than those in supported housing, but experienced less privacy and choice, each supported housing model may offer different advantages to people with

  18. The Application of Instructional Design in the National Open University of the Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco Wen-Ruey Lee

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available 無Designing instruction through the systematic approach is a way to assure the efficiency and the effectiveness of teaching and learning. Since the institute was established in August 1986, the National Open University of R.O.C. has adapted this concept into her system. Experts in the university developed an eight-step model for the carrying out of this instructional design concept. Main tasks to be executed at each step are clearly identified and stated in this model. Each member of the course design team, which includes the subject matter experts, the instructional designer, the media specialist, and the team assistant, follows this model to perform his or her duties. In the past years, this ID model has been widely applied to all NOU courses. Though, many difficulties and problems encountered, it is leading the instructions of the National Open University up to the goal of efficiency and effectiveness.

  19. National University Extension Policy: analysis of the experience of the Institute of Health Sciences of UFPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durbens Martins Nascimento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study purpose refers to the university extension, addressing the concepts of university, organization, knowledge andextension. We sought to answer the following question: Does the outcome that has been generated through projects on extension practices developed by ICS/UFPA actually fulfill the guidelines of the National University Extension Policy? The pursued objective consisted in a general analysisof the extension practices of the Institute of Health Sciences (ICS at the Federal University of Pará (UFPA in the light of the National University Extension Policy (NUEP, comprehending dialogical interaction, interdisciplinary and interprofessionalism, teaching-research-extension inseparability, impact on student training, and impact and social transformation envisaged within the Policy Extension of UFPA. The research methodology comprehended a quantitative and qualitative approach supported by bibliographic and documentary supply. It was consulted the collection of various documents, given more evidence to those focused on the university extension in 2012, contained into several instances of UFPA. A number of 80 projects and 60 reports of extension of ICS were selected for analysis in the year 2012. The results revealed that the guidelines of PNEU fell far short of being reached by the ICS products, when it came to interdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism, teaching-research-extension inseparability, and impact and social transformation. Furthermore, there was little participation by teachers, students and administrative technicians of ICS in such activity. It was concluded that the extension model of ICS consists is a welfare model, developed through service provision.

  20. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Minnesota National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore), operated by the University of Minnesota is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  1. Profile of 1 year of fieldwork experiences for undergraduate occupational therapy students from a large regional Australian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lynette; O'Toole, Gjyn

    2017-10-01

    Objective Fieldwork experience is a significant component of many health professional education programs and affects future practice for graduates. The present study used self-reported student data to produce a profile of undergraduate student placement experiences. Methods Cross-sectional surveys exploring placement location, setting and client types, models of supervision, interventions and financial costs were completed by students following each placement. Data were analysed using descriptive analysis. Results Placements were predominantly conducted outside capital cities (69.8%; n=184), with 25.8% (n=68) in rural settings. Students experienced predominantly public health in-patient settings and community settings, with only 15% experiencing private settings. Conclusions The placement profile of undergraduate occupational therapy students appeared to be consistent with workforce reports on occupational therapy professional practice. What is known about the topic? Fieldwork experienced by health professional students is critical to preparing new graduates for practice. Although the World Federation of Occupational Therapy provides guidance on what is required for occupational therapy fieldwork experience, little is known about what students actually experience during their fieldwork placements. What does this paper add? The present study is the first to document the range of fieldwork experienced by occupational therapy students in one program over 1 year, and provides the basis for comparison with other occupational therapy programs, as well as other disciplines nationally and internationally. What are the implications for practitioners? Occupational therapy students experienced few opportunities in private practice or speciality services, and had mostly one-on-one supervision. To provide a future workforce that is able to address the changing health system, it is vital that students are exposed to a range of fieldwork experiences and supervision styles that

  2. Collaborative networks and patent production in Andean Community of Nations universities (UCANS, 2005-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Agüero Aguilar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The competitiveness and technological development of a region are measured by the degree of innovation supporting them. The quantity and quality of patents generated and applied in production dynamics serve as an element for evaluation. In this sense, universities play a role as generators and transmitters of knowledge. So it is important to identify the level of their collaboration and the trends in terms of technology application in order to establish future policies for development in this sector. This article identifies the degree of collaboration, types of patents, actors (primary and secondary and dynamics of patents produced at the Andean Community of Nations universities during the period 2005-2015 and present in the European Patent Office database. In conclusion, there is a great disparity between CAN universities regarding patent production, so it is necessary to strengthen the collaborative level among universities in this community. Nevertheless, an increase is seen in the production of patents.

  3. Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury among lesbian, gay, bisexual and heterosexual adults: Findings from an Australian national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swannell, Sarah; Martin, Graham; Page, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated associations between sexual orientation and measures of suicidality and non-suicidal self-injury in Australian adults. Previous studies of sexual orientation and suicidality have been limited by unclear conceptualisations of suicidal intent, failure to differentiate between homosexuality and bisexuality, inattention to gender differences and use of convenience-based samples. A large (N = 10,531) representative national sample of Australian adults was used to investigate associations between sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual) and (1) suicidal ideation, (2) attempted suicide and (3) non-suicidal self-injury, for males and females separately, in a series of sequentially adjusted logistic regression models. Sexual minority participants were at greater risk of suicidality and self-injury than heterosexuals, after adjusting for age and other covariates, with patterns of risk differing by sexual orientation and gender. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, gay men, but not bisexual men, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = [1.65, 5.60]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.16, confidence interval = [2.18, 7.93]). Bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 4.40, confidence interval = [3.00, 6.37]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.46, confidence interval = [2.41, 8.24]). Neither bisexual nor gay men were more likely than heterosexual men to report self-injury. However, bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely than heterosexual women to report self-injury (odds ratio = 19.59, confidence interval = [9.05, 42.40]). Overall, bisexual females were at greatest risk of suicidality and self-injury. Clinicians working with sexual minority populations are encouraged to openly discuss suicidal and self-injurious thoughts and behaviours with their clients and may consider using therapeutic

  4. Australian synchrotron radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron Radiation Program, ASRP, has been set up as a major national research facility to provide facilities for scientists and technologists in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science who need access to synchrotron radiation. Australia has a strong tradition in crystallography and structure determination covering small molecule crystallography, biological and protein crystallography, diffraction science and materials science and several strong groups are working in x-ray optics, soft x-ray and vacuum ultra-violet physics. A number of groups whose primary interest is in the structure and dynamics of surfaces, catalysts, polymer and surfactant science and colloid science are hoping to use scattering methods and, if experience in Europe, Japan and USA can be taken as a guide, many of these groups will need third generation synchrotron access. To provide for this growing community, the Australian National Beamline at the Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan, has been established since 1990 through a generous collaboration with Japanese colleagues, the beamline equipment being largely produced in Australia. This will be supplemented in 1997 with access to the world's most powerful synchrotron x-ray source at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA. Some recent experiments in surface science using neutrons as well as x-rays from the Australian National Beamline will be used to illustrate one of the challenges that synchrotron x-rays may meet

  5. BUILDING RUSSIAN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ NATIONAL IDENTITY IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY (ANALYSIS OF MULTICULTURAL NATIONS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Pluzhnik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Development of the pedagogical toolkit for building national identity of young generation has a special significance in terms of modern globalization processes that weaken the national unity and national identity of many countries. Present-day Russian multicultural society is in the search of a meaningful content of the new Russian identity, which is supposed to serve as the basis of the country. In this regard, it is of vital importance to consider the effective experience of national identity development in countries characterized by an extended multicultural structure. The aim of the article is to study, put together and critically assess productive international approaches, methods and technologies for building of university students’ national identity acceptable in the Russian higher education system. Methodology and research methods. The methodology is based on the personal identity theory, the concept of national identity, the theory of ethno-cultural and national stereotypes and the theory of intercultural interaction. To conduct an empirical study, a survey method (questionnaire and the methodology of content analysis were applied. The research methods used in the study include comparative, historical, and contrastive methods. Results and scientific novelty. The concept «national identity» has no common interpretation because of complexity of the term and rather short history of its use in the Russian pedagogical studies; thus, the authors have clarified the definition. Structural and content-related components of the national identity of students have been stated: cognitive, emotional and behavioral, which correlate with national consciousness, national feelings and nationally-based behavior. Practical methods and technologies that ensure a balanced development of ethnocultural and national components of university students’ national identity have been revealed, systematized and structured: inclusive and activity

  6. Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed photovoltaic generation in the Australian National Electricity Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Dylan; Hearps, Patrick; Eales, Dominic; Sandiford, Mike; Dunn, Rebecca; Wright, Matthew; Bateman, Lachlan

    2013-01-01

    In electricity markets that use a merit order dispatch system, generation capacity is ranked by the price that it is bid into the market. Demand is then met by dispatching electricity according to this rank, from the lowest to the highest bid. The last capacity dispatched sets the price received by all generation, ensuring the lowest cost provision of electricity. A consequence of this system is that significant deployments of low marginal cost electricity generators, including renewables, can reduce the spot price of electricity. In Australia, this prospect has been recognized in concern expressed by some coal-fired generators that delivering too much renewable generation would reduce wholesale electricity prices. In this analysis we calculate the likely reduction of wholesale prices through this merit order effect on the Australian National Electricity Market. We calculate that for 5 GW of capacity, comparable to the present per capita installation of photovoltaics in Germany, the reduction in wholesale prices would have been worth in excess of A$1.8 billion over 2009 and 2010, all other factors being equal. We explore the implications of our findings for feed-in tariff policies, and find that they could deliver savings to consumers, contrary to prevailing criticisms that they are a regressive form of taxation. - Highlights: ► We model the impact of photovoltaic generation on the Australian electricity market. ► Photovoltaic generation depresses electricity prices, particularly in summer peaks. ► Over the course of a year, the depression in wholesale prices has significant value. ► 5 GW of solar generation would have saved $1.8 billion in the market over two years. ► The depression of wholesale prices offsets the cost of support mechanisms

  7. KĀFIR PRIDE: AN EXAMINATION OF THE RECENT APPARENT RISE IN AUSTRALIAN ANTI-ISLAMIC ACTIVITY AND THE CHALLENGES IT PRESENTS FOR NATIONAL SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Fry

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple high-profile instances of anti-Islamic activity in Australia throughout 2015 – for example, the Reclaim Australia rallies in April and July, and the establishment of an anti-Islamic federal political party – is in keeping with increased Islamophobia observed in other western nations. While a key driving force behind this phenomenon is the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, ongoing jihadi violence – particularly atrocities committed by or on behalf of Islamic State –has served to reinforce anti-Islamic sentiment. Although objections to Islam are ostensibly cultural and religious, the prejudiced nature of Islamophobia essentially operates as racism. Emergent discourses about Islamic culture – for example, fears of Sharia law being imposed on western society – have positioned Muslims as an “enemy” who endanger western cultural values, and even present an existential threat. Accordingly, the risk of violence from anti-Islamic elements is not insignificant. To that end, this paper examines the range of security issues arising from Australian Islamophobic activity in two parts. First, it provides historical and cultural context for contemporary Islamophobia, noting the parallels and overlap with similar movements in the West. The primary themes promoted by anti-Islamic groups, and the manner by which they interact with audiences, are also analysed, noting the heavy emphasis on online communication, and how this translates to offline activities. Second, it will examine the types of potential or actual security risks that anti-Islamic activity presents to Australian authorities, describing a spectrum of increasing intensity that incorporates communication, physical violence, radicalisation and terrorism.

  8. Do Clinicians Ask Pregnant Women about Exposures to Tobacco and Cannabis Smoking, Second-Hand-Smoke and E-Cigarettes? An Australian National Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian S. Gould

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians often ask pregnant women about tobacco smoking, but their practices of asking about other smoking and nicotine exposures are unknown. This study analysed how often clinicians ask pregnant women about their use of e-cigarettes, cannabis, chewing tobacco, and second-hand smoke (SHS exposure. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken. A random sample of 500 General Practitioner (GP members were invited from the National Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NFATSIH to complete an on-line survey, and 5571 GP and Obstetrician (OBS members of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG were sent a paper survey by mail. Questions on frequency of asking about the exposures used Likert Scales, later dichotomized to “often-always” and “never-sometimes”. Logistic regressions estimated associations between clinician type and asking about cannabis, e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco, and SHS. An adjusted model reduced potential confounders of location, guidelines, gender and population. n = 378 GPs and OBS participated (6.2% response. In total, 13–14% asked “often-always” about e-cigarettes; 58% cannabis; 38% cannabis with tobacco; 27% SHS, and 10% chewing tobacco—compared to 95% of the sample asking about cigarette smoking. After adjustment, the odds of RANZCOG GPs (OR 0.34 and OBS (OR 0.63 asking about cannabis were lower compared to NFATSIH GPs. Clinician type was non-significant for asking about e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco and SHS. Surveyed Australian GPs and obstetricians asked less frequently about e-cigarettes, chewing, SHS exposure, and cannabis, potentially missing important exposures for mother and child.

  9. The Phoenix syndrome: the National and University Library of Slovenia in 1941-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose: The period from 1941 to 1950 was a turning point in the history of the present National and university library. At the beginning of the II World War the library (at that time known as the University Library moved to the new palace, constructed by the architect Jožef Plečnik, to be in 1944 severely damaged by fire. However, it was reconstructed by the end of the decade and its library collections grew from 335.000 to 500.000 volumes. The number of library employees increased from 10 to 58 and the formal recognition of its national functions made it one of the most important national institutions.Methodology/approach: The article is based on archival documents and records of the National and university library from the period of 1941-1950.Results: During and after the war the library had a privileged status which was manifested in furnishing and reconstruction of the building, in the growth of library collections through numerous gifts which were received during and after the war to substitute the burnt collections, as well as in acquisition of library materials from the Federal Collection Centre. Its storages remained intact in spite of the war and the rigid censorship and the library was even allowed to collect and to store forbidden publications.Research limitation: The comparison with other national libraries and a socio-historical theoretical interpretation could be a fruitful continuation of this kind of study.Originality/practical implications: The case study explores the position of national library in the specific socio-political circumstances.

  10. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric; Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The UW-Madison Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in astrophysics (http://www.astro.wisc.edu/undergrads/uw-madison-reu-program/) is partnering with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the National Society of Black Physicists, and other universities in an entity called the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/). The mission of the NAC is to increase the numbers of students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. This begins with a cohort of students who are part of the regular REU program. In addition to working on original research projects under the mentorship of university astronomers and astrophysics, the cohort students participate in professional development seminars and join other NAC cohort sites in a diversity speaker series. The mentor-student and student-student connections continue beyond the summer, including a fall meeting of the national NAC cohorts. The UW-Madison REU program is supported by the National Science Foundation through Award AST-1004881.

  11. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  12. Diagnosis of the quality of service, in customer service, at the National University of Chimborazo- Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Yépez, Wilfrido; Cabrera Vallejo, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the quality of service of improvements in the enrollment processes at the National University of Chimborazo- Ecuador. This cross-sectional research is the result of a field work, where an analysis of the collected information was carried out, through surveys applied to the students, through the SERVQUAL model, afterwards, comparing these found aspects and determining The gap between perceptions and expectations, thus determining the quality of servi...

  13. Impact of Facebook Usage on Undergraduate Students Performance in Irbid National University: Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Altaany, Fawzi H.; Jassim, Firas A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the style of Facebook usage between undergraduate students and the impact on their academics performance. Also, this paper was evaluated in the view of student the using of Facebook. A questioner was design for collecting data from a sample of 480 undergraduate students in Irbid National University. The survey revealed that 77% of the students have an account on Facebook. One of the main findings is that there was a significant relationship between gend...

  14. Self-reported discriminatory and positive behaviours towards people with mental health problems: findings from an Australian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola J; Morgan, Amy J; Rossetto, Alyssia; Jorm, Anthony F

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore self-reported avoidance, discrimination, and positive treatment by members of the public towards people with mental health problems. In 2014, telephone interviews were carried out with 5220 Australians aged 18 +. Respondents were asked if they had known an adult with a mental health problem over the previous 12 months. If they had, they were asked further questions about the person's age, gender, relationship to the respondent, and their mental health problem. Respondents were then asked if they had avoided, discriminated against or treated the person more positively and, if so, some details about what happened. 19.9% of respondents reported avoiding someone with a mental health problem, with the most common reasons being difficulty tolerating the person's behaviour and needing time out. However, respondents were more likely to report treating the person with mental health problems more positively (73.0%) than avoiding or discriminating against them (4.7%). The most common positive behaviours were non-specific support and maintaining or increasing contact. Avoidance was less likely from friends and those aged 60 +. Discrimination was more likely from family members and spouses and less likely from respondents aged 60 +. Positive treatment was more likely from people who had experienced a mental health problem. This study provides insight into the reasons why people avoid others with mental health problems. The results can provide input into the design of anti-discrimination interventions and further empower people with mental health problems as they advocate for change in the area of discrimination.

  15. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  16. The role of Ethiopia's public universities in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Paul

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the Ethiopian government has embarked on an ambitious agriculture development strategy aimed at raising Ethiopia to the status of a middle-income-level country by 2025. Encouraged by the international development push behind the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the rapid expansion of public universities has taken centre stage in facilitating the country's aim of equipping a new generation with the expertise needed to fuel the country's economic development. While impressive strides have been made over the last two decades, various development challenges threaten to derail this promising progress. This article examines three of the main challenges - urbanisation, climate change and food security - and the potential for universities to address them. Based on a study using key informant analysis research with 50 experts in Ethiopian education and development, the author concludes that the developing public university system offers promising capabilities to assist the country on its developmental path despite many inherent problems.

  17. The Role of the University Professors as a Reference Group in the Promotion of the National Products of Jordan (Case Study on Universities and Industrial Companies in Jordan)

    OpenAIRE

    Basim Anagreh; Fathi Abdullah Al-share

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the importance of the university professors in the promotion of the national products of Jordan in the light that the social position of the university professor in the Jordanian society is not less important than any social dignities and leaders who have impacts on the consumer behavior. Moreover, his ability to form the intellectual and cultural backgrounds of the general public through the highest scientific forum; that is the Jordanian universities. The scientif...

  18. Analysis of Risks in a Learning Management System: A Case Study in the Spanish National University of Distance Education (UNED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Cano, Esteban; Sevillano García, Ma. Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a research that examines the university students' risk perception when using a Learning Management System called "aLF" and implemented by the Spanish National University of Distance Education (UNED) for the development of its university distance studies. The development of comprehensive Learning Management Systems…

  19. University Language Policies in Estonia and Sweden: Exploring the Interplay between English and National Languages in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Josep; Björkman, Beyza; Kuteeva, Maria

    2018-01-01

    As universities seek to become more international, their need to engage with a wider range of languages, particularly English, seems more prominent. At the same time, universities are also regarded by many stakeholders as key institutions to preserve a given national language and culture. This apparent tension makes universities a fruitful ground…

  20. Great hospitals of Asia: the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Chi Heon; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Established in 1957, the Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is the one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea. The seven past Chairmen (Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, Byung-Kyu Cho, Hyun Jib Kim, Hee-Won Jung, and Dong Gyu Kim) have devoted themselves to the development of the department. The current chair, Chun Kee Chung, assumed the position in July 2010. The current department comprises several clinical programs that encompass the entire spectrum of neurosurgical disorders, with 29 specialized faculty members and care teams in three hospitals: Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), Boramae Medical Center (BMC), and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The remarkable growth of the department during the last half century made it possible to perform 5,666 operations (3,299 at SNUH, 411 at BMC and 1,860 at SNUBH) during 2009. A total of 1,201 articles authored by faculty members were published in scientific journals between 1958 and 2009, approximately 32% of which were published in international journals. The department is regarded as the "Mecca" of neurosurgery in Korea because of its outstanding achievement and the many distinguished alumni with leadership roles in the academic field. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Austrialian National Chinese Japanese Korean Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Providing access to Asian-language materials has always been a problem for libraries. There are particular difficulties in acquiring Asian materials, in cataloguing them and providing access, and in incorporating them in library systems. There is, however, an urgent and growing need for access to Asian materials. Part of the response of the Australian library community to the difficulties and to the increasing need has been the Australian National CJK (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) Project. The CJK Project is a co-operative project involving seven Australian universities and the National Library of Australia. Membership is expected to grow to include other Australian research libraries, some public research libraries and some overseas libraries.

  2. Emerging infectious diseases in free-ranging wildlife-Australian zoo based wildlife hospitals contribute to national surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Cox-Witton

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly originating from wildlife. Many of these diseases have significant impacts on human health, domestic animal health, and biodiversity. Surveillance is the key to early detection of emerging diseases. A zoo based wildlife disease surveillance program developed in Australia incorporates disease information from free-ranging wildlife into the existing national wildlife health information system. This program uses a collaborative approach and provides a strong model for a disease surveillance program for free-ranging wildlife that enhances the national capacity for early detection of emerging diseases.

  3. Remote access to information sources in National and university library: development of service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazd Vodeb

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available National and University Library established remote access to information sources in september 2004. The article describes implementation and development of the service. Library wanted to offer information sources to users wherever and whenever they would need them. First main evaluation criteria for software selection were integration with existing authentication system and second no need for intervention user side. The EZproxy software from Useful Utilities was chosen. Key step to implementation was establishing communication between software applications EZproxy and COBISS library automation system. Library needed to obtain licence agreements from publishers. Promotion campaign aimed to notify large number of users. Only users of National & University Library were able to use the service. Other users and libraries of Ljubljana University requested to authenticate by credentials of their library. Remote access service was developed further in order to enable authentication for other libraries. We needed to establish authentication and authorisation system and also upgrade and install the communication command procedure on different servers. The data about service usage are presented.

  4. Professional practices: a short introduction of national nuclear activities to university students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Hugo R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of precedents annual works presented in AATN Meetings, informing about activities of Institutional Affairs Sector of Central Region delegation of National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA-RC). Regular activities in Cordoba city, have been carried out during half a century in urban zone of Cordoba City. Activities show a long misunderstanding and confrontations with the provincial and municipal authorities, and with the neighbors and environmentalist antinuclear organizations. The experience indicates that the people demands for the protection of health or environment, and sometimes the claiming for closing some facilities, have been directly related with what people really know about the activities in the site. The common denominator that one observes in the conflicts of the past, is the high degree of ignorance on the part of the citizenship on the activities that are carried out in the place. This is valid for the neighbors, the competent authorities and even for Cordoba's university, scientific and technical qualified community. Starting from the recognition of the responsibility that has the institution of informing the population appropriately on what is carried out in their facilities, the CNEA-RC had developed an institutional process of Professional Practices of university students which is described in this paper. The experience of two years, has shown that results are positive because the university community (teachers, students and researchers) knows now the real status of national nuclear activities. (author) [es

  5. Establishment of a National Wind Energy Center at University of Houston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Su Su [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The DOE-supported project objectives are to: establish a national wind energy center (NWEC) at University of Houston and conduct research to address critical science and engineering issues for the development of future large MW-scale wind energy production systems, especially offshore wind turbines. The goals of the project are to: (1) establish a sound scientific/technical knowledge base of solutions to critical science and engineering issues for developing future MW-scale large wind energy production systems, (2) develop a state-of-the-art wind rotor blade research facility at the University of Houston, and (3) through multi-disciplinary research, introducing technology innovations on advanced wind-turbine materials, processing/manufacturing technology, design and simulation, testing and reliability assessment methods related to future wind turbine systems for cost-effective production of offshore wind energy. To achieve the goals of the project, the following technical tasks were planned and executed during the period from April 15, 2010 to October 31, 2014 at the University of Houston: (1) Basic research on large offshore wind turbine systems (2) Applied research on innovative wind turbine rotors for large offshore wind energy systems (3) Integration of offshore wind-turbine design, advanced materials and manufacturing technologies (4) Integrity and reliability of large offshore wind turbine blades and scaled model testing (5) Education and training of graduate and undergraduate students and post- doctoral researchers (6) Development of a national offshore wind turbine blade research facility The research program addresses both basic science and engineering of current and future large wind turbine systems, especially offshore wind turbines, for MW-scale power generation. The results of the research advance current understanding of many important scientific issues and provide technical information for solving future large wind turbines with advanced design

  6. Young people's mental health first aid intentions and beliefs prospectively predict their actions: findings from an Australian National Survey of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Marie Bee Hui; Jorm, Anthony Francis

    2012-04-30

    Little is known about whether mental health first aid knowledge and beliefs of young people actually translate into actual behavior. This study examined whether young people's first aid intentions and beliefs predicted the actions they later took to help a close friend or family member with a mental health problem. Participants in a 2006 national survey of Australian youth (aged 12-25 years) reported on their first aid intentions and beliefs based on one of four vignettes: depression, depression with alcohol misuse, psychosis, and social phobia. At a two-year follow-up interview, they reported on actions they had taken to help any family member or close friend with a problem similar to the vignette character since the initial interview. Of the 2005 participants interviewed at follow-up, 608 reported knowing someone with a similar problem. Overall, young people's first aid intentions and beliefs about the helpfulness of particular first aid actions predicted the actions they actually took to assist a close other. However, the belief in and intention to encourage professional help did not predict subsequent action. Findings suggest that young people's mental health first aid intentions and beliefs may be valid indicators of their subsequent actions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Discussion Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Summary Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community. Additionally, it is imperative

  8. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley Christopher P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Discussion Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Summary Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community

  9. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Lindsey N; Cohen, Elizabeth F; Morley, Christopher P

    2010-06-04

    The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community. Additionally, it is imperative that stateless populations be

  10. Co-morbid depression is associated with poor work outcomes in persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD: A large, nationally representative survey in the Australian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neil Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-morbid major depressive disorder (MDD and cardiovascular disease (CVD is associated with poor clinical and psychological outcomes. However, the full extent of the burden of, and interaction between, this co-morbidity on important vocational outcomes remains less clear, particularly at the population level. We examine the association of co-morbid MDD with work outcomes in persons with and without CVD. Methods This study utilised cross-sectional, population-based data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (n = 8841 to compare work outcomes of individuals with diagnostically-defined MDD and CVD, MDD but not CVD, CVD but not MDD, with a reference group of "healthy" Australians. Workforce participation was defined as being in full- or part-time employment. Work functioning was measured using a WHO Disability Assessment Schedule item. Absenteeism was assessed using the 'days out of role' item. Results Of the four groups, those with co-morbid MDD and CVD were least likely to report workforce participation (adj OR:0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6. Those with MDD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI:0.7-0.9 and CVD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9 also reported significantly reduced odds of participation. Employed individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD were 8 times as likely to experience impairments in work functioning (adj OR:8.1, 95% CI: 3.8- 17.3 compared with the reference group. MDD was associated with a four-fold increase in impaired functioning. Further, individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD reported greatest likelihood of workplace absenteeism (adj. OR:3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-6.6. Simultaneous exposure to MDD and CVD conferred an even greater likelihood of poorer work functioning. Conclusions Co-morbid MDD and CVD is associated with significantly poorer work outcomes. Specifically, the effects of these conditions on work functioning are synergistic. The development of specialised treatment programs for those with co

  11. Co-morbid depression is associated with poor work outcomes in persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD): a large, nationally representative survey in the Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Adrienne; Williams, Emily D; Stevenson, Christopher E; Oldenburg, Brian; Sanderson, Kristy

    2012-01-18

    Co-morbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with poor clinical and psychological outcomes. However, the full extent of the burden of, and interaction between, this co-morbidity on important vocational outcomes remains less clear, particularly at the population level. We examine the association of co-morbid MDD with work outcomes in persons with and without CVD. This study utilised cross-sectional, population-based data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (n = 8841) to compare work outcomes of individuals with diagnostically-defined MDD and CVD, MDD but not CVD, CVD but not MDD, with a reference group of "healthy" Australians. Workforce participation was defined as being in full- or part-time employment. Work functioning was measured using a WHO Disability Assessment Schedule item. Absenteeism was assessed using the 'days out of role' item. Of the four groups, those with co-morbid MDD and CVD were least likely to report workforce participation (adj OR:0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6). Those with MDD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI:0.7-0.9) and CVD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9) also reported significantly reduced odds of participation. Employed individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD were 8 times as likely to experience impairments in work functioning (adj OR:8.1, 95% CI: 3.8- 17.3) compared with the reference group. MDD was associated with a four-fold increase in impaired functioning. Further, individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD reported greatest likelihood of workplace absenteeism (adj. OR:3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-6.6). Simultaneous exposure to MDD and CVD conferred an even greater likelihood of poorer work functioning. Co-morbid MDD and CVD is associated with significantly poorer work outcomes. Specifically, the effects of these conditions on work functioning are synergistic. The development of specialised treatment programs for those with co-morbid MDD and CVD is required.

  12. ELECTRONIC MEDIA LEARNING MATERIALS OF INDIRA GANDHI NATIONAL OPEN UNIVERSITY, INDIA: An Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Roy. V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU in 1985 has been a milestone in the growth of higher education in India. A very special feature of the University is that a composite of several instructional methods in practice are aimed at giving effective support to distance learners. Self-instructional print materials are the mainstay of the courseware. Besides this, at the support centres, the learners attend a few face-to-face counselling sessions and get access to audio-video materials stocked in the library. Gyandarshan and Gyanvani, the educational television and radio channels broadcast programmes with academic content. The curriculum-based audio-video programmes developed by the University are supplementary in nature. This blending of traditional printed self-learning materials with electronic courseware is a conscious decision of the University which is intended to enhance the quality and effectiveness of learning. Over the years, audio and video cassettes have made way for digital compact discs. Resultant development in information and communication technology heralded virtual campus initiatives of IGNOU, conspicuous among them being the creation of eGyanKosh, the digital repository of the learning materials of IGNOU. Nevertheless, majority of the academic programmes are not being provided audio video supports. The paper analyses the application of electronic media in IGNOU’s course delivery platform.

  13. Evaluation of the Department of Neurosurgery of the Seoul National University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Neurosurgery (DNS) of the Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), belongs to the largest and oldest such institutions in Korea. Because of its growing reputation it is hardly surprising that the DNS draws visitor and scholars for clinical education and academic exchange from far beyond Korea. I myself visited the SNUH in February and March 2013. During this time I composed this evaluation in which I compare the DNS to my home Department at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz/Germany, as well as the situation of Neurosurgery in Korea and Germany in general. In the first part this evaluation summarizes data concerning equipment, staff and organizational structure, as well as educational and scientific issues of the DNS. In the second part some issues of interest are discussed in special regard to the corresponding practices in Germany. PMID:23908698

  14. Exploring the views and experiences of callers to the PANDA Post and Antenatal Depression Association Australian National Perinatal Depression Helpline: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Laura J; Shafiei, Touran; Forster, Della A; Small, Rhonda; McLachlan, Helen L

    2015-09-07

    Anxiety and depression are common in the perinatal period. Telephone interventions, including telephone peer support and counselling, have been developed to support those experiencing perinatal mental illness. PANDA Post and Antenatal Depression Association provides support to women and men experiencing perinatal mental illness via the Australian National Perinatal Depression Helpline, encompassing both volunteer peer support and professional counselling. This study aimed to explore the experiences of callers to the Helpline. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All new callers from 1(st) May to 30(th) September 2013 were invited to participate. The survey, adapted from a previous survey of PANDA callers, included 23 questions using Likert-type scales, demographic and open-ended questions. Thematic network analysis was undertaken for responses to open-ended questions. 124 responses were received (124/405; 30% response). The majority of callers had called the Helpline regarding themselves (90%), with over one third (33%) of all callers seeking crisis support and help. Ninety-nine per cent of respondents 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that staff and/or volunteers understood their concerns, and 97% 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that overall PANDA had helped them. Callers described the PANDA service as uniquely tailored to the perinatal period, providing accessible, non-judgemental understanding and support, with a global theme from open-ended comments describing PANDA as 'a safe space to be heard and receive support without judgement'. Recommendations for service changes included increased hours of availability. Callers reported positive experiences of accessing support from the PANDA National Perinatal Depression Helpline. The Helpline was described as an accessible and acceptable telephone support for individuals experiencing perinatal mental illness. Recommendations for changes to the service included an increase in hours of operation to enable greater

  15. Users Behavior in Selecting Cited Bibliographies-A Case Study of National Taiwan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This project analyzes the behavior of selecting cited bibliographies of college and graduate students in National Taiwan University when they are writing their term papers and graduate theses. After instruction, 33 subjects searched through the semester, doing 41 searches and finishing 40 papers. This research studies the overlaps between the bibliographies from online searching and the cited references of those subjects’ works. In addition, this project attempts to identify the sources of articles that are not retrieved by the Dialog system and the reasons why students did not cite relevant articles.[Article content in Chinese

  16. Academic substance and location: The national technical university of Athens' five-year program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spyrou, Kostas J.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2014-01-01

    The National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) established a small Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering in 1969, within the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Today, it is organized in four divisions, ship design and maritime transport, ship and marine...... charge for European Union students, while a small fee is charged for students from other countries. In the first two years, the students are taught the fundamentals of engineering science. The core courses are taught in the third year. The wide spectrum of expertise that exists in school means that most...

  17. Institution repository of National Aviation University – new online resource of electronic library

    OpenAIRE

    О. В. Іванкевич; В. Ю. Вахнован

    2013-01-01

    The principles of institutional repository of the National Aviation University based on Dspace software environment are considered. Here are considered the principles of forming the repository content, which must consist of materials of scientific conferences, funds of faculties and departments, annotated reports, research topics, articles of scientific journals, student theses and dissertations abstracts, patents, publications, independent researchers and others Рассмотрены принципы созд...

  18. Cnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann: The National Folklore Collection, University College Dublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ríonach uí Ógáin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann, The National Folklore Collection at University College Dublin and successor to the Irish Folklore Commission (1935-1970, consists of manuscript, photographic, and audio/video archives, as well as a specialist library and a music archive. It contains two million manuscript pages, thousands of hours of audio recordings, 80,000 photographs, and a number of paintings. The specialist library holds some 50,000 items relating to Irish and comparative folklore and ethnology. It is tasked with the preservation, dissemination, and augmentation of the collections.

  19. A window on... The National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2011-01-01

    and Communication Secretariat. The areas of work include all aspects of food safety in relation to microbial and chemical hazards in the food production chain, toxicology and risk assessment in relation to chemical hazards in food and the environment, and others. Major areas of training are laboratory methods......The National Food Institute is an institute of the Technical University of Denmark. The Institute has a staff of 400, out of which approximately 275 hold an academic degree. It is divided into five Divisions; Chemistry, Toxicology, Microbiology, Nutrition, Industrial Food Research, and a Management...

  20. Integration Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of San Juan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenguer, T.; Salinas, L.; Cascon, R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents proposals for the mud handling derived from mineralogical processes, trying to maintain a balance between the nature and the sustainable development of the region; it comprises of an investigation project that the authors carry out in the National University of San Juan.In this case particular aspects of problematic the environmental one are approached as the contamination of associated the superficial and underground water to the handling of the mineral remainders, specifically muds.To practices and procedures of engineering are described that offer protection against the faults of the deposits so that the remainders and the water of process are outside the hydrological river basins. (author)

  1. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  2. [The Dermatological University Hospital during National Socialism. A Contribution to the History of Dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, T; Bondio, M G

    2011-03-01

    During the period of National Socialism, many politically motivated changes occurred in Germany in all areas of medicine and consequently in the field of dermatology as well. Most of the Jewish dermatologists were removed from their positions; many of the chair reshuffles were executed for political causes. These changes caused decline of dermatology in the time of National Socialism. This report gives an overview of the developments and changes in the Dermatological University Hospital (DUH) at Greifswald between 1933 and 1945. 3000 medical records were evaluated and archival data and literature reviewed. With these data we were able to reconstruct historical, medical and political aspects. We found a rapid increase in the number of patients suffering from venereal diseases during World War II and an increase in compulsory treatment as well as in forced sterilization. In six cases, the DUH was involved in the practice of compulsory sterilization. Research was performed with mustard gas in patients at the DUH.

  3. Building Innovation: Learning with Technologies. Australian Education Review Number 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Australian Education Review (AER) 56 explores national and international policy priorities for building students' innovation capabilities through information and communication technologies (ICT) in Australian schools. Section 1 sets out the Australian policy context for digital education and highlights some of the emerging challenges. It provides…

  4. Decreased management of genital warts in young women in Australian general practice post introduction of national HPV vaccination program: results from a nationally representative cross-sectional general practice study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Harrison

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Since the introduction of Australia's human papillomavirus vaccination program, the management rate of genital warts in sexual health clinics and private hospitals has decreased in women of vaccine-eligible age. However, most genital warts in Australia are managed in general practice. This study examines whether a similar decrease occurred in Australian general practice after the introduction of the program. METHODS: Analysis of a nationally representative cross-sectional database of Australian general practice activity (1,175,879 patient encounters with 11,780 general practitioners. Genital warts management rates were estimated for the periods before and after introduction of the program (Pre-program, July 2002-June 2006; Post-program, July 2008-June 2012. Control conditions included genital herpes and gardnerella/bacterial vaginosis in female patients and genital herpes and urethritis in male patients. Trends in management rates by year, pre-vaccine (July 2000-June 2007 and post-vaccine (July 2007-June 2012 were also calculated. RESULTS: Management rate of genital warts among women potentially covered by program (aged 15-27 years decreased by 61% from 4.33 per 1,000 encounters in the Pre-program period to 1.67 in the Post-program period. Trend analysis of the post-vaccine period showed, among women of vaccine eligible age, a significant year-on-year reduction in the rate of genital warts management (p<0.0001 and a significant increase in the management rate of control conditions per year (p<0.0001. For all other age-sex groups there was no significant change in the management rate of genital warts between the Pre- and Post-program periods. CONCLUSION: The large decrease in general practice management of genital warts in women of vaccine-eligible age highlights the success of the program in the wider community.

  5. Soil organic matter composition from correlated thermal analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance data in Australian national inventory of agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. S.; Sanderman, J.; Baldock, J.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    National-scale inventories typically include soil organic carbon (SOC) content, but not chemical composition or biogeochemical stability. Australia's Soil Carbon Research Programme (SCaRP) represents a national inventory of SOC content and composition in agricultural systems. The program used physical fractionation followed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. While these techniques are highly effective, they are typically too expensive and time consuming for use in large-scale SOC monitoring. We seek to understand if analytical thermal analysis is a viable alternative. Coupled differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved gas analysis (CO2- and H2O-EGA) yields valuable data on SOC composition and stability via ramped combustion. The technique requires little training to use, and does not require fractionation or other sample pre-treatment. We analyzed 300 agricultural samples collected by SCaRP, divided into four fractions: whole soil, coarse particulates (POM), untreated mineral associated (HUM), and hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated HUM. All samples were analyzed by DSC-EGA, but only the POM and HF-HUM fractions were analyzed by NMR. Multivariate statistical analyses were used to explore natural clustering in SOC composition and stability based on DSC-EGA data. A partial least-squares regression (PLSR) model was used to explore correlations among the NMR and DSC-EGA data. Correlations demonstrated regions of combustion attributable to specific functional groups, which may relate to SOC stability. We are increasingly challenged with developing an efficient technique to assess SOC composition and stability at large spatial and temporal scales. Correlations between NMR and DSC-EGA may demonstrate the viability of using thermal analysis in lieu of more demanding methods in future large-scale surveys, and may provide data that goes beyond chemical composition to better approach quantification of biogeochemical stability.

  6. Assessing genital human papillomavirus genoprevalence in young Australian women following the introduction of a national vaccination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Sarah L; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Brotherton, Julia M L; Cornall, Alyssa M; Wark, John D; Wrede, C David; Jayasinghe, Yasmin; Gertig, Dorota M; Pitts, Marian K; Garland, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Following the implementation of Australia's National HPV Vaccination Program in April 2007, this study evaluated the prevalence of vaccine-targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) amongst vaccine-eligible young women. Between September 2011 and August 2013, women from Victoria, Australia aged 18-25 were recruited through targeted advertising on the social networking website Facebook. Participants completed an online questionnaire, and sexually active women were asked to provide a self-collected vaginal swab for HPV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and genotyping. Samples positive for HPV were genotyped using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test (Roche Diagnostics). Self-reported HPV vaccination details were verified with the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR). Of 431 vaginal swabs, 24.8% were positive for HPV DNA. Vaccine-targeted HPV genotypes were detected in only seven (1.6%) samples; all HPV 16 (of the six HPV 16 positive vaccinated women, all had received the vaccine after sexual debut). There were no cases of HPV 6, 11 or 18 identified. HPV types 51, 59, 73, 84, and 89 were the most prevalent genotypes. Vaccination rates were high, with 77.3% of participants having received all three doses of the vaccine, and there was an 89.8% concordance between self-reported and registry-reported HPV vaccination status. Strong associations were observed between vaccination status, age, language spoken at home and country of birth, as well as between HPV detection and the number of male sexual partners. Preliminary data from this study demonstrate a very low prevalence of vaccine-related HPV genotypes amongst vaccine-eligible women from Victoria, Australia. We were able to use Facebook to effectively reach and recruit young women to participate in the assessment of the impact of Australia's HPV vaccination program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index Martin Thoms, Melissa Parsons, Phil Morley Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. Natural hazard management policy directions in Australia - and indeed internationally - are increasingly being aligned to ideas of resilience. Resilience to natural hazards is the ability of individuals and communities to cope with disturbance and adversity and to maintain adaptive behaviour. Operationalizing the measurement and assessment of disaster resilience is often undertaken using a composite index, but this exercise is yet to be undertaken in Australia. The Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index is a top-down, national scale assessment of the resilience of communities to natural hazards. Resilience is assessed based on two sets of capacities: coping and adaptive capacities. Coping capacity relates to the factors influencing the ability of a community to prepare for, absorb and recover from a natural hazard event. Adaptive capacity relates to the arrangements and processes that enable adjustment through learning, adaptation and transformation. Indicators are derived under themes of social character, economic capital, infrastructure and planning, emergency services, community capital, information and engagement and governance/leadership/policy, using existing data sets (e.g. census data) or evaluation of policy and procedure (e.g. disaster management planning). A composite index of disaster resilience is then computed for each spatial division, giving national scale coverage. The results of the Australian Natural Disaster Resilience Index will be reported in a State of Disaster Resilience report, due in 2018. The index is co-designed with emergency service agencies, and will support policy development, planning, community engagement and emergency management.

  8. Facial Bone Fracture Patients Visiting Pusan National University Hospital in Busan and Yangsan: Trends and Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Geon; Son, Yong-Hyun; Chung, In-Kyo

    2014-07-01

    This study examined patients with facial bone fracture visiting Pusan National University Dental Hospital to understand the trends, and to enhance appropriate care and treatment for patients with facial bone fracture. We investigated 531 patients presenting with facial bone fracture in Yangsan and 802 patients in Busan from January 2010 to December 2013. We divided the patients by year, month, gender, age, site, and cause to compare with historic data and other studies. The gender ratio was 3.58:1 in Yangsan and 4.31:1 in Busan. Patients aged in their 20s had the highest number of facial bone fractures in both Yangsan and Busan. The most frequent fracture site was the mandible, and the most frequent cause was slip down in both Yangsan and Busan. The investigation and comparison of patients with facial bone fracture who visited Pusan National University Hospital located at Yangsan and Busan from 2010 to 2013 found a difference in the total number of patients at each hospital, but the trends were not significantly different.

  9. Pilot for the Australian Breast Device Registry (ABDR): a national opt-out clinical quality registry for breast device surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Ingrid; Best, Renee L; McNeil, John J; Mulvany, Catherine M; Moore, Colin C M; Elder, Elisabeth; Pase, Marie; Cooter, Rodney D; Evans, Sue M

    2017-12-28

    To establish a pilot clinical quality registry (CQR) to monitor the quality of care and device performance for breast device surgery in Australia. All patients having breast device surgery from contributing hospitals in Australia. A literature review was performed which identified quality indicators for breast device surgery. A pilot CQR was established in 2011 to capture prospective data on breast device surgery. An interim Steering Committee and Management Committee were established to provide clinical governance, and guide quality indicator selection. The registry's minimum dataset was formulated in consultation with stakeholder groups; potential quality indicators were assessed in terms of (1) importance and relevance, (2) usability, (3) feasibility to collect and (4) scientific validity. Data collection was by a two-sided paper-based form with manual data entry. Seven sites were recruited, including one public hospital, four private hospitals and two day surgeries. Patients were recruited and opt-out consent used. The pilot breast device registry provides high-quality population-based data. It provides a model for developing a national CQR for breast devices; its minimum dataset and quality indicators reflect the opinions of the broad range of stakeholders. It is easily scalable, and has formed the basis for other international surgical groups establishing similar registries. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Evaluation of the Undergraduate Physics Programme at Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Mishra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate science programme was launched at the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU in 1991-92 with an enrolment of 1,210 students. The programme was well received, and enrolments increased over the years. However, the success rates have not kept pace with enrolment.In this paper, the authors report the results of an evaluation of the undergraduate Physics programme at IGNOU. The evaluation, the first of its type for this programme, adapted the major tenets of the CIPP model. The findings are based on the responses from a randomly chosen sample of 509 learners across India. The methods employed for the study include records, document, and database analysis, surveys, and case studies.Although the University has enhanced access to higher science education, the attrition rate is high (73%, and the success rate is low. The authors recommend that the University review and reorient its strategies for providing good quality, learner-centred higher education in science subjects. The programme should address the concerns of the learners about the effectiveness of the student support systems, the difficulty level, and the learner-friendliness of study materials with the goal of achieving long-term sustainability while maintaining parity with the conventional system. The need for improving the presentation of the courses and simplifying the mathematical details is emphasised.

  11. Policies Regulating the Assignments of the Bachelor of Education Programme of Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines the policies formulated by the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), an open and distance learning university of India for regulating the practices related to the assignments of its Bachelor of Education programme. Following the examination it argues that some policies are formulated in the context of the…

  12. 78 FR 23877 - Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism and A National Broadband Plan for Our...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ...-592] Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism and A National Broadband Plan for Our... (Bureau) seeks comment on a proposal to clarify the schools and libraries universal service support... eligible schools and libraries and the eligible service providers offering them discounted services. 15...

  13. Management of foot/ankle osteoarthritis by Australian General Practitioners: an analysis of national patient-encounter records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Kade L; Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2018-04-12

    To document the management of foot/ankle osteoarthritis/arthritis (OA) by general practitioners (GP) in Australia. We analysed data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health Program April 2010-March 2016 inclusive. Patient and GP encounter characteristics were extracted. Data were classified by the International Classification of Primary Care, Version 2, and summarised using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) around point estimates. The dataset included 583,900 patient-encounter records among which foot/ankle OA was managed 621 times, at a rate of 1.1 per 1,000 encounters, with an annual estimated 152,000 GP encounters nationally. The management rate was most frequent among patients aged 65-74 years (2.25 per 1,000 encounters). Comorbidities were managed at a rate of 105.8 per 100 encounters, the most common being hypertension, and few being other musculoskeletal problems. Foot/ankle OA was mostly managed using medication (64.6 per 100 problems), with prescription rates far exceeding non-pharmacological strategies such as counselling, advice or education (17.7 per 100), or allied health referral (10.1 per 100). When considering specific health/medical professionals, patients were referred to orthopaedic surgeons 8.4 times per 100 foot/ankle problems, podiatrists 6.3 times per 100 foot/ankle problems, and physiotherapists 2.6 times per 100 foot/ankle problems. Pharmacological management rates of foot/ankle OA were high and substantially exceeded non-pharmacological management such as lifestyle advice and allied health referral. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this care compared to self-management and conservative non-drug treatment in people with foot/ankle OA. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Producing the 'problem of drugs': A cross national-comparison of 'recovery' discourse in two Australian and British reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Kari; Duke, Karen; Ritter, Alison

    2015-07-01

    The notion of 'recovery' as an overarching approach to drug policy remains controversial. This cross-national analysis considers how the problem of drugs was constructed and represented in two key reports on the place of 'recovery' in drug policy, critically examining how the problem of drugs (and the people who use them) are constituted in recovery discourse, and how these problematisations are shaped and disseminated. Bacchi's poststructuralist approach is applied to two documents (one in Britain and one in Australia) to analyse how the 'problem of drugs' and the people who use them are constituted: as problematic users, constraining alternative understandings of the shifting nature of drug use; as responsibilised individuals (in Britain) and as patients (in Australia); as worthy of citizenship in the context of treatment and recovery, silencing the assumption of unworthiness and the loss of rights for those who continue to use drugs in 'problematic' ways. The position of the organisations which produced the reports is considered, with the authority of both organisations resting on their status as independent, apolitical bodies providing 'evidence-based' advice. There is a need to carefully weigh up the desirable and undesirable political effects of these constructions. The meaning of 'recovery' and how it could be realised in policy and practice is still being negotiated. By comparatively analysing how the problem of drugs was produced in 'recovery' discourse in two jurisdictions, at two specific points in the policy debate, we are reminded that ways of thinking about 'problems' reflect specific contexts, and how we are invoked to think about policy responses will be dependent upon these conditions. As 'recovery' continues to evolve, opening up spaces to discuss its contested meanings and effects will be an ongoing endeavour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Self-Reported Telephone Interviewing and Web-Based Survey Responses: Findings From the Second Australian Young and Well National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Alyssa C; Ellis, Louise A; Davenport, Tracey A; Burns, Jane M; Hickie, Ian B

    2017-09-26

    Web-based self-report surveying has increased in popularity, as it can rapidly yield large samples at a low cost. Despite this increase in popularity, in the area of youth mental health, there is a distinct lack of research comparing the results of Web-based self-report surveys with the more traditional and widely accepted computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The Second Australian Young and Well National Survey 2014 sought to compare differences in respondent response patterns using matched items on CATI versus a Web-based self-report survey. The aim of this study was to examine whether responses varied as a result of item sensitivity, that is, the item's susceptibility to exaggeration on underreporting and to assess whether certain subgroups demonstrated this effect to a greater extent. A subsample of young people aged 16 to 25 years (N=101), recruited through the Second Australian Young and Well National Survey 2014, completed the identical items on two occasions: via CATI and via Web-based self-report survey. Respondents also rated perceived item sensitivity. When comparing CATI with the Web-based self-report survey, a Wilcoxon signed-rank analysis showed that respondents answered 14 of the 42 matched items in a significantly different way. Significant variation in responses (CATI vs Web-based) was more frequent if the item was also rated by the respondents as highly sensitive in nature. Specifically, 63% (5/8) of the high sensitivity items, 43% (3/7) of the neutral sensitivity items, and 0% (0/4) of the low sensitivity items were answered in a significantly different manner by respondents when comparing their matched CATI and Web-based question responses. The items that were perceived as highly sensitive by respondents and demonstrated response variability included the following: sexting activities, body image concerns, experience of diagnosis, and suicidal ideation. For high sensitivity items, a regression analysis showed respondents who were male

  16. The Australian Integrated Marine Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R.; Meyers, G.; Roughan, M.; Operators, I.

    2008-12-01

    The Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) is a 92M project established with 50M from the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) and co-investments from 10 operators including Universities and government agencies (see below). It is a nationally distributed set of equipment established and maintained at sea, oceanographic data and information services that collectively will contribute to meeting the needs of marine research in both open oceans and over the continental shelf around Australia. In particular, if sustained in the long term, it will permit identification and management of climate change in the marine environment, an area of research that is as yet almost a blank page, studies relevant to conservation of marine biodiversity and research on the role of the oceans in the climate system. While as an NCRIS project IMOS is intended to support research, the data streams are also useful for many societal, environmental and economic applications, such as management of offshore industries, safety at sea, management of marine ecosystems and fisheries and tourism. The infrastructure also contributes to Australia's commitments to international programs of ocean observing and international conventions, such as the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention that established the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Global Ocean Observing System and the intergovernmental coordinating activity Global Earth Observation System of Systems. IMOS is made up of nine national facilities that collect data, using different components of infrastructure and instruments, and two facilities that manage and provide access to data and enhanced data products, one for in situ data and a second for remotely sensed satellite data. The observing facilities include three for the open (bluewater) ocean (Argo Australia, Enhanced Ships of Opportunity and Southern Ocean Time Series), three facilities for coastal

  17. Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Choice and Its Impact on Nutrient and Sugar Intakes and Anthropometric Measures among a Nationally Representative Sample of Australian Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Fayet-Moore

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited evidence in Australia that compares the nutritional impact of a breakfast cereal breakfast to a non-cereal breakfast, and includes the type of cereal. This study investigated the impact of breakfast choice and the total sugar content of breakfast cereal on nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures among Australian children and adolescents. Data from 2 to 18-year-old in the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used (n = 2821. Participants were classified as breakfast cereal consumers (minimally pre-sweetened (MPS or pre-sweetened (PS, non-cereal breakfast consumers, or breakfast skippers. Foods consumed for breakfast, foods added to the cereal bowl, and the impact of breakfast choice on daily nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures were determined. Although only 9% of children skipped breakfast, 61% of skippers were aged 14–18 years. Among breakfast consumers, 49% had breakfast cereal, and 62% of these exclusively consumed MPS cereal. Breakfast skippers had a higher saturated fat intake than breakfast cereal consumers, and lower intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients (p < 0.001. Compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers, breakfast cereal consumers had additional free sugars intake, lower sodium, and higher total sugars, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, and almost all other micronutrients (p < 0.001. The only difference in nutrient intakes between MPS and PS cereal consumers was higher folate among PS consumers. No associations between anthropometric measures and breakfast or breakfast cereal choice were found. The highest prevalence of breakfast skipping was among 14–18-year old. Breakfast cereal consumers had higher intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers and skippers, and almost no differences were found between MPS and PS cereal consumers.

  18. Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Choice and Its Impact on Nutrient and Sugar Intakes and Anthropometric Measures among a Nationally Representative Sample of Australian Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; McConnell, Andrew; Tuck, Kate; Petocz, Peter

    2017-09-21

    There is limited evidence in Australia that compares the nutritional impact of a breakfast cereal breakfast to a non-cereal breakfast, and includes the type of cereal. This study investigated the impact of breakfast choice and the total sugar content of breakfast cereal on nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures among Australian children and adolescents. Data from 2 to 18-year-old in the 2011-2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used ( n = 2821). Participants were classified as breakfast cereal consumers (minimally pre-sweetened (MPS) or pre-sweetened (PS)), non-cereal breakfast consumers, or breakfast skippers. Foods consumed for breakfast, foods added to the cereal bowl, and the impact of breakfast choice on daily nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures were determined. Although only 9% of children skipped breakfast, 61% of skippers were aged 14-18 years. Among breakfast consumers, 49% had breakfast cereal, and 62% of these exclusively consumed MPS cereal. Breakfast skippers had a higher saturated fat intake than breakfast cereal consumers, and lower intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients ( p < 0.001). Compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers, breakfast cereal consumers had additional free sugars intake, lower sodium, and higher total sugars, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, and almost all other micronutrients ( p < 0.001). The only difference in nutrient intakes between MPS and PS cereal consumers was higher folate among PS consumers. No associations between anthropometric measures and breakfast or breakfast cereal choice were found. The highest prevalence of breakfast skipping was among 14-18-year old. Breakfast cereal consumers had higher intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers and skippers, and almost no differences were found between MPS and PS cereal consumers.

  19. [Scientific productivity standards and the National Automous University of Mexico School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Federico; Palomares, Alejandra; Piña, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    The scientific production at theNational Autonomous University of Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM) School of Medicine was analyzed during the period from 1999 to 2002. We found the following: 1) 94.83% of total international scientific papers was recovered; 2) mean impact factor had a value of 2.5, ca. the value reported by CONACYT, México, for the period 1998-2002; 3) percentage of corresponding authors was 58.83%, 27.80% of papers were national collaborations, 9.83% were international collaborations, and 3.37% corresponded to personal publications; 4) by using corresponding author and collaborations, academic leaders were identified; 5) there are differences among academic departments, and 6) basic research from the UNAM School of Medicine contributes 14% of national research and teaches ca. 2,450 students per year. It is proposed that this type of analysis should be used to establish the politics of science.

  20. Error Management Practices Interacting with National and Organizational Culture: The Case of Two State University Departments in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktürk, Söheyda; Bozoglu, Oguzhan; Günçavdi, Gizem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Elements of national and organizational cultures can contribute much to the success of error management in organizations. Accordingly, this study aims to consider how errors were approached in two state university departments in Turkey in relation to their specific organizational and national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  1. Universities and the Public Good: A Review of Knowledge Exchange Policy and Related University Practice in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthill, Michael; O'Shea, Éidín; Wilson, Bruce; Viljoen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Australian policy relating to knowledge exchange has never been well articulated, notwithstanding that the nexus between knowledge, engagement and higher education in Australia has been on the national agenda for several decades (Grattan Institute, 2013). In universities, this policy deficit is reflected in a lack of project management and…

  2. Aligning and Elevating University-Based Low-Income Nutrition Education through the Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System. National Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The nation's Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System (LGU-CES) is committed to ensuring that low-income populations have a safe, affordable, and healthy food supply. Two low-income nutrition education programs that are core to this commitment are the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition…

  3. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Doudna, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The Universe explores the science of what we see in the night sky. Kids will learn about the life cycle of a star, find out how our universe was created, explore nebulae, galaxies, black holes, giant stars and more. Engaging photos, exciting graphics, and a fun quiz at the end of each book will keep them learning. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Super Sandcastle is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  4. Subject cataloguing of the works of fiction at the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Kovač

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the principles of construction and policies of application of subject headings to works of fiction at the National and University Library in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The records are created in COMARC format, and the literary type, genre and the language of a document are each assigned a code, whereas literature is also indexed by using UDC class numbers. The principles for constructing and assigning subject headings for fiction are in accordance with the IFLA Principles Underlying Subject Heading Languages, and the rules of the Slovenian General List of Subject Headings (2002. The author presents the general and more specific rules and procedures for the construction of subject headings. Most frequently used subject headings for the works of fiction are name, topical or geographic headings.

  5. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  6. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  7. A DOE University-national laboratory waste-management education and research consortium (WERC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhada, R.K.; Morgan, J.D.; Townsend, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results and current status of a consortium of three universities and two national laboratories working closely with industry for an Education and Research program on waste-management and environmental restoration. The program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has been in effect for 18 months and has achieved significant progress towards establishing: undergraduate, graduate and associate degree programs involving environmental management, interactive TV courses from the consortium members transmitted throughout the United States, Mexico ampersand Canada, a satellite TV network, a professional development teleconference series, research programs at the leading edge of technology training multi-disciplinary students, research laboratories for analyses, testing, and student training, technology transfer programs, including a TV series on research applications, outreach programs, including pre-college and minority education, community monitoring

  8. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  9. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  10. Interactivity in distance education: The National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhemba Nom AMBE-UVA

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents a study of students’ experience of interactivity in distance education programmes at the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN. Through surveys and focus groups with students, facilitators, and administrative support staff, we found out that interactivity is a key determinant of student success rate. Majority of the students are workers in the urban areas who combine “work and learn” which is the motto of NOUN. The survey showed that majority of the students depended on their facilitators as key resource persons and on their peers or study groups both for required and voluntary interactivity to reinforce their learning. This was able to reduce loneliness, boredom and loss of community experienced in distance education. Because NOUN has not completed its Repository, Production, Distribution, and Administration Headquarters (REPRODAhq and equipped the study centers with up-to-date technological facilities, this frustrated accessibility that is dialectically linked to interactivity.

  11. Research and analysis of the level of physical preparedness of Oles Honchar Dnipro National University students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Hotienko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study and analyze the level of physical preparedness of Oles Honchar Dnipro National University students. Material & Methods: the level of physical readiness of students was determined with the help of tests and standards for the annual assessment of the physical preparedness of the population of Ukraine, the results of which determine the level of development of the basic physical qualities: strength, endurance, speed, flexibility, agility. Students performed 5 types of tests. Results: obtained results made it possible to compile the dynamics of the level of physical preparedness of students: high, decent, medium, low, and also an appropriate assessment of the physical state: excellent, good, satisfactory, unsatisfactory. Conclusion: these data suggest that the majority of students are middle and low level of physical preparednes. In connection with the results suggested a set of exercises to improve the physical preparedness of students.

  12. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2009-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  13. Ethics Education in Australian Preservice Teacher Programs: A Hidden Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Helen J.; Maxwell, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a snapshot of the current approach to ethics education in accredited Australian pre-service teacher programs. Methods included a manual calendar search of ethics related subjects required in teacher programs using a sample of 24 Australian universities and a survey of 26 university representatives. Findings show a paucity of…

  14. Student Assessment of Quality of Access at the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Obhajajie Inegbedion

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted by Inegbedion, Adu and Ofulue from the National Open University of Nigeria. The study focused on the quality of access (admission and registration at NOUN from a student perspective. A survey design was used for the study while a multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the sample size. All the 78,555 registered students in all the 61 Study Centres of the University at the time of the study formed the population; out of which 3,060 students were sampled. The questionnaire instrument is the Institutional Internal QA Tools and Instrument developed by the African Council for Distance Education (ACDE as a regulatory mechanism. The data collected were analyzed using simple statistics. The result showed that 66% of the students confirmed that NOUN has published clear policies on the admission and registration of students. About 29.1% of the students were not satisfied with the transparency of the admission process. In conclusion, the study revealed high quality of access and some deficiencies in website and Internet connectivity.

  15. A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Airi; Laimi, Katri; Björklund, Katja; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Kunttu, Kristina

    2017-06-01

    The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012. The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425). In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students. The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017

  16. AN APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION IN NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY OF ARTS E-LEARNING PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Feng Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the development of the course ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ by using the Learning Content Management System (LCMS in National Taiwan University of Arts (NTUA E-learning platform. There are three segments for this article. First, it discusses the characteristics of the NTUA E-learning platform, which is based on the theory of E-learning, and to discern the differential function of authorization between teachers and students. Second, it analyzes how the E-learning version of ―Education for Environmental Sustainability‖ course is planned and developed. This course is an outgrowth of Blending Learning, which is the integration of Classroom Learning and Electronic Learning. The course development theory is based on the process of five stages: A (Analysis, D (Design, D (Development, I (Implement and E (Evaluation. Third, it concerns the usage of, and the suggestion for, the platform. With students as the end users, it should be designed in a student-oriented way, especially when the learning achievement of NTUA students originated mainly from presenting their individual talent (i.e., their artwork pictures or performance videos. Hence, the students‘ performance talent and comments will be significant references for future development of e-contents, e-services, and e-technical in art universities.

  17. Mind the gap between high school and university! A field qualitative survey at the National University of Caaguazú (Paraguay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Anna; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Khabbache, Hicham; Spandonari, María Maddalena; Cáceres, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Paraguay has eight public universities and 45 private universities. The National University of Caaguazú (Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú or UNCA), with its main campus located in Coronel Oviedo, is one of the most recently founded public universities, being established in 2007. The UNCA has launched a project aiming at exploring the potentiality of its educational system, as well as its gaps. In particular, the UNCA wants to assess the effectiveness of preparatory courses for preparing students for admission to the degree course in medicine (Cursos Probatorios de Ingreso or CPI), in order to identify the main strong and weak points of the system, the popularity and usefulness of CPI as perceived by the students, the students' and teachers' opinions regarding the limits of school, and their suggestions. This paper is based on a field survey and highlights the care that must be taken in order to develop conditions respectful of the wellbeing of those participating in the educational context.

  18. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  19. Mind the gap between high school and university! A field qualitative survey at the National University of Caaguazú (Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna Siri,1,2  Nicola Luigi Bragazzi,1–3 Hicham Khabbache,4 María Maddalena Spandonari,5 Luis Alberto Cáceres,5 1Department of Mathematics (DIMA, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 2UNESCO CHAIR “Anthropology of Health – Biosphere and Healing System”, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 3Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 4Faculty of Literature and Humanistic Studies, Sais, Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Fez, Morocco; 5Administrative Direction, Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú, Coronel Oviedo, Paraguay Abstract: Paraguay has eight public universities and 45 private universities. The National University of Caaguazú (Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú or UNCA, with its main campus located in Coronel Oviedo, is one of the most recently founded public universities, being established in 2007. The UNCA has launched a project aiming at exploring the potentiality of its educational system, as well as its gaps. In particular, the UNCA wants to assess the effectiveness of preparatory courses for preparing students for admission to the degree course in medicine (Cursos Probatorios de Ingreso or CPI, in order to identify the main strong and weak points of the system, the popularity and usefulness of CPI as perceived by the students, the students’ and teachers’ opinions regarding the limits of school, and their suggestions. This paper is based on a field survey and highlights the care that must be taken in order to develop conditions respectful of the wellbeing of those participating in the educational context. Keywords: university students, school-university transition, social inclusion, drop-out, preparatory courses

  20. Influence of university network structures on forming the network environment of regional economy (on the example of national research universities of Tatarstan Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya-Anna Alekseevna Kaibiyainen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to elaborate theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of forming the new network institutional environment of the Russian regional economy under the influence of the developing integral educational network structures basing on the study of the experience of national research universities of Tatarstan Republic Methods general scientific logical methods of analysis and synthesis induction and deduction scientific abstraction as well as the method of systemicfunctional analysis. Results the practical examples are revealed and analyzed of introducing the new network integral principles into the functioning of national research universities which have a real economic effect and influencing such indicators of regional economy as the growth of employment reduction of unemployment etc. Scientific novelty problems of network structures development in the Russian education have not been thoroughly studied yet. The article analyzes the experience reveals and describes the methods and techniques of forming the network educational structures in the functioning of national research universities in Tatarstan Republic Practical value the author shows the ability of network university structures not only to play a significant role forming the new institutional environment of the regional economy but also to influence the macro and microeconomic indicators of development of the region and the country. nbsp

  1. Girls Playing Soccer: Resistance or Submission? A Case Study of Women's Soccer in the ACT. A Report to the National Sports Research Centre, Australian Sports Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traill, R. D.; And Others

    This study identifies Australian girls' sports participation and variables associated with participation and dropping out. It describes the sporting experiences, and the decisions associated with those experiences, of a group of girls opposing traditional pressures by participating in a "male" sport (soccer). A survey was conducted of…

  2. German Lieder in the Perception of the Modern Australian Listener and/or Singer: A Survey at the 30th National Liederfest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Julia

    2011-01-01

    German Romantic Art Songs or German "Lieder" constitute a consistent part of every aspiring classical singer's repertoire around the world. This study investigates a contemporary Australian audiences' appreciation of the genre; it asks further what role the various Romantic characteristics play in German "Lieder" genre, gauges…

  3. Trends in Food and Beverage Portion Sizes in Australian Children; a Time-Series Analysis Comparing 2007 and 2011–2012 National Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne van der Bend

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In 2011–2012 approximately 26% of Australian children aged between 5–17 years were reported to be overweight or obese. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children parallels reported increases in energy intake and portion sizes of common foods, leading to the recognition that availability of larger portion sizes contributes to the rise in overweight and obesity prevalence. Thus, the aim of this time-series analysis was to investigate whether selected food portion sizes in Australian children aged 2–16 years changed between 2007 and 2011–2012. Portion size data from 24-h recalls collected in Australian nutrition surveys were compared between 2007 and 2011–2012. Portion sizes changed significantly in 23% of items with increases in 15% and decreases in 8%. Changes in portion sizes varied by age, sex, and food group. Changes occurred for many meat-based items, energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items, breads, cereals, and some fruits and vegetables. Vegetable and fruit portion sizes were below the respective serving sizes of 75 g and 150 g in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, while portion sizes of some energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods have increased. These findings suggest approaches to increasing consumption of nutrient-dense core foods and reducing energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items in children are warranted.

  4. Trends in Food and Beverage Portion Sizes in Australian Children; a Time-Series Analysis Comparing 2007 and 2011-2012 National Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bend, Daphne; Bucher, Tamara; Schumacher, Tracy L; Collins, Kate; De Vlieger, Nienke; Rollo, Megan; Burrows, Tracy L; Watson, Jane F; Collins, Clare E

    2017-08-04

    In 2011-2012 approximately 26% of Australian children aged between 5-17 years were reported to be overweight or obese. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children parallels reported increases in energy intake and portion sizes of common foods, leading to the recognition that availability of larger portion sizes contributes to the rise in overweight and obesity prevalence. Thus, the aim of this time-series analysis was to investigate whether selected food portion sizes in Australian children aged 2-16 years changed between 2007 and 2011-2012. Portion size data from 24-h recalls collected in Australian nutrition surveys were compared between 2007 and 2011-2012. Portion sizes changed significantly in 23% of items with increases in 15% and decreases in 8%. Changes in portion sizes varied by age, sex, and food group. Changes occurred for many meat-based items, energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items, breads, cereals, and some fruits and vegetables. Vegetable and fruit portion sizes were below the respective serving sizes of 75 g and 150 g in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, while portion sizes of some energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods have increased. These findings suggest approaches to increasing consumption of nutrient-dense core foods and reducing energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items in children are warranted.

  5. Trends in Food and Beverage Portion Sizes in Australian Children; a Time-Series Analysis Comparing 2007 and 2011–2012 National Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bend, Daphne; Collins, Kate; Rollo, Megan; Watson, Jane F.; Collins, Clare E.

    2017-01-01

    In 2011–2012 approximately 26% of Australian children aged between 5–17 years were reported to be overweight or obese. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of overweight and obesity among US children parallels reported increases in energy intake and portion sizes of common foods, leading to the recognition that availability of larger portion sizes contributes to the rise in overweight and obesity prevalence. Thus, the aim of this time-series analysis was to investigate whether selected food portion sizes in Australian children aged 2–16 years changed between 2007 and 2011–2012. Portion size data from 24-h recalls collected in Australian nutrition surveys were compared between 2007 and 2011–2012. Portion sizes changed significantly in 23% of items with increases in 15% and decreases in 8%. Changes in portion sizes varied by age, sex, and food group. Changes occurred for many meat-based items, energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items, breads, cereals, and some fruits and vegetables. Vegetable and fruit portion sizes were below the respective serving sizes of 75 g and 150 g in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, while portion sizes of some energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods have increased. These findings suggest approaches to increasing consumption of nutrient-dense core foods and reducing energy-dense, nutrient-poor food items in children are warranted. PMID:28777355

  6. Repositioning interprofessional education from the margins to the centre of Australian health professional education ? what is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunston, Roger; Forman, Dawn; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Steketee, Carole; Rogers, Gary D; Moran, Monica

    2018-01-16

    health service and education development priority. What does this paper add? The paper presents a summary of how Australian IPE was conceptualised, developed and delivered across 26 universities during the period of the four CRS studies. It points to strengths and limitations of existing IPE. An innovative approach to the future development of Australian IPE is presented. The importance of sociocultural factors in the development of practitioner identity and practice development is identified. What are the implications for practitioners? The findings of the CRS program present a challenging view of current Australian IPE activity and what will be required to meet industry and health workforce expectations related to the development of an Australian interprofessional- and collaborative-practice-capable workforce. Although the directions identified pose considerable challenges for the higher education and health sectors, they also provide a consensus-based approach to the future development of Australian IPE. As such they can be used as a blueprint for national development.

  7. Reorganization of the radiologic protection of the nuclear reactor RA-0 for the next starting up at Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R.; Chautemps, N.A.; Rumis, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the fulfillment to the tasks for the new starting up of the RA-0 Nuclear Reactor situated at the National University of Cordoba, it was necessary to plan and organize the service of Radiologic Protection to meet the future requirements in normal operation. The special characteristics that an installation of this type has in the university field, required special attention for making the university staff become aware in the working proceedings to follow up in normal conditions, such as the case of emergency that would originate in the installation. The training of the teaching and non teaching staff of the National University of Cordoba, the adjusting of the installations, the obtention of dosimetry and measurement equipment and the implementation of a monitor system of the staff were the main tasks confronted for the reorganization of the sector. (Author) [es

  8. Using Web 2.0 Technologies for Collaborative Learning in Distance Education—Case Studies from an  Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lloyd

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of Web 2.0 technologies for collaborative learning in a higher education context. A review of the literature exploring the strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 technology is presented, and a conceptual model of a Web 2.0 community of inquiry is introduced. Two Australian case studies are described, with an ex-poste evaluation of the use of Web 2.0 tools. Conclusions are drawn as to the potential for the use of Web 2.0 tools for collaborative e-learning in higher education. In particular, design and integration of Web 2.0 tools should be closely related to curriculum intent and pedagogical requirements, care must be taken to provide clear guidance on both expected student activity and learning expectations, and there is a clear need to develop, support and encourage strong interaction both between teachers and students, and amongst the students themselves.

  9. Fostering the institutional repository through policies and interoperability with online services: the case of La Plata National University

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal, Gonzalo Luján; Terruzzi, Franco Agustín; Lira, Ariel Jorge; Texier, José

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the work being done by La Plata National University (Universidad Nacional de La Plata, UNLP) to ensure both the preservation and dissemination of its academic and scientific output. To this end, the university has established a combination of institutional policies, workflows among departments, and services and sofware developments for its programs and projects. Developments focused on importing and exporting metadata between DSpace – the sofware used by the UNLP main re...

  10. Progress, discipline and manhood? A case of sodomy in the National University of the United States of Colombia (1880)

    OpenAIRE

    Leidy Jazmín Torres Cendales

    2015-01-01

    In this article, an act of sodomy presumably committed by two Philosophy and Literature students in the National University of the United States of Colombia in 1880 is studied closely. Based on the analysis of the disciplinary system of the University, the possible meanings of sexual contact between men in the late nineteenth century, and the power relations demonstrated in the file, I intend to evince how this case destabilized and, at the same time, reaffirmed the control system and the phy...

  11. Review of triage reform: the case for national consensus on a single triage scale for clients with a mental illness in Australian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Marc; Creaton, Anne; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the use of mental health triage scales in Australian emergency departments (EDs) and to explore the use of the Australasian Triage Scale (ATS) with existing mental health triage scales. Since the introduction of mainstreaming and deinstitutionalisation in Australian mental health care, the number of clients presenting to Australian EDs has been increasing. It has become apparent that the lack of mental health descriptors in existing triage scales diminishes the ability of ED triage staff to accurately assess clients with a mental illness. In response to this, specialised mental health triage scales have been developed and introduced into practice. Concurrently, mental health descriptors have been incorporated into the ATS used across Australian EDs. A review of English language literature was conducted. The data bases Proquest, Synergy and CINAHL were searched using the key words 'emergency department', 'triage', 'mental health' and again using the term 'emergency mental health triage'. There is a paucity of literature surrounding the use of mental health triage scales in Australian EDs; 18 articles were found to be directly relevant to the subject matter. Currently clients with a mental illness presenting to the ED may be triaged against one of four mental health triage scales. Research has shown that the mental health descriptors in the ATS are not as reliable as a specialised mental health triage scale. This has implications for clinical practice on two levels. First, it affects the initial triage assessment in the ED and the ability for mental health clinicians to respond in a timely manner and this will have an impact on clinical outcomes. Second, the use of the mental health triage criteria in the ATS may misrepresent ED workloads and affect data pertaining to ED performance.

  12. National autonomous university of Mexico RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based plant simulation and training applications to the Laguna Verde NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez-Mercado, C.; Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behavior of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed by Innovative Systems Software as part of the International SCDAP Development and Training Program (SDTP). This code is being used as the simulator engine for the National Autonomous University of Mexico's Simulation and Training Facility located at the Campus Morelos in Jiutepec, Mexico. This paper describes the RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, the Simulation and Training facility at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, and the application of the training system to the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant located in the Mexican state of Veracruz. (author)

  13. HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT OF CAMPUS AT UMAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF HORTICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Golovchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In modern conditions of energy consumption growth and a rapid increase in energy prices the actual problem is the development and implementation of energy efficiency programs and resource-saving conversion in to a source to provide the needs of industry and municipal power. The paper aims to solve the urgent problem of energy saving and efficient use of fuel-energy ones and heat supply system optimization on the basis of Uman National University of Horticulture (UNUH. Methodology. The work investigated the process of heating and hot water supply in the course of 2007-2015 years. Implementation of current problems of energy saving is grounded on the scientific-practical and efficient assurance of fuel and energy usage. At the same time energy-saving technologies are viewed as a priority direction of the energy sector development, reduction of man-induced impact on the environment and as a way of improving the competitiveness of the national economy. Findings. Statistical data acquisition and analyzing of gas flow and outside air temperature for nine years was carried out. On the basis of this analysis, the problem was identified and specific targets for its solutions were set. Originality. Scientific novelty lies in solving the problem of energy saving and efficient use of fuel resources in Ukraine through the use of a systematic approach, the methodology development of efficient use of different fuels and optimization of local heating operation, applying contemporary automation and control systems. Firstly it was in detail analyzed and conducted the comprehensive assessment of various factors influence on energy conservation. It takes into account the human factor, professionalism and responsibility of the operators of boilers and their superiors, as well as the relevant control services. Practical value. For UNUH campus hybrid use of solid fuel and gas boilers was carried out. Decentralization of the university heating system has been

  14. Are University Students in Singapore Meeting the International and National Recommended Daily Servings of Fruits and Vegetables?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Tham, Dede Kam Tyng; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Wong, Mee Lian

    2017-04-01

    Data are lacking on fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption among young adults in the Asia-Pacific region. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of students who met the international and national recommendation of daily consumption of 5 and 4 FV servings, respectively, in a university in Singapore and the factors associated with meeting the national recommendation. A cross-sectional survey using proportional stratified random sampling was conducted on 884 undergraduates in 2013. The prevalence of meeting the international and national recommendation was 13.6% and 27.1%, respectively. The significant factors of meeting national recommendation were those from higher socioeconomic status, those making conscious effort to eat food high in fiber, those not skipping breakfast, those having a lower frequency of deep fried food consumption and those with higher meal frequency. Behavioral and structural interventions to educate, motivate and nudge university students to promote FV consumption are required in Singapore.

  15. The impact of universal National Health Insurance on population health: the experience of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Ken N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taiwan established a system of universal National Health Insurance (NHI in March, 1995. Today, the NHI covers more than 98% of Taiwan's population and enrollees enjoy almost free access to healthcare with small co-payment by most clinics and hospitals. Yet while this expansion of coverage will almost inevitably have improved access to health care, however, it cannot be assumed that it will necessarily have improved the health of the population. The aim of this study was to determine whether the introduction of National Health Insurance (NHI in Taiwan in 1995 was associated with a change in deaths from causes amenable to health care. Methods Identification of discontinuities in trends in mortality considered amenable to health care and all other conditions (non-amenable mortality using joinpoint regression analysis from 1981 to 2005. Results Deaths from amenable causes declined between 1981 and 1993 but slowed between 1993 and 1996. Once NHI was implemented, the decline accelerated significantly, falling at 5.83% per year between 1996 and 1999. In contrast, there was little change in non-amenable causes (0.64% per year between 1981 and 1999. The effect of NHI was highest among the young and old, and lowest among those of working age, consistent with changes in the pattern of coverage. NHI was associated with substantial reductions in deaths from circulatory disorders and, for men, infections, whilst an earlier upward trend in female cancer deaths was reversed. Conclusions NHI was associated in a reduction in deaths considered amenable to health care; particularly among those age groups least likely to have been insured previously.

  16. Citizenship Education: Cultivating a Critical Capacity to Implement Universal Values Nationally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Twarog

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Citizenship and citizenship education face challenges due to globalizing factors affecting modern liberal-democratic states. Earlier models of citizenship, which were based on assimilation into the dominant society, have been challenged by scholars seeking to create a fuller understanding of citizenship more inclusive of diversity. This paper addresses the works of Martha Nussbaum and James A. Banks who present two possibilities for citizenship education: purified patriotism (Nussbaum and transformative citizenship education (Banks. By considering values, identity and the national narrative, this paper compares their views in relation to these topics as well as gives supporting and opposing ideas from other scholars. It concludes by stating that these authors share a common commitment to the need for a critical civic culture, which in turn requires a willingness and openness on the part of all citizens to use their imagination and help foster the critical capacity to think anew. In this way, the traditional dichotomous debate over citizenship, values and identity within the nation and the world might be transformed. By utilizing what Freire refers to as deliberative dialogue, we can foster creative solutions to ensure that universal values of justice, tolerance, recognition and equality are not merely democratic ideals, but are practiced by all individuals and institutions. Furthermore, this paper addresses the need for a teacher training program which would teach educators how to promote and endorse a critical culture through dialogue within the classroom and create citizens who are capable of using their imagination and critical thinking to function cooperatively within a multicultural society.

  17. Teaching National and General History of Music at College Level and at the University of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Tuksar

    2017-01-01

    staff for music history at the Department of Musicology of the Academy of Music consists of specialists for specific stylistic periods from the Middle Ages up to the 21st century, most of them partly educated at foreign universities (Vienna, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Erlangen, Köln, Freiburg who use international pedagogical literature translated into Croatian for teaching European music history, while compiling various multi-authored collections of texts for teaching courses in national music history. In all, some forty or so teachers have been identified until now, who taught music history at five different schools, mostly within the frames of the University of Zagreb. Finally, elements of some of the most important aspects regarding areas of music history, topics, methods and technical equipment used are briefly presented, and some perspectives on further investigation are offered.

  18. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  19. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  20. The Transition to Full-Time Work of Young People Who Do Not Go to University. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Gary N.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the transition to full-time employment of young people who do not go to university. The majority of Australia's school leavers do not enroll in university, and it is important to better understand the pathways that they follow. The report uses a substantial longitudinal dataset to map the dynamics of the youth labour market,…