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Sample records for australian construction industry

  1. Factors influencing Australian construction industry apprentices' dietary behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To date there has been a theoretical and empirical gap in workplace-centered health promotion research-particularly as it applies to blue-collar men's diets. To begin addressing the paucity of research, five qualitative focus groups (N = 53) were conducted in Australian training colleges to explore the dietary behaviors of apprentices. Thematic analysis was used by the researcher who concludes that although some apprentices were health conscious and attempted to eat healthy foods, many had diets high in saturated fats and sugar. These types of diets are associated with increased risks for developing chronic disease and are associated with decreased life expectancy. As such it poses a serious challenge for health promoters. Apprentices' dietary practices were also found to be moderated by convenience, availability, and cost of foods in their environment. Their nutritional beliefs, significant others, colleagues in the workplace, and their body image also influence their food choices. PMID:21862566

  2. Innovation Performance and Its Impact on Profitability Among Different Sectors in the Australian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hardie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The BRITE (Building Research Information Technology and Environment project was established by the Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation to encourage innovation in the construction industry. While innovation is generally perceived to be broadly beneficial, there has been little formal study of its occurrence or impact in Australian construction or of the factors which foster an innovative atmosphere within an enterprise. In order to benchmark innovation performance, the BRITE project conducted a survey in 2004 into the nature, incidence and variety of technological and organisational innovations in various sectors of the industry. With some exceptions, the survey found that clients and consultants engaged in significantly higher levels of innovation than did suppliers, main contractors or trade contractors. Within the industry sectors those organisations classified as high innovators favoured the adoption of advanced management practices and had formal evaluation systems in place to judge their progress. They reported significant positive impacts on their profitability from innovation and can therefore provide instructive examples for the rest of the industry to follow.

  3. Drivers of Productivity: a Case Study of the Australian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Chancellor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Australian construction productivity has grown slowly since 1985 and remains arguably stagnant. The importance of this study is therefore to examine several factors through to be drivers of construction productivity and to understand possible avenues for improvement. The drivers tested are research and development, apprentices, wage growth, unionisation and safety regulation. Expenditure on research and development and the number of apprentices were found to be drivers of productivity growth in Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia. These findings are important because collectively, these three states account for a majority of construction activity in Australia.

  4. Barriers to the Development of SME's in the Australian Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Mills; Jim Smith; Peter Love

    2012-01-01

    Small and medium sized companies (SMEs) operating in the construction industry in regionalareas of Australia often struggle to compete against city-based companies for constructionwork. This paper identifies the barriers that confront SMEs in areas outsidemajor cities, specifically in regional areas of Victoria (Australia) where local firms oftencompete unsuccessfully against large Melbourne-based organisations. The authors alsolook at the possibility of using e-commerce solutions to give reg...

  5. Barriers to the Development of SME's in the Australian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mills

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium sized companies (SMEs operating in the construction industry in regionalareas of Australia often struggle to compete against city-based companies for constructionwork. This paper identifies the barriers that confront SMEs in areas outsidemajor cities, specifically in regional areas of Victoria (Australia where local firms oftencompete unsuccessfully against large Melbourne-based organisations. The authors alsolook at the possibility of using e-commerce solutions to give regional SMEs greater competitivenessas well as considering possible policy initiatives that may assist these companiesto be more successful in tendering against city-based competition.

  6. The Case for Family-Friendly Work Practices in the Australian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Francis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although significant changes at the social, demographic, technological and workforce levelshave transformed the relationship between family and work, these changes have notbeen reflected in the employment practices of many construction companies. Many of thejob and organisational factors found to be negatively associated with family functioning arepertinent to construction professionals. Staff are expected to work long hours in demandingroles and this, combined with job insecurity and frequent relocation, means that familylife and individual well-being can be compromised. A growing body of research has foundthat the implementation of family-friendly work policies and practices can lead to greaterproductivity, lower attrition rates and higher morale in the workplace. In addition providinga work environment that is supportive of workers' family roles can help to alleviate workrelatedmental health problems.This paper outlines the changing demographic trends and societal attitudes that are makingindividuals and organisations question current work cultures and structures. Optionsfor making the construction industry a more family-friendly work environment are considered.All professionals, regardless of their age, gender and family responsibilities, canbenefit from these initiatives. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of theseissues for construction companies and future research work.

  7. Managing Motherhood in the Australian Construction Industry: Work-family Balance, Parental Leave and Part-time Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lingard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A survey of women in the Australian construction industrywas undertaken to examine women's work experiencesin construction. Questionnaires were distributed to threehundred women in construction occupations and 109completed and usable questionnaires were returned.Women were found to be seriously under-represented insite-based roles. Site/project engineers worked longer hoursthan other occupational groups and expressed significantlygreater work-family conflict. Lack of flexibility and theinability to balance work and family were common themesin the qualitative comments made by many respondents.Even when women indicated that part time work options andmaternity entitlements were provided by their organizations,many expressed a reluctance to use them and perceivedcareer penalty associated with this usage. It is concludedthat more flexible work schedules and the implementationof family-friendly policies may encourage more women intosite-based roles in construction. The paper concludes thatthe rigid work practices presently in place act as a subtleform of discrimination. The provision of such policies willonly be effective if cultural and attitudinal change is alsoachieved.

  8. An industry endorsed strategic plan for the Australian venison industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Rodney J.; Watson, Geoff K.; McRae, Timothy B.; Cunial, Catharine M.

    2006-01-01

    The process of developing and successfully achieving endorsement of a strategic plan formulated for the Australian Venison Industry is presented in this paper, the first in a series of four papers on this theme. The endorsed strategic plan recommends that the industry should establish market focussed alliances with the aim of delivering a specified product to an identified target market. It also proposes generic industry policies and initiatives and suggests a stronger commercial focus for th...

  9. The Asian currency crisis and the Australian health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, S

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies linkages between the Australian health industry and the global economy. It discusses some of the consequences of the Asian currency crisis of 1997-98 for the Australian economy and health industry, with special emphasis upon exports. Devaluation of the Australian dollar will increase the cost of most pharmaceutical and medical imports, but may offer competitive advantages to some Australian exporters. The nascent engagement with Asia of many health industry enterprises is likely to be stifled. It is therefore important for Australian governments, as well as the Australian health industry, to provide intelligence and encouragement to those enterprises that wish to continue their engagement with Asia or resume it when economic equilibrium returns. Markets throughout the world must also be further developed. The crisis may therefore provide the stimulus for re-thinking and re-stating Australian health export policy. PMID:10537568

  10. The Asian currency crisis and the Australian health industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, S

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies linkages between the Australian health industry and the global economy. It discusses some of the consequences of the Asian currency crisis of 1997-98 for the Australian economy and health industry, with special emphasis upon exports. Devaluation of the Australian dollar will increase the cost of most pharmaceutical and medical imports, but may offer competitive advantages to some Australian exporters. The nascent engagement with Asia of many health industry enterprises is likely to be stifled. It is therefore important for Australian governments, as well as the Australian health industry, to provide intelligence and encouragement to those enterprises that wish to continue their engagement with Asia or resume it when economic equilibrium returns. Markets throughout the world must also be further developed. The crisis may therefore provide the stimulus for re-thinking and re-stating Australian health export policy.

  11. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES IN VICTORIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, AUSTRALIA

    OpenAIRE

    M. Asad, Abdurrahman

    2010-01-01

    The construction industry has one of the highest injury ratios of all Australian industries. Individuals employed on the construction industries find themselves confronted with dangerous and life-threatening work conditions. However, it appears that the trend in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) performance of construction industry has improved consistently compared with the other industries. The enforcement of OHS law and regulation, and the outcome of authority function to assist and pro...

  12. The potential for an Australian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of uranium and its part upgrading to enriched uranium for export could be equivalent to 20-25 per cent of Australia's future export income from coal. Australia could be supplying 15,000 tonnes U/yr. and enrichment services of 2.5 million SWU/yr. by 2000. The principles of nuclear energy, nuclear power reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle are described and the relationship between nuclear power and the requirements for uranium and the other steps in the fuel cycle is discussed. Estimates are given of the future world supply-demand balance for each step in the fuel cycle. A survey is made of world uranium resources and fuel cycle upgrading facilities. The costs of production and pricing are assessed in relation to the potential for an Australian industry. Comments are made on the possibility that Australia could provide the repository for both low-level radioactive waste from small countries and the bulk of the world's high level waste. The impact of a uranium industry on the Australian economy is discussed

  13. ACCELERATING CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT

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    Mohan M. Kumaraswamy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The needs for construction industry development are initially viewed from the broader perspectives of imperatives for infrastructure development and national development. All these are clearly more critical in developing countries. A non-exhaustive set of potential drivers and common barriers to construction industry development is identified from previous research. These suggest the usefulness of consolidating a cluster of recent proposals and exercises aiming at (a construction organization development in terms of an over-arching management support system model, as well as improved information and knowledge management; and (b project team development in the context of relationally integrated teams and supply chains, joint risk management and ‘technology and knowledge exchange’ in joint ventures, as well as longer term public private partnerships. These apparently disparate research thrusts are threaded together into a pattern that may inspire, if not feed, specific research and development (R & D agendas for construction industry development in different countries according to their own priorities, constraints and stages of infrastructure and national development.

  14. Developing an Australian code of construction ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Francis McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at the increasing need to consider the role of ethics in construction. The industry, historically, has been challenged by allegations of a serious shortfall in ethical standards. Only limited attempts to date in Australia have been made to address that concern. Any ethical analysis should consider the definition of ethics and its historical development. This paper considers major historical developments in ethical thinking as well as contemporary thinking on ethi...

  15. Developing an Australian code of construction ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Francis McCarthy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the increasing need to consider the role of ethics in construction. The industry, historically, has been challenged by allegations of a serious shortfall in ethical standards. Only limited attempts to date in Australia have been made to address that concern. Any ethical analysis should consider the definition of ethics and its historical development. This paper considers major historical developments in ethical thinking as well as contemporary thinking on ethics for professional sub-sets. A code could be developed specific to construction. Current methods of addressing ethics in construction and in other industries are also reviewed. This paper argues that developing a code of ethics, supported by other measures is the way forward. The author’s aim is to promote further discussion and promote the drafting of a code. This paper includes a summary of other ethical codes that may provide a starting point. The time for reform is upon us, and there is an urgent need for an independent body to take the lead, for fear of floundering and having only found ‘another debating topic’ (Uff 2006.

  16. The Australian black coal industry: productivity commission inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    February 1999 saw the release of the final report of the Productivity Commission's inquiry into the Australian black coal industry. The report is a comprehensive examination of the state of play of the Australian coal industry, drawing from the Commission's own research, submissions from a range of stakeholders and the results of a benchmarking study which compared Australia's performance with world's best practice. Essentially, the report finds that recent reforms have improved productivity and some parts of the industry now perform very well. However, the report finds that further changes to federal industry awards and state legislation and regulation could significantly improve the performance of the industry overall

  17. Concerns for Skills Shortages in the 21st Century: A Review into the Construction Industry, Australia

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    Michelle Watson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Construction Industry is now facing skills shortages in all trades. As an industry focused on the skill of its workforce, there is now concern the Australian standard in quality, workmanship, and productivity will inhibit both at national and international level.This research paper addresses the underlying, influential factors concerning skills shortages in the Australian construction industry. The influential factors addressed include funding, training statistics, employer expectations, financial limitations, Industrial Relations and immigration. Given the reference to skills shortages within the industry, and documented in related literature, if skills shortages are to continue to exist, their effect will impact upon the overall performance of construction companies throughout Australia.

  18. Nucleonic gauges in the Australian mining and exploration industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On-line and in-situ nucleonic analysis systems have found widespread application in the Australian metalliferous mineral and coal industries. The rapid and reliable response of these systems has led to improved exploration and better control of mining and mineral processing. This paper reviews both types of nucleonic control system (on-line and in-situ) available in Australian exploration and mining market. (author)

  19. Industrial Disputes in the Construction Sector

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    L.J Perry

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cole Royal Commission enquiry into the building and construction (abbreviated to ‘construction’ sector recommended controversial workplace-relation reforms for that sector. The recommended changes are likely to be enshrined in legislation within the year. The Commission drew on analyses of industrial disputes that focused, in the main, on quite recent experience. This paper attempts to give a broader historical perspective on disputes in that sector by considering the pattern of disputes for the entire post-World War II period. Accordingly, data on disputes and employees during the entire period are gathered from Australian Bureau of Statistics current and archived sources. These data are classified according to sector (construction versus non-construction and analysed. It is found that the strike rate has, on average, been greater in the construction sector than in the non-construction sector. However, there have been periods during which disputes in the construction sector have been relatively low. The most recent period was during the period of the Accord (1983-96, during which the strike rate in the construction sector fell relatively strongly. The analysis of this relatively broad historical period draws attention, among other things, to the possibility that the sort of strategies employed during the Accord years – strategies of cooperation and consensus building – may provide a more effective means of bringing industrial peace to the workplace relations scene of the construction sector than policies that are relatively confrontational.

  20. Training implications of reform in the Australian coal mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, J. (NSW Coal Association, Sydney, NSW (Australia))

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 the Australian coal mining industry reached an agreement with the unions to restructure the industry improving efficiency and cost effectiveness. Part of this agreement was the provision of structured and accredited training for employees. The Australian coal mining industry has adopted the National Training Reform Agenda and a new system of competency-based training is currently being implemented across Australia. The aims of the new system are: (1) to improve the level and flexibility of skills in the workforce; to better meet the needs of industry; and to facilitate the progressive introduction of a competency based approach to training. Competency based training places the emphasis on what a person can do in the workplace after training rather than the quantity of training (e.g measured by cost or time spent). The paper describes the new training programme and the development of competency standards.

  1. Productivity Change in the Australian Sheep Industry Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Villano, Renato A.; Fleming, Euan M.; Farrell, Terence C.; Fleming, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    Recent low estimates of total factor productivity change for wool producers in the Australian sheep industry indicate that they are struggling to improve their performance. This evidence is at odds with the views of many technical observers of industry performance, prompting us to re-estimate total factor productivity change for farmers in a benchmarking group in south-west Victoria who had been the subject of such a negative finding. An important transformation in sheep production in Austral...

  2. Environmental and Social Disclosure in Australian Mining Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiaolu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how Australian mining industry performs in environmental and social disclosure. There is growing public consensus that corporations should take responsibility for their environmental and social activities, which have already produced a massive amount of social problems such as wastes or pollutions. In response to the increasing public demand, environmental and social disclosure has developed rapidly during last decades. The paper tries to attribute to t...

  3. The Economics of Regulated Changes to the Australian Egg Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Trewin, Ray

    2001-01-01

    The Australian egg industry is facing adjustment pressures including from animal welfare developments. Production and consumption of free-range eggs are rising in response. However, considerations have been given to banning the dominant conventional cage production as in Switzerland. Consideration has also been given to compulsory labelling eggs by their form of production. A focus of the research is to develop possible future scenarios and to value any associated animal welfare benefits agai...

  4. Initiatives in the Australian Medical Devices Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical device industry is as diverse as it is specialised and calls on the innovative use of design and components and utilises all facets of precision manufacturing from printed circuit boards, injection-moulded plastics to engineering, using a wide range of materials. It generally requires exacting standards, starting with design, particularly for devices that are invasive or have direct contact with the human body. Of course this brings the further consideration of sterilisation and whether it is for single or multiple use. There is an ever-present need to produce more accurate less invasive and cheaper devices. The driving motivation appears to be meeting clinical needs at a reduced cost. The push to treat people outside the hospital is growing, creating new demands and directions. The advent of the Internet and wireless technology has opened a whole new direction of research and development opportunities

  5. E-Business Developmental Issues in the Australian Food Industry

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    Mohini Singh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses e-business developmental issues in the Australian Food industry that were identified from a research project funded by the Australian Research Council. Data was gathered from interviews with 11 food organisations in the year 2000, most of which can be classified as ‘bricks and clicks’. These 11 companies were traditional businesses that had adopted e-business as a new way of doing business. The findings of the paper highlight the fact that the B2B is the predominant e-business model in the Australian Food Industry, EDI is an important foundation technology platform for developing B2B e-business, e-procurement was an important reason for adopting B2B e-business and improved supply chain management was the most important achievement from E-Business for these organizations. It also highlighted the fact e-business developed in-house with an IT department managed e-business sites better than those that outsourced the development.

  6. The Corporate Governance of Australian Listed Construction Companies

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    Patrick Tait

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the compliance level of Australian StockExchange (ASX listed construction and non-constructioncompanies with the ASX Corporate Governance Council (CGCrecommendations on sound corporate governance. It alsoexamines the difference in board characteristics between thetwo groups, paying particular attention to differences in boardindependence. It concludes that compared with the top 20 ASXlisted non-construction companies, listed construction companiesare less compliant overall particularly with regards to boardstructure, and have lower levels of independence both in terms ofCEO/Chairperson duality, the ratio of executive to non-executiveindependent directors and independent membership of nomination,remuneration and audit committees. These conclusions areimportant because sound corporate governance has beenassociated with higher levels of organisational resilience derivedfrom the reputational and fi nancial benefi ts of greater transparency,market value, investor attractiveness and organisationalperformance.

  7. Partnering in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev Bohnstedt, Kristian; Haugbølle, Kim; Bejder, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Huge efforts have been made in order to stimulate thorough improvements in the construction industry in terms of value for money, feasibility and consistency when facilitating a partnering approach. Despite this attention there is limited documentation on the development of research trends, thus...

  8. Australian trade unions and the politics of scale: Reconstructing the spatiality of industrial relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, D.; Fagan, B. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we explore responses of trade unions to the reconfiguration of the Australian industrial relations system in the 1990s. We argue that a major characteristic of these changes is the way in which they were socially constructed as necessary imperatives of globalization and new modes of production. Our interpretation focuses on the importance of geographic scale. We contend that a relational sense of scale is consistent with an analysis of the situatedness of labor practices and that Australia has witnessed a particularly striking use of 'globalization' as political narrative. We then detail key features of the new industrial relations environment in Australia that have transformed a system that was once exceptional in its degree of nationally centralized negotiation and collective bargaining. The implications of two important confrontations related to the 1996 Workplace Relations Act are explored in detail: the conflicts between transnational mining giant Rio Tinto and the mineworkers' union over reform in the Australian coal industry and the waterfront dispute over working practices and relations in Australian ports.

  9. Retrospective exposure assessment for benzene in the Australian petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, D.C. [Deakin Univ., Occupational Hygiene Unit, Geelong, VIC (Australia); Melbourne Univ., Dept. of Public Health and Community Medicine, Carlton, VIC (Australia); Adams, G.G.; Manuell, R.W.; Bisby, J.A. [Melbourne Univ., Dept. of Public Health and Community Medicine, Carlton, VIC (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    An excess of lympho-haematopoietic (LH) cancers has been identified in the Australian petroleum industry through the Health Watch surveillance programme. A nested case-control study is being conducted to investigate this excess. This paper describes the methods used to provide quantitative estimates of benzene exposure for each of the subjects in the case-control study. Job histories were compiled for each subject from interviews and company employment records. Site visits and telephone interviews were used to identify the tasks included in each job title. Details about the tasks such as their frequency, the technology in use and about changes that had taken place over the years were also gathered. Exposure dated back to the late 1940s for a few subjects. Collaborating petroleum companies provided recent benzene exposure monitoring data. These were used to generate Base Estimates of exposure for each task, augmented with data from the literature where necessary. Past exposures were estimated from the Base Estimates by means of an exposure algorithm. The modifying effects of technological changes and changes to the product were used in the algorithm. The algorithm was then computed to give, for each job, for each subject, an estimate of average benzene exposure in ppm in the workplace atmosphere (Workplace Estimate). This value was multiplied by the years for which the job was held and these values summed to give an estimate of Cumulative Estimate of benzene in ppm-years. The occupational hygienists performing the exposure assessment did so without knowledge of the case or control status of subjects. Overall exposures to benzene in the Australian petroleum industry were low, and virtually all activities and jobs were below a time-weighted average of 5 ppm. Exposures in terminals were generally higher than at refineries. Exposures in upstream areas were extremely low. Estimates of Cumulative Estimate to benzene ranged from 0.005 to 50.9 ppm-years. (Author)

  10. Economic Evaluation of New Technologies and Promotions in the Australian Sheep and Wool Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Mounter, Stuart W.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about the size and distribution of returns from alternative broad types of R&D and promotion investments permit strategic-level decisions about resource allocation, both within and across research programs. The Australian sheep meat and wool industries are characterised by strong cross-commodity relationships due to the joint product nature of the industries. An equilibrium displacement model of the Australian sheep meat and wool industries was developed to account for these relatio...

  11. Strategy implementation in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Gabriel; Nilsson, Pontus

    2007-01-01

    Background: After immense criticism, the Swedish government requested an investigation concerning the construction industry. The report concludes that the inactive competition within the construction industry entail that the industry continuously delivers the same products, in the same way. Gabrielsson & Lutz (2002), states that the market condition and the long history of static competition within the construction industry has led to low productivity, high consumption of resources, large...

  12. Australians are not equally protected from industrial air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian air pollution standards are set at national and state levels for a number of chemicals harmful to human health. However, these standards do not need to be met when ad hoc pollution licences are issued by state environment agencies. This situation results in a highly unequal distribution of air pollution between towns and cities, and across the country. This paper examines these pollution regulations through two case studies, specifically considering the ability of the regulatory regime to protect human health from lead and sulphur dioxide pollution in the communities located around smelters. It also considers how the proposed National Clean Air Agreement, once enacted, might serve to reduce this pollution equity problem. Through the case studies we show that there are at least three discrete concerns relating to the current licencing system. They are: non-onerous emission thresholds for polluting industry; temporal averaging thresholds masking emission spikes; and ineffective penalties for breaching licence agreements. In conclusion, we propose a set of new, legally-binding national minimum standards for industrial air pollutants must be developed and enforced, which can only be modified by more (not less) stringent state licence arrangements. (letter)

  13. Evaluation of the Australian Industry Group / PricewaterhouseCoopers - Performance of Manufacturing Index (Ai-PMI)

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Don; Song, Lei Lei; Tran, Duy

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the Australian Industry Group / PricewaterhouseCoopers Performance of Manufacturing Index (Ai-PMI) as a tool for analysis. Particular interest focuses on the issue of how useful it is as an early signal of Australian business cycle turning points.

  14. Australian Power: Can renewable technologies change the dominant industry view?

    OpenAIRE

    Lynette Molyneaux; Craig Froome; Liam Wagner; John Foster

    2012-01-01

    With carbon dioxide the major contributor to anthropogenic climate change, being required to reduce the carbon emissions from burning coal for electricity presents a systemic shock to Australian power. The Australian government is committed to the development of its coal seam gas resources for export to lucrative world markets and to transition domestic power generation to greater resilience by moving away from a reliance on coal to lower-emissions intensive gas. Using a commercially availabl...

  15. COMPETITIVENESS OF THE INDONESIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

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    Agung Budiwibowo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia’s construction industry is important to the national economy. However, its competitiveness is considered low due to the lack of success of its development strategy and policy. A new approach known as the cluster approach is being used to make strategy and policy in order to develop a stronger more competitive industry . This paper discusses the layout of the Indonesian construction cluster and its competitiveness. The archival analysis research approach was used to identify the construction cluster. The analysis was based on the I/O tables of the years 1995 and 2000, which were published by the Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics. The results suggest that the Indonesian construction cluster consists of the industries directly involved in construction as the core, with the other related and supporting industries as the balance. The anatomy of the Indonesian construction cluster permits structural changes to happen within it. These changes depend on policies that regulate the cluster’s constituents.

  16. Corporate social responsibility in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Barvínková, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Barvínková, Z. Corporate Social Responsibility in construction industry. Diploma thesis. Brno: Mendel University, 2014. This thesis deals with the issue of corporate social responsibility. Corporate social responsibility is the responsibility of companies for their impacts on society and is based on voluntary commitment. The thesis analyzes current state of CSR in small and medium-sized companies in construction industry of Czech Republic as an industry which has great impacts on environment,...

  17. Safety Management Analysis In Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    T. Subramani; R. Lordsonmillar

    2014-01-01

    The Indian society and economy have suffered human and financial losses as a result of the poor safety record in the construction industry. The purpose of this study is to examine safety management in the construction industry. The study will collects data from general contractors, who are involved in major types of construction. Collected data include information regarding organizational safety policy, safety training, safety meetings, safety equipment, safety inspections, sa...

  18. SPECIFICITY IN DEVELOPMENT OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

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    O. Golubova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specificity in development of construction industry of the Republic of Belarus determines  character of competition on the construction market, forms a pricing, marketing and product policy of building companies. Construction represents itself as a highly developed complex where interaction of business entities is of rather complicated multilateral character.

  19. Utilizing platforms in industrialized construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonev, Martin; Wörösch, Michael; Hvam, Lars

    2015-01-01

    construction companies. A promising approach adapted by operations management and design theory regards individual building projects as the adjustment and recombination of components and processes from a set of predefined platforms, while configuration systems assure feasible building solutions. Design...... methods map structural platform characteristics so as to balance commonality and distinctiveness. Originality/value – This paper proposes a general theory of platform-based development and execution in the industrialised construction sector, which goes beyond concurrent approaches of standardising...

  20. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Suliman L. Kh. M.; Abdelnaser Omran

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A li...

  1. Digital Modeling, Integrated Project Delivery and Industry Transformation: An Australian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy A. Kraatz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on realizing productivity benefits for the delivery of transport infrastructure in the Australian construction industry through the use of building information modeling (BIM, virtual design and construction (VDC and integrated project delivery (IPD. Specific objectives include: (I building an understanding of the institutional environment, business systems and support mechanisms (e.g., training and skilling which impact on the uptake of BIM/VDC; (II gathering data to undertake a cross-country analysis of these environments; and (III providing strategic and practical outcomes to guide the uptake of such processes in Australia. Activities which will inform this research include a review of academic literature and industry documentation, semi-formal interviews in Australia and Sweden, and a cross-country comparative analysis to determine factors affecting uptake and associated productivity improvements. These activities will seek to highlight the gaps between current-practice and best-practice which are impacting on widespread adoption of BIM/VDC and IPD. Early findings will be discussed with intended outcomes of this research being used to: inform a national public procurement strategy; provide guidelines for new contractual frameworks; and contribute to closing skill gaps.

  2. Innovation, Procurement and Construction Industry Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geard de Valence

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The implications for analysis of innovation in construction of theoretical developments in industrial organisation are considered in this research, as an attempt to outline a new approach to construction innovation incorporating the ideas found in knowledge based, technology centred models. The paper firstly summarises characteristics of the construction industry, focusing on their effects on innovation, before surveying some of the ideas about the sources of innovation and the expansion and application of knowledge. Construction can be seen as an industry with limited scope for knowledge externalities, where the procurement methods used by the industry’s clients do not pay for innovation. The following discussion uses recent developments in the research on the economics of innovation and industrial organization theory, such as research intensity and the endogenous sunk costs in competitive, fragmented, low research intensity industries. The effects on R&D of procurement methods and on industry structure are discussed, with a focus on the appropriability of innovations and the role of the client on the Heathrow Terminal 5 project. The paper concludes that the procurement methods used for building and construction projects appears to be a determining factor in the level of innovation in the construction industry

  3. Construction of Circular Economy Industrial System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Man; Ye Wenhu

    2007-01-01

    It is difficult to realize the transformation from traditional economy industrial system to circular economy industrial system.Regarding primary raw materials as the indicators,the industrial system has been specified according to the divergence among the indicators and the circular utilization modes.In comparison with the association among industrial systems,the relationship among industrial sub-systems is named as industrial cross-linking in this paper.The industrial system which could completely utilize and recycle the indicators should be increased and strengthened,and the circular economy industrial system with complete industrial association and industrial cross-linking should also be constructed.Taking the development of circular agricultural system basing on the traditional agricultural system as an example,the traditional agricultural products are regarded as the indicators which have been divided into foodstuff and crop straws which are used to produce food and articlesfor use,like fertilizer,energy and papers etc.The way to construct the circular agricultural industrial system is to increase the industrial systems that could utilize the products generated from crop straws,feces and other castoffs and transform the wastewater and other trucks into environmental friendly products.It has also been pointed out that the construction of circular economy industrial system is conducive to the foundation of circular industrial economics and the establishment of the construction layout of circular economy and the application schemes.Suggestions to the theoretical and practical work of the next step have also been brought forward in this paper.

  4. Risk management in Nigerian construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Aminu, Aliyu Bashir

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The major requirement of every construction project is meeting client’s need of cost, quality and time. However, the construction industry is overwhelmed with risks more than any other industry due to the fact that they are present in every activity from design to completion. These risks need to be controlled early or face the possibility of cost overruns, time delays and poor quality work leading to displeasure of client and public. This study assesses the ways of managing the most...

  5. COMPETITIVENESS OF THE INDONESIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Agung Budiwibowo; Bambang Trigunarsyah; Ismeth S Abidin; Hari G Soeparto

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia’s construction industry is important to the national economy. However, its competitiveness is considered low due to the lack of success of its development strategy and policy. A new approach known as the cluster approach is being used to make strategy and policy in order to develop a stronger more competitive industry . This paper discusses the layout of the Indonesian construction cluster and its competitiveness. The archival analysis research approach was used to identify the cons...

  6. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman L. Kh. M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A list of recommendation was proposed to drive sustainable construction in this country. In conclusion, the status of sustainable construction in Malaysia is still in its infancy. The lack of awareness, training and education, ineffective procurement systems, existing public policies and regulatory frameworks are among the major barriers for sustainable construction in Malaysia. Besides the needs for capacities, technologies and tools, total and ardent commitment by all players in the construction sectors including the governments and the public atlarge are required in order to achieve sustainable construction in Malaysia.

  7. Management for Construction Materials and Control of Construction Waste in Construction Industry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gulghane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent treads a wide range of building materials is available for the construction of civil engineering structures. The total cost of materials may be up to 60% or more of the total cost incurred in construction project dependent upon the type of project. Effective construction materials management is a key to success for a construction project. Construction waste is another serious problem in construction industry. A large and various types of construction waste with different characteristics are created at all the stages of construction. Construction industries have a larger part in contributing environmental problems. The economic and environmental benefits must be gained from construction waste minimization. This paper presents a review on systematically investigation of the management of construction materials and construction waste, material management techniques, control of construction waste and existing situation of construction management and construction waste in the industry.

  8. Achieving Supply Chain Integration within Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Peter McDermotti; Malik Khalfan

    2012-01-01

    The main driver behind the adoption of supply chain management (SCM) philosophy into the construction industry was the successes within other industry sectors. SCM can be defined as network of different organisations, linked upstream and downstream in a chain, aiming to produce quality and value in the services and products for the end consumers through integrated processes and activities. In order to achieve the optimised level of integration of the whole supply chain, the industry has respo...

  9. Prefabrication in Building Construction: A Perspective of Pakistan Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmed Memon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry is facing many problems in terms of construction waste, quality, environment, durability, safety and higher construction cost. Adoption of prefabrication is a possible solution to such problems. Accordingly, there is a need to study the prospects that would stimulate the appropriate discussion of the suitability of prefabrication and other construction methods for concrete buildings. Therefore, this study investigates the significance of advantages in adopting prefabrication along with hindrances through questionnaire survey. The data has been analyzed using RIW (Relative Importance Weight method as a MCDM approach. The results depict that main advantages of prefabrication are ?Shorter construction time? and ?Less construction site waste?. The top hindrances in adopting prefabrication as identified in this study are: ?Higher initial construction cost? and ?Inflexible for design changes?. Based on the survey results and apparent progress in the adoption of prefabrication around the world, it is concluded that the use of prefabrication is likely to increase in developing countries like Pakistan

  10. Collaborating to compete: the imperative for the South Australian citrus industry

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Bruno; Chapman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper arises from a series of economic reports into the South Australian citrus industry undertaken by the Department of Primary Industries and Resources South Australia (PIRSA). The citrus industry faces a number of significant challenges. Future prosperity depends on the response. Principles of Transaction Cost Economics are drawn upon to understand the nature of the investments involved in citrus growing, permitting the identified problems to be viewed in light of inefficiencies and o...

  11. Extending the Grapevine: Innovation and Knowledge Transmission within the Australian Wine Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Aylward, David

    2005-01-01

    Innovation and its uptake are two key ingredients in the Australian wine industry’s rapid rise from cottage industry to international success. The industry has a well-deserved reputation of leadership in the funding, coordination and adoption of both product and process innovation. This leadership continues to underpin its competitive advantage in oenological and viticultural practices, training, branding, and export. Empirical research, however, upon which this paper is based, suggests tha...

  12. "What's the problem?": Australian public policy constructions of domestic and family violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Suellen; Powell, Anastasia

    2009-05-01

    The campaign of feminists to have domestic violence formally acknowledged as a key issue affecting Australian women succeeded in the early 1980s when governments began developing policy seeking to address the problem. Far from simply adopting feminist gendered understandings of domestic violence, however, the development of contemporary policy responses to this issue has been influenced by a number of competing discourses about the problem, its causes, and possible solutions. Drawing on Bacchi's policy analysis approach, the authors compare the discursive constructions of domestic violence inherent in how the issue is named, framed, and defined across contemporary Australian policy documents. PMID:19208919

  13. Accounting window dressing and template regulation: A case study of the Australian credit union industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Hillier; A. Hodgson; P. Stevenson-Clarke; S. Lhaopadchan

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the response of cooperative institutions that were required to adhere to new capital adequacy regulations traditionally geared for profit-maximising organisations. Using data from the Australian credit union industry, we demonstrate that the cooperative philosophy and internal

  14. Management for Construction Materials and Control of Construction Waste in Construction Industry: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Gulghane; Prof P. V. Khandve

    2015-01-01

    In recent treads a wide range of building materials is available for the construction of civil engineering structures. The total cost of materials may be up to 60% or more of the total cost incurred in construction project dependent upon the type of project. Effective construction materials management is a key to success for a construction project. Construction waste is another serious problem in construction industry. A large and various types of construction waste with different...

  15. Stakeholder Analysis in Libyan Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hraisha, Ahmed A. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Scholars in the construction management field have highlighted the importance of analyzing and managing the project stakeholders effectively, since the project success or failure is related to their perceptions of the value created by the project, and the nature of their relationship with the project team. This study intended to facilitate the analysis of the construction industry stakeholders by providing an original framework model. This framework displays a clear process for stakeholders’ ...

  16. PRICING STRATEGY IN THE INDONESIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Mochtar

    2002-01-01

    Issues related to pricing strategy in the Indonesian construction industry are covered%2C including problems of current pricing strategy in construction%2C exploration of pricing strategies with a market-based approach%2C and survey findings of the top Indonesian contractors regarding their current pricing practices and the applicability of market-based pricing strategy models developed by Mochtar and Arditi. Comparisons with similar survey findings of the top U.S. contractors are conducted w...

  17. Reverse logistics in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M Reza; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen; Chileshe, Nicholas; Lehmann, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Reverse logistics in construction refers to the movement of products and materials from salvaged buildings to a new construction site. While there is a plethora of studies looking at various aspects of the reverse logistics chain, there is no systematic review of literature on this important subject as applied to the construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to integrate the fragmented body of knowledge on reverse logistics in construction, with the aim of promoting the concept among industry stakeholders and the wider construction community. Through a qualitative meta-analysis, the study synthesises the findings of previous studies and presents some actions needed by industry stakeholders to promote this concept within the real-life context. First, the trend of research and terminology related with reverse logistics is introduced. Second, it unearths the main advantages and barriers of reverse logistics in construction while providing some suggestions to harness the advantages and mitigate these barriers. Finally, it provides a future research direction based on the review. PMID:26018543

  18. Reverse logistics in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M Reza; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen; Chileshe, Nicholas; Lehmann, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Reverse logistics in construction refers to the movement of products and materials from salvaged buildings to a new construction site. While there is a plethora of studies looking at various aspects of the reverse logistics chain, there is no systematic review of literature on this important subject as applied to the construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to integrate the fragmented body of knowledge on reverse logistics in construction, with the aim of promoting the concept among industry stakeholders and the wider construction community. Through a qualitative meta-analysis, the study synthesises the findings of previous studies and presents some actions needed by industry stakeholders to promote this concept within the real-life context. First, the trend of research and terminology related with reverse logistics is introduced. Second, it unearths the main advantages and barriers of reverse logistics in construction while providing some suggestions to harness the advantages and mitigate these barriers. Finally, it provides a future research direction based on the review.

  19. IMPROVING COMPETITIVENESS OF THE AUSTRALIAN SUGAR INDUSTRY BY ANALYSING CANE SUPPLY ARRANGEMENTS ACROSS THE VALUE CHAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Lisa E.; Muchow, Russell C.; Wegener, Malcolm K.; Higgins, Andrew J.

    1999-01-01

    The term “value chain” describes the collection of activities that are performed to design, produce, market, deliver and support a product. The Australian sugar industry value chain has a number of distinct stages involved in the transformation of the cane crop into raw and refined sugar and other manufactured products. These stages include production, processing and distribution functions. Despite its linear direction, a critically important feature of the sugar industry value chain is that ...

  20. Size and Distribution of Research Benefits in the Australian Dairy Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Esther; Tarrant, Katherine A.; Ho, Christie K.M.; Malcolm, Bill; Griffith, Garry R.

    2012-01-01

    An equilibrium displacement model of the Australian dairy industry is being developed for estimating the net benefits from dairy research undertaken by DPI Victoria. In this initial version, the dairy industry is represented by a system of aggregate demand and supply relationships for two input sectors, raw milk and milk processing inputs, and three output sectors, export and domestic manufactured milk and domestic fluid milk. Quantities and prices are calibrated in terms of milk equivalents....

  1. A prospective study in the Australian petroleum industry. II. Incidence of cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, D; Robinson, K.; Gordon, I.; Bisby, J

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports incidence of cancer in employees of the Australian petroleum industry from 1981 to 1989. Two surveys by personal interview incorporated more than 15,000 employees, representing 92% of the eligible population. Subjects were included in the analysis after completing five years of service in the industry. At the time of this report the cohort did not include sufficiently large numbers of women for useful analysis; results presented are restricted to the men. On 31 December 198...

  2. Innovation in the Danish Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonke, Sten; Bang, Henrik; Clausen, Lennie

    This report is concerned with public policy instruments, how they are used and to which degree they enhance innovativeness in the Danish construction sector.The report is written as a Danish response to the first of three thematic questions raised in CIB Task Group 35 on innovation systems...... in construction. The three themes are:A. Which current public policy instruments facilitate innovation in construction?B. What is the role of knowledge brokers in the innovation process?C. How does the client-industry interface influence innovation?...

  3. Safety Management Analysis In Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Indian society and economy have suffered human and financial losses as a result of the poor safety record in the construction industry. The purpose of this study is to examine safety management in the construction industry. The study will collects data from general contractors, who are involved in major types of construction. Collected data include information regarding organizational safety policy, safety training, safety meetings, safety equipment, safety inspections, safety incentives and penalties, workers’ attitude towards safety, labor turnover rates and compliance with safety legislation. The study will also reveal several factors of poor safety management. Thus the paper will conclude by providing a set of recommendations and strategies to contractors for improving their safety performance.

  4. Australian Government Policies and the Balance of Trade Performance of the Transportation Equipment Industry: A Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dale B Truett; Lila J. Truett

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates factors that have affected the trade balance of the Australian motor vehicle industry and considers the impact of Australian government policies to encourage the development of that industry. It presents an overview of the industry, discusses the history of government policies to promote both manufacturing and exports of motor vehicle products, and provides a comparison of Australia with other developing producers of motor vehicles. A linear regression model is employe...

  5. The construction industry takes up the gauntlet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Elsebet Frydendal

    2005-01-01

    of experiments in the last decade. Many of these results are now being implemented in daily production. Special focus has been on new management concepts and activities to inprove the general image, not least to signal the drive for better quality and value and to attract a new generation of workers. Increased......Public and political dissadisfaction with the Danish construction industry in terms of low productivity, high prices and poor qualiyt has lead the industry to a stage where new methods and new innovative measures are needed. The industry, supported by the government, has engaged in a range...... focus on health and safety, including attempts to reduce the high risks of accidents in the industry has also been adressed. This paper questions whether these activities are enough and presents an ongoing reseach project that illustrates the need for innovation from a more holistic, normative...

  6. Construct Validity of Four Frailty Measures in an Older Australian Population: A Rasch Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widagdo, I S; Pratt, N; Russell, M; Roughead, E E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals identified as frail have been shown to be at an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. However, there is no gold standard frailty measure and frailty status can vary depending on the measure used, suggesting the measures perform differently. Construct validity can be used to assess a measure's performance. This study aimed to examine the construct validity of four frailty measures in an Australian older population using Rasch analysis. Frailty status among the 2087 participants aged 65 years and above from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ALSA) was assessed using: frailty phenotype--FP, simplified frailty phenotype--SFP, frailty index--FI, and prognostic frailty score--PFS. Rasch analysis was used to assess the unidimensionality of the measures, which is the extent to which the underlying characteristic of frailty is assessed. The criteria for unidimensionality from principal component analysis of the residuals was when 50% or more of the raw variance was explained by the measures, and less than 5% was unexplained variance. Only FI meet the unidimensionality criteria with 74% of explained variance and 2.1% of unexplained variance. SFP did not show a unidimensional construct with 13.3% of explained variance and 47.1% of unexplained variance. FP and PFS had 39.6%, 18.1% and 46.5%, 8.7% of explained and unexplained variance, respectively. Our findings showed that FI has better construct validity than the other three measures in assessing frailty among the Australian older population.

  7. Application of Materials Science in Australian Mining Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Sheng Li

    2000-01-01

    @@ 1. Introduction Australia is a huge country and one of the largest producers of mineral in the world. Mining is an important industry in Australia. More than 40 percent of Australia's total exports are mineral products.

  8. Prefabricated Construction using Digitally Integrated Industrial Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Giles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research being carried out in relation to prefabricated high density affordablehousing under a grant from the Partnership for the Advancement of Technology in Housing(PATH and the National Science Foundation (NSF in the USA. The objective is to demonstratehow a new paradigm for the conceptualization and construction of buildings can be conceivedof as an entirely factory based process that creates advantages for construction through industrialsystems technology transfer. Our approach is intended to transform design methodologythrough demonstrating how alternative construction concepts, using entirely pre-manufacturedvolumetric units, can be adopted. This involves digital modeling that facilitates parametric variationsfor creating customized prefabricated products from design conceptualization through tofinal product delivery. The paper discusses key areas under investigation in relation to a manufacturingparadigm used in the automotive industry that integrates virtual prototyping and industrialmanufacturing systems. Our research explores a type of monocoque volumetric unit prefabricatedin steel, which will be pre-finished as part of a modular factory-built approach usingindustrialized methodologies that will facilitate customized manufacture of a high quality energyefficient product for affordable housing.The paper addresses the automotive industry methods of manufacture that have served increasedautomobile performance and economics through mass production for over a century. In starkcontrast, the building industry and in particular the housing industry is still a century behind. It issuggested that a move away from tradition will require an industry wide initiative, just like HenryFord led the way with mass production. By embracing the increasing sophistication and capabilitythat digital technology offers, it is shown how digital tools are implemented towards masscustomization in house design using virtual modeling in the

  9. Ethics and responsibility within the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Hamad; Al-Haddad, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    All people face moral choices, it can be in private life, work, school or daily life. There are often rules and laws that guide us and declare how we should act in a specific situation. But how should we act in the "gray zone”, where there are no clear guidelines and rules, where the boundaries between right and wrong are not so clear. Like other industries, the construction industry is subjected to moral problems, and it is not always obvious what is right and wrong. Ethics and responsibili...

  10. Indonesian And Australian Tax Policy Implementation In Food And Agriculture Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanggoro Pamungkas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tax policy is one of the most important policy in consideration of investment development in certain industry. Research by Newlon (1987, Swenson (1994 and Hines (1996 concluded that tax rate is one of the most important thing considered by investors in a foreign direct investment. One of tax policy could be used to attract foreign direct investment is income tax incentives. The attractiveness of income tax incentives to a foreign direct investment is as much as the attractiveness to a domestic investment (Anwar and Mulyadi, 2012. In this paper, we have conducted a study of income tax incentives in food and agriculture industry; where we conduct a thorough study of income tax incentives and corporate performance in Indonesian and Australian food and agriculture industry. Our research show that there is a significant influence of income tax incentives to corporate performance. Based on our study, we conclude that the significant influence of income tax incentives to Indonesian corporate performance somewhat in a higher degree than the Australian peers. We have also concluded that Indonesian government provide a relatively more interesting income tax incentives compare to Australian government. However, an average method of net income –a method applied in Australia– could be considered by Indonesian government to avoid a market price fluctuation in this industry

  11. Industrial Disputes in the Construction Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, L.J

    2012-01-01

    The Cole Royal Commission enquiry into the building and construction (abbreviated to ‘construction’) sector recommended controversial workplace-relation reforms for that sector. The recommended changes are likely to be enshrined in legislation within the year. The Commission drew on analyses of industrial disputes that focused, in the main, on quite recent experience. This paper attempts to give a broader historical perspective on disputes in that sector by considering the pattern of disputes...

  12. Supply Chain Management in the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Fredrik

    2000-01-01

    In this licentiate thesis the implications of a deliberate use of logistics knowledge have been investigated by describing and analyzing the use of a supply chain management approach in the construction industry.
    A five-step approach is used in the thesis. First, theoretical models are developed from the supply chain management literature. Two models are elaborated; One model identifying supply chain criteria and the other comparing traditional to supply chain-based.

  13. An Australian Icon - Planning and Construction of the Parkes Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    By almost any measure, the Parkes Radio Telescope is the most successful scientific instrument ever built in Australia. The telescope is unsurpassed in terms of the number of astronomers, both national and international, who have used the instrument, the number of research papers that have flowed from their research, and the sheer longevity of its operation (now over fifty years). The original planners and builders could not have envisaged that the telescope would have such an extraordinarily long and productive future. From the start, it was an international project by CSIRO that in the 1950s launched Australia into the world of `big science'. Partly funded by the US Carnegie and Rockefeller foundations, it was designed in England by Freeman Fox & Partners, and built by the German firm MAN. This article will give an overview of the origins of the idea for the telescope and the funding, planning and construction of the Parkes dish over the period 1954 to 1961.

  14. PRICING STRATEGY IN THE INDONESIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mochtar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to pricing strategy in the Indonesian construction industry are covered%2C including problems of current pricing strategy in construction%2C exploration of pricing strategies with a market-based approach%2C and survey findings of the top Indonesian contractors regarding their current pricing practices and the applicability of market-based pricing strategy models developed by Mochtar and Arditi. Comparisons with similar survey findings of the top U.S. contractors are conducted whenever possible. In conclusion%2C the belief that current pricing strategy in construction is predominantly cost-based is confirmed by the survey findings%3B indeed%2C in setting the markup%2C most contractors rely on subjective assessment of the competition. Using simulated bidding scenarios%2C it is discovered that Indonesian contractors tend to be more market-based as they know more about the owner%5C%27s characteristics%2C competitors%5C%27 characteristics%2C and market demand. Consequently%2C the implementation of bidding procedure proposed by Mochtar and Arditi is supported. To maximize the benefits of market-based pricing strategies%2C the bidding procedure change should be explored by all parties involved in the Indonesian construction industry. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Cost-based+pricing%2C+market-based+pricing%2C+pricing+variables%2C+bidding+procedure.

  15. Social identity in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L. P.; Karlsen, I. L.; Kines, P.;

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry has one of the highest frequency levels and rates of work-related injuries, yet the evidence for successful attempts to reduce injuries is generally lacking. The motivational and (safety) behavioural implications of social identification and social categorization among...... construction labourer work crews were investigated to ascertain how their interactions are affected by the social structure and organization of work. Semi-structured group interviews and mini interviews during work were carried out with 13 concrete work crews (totalling 53 persons) at five large construction...... sites. The organization of work fosters social identification within a crew, resulting in distancing from and social categorization of site management. Social identification influences safety behaviour in the crews, where worksite safety rules may meet resistance. Future safety initiatives at large...

  16. Cross-cultural comparison of concrete recycling decision-making and implementation in construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Tam, Leona; Le, Khoa N

    2010-02-01

    Waste management is pressing very hard with alarming signals in construction industry. Concrete waste constituents major proportions of construction and demolition waste of 81% in Australia. To minimize concrete waste generated from construction activities, recycling concrete waste is one of the best methods to conserve the environment. This paper investigates concrete recycling implementation in construction. Japan is a leading country in recycling concrete waste, which has been implementing 98% recycling and using it for structural concrete applications. Hong Kong is developing concrete recycling programs for high-grade applications. Australia is making relatively slow progress in implementing concrete recycling in construction. Therefore, empirical studies in Australia, Hong Kong, and Japan were selected in this paper. A questionnaire survey and structured interviews were conducted. Power spectrum was used for analysis. It was found that "increasing overall business competitiveness and strategic business opportunities" was considered as the major benefit for concrete recycling from Hong Kong and Japanese respondents, while "rising concrete recycling awareness such as selecting suitable resources, techniques and training and compliance with regulations" was considered as the major benefit from Australian respondents. However, "lack of clients' support", "increase in management cost" and "increase in documentation workload, such as working documents, procedures and tools" were the major difficulties encountered from Australian, Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively. To improve the existing implementation, "inclusion of concrete recycling evaluation in tender appraisal" and "defining clear legal evaluation of concrete recycling" were major recommendations for Australian and Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively. PMID:19854634

  17. Cross-cultural comparison of concrete recycling decision-making and implementation in construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Tam, Leona; Le, Khoa N

    2010-02-01

    Waste management is pressing very hard with alarming signals in construction industry. Concrete waste constituents major proportions of construction and demolition waste of 81% in Australia. To minimize concrete waste generated from construction activities, recycling concrete waste is one of the best methods to conserve the environment. This paper investigates concrete recycling implementation in construction. Japan is a leading country in recycling concrete waste, which has been implementing 98% recycling and using it for structural concrete applications. Hong Kong is developing concrete recycling programs for high-grade applications. Australia is making relatively slow progress in implementing concrete recycling in construction. Therefore, empirical studies in Australia, Hong Kong, and Japan were selected in this paper. A questionnaire survey and structured interviews were conducted. Power spectrum was used for analysis. It was found that "increasing overall business competitiveness and strategic business opportunities" was considered as the major benefit for concrete recycling from Hong Kong and Japanese respondents, while "rising concrete recycling awareness such as selecting suitable resources, techniques and training and compliance with regulations" was considered as the major benefit from Australian respondents. However, "lack of clients' support", "increase in management cost" and "increase in documentation workload, such as working documents, procedures and tools" were the major difficulties encountered from Australian, Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively. To improve the existing implementation, "inclusion of concrete recycling evaluation in tender appraisal" and "defining clear legal evaluation of concrete recycling" were major recommendations for Australian and Hong Kong, and Japanese respondents, respectively.

  18. Dynamics of productivity change in the Australian electricity industry: Assessing the impacts of electricity reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian electricity industry has undergone a significant reform, since the mid-1990s. Key changes comprised functional unbundling, market restructuring, regulatory reform, public corporatisation and privatisation. Technological development has been another indisputable constituent of these changes, in the wake of ICT revolution. The principle rationale behind these changes has been that they would improve productivity of the industry and social well-being of people. This paper examines the dynamics of productivity changes in the Australian electricity industry and conducts several hypotheses-testings to identify whether industry's efficiency measures are truly improved as a result of the reform-driven changes. Malmquist Total Factor Productivity Index approach and ANOVA are used for this purpose. The results reveal that the productivity gains in the industry have been largely driven by technological improvements and, to a lesser extent, by reform-induced comparative efficiency gains. On average at national level and for the entire industry, there are efficiency gains that, to large extents, can be attributed to functional unbundling and public corporatisation and, to a lesser extent, to market restructuring and privatisation. The results, however, reveal that the reform-driven changes have made insignificant contribution to comparative efficiency, at the level of thermal generation. - Highlights: → Dynamics of productivity changes in Australian electricity industry are examined. → Several hypotheses are also tested against reform-driven changes. → Technology impact is proved to be far larger than reform-induced impacts. → Unbundling and corporatisation had larger impacts than market restructuring and privatisation. → At thermal generation level, no reform-induced impact is encountered.

  19. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in the Dutch Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalinde J.A. Klein Woolthuis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the strategies that sustainable entrepreneurs use to interact with their environment in the Dutch construction industry. The Dutch construction industry is under great pressure to move towards sustainability, and entrepreneurs are believed to be able to play a large role in this transition by introducing new products and new business practices. But how can entrepreneurs prosper in an environment that is not geared up towards such a change? And which strategies do they use to bend conditions in their favor? In this article we make use of the Market and System Failure Framework to analyze the pressures that entrepreneurs are confronted with when introducing sustainable innovations. We recognize that these pressures can be seen as bottlenecks, but that market and system failures can also create entrepreneurial opportunities. We interviewed 16 entrepreneurs in the Dutch construction industry to determine the influences they experienced from their environment and the strategies they use to deal with these. We conclude that we can distinguish between system building and following entrepreneurs, where the former aims to build a new system to challenge the old one, whereas the latter rather makes use of existing structures to build a business. We find that both strategies can be successful and that overall, the entrepreneurs confirm the belief that sustainability on people, planet and transparency aspects, can contribute very well to the long term profitability of the businesses the entrepreneurs are running. These in-depth insights into the influences from the context on the one hand, and the entrepreneurs’ strategic reactions on the other hand, contribute to our understanding of the interactions between entrepreneurs and the system context. This can help us to more effectively stimulate and support innovating entrepreneurs to contribute to the transition towards sustainability.

  20. New breeding objectives and selection indices for the Australian dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, T J; Santos, B F S; Amer, P R; Martin-Collado, D; Pryce, J E; Axford, M

    2016-10-01

    This study comprises an update of the economic values for dairy traits for the Australian industry and the formulation of updated selection indices. An economic model, which calculates partial economic values for each trait individually, was developed to determine the economic implications of selective dairy breeding, based on the effect of trait changes on the profit of commercial dairy farms in Australia. Selection indices were developed from economic values, which were transformed into base economic weights by including the discounted genetic expressions coefficients. Economic weights (in Australian dollars) were 1.79, 6.92, -0.10, -5.44, 8.84, 7.68, 1.07, 4.86, 1.91, 3.51, 4.90, 0.31, 2.03, 2.00, and 0.59, for milk fat (kg), milk protein (kg), milk volume (L), body weight (kg), survival (%), residual survival (%), somatic cell count (cells/mL), fertility (%), mammary system [Australian Breeding Value (ABV) unit], temperament (ABV unit), milking speed (ABV unit), udder depth (%), overall type (%), fore udder attachment (%), and pin set (%), respectively. The updated economic weights presented in this study constituted the basis of the definition for 3 new indices. These indices were developed from combination of bioeconomic principles, patterns of farmer preferences for trait improvements, and desired gains approaches. The 3 indices, Balanced Performance Index, Health Weighted Index, and Type Weighted Index, have been released to the industry. PMID:27522425

  1. Leadership styles of women managers in the UK construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Thayaparan, M; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of an ongoing doctoral study about exploring the contribution of women managers towards the construction industry. UK construction is typically portrayed as a male dominated industry. Women are highly under-represented particularly at the managerial and technical sectors of the construction industry. This research intends to explore the contribution women managers could bring to the construction industry. Exploring the benefits women could bring to constructi...

  2. Efficient Consumer Response (ECR: a survey of the Australian grocery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Swatman

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient consumer response (ECR is a U.S. supply chain management strategy which attempts to address the inefficiencies which have led to excessive inventory and unnecessary costs at all levels within the grocery industry supply chain. This paper discusses the traditional grocery store format, the supermarket, and the ways in which inefficient business practices developed in the U.S. grocery supply chain; and discusses the major business activities needed for successful implementation of ECR. The paper then presents a brief summary of the results of a survey of ECR knowledge and usage within the Australian grocery industry, which is the initial phase of a long term research project whose main purpose is to evaluate ECR as it applies to that industry.

  3. MARKETING EXPENDITURES IN THE INDONESIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mochtar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1960s, a “new” marketing concept known as "four Ps marketing mix" appeared and shifted the focus from the product to the customer. The objective of the new concept was not only profit, and the means of achieving the objective expanded to include the entire “marketing mix”: product, price, promotion, and place (channels and distribution. Expenditures of marketing in a company should be explored from these mixes, because each mix would have an impact on the total marketing expenditures. These four mixes are the main aspects of marketing and thus, should represent almost all expenditures in marketing in a company. From this research it is discovered that the responding contractors have only average efforts to improve or innovate their service, mostly using the latest construction methods and management approach. Correlated to their policy in the fourth mix (Place, they are still national oriented and not international oriented in marketing their services, this may lead to the big question of their survival; their motivation to innovate is only average while their target market is only national market. Their attitude to use more intensive “fees” policy rather than both product innovation and promotion is also interesting. Big percentage of the responding contractors assumes these “fees” are regular marketing practices. This attitude may better be stopped to make the construction industry practices healthier. Attitude to use more product innovation and true promotion approach in marketing in construction must be encouraged systematically in the future, to improve competitiveness in the long term.

  4. THE IMPORTANCE OF INDUSTRY STRUCTURE: LESSONS FROM THE AUSTRALIAN WINE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Transaction costs are a large proportion of the cost structure along the value chains of most industries, especially the food and beverage industries. Competition forces industries to structure their value chains to minimise transaction costs but, in agriculture, this process is commonly impeded by government intervention. In Australia, this has resulted in severe distortions to the structure of most agricultural industries. The wine industry, particularly in South Australia, has avoided or o...

  5. The effects of the global financial crisis on the Australian building construction supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Karthikeyan Thangaraj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study involves a financial analysis of 43 publicly listed and large private companies in the building and construction supply chain from 2005 to 2010; straddling the period of the global financial crisis (GFC; and examines the impact of the GFC on the performance of these companies. The construction supply chain was divided into four sectors – material suppliers, construction companies, property developers and real estate investment trusts (REITs. The findings indicate that the impact was minimal for both material suppliers and construction companies, but especially severe for the more leveraged property developers and REITs. Building material suppliers and construction companies have benefitted substantially from the building economic stimulus package provided by the Australian government to mitigate the effects of the GFC. Decreases in the valuation of assets have, to a large extent, reduced the profitability of property developers and REITs during the GFC but these companies have recovered quickly from these adverse conditions to return to a sound financial position by the end of the 2010 financial year. The results will inform investors, managers and construction professionals in devising strategies for prudent financial management and for weathering future financial crises.

  6. Germany's Construction Industry: Strong Growth Followed by Stagnation

    OpenAIRE

    Gornig, Martin; Hagedorn, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    2011 was one of the construction industry's strongest years of growth since German reunification. For the year as a whole, a nominal increase in construction volume of almost eight percent is expected. The price increase is forecast at over 2.5 percent. Real construction volume in 2011 will be over five percent higher than in 2010. However, according to current information, we can expect the construction industry to experience a break in growth in 2012. Real construction volumes will barely b...

  7. Carbon Emission Management in the Construction Industry – Case Studies Of Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edeoja, Joy Acheyini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a global concern. The effect is seen all over the globe and man’s anthropogenic activities is a major contributor. This study evaluates the management of carbon emissions in the Nigerian construction industry by measuring the amount of carbon being emitted from constructional activities within selected organizations. At present, there is no standard of measuring greenhouse gas emissions that is acceptable internationally for all countries so the UK Department for Environment and Rural Affairs (DEFRA methodology of emission monitoring and measurement was used to evaluate the extent of carbon dioxide emissions in these organizations. This methodology was adopted for this study because there was no known national methodology for emission measurement and monitoring within Nigeria. Case studies were undertaken and questionnaires were applied in some construction organizations within Nigeria and the responses from these questionnaires were evaluated and it was found that though there was significant emissions from the Nigerian construction industry, the provision for emissions monitoring and management was lacking, the general awareness regarding carbon emissions and environmental issues across the various organizations evaluated was poor and the construction organizations had no singular person directly in charge of carbon or environmental issues.

  8. 48 CFR 236.275 - Construction of industrial resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction of industrial resources. 236.275 Section 236.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 236.275 Construction of industrial resources....

  9. Reuse of harbour sediments in the Greenlandic construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possibilities of using harbour sediments from the Greenlandic harbours as substitutes in the Greenlandic construction industry, mainly for concrete production and road construction. Materials for use in the Greenlandic construction industry are shipped...

  10. Contemporary challenges of the Australian international education industry: Analysis of a bureaucratic myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams, S M Riad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to respond to the contemporary issues of the International Education Industry (IEI and the long-term skill shortage goals, Australia amends the IEI and relevant immigration policy from time to time. Some of the amendments have been impacting the IEI and its stakeholders despondently. A literature review has been conducted to realize the contemporary challenges of the Australian IEI. The study shows that the lethargic impact of the continuous policy changes on the IEI and its stakeholders is resulting from a kind of bureaucratic myopia: the failure of setting a direction for international education. The findings outline the contemporary key challenges of the Australian IEI, surrounding to this myopia, where further deliberation is required. Also, the findings convey a message to developed or developing economies, who want to establish, maintain and enhance their international education industry, and to be vigilant against the prospective challenges of an IEI in order to smoothen a worthwhile experience of the stakeholders, associated with their IEI.

  11. Recent initiatives to improve tailings and water management in the expanding Australian uranium milling industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the environmental and safety related changes that have recently occurred, or are about to be implemented in the Australian uranium milling industry. There are several drivers for these changes. The most important are the significant expansions to the Ranger and Olympic Dam uranium mills, the mining of a new orebody at Ranger and Government permission for the development of the Jabiluka deposit. The major changes in the operation of mines relate to the conservation and recycle of water, an important environmental issue in the arid country surrounding the Olympic Dam deposit, and tailings disposal strategies recently adopted or under consideration. These strategies include methods such as central thickened discharge, and cemented paste-fill for both underground and above ground disposal. The new ICRP 60 recommendations concerning radiation exposure have not been of major concern to the Australian industry, as dose rates have been historically less than the new limits. Current and expected dose rates are discussed in the context of these recommendations. (author)

  12. The discourse of "social licence to operate": case study of the Australian wind industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina L. Hall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social Licence to Operate is a concept from the mining industry that reflects the ongoing acceptance or approval for a development granted by local stakeholders. It is now being applied by wind farm developers. Using the Australian wind industry as a case study, this discourse analysis examined how Social Licence to Operate is perceived and operationalised, and the key themes in this conceptual and applied discourse. Discourse analysis acknowledges that language choices are not accidental and discourse reflects power relationships. The wind industry representatives interviewed considered power over the Social Licence to Operate was shared with community stakeholders. They recognised the stakeholders' power to delay or prevent projects, but rejected the notion that every stakeholder group should have veto power. Social Licence to Operate is seen by the wind industry through a business-oriented perspective, with an emphasis on business risk, and they describe the opposition to wind farms by invoking a metaphor of "battle". The industry respondents described Social Licence to Operate as incorporating the values of trust, transparency and participation—which all contribute to creating "authentic" relationships. These findings can inform Social Licence to Operate research, engagement practices, and also encourage reflection by industry representatives on their implicit intentions for stakeholder engagement.

  13. An Innovation Systems Assessment of the Australian Biofuel Industry. Policy and Private Sector Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Jason D.

    2006-07-15

    A strong biofuel industry in Australia has the potential to provide numerous benefits to the nation and its peoples. The benefits include; reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful particulate matter, a boost to rural development goals, enhanced fuel security and a lower balance of payments. For biofuels to be seriously considered as alternatives to traditional petroleum based automotive fuels they must be economically viable. The findings from a series of Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) investigations suggest that ethanol and biodiesel production would be economically viable, in the Australian context, with oil prices in the range of 30-40 USD a barrel. Despite the price of oil being in or above this range for over two years a strong home grown biofuel industry has failed to develop in Australia. The purpose of this master's thesis therefore is to identify the critical issues facing biofuel industry development in Australian and to propose possible policy and private sector strategies for dealing with them. The analysis was done in the following three steps; the first was to map the development of the ethanol and biodiesel industries, the second was to analyse the performance of the industries overtime and the third was to identify the mechanisms which have either induced or blocked their growth. The strategies proposed by this thesis were derived from analysing the inducing and blocking mechanisms and the related issues. The innovation systems approach was chosen because of its ability to provide insights into key industry players, their network interactions and the institutional setup within which they work together to develop, diffuse and use their products. The data needed for the analysis stated above included information related to the development, diffusion and use of ethanol and biodiesel; that is, details about the industry actors and their activities, industry networks, product standards, excise arrangements

  14. An Innovation Systems Assessment of the Australian Biofuel Industry. Policy and Private Sector Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong biofuel industry in Australia has the potential to provide numerous benefits to the nation and its peoples. The benefits include; reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and harmful particulate matter, a boost to rural development goals, enhanced fuel security and a lower balance of payments. For biofuels to be seriously considered as alternatives to traditional petroleum based automotive fuels they must be economically viable. The findings from a series of Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE) investigations suggest that ethanol and biodiesel production would be economically viable, in the Australian context, with oil prices in the range of 30-40 USD a barrel. Despite the price of oil being in or above this range for over two years a strong home grown biofuel industry has failed to develop in Australia. The purpose of this master's thesis therefore is to identify the critical issues facing biofuel industry development in Australian and to propose possible policy and private sector strategies for dealing with them. The analysis was done in the following three steps; the first was to map the development of the ethanol and biodiesel industries, the second was to analyse the performance of the industries overtime and the third was to identify the mechanisms which have either induced or blocked their growth. The strategies proposed by this thesis were derived from analysing the inducing and blocking mechanisms and the related issues. The innovation systems approach was chosen because of its ability to provide insights into key industry players, their network interactions and the institutional setup within which they work together to develop, diffuse and use their products. The data needed for the analysis stated above included information related to the development, diffusion and use of ethanol and biodiesel; that is, details about the industry actors and their activities, industry networks, product standards, excise arrangements

  15. Sustainable technologies for the building construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanegas, J.A.; DuBose, J.R.; Pearce, A.R. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As the dawn of the twenty-first century approaches, the current pattern of unsustainable, inequitable and unstable asymmetric demographic and economic growth has forced many segments of society to come together in facing a critical challenge: how can societies across the world meet their current basic human needs, aspirations and desires, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs? At the core of this challenge is the question: how can the human race maintain in perpetuity a healthy, physically attractive and biologically productive environment. The development path that we have been taking, in the past few centuries, has been ultimately detrimental to the health of our surrounding ecological context. We are consuming an increasing share of the natural resources available to use on this planet, and we are creating sufficiently large amounts of waste and pollution such that the earth can no longer assimilate our wastes and recover from the negative impacts. This is a result of a growing population as well as new technologies which make it easier for use to access natural resources and also require the consumption of more resources. Unsustainable technology has been the result of linear rather than cyclic thinking. The paradigm shift from linear to cyclic thinking in technological design is the crux of the shift from unsustainability to sustainability. This paper discusses the implications for the building design and construction industries. Strategies, technologies, and opportunities are presented to improve the sustainability of the built environment.

  16. Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Processing and Extractive Metallurgical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell'Amico, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The Australian minerals processing and extractive metallurgy industries are responsible for about 20% of Australia's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article reviews the potential applications of concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy in the Australian minerals processing industry to reduce this impact. Integrating CST energy into these industries would reduce their reliance upon conventional fossil fuels and reduce GHG emissions. As CST technologies become more widely deployed and cheaper, and as fuel prices rise, CST energy will progressively become more competitive with conventional energy sources. Some of the applications identified in this article are expected to become commercially competitive provided the costs for pollution abatement and GHG mitigation are internalized. The areas of potential for CST integration identified in this study can be classed as either medium/low-temperature or high-temperature applications. The most promising medium/low-grade applications are electricity generation and low grade heating of liquids. Electricity generation with CST energy—also known as concentrated solar power—has the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions out of all the potential applications identified because of the 24/7 dispatchability when integrated with thermal storage. High-temperature applications identified include the thermal decomposition of alumina and the calcination of limestone to lime in solar kilns, as well as the production of syngas from natural gas and carbonaceous materials for various metallurgical processes including nickel and direct reduced iron production. Hybridization and integration with thermal storage could enable CST to sustain these energy-intensive metallurgical processes continuously. High-temperature applications are the focus of this paper.

  17. Assessing the environmental performance of construction materials testing using EMS: An Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejkovski, Nick

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the audit findings of the waste management practices at 30 construction materials testing (CMT) laboratories (constituting 4.6% of total accredited CMT laboratories at the time of the audit) that operate in four Australian jurisdictions and assesses the organisation's Environmental Management System (EMS) for indicators of progress towards sustainable development (SD). In Australia, waste indicators are 'priority indicators' of environmental performance yet the quality and availability of waste data is poor. National construction and demolition waste (CDW) data estimates are not fully disaggregated and the contribution of CMT waste (classified as CDW) to the national total CDW landfill burden is difficult to quantify. The environmental and human impacts of anthropogenic release of hazardous substances contained in CMT waste into the ecosphere can be measured by construing waste indicators from the EMS. An analytical framework for evaluating the EMS is developed to elucidate CMT waste indicators and assess these indicators against the principle of proportionality. Assessing against this principle allows for: objective evaluations of whether the environmental measures prescribed in the EMS are 'proportionate' to the 'desired' (subjective) level of protection chosen by decision-makers; and benchmarking CMT waste indicators against aspirational CDW targets set by each Australian jurisdiction included in the audit. Construed together, the EMS derived waste indicators and benchmark data provide a composite indicator of environmental performance and progress towards SD. The key audit findings indicate: CMT laboratories have a 'poor' environmental performance (and overall progress towards SD) when EMS waste data are converted into indicator scores and assessed against the principle of proportionality; CMT waste recycling targets are lower when benchmarked against jurisdictional CDW waste recovery targets; and no significant difference in the average

  18. Natural radioactivity in Egyptian and industrially used australian bauxites and its tailing red mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red mud is produced in considerable masses as a waste product in the production of aluminum from bauxite. It may be used for industrial or agricultural purposes. According to it's genesis by weathering and sedimentation bauxites contain high concentrations of uranium and thorium. Three Egyptian bauxites, Australian industry used bauxite and its red mud tailing were analyzed by a high resolution gamma spectrometer, with a hyper pure germanium detector. The three Egyptian bauxites show high concentrations in uranium series, and around 120 Bq kg-1 for uranium -235. K-40 concentrations for these samples ranged from 289 to 575 Bq kg-1. Thorium series concentrations show lower values. The industrially used bauxite shows very low concentrations for all radioactive nuclides. Its tailing red mud as a low level radioactive waste LLRW, shows low concentrations for uranium - series, thorium - series and also 40K, so it is recommended to be used in industrial and agricultural purposes, which is not permissible for the normal red mud. (author)

  19. Enablers of innovation in the construction material industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Jacobsen, Alexia;

    2014-01-01

    , which creates a strong interdependence between the different supply network partners and can be seen as a hindrance for innovation. Innovation models must embrace such a contemporary business structures, where competition often takes place between supply chains rather than between individual companies......The construction material industry is often acknowledged as slightly more innovative than the overall construction industry and could hence serve as a valuable learning place for how innovation could flourish in the construction industry. Construction is viewed as network or supply chain based...

  20. Lean construction: Prospects for the German construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Eric; Walter, Lorenz

    2007-01-01

    There is little, if any, information available about the range and dissemination of lean concepts among construction companies in Germany. Building on the methodologies and conceptual frameworks used in earlier work in the UK (Common et al., 2000) and the Netherlands (Johansen et al., 2002) this study carried out a similar survey among German construction companies to discover the current understanding of lean principles, perceptions of lean and trends in lean development. Qualitative and qua...

  1. Business Structure of Indigenous Firms in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Julius ODEDIRAN; Busayo Funmilola ADEYINKA; Oladele Ayinde OPATUNJI; Kolawole Opeyemi MORAKINYO

    2012-01-01

    The roles of contracting firms in construction industry cannot be overemphasized and their structure is a function of performance and output in the industry. Sets of questionnaire were administered on construction professionals working within the contracting firms. Data obtained was analyzed using descriptive statistic (mean ranking). The study found out that the firms are medium-size firms, engaged in building construction and cannot finance projects independently prior to client financial c...

  2. Project Time Planning in Norwegian Construction Industry - An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hoseini, Erfan

    2015-01-01

    Literatures investigation reveal that poor project planning is cited by many authors as a delay factor in the construction projects. Project planning have many different aspects and this research only addresses time aspect of project planning in the Norwegian construction industry. To capture the real word experience of experts in Norwegian construction industry and to find out the factors influencing project time planning, a survey questionnaire was conducted. The survey was distribute...

  3. QUALITY OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofronov Daniil Sergeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human resources serve as the basis for development of the national economy, as a whole, and the construction industry, as its constituent part. The problem of inferior labor productivity within the framework of the national economy and its construction industry is considered in the paper. The author has identified the reasons why the productivity of the national economy and its construction industry is low. Low quality manpower is one of the reasons. Analysis of the statistical information has proven that the quality of the manpower in the construction industry is unsatisfactory. The author has also analyzed the relation between the construction industry development pattern and the quality of the manpower. Low manpower quality is a consequence of low personnel training and development expenditures assumed by local construction companies, if compared to the same assumed in the developed economies. Russian businesses do not invest any proceeds into their employees, as any employee may leave the company at any moment, and the employer will lose the investment. Therefore, the performance rate of the Russian construction industry cannot catch up with its western counterpart. The author also provides the analysis of the western personnel development concept. The author also makes his suggestions designated to reverse the unfavourable trend of the construction industry.

  4. Safety Management Practices in the Bhutanese Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Dorji

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is considered as one of the most hazardous industrial sectors wherein the construction workers are more prone to accidents. In developed countries such as United Kingdom and United States of America, there is strict legal enforcement of safety in the construction industry and also in the implementation of safety management systems which are designed to minimize or eliminate accidents at work places. However, occupational safety in construction industry is very poor in developing countries such as Bhutan. This study investigates the prevalent safety management practices and perceptions in the construction industry in Bhutan. The study was conducted among 40 construction contractors and 14 government officials through method of questionnaire survey, interview and discussion. The result of the study revealed that there are many occupational safety problems in the construction industry in Bhutan, problems such as lack of safety regulations and standards, low priority of safety, lack of data on safety at construction sites, lack of competent manpower, lack of safety training, lack of safety promotion and lack of documented and organized safety management systems. Furthermore, the study also proposes some recommendations for safe construction in Bhutan.

  5. Rethinking the contractual context for Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the Australian built environment industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ilsa Kuiper; Dominik Holzer

    2013-01-01

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) can be defined as a process of generating and managing information of a building or infrastructure during its life cycle. Whilst the 3D visualisation or dimensional functions of BIM are not necessarily new, it is the usage and integration of this information related to project delivery, management and performance analysis that are challenging current construction industry practices.  Industry has called for the development of more collaborative and integra...

  6. Constructing Global Production Activity Indices: The Chemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Saswati Mahapatra; Thomas K Swift

    2012-01-01

    This article first presents the challenges involved in constructing consistent, timely, and reliable short-term measures of national, regional, and global industry activity. The chemical industry is used as a case study. Second, this article presents the comparison of the movement or fluctuations in industrial production indices and chemical production indices that aid in determining if production in the chemical industry can be used as a proxy for total production in an economy. The American...

  7. PRIORITISING LEAN CONSTRUCTION BARRIERS IN UGANDA'S CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Mwanaki Alinaitwe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Engaging in lean construction efforts could prove to be highly rewarding for building firms in Uganda. However, lean construction is risky and can be disastrous if not properly managed. Lean production efforts in some other countries have not been successful due to the many barriers to its successful implementation. To enable sound lean construction efforts and to increase the chances of success in eliminating waste, a thorough investigation of the barriers is essential. This study presents 31 barriers and investigates their influence (strength on the success of lean construction initiatives. Structured interviews were carried out with technical managers of building firms to assess their perception of the barriers to lean production based on their experience at their firms. The strongest barrier is the provision of inputs exactly when required. Additionally, the barriers were ranked according to the ease of overcoming each. The easiest barrier to overcome is keeping the required items in the right place. Finally, a graphical aid is provided to enable decision makers to concentrate their efforts on the influential (strong, yet easy to overcome barriers. A lack of buildable designs and a participative management style for the workforce are the most important barriers to successful waste reduction in terms of strength and ease of overcoming. On the other hand, a lack of an organisational culture that supports teamwork, a lack of prefabrication and a lack of knowledgeable and skilled workers are regarded as low in strength, and at the same time difficult to overcome.

  8. An Australian study to evaluate worker exposure to chrysotile in the automotive service industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P; Patience, K; Apthorpe, L; Willcocks, D

    1999-07-01

    A study was conducted in Sydney, Australia, in 1996 to investigate the current exposure levels, control technologies, and work practices in five service garages (four car and one bus), three brake bonding workshops, and one gasket processing workshop. This study formed part of the assessment of chrysotile as a priority existing chemical under the Australian National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme. A total of 68 (11 personal and 57 area) air samples were collected, in accordance with the Australian standard membrane filter method. Fiber concentrations were determined by the traditional phase contrast microscopy (PCM) method and 16 selected samples were analyzed by the more powerful transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Chrysotile exposure of car mechanics measured by PCM was typically below the reportable detection limit of 0.05 f/mL, irrespective of whether disc brake, drum brake, or clutch was being serviced. These low levels can be attributed to the wet cleaning or aerosol spray methods used in recent years to replace the traditional compressed air jet cleaning. In the three brake shoe relining workshops, task-specific exposure reached up to 0.16 f/mL in the processes of cutting and radius grinding. TEM results were generally higher, due to its higher resolution power. The median diameter on samples taken from the service garages (passenger cars), as determined by TEM, was 0.5-1.0 micron; and was between 0.2-0.5 micron for the brake bonding and gasket processing workshops, while that for the bus service depot was 0.1-0.2 micron. Most of the respirable fibers (84%, mainly forsterite) from the bus service depot were below 0.2 micron in diameter which is the resolution limit of PCM. In the brake bonding and gasket cutting workshops, 34 percent and 44 percent of the chrysotile fibers were below 0.2 micron in diameter.

  9. An Australian study to evaluate worker exposure to chrysotile in the automotive service industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P; Patience, K; Apthorpe, L; Willcocks, D

    1999-07-01

    A study was conducted in Sydney, Australia, in 1996 to investigate the current exposure levels, control technologies, and work practices in five service garages (four car and one bus), three brake bonding workshops, and one gasket processing workshop. This study formed part of the assessment of chrysotile as a priority existing chemical under the Australian National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme. A total of 68 (11 personal and 57 area) air samples were collected, in accordance with the Australian standard membrane filter method. Fiber concentrations were determined by the traditional phase contrast microscopy (PCM) method and 16 selected samples were analyzed by the more powerful transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Chrysotile exposure of car mechanics measured by PCM was typically below the reportable detection limit of 0.05 f/mL, irrespective of whether disc brake, drum brake, or clutch was being serviced. These low levels can be attributed to the wet cleaning or aerosol spray methods used in recent years to replace the traditional compressed air jet cleaning. In the three brake shoe relining workshops, task-specific exposure reached up to 0.16 f/mL in the processes of cutting and radius grinding. TEM results were generally higher, due to its higher resolution power. The median diameter on samples taken from the service garages (passenger cars), as determined by TEM, was 0.5-1.0 micron; and was between 0.2-0.5 micron for the brake bonding and gasket processing workshops, while that for the bus service depot was 0.1-0.2 micron. Most of the respirable fibers (84%, mainly forsterite) from the bus service depot were below 0.2 micron in diameter which is the resolution limit of PCM. In the brake bonding and gasket cutting workshops, 34 percent and 44 percent of the chrysotile fibers were below 0.2 micron in diameter. PMID:10461401

  10. Impact of Fragmentation Issue in Construction Industry: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nawi Mohd Nasrun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, fragmentation within the construction industry arises from two areas within the traditional construction process; the construction work process where the most significant division is in the separation of the design and construction phase, and the construction structure itself. The fragmentation process in traditional contracting practice further hinders the integration of construction knowledge among contractors, diminishing the opportunity for them to influence design decisions. When design professionals fail to consider as to how a contractor would construct the designed project results in scheduling problems, delays, and disputes during the construction process. Moving towards team integration is considered a significant strategy for overcoming the issue. Accordingly, this paper discusses the fragmentation issue in more detail including its definition, and causes and effects to the construction projects. It also explores that the team integration strategy alleviates scheduling problems, and helps avoid delays and disputes during the construction process, preventing harm to overall project performance.

  11. Occupational Accidents: A Perspective of Pakistan Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauha Hussain Ali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been observed that the construction industry is one of the notorious industry having higher rate of fatalities and injuries. Resulting in higher financial losses and work hour losses, which are normally faced by this industry due to occuptional accidents. Construction industry has the highest occupational accidents rate recorded throughout the world after agriculture industry. The construction work site is often a busy place having an incredibly high account of activities taking place, where everyone is moving in frenzy having particular task assigned. In such an environment, occupational accidents do occur. This paper gives information about different types of occupational accidents & their causes in the construction industry of Pakistan. A survey has been carried out to identify the types of occupational accidents often occur at construction site. The impact of each occupational accident has also been identified. The input from the different stakeholders involved on the work site was analyzed using RIW (Relative Importance Weight method. The findings of this research show that ?fall from elevation, electrocution from building power and snake bite? are the frequent occupational accidents occur within the work site where as ?fall from elevation, struck by, snake bite and electrocution from faulty tool? are the occupational accident with high impact within the construction industry of Pakistan. The results also shows the final ranking of the accidents based on higher frequency and higher impact. Poor Management, Human Element and Poor Site Condition are found as the root causes leading to such occupational accidents. Hence, this paper

  12. Rethinking the contractual context for Building Information Modelling (BIM in the Australian built environment industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilsa Kuiper

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modelling (BIM can be defined as a process of generating and managing information of a building or infrastructure during its life cycle. Whilst the 3D visualisation or dimensional functions of BIM are not necessarily new, it is the usage and integration of this information related to project delivery, management and performance analysis that are challenging current construction industry practices.  Industry has called for the development of more collaborative and integrated contractual arrangements to facilitate the use of BIM. Such recommendations appeal to the ideal use of BIM, but also provide a potential opportunity to seek improvement within the construction industry. This paper proposes a procurement approach to BIM to establish the applicable contractual context to address the potential legal risks and commercial considerations, relative to current practices in Australia. It als ooutlines why BIM, with other enabling technologies, will drive the evolution of contract delivery methodologies.

  13. Generic Attributes of IS Graduates: A Comparison of Australian Industry and Academic Views

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Snoke; Alan Underwood

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the final phase of a study that validates a group of generic attributes of graduates of Australian undergraduate degree programs with majors in Information Systems (IS). 105 academics from all Australian universities that offer IS undergraduate degree programs of study and 53 member of the Australian Computer Society (ACS) took part in this study. A three round Delphi questionnaire was used. The results of this study are compared with a previous study of generic attribute...

  14. Project and Production Management in the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Ho Ko

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, the Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management (EPPM-Journal) presents five original research papers related to project and production management in the construction industry from authors in Africa, Asia, and Europe.

  15. Evaluation of IT in the Danish Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Jan Lambrecht

    1999-01-01

    companies manage (and evaluate) their IT systems and what their requirements are. With the aim of identifying the sophistication of IT evaluation a questionnaire has been sent to 648 Danish companies in the construction industry. Primarily findings in the area of IT strategy and evaluation of IT systems...... are presented in this paper. The findings are compared with other related surveys and some comparisons will be made between these.The analysis of the survey indicates in general that the evaluation of IT is unsophisticated and insufficient in the construction industry. These indications are, however, found......How are companies in the Danish construction industry identifying the value achieved by investing in and using information technology (IT)? This question has become more important and is the subject of this paper.The construction industry has characteristics which may have some influence on how...

  16. Singleness, Marriage, and the Construction of Heterosexual Masculinities: Australian Men Teaching English in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Appleby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study of Australian men and their accounts of living and working in Japan as English language teachers. In this site, recent research has explored Japanese discourses of desire for the West, Western men, and English language learning. These patterns of desire have afforded white Western men a privileged personal and professional status in Japan, and enabled access to employment opportunities as teachers of English language. At the same time, white Western men working as English language teachers face the challenge of negotiating competing discourses that threaten their social status. In particular, their employment in a lowly-regarded profession and a reputation for sexual promiscuity potentially position Western male language teachers as the ‘white trash’ of Asia. My analysis of interview data focuses on the ways in which the men negotiate these discourses, and construct ‘respectable’ Western heterosexual masculinities by mobilising a binary distinction between singleness and marriage. Marriage to a Japanese spouse is presented as a bulwark against alignment with problematic discourses that threaten the status of white masculinity: it is associated with fidelity and maturity, and with integration into Japanese social, linguistic and professional communities. However, the articulation of marital status also reinforces a marginalised position for teachers who do not conform to heteronormative expectations.

  17. Speaking of women's 'nameless misery': the everyday construction of depression in Australian women's magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, Suzy; Fullagar, Simone; Young, Ilena

    2005-10-01

    In this article we examine the tensions between current Australian depression policy directions and lay beliefs about depression as constructed and circulated through popular media at a time when mental health education discourses are also promoting 'depression literacy' [Parslow & Jorm, 2002. Medical Journal of Australia, 177(7), 117-121]. Drawing upon research into articles on depression published in two women's magazines before and after the promulgation of the National Action Plan for Depression [Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, 2000. National action plan for depression. Canberra: Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care-Mental Health and Special Programs Branch] we identify the cultural context of certain lay beliefs about depression as articulated through personal and celebrity stories, advice columns and resource links. The depression literacy literature privileges biomedical and psychological expertise in explaining depression and promoting help-seeking behaviour. In contrast, the magazine discourses foreground an individualising discourse of depression as a problem of self-management while also referring to biomedical expertise. They emphasise women's abilities to manage difficult life events and to build informal supportive relationships, which reinforces dominant notions of feminine identity as concerned with balancing competing gender demands. We critique the national policy on depression literacy as taking insufficient account of women's belief structures, which leads, for example, to a limited analysis of stigma. We also critique policy for not engaging sufficiently with the gendered nature of depression and its relation to social inequities, something the magazines replicate. PMID:16029771

  18. Work Stress among Professionals in Building Construction Industry in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Eziyi Offia Ibem; Michael Nwabueze Anosike; Dominic Ezenwa Azuh; Tim O. Mosaku

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to identify key stress factors among professionals in building construction industry in Nigeria. This is in view of the fact that to date, very little is known about work stress among professionals in building construction industry in this country. The study involved the administration of questionnaire to 107 professionals including architects, builders, civil/structural engineers and quantity surveyors randomly selected from 60 ongoing building projects in Anambra, ...

  19. Risk management in the construction industry: a new literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renault Berenger Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is well known as a highly risk prone industry owing to the complexity of its activities and dynamic project environments generating an atmosphere of risks that must be taken into consideration in the decision process. For this reason, we have developed this treatise to elucidate the fundamentals of risk management through a concise new proposal of literature review for risk management in construction. Our explanation of this is venture is that over the years, this area has been acknowledged as a crucial process in the business institutions and the most discussed subject among experts and researchers in the construction sector. We have tried in this report to present the most recent studies considering the impossibility to present all definitions of the concept of risk. This study is mainly a literature review; it looks at the literature relating to the concept of risk, risk management in construction as well as methods used in construction industry.

  20. Collaboration Initiative on Green Construction and Sustainability through Industrialized Buildings Systems (IBS in the Malaysian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarul Anuar Mohamad Kamar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysian Construction Industry has been urged to use innovative construction technique and to shift from traditional practice of brick and mortar to Industrialized Building System (IBS construction. IBS is defined as a construction technique in which components are manufactured in a controlled environment (on or off site, transported, positioned and assembled into a structure with minimal additional site works. On the other hand, the issues of sustainability and green construction have been duly highlighted in the Construction Industry Master Plan (2005 – 2015 as being of significant importance for the Malaysian construction industry. The Malaysian government is also committed to addressing sustainability issues and meeting its target and obligations in this regard. This paper highlights several aspects of IBS that has the potential of contributing to green construction and sustainability. IBS promotes sustainability from controlled production environment, minimization of waste generation, extensive usage of energy efficient building material, effective logistics and long term economic stability which can contribute to better investment in environment technologies. The Construction Research Institute of Malaysia (CREAM, University of Salford and other research institutes in Malaysia will conduct a collaboration Research and Development (R&D initiative on green construction and sustainability trough IBS implementation. From this paper, the authors hope to receive feedbacks, comments and recommendations to improve research aims, objectives, expected deliverables and research methodology.

  1. Occupational accidents: a perspective of pakistan construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that the construction industry is one of the notorious industry having higher rate of facilities and injuries. Resulting in higher financial losses and work hour losses, which are normally faced by this industry due to occupational accidents. Construction industry has the highest occupational accidents rate recorded throughout the world after agriculture industry. The construction work site is often a busy place having an incredibly high account of activities taking place, where everyone is moving in frenzy having particular task assigned. In such an environment, occupational accidents do occur. This paper gives information about different types of occupational accidents and their causes in the construction industry of Pakistan. A survey has been carried out to identify the types of occupational accidents often occur at construction site. The impact of each occupational accident has also been identified. The input from the different stakeholders involved on the work site was analyzed using RIW (Relative Importance Weight) method. The findings of this research show that fall from elevation, electrocution from building power and snake bite are the frequent occupational accidents occur within the work site where as fall from elevation, struck by, snake bite and electrocution from faulty tool are the occupational accident with high impact within the construction industry of Pakistan. The results also shows the final ranking of the accidents based on higher frequency and higher impact. Poor Management, Human Element and Poor Site Condition are found as the root causes leading to such occupational accidents. Hence, this paper identify that what type of occupational accidents occur at the work place in construction industry of pakistan, in order to develop the corrective actions which should be adequate enough to prevent the re-occurrence of such accidents at work site. (author)

  2. Textual complexity of standard conditions used in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen; Anushi Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Clearly written communication aids the understanding of construction contracts, resulting in less disputation. Past research, using opinion surveys rather than objective criteria, shows that construction contracts lack clarity and standard forms have become complex over time. The study outlined in this paper uses three objective measures of clarity developed by linguists to establish the readability of construction contracts. In addition, thirty industry professionals participated in a Cloze ...

  3. Upflow Constructed Wetland for On-site Industrial Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagiwa, Kazuaki; Ong, Soon-An

    2007-01-01

    Constructed wetlands are cost-effective wastewater treatment technology highly applicable to Asia region. Combination of anaerobic and aerobic processes can upgrade constructed wetlands to treat industrial wastewater containing less-degradable organic pollutants. Controllability of anaerobic and aerobic activities in a vertical constructed wetland was investigated with and without supplementary aeration. The ORP profile along the wetland bed showed clear distinguishes between the anaerobic an...

  4. Productivity Growth and Capacity Utilization in the Australian Gold Mining Industry: A Short-Run Cost Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    B Shebeb

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses a stochastic short-run translog cost function to estimate productivity growth, adjusted for capacity utilisation effects, in the Australian gold mining industry over the time period 1968/69-1994/95. Productivity growth is measured and adjusted for the changes in capacity utilisation. It is found that a large portion of the cost-measure (observed) productivity growth may be attributed to technological change. Changes in capacity utilisation are found to have insignificant impac...

  5. Business Structure of Indigenous Firms in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Julius ODEDIRAN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The roles of contracting firms in construction industry cannot be overemphasized and their structure is a function of performance and output in the industry. Sets of questionnaire were administered on construction professionals working within the contracting firms. Data obtained was analyzed using descriptive statistic (mean ranking. The study found out that the firms are medium-size firms, engaged in building construction and cannot finance projects independently prior to client financial contribution (mobilization fee. Their activities are limited to their locality and rarely get bank loans. They do not have share capital and therefore could not fund project from company capital base.

  6. Optimization and control methods in industrial engineering and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in optimization and control methods with applications to industrial engineering and construction management. It consists of 15 chapters authored by recognized experts in a variety of fields including control and operation research, industrial engineering, and project management. Topics include numerical methods in unconstrained optimization, robust optimal control problems, set splitting problems, optimum confidence interval analysis, a monitoring networks optimization survey, distributed fault detection, nonferrous industrial optimization approaches, neural networks in traffic flows, economic scheduling of CCHP systems, a project scheduling optimization survey, lean and agile construction project management, practical construction projects in Hong Kong, dynamic project management, production control in PC4P, and target contracts optimization.   The book offers a valuable reference work for scientists, engineers, researchers and practitioners in industrial engineering and c...

  7. Corruption and internal fraud in the Turkish construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Murat; Önder, Oytun

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding about the internal fraud and corruption problem in the Turkish construction industry. The reasons behind the internal fraud and corruption problem as well as the types of prevention methods were investigated; and as a result various recommendations were made. To this end, a risk awareness questionnaire was used to understand the behavioral patterns of the construction industry, and to clarify possible proactive and reactive measures against internal fraud and corruption. The type of fraud experienced by Turkish construction companies was also surveyed in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was sent to 89 firms; and depending on the collected data, certain recommendations for construction industry professionals were provided.

  8. Various Forms of Project Delay in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbasirah Mohamed Alias

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Project delay can be defined as an incident that causes extended time in order to complete all or part of a particular project successfully. In other words, delay is the time overrun, either ahead of the date for project completion specified by the contract or further than the extensive contract period where an addition of time has been granted. It should be pointed out that the project delay in the construction industry is a universal or large-scale observable fact affecting not only the construction industry but the overall economy of countries too. As far as world construction industry is concerned, project delays are common problems in the construction industries; particularly most common is in the housing development industries. This paper will present different types of project delay that took place around the world. Project delay involves diverse complicated issues all of which are continuously of crucial importance to the parties to the construction contract. These issues concern right to convalesce costs of the project delay or the need to lengthen the project with the considerable right to recovery costs for adjustments to the contract schedules.

  9. Research on the Construction of Food Industrial Correlation Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhenlei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As the objective existence of economy, the relational and spatial structure of Industrial correlation not only determines the quality and level of economic growth, but is regarded as the important source of gaining competitive advantages. Based on the input-output model and network model of food industry, this study focuses on the method and application of the construction of food industrial correlation network model. Analyzing the connotation of food industrial correlation, the article finds the way to describe it with graphs. What’s more, these graphs and network theory are used to design the index coefficient of industrial correlation to show the food industrial correlation and its structure feature.

  10. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    identifies seven factors perceived by the professionals as related to lower occupational accident rates in the construction industry. Engaging in participatory management, promoting long-term planning and long-term tenures, encouraging cooperation, cautiousness and compliance to rules as well as challenging...... authorities, were described as connected to successful safety management. These factors may guide further research in the field, as well as safety managers and officials engaged in decreasing accident rates in the construction industry in Scandinavia and elsewhere.......Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference...

  11. FacilitatingIndustrial Placement in the Construction Engineering Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Ussing, Lene Faber

    2016-01-01

    outset in the hypothesis that external effectiveness (industry readiness) is better in those modes of education that, at least in part, are based on the world of work itself, and several sources highlight the necessity of strong links between engineering education and industry. Hence, it becomes central......There is often a claim that there is a disconnection between theory and practice, which raises questions on student’s readiness for employment and the extent that higher education responds effectively to the evolving needs of the construction industry. Industrial placements schemes can facilitate...... student learning from construction practice whereby students can reflect on their learning experience at the university. The interplay between traditional engineering curriculum and the context-based learning is important for securing the right skills and competencies among the graduates. This paper takes...

  12. Facilitating Industrial Placement in the Construction Engineering Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Faber, Lene

    2016-01-01

    outset in the hypothesis that external effectiveness (industry readiness) is better in those modes of education that, at least in part, are based on the world of work itself, and several sources highlight the necessity of strong links between engineering education and industry. Hence, it becomes central......There is often a claim that there is a disconnection between theory and practice, which raises questions on student’s readiness for employment and the extent that higher education responds effectively to the evolving needs of the construction industry. Industrial placements schemes can facilitate...... student learning from construction practice whereby students can reflect on their learning experience at the university. The interplay between traditional engineering curriculum and the context based learning is important for securing the right skills and competencies among the graduates. This paper takes...

  13. Experience modeling with graphs encoded knowledge for construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kamsu-Foguem, Bernard; Abanda, Fonbeyin Henry

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is becoming increasingly knowledge intensive. Knowledge management has been hailed as an enabler for tapping this knowledge to improve efficiency in the AEC industry. In this study, the main concepts and benefits of knowledge management, relationships between knowledge management and continuous improvement have been examined. Furthermore, emphasis has been laid on knowledge management through experience feed...

  14. Implementation of Risk Management in Malaysian Construction Industry: Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamzah Abdul-Rahman; Chen Wang,; Farhanim Sheik Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Construction industries are exposed to wide array of risks, such as financial, design, and contractual ones, which might have a direct impact on their performance toward achieving the desired objectives. Risk Management is a proactive decision-making process used to minimize and manage the risks in the most efficient and appropriate manner. However, most construction firms in Malaysia do not apply formal risk management in their projects. Thus, this study aims to identify the actual process o...

  15. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND THE UK CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter; Daphne COMFORT; Hillier, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper offers a preliminary exploration of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) issues being addressed and reported by some of the UK’s leading construction companies. The paper begins with a short discussion of the characteristics and origins of CSR and this is followed by brief outline of the construction industry and some of the challenges it is currently facing. The empirical information for the paper is drawn from the CSR reports and information posted on the World Wide Web by s...

  16. Quality Status and Quality Aspects in the Icelandic Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Dagbjartsdóttir 1986

    2012-01-01

    A common discussion is that the construction industry lacks efficiency, quality is poor, budgets are unreliable and prices are excessive. Better management would result in increased efficiency with reduced quality failures while saving tremendous amount of money. This research aims at identifying and documenting the current status of the construction quality in Iceland. This involves identifying the main problems and point out where the scope lies for improving and by what means it is poss...

  17. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Enshassi; Rafiq M. Choudhry; Peter E. Mayer; Younis Shoman

    2008-01-01

    Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine) according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and ...

  18. The Role of E-Commerce Systems for the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stewart

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of e-commerce systems has increased substantially in the past five years, and now a number of companies in the construction industry have joined consortiums to develop e-commerce portals. These new systems encourage companies to review the way in which existing processes are undertaken, and often re-engineered process are introduced. It is important to understand the difference between the terms e-commerce and e-business, e-commerce refers to buying and seeling transactions which use some24The Australian Journal of Construction Economics & Building Page (iiiform of electronic media, while e-business suggests a review and redefinition of business models linked to the greater use of IT. It is argued that the greater use of the internet and e-commerce, and the move towards the integration of applications will compel construction companies to re-engineer processes and introduce e-commerce systems. A series of business drivers and business designs are discussed in later sections of this paper.There are many benefits associated with the introduction of e-commerce systems, and these include increases in GDP, real wages and employment together with reduced transaction costs. It has been forecast that there will be more than 400,000 companies in Australia using e-commerce systems by 2005 (NOIE 2000. For the construction industry, the benefits will include increased project efficiencies, communications, control, and reduced design and construction times as well as reduced costs (BuildOnline 2000. In the past year, two local consortiums have been formed to develop and offer e-commerce applications, and this heightens the need for all companies to reflect on how they might engage with these new technologies.

  19. Potential uses of Waste Sludge in Construction Industry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Johnson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Waste generation and management is becoming a global challenge resulting into increased environmental concern. Waste management and recycle into a sustainable construction materials as proved to be an alternative for waste disposal helping out in the area of environmental pollution and economic. In recent years various type of waste has been used/reused in the development of sustainable construction materials. This study reviews various attempts that have been made to use sludge from different plants in construction industry. The mechanical and physical properties of the products, the environmental effect of the products and possible recommendations for future research was presented in the review.

  20. The Unidentified Value of IT in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Jan Lambrecht

    2000-01-01

    of their IT strategy is generally low. Most IT evaluation is done before the investment is made using primarily oral guidelines and subjective arguments. CAD systems are the most evaluated. In general it is found that the IT evaluations completed by companies in the construction industry are unsophisticated compared...

  1. The construction industry has to focus on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Balogh, Andre

    1997-01-01

    The construction industries needs to follow the developments on the computing scene is discussed. A proposal to separate information relevant for the building sector into three areas are described. Further it is described how this information can be accessed during new technology, especially...... the Internet. An "extra-net" on the Internet combined with an user friendly GUI is described as a possibility....

  2. The impact of internationalization and diversification on construction industry performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horta, Isabel M.; Kapelko, Magdalena; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Camanho, Ana S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of internationalization and diversification strategies on the financial performance of construction industry companies. The results obtained can guide the design of strategies to pursue company growth and achieve competitive advantage. The evaluation of companie

  3. AUTHORITY OF SELF-REGULATING ORGANIZATIONS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Любовь Борисовна Ситдикова

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the legal means of self-control in the construction industry. It was revealed that the mandatory requirements for the self-regulatory organization controlling quality of its work and its technical regulations applied are not considered by current legislation. The author suggests possible solutions to this problem.

  4. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    -compliance; cooperation or conflict; caution or cockiness; planning management; and employment security. Interconnections between the thematic areas revealed patterns of interaction between managers and employees, interpreted as process models of participatory and directive safety cultures. Conclusion: This study......Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference...... in accidents rates, especially in construction, and as such offer an opportunity to explore organizational and managerial issues related to safety outcomes. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with five construction managers and four construction workers in Danish and Swedish construction...

  5. Structural modeling of safety performance in construction industry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Khosravi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With rapid economic development and industrialization, the construction industry continues to rank among the most hazardous industries in the world. Therefore, construction safety is always a significant concern for both practitioners and researchers. The objective of this study was to create a structural modeling of components that influence the safety performance in construction projects.We followed a two-stage Structural Equation Model based on a questionnaire study (n=230. In the first stage, we applied the Structural Equation Model to the proposed model to test the validity of the observed variables of each latent variable. In the next stage, we modified the proposed model. The LISREL 8.8 software was used to conduct the analysis of the structural model.A good-fit structural model (Goodness of Fit Index=0.92; Root Mean Square Residual=0.04; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation=0.04; Comparative Fit Index=0.98; Normalized Fit Index=0.96 indicated that social and organizational constructs influence safety performance via the general component of the safety climate.The new structural model can be used to provide better understanding of the links between safety performance indicators and contributing components, and make stronger recommendations for effective intervention in construction projects.

  6. Accelerating nano-technological innovation in the Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Stissing Jensen, Jens

    2007-01-01

      By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which....... The institutional features of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support "incubation rooms" or marked...... niches in order for the different elements of the TIS to evolve. This could involve nano-visioning including scenarios of future technological applications and industrial dynamics....

  7. Sustainable Industrialization in the Building Industry: On the Road to Energy Efficient Construction Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandahl, Søren; Ussing, Lene Faber

    2013-01-01

    in this discussion paper. The main method is a review to track past merits in the two domains and to detect knowledge gaps that have research potential. A strategic research agenda focusing on energy-efficient construction management is outlined showing the need for future focus on combining industrialization......Since the Brundtland report in 1987, sustainability has been an issue in all parts of the world, and the focus is increasing in these years. In the same period, the building industry has in the same period also been under heavy pressure to increase productivity in the same pace as other...... in construction management with sustainability and energy concerns in construction management....

  8. Demand and Supply Trends and Construction Industry Development: A Case Study in the Sri Lankan Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Weddikkara

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction sectors in the developing countries (DCs have recently demonstratednumerous trends towards globalisation, raising considerable concern in the field.However, the nature of the effect of demand on supply characteristics of the domesticindustry has not been sufficiently discussed with respect to what development measuresare needed in the context of constraints that originate locally to accommodate the globaltrends in DCs. This paper therefore analyses reasons for these trends and attempts toidentify the necessary industry developments to benefit from them locally. For thispurpose, the Sri Lankan construction industry has been taken as a case study and ademand and supply framework is being used to analyse the case. The analysis revealsthat while government policies contribute intrusively in stimulating demand side trends,the role of the contracting firms together with project delivery process and projectprocurement process are also subject to change as a result of these demanddeterminants. In this context, the main focus is concentrated on corporatedevelopments, while wider industry development is also necessary to support them. Asa consequence, both institutional reforms and capacity building are required to enhancefirms’ technological and managerial capacity. The necessity for these developmentmeasures reflects in partly the underdeveloped framework of the construction industry inDCs. Nevertheless, they could still foster indigenous construction capacity within thecontext of global trends.91

  9. Quality Cost in the Construction Industry ' Preliminary Findings in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Che Ali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key areas being emphasis in ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS is performance measurement towards continual improvement. Among the primary measuring tools is quality cost approach. Quality cost has been well practice in manufacturing sector but slowly gain its importance in construction industry. In fact Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK has reckoned quality cost as one of the tool and technique in few of its management processes. In view of such circumstances that has prompted an effort to undertake a study to ascertain the level of knowledge and practice on quality cost in Malaysian construction landscape. The targeted group of respondents was the personnel in the project management team. Capitalizing Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB National Electronic Tendering Initiatives (NETI road shows which were held in year 2007 throughout the country, the author was able to garner 263 respondents representing the project management team. Subsequently the data gathered from the completed forms were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS software. General findings indicated that the level of knowledge and practice on quality cost among the project management team were relatively low. One of the main contributing factors was poor knowledge in the area related to quality cost. Despite of such scenario most of the respondents showed their interest in acquiring knowledge in the field of quality cost. Hence quality cost approach is at the infancy stage in Malaysian construction industry.

  10. Implementation of building information modeling in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Aftab Hameed; Rahman, Ismail Abdul; Harman, Nur Melly Edora

    2014-10-01

    This study has assessed the implementation level of Building Information Modeling (BIM) in the construction industry of Malaysia. It also investigated several computer software packages facilitating BIM and challenges affecting its implementation. Data collection for this study was carried out using questionnaire survey among the construction practitioners. 95 completed forms of questionnaire received against 150 distributed questionnaire sets from consultant, contractor and client organizations were analyzed statistically. Analysis findings indicated that the level of implementation of BIM in the construction industry of Malaysia is very low. Average index method employed to assess the effectiveness of various software packages of BIM highlighted that Bentley construction, AutoCAD and ArchiCAD are three most popular and effective software packages. Major challenges to BIM implementation are it requires enhanced collaboration, add work to a designer, interoperability and needs enhanced collaboration. For improving the level of implementing BIM in Malaysian industry, it is recommended that a flexible training program of BIM for all practitioners must be created.

  11. Implementing efficient and effective learnerships in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mummenthey

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Overcoming skills deficits has been a major concern in South Africa since the advent of democracy in 1994.Research purpose: This study investigated the current state of the learnership system in the construction sector and identified the major obstacles.Motivation for the study: The study was an attempt to illustrate why it is necessary to implement efficient and effective learnerships in the construction industry.Research design, approach and method: A learnership evaluation framework was developed and indicated the critical factors for efficient and effective learnership implementation as well as the roles of the various key stakeholders. The sample included respondents from building and civil companies (n = 90, learners (n = 135, accredited training providers (n = 14 and Construction Education and Training Authority and industry-related bodies (n = 10.Main findings: It was found that descriptive statistics, non-parametric tests and a content analysis of the Western Cape data indicated that, despite low satisfaction with the system in the workplace and among institutional providers, the learnership system was nevertheless regarded as an appropriate means to develop artisans.Practical/managerial implications: Companies were motivated to offer learnerships but felt inadequately prepared for actual implementation. Learnerships were felt to demonstrate effectiveness in terms of employability and skills enhancement.Contribution/value-add: This research provides a theoretical framework to understand, describe and assess the implementation of efficient and effective learnerships in the construction industry.

  12. Accidents in Malaysian construction industry: statistical data and court cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Heap Yih; Low, Thuan Siang

    2014-01-01

    Safety and health issues remain critical to the construction industry due to its working environment and the complexity of working practises. This research attempts to adopt 2 research approaches using statistical data and court cases to address and identify the causes and behavior underlying construction safety and health issues in Malaysia. Factual data on the period of 2000-2009 were retrieved to identify the causes and agents that contributed to health issues. Moreover, court cases were tabulated and analyzed to identify legal patterns of parties involved in construction site accidents. Approaches of this research produced consistent results and highlighted a significant reduction in the rate of accidents per construction project in Malaysia. PMID:25189753

  13. How Programme Teams Progress Agricultural Innovation in the Australian Dairy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Ruth; Brightling, Pauline; Hope, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article outlines the emergence of programme teams in the Australian dairy farm sector as a response to counter weaknesses in the institutional environment for agricultural innovation which favours technology adoption/diffusion approaches. Design/methodology/approach: The strengths, weaknesses and risks of different approaches to…

  14. Urban BIPV in the new residential construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzinga, D.

    2008-03-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 10 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at urban building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) in the new residential construction industry. The mission of the Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme is to enhance the international collaboration efforts which accelerate the development and deployment of photovoltaic solar energy. The aim of Task 10 is stated as being to enhance the opportunities for wide-scale, solution-oriented application of photovoltaics in the urban environment. The report states that different types of building require different approaches to BIPV due to their associated varying dimensions and geometry. Several solutions are proposed to encourage the adoption and diffusion of BIPV by the new home residential building industry. These are divided into PV industry-based approaches and policy-based solutions. The former include end-customer focused policies, the identification of early adopters, the creation of product solutions that meet the needs of the building industry and standards and that the construction industry must be engaged in the design and planning stage of residential developments. Policy questions discussed include the provision of incentives, a planned approach to the demonstration of BIPV and the development of BIPV-specific policy.

  15. - Construction Workers’ Satisfaction with Work Provision Requirement Dimensions in Ghana’s Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphrey Danso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper, sought to empirically assess and analyze workers’ satisfaction with different dimensions of work provision requirement of the construction industry in Ghana. It involved a cross-sectional survey that used a self-administered structured questionnaire administered to five hundred respondents of building construction workers. The findings indicate that though workers are satisfied with some work provision requirement dimension items significantly, most of the workers are very dissatisfied with working environment and work benefit of the work provision requirement in Ghana. The management of construction firms in Ghana and policy makers are called upon to focus and redirect attention and effort to ensuring that work provision requirement that workers are dissatisfied with are improved significantly to meet workers expectations. The paper contributes to the general body of knowledge in the area of workers’ satisfaction in developing countries particularly in Ghana’s construction industry. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

  16. Mapping Innovation: Facilitating Innovation in the Danish Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    regime, built in the existing ways of working and developing over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, Building Information Modelling (BIM) and System Deliveries) are subject......By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. Theories within SNM look upon innovation in a sector as a socio-technical phenomenon and identifies three levels of socio...

  17. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL CRISIS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina PLOSCARU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The current financial and economic crisis has affected many sectors, and also the construction sector. The construction market has been and will be an important source of income for the entire Europe, totaling about 1.650 thousand billion euro, which is more than the GDP of Italy. Building no doubt brings significant percentage in the GDP of any European country, which of course is different from country to country. In Western European countries, the residential market is almost 50% from the construction market, while in Eastern European countries the majority is held by the civil and non-residential constructions. In addition, in the West the medium budget per capita spent on construction is 3-4 times higher than that spent in Eastern countries. But, according to previsions in the coming years the countries that will witness a growth, albeit small, will be the Eastern ones. The paper highlights the impact of the economic and financial crisis in the construction industry on a European and national level, as the sustainable constructions that may represent the sector’s future.

  18. - Construction Workers’ Satisfaction with Work Provision Requirement Dimensions in Ghana’s Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey Danso

    2012-01-01

    This paper, sought to empirically assess and analyze workers’ satisfaction with different dimensions of work provision requirement of the construction industry in Ghana. It involved a cross-sectional survey that used a self-administered structured questionnaire administered to five hundred respondents of building construction workers. The findings indicate that though workers are satisfied with some work provision requirement dimension items significantly, most of the workers are very dissati...

  19. Disputes and Conflicts within Construction Contracts in the Icelandic Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Birkir Kúld Pétursson

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry suffers from frequent disputes and conflicts between all parties of construction contracts. No public data is in place to estimate the general cost of disputes within the sector. A new regulation has recently taken effect and among the updated amendments is the requirement for contractors to obtain a quality management system. Disputes and conflicts are to be recorded in these quality management systems. In this thesis, structured interviews were conducted with parti...

  20. Are Innovations Being Created or Adopted in the Construction Industry? Exploring Innovation in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor’Aini Yusof

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent debate on innovation within an organizational setting has shifted focus toward discussing whether innovation is being adopted or being created. This shift is due to the failure of many innovation efforts and the fact that for each innovation creation or innovation adoption, different skills, resources, and cultures are needed to encourage each innovation. The objective of this article is to explore the type of innovation implemented by the construction participants. A conceptual model of innovation creation and innovation adoption was developed using four criteria: by justification of new ideas, by purposes, by activities involved, and by nature. Face-to-face questionnaires were conducted with developers, consulting firms, and contractors in Penang, Malaysia. The data were analyzed using descriptive analysis. Factor analysis was used to classify the innovation creation and innovation adoption. The results show that the construction participants in Malaysia are categorized as an innovation adopter. This result provides better understanding about the type of innovation implemented by the construction participants, in particular the contractors and the consulting firms. The results could also be used as a foundation for conducting future research to identify appropriate skills, knowledge, culture, and resources for such innovations.

  1. Identifying program critical success factors in construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmad Kiani; Vahidreza Yousefi; Siamak Haji Yakhchali; Aghil Mellatdust

    2014-01-01

    In project management literature, the concept of program is a group of related projects managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits not available from managing them individually. This paper attempts to identify program critical success factors focusing on Iran’s construction industry so that the level of relative importance of various factors could be determined for key stakeholders. Furthermore, since a program includes a set of projects, another objective of this study is to find out wh...

  2. BENCHMARKING THE PERFORMANCE OF MALAYSIA’S CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail SYUHAIDA; Md. Yusof AMINAH

    2009-01-01

    Malaysia’s construction industry particularly the provision of public infrastructure projects faces various debatable issues of the government’s belt-tightening budget, abandoned public projects, shoddy workmanship, over-budgeted project procurement and unresolved debts in public project provision. The current global economic downturns as well as the fluctuation in the oil prices worldwide have exacerbated the situation. Thus, in materialising the efficiency, accountability for performance, p...

  3. MAPPING INNOVATION:FACILITATING INNOVATION IN THE DANISH CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. Theories within SNM look upon innovation in a sector as a socio-technical phenomenon and identifies three levels of socio-technical interaction within which sectorial innovation can be explained. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built in the existing ways of working a...

  4. Project Culture in the Chinese Construction Industry: Perceptions of Contractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years culture has become one of the most studied topicsin project management research. Some studies have investigatedthe infl uence of culture at different levels – such as nationalculture, industry culture, organisational culture and professionalculture. As a project-based industry, the construction industryneeds to have more insight concerning cultural issues at theproject level and their infl uence on the performance of constructionprojects. Few studies, however, have focused on culture at theproject level. This paper uses a questionnaire survey to determinethe perceptions of Chinese contractors about the impact of projectculture on the performance of local construction projects. This isaugmented by a series of in-depth interviews with senior executivemanagers in the industry. The fi ndings indicate that specifi c projectculture does contribute signifi cantly towards project outcomes.In particular, goal orientation and fl exibility, as two dimensionsof project culture, have a negative statistical correlation withperceived satisfaction of the process, commercial success, futurebusiness opportunities, lessons learnt from the project, satisfactionwith the relationships, and overall performance. This paper alsoindicates that the affordability of developing an appropriate projectculture is a major concern for industry practitioners.

  5. Vectors of technical innovation delivery by small and medium Australian construction firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Hardie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-established Schumpeterian theory on innovation assumes that significant innovations are generated by large companies with ample spare resources. The allocation of time and money to speculative endeavours with unclear outcomes has often been regarded as beyond the scope of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. As a result, authorities sometimes advise SMEs to concentrate on the adoption of existing innovative products and processes rather than the generation of new creative ideas. Despite this traditional wisdom, some very capable individuals actively choose to participate in the SME sector because the relative absence of internal bureaucratic processes and the capacity for agile response to changing circumstances. Ten case studies of significant technical innovations generated within construction SMEs were examined in the light of common themes identified through a literature review. The case studies were classified according to existing taxonomies of innovation. Content analysis was used to map the identified themes against the published material about the innovations from patent applications, company websites, trade literature and industry magazines. The findings indicate that SME innovation stems from several distinct motivations. These drivers of innovation can be described vectors. They inspire innovative solutions but the generated innovations also drive development towards solutions for other, quite different problems.

  6. Driving Innovative Thinking in the New Zealand Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Noktehdan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between innovation and productivity improvement in the construction industry. It is argued that this relationship is not well understood due to lack of in-depth understanding of innovation in construction. To overcome this obstacle, the authors present a multi-dimensional innovation classification system which aims at better defining and classifying what is meant by innovation in construction. The use of this classification system is demonstrated by applying it to a database of 500 innovations reported by the construction alliance, the Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team. The results clearly demonstrate the diversity of types, degree of novelty and performance improvement benefits among construction innovations. Such diversity means that the impact of the reported innovations on productivity and performance are of different levels of significance. The classification system developed in this study can be used by construction organisations and alliances in the future to develop more detailed methods of calculating innovation performance indicators, based on the innovation type, novelty and benefits factors. By using this system, they can also put in place mechanisms to influence the types of innovation developed in their projects with the aim of maximising their productivity performance.

  7. Strategies for Minimizing Corruption in the Construction Industry in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick X.W. Zou

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Corruption is a social phenomenon deep rooted in the history of mankind. It is similar to other kinds of crime which are likely to occur in procurement of works by governments and local authorities, due to the large amount of money involved in a single transaction and the difficulty in monitoring project expenditure. Therefore, it is necessary to develop strategies to minimize any corruption risks and corrupt behaviour in procurement of construction projects. The aim of this paper is to review the current corruption prevention practices in China’s construction industry and suggest ways for improvement. To collect useful and insightful information, desktop studies, focus-group workshops and face-to-face interviews were conducted with supervisory and construction officers at different levels – state, province and municipal in China, who have direct responsibilities and experience in cracking down construction corruption. It was found that corruption happens in different forms during any stage of construction project procurement, and the current anti-corrupt practices are reactive rather than proactive. It was also found that improvements on the legal system, inspection strategies and processes, and promotion of ethical culture are all required. Based on the research findings, corruption prevention strategies were developed. The paper concludes that institution of random and regular checks, severe punishment and prosecution to corrupt personnel, and promotion of a healthy and clean construction culture are all necessary to mitigate the scourge.

  8. Textual complexity of standard conditions used in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Clearly written communication aids the understanding of construction contracts, resulting in less disputation. Past research, using opinion surveys rather than objective criteria, shows that construction contracts lack clarity and standard forms have become complex over time. The study outlined in this paper uses three objective measures of clarity developed by linguists to establish the readability of construction contracts. In addition, thirty industry professionals participated in a Cloze Test which measured the level of comprehension of clauses concerning disputes. The study verifies that contract conditions are very difficult to read, with college level reading skills needed to comprehend half of the clauses. However, the hypothesis that standard forms have become complex over time was not supported by the study. The study establishes a linear relationship between readability and comprehension, proving the hypothesis that improved readability increases the comprehension of a contract clause. 

  9. Constructing Learning: Adversarial and Collaborative Working in the British Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Dan; Felstead, Alan; Fuller, Alison; Jewson, Nick; Unwin, Lorna; Kakavelakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines two competing systems of work organisation in the British construction industry and their consequences for learning. Under the traditional "adversarial" system, conflict, hostility and litigation between contractors are commonplace. Such a climate actively militates against collective learning and knowledge sharing between…

  10. Implications of Recent Australian Wheat Industry Developments for Domestic and Overseas Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Lobb, Alexandra E.; Fraser, Rob W.

    2003-01-01

    This study is motivated by the proposition that the objectives of the AWB Ltd have changed since semi-privatisation of the Australian Wheat Board under the Wheat Marketing Act, 1989. Conceptualising this change of objectives as a shift from revenue maximization to profit maximization, this study examines the impact of such a change on the pricing policies of a multi-market price-setting firm. More specifically, this paper investigates, using two hypothetical objective functions, a risk averse...

  11. Convergence Among the Submarkets in Australian Regional Building and Construction Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Junxiao Liu; Kerry London

    2010-01-01

    Studies on market convergence are well considered in the literature. However, the majority of the previous research focused on housing markets and few studies have concentrated on construction markets. Owing to a simultaneously dramatic increase in the construction prices of the sub-markets in the building construction sector in Australia, this paper aims to identify the convergence among these markets, involving house construction market, other-residential building construction market, and n...

  12. The development of public and private construction procurement systems in the Malaysian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastura Jaafar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As demand on building construction projects rises, various procurement methods have been adapted to suit with unique project requirements. However, poor industry performance and rapid developments within it indicate the need for a research on the procurement systems in the industry. In order to explore the development of procurement systems in Malaysia, a discussion on different economic phases which influence the routes of procurement systems and its evolution in Malaysia's construction industry is initiated. Subsequently, based on a questionnaire survey collected from 73 public and 68 private parties, the significant and dominant role of traditional procurement system used by both the public and private sectors in Malaysia can be confirmed. Further, compared to the public sector, the private sector is observed to be more aggressive in adapting alternative systems such as design and build (D&B and Turnkey. Further elaboration on the research findings is covered in the discussion section.

  13. Shortening of construction period of nuclear power plant. Activities of construction industry on construction period shortening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total construction period could be shorten by prefabricating structures efficiently in another yard and reducing working hours on site, which would reduce work at height or congestion work and also upgrade safety at work. Construction period shortening would surely reduce expenses during work and advance operation start of electric utilities. Construction of reactor building, turbine building, water intake and drainage canal was performed on a relatively large scale and a big share of whole schedule. This article summarized basic technologies to shorten construction period for reactor building/turbine building and water intake and drainage canal. Advanced methods of reactor building/turbine building; (1) modularization of equipment and skeleton, (2) utilization of concrete mold, reinforcing bar and steel frame, (3) precedent steel frame method and (4) steel plate reinforced concrete (SC) method, were outlined and their application examples were shown to reduce work on site and improve work efficiency. As for water intake and drainage canal construction, (1) precast concrete method, (2) SC method and (3) steel plate shell method were described with application examples. Construction procedures and problems using mega block method for water intake and drainage canal were also introduced. (T. Tanaka)

  14. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Enshassi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and their workers if new workers are trained well in the work site and they are informed about dangerous places, and if a workable safety plan is well preplanned. The results also showed that reported accident rates increased among subcontractors when using old, unsafe equipment and due to the complexity or difficulty in the construction sites features. Owners and general contractors need to stipulate strict clauses for safety in the contract for improving safety record of subcontractors. Construction workers must receive proper job related safety and health training with a safety logbook. It is recommended that the subcontractors and workers should attend continuing safety programs on regular basis as part of their perquisite to work in construction sites.

  15. Analysis of Project Success Criteria in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseun Sunday Dosumu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the relative importance of the project success criteria in the Nigerian construction industry. It also determined the correlation among the project success criteria. Based on the literatures reviewed, the study proposed a framework for measuring project success in the construction industry. The respondents for the study were the government, private clients, consultants and contractors. Three hundred copies of questionnaires were distributed to capture data on the subject, but only 86 were returned and used for the study. The paper captured respondents that are resident in Lagos state, Nigeria and chosen by convenience from selected organizations used for the study. The data were analysed with SPSS 16 through the use of frequencies, mean scores, factor analysis and correlation. Factor analysis was employed because the mean scores showed that all the project success criteria were at least important. Nine principal components were finally merged into 4 through the factor analysis using the Varimax rotation with Keiser normalization. The study found out that all the project success criteria were important but their level of importance differs according to the factor analysis carried out. Therefore, it was concluded that there are four major components of construction project success in Nigeria- user-related factors, professionals’ factors, organisational factors and other minor factors. The minor factors were found to be related to both organizations and projects but were not highly rated by respondents for determining construction project success. The study also concludes that project success criteria goes beyond meeting cost, time and quality target, it includes users’ satisfaction, professionals’ fulfilment and achievement of organizational goals. The recommendation of the study was that for construction projects to be successful, attention must be paid to users’ related factors, professionals’ factors and

  16. Work Stress among Professionals in Building Construction Industry in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Offia Ibem

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify key stress factors among professionals in building construction industry in Nigeria. This is in view of the fact that to date, very little is known about work stress among professionals in building construction industry in this country. The study involved the administration of questionnaire to 107 professionals including architects, builders, civil/structural engineers and quantity surveyors randomly selected from 60 ongoing building projects in Anambra, Ogun and Kaduna States, Nigeria. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, and findings show that the principal sources of stress were high volume of work, uncomfortable site office environment, lack of feedback on previous and ongoing building projects, and variations in the scope of work in ongoing building projects. The paper suggests that taking responsibility for work which one has adequate capacity to handle, establishing realistic budgets and time frame for project delivery, provision of spatially adequate, visually and thermally comfortable site offices, adoption of appropriate job design practice and education of professionals on stress management strategies will reduce the incidence of stress among professionals in building industry in Nigeria.

  17. Work Stress among Professionals in Building Construction Industry in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Offia Ibem

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify key stress factors among professionals in building construction industry in Nigeria. This is in view of the fact that to date, very little is known about work stress among professionals in building construction industry in this country. The study involved the administration of questionnaire to 107 professionals including architects, builders, civil/structural engineers and quantity surveyors randomly selected from 60 ongoing building projects in Anambra, Ogun and Kaduna States, Nigeria. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, and findings show that the principal sources of stress were high volume of work, uncomfortable site office environment, lack of feedback on previous and ongoing building projects, and variations in the scope of work in ongoing building projects. The paper suggests that taking responsibility for work which one has adequate capacity to handle, establishing realistic budgets and time frame for project delivery, provision of spatially adequate, visually and thermally comfortable site offices, adoption of appropriate job design practice and education of professionals on stress management strategies will reduce the incidence of stress among professionals in building industry in Nigeria. 

  18. Jointly achieving profitability and environmental outcomes: methane abatement from genetic improvement in the Australian beef industry

    OpenAIRE

    Alford, Andrew R.; Cacho, Oscar J.; Griffith, Garry R.; Hegarty, Roger S.

    2006-01-01

    Selection of cattle with greater feed efficiency is known to be profitable. Savings in southern Australian beef production systems of $6.55 per breeding cow per year have been estimated for selection for lower residual feed intake (RFI), and an additional saving of $4.34 per breeding cow per year may be achieved in feedlots. Greater feed efficiency is also expected to reduce methane emissions. A gene flow model was developed to simulate the spread of improved RFI genes through both a single h...

  19. Zero carbon homes: Perceptions from the UK construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The take-up of the many voluntary energy efficiency standards which exist in the UK and internationally has been limited. As a result, governments have recognised the need to introduce mandatory schemes through legislation, e.g. from 2016 all new build homes in the UK will be required to achieve zero carbon in regulated energy consumption. However, as 2016 approaches, very few zero carbon homes are being delivered. This paper explores the drivers and barriers for zero carbon homebuilding. The perceptions of the wider construction industry were gathered through a series of semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in commissioning, designing, constructing and regulating housing. The results show that, whilst drivers for zero carbon homebuilding exist, the barriers are currently perceived to be greater than the drivers. The barriers are categorised into five groups: economic, skills and knowledge, industry, legislative and cultural. Mechanisms for policy and industry support for the delivery of zero carbon homes are identified to address these barriers. The research findings highlight the need for a clear and robust policy framework for the forthcoming standard. The Government and industry must prioritise raising public awareness of the need for and benefits of zero carbon homes to help develop market demand. - Highlights: • The strongest drivers were perceived to be in the legislative and economic themes. • More barriers were identified than drivers or potential support mechanisms. • Economic and skills and knowledge barriers were perceived as the most significant. • Uncertainty in zero carbon homes policy is a barrier to zero carbon homebuilding. • Proposed support mechanisms include zero carbon champions and self-build homes

  20. The institutionalization of benchmarking in the Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard; Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    on how to institutionalize new structures in the Danish construction industry? In the methodology chapter, I outline how institutional theory facilitates new and important inquiries into understanding institutionalization of benchmarking. I account for how the choice of theory is influencing my......, the chapter accounts for the data collection methods used to conduct the empirical data collection and the appertaining choices that are made, based on the account for analyzing institutionalization processes. The analysis unfolds over seven chapters, starting with an exposition of the political foundation...... legitimacy. The political pressures ended up radically transforming the institutionalization of benchmarking. This transformation is accounted for in chapter six. As a result of the transformation, private construction companies were provided an opportunity to influence the future institutionalization...

  1. Revaluering benchmarking - A topical theme for the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, benchmarking has increasingly gained foothold in the construction industry. The predominant research, perceptions and uses of benchmarking are valued so strongly and uniformly, that what may seem valuable, is actually abstaining researchers and practitioners from studying...... the perception of benchmarking systems as secondary and derivative and instead studying benchmarking as constitutive of social relations and as irredeemably social phenomena. I have attempted to do so in this paper by treating benchmarking using a calculative practice perspective, and describing how...... organizational relations, behaviors and actions. In closing it is briefly considered how to study the calculative practices of benchmarking....

  2. Convergence Among the Submarkets in Australian Regional Building and Construction Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiao Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on market convergence are well considered in the literature. However, the majority of the previous research focused on housing markets and few studies have concentrated on construction markets. Owing to a simultaneously dramatic increase in the construction prices of the sub-markets in the building construction sector in Australia, this paper aims to identify the convergence among these markets, involving house construction market, other-residential building construction market, and non-residential building construction market. To achieve it the Granger causality test and generalized response function depending on the vector error correction model with the quarterly data of Australia’s eight states from 1998 to 2010 will be applied. Based upon the econometric tests, the price diffusion patterns among these construction markets have been identified. Research on the convergences of construction markets not only helps construction firms perform well in business operations and arbitrage activities, but also provides policy makers with useful information for enacting effective construction policies for national perspectives and approaches to infrastructure planning.

  3. BOOMERANG - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposal has been prepared for the installation in Australia of a national high performance synchrotron light facility called Boomerang. The Boomerang proposal had its origin in the establishment of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) which was one of the seven Major National Research Facilities announced by the Federal Government in December 1995. The ASRP provides the opportunity and funding for Australian researchers to access international synchrotron facilities, specifically two consortia at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA and continued interaction with the Photon Factory at the KEK Laboratory in Japan. The ASRP was the successor to the Australian National Beamline Facility project (ANBF) which began in 1991 following the ASTEC inquiry titled 'Small Country - Big Science'. The Federal Government also provided funding for a Feasibility Study to determine the value of establishing an Australian-based synchrotron radiation facility. The Feasibility Study was completed in August 1998 and endorsed by the institutional members of the ASRP and the research community in general. The study concluded that, on the data available in Australia, there was a strong case for the installation of an Australian-based facility. The study considered several options for an Australian-based facility and recommended that these options and the data supporting the general conclusions receive further investigation. A mission was arranged to a select group of overseas laboratories to explore these questions in detail. The review team included a mix of scientific and industrial experience and also represented the interests of the ASRP and an Industrial Synchrotron Consortium based in Victoria. Based on the conclusions of the overseas mission and incorporating the advice of all international specialists in the design and use of synchrotron facilities consulted during the mission, the most cost-effective option was an extended

  4. Implementing US-style anti-fraud laws in the Australian pharmaceutical and health care industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas A; Urbas, Gregor; Skillen, Lesley

    2011-05-01

    This article critically analyses the prospects for introducing United States anti-fraud (or anti-false claims) laws in the Australian health care setting. Australian governments spend billions of dollars each year on medicines and health care. A recent report estimates that the money lost to corporate fraud in Australia is growing at an annual rate of 7%, but that only a third of the losses are currently being detected. In the US, qui tam provisions - the component of anti-fraud or anti-false claims laws involving payments to whistleblowers - have been particularly successful in providing critical evidence allowing public prosecutors to recover damages for fraud and false claims made by corporations in relation to federal and state health care programs. The US continues to strengthen such anti-fraud measures and to successfully apply them to a widening range of areas involving large public investment. Australia still suffers from the absence of any comprehensive scheme that not only allows treble damages recovery for fraud on the public purse, but crucially supports such actions by providing financial encouragement for whistleblowing corporate insiders to expose evidence of fraud. Potential areas of application could include direct and indirect government expenditure on health care service provision, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, defence, carbon emissions compensation and tobacco-related illness. The creation in Australia of an equivalent to US anti-false claims legislation should be a policy priority, particularly in a period of financial stringency.

  5. Management strategies to harness cultural diversity in Australian construction sites - a social identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Loosemore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available  Construction sites around the world employ large numbers of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The effective management of this cultural diversity has important implications for the productivity, safety, health and welfare of construction workers and for the performance and reputation of firms which employ them. The findings of a three year, multi-staged study of cultural diversity management practices on construction sites are critiqued using social identity theory. This reveals that so called “best-practice” diversity management strategies may have an opposite effect to that intended. It is concluded that the management of diversity on construction projects would benefit from being informed by social identity research. 

  6. Students' Experiences of Supervision in Academic and Industry Settings: Results of an Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Suzanne; Pitt, Rachael; Manathunga, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The joint supervision of Research Higher Degree (RHD) students by an industry and university supervisor is likely to increase in forthcoming years with a rise in the number of university-industry collaborations. Research students may become involved in these collaborative arrangements for a variety of reasons and may launch into their RHD without…

  7. Trends and Reliance on Foreign Labourers in Malaysia: Conventional Construction versus Industrialized Building System Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydin M.A.O

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an influx of foreign labourers in Malaysia over the past decade due to sustained economic growth and a limited labour market. As a long term measure to ensure sustainable growth as well as to minimize socio-economic implications, a medium to longer-term policy on foreign workers will be devised with the goal of reducing overdependence on foreign workers while attracting more skilled and trained professionals. In order to reduce the number of foreign workers, the government has encouraged the implementation of an IBS. An Industrialized Building System (IBS is a construction system in which the components are manufactured in a factory, on or off site, positioned, and assembled into complete structures with minimal additional site work. This research has been carried out to discover trends, whether decreasing or increasing, in the employment of foreign labour in the Malaysian construction industry with reference to the Immigration Department of Malaysia. Additionally, interviews with construction labourers at IBS sites and conventional sites were carried out to identify the number of foreign labourers that are used in such projects.

  8. Construction of Industrial Electron Beam Plant for Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.; Choi, J.; Ahn, S.; Makarov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2004-10-06

    A pilot plant for treating 1,000 m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant, and it gave rise to elaborate the optimal technology of the electron beam treatment of wastewater with increased reliability at instant changes in the composition of wastewater. Installation of the e-beam pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, appreciable to reduction of chemical reagent consumption, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000 m3/day, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Korean Government.

  9. Applying Project Histories and Project Learning through Knowledge Management in an Australian Construction Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Tayyab; Finegan, Andrew; Walker, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: With the advent of information and communication technologies (ICT), some organisations have endeavoured to develop and maintain systems commonly known as project histories. This paper aims to provide a framework to the construction organisations in order to improve the learning from projects through the development and use of project…

  10. The Efficacy of Waste Management Plans in Australian Commercial Construction Refurbishment Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Hardie; Shahed Khan; Angela O'Donnell; Graham Miller

    2012-01-01

    Renovation and refurbishment of the existingcommercial building stock is a growing area oftotal construction activity and a significantgenerator of waste sent to landfill in Australia. Awritten waste management plan (WMP) is awidespread regulatory requirement forcommercial office redevelopment projects. Thereis little evidence, however, that WMPs actuallyincrease the quantity of waste that is ultimatelydiverted from landfill. Some reports indicate anabsence of any formal verification or monit...

  11. Leadership Talent: A Study of the Potential of People in the Australian Rail Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Janene Piip

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of leadership talent in the rail industry in Australia. Like many other countries around the world, rail is troubled by its ability to attract new talent as older leaders with specialized knowledge retire. This study sought to identify whether the sector is making the most of the talent already existing within, knowing the barriers faced in attracting new industry entrants, and questions what can be done to strengthen current approaches to developing leader...

  12. Career advancement of the professional women in the UK construction industry: Career success factors

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, G.; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Haigh, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The issue regarding the lack of women in the UK construction industry has become more prominent for some time, attracting government and industry wide attention due to this potential skill shortage facing the industry. In order to meet these future demands the industry cannot rely on recruiting only from the male workforce. Therefore women?s participation for the construction industry especially for professional level is important. This paper explores the importance of career success factors ...

  13. Overview of Researches on Rural Industrial Development in China’s New Socialist Countryside Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jie-wu

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of rural industrial development, this paper summed up representative research results of China’s new countryside construction, including approval of criteria for classification of rural industrial structure, definition and scope of rural industrial development, introduction and application of industrial development theory, existing problems, causes and countermeasures of three times of industrial development in rural areas, and experience of foreign rural industrial development model. Among these researches, most researches are general and narrow about achievements in rural industrial development, while the causes are little touched upon. In future, it is expected that the research on rural industrial development in new socialist countryside construction will be deepened and specified.

  14. The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) is a joint venture between the Australian mining industry through the Australian Mineral Industries Research Association Ltd. (AMIRA) and three of the organizations working most actively in this area in Australia: CSIRO Minesite Rehabilitation Research Program; University of Queensland Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation; and Curtin University Mulga Research Centre. The ACMRR was established in July 1993 to provide a national framework to conduct Strategic Research into minesite rehabilitation. It is an industry led and funded initiative. The Goals of the Centre include: to conduct strategic research into minesite rehabilitation to provide sustainable environmental solutions which are acceptable to industry, government and the community; to be recognized as a center of excellence undertaking commissioned research on minesite rehabilitation in an independent and thorough manner; to provide scientific and technological foundations to facilitate industry and government in setting acceptable standards; to act as networking and communications focus; and to enhance education and training in minesite rehabilitation. Strategic Research Programs in: Water Systems--downstream surface and groundwater quality; Land--the long-term behavior and stability of constructed landforms; Ecosystems--the long-term sustainability of constructed landforms; Waste--the long-term treatment and disposal of waste products; will allow the ACMRR to achieve these goals through specific research projects in these areas, developed with industry sponsors. This paper will discuss their progress to date, research projects underway, and plans for the future

  15. INVESTIGATION ON USE OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TO COUNTERMEASURES OF NATURAL DISASTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuo

    The construction industry makes effective social contributions during disaster recovery efforts. The present study investigated the possibility of the construction industry also contributing to disaster prevention efforts and the formulation of emergency policy. The administrative divisions of the construction industry society were surveyed regarding the possibility of the industry contributing to disaster prevention measures, emergency response efforts, and emergency policy. A questionnaire given to municipal disaster prevention sections in Kyushu and the Yamaguchi Prefecture showed that the construction industry could contribute to these efforts.

  16. Shifting constructions of scarcity and the neoliberalization of Australian water governance

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Gareth A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the discursive construction of water scarcity and its role in the establishment and ongoing legitimacy of Australia’s market environmentalist water reforms. It shows that climate was the dominant explanation for scarcity crises in Australia until the reforms commenced in the early 1990s, when it was overtaken by mismanagement. Since 2007 climate change has become increasingly prominent, particularly as a discourse explaining future water crises. Drawing on interviews with ...

  17. Balancing Study and Paid Work: The Experiences of Construction Undergraduates in an Australian University

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Lingard

    2012-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was undertaken among third year studentsenrolled in the University of Melbourne’s Bachelor of Property andConstruction (BPC) programme. The survey explored students’experiences in balancing paid work with study. Hours spent in paidemployment were at least as long and, in many cases, were inexcess of hours spent at university. While work was not perceivedby students to pose a difficulty for attending lectures and tutorials,students indicated that their paid work made it ...

  18. Leadership Talent: A Study of the Potential of People in the Australian Rail Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janene Piip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of leadership talent in the rail industry in Australia. Like many other countries around the world, rail is troubled by its ability to attract new talent as older leaders with specialized knowledge retire. This study sought to identify whether the sector is making the most of the talent already existing within, knowing the barriers faced in attracting new industry entrants, and questions what can be done to strengthen current approaches to developing leaders. In exploring the meaning of leadership talent, from a skills based perspective with three levels of leaders, blended methods using semi-structured interviews and a survey were utilized. The study is important because it focuses on the people aspects of the industry, a little researched area of rail that has major implications for how employees are engaged and retained. The findings identified a certain mindset, culture and approach about leadership talent in organizations that overlooked the heterogeneity of rail organization populations, precluding certain groups of people from becoming leaders. The project identified that leadership and other soft skills required in the rail industry are both under researched, and often undervalued, for the impact that they can have on performance and productivity of companies. There are key messages from this study for both organizations as well as inspiring rail industry leaders.

  19. Construction of Chaihu Selenium Industrial Demonstration Area in Zhongxiang City of Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzhong; DAI

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop selenium industry in Jianghan Basin,Hubei Provincial Party Committee decided to build Chaihu selenium industrial demonstration area in Zhongxiang City.This paper introduced general situation of Chaihu Town,analyzed countermeasures for construction of selenium industrial demonstration area in depth,and finally came up with 12 constructive and pertinent recommendations.

  20. A Study of the potency of construction service industries to support the first nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was conducted to identify the potency of construction service industries to participate in nuclear power plant program in Indonesia. The potency is identified by evaluation results of national industries potency in some multinational construction service industries. The research methodology chosen was the survey method by sending questionnaires, visits to National industries, interview, and literature study. The data collection technique was sampling purposive. Data can be obtained from both primary and secondary data. The study results showed that the performance of construction service industries to support the NPP program must be increased through the selection of competent human resources, reliable equipment and an effective and efficient project management system, so that they can be expected to play necessary role in the nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia. (author)

  1. Aspects of Training and Remuneration in the Accommodation Industry: A Comparison between Australian and Singaporean Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth; Davies, Doug

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognised that effective staff training and remuneration allows an organisation to provide a unique and differentiating standard of service in industry, resulting in increased profitability to service providers. The purpose of this research study is to investigate the training strategies, and hence the training profile, of…

  2. THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN AND AUSTRALIAN FLOWER INDUSTRIES: An application of three methodologies.

    OpenAIRE

    van Rooyen, I.M.; Kirsten, Johann F.; Van Rooyen, C.J.; Collins, Ray

    2001-01-01

    Competitiveness is defined to include both comparative and competitive advantage. Three different methodologies are applied in the analysis of the flower industries of South Africa and Australia: "Determinants of competitive advantage" methodology of Michael Porter (1990) describes the factors influencing competitive advantage; "Revealed comparative advantage" states the relative importance of flower trade in each country; and the "Policy Analyses Matrix" calculates the comparative advantage ...

  3. Knowledge Management Practice in Two Australian Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management (KM could be described as a management system that supports the creation, sharing and retrieving of valued information, expertise and insight within and across communities of people and related organizations using information and communication technologies and hence it is a combination of the effective application of information technlogy and management of human resources. KM is becoming a core competitive factor in construction operations. This paper presents the results of two case studies of KM practices in large AEC (architecture, engineering and construction companies through desk-top study and semi-structured interviews. The results indicate that implementing KM in AEC companies leads to competitive advantages and improved decision-making, problem solving and business performance. The results also indicateed that while technology plays an important role, top management commitment, total employee involvement, performance assessment and the culture of knowledge-learning and sharing must be considered when implementing KM. Therefore it is suggested that the implementation of KM should incorporate the company's vision, work processes, technology and culture, to improve the ability of knowledge creating, capturing, sharing, retrieving and ultimately, to improve the company's competitive advantage, decision making, problem solving and innovation.

  4. The Efficacy of Waste Management Plans in Australian Commercial Construction Refurbishment Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hardie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Renovation and refurbishment of the existingcommercial building stock is a growing area oftotal construction activity and a significantgenerator of waste sent to landfill in Australia. Awritten waste management plan (WMP is awidespread regulatory requirement forcommercial office redevelopment projects. Thereis little evidence, however, that WMPs actuallyincrease the quantity of waste that is ultimatelydiverted from landfill. Some reports indicate anabsence of any formal verification or monitoringprocess by regulators to assess the efficacy ofthe plans. In order to gauge the extent of theproblem a survey was conducted of twenty fourconsultants and practitioners involved incommercial office building refurbishment projectsto determine the state of current practice withregard to WMPs and to elicit suggestions withregard to ways of making the process moreeffective. Considerable variation in commitmentto recycling policies was encountered indicatinga need to revisit waste minimisation practices ifthe environmental performance of refurbishmentprojects is to be improved.

  5. The survey of cement dermatitis among construction industry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faride Sadeghian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cement has long been known as a cause of both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. However, there are little data relating to occupational skin diseases (OSD in the Iranian construction industry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the epidemiology of cement dermatitis among terrazzo and cement manufactory workers. Methods: This is cross-sectional descriptive study. In this study 50 cement manufact-ory workers in Shahroud and 150 terrazzo workers in Lordegan were interviewed through questionnaire. Questionnaire includes demographic characteristics and questions about present dermatitis, background eczema, daily work hours, exposed chemical agents, using of gloves. Patients examined and patch tested by dermatologist. Data analyzed with SPSS software and c2, Mann Whitney and logistic regression statistical test. Results: The findings of the study showed that 8 workers (16% in cement factories and 52 workers (34.7% in Lordegan terrazzo enterprises had reported dermatitis at the time of review. Of which 15.5% in terrazzo workers had allergic contact dermatitis. In this study the prevalence of cement dermatitis increased with increasing age and there was significantly differences between dermatitis and background of dermatitis in terrazzo workers (P<0.05. Conclusion: Cement should be treated as hazardous materials, wearing of suitable gloves, early diagnosis and treatment of contact dermatitis and health education to workers is suggested.

  6. HiLumi prepares its construction phase with industry

    CERN Multimedia

    Agnes Szeberenyi

    2015-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC project is now seeking industrial suppliers and collaborations to start the construction phase and make the high-luminosity upgrade happen. The “HiLumi LHC goes to Industry” event held on 26 June aimed to foster R&D collaborations and knowledge exchange between CERN and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) - the perfect opportunity for them to match their capacity with the requirements of HiLumi.   Isabel Bejar-Alonso (High-Luminosity LHC Technical Coordinator) addresses the participants of the “HiLumi LHC goes to Industry” event held at IdeaSquare on 26 June. To reach the 14 TeV and 3000 fb-1 goal of the High-Luminosity LHC, more than 1.2 km of the current LHC machine will need to be replaced with high-technology components that require cutting-edge technologies. HiLumi experts have already identified more than 65 technology areas and even more challenging components that need to be manufactured, assembled and tested bef...

  7. Industrial relations, migration, and neoliberal politics : The case of the European construction sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lillie, Nathan; Greer, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Transnational politics and labor markets are undermining national industrial relations systems in Europe. This article examines the construction industry, where the internationalization of the labor market has gone especially far. To test hypotheses about differences between '' national systems,'' t

  8. The Australian Farm Business Management Network: Industry, Education, Consultancy and Research Coming Together

    OpenAIRE

    Charry, Al A.; Parton, Kevin A.; Murray-Prior, Roy B.; Crockett, Judith; Gardner, M.W.; Johnson, Sue; Livingstone, S.

    2003-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the University of Sydney, on 5-6th December 2002 the future of farm management in Australia was discussed. The fundamental conclusion achieved by key primary industry representatives, corporate executives, academics, consultants and researchers is that farm management will have a more significant role to play in the future than previously in servicing the primary sector. The idea of farm management as a profession was proposed. Its basis would be business management s...

  9. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the indus...

  10. Discussion on the construction and industrialization of space-breeding land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the current situation and problems that exist in the construction of Space-Breeding Land, and gives some suggestions on the construction and industrialization of Space-Breeding Land

  11. Balancing Study and Paid Work: The Experiences of Construction Undergraduates in an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lingard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire survey was undertaken among third year studentsenrolled in the University of Melbourne’s Bachelor of Property andConstruction (BPC programme. The survey explored students’experiences in balancing paid work with study. Hours spent in paidemployment were at least as long and, in many cases, were inexcess of hours spent at university. While work was not perceivedby students to pose a difficulty for attending lectures and tutorials,students indicated that their paid work made it difficult for them toengage in independent learning activities, such as using libraryresources or preparing for classes by reading beforehand. Twoscales, previously used in other countries to measure students’burnout and engagement, were tested. Both scales were foundto be valid and reliable in that the factorial structures foundin previous studies were confirmed and acceptable internalconsistency reliability coefficients were generated for each of thescales’ component factors. This opens the way for more in-depthmultivariate analysis to determine the linkages between workhours, work-study conflict and students’ burnout or engagementwith university life.

  12. THE REAL ESTATE RECESSION AND THE PERFORMANCES OF FIRMS IN ROMANIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Diana Oancea-Negescu; Adrian Anica-Popa

    2009-01-01

    In the last years, the real estate developers, the firms that offer construction materials and the construction firms have experienced a spectacular development with considerable profits. The present study aims to identify the correlations between the economic conjecture identified at national and international level and the performances of the companies in construction industry. The unfavorable effects of the economic crisis on the construction industry, on the main indicators that reflect t...

  13. ENABLING KNOWLEDGE FLOW: RETAINING GRADUATE WOMEN IN THE SINGAPORE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Yean Yng Ling

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As extensive resources are expanded in transferring knowledge from universities to undergraduates, it is important for them to enter the workforce upon graduation to enable the knowledge to flow to the industry. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which knowledge flow is disrupted because graduate women are not entering the Singapore construction industry to ensure its sustainable growth. This study used a structured questionnaire, with data collected from 116 construction-trained graduate women via postal survey. Results show that 58% of them chose not to enter or are considering leaving the construction industry. The disruption in knowledge flow is due to better prospects in other industries (pull factor and poor job conditions within the construction industry (push factor. To retain graduate women in the construction industry, it is recommended that employers: introduce flexible work schedule; allow graduate women to work from home; and give them the same opportunities as their male counterparts.

  14. THE APPLICATION OF THE JUST-IN-TIME PHILOSOPHY IN THE CHINESE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Sui Pheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Just-in-Time (JIT philosophy originated from the Toyota Production System (TPS and has been used in the manufacturing industry for many decades. It has helped to increase the productivity of the industry and has also increased the quality of its products. In recent years, numerous studies in developed countries have endeavoured to introduce JIT in the construction industry to reap similar benefits. This study focused on applying JIT to the Chinese construction industry with the goal of improving its performance and thus its competitiveness. This paper discusses the current state of the Chinese construction industry; presents the potential impediments to implementing JIT; and proposes a framework for JIT implementation in the areas of design, procurement, construction and inspection. The results of this study suggest that government and educational institutions should play a key role in spearheading the application of JIT in the construction industry in China.

  15. Achievements of Capital Construction of Onshore Petroleum Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Jinhui

    1994-01-01

    @@ In 40 years since the founding of new China,the capital construction of onshore petroleum was greatly developed, a capital construction system with rational structure and complete specialities was formed, and a capital construction battalion for petroleum with high technical quality was established.

  16. Fostering of Innovative Talents Based on Disciplinary Construction: HRD Strategy of Chinese Nuclear Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workforce challenge to nuclear power industry: • We are facing the aging workforce and talent loss since the tough time of nuclear power industry. • Professional workforce fostering in nuclear power industry always needs a long period of time. • Professional workforce fostering in nuclear power industry is a systematic and interdisciplinary work. Talents fostering in nuclear power industry: Major measures → national overall planning; engineering practice; knowledge management; disciplinary construction; cooperation and communication

  17. An investigation of how the Australian brewing industry influence consumers on Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgeir Aleti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop and test hypotheses around organisations’ behaviour on social media and its effect on consumers’ responses. We draw on the notion of the market maven to underpin the research and suggest that organisations on social media need to focus on acting in a maven-like manner in order to influence audiences in Twitter. We collected data from the Twitter accounts of the entire brewing industry in Australia, analysing organisational postings and their impact on influence (follower numbers, retweets of their respective Twitter accounts. In particular, we look at message formulation and language, native platform behaviour, reciprocity and persistency variables. Findings suggest that establishing a larger follower base requires an interactive, one-to-one and reciprocal approach. In order to influence audiences to retweet organisations need to speak the ‘native platform language’ and employ a soft-sell strategy. Maven-like behaviour tends to reside in the small independent craft breweries. We offer the conclusion that these craft breweries have realised that, on social media, a different approach to marketing is required: the organisations must act in a maven-like manner.

  18. Metal Extraction Processes for Electronic Waste and Existing Industrial Routes: A Review and Australian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Khaliq

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The useful life of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE has been shortened as a consequence of the advancement in technology and change in consumer patterns. This has resulted in the generation of large quantities of electronic waste (e-waste that needs to be managed. The handling of e-waste including combustion in incinerators, disposing in landfill or exporting overseas is no longer permitted due to environmental pollution and global legislations. Additionally, the presence of precious metals (PMs makes e-waste recycling attractive economically. In this paper, current metallurgical processes for the extraction of metals from e-waste, including existing industrial routes, are reviewed. In the first part of this paper, the definition, composition and classifications of e-wastes are described. In the second part, separation of metals from e-waste using mechanical processing, hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical routes are critically analyzed. Pyrometallurgical routes are comparatively economical and eco-efficient if the hazardous emissions are controlled. Currently, pyrometallurgical routes are used initially for the segregation and upgrading of PMs (gold and silver into base metals (BMs (copper, lead and nickel and followed by hydrometallurgical and electrometallurgical processing for the recovery of pure base and PMs. For the recycling of e-waste in Australia, challenges such as collection, transportation, liberation of metal fractions, and installation of integrated smelting and refining facilities are identified.

  19. Co-operation and competition in the construction industry of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorée, André; Holmen, Elsebeth; Caerteling, Jasper

    2003-01-01

    In 2002, a Parliamentary Enquiry Committee exposed widespread collusion practices in the Dutch construction industry. The construction industry in the Netherlands is in turmoil and is seen as not living up to the standards that society requires. There seems to be a culture and an environment that in

  20. Use of Anthropogenic Sea Floor Structures by Australian Fur Seals: Potential Positive Ecological Impacts of Marine Industrial Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Y Arnould

    Full Text Available Human-induced changes to habitats can have deleterious effects on many species that occupy them. However, some species can adapt and even benefit from such modifications. Artificial reefs have long been used to provide habitat for invertebrate communities and promote local fish populations. With the increasing demand for energy resources within ocean systems, there has been an expansion of infrastructure in near-shore benthic environments which function as de facto artificial reefs. Little is known of their use by marine mammals. In this study, the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures (pipelines, cable routes, wells and shipwrecks on the foraging locations of 36 adult female Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus was investigated. For 9 (25% of the individuals, distance to anthropogenic sea floor structures was the most important factor in determining the location of intensive foraging activity. Whereas the influence of anthropogenic sea floor structures on foraging locations was not related to age and mass, it was positively related to flipper length/standard length (a factor which can affect manoeuvrability. A total of 26 (72% individuals tracked with GPS were recorded spending time in the vicinity of structures (from 75% of the foraging trip duration with pipelines and cable routes being the most frequented. No relationships were found between the amount of time spent frequenting anthropogenic structures and individual characteristics. More than a third (35% of animals foraging near anthropogenic sea floor structures visited more than one type of structure. These results further highlight potentially beneficial ecological outcomes of marine industrial development.

  1. Organisation, ‘anchoring’ of knowledge, and innovation in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2004-01-01

    at the firm level. The data refer to the overall Danish construction industry, as well as a specific region, North Jutland, which is relatively specialised in construction. By using latent class and regression analysis the results show that firms, which to a high extent make use of partnering and other......explanation for the relatively poor innovation performance of the industry. Using survey data from the Danish construction industry the paper investigates the importance of learning and ?anchoring? of project specific knowledge within the firms for facilitating engagement in innovative activities...... that temporary interorganisational projects may cause in relation to continuous learning at the firm level. These results may also have implications for project organising firms outside the construction industry. A characteristic feature of the construction industry is the widespread use of project organisation...

  2. Modeling injury rates as a function of industrialized versus on-site construction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Romero, J C; Suárez-Cebador, M; Abad, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    It is often predicted that the industrialization of building activities will lead to a reduction of accident rates in the construction sector, particularly as a result of switching activities from building sites to factories. However, to date no scientific research has provided objective quantitative results to back up this claim. The aim of this paper is to evaluate how industrialization affects the accident rate in different industrialized building systems in Spain. Our results revealed that the industrialized steel modular system presents the lowest accident rate, while the highest accident rate was recorded in the construction method with cast-in-place concrete. The lightweight construction system also presents a high accident rate. Accordingly, industrialized building systems cannot claim to be safer than traditional ones. The different types of "on-site work" seem to be the main variable which would explain the accident rates recorded in industrialized construction systems.

  3. Dynamic Innovation strategies and stable networks in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Cook, Nicole; Marceau, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigate the role of interorganisational networking for technology diffusion in an industry characterized by very limited R&D activity. Udgivelsesdato: APR......This paper investigate the role of interorganisational networking for technology diffusion in an industry characterized by very limited R&D activity. Udgivelsesdato: APR...

  4. Perspectives on artificial intelligence in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom; Gaarslev, Axel

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines 14 research projects conducted since 1988. The value for industry for each project is listed, and its concluded that despite a high industrial rating, no projects have been implemented in the real world. Reason to the lack of AI-penetration is discussed, and guidelines to over...

  5. Advancing the Use of BIM Through a Government Funded Construction Industry Competency Centre in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Hore, Alan V.; Thomas, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop the early case for a new Competence Centre dedicated to industry led research in the Irish construction industry. It incorporates the results of a survey carried out by the Construction IT Aliance (CITA) and also identifies similiar centres carrying out industry led research around the world. Results from the survey show a clear support for the establishment of such a centre in Ireland and, in particular, a strong interest in Building Information Model...

  6. Barriers to the Uptake of Concurrent Engineering in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Nathaniel Anny Aniekwu; Igboanugo, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    It is the consensus of scholars that the productivity of the construction industry is very low when compared with other industries. Concurrent Engineering (CE), which has a primary goal of reducing the total time from designing a product to releasing it into the market, while creating better designs as well, has been identified as one of the concepts that has yielded effective adaptation in the construction industry. An exploratory survey was used to identify 63 variables with the capacity to...

  7. Cost estimate classification and accuracy for Major Industrial Plant Projects (MIPP) versus building construction in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Erbe, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing pressure on prices for construction projects adds to the significance of cost estimation accuracy in building construction. Due to competition from Asian entrants, main contractors in the plant engineering industry are starting to face a similar situation. In the present paper, the cost estimation standards for Major Industrial Plant Projects (MIPP) are analyzed and compared with the cost estimation standards for Building Construction (BC). The research method uses a literature and st...

  8. 29 CFR 776.23 - Employment in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Engineering Co., 224 F. (2d) 359 (C.A. 8), certiorari denied 350 U.S. 875; Chambers Construction Co. and L. H... are engaged in work at the site of the construction such as mechanics, laborers, handymen..., but also office, clerical, bookkeeping, auditing, promotional, drafting, engineering, custodial...

  9. Surface Engineering Construction of Sichuan Natural Gas Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Kaicheng

    1995-01-01

    @@ The Present Status of Surface Engineering Construction A comparatively integrate and systematic surface engineering system, including gas gathering, purification transportation and distribution facilities, which approaches the international technical level, has been established. (Fig. 1)

  10. Exploring the attributes of collaborative working in construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shuwei; Greenwood, David; Steel, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Due to the increased level of uncertainty of construction market and the variety of building functions, the practitioners in construction need work together more closely, which means a higher degree of collaborative working is often necessary. There is evidence that higher degree of collaborative working can produce more successful projects, but there has been only limited research to examine the definition of collaborative working. The lack of understanding of collaborative working resulted ...

  11. Evaluating financial health of real estate & construction industry in India

    OpenAIRE

    C. Batra

    2015-01-01

    Real Estate & Construction sector plays an important role in the development of a country’s base. Understanding its performance would be crucial as, in India, it is one of the largest contributors to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and one of the largest generators of economic activity. Real estate & construction sector in general, is perceived to be financially more risky compared to other sectors of the economy. The current research extends and adds to the extant literature by investigatin...

  12. The Rural Information-based Construction under the Perspective of Expanding Agricultural Industrial Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of expounding connotation and significance of expansion of agricultural industrial chain, coupled with the connotation of rural informatization connotation, this article analyses the role of rural informatization in expanding agricultural industrial chain: it can enhance market competitiveness of industry chain, improve the operational efficiency of industry chain, and promote the income and quality of farmers in industry chain. Under the perspective of expanding agricultural industrial chain, this article puts forwards thinking about the construction of rural informatization as follows: first, give full play to the leading role of the government; second, strengthen the construction of information-based network facility; third, integrate information resources in rural areas, and improve the quality of information; fourth, build comprehensive information service platform in rural areas; fifth, improve organizational level of production and management of individual farmers; sixth, strengthen the construction of information-based personnel in rural areas; seventh, strengthen publicity and training, promote overall cultural quality and information awareness of farmers.

  13. The Month-of-the-year Effect in the Australian Stock Market: A Short Technical Note on the Market, Industry and Firm Size Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marrett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This short note examines the month-of-the-year effect in Australian daily returns using a regression-basedapproach. The results indicate that marketwide returns are significantly higher in April, July and Decembercombined with evidence of a small cap effect with systematically higher returns in January, August, andDecember. The analysis of the sub-market returns is also supportive of disparate month-of-the-year effects.However, only in the case of small cap firms and the telecoms industry do these coincide with the higherreturns associated with the January effect as typified in work elsewhere.This

  14. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  15. Construction Industry Products Diversification by Implementation of BIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kalinichuk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One way to increase the effectiveness and economic stability of a construction company is product diversification. Intention to diversify construction products can be initiated for such reasons as necessity of capital injection, reducing of risks and costs of production, desire for optimization of delivery system, increasing economic competitiveness, etc. BIM can help to solve assigned tasks by diversification and optimize system operation as a whole. It becomes an actuality especially under conditions of severe competition when the possibility of attaining a work contract is reduced by increased focus.

  16. Decision-making on reverse logistics in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanwadee Chinda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With the growing competition, many construction organizations attempt to improve their productivity, quality, and efficiency. Construction waste management, by means of reverse logistics, becomes a key issue to improve the productivity, and raise the company’s green image. In this study, four reverse logistics methods-direct reuse, remanufacturing, recycling, and landfill-are considered to manage construction and demolition (C&D waste. Two factors (economic and site-specific with their 15 sub-factors affecting the decisions to implement the reverse logistics are examined. The hierarchy model of reverse logistics decisions, developed through the analytic hierarchy process, reveal the importance of the economic factor over the site-specific factor. It is suggested that the transportation cost, the processing cost, the specific sorting technology, and the limited project time must be first considered before making decisions on reverse logistics plans. The construction company can utilize the developed hierarchy model to decide on the most appropriate reverse logistics plan to achieve the best benefits.

  17. ASSESSING STRATEGIC TYPOLOGY AND BUSINESS PERFORMANCE: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE IN SMALL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafie Sidek

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The research investigates Miles and Snow (1978 strategic typology as the strategic choice and business performance among Class F entrepreneurs in civil construction industry in Malaysia. The result concluded thatProspector strategy is the most effective strategic typology in the small construction industry in Malaysia whereas reactors are the lowest achievers. Analyzer and defender are the moderate class F performers. The most competitive and the destructive strategic typology have been revealed from this study. This is important to serve as a guide to those who involved or intend to be involved in the small construction industry in Malaysia. It is useful for strategist and businessman, especially in the small construction industry in Malaysia to take it as a normative theory which they might practice throughout the daily activities especially during the formation of the business strategy.

  18. Biotechnologies and bioinspired materials for the construction industry : an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; J. A. Labrincha

    2014-01-01

    Published online: 16 Oct 2013 Looking back to less than three centuries of industrialization, responsible for alarming levels of pollution and consumption of non-renewable resources that has led to the exhaustion of the earth’s capacity, the humankind only now begins to grasp the overwhelming potential of natural systems. During almost 40 million centuries, Nature has developed materials and processes with optimal performance which are totally biodegradable. Analysis of bioinspire...

  19. The impact of training and development on career advancement of professional women in the UK construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, G.; Amaratunga, Dilanthi

    2012-01-01

    The redressing the gender imbalance in the UK construction industry has been emphasised on numerous occasions and many researchers have identified that women can contribute in an immense way towards the construction industry development. However, construction industry has failed to attract and retain women who are interested in a construction career. Participation of women is still very low in some parts of the industry, in particular, at a time when skilled people at all levels of the indust...

  20. A STRATEGIC APPROACH OF SMES ACTIVITY IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN DOLI COUNTY

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Tudor Nistorescu Ph. D; Assist. Ludmila Paunescu(Railean) Ph. D Student

    2011-01-01

    Faced with rapid changes of conditions in management, economic, social and even political, the construction activity, like all other industries is in a time, when, by taking a proper strategic directions depends its future development. Only a realistic strategic approach, coherent and implicit for SMEs in the construction industry will lead to minimize the risk of making mistakes and to generate a coherent response to situations and problems wich this sector of national economy are confrontin...

  1. Constructed wetlands in the treatment of agro-industrial wastewater: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana Mar-Yam; Akratos Christos S.; Vayenas Dimitrios V.; Pavlou Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, constructed wetlands are becoming more prevalent in wastewater treatment all over the world. Their range of applications is no longer limited to municipal wastewater but has expanded to the treatment of heavily polluted wastewaters such as agro-industrial effluents. This paper provides a comprehensive literature review of the application of constructed wetlands in treating a variety of agro-industrial wastewat...

  2. ENABLING KNOWLEDGE FLOW: RETAINING GRADUATE WOMEN IN THE SINGAPORE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Florence Yean Yng Ling; Lena Leow

    2008-01-01

    As extensive resources are expanded in transferring knowledge from universities to undergraduates, it is important for them to enter the workforce upon graduation to enable the knowledge to flow to the industry. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which knowledge flow is disrupted because graduate women are not entering the Singapore construction industry to ensure its sustainable growth. This study used a structured questionnaire, with data collected from 116 construction-t...

  3. Strategic analysis of the construction industry in Spain .

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Martín García; Julio González Arias

    2011-01-01

    The construction sector has, in Spain, a remarkable importance, due to the contribution to GDP, around 10%, and employment (10%) and the wide business network it includes. The present economic situation and the residential market saturation have led to a sharp contraction in building activity, after a long period of growth. This is, therefore, a good time to perform a structural analysis to identify the determinants of profitability and assess the projection of the companies operating therein...

  4. End-to-end requirements management for multiprojects in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wörösch, Michael

    that are present in the industry by contributing to rework being avoided, shortened lead-times, less spending of resources, better quality, and a higher degree of satisfaction of stakeholders. The results of the conducted research show that formal requirements management can successfully be applied...... the long term effect of introducing requirements management to the construction industry and its customers. An investigation would be beneficial for the industry and academia...

  5. Combined Industrial Wastewater Treatment in Anaerobic Bioreactor Posttreated in Constructed Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Bibi Saima Zeb; Qaisar Mahmood; Saima Jadoon; Arshid Pervez; Muhammad Irshad; Muhammad Bilal; Zulfiqar Ahmad Bhatti

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) with monoculture of Arundo donax L. was investigated for the posttreatment of anaerobic bioreactor (ABR) treating combined industrial wastewater. Different dilutions of combined industrial wastewater (20, 40, 60, and 80) and original wastewater were fed into the ABR and then posttreated by the laboratory scale CW. The respective removal efficiencies of COD, BOD, TSS, nitrates, and ammonia were 80%, 78–82%, 91.7%, 88–92%, and 100% for original industrial wastewater tre...

  6. The Sectorial Code - an inquiry into the contemporary sector development activities in the Danish construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Jens Stissing; Bonke, Sten

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 1990'ties the Danish construction industry has been exposed to organised activities aiming to develop the industry from a sectorial point of view. It has however been difficult for these activities to establish a coherent and attractive sectorial development agenda which has been able to generate detectable and widespread effects in the industry as a whole. The objective of this thesis is to develop a vocabulary which is able to penetrate and explain the experiences of these c...

  7. A product modelling approach to competitive tendering in the building and construction industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolman, F.P.; Oszariyildiz, S.

    1998-01-01

    Competitive tendering is the activity of turnkey vendors and construction consortia in the Building and Construction industries that, to a large extend, determines the company's competitiveness. From the tender price it follows if a contract will be won or not, and, if the bid has been successful, t

  8. A Study of Potential Load Bearing Masonry (LBM System in Malaysia Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the problems in increasing of material prices, land prices, shortage of skilled workers, equipping low cost housing demands and maintained the cost of the constructing at an affordable price, there is a need to find the alternative solution for constructing method. The use of the load bearing masonry system (LBM has been identified as a sustainable and an effective alternative method for the construction industry. The system offers several advantages in term of cost and speed of the construction, durability, strength, environmentally friendly practices and aesthetic qualities. Despite these advantages, unfortunately, this system has not been widely used in Malaysia compared to reinforced concrete (RC frame construction. Therefore, this paper aims to discuss the advantages and potential of the system implementation to Malaysia construction industry in the future.

  9. Labour Productivity in the New Zealand Construction Industry: A Thorough Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Tookey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Productivity growth is strongly correlated to economic growth and increases in welfare. This fact also holds true at the industry level and is particularly true in the NZ construction industry, since productivity growth in this sector may have significant effects on the affordability of housing in the country. In recent years construction in NZ has been subjected to a series of reports that have either highlighted ‘failure’ to grow productivity or have exhorted the industry to improve its ‘poor performance’.  However thus far little by way of analysis has gone into the productivity figures that have been quoted, nor has much been done to explain and justify if or why these figures are correct or incorrect.This research seeks to deconstruct construction productivity figures in NZ and explain the patterns over recent years of ‘poor performance’ in comparison with other industries.  As such it will examine the nature of the NZ construction industry and analyse the historic statistics related to its labour productivity. This will provide an overall understanding of the sector as well as those extraneous factors that may have significant influences on the NZ construction sector.The research found that while factors influencing inputs of labour productivity measure such as labour and material costs remained stable, factors impacting the corresponding outputs such as house and land prices, value of work in Non-residential and Infrastructure construction grew significantly between 1997 and 2007. Given the positive skewing effect of standard economic indicators (inflation etc on construction labour productivity figures, the relatively poor performance of construction is worrying for the industry. The paper concludes by demonstrating labour productivity in construction is significantly worse performing than previously suspected.

  10. Nano in the Construction Industry (NanoTrust Dossier No. 032en – August 2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Gazsó, André; Greßler, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    In the construction industry and in architecture, nanotechnology and nanomaterials provide new opportunities. “Nano-products” for construction purposes are currently found in four main sectors: cement-bound construction materials, noise reduction and thermal insulation or temperature regulation, surface coatings to improve the functionalities of various materials, and fire protection. At the present time, nanomaterials – and therefore “nano-products” – remain considerably more expensive than ...

  11. PROBLEMS OF PROJECTS AND EFFECTS OF DELAYS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OF PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    M. Haseeb; Xinhai-Lu; Aneesa Bibi; Maloof-ud-Dyian; Wahab Rabbani

    2011-01-01

    The problem of project delays is a fact that occurs mostly in construction industry of Pakistan. Delays are always measured as expensive to all parties concerned in the projects and very often it will result in clash, claims, total desertion and much difficult for the feasibility and it slows the growth of construction sector. For analyzing the causes of delay, an appraisal on construction project’s time performance was conducted. The main objective of this study is the identification of fact...

  12. Exploring the Barriers and the Level of TQM Implementation in Malaysian Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, Lian Seng; Ooi, Teck Loon

    2014-01-01

    More and More construction firms are engaging in Total Quality Management (TQM) to improve the quality of their products which, in hope of, ultimately lead to higher level of customer satisfaction. However, there are still a number of players in Malaysian construction industry refused to implement TQM. This study aimed at identifying the barriers for construction firms to engage in TQM and tested its relationship with the level of implementation of TQM. Based on data collected from 138 engine...

  13. A review of productivity analysis of the New Zealand construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years there has been a rising interest in the level of productivity and efficiency of the New Zealand construction industry. This interest has meant that there has been an increased use of statistical techniques to determine the productivity and efficiency of the overall industry. The purpose of this paper is to review the various measures that have been used to gauge the levels of productivity and efficiency in the New Zealand construction industry; as well as analyse some of the results to date. Finally, it considers potential areas for future research.

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE INNOVATIVE PRACTICES AT CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Schreiber

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The complexity that has characterized the market relations, especially in the last two decades, with an ever increasing demand for innovative products and processes, has reflected even more in the traditional activities, such as the building sector. Although traditional, that segment has undergone many changes in the business model as a result of major technological advances, requiring companies to adapt to the new conditions, incorporating new technologies, materials and developing new processes, considered innovative. With the purpose of studying in depth this process a research with a qualitative single case study was conducted in an industrial building company, located in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, through in-depth interviews, analysis of the narratives and of documents. The results showed characteristics that required a specific design of the strategy, management practices and coordination of organizational resources, which allowed the company to become a reference in the sector.

  15. Strategic analysis of the construction industry in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martín García

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction sector has, in Spain, a remarkable importance, due to the contribution to GDP, around 10%, and employment (10% and the wide business network it includes. The present economic situation and the residential market saturation have led to a sharp contraction in building activity, after a long period of growth.This is, therefore, a good time to perform a structural analysis to identify the determinants of profitability and assess the projection of the companies operating therein.This paper identifies the rules of competition and reasonable business expectations for coming years, using the Model of Five Competitive Forces. This analysis will show opportunities and difficulties for constructors as a tool in making decisions. The success of the strategy will depend on the management of strengths and capabilities, especially in times of change in the competitive environment.

  16. PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT IN RUSSIA IN THE CONDITIONS OF ECONOMIC CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidziy Elena Nikolaevna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is one of the key fund-creating industries, the formation of the Russian economy greatly depends on it. The construction sector is cyclic, that’s why it has always been sensitive to the tendencies of the national economy. In the contemporary conditions of weak economical climate the construction industry is in a state of sluggish recession. The key indicators exercising restraining influence on the construction complex are analyzed. The author carried out calculations of the prices for residential real estate in the past years. The author’s view on the near-term prospects on the exit from recession state is formulated. From the view of the today’s state and the nearest development prospects, it can be stated that the construction industry is one of the most problematic among the basic economic sectors. Retrieval of the expansion rate of the construction industry is possible in case of the positive changes of general economic state.

  17. Decision support model for selecting and evaluating suppliers in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Schramm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A structured evaluation of the construction industry's suppliers, considering aspects which make their quality and credibility evident, can be a strategic tool to manage this specific supply chain. This study proposes a multi-criteria decision model for suppliers' selection from the construction industry, as well as an efficient evaluation procedure for the selected suppliers. The model is based on SMARTER (Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique Exploiting Ranking method and its main contribution is a new approach to structure the process of suppliers' selection, establishing explicit strategic policies on which the company management system relied to make the suppliers selection. This model was applied to a Civil Construction Company in Brazil and the main results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model. This study allowed the development of an approach to Construction Industry which was able to provide a better relationship among its managers, suppliers and partners.

  18. The New World challenge: Performance trends in wine production in major wine-exporting countries in the 2000s and their implications for the Australian wine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan Fleming

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anderson, K., Nelgen, S., 2011. Global Wine Markets, 1961 to 2009: A Statistical Compendium. University of Adelaide Press, Adelaide publication of an index of revealed comparative advantage suggests that the Australian wine industry had come under increased competition from other “New World” producers in the first decade of this century. We examine this influence by comparing the transformation of winegrapes into wine volume and value in the 11 largest wine-exporting countries during the years, 2000–2009. Our focus is on the challenge issued by other New World producers from the Southern Hemisphere to Australian producers, and the continuing challenge to Old World global supremacy by New World producers and its response. Four performance measures are used this study. Two key trends are evident. First, all countries migrated to higher price points, albeit with differing degrees of success: slightly declining productivity in transforming winegrapes into wine output was overwhelmed by price/quality effects, leading to substantial gains in transforming winegrapes into wine value. Second, New World producers plus Portugal and Spain were much more successful in achieving gains in their export value proposition than they were in extracting value in their domestic markets. Results show that Australian wine producers had lost some of their competitive advantage during the 2000s as their pre-existing strategy dominated by the export of high-volume wines by large companies at low to medium price points, and their reliance on a reputation for reliable good quality for the price point was beginning to fail in the face of competition from both New World and Old World producers. Acknowledgement of this outcome has led to a good deal of introspection, and recognition of the need to promote the wine regions of Australia, based on higher-quality wines, and to select and promote quality indicators.

  19. The Construction and Competitiveness of Operation Model of Agricultural Industrial Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Through reviewing the viewpoints of former scholars, the connotation and features of supply chain of agricultural industrial cluster are introduced. The agricultural industrial cluster model constituted by core network and supporting network is constructed. Three operation models of this kind of supply chain is described: the model takes wholesale market of agricultural products as the core; the model take pillar industries of agricultural industrialization as core; model takes the chains of retail enterprises as core. The competitiveness of agricultural industrial cluster is researched. The research assumes that the competiveness of supply chain of agricultural industrial cluster is mainly represented to make the agricultural industrial cluster to acquire more capabilities in terms of innovation and knowledge sharing capability, resource allocation capability, agile market adaptability and distinct value creation capability.

  20. Treatment of industrial and agro-industrial wastewater using constructed wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Mar-Yam

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution from untreated wastewater disposal is one of the most serious environmental issues. Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is known to be a very toxic compound, frequently found in polluted industrial wastewaters, and causes major environmental problems. On the other hand, among the agro-industrial wastewaters, dairy wastewaters can also cause serious environmental pollution due to their high organic loads. Specifically, when untreated dairy wastewater is deposited into surface ...

  1. Exploring the Barriers and the Level of TQM Implementation in Malaysian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tey, Lian Seng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available More and More construction firms are engaging in Total Quality Management (TQM to improve the quality of their products which, in hope of, ultimately lead to higher level of customer satisfaction. However, there are still a number of players in Malaysian construction industry refused to implement TQM. This study aimed at identifying the barriers for construction firms to engage in TQM and tested its relationship with the level of implementation of TQM. Based on data collected from 138 engineers from Malaysian construction firms, the results showed that there were six barriers of implementation of TQM in Malaysian construction industry, which were lack of knowledgeable personnel, low bid mindset, lack of effective communication, extra cost and time consuming, lack of top management support and difficulties in measurement. The results also showed that only lack of effective communication and lack of top management support were not significantly associated with the level of implementation of TQM.

  2. Carbon abatement via treating the solid waste from the Australian olive industry in mobile pyrolysis units: LCA with uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hanandeh, Ali

    2013-04-01

    The olive oil industry in Australia has been growing at a rapid rate over the past decade. It is forecast to continue growing due to the steady increase in demand for olive oil and olive products in the local and regional market. However, the olive oil extraction process generates large amounts of solid waste called olive husk which is currently underutilized. This paper uses life-cycle methodology to analyse the carbon emission reduction potential of utilizing olive husk as a feedstock in a mobile pyrolysis unit. Four scenarios, based on different combinations of pyrolysis technologies (slow versus fast) and end-use of products (land application versus energy utilization), are constructed. The performance of each scenario under conditions of uncertainty was also investigated. The results show that all scenarios result in significant carbon emission abatement. Processing olive husk in mobile fast pyrolysis units and the utilization of bio-oil and biochar as substitutes for heavy fuel oil and coal is likely to realize a carbon offset greater than 32.3 Gg CO2-eq annually in 90% of the time. Likewise, more than 3.2 Gg-C (11.8 Gg CO2-eq) per year could be sequestered in the soil in the form of fixed carbon if slow mobile pyrolysis units were used to produce biochar.

  3. Industry Training: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Freeland, Brett

    Research on Australian organizations in five industry sectors--building and construction, food processing, electronics manufacturing, retailing, and finance and banking--has identified these three key drivers of enterprise training: workplace change, quality assurance, and new technology. Operation of the training drivers is moderated by a range…

  4. Labour Productivity in the New Zealand Construction Industry: A Thorough Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dai Tran

    2011-03-01

    The research found that while factors influencing inputs of labour productivity measure such as labour and material costs remained stable, factors impacting the corresponding outputs such as house and land prices, value of work in Non-residential and Infrastructure construction grew significantly between 1997 and 2007. Given the positive skewing effect of standard economic indicators (inflation etc on construction labour productivity figures, the relatively poor performance of construction is worrying for the industry. The paper concludes by demonstrating labour productivity in construction is significantly worse performing than previously suspected.

  5. Performance measurement in the UK construction industry and its role in supporting the application of lean construction concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Sarhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement has received substantial attention from researchers and the construction industry over the past two decades. This study sought to assess UK practitioners’ awareness of the importance of the use of appropriate performance measures and its role in supporting the application of Lean Construction (LC concepts. To enable the study to achieve its objectives, a review of a range of measurements developed to evaluate project performance including those devoted to support LC efforts was conducted. Consequently a questionnaire survey was developed and sent to 198 professionals in the UK construction industry as well as a small sample of academics with an interest in LC. Results indicated that although practitioners recognise the importance of the selection of non-financial performance measures, it has not been properly and widely implemented. The study identified the most common techniques used by UK construction organisations for performance measurement, and ranked a number of non-financial key performance indicators as significant. Some professed to have embraced the Last Planner System methodology as a means for performance measurement and organisational learning, while further questioning suggested otherwise. It was also suggested that substance thinking amongst professionals could be a significant hidden barrier that militates against the successful implementation of LC.

  6. BIM in Malaysian Construction Industry: Status, Advantages, Barriers and Strategies to Enhance the Implementation Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Hameed Memon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modeling (BIM is a new approach of construction design. It does not only facilitate the digital representation for designs but also provides all the necessary information for any project before it is constructed. Despite this advantage, the adoption of BIM in Malaysian construction is very low. Motivated by this, current study has focused on assessing current status of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. It has also investigated advantages and disadvantages together with barriers to implementations of BIM and proposing effective strategies for enhancing the BIM implementation in construction industry. Investigation was done through survey where 150 questionnaire forms were distributed and 95 completed forms received back were analyzed with Average Index (AI and Relative Importance Index (RII method. Findings of the study revealed that the rate of BIM implementation in construction industry is very low. Major advantages of BIM are improved scheduling, improved drawing coordinated, controlling time and cost and singe detailed model. Enhanced collaboration, requires coordinated drawing, interoperability are the major disadvantages and limitations of BIM. Major barriers to low level of BIM implementation are lack of competent staff to operate the software, unawareness of the technology and non availability of parametric library. Provision of trial software, training of construction staff and introducing of BIM in university curriculum are very effective strategies in enhancing the implementation of BIM.

  7. Modularization in the construction industry using a top-down approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Anders; Hvam, Lars; Thuesen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the last centuries, the manufacturing industry has experienced great improvements in efficiency and cost reductions, but the same improvements have not taken place in the construction industry. Based on the principles of mass customization that are known from the manufacturing industry......, a case study of one of the largest construction companies in Northern Europe was carried out according to the principles of action research. This approach was used to clarify whether potential exists for using the principles of mass customization to improve efficiency and minimize costs connected...... with the construction of buildings; and if so, what they are. The main technical solutions used for residential and office buildings were analyzed using a top-down approach. These solutions were identified and their relations mapped using a Product Variant Master (PVM). When a satisfactory overview was achieved...

  8. A bilateral and multi-issue negotiation framework to support a supply chain of construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Schramm

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Any interaction involving individuals, whose objectives are conflicting with each other, may establish a negotiation process. In a negotiation, each party should develop his/her own strategy and, normally, a win-lose vision is frequently adopted. The main consequence of this behavior is a result, in which both parties lose, especially when the negotiation involves more than one aspect, such as negotiations resulting from purchases of material for construction industry, where aspects like price, quality and lead-time should be considered. Most of the negotiation involving construction industry adopts a win-lose vision; and, commonly, only the issue price is considered. The goal of this paper is to propose a framework to support negotiations between two parties (buyer and seller in the supply chain of construction industry. The combination of a win-win strategy with a multicriteria analysis produces a best compromise solution for both parties. A simulation of negotiation using realistic data is presented.

  9. Internationalization of Finnish construction companies: An interview-based study in the Swedish construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Saloranta, Juuso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to discover what aspects affect the internationalization success of Finnish construction companies and how that success could be improved. According to the exist- ing business network literature, internationalization can be seen as a company's entry to a new international business network rather than a new country. Therefore the internationalization pro- cess can be described through the process of network development. In network development the elements of trust...

  10. Stepwise modularization in the construction industry using a bottom-up approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Anders; Grønvold, Martin O'Brien; Olsen, Magnus Holo;

    2013-01-01

    implemented stepwise. The case shows that substantial benefits can be gained through implementing modularized construction. It is especially interesting to note that these benefits are achieved through the development of a module with focus on the internal interfaces. © Kudsk et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.......The manufacturing industry has experienced a great deal of improvement in efficiency and cost reductions throughout the last centuries. But although there have been improvements in the manufacturing industry, the principles and work methods in the construction industry have stood still for more...... than a hundred years. Based on principles of mass customization applied in the manufacturing industry, two cases of successful implementation of mass customization and modularization have been investigated as a means of showcasing the possibility to incorporate standardization in parts...

  11. Creating a Software Marketplace for the SME Community in the Irish Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hore, Alan V; West, Roger; Redmond, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The Construction Industry is a sector where Information Communication Technology (ICT) and e-Business are used to a lesser extent than in most other sectors. The high concentration of Small to Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the industry and the typical nature of the service provided, being an on-site and often highly customised service are generally identified as the reason for the low ICT uptake. The majority of Irish companies in the construction sector are SMEs. E-Business has provided...

  12. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the industry level as the country moves towards the ultimate safety management strategy of self-regulation. The findings also indicate that the challenge of making worksites safe should not be placed solely on the contractors but should be shared by all parties affecting the value chain of construction, including the developers, the consultants and the government. The factors identified through factor analysis may inform legislators and industry practitioners in terms of the sources of problems and help develop effective strategies for improvement. Some of the experiences mentioned in the paper could also be relevant to other countries facing similar circumstances.

  13. The implementation of clean development mechanism (CDM) in the construction and built environment industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse gas emissions due to human activities are the main contributors to global climate change, a problem that should not be ignored. Through the clean development mechanism (CDM) introduced under the Kyoto Protocol, developing countries are able to earn certified emission reduction (CER) credits through a myriad of emission reduction projects. This study aims to explore the potential of implementing CDM projects in the construction and built environment (C and BE) industry, which has been criticized for not only consuming an enormous amount of resources, but also for contributing to adverse environmental health. In this research, we limit the boundary of the C and BE industry to include the planning, procurement, construction, occupation and refurbishment/demolition phases of a project's life cycle. Surveys and in-depth follow-up interviews with experts have generated useful insights pertaining to CDM potential and its adaptation into the C and BE industry. From this foundation, this paper evaluates the current obstacles to CDM and presents feasible suggestions to increase CDM projects related to the C and BE industry. - Highlights: • We review the development and limitation of CDM relates to the construction and built environment (C and BE) industry. • We obtain experts' opinions on the feasibility of CDM in the C and BE industry. • Validation, monitoring, verification and additionality of CDM projects are crucial. • Experts agreed that most of our suggestions are feasible in principle

  14. INNOVATION MANAGEMENT AS A FIRM-LEVEL STRATEGY FOR INNOVATION DIFFUSION IN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Emiliya V. Suprun

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, conscious management of innovation in construction firms is becoming increasingly necessary. The research investigates the role of innovation management as an element of firm-level strategies of innovation diffusion. As a part of larger study of Russia's construction industry, a survey was conducted and data was collected via mailed questionnaires. The questionnaire requested respondents to provide specific data about the type of innovations adopted, the barriers to innovation diffu...

  15. A study of forms of project organisation and matrix management: case studies from the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bresnen, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the forms and processes of interaction that occur in the organisation and management of projects. It takes as its empirical focus of enquiry the situation in the UK construction industry; and uses, as its database, five case studies of medium to large-scale, 'one-off' construction projects. The literature on project organisation and management is reviewed, with attention directed towards the phenomenon of matrix forms of organisation and related processes of manage...

  16. The Future Scenario of Creating a Digital SME Community in the Irish Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hore, Alan V; West, Roger; Redmond, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The problems associated with the Construction Industry not being able to manage and com-municate electronically product and project data between collaborating firms and within individual companies is compounded by the large number of small companies that have not adopted advanced Information Com-munication Technology (ICT). The typical nature of the service provided in construction, being an on-site and often highly customised service are generally identified as the reason for the low ICT upt...

  17. Mapping the e-business profile and trends in cost management in the UK construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Srinath; Park, Rachael; Udeaja, Chika; Zhou, Lei; Rodrigo, Anushi

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of e-business applications and IT infrastructure has had massive impact on construction business processes over the last decade. The added effects of globalisation coupled with global economic recession have forced businesses to implement e-business applications within their organisations. It is clear in all industries, that e-business technologies have become a key strategic vehicle in improving performance. In Construction, e-business applications complement most of the busi...

  18. Barriers and Benefits of Total Quality Management in the Nigerian Construction Industry: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Okuntade Tope Femi

    2015-01-01

    The more bigger a building project becomes, the more complex it will be, coupled with the fact that clients are now demanding for higher quality at a reduced cost and budget, these and many other challenges are faced by construction companies on how to adopt a strategy for higher quality at a reduced cost without affecting their profit margin and the clients requirement. This study recommends TQM as the only ways of solving these challenges in the construction industry

  19. Development of a fuzzy qualitative risk assessment model applied to construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Abel Fernando do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is plagued by occupational risky situations and poor working conditions. Risk Assessment for Occupational Safety (RAOS) is the first and key step to achieve adequate safety levels, particularly to support decision-making in safety programs. Most construction safety efforts are applied informally under the premise that simply allocating more resources to safety management will improve safety on site. Moreover, there are many traditional methods to address RAOS, but...

  20. The Road to Effective Remedies: Pragmatic reasons for treating cases of “sex trafficking” in the Australian sex industry as a form of “labour trafficking”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Simmons

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, it is widely recognised that labour law and associated protections are a critical part of any comprehensive response to trafficking in persons. In this article, we argue that while Australia has taken some important steps to incorporate labour protection systems into the anti-trafficking response, there is still more work to be done. In particular, the federal, and state and territory governments have yet to take up the opportunity to link anti-trafficking efforts with initiatives aimed at improving the working conditions of workers in the sex industry. We suggest this reflects a common—but unjustified—assumption that “labour trafficking” and “sex trafficking” are distinct and different species of harm. As a result of this distinction, workers in the Australian sex industry—an industry where slavery and trafficking crimes have been detected— are missing out on a suite of potentially effective prevention interventions, and access to civil remedies. We argue that there is a need to provide practical and financial support, so that the national industrial regulator, the Fair Work Ombudsman, can work directly with sex worker advocacy groups, to examine opportunities and barriers to accessing the labour law system, particularly for migrant sex workers.

  1. Constructed wetlands in the treatment of agro-industrial wastewater: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Mar-Yam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, constructed wetlands are becoming more prevalent in wastewater treatment all over the world. Their range of applications is no longer limited to municipal wastewater but has expanded to the treatment of heavily polluted wastewaters such as agro-industrial effluents. This paper provides a comprehensive literature review of the application of constructed wetlands in treating a variety of agro-industrial wastewaters, and discusses pollutant surface loads and the role of constructed wetland type, prior-treatment stages and plant species in pollutant removal efficiency. Results indicate that constructed wetlands can tolerate high pollutant loads and toxic substances without losing their removal ability, thus these systems are very effective bio-reactors even in hostile environments. Additionally, the review outlines issues that could improve pollutant treatment efficiency and proposes design and operation suggestions such as suitable vegetation, porous media and constructed wetland plain view. Finally, a decision tree for designing constructed wetlands treating agro-industrial wastewaters provides an initial design tool for scientists and engineers.

  2. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy: Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P

    2013-01-01

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes, such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  3. A revisit on the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Suhaimi Mohd Danuri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The current dispute resolution procedures available in the Malaysian construction industry are mainly litigation and arbitration. In addition, the alternative dispute resolutions (ADR, namely mediation and adjudication, have also been introduced as the other methods for resolving disputes. The objective of this study is to examine the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR available in the Malaysian construction industry. The aim of this paper is two-fold: to report the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, and identify the attributes of successful implementation of both mechanisms based on the perceptions of the Malaysian construction industry players. From the jurisprudence point of view, this study looks into the law as it is, in relation to the current practice of dispute resolution and ADR, by showing how those findings can be used to explain why improvement is needed to promote a successful and well received dispute resolution and ADR, and what lessons can be learnt, towards the formulation of a more viable methods for the Malaysian construction industry. NVivo software has been used to manage and organise the complete interview transcripts and facilitate the data analysis process for this study. Literature review reveals a continuous development of dispute resolution and ADR in the Malaysian construction industry, while, globally the industry has not only embraced ADR but also spearheaded the development of innovative forms of dispute avoidance mechanism. The findings of interviews show that locally, apart from litigation, the common types of ADR are arbitration, mediation and ad hoc mechanism. The findings also lead to the discovery of the following attributes: faster, less procedural, cost effective and enforceable; regulation and government's support; professionalism and ethic; training; and facility, that may promote a successful implementation of dispute resolution and ADR in Malaysia.

  4. Occupational Health Hazards of Women Working in Brick Kiln and Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G Vaidya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In brick kiln and construction industry the exposure to carbon monoxide and silica dust is the most common occupational hazard to the workers in these industries. A study on occupational health hazards of working women in these two unorganized sectors was undertaken by Lokmanya Medical Research Centre. Objectives: To study the effect of work site environment on the health of the women working in brick kiln and construction industry. An attempt was also made to study the seasonal changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide and dust at the worksite. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the working women (age 18-40 years at brick kilns and construction sites during summer and winter season. They were examined primarily to assess the effect of working environment on health. Gasteck Detector Pump of model 800 and air sampling instrument (SKC Air Check–52 were used to measure concentration of carbon monoxide and dust in the air respectively. Results: There were 66% of women who were in the age group of 18-40 years and most of them (94% were married. At brick kiln sites, average CO exposure was 62.8 ppm and 55.5 ppm and average dust exposure was 3 3 146.1 mg/m and 91.4 mg/m in summer and winter season respectively.At construction sites, average dust exposure was 41.5 ppm and 90.8 ppm in summer and winter. Conclusion: Both exposure to CO and dust were more in summer than in winter in brick kiln industry whereas in construction industry the exposure to dust was more in winter season. A high level of morbidity in the form of headache, bodyache, problems with vision, cough and breathlessness were observed in both industries. It is strongly recommended to take pollution control measures.

  5. INNOVATION MANAGEMENT AS A FIRM-LEVEL STRATEGY FOR INNOVATION DIFFUSION IN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliya V. Suprun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, conscious management of innovation in construction firms is becoming increasingly necessary. The research investigates the role of innovation management as an element of firm-level strategies of innovation diffusion. As a part of larger study of Russia's construction industry, a survey was conducted and data was collected via mailed questionnaires. The questionnaire requested respondents to provide specific data about the type of innovations adopted, the barriers to innovation diffusion and strategies to innovation promotion. The main objective of the paper is to find which management methods and practices are used by construction companies to become innovative.

  6. Safety Training Evaluation: The Case of Construction Induction Training and the Impact on Work-Related Injuries in the Western Australian Construction Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Susanne; Barratt-Pugh, Llandis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an evaluation of the mandatory Construction Induction Training initiative (CIT). The paper details a pilot study conducted in 2010 with the commercial construction sector and a subsequent study in 2011 of the housing and civil sectors conducting business in the metropolitan area of Perth and in regional Western…

  7. 76 FR 70166 - Electrical Standards for Construction and General Industry; Extension of the Office of Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 5-2010 (75 FR 55355). Signed... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Electrical Standards for Construction and General Industry; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of the Information Collection...

  8. Women in the Construction Industry in the U.K.: a Cultural Discord?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagilhole, Barbara M.; Dainty, Andrew R. J.; Neale, Richard H.

    The construction industry is the most male dominated of all industrial sectors in the United Kingdom. This article reports on a study that explored women's and men's experiences of working in the industry, focusing on how the cultural aspects of the workplace environment impinged upon women's career development. We interviewed more than 80 male and female construction professionals from large construction organizations, and compared their career accounts in order to establish the aspects of the workplace culture that had a gender-differentiated impact on progression. We found that construction organizations formed competitive "power" cultures where women's contributions were marginalized and their careers impeded through a combination of inflexible work practices and discriminatory behavior. These barriers to women's careers were maintained in small project teams by autonomous male operational managers. Their locus of control embraced recruitment, promotion, and staff development, which allowed them to sustain a workplace culture intolerant of nontraditional entrants. We conclude that this cultural environment is likely to remain problematic for women unless it can be changed in a way that values their contribution. This requires a radical shift in middle management attitudes, a departure from current organizational human resource management systems, and a wider acceptance of the need for cultural change within the industry.

  9. Evolutionary, Unconscious Design Support for the Architectural, Engineering and Construction Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Ruitenbeek, H.K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is a complex system in which carpenters, structural designers, architects, modellers, cost estimators, planners, politicians and many others act apart together in project-specific virtual enterprises. There is a large amount of actors, an

  10. Industrial Training of Construction Students: Perceptions of Training Organizations in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarkwa, Joshua; Adinyira, Emmanuel; Osei-Asibey, Dickson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The industrial training component in a university's curricula adds tremendous value to a degree programme by enhancing the employable skills of graduates. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of organisations that have trained construction students from the Department of Building Technology of the Kwame Nkrumah University…

  11. Transparency, market operation and trust in the Dutch construction industry: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Johan; Nijhof, André

    2007-01-01

    After the discovery of illegal price agreements in the Dutch construction industry, the government and major players in the sector have initiated a transition process towards more professional commercial relations. In the transition process transparency plays an important part, as it is a preconditi

  12. Stimulating The Use Of Secondary Materials In The Construction Industry: The Role Of Certification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction of secondary materials in the construction industry is quite difficult and has not always been successful, even when they satisfy all necessary product demands and environmental (leaching) conditions. Besides the financial and commercial aspects the main problem is convincing the user o

  13. Design and construction of the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purposes of the project are the supporting to design and construction of the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment; with the accuracy ±2% of Output High Voltage 200 kV and Tube current 5 mA. The Equipment is composed of control unit, X-ray generator, and power cable, connection cable. X-ray generator is assembling construction X-ray tube, H.V transformer together with gas insulation (SF6) are sealed up in aluminum bucked cabinet, fan and heat-sink are mounted in the end of X-ray generator as cooling, SF6 is a gas electrical performance to H.V. Alarm lamp is used to warn, flashing, show generating X-ray. Control unit is box construction. Four printed circuit boards (PCB) and electronic device are mounted in it. All operating buttons switches and displays are equipped on the panel. We have completed to design and construct the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment; and have tested the electronic parameters of all test points and the main parameters of equipment (the accuracy ±2% of Output High Voltage 200 kV and Tube current 5 mA). We also have successful used the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment to evaluate the welds in industry. (author)

  14. Design and Construction of the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purposes of the project are the supporting to design and construction of the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment; with the accuracy ±2% of Output High Voltage 200 kV and Tube current 5 mA. The Equipment is composed of control unit, X-ray generator, and power cable, connection cable. X-ray generator is assembling construction X-ray tube, H.V transformer together with gas insulation (SF6) are sealed up in aluminum bucked cabinet, fan and heat-sink are mounted in the end of X-ray generator as cooling, SF6 is a gas electrical performance to H.V. Alarm lamp is used to warn, flashing, show generating X-ray. Control unit is box construction. Four printed circuit boards (PCB) and electronic device are mounted in it. All operating buttons switches and displays are equipped on the panel. We have completed to design and construct the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment; and have tested the electronic parameters of all test points and the main parameters of equipment (the accuracy ±2% of Output High Voltage 200 kV and Tube current 5 mA). We also have successful used the Portable Industrial X-Ray Equipment to evaluate the welds in industry. (author)

  15. A Feasibility Study of a Computer-Based Manpower Information System for the Construction Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Edward A.; And Others

    The result of a Presidential directive, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility and means for implementing a computer-assisted labor market information system designed to improve information flow in and about the construction industry. Data were collected by means of: (1) extensive research reviews, (2) contact with selected…

  16. Relationship between time management in construction industry and project management performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Najuwa; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, construction industry particularly in Malaysia struggle in achieving status of eminent time management for construction project. Project managers have a great responsibility to keep the project success under time of project completion. However, studies shows that delays especially in Malaysian construction industry still unresolved due to weakness in managing the project. In addition, quality of time management on construction projects is generally poor. Due to the progressively extended delays issue, time performance becomes an important subject to be explored to investigate delay factors. The method of this study is review of literature towards issues in construction industry which affecting time performance of project in general by focusing towards process involved for project management. Based on study, it was found that knowledge, commitment, cooperation are the main criteria as an overall to manage the project into a smooth process during project execution until completion. It can be concluded that, the strength between project manager and team members in these main criteria while conducting the project towards good time performance is highly needed. However, there is lack of establishment towards factors of poor time performance which strongly related with project management. Hence, this study has been conducted to establish factors of poor time performance and its relations with project management.

  17. MATES in Construction: Impact of a Multimodal, Community-Based Program for Suicide Prevention in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Martin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale workplace-based suicide prevention and early intervention program was delivered to over 9,000 construction workers on building sites across Queensland. Intervention components included universal General Awareness Training (GAT; general mental health with a focus on suicide prevention; gatekeeper training provided to construction worker volunteer ‘Connectors’; Suicide First Aid (ASIST training offered to key workers; outreach support provided by trained and supervised MIC staff; state-wide suicide prevention hotline; case management service; and postvention support provided in the event of a suicide. Findings from over 7,000 workers (April 2008 to November 2010 are reported, indicating strong construction industry support, with 67% building sites and employers approached agreeing to participate in MIC. GAT participants demonstrated significantly increased suicide prevention awareness compared with a comparison group. Connector training participants rated MIC as helpful and effective, felt prepared to intervene with a suicidal person, and knew where to seek help for a suicidal individual following the training. Workers engaged positively with the after-hours crisis support phone line and case management. MIC provided postvention support to 10 non-MIC sites and sites engaged with MIC, but not yet MIC-compliant. Current findings support the potential effectiveness and social validity of MIC for preventing suicide in construction workers.

  18. Prioritization of Effective Risk Factors on Oil Industry Construction Projects (By PMBOK Standard Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Baharmand

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an applied, analytic-descriptive research in terms of nature. It is thus an analysis in which a sample has been applied for data collection and it is descriptive since its variables are assessed and reported as they are in reality. This study seeks to identify effective risks existing in construction industry specifically in the national macro projects such as oil industry projects through utilizing Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK model and to estimate the relative impact of each risk on the projects. It aims at prioritizing the effective risk factors on the construction projects (a case study of National Iranian Oil Company. Thus NIOC construction projects, consulting engineers companies and contractor companies in construction projects of oil industry have been selected as the statistical universe to identify and prioritize the risks. Due to the focus of oil industry construction projects on South Pars Special Economic Zone, under planning, implementation or completion phases and with regard to the phases' expansion in terms of number and volume of activities and also strategic features and confidentiality of information, three phases out of 28 ones have been case-studied. It is generally concluded in this study that with respect to the country significant strategic, geopolitical, geographical, economic and military position in the world, it is a matter of great magnitude to regard the risks identification and management as one of the important areas in the project management and to consider it as a national and comprehensive plan when designing and ratifying industrial projects of the country.

  19. Efforts to Manage Disputes in the Construction Industry: A Comparison of the New Engineering Contract and the Dispute Review Board

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Roxene Marie II

    1998-01-01

    The construction industry has been plagued with an increasing number of claims and high litigation costs. How do we reduce conflict and litigation in the construction process? On one hand, leaders of the construction industry in the United States (US) focused their efforts on improving alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. For instance, the American Society of Civil Engineers has introduced the Dispute Review Board (DRB) as a complementary provision to standard US construction practic...

  20. Application of mathematical model techniques to the planning and control of overhead costs in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kamanda-Kabague, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    For the purposes of cost-planning and'control and efficient execution of construction projects, overhead costs - head office overhead costs of construction companies and site overhead costs of, construction projects - are-important-to companies in the industry as these costs sometimes amount-to-ten to twenty per cent of project , costs. ';. The aim of this research-. has been to study methods. of overhead costs planning and control that are in use in the construction industry, the limitations...

  1. Projects Delay Factors of Saudi Arabia Construction Industry Using PLS-SEM Path Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul RahmanIsmail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of PLS-SEM Path Model of delay factors of Saudi Arabia construction industry focussing on Mecca City. The model was developed and assessed using SmartPLS v3.0 software and it consists of 37 factors/manifests in 7 groups/independent variables and one dependent variable which is delay of the construction projects. The model was rigorously assessed at measurement and structural components and the outcomes found that the model has achieved the required threshold values. At structural level of the model, among the seven groups, the client and consultant group has the highest impact on construction delay with path coefficient β-value of 0.452 and the project management and contract administration group is having the least impact to the construction delay with β-value of 0.016. The overall model has moderate explaining power ability with R2 value of 0.197 for Saudi Arabia construction industry representation. This model will able to assist practitioners in Mecca city to pay more attention in risk analysis for potential construction delay.

  2. UTILIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT AS RAW MATERIAL IN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAISHALI SAHU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A large quantity of sludge rich in nutrients and microorganisms is generated every year from water and wastewater treatment plants, the final destination of which affects the environment. Generally, dewatered sludge is disposed of by spreading on the land or by land filling. However, space limitations on existing landfill sites and problems of waste stabilization have prompted investigation into alternative reuse techniques and disposal routes for sludge. A more reasonable approach is to view the sludge as a resource that can be recycled or reused. Many researchers have exploited the reuse of lime sludge from water treatment plant and sewage sludge ash as an inexpensive source of soil stabilizer in sub grade stabilization and soft cohesive soil respectively. Sewage sludge pellets (SSP has replaced sand in concrete manufacturing for pavements. The use of SSP as substituting material in raw mix formulation in Portland cement manufacturing has been studied by many researchers. Experimental results showed the feasibility of the partial replacement (15 and 30% of cement by sewage sludge ash (SSA in mortars. This paper highlights the potential of dried sludge, sludge pellets and sludge ash in various building materials for construction.

  3. PROBLEMS OF PROJECTS AND EFFECTS OF DELAYS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haseeb

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of project delays is a fact that occurs mostly in construction industry of Pakistan. Delays are always measured as expensive to all parties concerned in the projects and very often it will result in clash, claims, total desertion and much difficult for the feasibility and it slows the growth of construction sector. For analyzing the causes of delay, an appraisal on construction project’s time performance was conducted. The main objective of this study is the identification of factors of delay and their effects on the success and completion of project. The most common factor of delay are natural disaster in Pakistan like flood and earthquake and some others like financial and payment problems, improper planning, poor site management, insufficient experience, shortage of materials and equipment etc. This paper covers the delay factors and causes of delay and some suggestion for reducing these delays in large construction projects in Pakistan.

  4. The Use of Information Technology Techniques in the Construction Industry of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Ahmed Memon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Construction sector together with service, manufacturing, agriculture and mining sectors is the main contributors of the Pakistan\\'s GDP (Gross Domestic Product and economic growth. It is also a key indicator in determining the economic performance of the country. As the issues of globalization and trades deregulation, stringer requirements of time, cost, quality and advancement of technologies have become more critical, the sector has to find ways to enhance its operational efficiency and effectiveness. IT (Information Technology as a key enabler has been recognized to be an inseparable tool to sustain business and become more competitive. This paper gives an overview of the current status of IT application and presents the significant results from PCI (Pakistan Construction Industry. The result of survey also highlights the challenges to the construction industry of Pakistan before implementing the IT techniques. A statistical method \\'Average Index\\' is used to analyze the collected data and statistical hypothesis testing is conducted to know the difference between the parameters. The survey produced knowledge about the use of computers, hardware and software, communication and strategies for the use of IT. The use of spread sheets, word processor, CAD (Computer Aided Drafting in general has increased and the use of model based CAD software has increased among the major key players of construction industry. The use of project webs and electronic trade in the industry is not started properly. From the analysis it is concluded that construction firms in Pakistan are mostly using manual procedures and the use of IT seems to be at the inception stage

  5. Construct a procedure to verify radiation protection for apparatus of industrial gamma radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for industrial gamma radiography include an exposure container, source guide tube, remote control hand crank assembly and other attached equipment. It is used a lot in inspection and evaluation of projects. In Vietnam, there are now more than 50 companies in radiography field and more than 100 apparatus are being used on the site. Therefore, the verification and evaluation is very necessary and important. This project constructs a procedure to verify a radiation protection for apparatus in the industrial gamma radiography for its application in Vietnam. (author)

  6. Vigorously Develop Satellite Application Industry to Serve National Socio-economic Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian Ji

    2010-01-01

    @@ China International Aviation and Aerospace Forum 2010 was held on November 15 in Zhuhai, Guangdong Province.Vice President of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC)Rui Xiaowu delivered a speech at the forum with the theme of "vigorously developing satellite application industry to serve national socio-economic construction".He stated in his speech that as an important method for information transmission, navigation and position and obtaining geographic information satellite applications have been integrated into all industries in the national economy in China and have become one of the indispensable information infrastructures for national security, the economy and society.

  7. Performance of Higher National Diploma of Building Technology Graduates in the Construction Industry: A Tracer Study in Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awere, E.; Edu-Buandoh, K. B. M.; Dadzie, D. K.; Aboagye, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Building Technology graduates from Ghanaian Polytechnics seek employment in the construction industry, yet little information is known as to whether their tertiary education is really related to and meeting the actual needs of their prospective employers in the construction industry. The tracer study was conducted to ascertain the performance of…

  8. A Review of the Case of a Levy-Grant Scheme (LGS) in the UK Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Dainty, Andrew; Ison, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A Levy-Grant Scheme (LGS) has existed in the UK construction industry since 1964 to provide financial support for companies undertaking training activities. Despite the support of the LGS for various training activities, notably apprenticeships, the construction industry continues to suffer from both labour shortages and an under-investment in…

  9. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  10. Design and construction of a batch oven for investigation of industrial continuous baking processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette; Risum, Jørgen; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    A new batch oven has been constructed to mimic industrial convection tunnel ovens for research and development of continuous baking processes. The process parameters (air flow, air temperature, air humidity, height of baking area and the baking band velocity) are therefore highly controllable...... of the baking was documented over a range of temperatures (160C to 190C). Practical Applications The purpose of this paper is to describe a new specially designed pilot scale batch oven. The batch oven is designed and constructed to imitate the baking processes in continuous tunnel ovens with forced convection...

  11. Working operations of simple technological processes in construction industry ordering (rus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyuzhnyuk A.V.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ordering process has been described by the example of the simple technological processes of reinforced concrete building structures joints welding working operations set.Methods of ordering are adopted from graph theory, expert assessment, network planning and management. The proposed method is designed for application in technical regulation for organizational effectiveness indicators of simple technological processes of construction and special types of work determining.The proposed methods improve the technical normalization quality. They are recommended for application in systems of the construction industry automated preparation.

  12. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal

  13. An industrial strategy to master the construction of an EPR fleet from Flamanville 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. EDF's industrial strategy to master the construction of an EPR fleet from Flamanville 3 (FA3) rests on 3 base ideas. First, an organisation based on Architect engineer approach: As for the construction of the french NPP under operation, EDF approach for the construction of Flamanville 3 is to act as architect engineer that means EDF manages the project of construction in terms of quality, schedule and cost from the detailed design to manufacturing and site activities. EDF is also in interface with the french safety authority for the licensing and in charge to coordinate all the suppliers involved in the project. Secondly, a strong feed back organisation from FA3 experience: the construction of FA3 NPP is in line with the objective given by EDF for a connection to the grid in 2014: the civil phase is now in good progress and several buildings are already achieved. The electro-mechanical erected has started in all the buildings and the first commissioning tests occurred for the electrical distribution. From all these activities, EDF get the lessons learnt and has organised the feedback experience for the future EPR plants to be built. And thirdly, an EPR family organisation involving all EPR utilities partners of EDF: in order to share the experience gained on EPR under construction, EDF has created the EPR Family which gathers all the utilities involved in construction of EPR NPP in partnership with EDF. (author)

  14. Impact of Plants and Equipment Management in Construction Industry of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Aadal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the recent years different people in charge have been considered about different costs of the plants in the construction industry. Usually it seems to be a big challenge for different people in charge and mainly contractors to decrease the costs of the projects through the optimum use of construction plants in order to increase the quality of the project and decrease time and cost. During the current study, researchers have been investigated about the construction plant use in the construction sites and also its effect on the quality and also time of the project. Forty three people in charge with the construction projects have been participated in the current survey. After analyzing the required data through SPSS software and based on the mean index of the scores five items have been identified as the most important issues in the construction management regarding the use if plants namely: The effect of spare parts availability to decrease downtime, the effect of employing expert mechanics to increase the repair quality, impact of gasoline and petrol availability to decrease wasting the time, impact of periodic control and serviceability of plants and equipment to increase productivity, impact of training persons who are involved plants and equipment to increase productivity. It goes without saying that extracted factors have significant role in the construction projects and different contractors should consider them in their projects.

  15. LABOUR SUBCONTRACTING IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: AN ASSESSMENT FROM TWO PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Wells

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The practice of employing labour through subcontractors (often referred to as the ‘outsourcing’ of labour is both long established and widespread in the construction industries of developing countries. Recent studies show that it is also increasing in both developing and developed countries. An assessment of the advantages of the practice from the viewpoint of the contractors and of the labour force, suggests it is unlikely to disappear. The paper goes on to explore the implications for the development of the construction industry, as well as for the welfare of the workers and the achievement of broader development objectives. It is concluded that interventions may be needed to deal with some of the negative repercussions, but they have to accept and build on current labour practices.

  16. EVALUATION OF PRODUCTION IN SEASONALITY PERIODS: ANALYSIS OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos William Kaspchak Machado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work has as an objective to evaluate the impacts of production seasonality in seasonality periods in the Brazilian construction industry. The adopted methodology was based on the qualitative and quantitative approaches of the aspects inherent to the seasonality factors in the construction industry and its possible causes. Besides that, literature data were collected in year report books and devices provided by institutions of the sector. The results demonstrated the importance of production management mechanisms to optimize the use of productive factors through cost analysis, which are fundamental to understand the operational flux of resources used in the operational media. Obtaining this information, connected to market indicators helped in the decision making process related to the development of prospective scenarios which will give support to the decision making strategy aiming to stabilize the production levels.

  17. Accidents in the construction industry in the Netherlands: An analysis of accident reports using Storybuilder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of an ongoing effort by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment of the Netherlands, a research project is being undertaken to construct a causal model for occupational risk. This model should provide quantitative insight into the causes and consequences of occupational accidents. One of the components of the model is a tool to systematically classify and analyse reports of past accidents. This tool 'Storybuilder' was described in earlier papers. In this paper, Storybuilder is used to analyse the causes of accidents reported in the database of the Dutch Labour Inspectorate involving people working in the construction industry. Conclusions are drawn on measures to reduce the accident probability. Some of these conclusions are contrary to common beliefs in the industry

  18. Evolutionary, Unconscious Design Support for the Architectural, Engineering and Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Ruitenbeek, H.K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is a complex system in which carpenters, structural designers, architects, modellers, cost estimators, planners, politicians and many others act apart together in project-specific virtual enterprises. There is a large amount of actors, an overwhelming number of ongoing processes, distributed, decentralised organisations and a variety of projects. This complicates efficient communication and supply chain integration which, according...

  19. The role of effective communication in the construction Industry: a guide for education and health clients

    OpenAIRE

    Terry Aulich

    2013-01-01

    The construction industry operates primarily as a system of sub-contracting and purpose built alliances. There is a wide spread of stakeholders involved in conceiving a building project through typical stages such as design, finance, build,  manage, upgrade and, ultimately, replacement and a corresponding need for communication and cooperation. Specialists who can prevent bridges falling down or who build 20 storey buildings are seen as the hard-nosed, action people who have helped bring us i...

  20. Exploring the Legitimacy Construction of the Pharmaceutical Industry from a Communication View on Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Arellano, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The current dissertation adopts the recently developed communication view on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which frames the exploration of legitimacy construction of the pharmaceutical industry in the network society. In line with this view, polyphony of CSR and communicative dynamics within social media networks are necessary for the legitimation process (Schultz et al., 2013; Castelló et al., 2013). These two elements were studied through the content analysis of corporate webs...

  1. Environmental Strategy and Competitiveness : An examination of the Swedish construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksson, David; Laskin, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study how the process of introducing an environmental strategy has led to competitiveness in the Swedish construction industry. Previous research in the area indicated that there was insufficient empirical evidence in the field and this study hopes to increase the empirical understanding for the relation between the concepts.Research conducted was of qualitative nature and the semi-structured interview was used to gather information from Sweden's three largest...

  2. Life Cycle Assessment in construction industry: applications to structural materials and components.

    OpenAIRE

    Napolano, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Material, energy, water use and occupation land related to construction industry activities represent a major contribution to the total environmental impact caused by society. In fact, it is estimated that the building sector is responsible for the 30–40% of the society’s total energy demand and approximately 44% of the total material use. Consequently, the building sector has to be prioritized to be able to reach a sustainable society within a reasonable period of time. The present wor...

  3. Construction waste management based on industrial management models: a Swedish case study

    OpenAIRE

    Stenis, Jan

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating the true internal costs of construction waste, aimed at promoting environmentally friendly waste management. The study employs cost-benefit analysis, contribution margin analysis, the polluter-pays principle and a mathematical model: the model for Efficient Use of Resources for Optimal Production Economy (EUROPE), which has been introduced previously by the author for assigning industrial costs to waste. The calculations are performed on const...

  4. Energy-Efficient Devices for Transporting and Feeding Bulk Materials in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishkov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only in the construction industry millions of tons of bulk materials that need to be transported to the place of processing, storing and evenly or dosed feeding are recycled annually. Decreasing the costs of these processes will significantly reduce the cost of the finished product. The article presents a review of studies conducted in the field of storage, transport and feed bulk materials, and it describes the innovative design of energy-efficient disc vibrating feeder bulk materials.

  5. Temporary foreign workers in British Columbia's construction industry: friends or rivals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ahna

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the extent to which opposition to temporary foreign workers exists in British Columbia’s construction industry and uses the findings to suggest policies designed to address the concerns of resident workers. Using a survey of resident workers, the study examines the economic rationale behind their opposition to the employment of temporary foreign workers and determines whether skill levels affect the degree of opposition. The survey finds that resident workers are most conc...

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility within the Northern Ireland Construction Industry: A Regional Review

    OpenAIRE

    Spillane, J. P.; Rafferty, S.; Oyedele, L. O.; von Meding, J. K; Bruen, J.; McGrath, R.

    2013-01-01

    As the construction industry continues to struggle with a poor societal image, many organizations have adopted a positive corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards their surrounding environment, with the objective of improving their persona within social circles. The aim of this research is to identify and document the various approaches adopted by UK contractors in relation to their international counterparts to aid in the identification of possible future benefits which may be exploitab...

  7. Improved SWOT approach for conducting strategic planning in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) analysis has been in use since the 1960s as a tool to assist strategic planning in various types of enterprises including those in the construction industry. While still widely used, the approach has called for improvements to make it more helpful in strategic management. The project described in this paper aimed to study whether the process to convert a SWOT analysis into a strategic plan could be assisted with some simple rationally quantit...

  8. Barriers to the Uptake of Concurrent Engineering in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Anny Aniekwu

    2012-12-01

    engineering and also to compute the Kendall’s coefficient of concordance, which assess the levels of agreement among the judges on the consistency of the rankings. A Kendall’s coefficient of concordance of W=0.57365 was recorded. A lack of awareness emerged as the most important barrier against the integration of this concept into the Nigerian construction industry. The top five variables are all human factors that can be ameliorated by proper education.

  9. A review on the occupational health and social security of unorganized workers in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guddi Tiwary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction is one of the important industries employing a large number of people on its workforce. A wide range of activities are involved in it. Due to the advent of industrialization and recent developments, this industry is taking a pivotal role for construction of buildings, roads, bridges, and so forth. The workers engaged in this industry are victims of different occupational disorders and psychosocial stresses. In India, they belong to the organized and unorganized sectors. However, data in respect to occupational health and psychosocial stress are scanty in our country. It is true that a sizable number of the workforce is from the unorganized sectors − the working hours are more than the stipulated hours of work - the work place is not proper − the working conditions are non-congenial in most of the cases and involve risk factors. Their wages are also not adequate, making it difficult for them to run their families. The hazards include handling of different materials required for construction, and exposure to harsh environmental conditions like sun, rain, and so on. On account of this, in adverse conditions, it results in accidents and adverse health conditions cause psychosocial strain and the like. They are victims of headache, backache, joint pains, skin diseases, lung disorders like silicosis, other muscular skeletal disorders, and so on. The repetitive nature of the work causes boredom and the disproportionate earning compared to the requirements puts them under psychological stress and strain and other abnormal behavioral disorders. The Government of India has realized the importance of this industry and has promulgated an Act in 1996. The state government are being asked to adhere to this, although only a few states have partially enforced it. In this article, attempts have been made to review some of the important available articles for giving a broad idea of the problem and for furtherance of research in this field.

  10. A review on the occupational health and social security of unorganized workers in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Guddi; Gangopadhyay, P K

    2011-01-01

    Construction is one of the important industries employing a large number of people on its workforce. A wide range of activities are involved in it. Due to the advent of industrialization and recent developments, this industry is taking a pivotal role for construction of buildings, roads, bridges, and so forth. The workers engaged in this industry are victims of different occupational disorders and psychosocial stresses. In India, they belong to the organized and unorganized sectors. However, data in respect to occupational health and psychosocial stress are scanty in our country. It is true that a sizable number of the workforce is from the unorganized sectors - the working hours are more than the stipulated hours of work - the work place is not proper - the working conditions are non-congenial in most of the cases and involve risk factors. Their wages are also not adequate, making it difficult for them to run their families. The hazards include handling of different materials required for construction, and exposure to harsh environmental conditions like sun, rain, and so on. On account of this, in adverse conditions, it results in accidents and adverse health conditions cause psychosocial strain and the like. They are victims of headache, backache, joint pains, skin diseases, lung disorders like silicosis, other muscular skeletal disorders, and so on. The repetitive nature of the work causes boredom and the disproportionate earning compared to the requirements puts them under psychological stress and strain and other abnormal behavioral disorders. The Government of India has realized the importance of this industry and has promulgated an Act in 1996. The state government are being asked to adhere to this, although only a few states have partially enforced it. In this article, attempts have been made to review some of the important available articles for giving a broad idea of the problem and for furtherance of research in this field.

  11. System for Sewing Machine Industry Standard Innovation——Constructive Research for a Technical Standards System for Sewing Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Constructive research of a market-oriented industry's system of technical standardization by redefining those technical standards is the basis of innovation. Through considering and implementing innovation of the industry's standards,rapid development and standardization of the industry can be achieved.

  12. Constructing Relationships between Science and Practice in the Written Science Communication of the Washington State Wine Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Erika Amethyst

    2016-01-01

    Even as deficit model science communication falls out of favor, few studies question how written science communication constructs relationships between science and industry. Here, I investigate how textual microprocesses relate scientific research to industry practice in the Washington State wine industry, helping (or hindering) winemakers and…

  13. Construction and Characterization of Mini-ruthenium-Carbon Eutectic Cells for Industrial Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diril, A.; Bourson, F.; Parga, C.; Sadli, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-temperature eutectic fixed points have proved to be convenient tools for temperature scale dissemination and thermometer calibrations/checks at temperatures above 1100°C. In order to investigate the feasibility of metal-carbon eutectic cells in industrial applications as a means for assessing the traceability of non-contact thermometers, a batch of cells was constructed at LNE-Cnam, NPL, and TUBITAK UME. Compared to the usual dimensions of high-temperature fixed point cells (45 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter), a new cell design was created to fit with industrial applications. TUBITAK UME constructed and characterized five ruthenium-carbon (Ru-C) eutectic cells of dimensions 24 mm in length × 24 mm in diameter. One of these cells has been selected and characterized at CEA premises. Ru-C eutectic cells have been evaluated in terms of short-term repeatability, reproducibility, furnace effect, sharp temperature ramps, and the effect of cell location. Measurements at TÜBİTAK UME have been performed with a transfer standard pyrometer calibrated at the copper point and a BB3500pg high-temperature blackbody furnace was used for construction and measurement. For the measurements at CEA, a Land Standard—HIMERT S1 radiation thermometer and a VITI induction furnace were used. In this article results of the measurements at TÜBİTAK UME and CEA will be presented. The possible use of these mini-eutectic cells as industrial temperature standards will be discussed.

  14. An Index to Measure Sustainability of a Business Project in the Construction Industry: Lithuanian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomeda Dobrovolskienė

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of the world population, resource scarcity and the threat of climate change pose numerous environmental and social problems to the world. Therefore, much hope is put in the concept of sustainability. Companies are increasingly coming under strong global pressure to incorporate sustainability considerations into their project decision-making process. Business projects in the construction industry are among the most important, as this sector is one of the largest sectors and of major importance for the national economy and therefore has a huge impact on the environment and society. Thus, we have to explore ways to integrate sustainability into the management of those projects. This paper presents a composite sustainability index of a project (CSIP which has been created following a review of existing literature and a pilot research study. A pilot research study was conducted in the Lithuanian construction industry between January 2015 and June 2015. Sustainability criteria were chosen and grouped on the basis of the analysis of the literature and different standards relating to sustainability applicable in the construction industry. A survey was used to select and rank the most important sustainability criteria. The index was constructed using multi-criteria decision-making methods. The results of the pilot study revealed that practitioners in the Lithuanian construction sector attach most importance to 15 sustainability criteria. A composite sustainability index of a project combining all these criteria may be useful in assessing the sustainability of a business project and making decisions regarding project portfolio selection and financial resource allocation. When addressing the issue of financial resource allocation in a project portfolio, the decision-maker could take into account not only the project’s return and risk, but also its sustainability. The understanding of this study should enable companies to execute

  15. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  16. Skilled labour supply in the South African construction industry: The nexus between certification, quality of work output and shortages

    OpenAIRE

    Abimbola O. Windapo

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: Construction human resource management.Research purpose: The study examines the skilled labour supply in the South African construction industry and determines whether there is a relationship between trade certification, quality of work output and scarce labour skills.Motivation for the study: The rationale for the investigation is based on the view of scholars that a skilled labour shortage is preponderant in the South African construction industry even though there is a high le...

  17. M&A in the Construction Industry -Wealth Effects of Diversification into Real Estate Life Cycle Related Services

    OpenAIRE

    Nico Rottke; Dirk Schiereck; Stephan Pauser

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, the construction industry has undergone a change in business model, as contractors vertically expand their operations to other parts of the real estate life cycle. The question arises on whether construction companies have superior abilities as real estate service providers. We have examined the value implications of 106 large merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions in the construction industry worldwide from 1986 to 2006. We inquire if a vertical expansion of the cons...

  18. Feasibility Studies of Palm Oil Mill Waste Aggregates for the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegathish Kanadasan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural industry in Malaysia has grown rapidly over the years. Palm oil clinker (POC is a byproduct obtained from the palm oil industry. Its lightweight properties allows for its utilization as an aggregate, while in powder form as a filler material in concrete. POC specimens obtained throughout each state in Malaysia were investigated to evaluate the physical, chemical, and microstructure characteristics. Variations between each state were determined and their possible contributory factors were assessed. POC were incorporated as a replacement material for aggregates and their engineering characteristics were ascertained. Almost 7% of density was reduced with the introduction of POC as aggregates. A sustainability assessment was made through greenhouse gas emission (GHG and cost factor analyses to determine the contribution of the addition of POC to the construction industry. Addition of POC helps to lower the GHG emission by 9.6% compared to control specimens. By channeling this waste into the construction industry, an efficient waste-management system can be promoted; thus, creating a cleaner environment. This study is also expected to offer some guides and directions for upcoming research works on the incorporation of POC.

  19. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry. PMID:26706434

  20. Key factors contributing to accident severity rate in construction industry in Iran: a regression modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Ghiasvand, Reza

    2016-03-01

    Construction industry involves the highest risk of occupational accidents and bodily injuries, which range from mild to very severe. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with accident severity rate (ASR) in the largest Iranian construction companies based on data about 500 occupational accidents recorded from 2009 to 2013. We also gathered data on safety and health risk management and training systems. Data were analysed using Pearson's chi-squared coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Median ASR (and the interquartile range) was 107.50 (57.24- 381.25). Fourteen of the 24 studied factors stood out as most affecting construction accident severity (psafety and health risk management system to reduce ASR. PMID:27092639

  1. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry.

  2. The role of effective communication in the construction Industry: a guide for education and health clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Aulich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry operates primarily as a system of sub-contracting and purpose built alliances. There is a wide spread of stakeholders involved in conceiving a building project through typical stages such as design, finance, build,  manage, upgrade and, ultimately, replacement and a corresponding need for communication and cooperation. Specialists who can prevent bridges falling down or who build 20 storey buildings are seen as the hard-nosed, action people who have helped bring us into the modern era. However, there are intuitive activities and disciplines which help us to achieve the type of construction achievements that have been the hallmarks of the 19th, 20th and now the 21st centuries. Most of these so called soft disciplines are about how one helps people, often highly skilled, achieve those construction and engineering goals. The key components are consultation and communication. Communication strategies should be based on a thorough understanding of the ways that humans co-operate in joint undertakings, the key principles of social dynamics and learning theory plus the ways in which people deliver, accept and understand words and pictures. The disciplines of organisational and environmental psychology have become a basic fundamental of modern business activities from management and organisational strategy to marketing and customer relations and to the improvement of working, recreational and living environments. However it is rare for a mature industry such as construction to adopt or examine those disciplines for guidance about either strategies or operations. This is despite the fact that the construction industry is almost entirely based on the principle of sub-contracting, business and professional alliances, all of which require understanding of environmental psychology and social dynamics in order to build trust, reputation, teamwork and client satisfaction. There is therefore a major need for communications to be

  3. Recent advances of pore system construction in zeolite-catalyzed chemical industry processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Weimin; Tang, Yi; Xie, Zaiku

    2015-12-21

    The kaleidoscopic applications of zeolite catalysts (zeo-catalysts) in petrochemical processes has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in recent decades. About twenty types of zeolite have been industrially applied so far, and their versatile porous architectures have contributed their most essential features to affect the catalytic efficiency. This review depicts the evolution of pore models in zeolite catalysts accompanied by the increase in industrial and environmental demands. The indispensable roles of modulating pore models are outlined for zeo-catalysts for the enhancement of their catalytic performances in various industrial processes. The zeolites and related industrial processes discussed range from the uni-modal micropore system of zeolite Y (12-ring micropore, 12-R) in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), zeolite ZSM-5 (10-R) in xylene isomerization and SAPO-34 (8-R) in olefin production to the multi-modal micropore system of MCM-22 (10-R and 12-R pocket) in aromatic alkylation and the hierarchical pores in FCC and catalytic cracking of C4 olefins. The rational construction of pore models, especially hierarchical features, is highlighted with a careful classification from an industrial perspective accompanied by a detailed analysis of the theoretical mechanisms.

  4. Submission to the Senate Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology Inquiry into the impact that Australian industry, science and technology can make to reducing the impact of the Greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submission makes some comments on historical aspects of comparisons between nuclear energy and non-nuclear strategies and technologies (including conservation/efficiency and renewable energy) and the relative economics of nuclear energy and conservation/efficiency strategies. It seek to place the nuclear factor within a larger perspective of choices and trade-offs and then to analyse that nuclear factor in more detail to demonstrate its potential and limitations and to counter misinformation and distortion about it. The nuclear techniques described in Section 2 provide Australia and the world with tools which not only can provide basic data about the Greenhouse effect in the immediate term, but can also contribute immediate term solutions to aspects of the problems which are either contributing to the Greenhouse effect (industrial processes) or likely to be affected by it in the near future (land and water uses). The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has many of these nuclear-related and non-nuclear techniques which can be of assistance in building up the data base on Greenhouse effects and developing techniques for controlling or reducing industrial and other sources of Greenhouse gases. Therefore, nuclear energy can be a longer term strategy which could be integrated into many countries' programs of actions to ameliorate the impact of global warning. 23 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Quality improving and construction industrialization of thermal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems on quality increasing and labour requirement decreasing as well as the reduction of the construction period of thermal and nuclear power plants are discussed. Specific factors, characterizing volumes and labour requirements for civil engineering and installation works at modern NPPs with WWER-1000 and RBMK-1000 reactors, are shown to be consderably higher than at thermal power stations with 800 MW power units: concrete and reinforced concrete volume is higher by 1.7-3.0 times, the mass of structural metalwork is 1.5-2.5 times bigger; the pipeline mass - by 2.4-3.7 times, the volume of engineering and installation works - by 1.4-1.5 times, labour expenditure - by 2.1-2.6 times. Main trends for acceleration and increase of object quality are further complex industrialization of construction, creation of more developed methods of installation works, introduction of new forms of labour and production organization, transition to unified typical quantity projects permitting to use in-line methods of construction. Experience in the Zaporozhe NPP construction shows that the construction period is reduced by 20-30%, and labour expenditure is decreased by 15-20%, when the in-line method is used

  6. Quickening development of nuclear industry and promoting nuclear power construction in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of China's nuclear industry is presented. For the sake of meeting energy needs, adjusting energy mix and protecting environment, the Chinese government has adjusted the principle for nuclear power development from the previous moderate development to the present activity pushed forward. The nuclear power scale in China is targeted to reach 40 GW by 2020, accounting for about 4% of the total installed capacity of electric power nationwide. The China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) shoulders the glorious mission and important task of nuclear power development and nuclear fuel supply in China. The CNNC is in possession of a comprehensive nuclear scientific and industrial fleet. It is the main body for R and D of nuclear power technologies and the exclusive nuclear power design supplier in China. Furthermore, the CNNC is the only nuclear fuel supplier in China with a complete nuclear fuel industrial system ranging from uranium geologic survey, mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel element manufacturing through spent fuel reprocessing. In addition, the CNNC is also a major investor of nuclear power in China, holding most of the exiting nuclear power plants in the mainland of China or as a major shareholder. Through years of efforts, the CNNC had made great achievement in nuclear power construction. The 65 MWe China Experimental Fast Reactor under construction now enters the installation phase. China's prototype fast reactor is expected to build up by around 2020. The FBR will become China's leading reactor type for nuclear power development in the mild of this century

  7. Australian Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  8. Selection of procurement systems in the South African construction industry: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Thwala

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this paper: Procurement systems are vital in ensuring the successful implementation of construction projects precisely in all the phases of any particular project. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate in a systematic manner the factors that influence the selection of a procurement system in the South African construction industry. Research methodology: An extensive theory and literature review of procurement systems was conducted. The literature reviewed included a sample of case studies of procurement systems successfully implemented in completed building and civil engineering projects in South Africa. A questionnaire using a four-round Delphi survey method was used to conduct the empirical study in order to obtain participants' opinions about factors influencing the selection of procurement systems as well as the utility value of various procurement systems on each factor as identified. Finally, data analysis of both qualitative and quantitative techniques was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Findings: After qualitative analysis, findings of the literature reviewed suggest that factors that influence the selection of procurement systems cut across all the phases of the project as identified in this paper. Therefore, these factors are categorically classified into internal and external factors. Factors from the internal environment were further classified into client characteristics and project characteristics, with client characteristics comprising of variables such as clients' level of knowledge and control, political and social consideration, familiarity of procurement systems, competition, funding arrangement, government public/private sector projects and risk allocation whereas project characteristics comprise of factors (variables such as size and technical complexity of the project, influence of the project life cycle, expedited project delivery, time, quality and price certainty. Factors

  9. Structuring Requirements in a Multi-Project Environment in the Construction Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wörösch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    in this industry, yet, success is here defined as an accomplished and accepted implementation of requirements management processes that are used by the relevant project members in their daily work and where the benefits of implementing requirements management outweighs the cost of invested resources. Furthermore......Being in control of requirements in building projects is vital, since it helps securing the often small profit margins and the reputation of the responsible company. Hence this research aims to introduce requirements management to the construction industry. By means of case study and action...... it is argued that when running technology development, product development, product platform development, and a portfolio of building projects at the same time the use of requirements management is advantageous and an intelligent way of structuring requirements is needed. This article also demonstrates...

  10. Discussion on construction of scientific and technological digital library in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid development of digital and network technology, traditional libraries have been unable to meet the needs of the times. Digital libraries will gradually take the place of traditional libraries. Under the circumstances, how will the libraries of the enterprises in nuclear industry face this transformation? This paper gives the brief descriptions and comparative analyses in the four aspects: the definition of the digital library, the meaning of nuclear scientific and technological digital library, the characteristics of the digital library, and major problems in the construction of nuclear scientific and technological digital library that should be solved. Therefore, setting up the digital library is very important. At the same time, it's very necessary and urgent for the libraries of the enterprises in nuclear industry to establish nuclear scientific and technological digital library. (author)

  11. Studying in a ‘classy’ school. Energy efficiency to save schools construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gallo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to investigate the emergency of estate management the scholastic buildings. It examines the economic and legal resources problems, necessary to start an effective redevelopment of the public school buildings in Italy. In detail, the paper analyse the European researches field, which funded renovation and the new construction actions of energy efficient school buildings, and presents same results of research Teenergy School. The Teenergy research, has involved the University of Florence and a Tuscany Public Administration in a benchmarking activities and in a pilot projects development. The paper aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of instruments and financial resources in promoting technological innovation, in this specific construction industry, as a vehicle to transform obsolete schools buildings in Nzeb, as indicated from the latest European legislation on energy performance of the buildings.

  12. Study on the Key Factor Parameters to Increase Productivity in Construction and Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazyed, K.; Alaswad, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    Proper management of human and non-human resources in construction and manufacturing projects can give-in considerable savings in time and cost. Construction and Manufacturing industry faces issues in connection with problems related with productivity and the problems are usually connected with performance of employees. The performance of employees is affected by many factors. In this paper a survey was made on respondents who are employed various projects of Saudi Arabia. The researcher developed a theoretical framework from the existing research which was used as a Model to collect and analyze the field data to test the hypothesis. In this research activity three predictors (commitment, job satisfaction and job performance) for determining the change in productivity. The results highlight that commitment and job performance (respectively) are the two predictors which are explaining 37% of variation in the productivity of the companies. The results also show that Job Satisfaction has no role in the prediction of productivity.

  13. APPLICATION OF CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATER FROM FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Puchlik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available About 2000 plants are involved in fruit and vegetable processing in Poland, they are mostly located in non-urbanized areas and without any access to sewerage and sewage treatment facilities. In 2014, they produced more than 10 hm3 of wastewater requiring treatment, which was discharged directly into surface waters or into the ground. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of the constructed wetland for treating the sewage from fruit and vegetable industry. The analyzed constructed wetland with vertical flow reveled a reduction in the value of BOD5 to 68.2%, and CODCr to 79.3%. The model was characterized by 60.2% efficiency of total phosphorus removal.

  14. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT THE STRATEGIC ALLIANCES BETWEEN SMEs IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY AND TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUDMILA PĂUNESCU (RAILEAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The SMEs who are looking the way to success and sustainable development are beginning to seek strategic alliances with one or more players on the market, just to gain fast and inexpensive acces to: technology, expertise, marketing, production, distribution and other benefits.Tourism development both as a way to spend a pleasant and instructive leisure, even as a service activity required at various stages of a tourist trip, is a necessity of today civilization, with broad prospects for development, is at once a consequence and cause of mutations economic, social, cultural and environmental. Thus, this paper approaches the advantages and disadvantages of strategic alliance between SMEs in the construction industry and tourism, and the elements necessary to achieve its objectives, in view to stimulate touristic activities and development of constructions sector.

  15. Use of industrial isotopes in the construction of an integrated steel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of radioisotopes by industrial radiography methods in the control of quality of welding of steel structures and equipment during the construction of a steel plant are highlighted. Some of the main units that are controlled in a steel plant by the radiography methods are boilers, pressure vessels, blast furnace shells and stoves, L.D. convertors, technological pipelines etc. After briefly describing the different radioisotopes (sources) and the accessories required for radiography work, the different techniques adopted for determining the defects in the welded joints are mentioned. A mention is also made of the different types of image quality indicators (penetrameters) and their relative advantages. The norms for control and acceptance of the defects for different structures are also covered. Finally, the safety requirements that are to be followed during radiography work at the site of erection, where different agencies of construction work simultaneously are dealt with. (author)

  16. The Role of E-Commerce Systems for the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Stewart

    2012-01-01

    The use of e-commerce systems has increased substantially in the past five years, and now a number of companies in the construction industry have joined consortiums to develop e-commerce portals. These new systems encourage companies to review the way in which existing processes are undertaken, and often re-engineered process are introduced. It is important to understand the difference between the terms e-commerce and e-business, e-commerce refers to buying and seeling transactions which use ...

  17. The relevance of the ISO26000 social responsibility issues to the Hong Kong construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Robyn Barnes; Norman Croker

    2013-01-01

    CorporateSocial Responsibility (CSR), the responsibility of a corporation for theimpacts of its decisions on society and the environment, originated as a termin the 1950’s (Carroll 1999). However, ISO 26000 (ISO 2010)“Guidance on Social Responsibility” published in November 2010, redefines “SocialResponsibility” (“SR”) broadly, by reference to SR principles, core subjectsand issues. The Hong Kong Construction Industry (“HKCI”) sector is critical to Hong Kong’s economy, accounting for5.6% of t...

  18. Atmospheric pollutants in alpine peat bogs record a detailed chronology of industrial and agricultural development on the Australian continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two peat bogs from remote alpine sites in Australia were found to contain detailed and coherent histories of atmospheric metal pollution for Pb, Zn, Cu, Mo, Ag, As, Cd, Sb, Zn, In, Cr, Ni, Tl and V. Dramatic increases in metal deposition in the post-1850 AD portion of the cores coincide with the onset of mining in Australia. Using both Pb isotopes and metals, pollutants were ascribed to the main atmospheric pollution emitting sources in Australia, namely mining and smelting, coal combustion and agriculture. Results imply mining and metal production are the major source of atmospheric metal pollution, although coal combustion may account for up to 30% of metal pollutants. A novel finding of this study is the increase in the otherwise near-constant Y/Ho ratio after 1900 AD. We link this change to widespread and increased application of marine phosphate fertiliser in Australia's main agricultural area (the Murray Darling Basin). - Detailed records of atmospheric metal pollution accumulation in Australia are presented and are shown to trace the industrial and agricultural development of the continent.

  19. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  20. The carbon cycle in the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1 – Part 1: Model description and pre-industrial simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Law

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Earth System Models (ESMs that incorporate carbon-climate feedbacks represent the present state of the art in climate modelling. Here, we describe the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1 that combines existing ocean and land carbon models into the physical climate model to simulate exchanges of carbon between the land, atmosphere and ocean. The land carbon model can optionally include both nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the land carbon uptake. The ocean carbon model simulates the evolution of nitrate, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and iron with one class of phytoplankton and zooplankton. From two multi-centennial simulations of the pre-industrial period with different land carbon model configurations, we evaluate the equilibration of the carbon cycle and present the spatial and temporal variability in key carbon exchanges. For the land carbon cycle, leaf area index is simulated reasonably, and seasonal carbon exchange is well represented. Interannual variations of land carbon exchange are relatively large, driven by variability in precipitation and temperature. We find that the response of the ocean carbon cycle shows reasonable agreement with observations and very good agreement with existing Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 models. While our model over estimates surface nitrate values, the primary productivity agrees well with observations. Our analysis highlights some deficiencies inherent in the carbon models and where the carbon simulation is negatively impacted by known biases in the underlying physical model. We conclude the study with a brief discussion of key developments required to further improve the realism of our model simulation.

  1. The carbon cycle in the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS-ESM1) - Part 1: Model description and pre-industrial simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, R. M.; Ziehn, T.; Matear, R. J.; Lenton, A.; Chamberlain, M. A.; Stevens, L. E.; Wang, Y. P.; Srbinovsky, J.; Bi, D.; Yan, H.; Vohralik, P. F.

    2015-09-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) that incorporate carbon-climate feedbacks represent the present state of the art in climate modelling. Here, we describe the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS)-ESM1 that combines existing ocean and land carbon models into the physical climate model to simulate exchanges of carbon between the land, atmosphere and ocean. The land carbon model can optionally include both nitrogen and phosphorous limitation on the land carbon uptake. The ocean carbon model simulates the evolution of nitrate, oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and iron with one class of phytoplankton and zooplankton. From two multi-centennial simulations of the pre-industrial period with different land carbon model configurations, we evaluate the equilibration of the carbon cycle and present the spatial and temporal variability in key carbon exchanges. For the land carbon cycle, leaf area index is simulated reasonably, and seasonal carbon exchange is well represented. Interannual variations of land carbon exchange are relatively large, driven by variability in precipitation and temperature. We find that the response of the ocean carbon cycle shows reasonable agreement with observations and very good agreement with existing Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. While our model over estimates surface nitrate values, the primary productivity agrees well with observations. Our analysis highlights some deficiencies inherent in the carbon models and where the carbon simulation is negatively impacted by known biases in the underlying physical model. We conclude the study with a brief discussion of key developments required to further improve the realism of our model simulation.

  2. Execution of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (1994) in the Construction Industry from Contractors’ Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Awang H.; Kamil I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Construction is one of the highest contributing industries to occupational accidents by sector in Malaysia. Statistics have been drawn from year to year that show an increasing number of cases of accidents by industry sector. While it is impossible to completely eliminate all accidents, with a proper and effective safety and health policy or rules set by top management, especially contractors, the rate of accidents on construction sites can be reduced. The main objective of this study is to a...

  3. On-site Labour Productivity of New Zealand Construction Industry: Key Constraints and Improvement Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Durdyev

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Productivity is key to the survival and growth of any organisation, industry or nation. Some factors constrain the achievement of the set project objectives in the New Zealand building and construction industry and are responsible for the reported steady decline of productivity and performance. This study aims to identify the key constraints to on-site labour productivity and improvement measures. Using the descriptive survey method, views of some project managers, contractors and subcontractors in New Zealand were canvassed via pilot interviews and questionnaire surveys at the qualitative and quantity data gathering stages, respectively. Multi-attribute technique was used to analyse the quantitative data. Results showed that the key external constraints to on-site labour productivity comprise, in order of decreasing impact, statutory compliance, unforeseen events and wider external dynamics. The internal constraints, which contribute 67 percent of the onsite productivity issues, comprise reworks, level of skill and experience of the workforce, adequacy of method of construction, buildability issues, and inadequate supervision and coordination. . The factors underlying each broad category of external and internal constraints are reported. The relative levels of impact of the identified constraints are expected to guide the project team in addressing the constraints in a cost-effective manner.

  4. Industry Standards for Technological Design and Construction Drawing Design of Rubber Factories Carried Out on August 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On May 18, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology approved 2 industry standards of Rules of Technological Design Technology of Rubber Factories(HG/T 21558-2011) and Rules of Rubber Factories Construction Drawing Design Document Content and Depth (HG/T 21511-2011), which are to be carried out on August 1.

  5. Laboratory studies of Miocene limestone for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali

    2016-04-01

    Geologically ten percent of Sri Lanka is made up of Miocene limestone which covers northern and north-western coastal belt of the Island. It is used as a raw material for various industries but only cement and lime are being used for the construction industry. Except its chemical composition there is no available literature to study about other properties. Therefore the author carried out a series of laboratory tests to find out the mechanical properties of limestone in Sri Lanka. The objective of this paper is to make a note on the various properties of Miocene limestone and describe its suitability to use as an aggregate for the construction industry in Sri Lanka. Borehole samples (NX size) of limestone were obtained from various drilling sites in Northern Province of Sri Lanka and selected samples were prepared for different laboratory tests after visual observations. The tests were carried out according to ASTM Standards at the geotechnical and materials testing laboratories. The number of samples per each test was different. The range (and average result) for each property can be mentioned here as bulk density 2213-2643 (2452) kg/m3, water absorption 2.2-4.5 (1.91)%, porosity 1-15 (6.5)%, specific gravity 2.58-2.68(2.62), ultrasonic pulse velocity P wave 4480-6338 (5668) m/s and S wave 2688-3802 (3400) m/s, uniaxial compressive strength 11-92 (35)MPa, point load strength 1.2-7.1 (3.7)MPa, aggregate impact value, AIV 25-30 (28)%, LAAV 35-38 (36)%, and Brazilian tensile strength 2.1-4.4 (3.2)MPa. Poisson's ratio 0.12-0.68 (0.22) and modulus of elasticity 42-85 (62) GPa were obtained by using P and S ultrasonic wave velocity values. According to LAAV and AIV this limestone may be suitable as the base course material for road construction but may not be suitable for surface material of highways and rail road ballasts. Ultrasonic velocity waves indicate that limestone is highly compacted and solid. According to the compressive strength of solid limestone rock a few

  6. An Empirical Analysis of the Integration-Responsiveness Framework: U.S. Construction Equipment Industry Firms in Global Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Julius H Johnson

    1995-01-01

    In this study, businesses competing as part of the global U.S. construction equipment industry were categorized into three subgroups according to the integration-responsiveness framework (I-R) in an attempt to further understand industry pressures confronting businesses that compete internationally. The results show that three generic strategies suggested by the I-R framework do appear in a single industry context: globally integrated, locally responsive and multifocal. Beyond providing addit...

  7. Launching Avant Compact Multi-functional Loaders in Southeast Asia : Golf, Construction, Landscaping and Property Maintenance Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to research target-industry environments within Southeast Asia and to provide Jebsen & Jessen Technology, Turf & Irrigation branches with means of introducing Avant compact multi-functional loaders to prospective customers in the region. The emphasis of the research was on the golf industries of Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Thailand, but research was also conducted on the construction, landscaping and property maintenance industries of the aforementioned ...

  8. Construction Started for the Specialty Paper & Coated Paper Industrial Base Project of Guanhao High-tech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    On November 18,2011,construction started for the specialty paper & coated paper industrial base project of Guanhao High-tech Co.,Ltd.in Zhanjiang Development Zone.The total investment planned for the project is RMB 7.6 billion.After completing the construction and putting into production,

  9. Application of a constructed wetland for industrial wastewater treatment: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T Y; Kao, C M; Yeh, T Y; Chien, H Y; Chao, A C

    2006-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the efficacy and capacity of using constructed wetlands on industrial pollutant removal. Four parallel pilot-scale modified free water surface (FWS) constructed wetland systems [dimension for each system: 4-m (L)x1-m (W)x1-m (D)] were installed inside an industrial park for conducting the proposed treatability study. The averaged influent contains approximately 170 mg l(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), 80 mg l(-1) biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), 90 mg l(-1) suspend solid (SS), and 32 mg l(-1) NH(3)-N. In the plant-selection study, four different wetland plant species including floating plants [Pistia stratiotes L. (P. stratiotes) and Ipomoea aquatica (I. aquatica)] and emergent plants [Phragmites communis L. (P. communis) and Typha orientalis Presl. (T. orientalis)] were evaluated. Results show that only the emergent plant (P. communis) could survive and reproduce with a continuous feed of 0.4m(3)d(-1) of the raw wastewater. Thus, P. communis was used in the subsequent treatment study. Two different control parameters including hydraulic retention time (HRT) (3, 5, and 7d) and media [vesicles ceramic bioballs and small gravels, 1cm in diameter] were examined in the treatment study. Results indicate that the system with a 5-d HRT (feed rate of 0.4m(3)d(-1)) and vesicles ceramic bioballs as the media had the acceptable and optimal pollutant removal efficiency. If operated under conditions of the above parameters, the pilot-plant wetland system can achieve removal of 61% COD, 89% BOD, 81% SS, 35% TP, and 56% NH(3)-N. The treated wastewater meets the current industrial wastewater discharge standards in Taiwan. PMID:16413595

  10. Treatment of industrial effluents in constructed wetlands: challenges, operational strategies and overall performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shubiao; Wallace, Scott; Brix, Hans; Kuschk, Peter; Kirui, Wesley Kipkemoi; Masi, Fabio; Dong, Renjie

    2015-06-01

    The application of constructed wetlands (CWs) has significantly expanded to treatment of various industrial effluents, but knowledge in this field is still insufficiently summarized. This review is accordingly necessary to better understand this state-of-the-art technology for further design development and new ideas. Full-scale cases of CWs for treating various industrial effluents are summarized, and challenges including high organic loading, salinity, extreme pH, and low biodegradability and color are evaluated. Even horizontal flow CWs are widely used because of their passive operation, tolerance to high organic loading, and decolorization capacity, free water surface flow CWs are effective for treating oil field/refinery and milking parlor/cheese making wastewater for settlement of total suspended solids, oil, and grease. Proper pretreatment, inflow dilutions through re-circulated effluent, pH adjustment, plant selection and intensifications in the wetland bed, such as aeration and bioaugmentation, are recommended according to the specific characteristics of industrial effluents. PMID:25792030

  11. Treatment of industrial effluents in constructed wetlands: challenges, operational strategies and overall performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shubiao; Wallace, Scott; Brix, Hans; Kuschk, Peter; Kirui, Wesley Kipkemoi; Masi, Fabio; Dong, Renjie

    2015-06-01

    The application of constructed wetlands (CWs) has significantly expanded to treatment of various industrial effluents, but knowledge in this field is still insufficiently summarized. This review is accordingly necessary to better understand this state-of-the-art technology for further design development and new ideas. Full-scale cases of CWs for treating various industrial effluents are summarized, and challenges including high organic loading, salinity, extreme pH, and low biodegradability and color are evaluated. Even horizontal flow CWs are widely used because of their passive operation, tolerance to high organic loading, and decolorization capacity, free water surface flow CWs are effective for treating oil field/refinery and milking parlor/cheese making wastewater for settlement of total suspended solids, oil, and grease. Proper pretreatment, inflow dilutions through re-circulated effluent, pH adjustment, plant selection and intensifications in the wetland bed, such as aeration and bioaugmentation, are recommended according to the specific characteristics of industrial effluents.

  12. Outsourcing as a Factor in the Effectiveness of the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Tischenko Aleksandr N.; Khaustova Viktoriya Ye.

    2012-01-01

    The article reflects the diversity of opportunities to increase the efficiency of construction enterprises by outsourcing services. The overall development of outsourcing in the country and the construction industry was described. Risks of domestic construction reflected from unreasonable use of outsourcings were shown.В статье отражено разнообразие возможностей повышения эффективности предприятий строительной отрасли с помощью аутсорсинговых услуг. Охарактеризован общий уровень развития видо...

  13. Perspective on the personal and professional needs of the project leader in construction industry in Libya: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hamid kadir Pakir

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of leadership is one of the most important factors in determining the success and survival of groups and organizations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the leadership needs of the project manger in the Libyan construction companies. The objective was identified the most important and crucial personal and professional needs of the project manager. This study attempted to identify the needs of the project managers in the construction industry in Libya. The finding has shown that all managers surveyed basically agreed that adherence to law/legality, specific, concise and rational, followed by intuitive and open minded are ranked as the most crucial personal needs that should be acquired to become an effective project manager in the construction industry. On the other hand, attention to details, project focus, adherence to construction industries/ professional codes, time concious / constraints, problem solving were ranked as the crucial professional needs that required the respondents.

  14. Competency Standards for Bachelor of Industrial Technology Graduates for the Construction Industry in Region IV-A: Inputs For Curriculum Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Compasivo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to develop competency standards for Industrial Technology graduates for employment in the construction industry in Region IV-A, Philippines. It specifically identified the basic and core competency standards for industrial technology and determined the degree of importance of competencies needed in the construction industry sector. The study identified 28 common competencies for three areas of specializations in industrial technology namely: electrical, civil and drafting technology. There were 39 core competencies for electrical, 31 for drafting and 38 items for civil technology. A total of 50 panel of experts were carefully selected using the purposive sampling as respondents in the study. Experts are selected based on their technical know-how or proficiency and currently practicing their line of profession in the construction industry. The study used the descriptive-developmental method of research. The Delphi technique was applied to determine if the competency under investigation reached the general agreement of opinions by the panel of experts involved. The findings implied that the newly developed competency standards were good input for curriculum enhancement in the area of civil, drafting and electrical technology. The study recommended the newly developed competencies may be followed by the faculty in the course they teach and the new competency items suggested by the panel of experts for inclusion in the curriculum for the three areas of specializations may be considered during the curriculum revision.

  15. Australian uranium and the election

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international and national complexities of the situation in Australia over the question of mining of the country's large and rich uranium deposits are explored with especial reference to the pending general election. The present position is ironical since access to low cost uranium would give a welcome boost to the nuclear industry which is enthusiastically supported by the Australian prime minister and his colleagues yet the Australian government is unable to promote mining as rapidly as it would like because of the international commitments it has made to provide a justification for its policy. (U.K.)

  16. Engineering controls for selected silica and dust exposures in the construction industry--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2003-04-01

    This literature review summarizes engineering control technology research for dust and silica exposures associated with selected tasks in the construction industry. Exposure to crystalline silica can cause silicosis and lung fibrosis, and evidence now links it with lung cancer. Of over 30 references identified and reviewed, 16 were particularly significant in providing data and analyses capable of documenting the efficacy of various engineering controls. These reports include information on generation rates and worker exposures to silica and dust during four different tasks: cutting brick and concrete block, grinding mortar from between bricks, drilling, and grinding concrete surfaces. The major controls are wet methods and local exhaust ventilation. The studies suggest that while the methods provide substantial exposure reductions, they may not reduce levels below the current ACGIH threshold limit value (TLV) of 0.05 mg/m(3) for respirable quartz. Although further research on controls for these operations is indicated, it is clear that effective methods exist for significant exposure reduction.

  17. Development of lightweight concrete mixes for construction industry at the state of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansouri, Mohammed Abdulwahab

    As the construction industry evolved, the need for more durable, long lasting infrastructure increased. Therefore, more efforts have been put to find new methods to improve the properties of the concrete to prolong the service life of the structural elements. One of these methods is the use of lightweight aggregate as an internal curing agent to help reducing self-desiccation and shrinkage. This research studied the effects of using locally available lightweight aggregate (expanded clay), as a partial replacement of normal weight aggregate in the concrete matrix. The concrete mixtures contained lightweight aggregate with a replacement percentage of 12.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 percent by volume. Fresh properties as well as compressive strength, modulus of rupture, and drying shrinkage were measured. While was effective in reducing drying shrinkage, the use of lightweight aggregate resulted in slightly reducing both the compressive strength and modulus of rupture.

  18. Time for a real shift to relations: appraisal of Social Network Analysis applications in the UK construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Ruan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Social Network Analysis (SNA has been adopted in the UK construction management research and generated meaningful insights in analysing project management organisations from network perspectives. As an effective tool, social network analysis has been used to analyse information and knowledge flow between construction project teams which is considered as foundation for collaborative working and subsequently improving overall performance. Social network analysis is based on an assumption of the importance of relationships among interacting units. The social network perspective encompasses theories, models and applications that are expressed in terms of relational concepts or processes. Many believe, moreover, that the success or failure of organisations often depends on the patterning of their internal structure. This paper reviewed existing literatures on SNA applications in construction industry from three leading construction management journals.  From the review, the research proposed some advance in the application of SNA in the construction industry

  19. Time for a real shift to relations: appraisal of Social Network Analysis applications in the UK construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Ruan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Social Network Analysis (SNA has been adopted in the UK construction management research and generated meaningful insights in analysing project management organisations from network perspectives. As an effective tool, social network analysis has been used to analyse information and knowledge flow between construction project teams which is considered as foundation for collaborative working and subsequently improving overall performance. Social network analysis is based on an assumption of the importance of relationships among interacting units. The social network perspective encompasses theories, models and applications that are expressed in terms of relational concepts or processes. Many believe, moreover, that the success or failure of organisations often depends on the patterning of their internal structure. This paper reviewed existing literatures on SNA applications in construction industry from three leading construction management journals.  From the review, the research proposed some advance in the application of SNA in the construction industry.

  20. Valuing the contribution of knowledge-oriented workers to projects: a merit based approach in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Arashpour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence points to the fact that frequent resignation of project engineers from construction companies is primarily the result of dissatisfaction with the factors that shape the salary scale. This research aims to identify the major influencing factors in merit based salary calculation systems for knowledge-oriented engineers so as to more accurately reflect their contribution to construction projects. Results from a questionnaire sent to managers, engineers and HR professionals throughout the Iranian construction industry revealed that while there was overall agreement on principles to a merit-based approach, engineers in particular identified ‘professional skills’, ‘experience’ and ‘creativity’. Management-oriented parties should take into account engineer perspectives in order to more accurately value the knowledge-oriented contribution of these workers to construction projects. This research provides a basis for understanding the key factors in the merit based salary scale formulation through the construction industry.

  1. Role of Target Indicators in Determination of Prognostic Estimates for the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalunina Olha M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers interrelation of planning and forecasting in the construction industry. It justifies a need of determining key indicators for specific conditions of formation of the market model of development of economy, inconstant volumes of production in industry, absence of required volumes of investments for technical re-equipment of the branch, absence of sufficient volumes of own primary energy carriers, sharp growth of prices on imported energy carriers, absence of the modern system of tariffs on electric energy, and inefficiency of energy saving measures. The article offers to form key indicators on the basis of a factor analysis, which envisages stage-by-stage transformation of the matrix of original data with the result of “compression” of information. This allows identification of the most significant properties that influence economic state of the region under conditions of use of minimum of original information. The article forms key target indicators of the energy sector for the Poltava oblast. It calculates, using the proposed method, prognostic values of key indicators of territorial functioning for the Poltava oblast.

  2. Quantitative and Qualitative Parameters of Awards in Architecture and Construction Industries of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Mikelsone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While evaluating the built environment, predominant agreement on what aspects constitute an achievement or failure in architecture is changing in the course of time. The subject of the research is value set agreements in regional comprehension, followed by the generic tree of award in architecture and construction industries of Latvia. Recently, besides the original task of promoting quality, the judgment typology can be considered a significant evidence of what the contemporary questions, problems and challenges consist of in the regional architecture. Based on the method of analytic comparison, this research paper lists regional awards as established public forms of judgment, reflected in professional editions and mass media during the last two decades. By sorting them by responsible initiatives, aim formulations, establishment data, criterion and target audience, the paper focuses on the general examination of affiliation segments and quantitative and qualitative indicators in the awards assigned since 1990. Conclusions include the data on widespread generalizations in the terms of criteria, segmentation and fragmentation, reputation of subjectivity, commercialization and expansive development in awarding, and at the same time raise the lack of constructive criticism culture in Latvia.

  3. Pattern extraction for high-risk accidents in the construction industry: a data-mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mehran; Ardeshir, Abdollah; Fazel Zarandi, Mohammad Hossein; Soltanaghaei, Elahe

    2016-09-01

    Accidents involving falls and falling objects (group I) are highly frequent accidents in the construction industry. While being hit by a vehicle, electric shock, collapse in the excavation and fire or explosion accidents (group II) are much less frequent, they make up a considerable proportion of severe accidents. In this study, multiple-correspondence analysis, decision tree, ensembles of decision tree and association rules methods are employed to analyse a database of construction accidents throughout Iran between 2007 and 2011. The findings indicate that in group I, there is a significant correspondence among these variables: time of accident, place of accident, body part affected, final consequence of accident and lost workdays. Moreover, the frequency of accidents in the night shift is less than others, and the frequency of injury to the head, back, spine and limbs are more. In group II, the variables time of accident and body part affected are mostly related and the frequency of accidents among married and older workers is more than single and young workers. There was a higher frequency in the evening, night shifts and weekends. The results of this study are totally in line with the previous research. PMID:25997167

  4. Evaluating Levels of Project Planning and their Effects on Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Idoro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the level of project planning on public andprivate sectors projects and its impact on performance. Thepurpose is to create awareness of the level and effectivenessof the planning done by public and private clients in the deliveryof construction projects. A questionnaire survey administeredto a sample of 130 client representatives selected by stratifi edrandom sampling from the population of public and private clientsin the Nigerian construction industry is used and analysed usingdescriptive statistics, the t-test and Spearman correlation test. Theresults show that the level of preconstruction planning on privatesector projects is higher than that of public sector projects whilethe level of contract planning done by the latter is higher thanthat of the former. Furthermore, the performance of private sectorprojects is higher than that of public sector projects in many of theparameters used. However, the level of preparation of life-cyclecharts that concern project delivery time in both public and privatesectors projects is low and the level of project planning in the twocategories of projects has a limited impact on project performance.The understanding of how public and private sectors projectsperform in planning and its impact are expected to assist publicand private clients to know the challenges ahead of them in theireffort to improve the planning and performance of their projects.

  5. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON THE LEVEL OF IBS ACCEPTANCE IN THE MALAYSIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHD SANUSI S. AHAMAD

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This IBS Survey report continues a practice that began in 2003. The first report was published in 2003 followed by in 2005 and in 2008. It records recent trends in selected areas that reflect Malaysia’s achievement on the IBS usage in building construction industry. Due to the dynamic economic and technological changes, IBS usage reports have been increasingly important. The design of the quantitative survey in IBS acceptance questionnaire is based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM. The comparison was done between the class of contractors G7 and the combined groups of G6, G5, G4. The t-test analysis shows that all the class of contractors (G7, G6, G5 and G4 have a common agreement on the awareness of IBS and IBS actual use (the benefits of using IBS in construction but have a significant difference in opinion on IBS actual use (the problems faced in using IBS and promotion of IBS by the government through CIDB, perceived ease of IBS use and perceived IBS usefulness. However, there are items in the variable that show significant difference between the comparison groups.

  6. The relevance of the ISO26000 social responsibility issues to the Hong Kong construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Robyn Barnes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CorporateSocial Responsibility (CSR, the responsibility of a corporation for theimpacts of its decisions on society and the environment, originated as a termin the 1950’s (Carroll 1999. However, ISO 26000 (ISO 2010“Guidance on Social Responsibility” published in November 2010, redefines “SocialResponsibility” (“SR” broadly, by reference to SR principles, core subjectsand issues. The Hong Kong Construction Industry (“HKCI” sector is critical to Hong Kong’s economy, accounting for5.6% of the GDP and 9.2% of employment in 1999 (Tang 2001. In 2011, the gross value of constructionwork by main contractors amounted to HK$128.53 billion and contributed HK$65.4 billion (HKGov 2013to the total GDP of HK$1,823.2 billion (3.6% (HKTDC 2013.The aim of this research is toinvestigate which ISO 26000 CSR issues are relevantto HKCI firms. Theprinciple findings are that: the reported level of HKCI CSR activity relativeto the 7 core subject of ISO 26000 is a function of company size; many SME’sconsider that many of the ISO 26000 SR issues are irrelevant to them; but forthe large construction contractors, reputation, legislation and or regulation andcorporate culture are drivers of improvements in CSR in the HKCI.

  7. Electron beam treatment of textile dyeing wastewater: Operation of pilot plant and industrial plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot plant for treating 1,000m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant. Installation of the EB pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000m3/day each, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Korean Government. A commercial plant for re-circulation of wastewater from Papermill Company is also designed for Pan Asia Paper Co. Cheongwon Mill, and after the successful installation, up to 80% of wastewater could be reused in paper producing process. The method for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater and other technologies are developed with the joint works with Institute of Physical Chemistry (IPC) of Russian Academy of Sciences. (author)

  8. THE PERFORMANCE OF THE PROJECT COALITION IN THE UK CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY A CONCEPTUAL OPTIMISATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Proverbs

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The UK construction industry has long been criticised for engendering adversarial relationships among project participants. The nature of interrelationships ultimately determines overall project performance%2C in terms of finished product%2C and levels of performance and satisfaction for the participants. To investigate these interrelationships%2C the performance and satisfaction of each individual participant must be considered. Better understanding of the interrelationships should help reduce adversarialsm and improve the performance and satisfaction of each participant. The possible interrelationships that may exist are discussed based on %91soft knowledge%92 approaches%2C i.e. psychology%2C organisational behaviour and sociology. It is concluded that the performance of each participant is interdependent and essential towards project performance. Two levels of satisfaction%2C which determine the quality of working relationships between participants%2C are postulated. The first level of satisfaction %28i.e. satisfaction on achieving organisational objectives%29 is%2C to some extent%2C dependent on the second level of satisfaction %28i.e. satisfaction on the performance of the other participants%29. Therefore%2C within the construction project coalition%2C each participant has to be satisfied with the performance of the other participants if harmonious working relationships are to be sustained. Based on these%2C a conceptual model for optimising the relationships between main participants of the project coalition is presented. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Coalition+participants%2C+Interrelationships%2C+Performance%2C+Satisfaction+

  9. A Principal Component Analysis of Project Management Construction Industry Competencies for the Ghanaian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Omoteso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study adopts a data reduction technique to examine the presence of any complex structure among a set of project management competency variables. A structured survey questionnaire was administered to 100 project managers to elicit relevant data, and this achieved a relatively high response rate of 54%. After satisfying all the necessary tests of reliability of the survey instrument, sample size adequacy and population matrix, the data was subjected to principal component analysis, resulting in the identification of six new thematic project management competency areas ; and were explained in terms of human resource management and project control; construction innovation and communication; project financial resources management; project risk and quality management; business ethics and; physical resources and procurement management. These knowledge areas now form the basis for lateral project management training requirements in the context of the Ghanaian construction industry. Key contribution of the paper is manifested in the use of the principal component analysis, which has rigorously provided understanding into the complex structure and the relationship between the various knowledge areas. The originality and value of the paper is embedded in the use of contextual-task conceptual knowledge to expound the six uncorrelated empirical utility of the project management competencies.

  10. A framework for measuring the supply chain's agility of mass construction industry in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Poloie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Impotent planning system in house providing process is the result of inadequate housing management system in theoretical, empirical, and operational fields. In addition, Mass Construction industry in Iran confronts with other problems such as instability in raw material prices, unsteadiness in production and investment laws and regulations, frailty of transportation infrastructure, international sanctions and etc. Furthermore, customers’ needs, lower costs, and greater customizations lead mass producing to search for new solutions and novel producing system. Agility is offered as a strategy to enable Mass Construction associations to be maintained in the competition of constantly changing market in Iran. In such a market, previous approaches lose their capabilities in supply chain. Thus to achieve agility by Mass Construction association is the chief aim of this study. This study is descriptive-analytic and can be identified as developmental –functional considering its target. After surveying previous research literature and using experts’ opinions, we investigated final agile sub criteria of supply chain and then we used interpretive- structural modeling approach to determine the relation among sub criteria and to offer an agile supply chain model. Surveying research literature and experts’ opinions lead us to identify 8 criteria (society, government, financial, information technology, market, partnership, quality and technology and also 22 sub criteria for supply chain’s agility. Then the results were analyzed through interpretive-structural approach and relation of criteria and sub criteria and their consequence were achieved. These relations showed that government and infrastructure investment, culture, regulations and responses to social and environmental issues are the basis of agility in mass housing productions’ supply chain. This model helps supply chain managers to have strategic planning to enhance agility in supply chain

  11. Australian Research Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Australian Research Council(ARC) is the Australian Government's main agency for allocating research funding to academics and researchers in Australian universities.Its mission is to deliver policy and programs that advance Australian research and innovation globally and benefit the community.

  12. 关于中国建筑业实施精益建造的思考%Consideration on Lean Construction Applied in China Construction Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宇; 高尚

    2011-01-01

    精益建造是当今建筑管理领域里一个较为热门的话题.通过比较建筑业和制造业的差异,以及讨论日式企业文化和管理与“精益”的渊源,并结合中国建筑业的现状,指出这些因素都将对推行精益建造提出一系列的挑战.对此,就如何在中国建筑业实施精益建造提出建议,即引入“改变/干预措施”,改变精益建造的重心,以及在高校开展精益建造的继续教育.%Lean construction has been a popular word in recent years in the construction management domain. The relationship between the Japanese management and lean are discussed by comparing the differences between construction and manufacturing. Based on the status of China' s construction industry, a series of challenges for implementing the lean construction in China are put forward. Therefore, authors give some advices for lean construction practices in China, namely by introducing the change approach, changing the focus of lean construction, and conducting lean construction education within the universities and colleges.

  13. 33 CFR 148.722 - Should the construction plan incorporate best available technology and recommended industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... incorporate best available technology and recommended industry practices? 148.722 Section 148.722 Navigation... plan incorporate best available technology and recommended industry practices? Each applicant must... industry practices as directed in § 148.730....

  14. A Survey on Usage and Diffusion of Project Risk Management Techniques and Software Tools in the Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Thaheem, Muhammad Jamaluddin; Marco, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The area of Project Risk Management (PRM) has been extensively researched, and the utilization of various tools and techniques for managing risk in several industries has been sufficiently reported. Formal and systematic PRM practices have been made available for the construction industry. Based on such body of knowledge, this paper tries to find out the global picture of PRM practices and approaches with the help of a survey to look into the usage of PRM techniques and diffusion of software ...

  15. Fair competition: How to apply the ‘Economically Most Advantageous Tender’ (EMAT) award mechanism in the Dutch construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dreschler, M.

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in the thesis contains a part of the ongoing effort to improve the situation of the Dutch construction sector. For at least the last decade, a number of measures known as integrated contracting has been heralded as the solution for many problems in the Dutch construction industry. One of the main reasons for integrated contracting is to stimulate suppliers adopting innovative solutions. The innovative solutions can lead to bids with a lower price, more value or both. Ho...

  16. Extend of Organisational Learning in Respect to Effective Implementation of Industrialised Building System (IBS) in the Construction Industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Willibrord, Evangelyn

    2007-01-01

    Since Malaysia’s independence 50 years ago, the construction industry in this country was at its infancy stage. Today, it is one of the contributors to the country's Gross Domestic Product. In construction, project experts hardly share knowledge in a structured manner; rather word of mouth is a common medium of disseminating information. Therefore, when the good people leaves the organisation or move to another project they bring with them the knowledge, experience and expertise. How do we in...

  17. Perspective on the personal and professional needs of the project leader in construction industry in Libya :a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Hamid kadir Pakir; Abdelnaser Omran; Salahaldein Alsadey

    2011-01-01

    The quality of leadership is one of the most important factors in determining the success and survival of groups and organizations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the leadership needs of the project manger in the Libyan construction companies. The objective was identified the most important and crucial personal and professional needs of the project manager. This study attempted to identify the needs of the project managers in the construction industry in Libya. The finding has shown ...

  18. Execution of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (1994 in the Construction Industry from Contractors’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction is one of the highest contributing industries to occupational accidents by sector in Malaysia. Statistics have been drawn from year to year that show an increasing number of cases of accidents by industry sector. While it is impossible to completely eliminate all accidents, with a proper and effective safety and health policy or rules set by top management, especially contractors, the rate of accidents on construction sites can be reduced. The main objective of this study is to analyse the degree of application of the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994 (OSHA 1994 in the construction industry and to identify the contributing factors leading to a lack of execution of OSHA 1994 on construction sites with a primary focus on contractors’ point of view. Five on-going construction projects in Perak were selected as case studies and site inspections were conducted. The results showed that none of the contractors have fully implemented the rules and regulations provided by the government. Within this report, some recommendations are made towards enhancing the safety and health issues on construction sites.

  19. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs.

  20. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs

  1. The Social Construction of the Microfinance Industry: a comparison of donor and recipient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Bisen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microfinance has been one of the fastest growing “industries” of the new millennium, with the sector now containing over 10,000 microfinance institutions (MFIs worth an estimated USD with over $60 billion in assets (Microfinance Information Exchange 2011. This expansion has stimulated interest from both scholars and the mainstream media. There is a growing volume of academic research which broadly centres on two approaches: an “institutionalist perspective” that highlights microfinance as an innovation in applying market solutions to social problems; and the other approach, often described as welfarist, that questions the capacity of an increasingly commericalised sector to realize a mission of poverty reduction. But do these themes and concerns permeate academic boundaries? Specifically, does media coverage in key donor and recipient countries confirm or challenge or even engage with these debates? To date much of this academic literature has overlooked how “microfinance” has been socially constructed in the public sphere through the mass media. Through its interpretation of events, the media can influence the way an issue is discussed and evaluated and in this way influence individual perceptions (Gamson 1988. In this article we present an analysis of recent media coverage of microfinance in one key donor country, the United States and one major recipient country, India. By conducting a media content analysis of 100 newspaper articles (sorted by level of relevance that appeared in the top 10 highest circulating English language newspapers in India and the US over a 12 month period January-December 2008 we discuss how media coverage in these two countries differed in significant ways. The Indian media sample tended to focus on operational issues and report on specific business activity within the microfinance industry, in general treating it as a ‘regular’ part of the financial and banking system. While the US media sample made

  2. Fire protection requirements of the insurance industry and their impact on nuclear power plant design and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The insurance industry, with its wealth of knowledge and experience in the fire protection area and with preservation of its funds at stake, has always been heavily involved in the fire protection programs of nuclear power plants. Since it was concerned with property preservation in addition to nuclear safety, the insurance industry placed more detailed emphasis on fire protection requirements than did the nuclear regulatory bodies. Since the Browns Ferry fire, however, the insurance industry, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and the utilities themselves have re-examined their approaches to fire protection. A more coordinated approach seems to have emerged, which is based largely upon insurance industry specifications and guidelines. The paper briefly summarizes the fire protection requirements of the insurance industry as they apply to nuclear power plants. Some of the ways these requirements affect project planning, plant design, and construction timing are reviewed, as well as some of the more controversial fire protection areas

  3. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  4. Investigating the Factors Associated with Job Satisfaction of Construction Workers in South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reza Hosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is twofold. Firstly, its aim is to ascertain the major aspects of job satisfaction for South Australian construction workers including the main ramifications of job satisfaction in the working environment. Secondly, it investigates the influence of key age-related factors i.e. chronological age, organisational age and length of service on major aspects of job satisfaction. The collected data for this study comprised 72 questionnaires completed by construction practitioners working at operational levels in the South Australian construction industry. Based on the responses from the target group, this study deduced that job dissatisfaction was predominantly related to the adverse impact on personal health and quality of life. In addition, indifference and the perception of dejection in the workplace are the main consequences of low levels of job satisfaction. Inferential analyses revealed that none of the age-related factors could significantly affect the major aspects of job satisfaction of construction workers in the South Australian context. The study concludes with providing practical suggestions for redesigning human resources practices for increasing the level of job satisfaction within the South Australian construction industry.Keywords: Job satisfaction, workers, age, construction industry, South Australia

  5. Study on Construction of Knowledge Management System Based on Enhancing Core Competence of Industrial Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfeng Chen; Xiangzhen Xu

    2010-01-01

    Under the background of the knowledge economy and globalization, knowledge becomes the firm's strategic resources, enhancing the core competence of industrial clusters requires knowledge management. In this paper, firstly, the connotation of the core competence of industrial clusters is analyzed. The mechanism of knowledge management affecting the core competence of industrial clusters is studied. Finally, the knowledge management system that helps to enhance the core competence of industrial...

  6. Research on Platform Construction of Manufacturing Practice for Industrial Design Specialty in Colleges

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowei Jiang; Yumei Song

    2015-01-01

    In view of that manufacturing practice is indispensable practical link of industrial design specialty, the author analyzes the current situation of manufacturing practice in industrial design specialty and the existing problem in manufacturing practice system, discussing the necessity of research on manufacturing practice for industrial design specialty. Among them establishing the manufacturing practice factory of industrial design on campus, which lets the student enter and learn various pr...

  7. [Effect of constructed wetland on the purification of industrial zone rainfall runoff contaminated with phenanthrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Dan-Dan; Wan, Jin-Quan; Ma, Yong-Wen; Li, Dong-Ya; Wang, Yan; Huang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-08-01

    According to the water characteristics of industrial rainfall runoff in the catchment of Tongsha Reservoir, Dongguan City, a subsurface-flow constructed wetland (SSFCW) was used to treat simulated rainfall and the spatial variation of removal efficiency of contaminants in the wetland bed was analyzed. The longitudinal and vertical variation of removal efficiency of COD, NH4(+) -N, TN, TP and phenanthrene were examined. Enzyme activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and nitrate reductase (NR) along the wetland bed were analyzed as well, meanwhile, four biogeochemical indexes of the wetland system, including DO, pH, ORP and water temperature, were monitored and their influences on the removal efficiency of contaminants and enzyme activity were analyzed. Results showed that DO, pH, ORP, water temperature all presented a decreasing tendency along the wetland bed, and the removal of COD, TP and phenanthrene occurred mainly in the front quarter of the wetland system; in the vertical direction, DO and ORP in the upper wetland bed were significantly higher than those in the ground floor, suggesting that the horizontal subsurface system was in an anaerobic or anoxic condition. The removal rates of COD, TP, TN, NH4(+) -N and phenanthrene were 1.17-1.36, 2.04-2.11, 1.40-1.92, 1.37-2.30, and 1.07-1.36 times higher than those at the bottom, respectively. Therefore, the vertical variation of purification efficiency was more significant than the longitudinal variation. A significant positive correlation was determined between the enzyme activity of NR and the NO3(-) -N concentration, but the longitudinal variation in the enzyme activity of NR and PPO was not obvious.

  8. The basic construction materials industry and today’s vast housing shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oteiza, I.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents some of the aspects of the major challenge facing world-wide building: humanity's daunting shortage of basic housing, monographically focusing on what this means for the basic building materials industry. These needs have created the greatest demand ever for ex-novo solutions and an exponential increase in slum rehabilitation and improvement, translated here into the need for construction materials and more specifically, cement, as the emblematic component of buildings.El trabajo aborda en forma documentada, algunos aspectos del mayor de los retos que tiene planteado a nivel cosmopolita el sector de la edificación: las ingentes necesidades de habitabilidad básica que padece la humanidad, centrándose en forma monográfica en lo que ello supone para la industria de materiales básicos de edificación. Necesidades que se traducen en la mayor demanda histórica de soluciones ex-novo y en el aumento exponencial de rehabilitación y mejora de tugurios, que los autores traducen en necesidades de materiales de construcción, y de forma más concreta, de cemento, como material emblemático de la edificación.El trabajo, mediante el análisis de casos, muestra la muy diferente repercusión que tienen los materiales sobre los presupuestos finales de lo ejecutado, según se trate del mundo desarrollado (MD o de países en vías de desarrollo (PVD. Por otra parte, estudia la incidencia general del sector 'informal' de la construcción, concluyendo que éste, en muchos países, es el consumidor mayoritario de materiales -specialmente cemento-y que a nivel mundial los PVD lo son tanto en producción como en consumo.

  9. Research study about the establishment of safety culture. Effects of organizational factors in construction industry's safety indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find the relationships between safety related activities (such as safety patrol' or '4s/5s activities') and accidents rate in the workplace, questionnaires were sent to 965 construction companies and 120 answers were returned. In this questionnaire, safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies were asked and organizational climates, company policies, philosophies and the number of accidents in workplace were also asked. There seems some relationships between accidents rate and safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies in the companies, but the deviations between estimate values and observed values are so great that it seems impossible to estimate the accidents rate in the working place from the safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies. On the other hand, some characteristics of safety activities and organizational climates in the construction industry were identified using multi variants analysis. More detailed researches using sophisticated questionnaire will be conducted in the construction industry and petrochemical industry and relationships between the accidents rate and the safety activities will be compared between different industries. (author)

  10. Spatiotemporal Changes of Built-Up Land Expansion and Carbon Emissions Caused by the Chinese Construction Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuai, Xiaowei; Huang, Xianjin; Lu, Qinli; Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Rongqin; Lu, Junyu

    2015-11-01

    China is undergoing rapid urbanization, enlarging the construction industry, greatly expanding built-up land, and generating substantial carbon emissions. We calculated both the direct and indirect carbon emissions from energy consumption (anthropogenic emissions) in the construction sector and analyzed built-up land expansion and carbon storage losses from the terrestrial ecosystem. According to our study, the total anthropogenic carbon emissions from the construction sector increased from 3,905×10(4) to 103,721.17×10(4) t from 1995 to 2010, representing 27.87%-34.31% of the total carbon emissions from energy consumption in China. Indirect carbon emissions from other industrial sectors induced by the construction sector represented approximately 97% of the total anthropogenic carbon emissions of the sector. These emissions were mainly concentrated in seven upstream industry sectors. Based on our assumptions, built-up land expansion caused 3704.84×10(4) t of carbon storage loss from vegetation between 1995 and 2010. Cropland was the main built-up land expansion type across all regions. The study shows great regional differences. Coastal regions showed dramatic built-up land expansion, greater carbon storage losses from vegetation, and greater anthropogenic carbon emissions. These regional differences were the most obvious in East China followed by Midsouth China. These regions are under pressure for strong carbon emissions reduction.

  11. People Centered Innovation: Enabling Lean Integrated Project Delivery and Disrupting the Construction Industry for a More Sustainable Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Paolillo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People-centered innovation is a paradigm shift in the construction industry. It is derived from the supposition that people not methods, schedules, or budgets deliver projects. Our data suggest that a multilevel, multidisciplinary project team through shared vision, values, and a common vernacular defines, designs, and delivers more successful projects than traditional methods. These projects meet the needs of shareholders, the community, stakeholders, and the planet. We employ the concepts of emotional intelligence and agency theory to explain an integrated project delivery (IPD construction project using lean tactics that not only delivered, but also exceeded expectations resulting in a six-month schedule acceleration and $60M savings over the original estimated cost of the project calculated assuming traditional project delivery methods. The safety rating for this project was 50% better than the national average and the expected improvement in operating margin for the new building is 33% greater. This paper introduces the notion of people-centered innovation to an industry that has struggled to adapt and show positive results over recent decades. Our case study describes the significance of people-centered innovation in construction project delivery. We discuss the implications for the construction industry going forward.

  12. 14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

  13. "A deep fragrance of academia": the Australian Tobacco Research Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S; Carter, S.; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To review the history of the tobacco industry supported Australian Tobacco Research Foundation (ATRF)(1970–1994) for evidence of the industry's use of the Foundation to further its objectives that "more research was needed" on smoking and health and to promulgate the view that nicotine was not addictive. (2) To review efforts by public health advocates to discredit the ATRF as a public relations tool used by the Australian industry.

  14. A proposal for improving sustainability practice through the implementations of reuse and recycle technique in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Wan Nadzri; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Saad, Rohaizah; Anuar, Herman Shah; Ibrahim, Siti Halipah

    2016-08-01

    Construction and demolition waste is often seen as the major contributor to the solid waste stream that is going to landfill, hence, making it the area of focus for improvement. In the construction industry, reuse and recycle principles have been promoted in order to reduce waste and protect the environment. Construction and demolition waste including demolished concrete, bricks and masonry, wood and other materials such as dry wall, glass, insulation, roofing, wire, pipe, rock and soil constitute a significant component of the total waste. Without proper reuse and recycle policies, these construction and demolition wastes would quickly fill all the remaining landfill space, which has already been growing in scarce around this region. Based on the feedback received, on average, a third of respondents said they currently have a lotto benefit from the use of reduce and reuse. In addition, they also agreed that the existing policies help and support the min carrying out the reduce and reuse practices. Respondents also agreed that other stakeholders in the construction industry currently have an excellent awareness in term of implementation of the reduce and reuse in their practices.

  15. Educational and Institutional Flexibility of Australian Educational Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurville, Simon; O'Grady, Thomas; Mayall, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide context for papers in this special issue on Australasian e-learning. The paper aims to examine the background to Australian flexible and transnational education and to evaluate the educational and intuitional flexibility of three typical products of the Australian educational software industry.…

  16. Factors Promoting Innovation and Efficiency in the Construction Industry: A Comparative Study of New Zealand and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Chancellor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous concerns about the lack of productivity improvement in the New Zealand construction industry.  The aim of this paper, therefore, is to determine the main drivers of productivity in the industry. The research used is a two-staged data envelopment analysis approach to achieve the aim. In terms of improvements to the productivity of construction in New Zealand, the study found that although there is a potential for gains through the greater use of research and development, apprentice training and degree education, as well as the consolidation of some building companies, there will be some limits to the gains that might be made. One main implication of the findings of the study, therefore, is that a renewed focus on education and skills training should be a priority of companies and policy makers in New Zealand.

  17. The construction industry in China: its image, employment prospects and skill requirements subtitle

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, You-Jie; Fox, P. W

    2001-01-01

    Documents recent changes in the organization and regulation of the construction sector in China. Analyses the impact of these changes upon the construction labour force, the terms and conditions of employment, health and safety, training and the acquisition of skills. Conclude that in China (as elsewhere in the world today) construction employment is going through a period of transition, from the ‘Iron Rice Bowl’ and ‘Fixed Workers’ towards flexible, short term contracts and labour-only contr...

  18. Material waste in the China construction industry: Minimization strategies and benefits of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Sulala M.Z.F. Al-Hamadani, ZENG Xiao-lan, M.M.Mian, Zhongchuang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Waste minimization strategies and the relative importance of benefits of material waste recognition were examined using a survey of construction companies operating in Chongqing city China. The results showed that a remarkable proportion of respondent companies have specific policies for minimizing construction waste. Amongst the strategies, minimizing waste at source of origin is practiced to a large degree by construction companies with specific waste minimization strategies. However, consi...

  19. Local exhaust ventilation for the control of welding fumes in the construction industry--a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2012-08-01

    Arc welding is a common unit operation in the construction industry, where frequent changes in location and welding position make it more difficult to control fume exposures than in industries where fixed locations are the norm. Welders may be exposed to a variety of toxic airborne contaminants including manganese (Mn) and hexavalent chromium (CrVI). Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is a well-known engineering control for welding fumes but has not been adopted widely in the construction industry. This literature review presents data on the performance of a variety of LEV systems for welding fume control from the construction (five references), shipyard (five references), and other industries. The studies indicate that LEV can reduce fume exposures to total particulate, Mn, and CrVI to levels below currently relevant standards. Field studies suggest that 40-50% or more reduction in exposure is possible with portable or fixed LEV systems relative to natural ventilation but that correct positioning of the hood and adequate exhaust flow rates are essential. Successful implementation of extraction guns for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux core arc welding has been demonstrated, indicating that a successful balance between extraction airflow and shielding gas requirements is possible. Work practices are an important part of achieving successful control of fume exposures; in particular, positioning the hood close to the arc, checking exhaust flow rates, and avoiding the plume. Further research is needed on hood size effects for controlling welding fume with portable LEV systems and identifying and overcoming barriers to LEV use in construction.

  20. BIM技术推动建筑行业变革%BIM technology promote the construction of industry transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勤

    2011-01-01

    BIM未来建筑行业的发展方向,透过BIM看建筑的全生命周期,BIM将在建筑的全生命周期管理中不断体现其价值。%BIM that the future direction of development of the construction industry,leaving the building through the whole life cycle of the watch in architecture,leaving the whole life cycle of management continuously reflects its value.

  1. Product modeling standards for the building and construction industry : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolman, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    For the past ten years most sectors of industry have been developing standards for the electronic sharing and exchange of product model data. While several related industries, such as automotive and shipbuilding manufacturing have been relatively successful in integrating electronic product models i

  2. Look-ahead strategies for controlling batch operations in industry : basic insights in rule construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, D.J.; Sullivan, W.A.; Ahmad, M.M.; Fichtner, D.; Sauer, W.; Weigert, G.; Zerna, T.

    2002-01-01

    Batching jobs in a manufacturing system is a very common policy in most industries. Main reasons for batching are avoidance of set ups and/or facilitation of material handling. Examples of batch-wise production systems are ovens found in aircraft industry and in semiconductor manufacturing. Starting

  3. A CONCEPTUAL DISASTER RISK REDUCTION FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY HAZARDS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S. GOHARDANI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The health and safety hazard status of construction workers is constantly challenged by the projects in the built environment. In this article, various aspects of health and safety hazards for construction workers have been reviewed and investigated through a disaster risk reduction prism. This approach has further led to the perception of glancing at the construction sector as an ongoing disaster zone and equally provides a new management perspective. From this perspective, the occurrence of a disaster within the construction sector corresponds to the temporary or permanent ill-health or death of a construction worker. Geographical location is one of the factors that play an important role in addressing the health and safety hazards for construction workers. In addition to the location, geographical considerations equally encapsulate regional, cultural, governmental and work ethical effects. These effects may potentially contribute to disparities in the construction sector. With an increasing level of understanding for health and safety hazards in the construction domain, more efficient prevention measures can be taken in order to enable a disaster management cycle, capable of responding to the rigorous demands of the construction sector.

  4. Creation of Polyurethane Injection Materials, Their Pilot-industrial Production, Development and Industrial Introduction of the Technology of Strengthening and Restoring the Operability of Damaged Constructions and Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marukha, V.І.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane and foam polyurethane fluid injection materials not conceding foreign analogues and technology technology of restoration and strengthening the operability of concrete and reinforced concrete structures and buildings damaged by cracks were developed. Normative and technical documentation on the injection materials and technological processes was created. The diagnosticrestoring complex for implementing the above technologies was designed, installed and utilized at the construction sites. The equipment is designed and manufactured; the technology of the research and industrial production of «A» and «B» components of injecting polyurethane materials is designed and developed. The pilot-scale batch is manufactured. Technological processes of preparation and application of the «A» and «B» componentsof the injecting materials in industrial conditions are worked out and implemented.

  5. Skilled labour supply in the South African construction industry: The nexus between certification, quality of work output and shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola O. Windapo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Construction human resource management.Research purpose: The study examines the skilled labour supply in the South African construction industry and determines whether there is a relationship between trade certification, quality of work output and scarce labour skills.Motivation for the study: The rationale for the investigation is based on the view of scholars that a skilled labour shortage is preponderant in the South African construction industry even though there is a high level of youth unemployment in South Africa and that the perceived skills shortage contributes to a decrease in productivity and product quality.Research design, approach and method: The paper reviews relevant literature and employs a mixed method research approach in collecting empirical data from contracting companies within the Western Cape Province of South Africa that are listed on the Construction Industry Development Board contractor register.Main findings: The study demonstrated that there is no shortage of manpower, but there is a shortage of qualified or skilled tradesmen, such as electricians, plumbers, welders, fitters and carpenters, whose professions are more technical and require formal training and certification. The level of supply of skilled tradesmen is attributed to the lack of high-quality basic education, the state of the economy, compulsory certification of tradesmen and an ageing workforce. It was also found that there is a significant relationship between skilled labour shortages and the requirement that labour be certified and that work output is unsatisfactory when there is no certification requirement.Practical/managerial implications: Based on these findings, the study concludes that skilled labour shortages and poor work output quality continue to be experienced in the South African construction industry when workers are unable to obtain formal certification for informal work experience acquired through years of practice on

  6. The analysis of injured and poisoned patients during the construction of urbanization and industrialization from 1998 to 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei-qun; TU Chang-di; LIANG Shu-hui; ZHONG Xiao-ni; MAI Gui-shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causes of injury and poisoning during construction of urbanization and industrialization and to explore proper measures.Methods: The data of the patients with injury and poisoning during construction of urbanization and industrialization treated in out hospital from 1998 to 2002 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The number of discharged patients of injury and poisoning accounted for 29.2% of the total number (49 800) of discharged patients in the corresponding period in our hospital, which was greater than that of other city and county hospitals, and accounted for 94.3% of the total number (15 411) of discharged patients of the Surgery Department in the corresponding period in our hospital. Injuries caused by motor vehicle traffic accidents, cutting and piercing instruments or objects, homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons and accidental falls held 78.9%. The number of the inpatients in 2002 increased by 83.3% compared with that of 1998, the number of injured and poisoned inpatients increased by 76.1% and these patients aged mainly at age of 15-39 years, holding 80.1%. In a year, the peak period of trauma patients was in summer because of hot weather; the fewest in February for the floating people went home for Spring Festival holidays.Conclusions: During construction of rural urbanization and industrialization, injuries and poisoning increase evidently and are the main tasks of surgical management. So to raise its treatment level and therapeutic effect is a key point.

  7. 澳大利亚国际教育产业化实践经验剖析%Analysis of the Practical Experience of Australian International Education Industrialization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱萍; 熊峰

    2015-01-01

    澳大利亚其高质量的教育水平、严格的教学质量保障、政府的政策支持、潜在的就业机会等因素受到国际学生的欢迎.本文剖析了澳大利亚国际教育的现状、发展历程、教育政策和实践经验,以期对我国发展国际教育带来启示.%With high education quality, strict teaching quality assurance, government policies support and potential employ-ment opportunities, Australia attracts more and more international students. Through the analysis of the key facts, development history, education policies and practice experience of Australian international education, the article tries to bring enlightenment to China's international education.

  8. Marketing theories and concepts for the international construction industry: a study of their applicability at the global, national and corporate perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Pheng, L. S.

    1990-01-01

    The role and applicability of marketing theories and concepts are explored at three levels of analysis for the international construction industry. Developments of the theoretical constructs are traced as marketing evolves to encompass an international perspective. The relevance and need for marketing in the construction industry was examined. Four schools of thought were identified before the strategic significance of marketing in the market place was reviewed and argued. The ...

  9. Sustainable material selection for construction industry - A hybrid multi criteria decision making approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Shankar, Madan; Kannan, Devika

    2016-01-01

    a hybrid multi criteria decision making (MCDM) methodology with a specific examination of the UAE. The indicators collected from existing literatures were used in evaluation of sustainable construction materials with the assistance of construction sector-based respondents. The proposed framework...

  10. Benchmarking effective service delivery drivers in the South African civil construction industry / by Ernest Venter

    OpenAIRE

    Venter, Ernest Nordin

    2010-01-01

    Identifying and prioritising effective service delivery drivers' in selected civil construction companies are more than merely satisfying customers' need. By successfully identifying and prioritising effective service delivery drivers within the selected civil construction companies, the companies will be able to achieve competitive advantage above their competitors. This study, by using a questionnaire as a measurement instrument, established that a gap currently exist betw...

  11. Design and construction of the first Iranian powerful industrial electron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Poursaleh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In This paper we will introduce the process of design and manufacturing an electron accelerator with 10MeV energy and 100kW power as the first Iranian powerful industrial electron accelerator. This accelerator designed based on modeling of one of the most powerful industrial accelerator called Rhodotron. But the design of the accelerator in a way that can be localize by relying on domestic industries. So although it looks like a Rhodotron accelerator structure but has some different in design and manufacture of components, the results are satisfactory

  12. Enhancing Environmental Performance by Green Procurement : A study of environmental procurement preferences in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Varnäs, Annika

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the general awareness of the environmental impacts that industrial production gives rise to has radically increased throughout the world. Finding ways to minimise these impacts has become a major concern of the authorities in many countries. In order to promote a more sustainable industrial production, different incentives can be used. Among these incentives, the consideration of environmental issues in public procurement is increasingly being emphasised. While much attention...

  13. Assessment of The Biological Integrity of The Native Vegetative Community In A Surface Flow Constructed Wetland Treating Industrial Park Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Galbrand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the biological integrity of a constructed wetland receiving landfill leachate and stormwater runoff from the Burnside Industrial Park, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The biological integrity of the constructed wetland was tested in the second growing season using vegetative community monitoring. The metrics analyzed were species diversity, species heterogeneity (dominance and exotic/invasive species abundance. There was no significant difference in the plant species diversity between the constructed wetland and the reference site. However, the constructed wetland supported a higher plant species richness than the reference site. The top three species in the constructed wetland were tweedy’s rush (Juncus brevicaudatus, soft rush (Juncus effusus and fowl mannagrass (Glyceria striata. In total, these three species occupied 46.4% of the sampled population. The top three species in the reference site were soft rush (Juncus effusus, sweetgale (Myrica gale and woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus. In total, these three species occupied a more reasonable 32.6% of the sampled population. The reference site supported greater biological integrity as it had greater heterogeneity and a smaller abundance of exotic and invasive species compared to the constructed wetland (3.8% versus 10.7%. Although poor heterogeneity and the presence of weedy, exotic species can be a sign of degraded biological health and future problems, these are also common indicators of a system simply undergoing early succession. As the constructed wetland matures, its plant biodiversity may actually decrease, but its integrity, as measured by exotic and invasive species abundance as well as heterogeneity, is expected to increase, so long as invasive species present in the constructed wetland remain controlled through weeding during the first few growing seasons.

  14. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO2, NOx, CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, NH3, Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  15. Distributed Virtual Workspace for Enhancing Communication within the Construction Industry - DIVERCITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarshar, M.; Christiansson, Per Lennart; Svidt, Kjeld

    should read this? This handbook has been written specifically for construction project leaders and business managers. What can DIVERCITY achieve? n Improved communications with the client; n Design of better facilities; n Improved collaboration and communication across the supply chain....

  16. Identifying the most critical project complexity factors using Delphi method: the Iranian construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Mozaffari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Complexity is one of the most important issues influencing success of any construction project and there are literally different studies devoted to detect important factors increasing complexity of projects. During the past few years, there have been growing interests in developing mass construction projects in Iran. The proposed study of this paper uses Delphi technique to find out about important factors as barriers of construction projects in Iran. The results show that among 47 project complexity factors, 19 factors are more important than others are. The study groups different factors into seven categories including environmental, organizational, objectives, tasks, stakeholders, technological, information systems and determines the relative importance of each. In each group, many other sub group activities are determined and they are carefully investigated. The study provides some detailed suggestions on each category to reduce the complexity of construction project.

  17. Exploring the beliefs of Australian prefabricated house builders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale A Steinhardt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The housing sector accounts for a majority of newly constructed buildings. Prefabrication, defined as the factory construction of houses or significant components, is widely promoted as a means to improve efficiency. This paper focuses on the research questions: RQ1. What are the attitudes of builders towards prefabrication adoption? RQ2. What types of stakeholders do builders believe influence their adoption decisions? RQ3. What types of contextual influences do builders believe impact their adoption decisions? Current prefabrication research has focused on the advantages and disadvantages of prefabrication, without further unpacking the beliefs of stakeholders that underpin them. This paper addresses this gap and increases the understanding of beliefs that can frame interventions to increase the market penetration of prefabrication. Fourteen interviews with Australian prefabricators were undertaken as a Belief Elicitation Study. This qualitative methodology is framed by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM. Results show that modern high-quality prefabricated housing has struggled to overcome historical stigma; improved construction speed has not and is not likely to translate to reduced totals costs for a majority of firms; and prefabrication adoption has been hindered by an almost completely unsupportive industry infrastructure. Recommendations are made to frame arguments in improving short-term outcomes for an industry driven by practical considerations. Future discourse must focus on cost impacts, financial security and risk reduction. Establishing networks of prefabricators that can build a strong, unified voice for the industry should be prioritised.

  18. From the Boom to the Collapse: a Technical Efficiency Analysis of the Spanish Construction Industry during the Financial Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xosé Luís Fernández-López

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its contribution to the Spanish economy, as far as the authors are aware, the technical efficiency of the Spanish construction industry has neither been measured nor have the factors influencing it been analyzed. This paper measures the technical efficiency of the Spanish construction sector before and during the current financial crisis and investigates the degree to which factors influencing efficiency levels in this sector have changed. Stochastic frontier analysis (SFA methods are applied to firm-level data (692 constructions firms over the period 1996-2011. The results show that the average Technical Efficiency of the sector is 0.85. Results also indicate that variables affecting Technical Efficiency in the construction sector must be analyzed depending on real state cycle. Based on the findings, policy recommendations to improve the sector efficiency were developed. Important factors affecting efficiency change have been identified, and some managerial recommendations to increase the sector efficiency have been developed. The main recommendations for construction companies include: (1 cooperation and company mergers have a positive impact on companies’ efficiency; (2 accumulation of excessive financial burden damages the business long-term stability; and (3 business strategy should be tailored to economic prospects. Paper Type: Viewpoint

  19. ROLE OF LAW IN CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL SCALE INDUSTRIES THROUGH NORMATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sutrisno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of law has become an absolute prerequisite that must exist in the dynamics of civil society. It is to achieve justice, certainty, and expediency, so the works of it will not be separated from such a noble mission. On the other side, the law is likely inseparable from the fields of meta-juridical, including economics. The expectations of the interference of law into economy, makes the existence of justice for the business players can be realized through the enacted product legislation. Regulations concerning investments and partnerships have the intent to build self-reliance and empowerment for small industry players so as to compete in the era of economic globalization. Laws employed as the instrument of social change to strengthen the capitalization of small industry and business empowerment through the training and development of small industries, as normatively mandated by law.

  20. Beyond knowledge transfer: The social construction of autonomous academic science in university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Dina Louise

    Autonomy is a social product. Although some might view autonomy as the absence of social interference in individual action, it is in fact produced through social institutions. It enables social actors to act; it is the justification for the allocation of enormous public resources into institutions classified as "public" or "nonprofit;" it can lead to innovation; and, significantly, it is key to the public acceptance of new technologies. In this dissertation, I analyze the social construction of autonomy for academic science in U.S. university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations. University-industry relationships (UIRs) are a site of concern about the influence of commercial interests on academic science. Agricultural biotechnology is a contentious technology that has prompted questions about the ecological and public health implications of genetically-modified plants and animals. It has also spurred awareness of the industrialization of agriculture and accelerating corporate control of the global food system. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with over 200 scientists and administrators from nine U.S. research universities and thirty agricultural biotechnology companies, I find that both the academy and industry have a vested interest in the social construction of the academy as an autonomous space from which claims to objective, disinterested scientific knowledge can be made. These claims influence government regulation, as well as grower and public acceptance of agricultural biotechnology products. I argue that the social production of autonomy for academic science can be observed in narratives and practices related to: (1) the framing of when, how and why academic scientists collaborate with industry, (2) the meanings ascribed to and the uses deemed appropriate for industry monies in academic research, and (3) the dissemination of research results into the public domain through publications and patents. These narratives and practices

  1. Establishment and Evaluation of the Vegetative Community in A Surface Flow Constructed Wetland Treating Industrial Park Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Galbrand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A surface flow constructed wetland, designed to curve in a kidney shape in order to increase the length to width ratio to 5:1 was used to treat runoff from an industrial park. A natural wetland system located approximately 200 m downstream of the constructed wetland was selected to act as the vegetative community model for the constructed wetland. The selected model was a riparian, open water marsh dominated by emergent macrophytes. Baseline plant species surveying was conducted. In total, 21 emergent wetland plant species, 40 upland vascular plant species, 17 upland shrub species and 13 upland tree species were identified in the model site. The species from the model site were screened for suitability in the constructed wetland based on the following criteria: (a phytoremediation potential (especially metal uptake, (b sedimentation and erosion control, (c habitat function, (d public deterrent potential and (e rate of plant establishment, tolerances and maintenance requirements. Transplantation was chosen as the main vegetation establishment methodology in the constructed wetland. The species woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus and soft rush (Juncus effusus were chosen to dominate the interior berms and littoral edges of the constructed wetland cells. The buffer areas were dominated by meadowsweet (Spiraea alba var. latifolia and the open water areas were dominated by cowlily (Nuphar variegate and pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata species. A diverse, self-sustaining vegetative community was successfully established in the constructed wetland. The transplant success was gauged by mortality census in the spring of 2003. Over all, 138 dead transplants were observed, many of which had died as a direct result of washout. These computes to an overall site establish success rate of about 87.3%. The species, which suffered the highest mortality rates, were the pickerelweed, with approximately 50 dead plants, the meadowsweet with 32 observed dead plants and

  2. The Construction of Intensive and Organized Agricultural Industrialization Model with Farmers as the Main Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The current agricultural conflicts of China are analyzed and the forms and drawbacks of current agricultural industrial structure are listed.The situations for intensifying the farmland with appropriate scale are analyzed from the aspects of policy,farmers,farms and modernization of agriculture.It is pointed out that the situations for the intensive use of land are becoming mature.Taking the single pig-breeding chain as an example,the agricultural industrialization model,which takes farmers as the main body,is expounded.Besides,its functions and significance in solving "the three agriculture problems" and facilitating the modernization of agriculture are discussed.

  3. Global Production Sharing in the Australian Automotive Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Kishor Sharma

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on global production sharing by investigating the experience of the Australian automotive industry, which has experienced significant structural change following trade liberalisation. Our analysis indicates that the globalisation of the world economy, together with developments in transport and communication, has significantly increased the importance of the global production network in the Australian automotive industry, leading to a substantial rise ...

  4. Discussion on Fluorine Chemical Industry 4.0 Construction%氟化工的工业4.0之路浅议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王水耀; 方国洪

    2015-01-01

    The basic meaning and essence of industry 4.0 were introduced. Characteristics of fluorine chemical industry and informationization construction of enterprises was analyzed. The industry 4.0 for fluo-rine chemical industry construction was discussed.%介绍了工业4.0的基本内涵和实质,剖析了氟化工企业的行业特点和信息化建设水平,论述了适合氟化工行业发展的工业4.0建设思路。

  5. 氟化工的工业4.0之路浅议%Discussion on Fluorine Chemical Industry 4.0 Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王水耀; 方国洪

    2015-01-01

    The basic meaning and essence of industry 4.0 were introduced. Characteristics of fluorine chemical industry and informationization construction of enterprises was analyzed. The industry 4.0 for fluo-rine chemical industry construction was discussed.%介绍了工业4.0的基本内涵和实质,剖析了氟化工企业的行业特点和信息化建设水平,论述了适合氟化工行业发展的工业4.0建设思路。

  6. Demands of Training: Australian Tourism and Hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Brett

    Qualitative research was conducted as part of a four-industry project studying operation of training markets, one of which was Australian tourism and hospitality (T&H). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 individuals representing stakeholder groups. Interviews were conducted across Queensland, Victoria, and South Australia and…

  7. Work injury trends during the last three decades in the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to analyze injury trends according to age, severity, work activity and business cycle in the construction sector. Methods: From 1980 to 2010 a total of 23.464 work related injuries were treated at the emergency department at Odense University Hospital. The annual incidences...... were calculated. Employment levels in the construction sector were used as an indicator of fluctuations in the business cycle since 1980. Results: Through the last three decades the overall trend of work-related injuries was unchanged. For some subgroups of injuries, such as major injuries and injuries....... Conclusion: Overall the number of injuries in the construction sector have not changed significantly during the recent three decades, except for minor subgroups related to 'major injuries' and 'injuries due to use of small power tools'. Re-evaluation of safety prevention programs is needed in order to break...

  8. The Perception of Women Engineers in the Construction Industry in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enshassi, A.; Ihsen, S.; Al Hallaq, K.

    2008-01-01

    The industrial and occupational distribution of women is such that women are concentrated predominately in a few occupations, mostly in the service sector, such as banking, finance, insurance, public administration, hotel, and catering. Men and women are equal in their capabilities in almost every respect, provided that women are given the same…

  9. Competency Documentation Desired by Employers in Banks and Residential Construction Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Don; Chester, James

    A study was conducted to determine the type of documentation of students' skills desired by employers in the banking and residential carpentry industries. Data were collected by interviews with employers of random samples of banking institutions (thirty-one) and residential carpentry firms (thirty-five) in Oklahoma. Results of the study led to the…

  10. Hualu Aluminum Will Construct Large Coal-Power-Aluminum Aluminum Processing Industrial Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reporter learned from relevant departments of Baiyin City that in order to further push forward industrial upgrading,fulfill expansion and consolidation of the enterprise,Gansu Hualu Aluminum Co.,Ltd(Hualu Aluminum)will implement Out-Of-City-Into-Park project,

  11. Improving supply chain management in construction: what can be learned from the aerospace industry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordijk, H.; Vrijhoef, R.; Greenwood, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    In order to provide for controllable delivery, reliable lead times and efficient customer response, lean manufacturing and platform assembly practices play an important role in supply chains in the aerospace industry. The adoption of lean manufacturing practices ensures an efficient delivery of prod

  12. The Overlap between Emotional Intelligence and Post-Industrial Leadership Capacity: A Construct Validity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, David M.; Joseph, Dana L.; Newman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 276 students enrolled in campus leadership programs completed the Emotional Competence Inventory-University Edition (ECI-U) and the Socially Responsible Leadership Scale (SRLS) as a means to determine the relatedness in college students of emotional intelligence (EI) to the practice of post-industrial leadership skills. Confirmatory…

  13. CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIALIZATION AND GREEN MODULE BUILDING%建筑工业化及绿色模块建筑

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敖宜; 张肇毅; 王卉; 杨志艳; 张嘉骐

    2014-01-01

    The paper explained industrialization of residential buildings and some problems , and also analysed the industrialized , assembled and the the seismic performance characteristics etc , of modularization buildings and it was pointed out that modular buildings could be used as one of important strategic measures to improve technical level of construction in China .%阐述当前住宅建设产业化现状和存在的若干问题,分析模块化建筑在工业化、装配化以及抗震性能等方面的特点,提出了模块化建筑可作为提高我国建筑技术水平的重要战略措施之一。

  14. Construction of First GSP Gasification Unit Was Kicked off at Shenhua Ningxia Coal Industry (Group)Co.,Ltd.in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The construction of the core unit for the coal-based olefin project-the GSP gasification unit,the investment in which totals 20 billion RMB,has been kicked off at Shenhua Ningxia Coal Industry (Group) Co.,Ltd.,in Ningxia,China.It is told that this is the first gasification unit that adopts the GSP gasification technology in China.The GSP gasification unit adopts the Siemens technology,the basic design of which is implemented by the Uhde Engineering Company and the detailed design and procurement service of which will be performed by the No.2 Design Institute of Chemical Industry under the China National Chemical Engineering Group Corporation.

  15. Process and building information modelling in the construction industry by using information delivery manuals and model view definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlshøj, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is gradually increasing its use of structured information and building information modelling.To date, the industry has suffered from the disadvantages of a project-based organizational structure and ad hoc solutions. Furthermore, it is not used to formalizing the flow...... of information and specifying exactly which objects and properties are needed for each process and which information is produced by the processes. The present study is based on reviewing the existing methodology of Information Delivery Manuals (IDM) from Buildingsmart, which also is also an ISO standard 29481...... Part 1; and the Model View Definition (MVD) methodology developed by Buildingsmart and BLIS. The research also includes a review of concrete IDM development projects that have been developed over the last five years. Although the study has identified interest in the IDM methodology in a number...

  16. Comparisons of VET Systems and Collective Agreements for the Labour Rights in the Construction Industry:The Netherlands and Turkey/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedef Özçelik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Working’ is regarded as a humanitarian effort; requiring respect due to ‘labour is not a commodity’ principle. Organizations such as ILO have been established to set standards for labour. Despite there are different applications, the system consists of employee unions and employer associations and social partners in Europe. The EU monitors member states where applications differ due to economic, politic and industrial backgrounds. In the industrial relations, VET Systems are crucial. Learning is stil either craft or training-based linked to employment policies, cultures and economic profiles. The construction industry urges for collective agreements due to its labour nature; since the industry demands for variety of professions within organizational chains. The mobility requiring security, temporary building process coping with deadlines, climate, dangerous labour in addition to specific demands for particular skills and unique production chains require special regulations. Therefore, bargaining leads to labour rights and workers’ training to achieve more qualified products or safety reasons; as well as a tool to increase economical activity and revise industry’s image. The Netherlands and Turkey are compared to analyse industry’s prosperity in EU.

  17. Material waste in the China construction industry: Minimization strategies and benefits of recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulala M.Z.F. Al-Hamadani, ZENG Xiao-lan, M.M.Mian, Zhongchuang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste minimization strategies and the relative importance of benefits of material waste recognition were examined using a survey of construction companies operating in Chongqing city China. The results showed that a remarkable proportion of respondent companies have specific policies for minimizing construction waste. Amongst the strategies, minimizing waste at source of origin is practiced to a large degree by construction companies with specific waste minimization strategies. However, considerable quantities of construction waste are generated. These quantities need to be reused or recycled or combination of them. The study also revealed that recycling is not highly practiced because it needs a lot of capital and an area, except for those high scrap value recycling materials like steel, whereas other non-profitable will be sent to C-and-D landfills directly. Respondents’ perceptions towards the benefits of material waste recognition revealed that materials waste is primarily considered an environmental and financial problem and its minimization a cost cutting activity and protection of the environment. In contrast, the contractual benefits were considered less important by surveyed companies.

  18. Actual challenges and solutions for Project Management in the Green industrial Construction

    OpenAIRE

    PALAGIN V.S.

    2014-01-01

    Process model of Project Management is inefficient without well tuned Quality Management System and developed competences of the project team. The development of Green Construction function should be done on the base of integration of methodologies under approach of Eurasian Project Management Standard in cooperation with others components of Corporative Project Management System.

  19. The relationship between macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators and workrelated injuries among Danish construction workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Lander, F.; Lauritsen, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study examines and compares the relationship between both macroeconomic and industry-specific business cycle indicators, and work-related injuries among construction workers in Denmark using emergency department (ED) injury data and also officially reported injuries...... to the Danish Working Environment Authority (WEA). Methods The correlations between ED and WEA injury data from the catchment area of Odense University Hospital during the period 1984–2010 were tested separately for variability and trend with two general macroeconomic indicators (gross domestic product...

  20. Industrialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses the role-plays by nuclear technology to enhance productivity in industry. Some of the techniques, Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) - x, gamma, electron and neutron radiography, nuclear gauges, materials characterization are discussed thoroughly

  1. Succession Planning in Australian Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hicks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this paper is that succession planning in Australian farming is under-developed.It may be linked to economic and social change which suggests that farmers need to adapt togenerational change but this is being resisted or ignored. The implications of this are the slowdecline of family farming, a poor transfer of skills and knowledge to subsequent generationsof farmers in some parts of the agricultural sector and the potential for an extension of thefinancial services industry to develop a more effective raft of succession planning measuresto mitigate the effects of a traditional approach to succession in agriculture.

  2. INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH «DEVELOPMENT OF RUSSIAN MARKET OF NANOTECHNOLOGICAL PRODUCTS IN CONSTRUCTION UNTIL 2020». PART 2. ANALYSIS OF THE WORLD MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    GUSEV Boris Vladimirovich; FALIKMAN Vyacheslav Ruvimovich; Steffen LEISTNER; Benny YOSHPA; PETUSHKOV Alexander Vladimirovich

    2013-01-01

    Some results of the industrial research «Development of Russian market of nanotechnological products in construction until 2020» have been published. Authors invite all interested specialists and specialized organization to take part in the broad public discussion.

  3. Corporate responsibility in the UK construction industry: a study of activities and reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, James Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Responsibility (CR) defines the process of self-regulation, whereby an organisation seeks to measure and improve its performance related to the social, environmental and economic expectations placed upon it by society. In the past two decades the prominence, and therefore uptake of CR activities and reporting has increased across many sectors. The pace of this change has varied significantly, with many industries quickly becoming aware of its importance and integrating it into t...

  4. Construction and Analysis on the Source Model of Competitive Advantage of Ningxia Wolfberry Industrial Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, E.

    2009-01-01

    Related literatures about the source of cluster competitive advantage are reviewed. A total of six sourcing factors of cluster competitive advantages are summarized, which are the external scale economy and scope economy, the regional resources, the government function, the reduction of transaction cost, the effect of learning and innovation, and the coordination mechanism of cluster. Development status of wolfberry industrial cluster in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region of China is studied by us...

  5. LINKING PERSONAL COMPETENCIES WITH TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE EVIDENCE FROM THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedsuda Limsila

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the linkage between personal competencies and leadership behaviours as well as their influences on leadership outcomes and subordinates’ work performance. Personal competencies were measured using the Project Manager Competency Development (PMCD tool. Leadership behaviours and outcomes were measured using Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ. Data was collected from construction projects in Thailand. Findings revealed that leadership outcomes have significant positive relationship with all personal competencies specified in the PMCD framework, every factor in the transformational style and contingent reward factor in the transactional style. Transformational leaders tend to produce high work quality, work quantity, and problem solving creativity from subordinates. Findings further verified that all PMCD personal competencies have significant positive relationship with every factor in the transformational style. It implies that project managers who apply the transformational style and/or have high personal competencies indicated in PMCD framework are likely to generate greater leadership outcomes and work performance on construction projects.

  6. Industrial fuel gas demonstration plant program. Construction permit. Compliance plan. (Deliverable No. 31)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this compliance plan is to insure that all required permits are filed and obtained prior to the start of construction of the U-gas demonstration plant. This plan addresses the permits in the following areas: construction, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, federal aviation lighting, and as-required permits. Each permit area is introduced by a brief summary of the permits required and the significant circumstances and/or conditions affecting permit acquisition. Each permit is then discussed in detail according to a format which includes the following: brief introduction of permit, responsible regulator agency, other potential reviewing agency(s), information needed for permit, filing procedures, normal review period, permit duration period, and permit fees. Copies of the actual application forms, guidelines for completing the applications, statements on required information and agency contacts are contained in the Appendices.

  7. Sustainability in the Brazilian Heavy Construction Industry: An Analysis of Organizational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas; Fernando Neves Pereira; Luis Roberto Arruda; Valdir de Jesus Lameira

    2013-01-01

    This study performs a comparison between the theoretical frameworks of sustainable development and its incorporation in the decision-making practices and models used by heavy construction companies. This study was conducted by using documentary analysis of corporate sustainability reports. Specifically, the content analysis method was used to examine the sustainability reports disclosed by the companies studied. The results indicate four main conclusions: first, the social, political and econ...

  8. Commercial management: An investigation into the role of the commercial manager within the UK construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, David; Fenn, Peter; Roberts, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    In 1989 a consortium of the UK's leading construction companies invited selected universities to submit proposals for a new degree programme in Quantity Surveying to prepare graduates for the wider aspects of their commercial activities. The Department of Building Engineering at UMIST was chosen to develop the first programme, to be called Commercial Management and Quantity Surveying (CM&QS). Ashworth (1994) has indicated that it is essential for programme designers to identify what studen...

  9. FINANCIAL AUDIT AND BENCHMARKING IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY - A STEP TOWARDS PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    GRIGORE MARIAN

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on and application of the legislation and professional reasoning in a professional manner related to control and situation in the field, of the control methods and procedures, is one of the essential premises that ensures efficiency and finality in the activity of patrimony control of an entity in the constructions field. A financial audit, which aims at an integrated control, provides conclusions on the entire activity. It fully characterizes the efforts and the results and it can ...

  10. Application of Project Time Management Tools and Techniques to the Construction Industry in the Gaza Strip

    OpenAIRE

    Nabil Sawalhi; Adnan Enshassi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the level of applying theproject time management tools and techniques by public ownersand construction contractors in the Gaza Strip. This study hasbeen conducted by means of a survey questionnaire. Seventythreequestionnaires were distributed to target constructioncontractors and twenty-five questionnaires to public owners. Sixtycompleted questionnaires from contractors and twenty-threequestionnaires from public owners were received and analysed.T...

  11. Phytoremediation of industrial effluent containing azo dye by model up-flow constructed wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.A.Ong; K.Uchiyama; D.Inadama; Y.Ishida; K.Yamagiwa

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the treatment of azo dye Acid Orange 7(AO7)containing wastewater by laboratory-scale up-flow constructed wetland(UFCW)with and without supplementary aeration.The supplementary aeration could effectively control the ratio of anaerobic and aerobic zones in the UFCW reactor.The results dearly show the supplementary aeration boosted the biodegradation of organic pollutants and mineralization of intermediate aromatic amines formed by AO7 degradation.

  12. Problems related to design and construction of industrial radiography exposure room - an experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), especially in radiography method, inspections of components are executed either on-site or in-house. For in-house inspections, work must be performed in a specially constructed exposure room. The design of the exposure room must be according to specific requirements described in various documents related to radiation safety. Stringent requirements specified for the exposure room is for the purpose of ensuring the safety of public and radiation workers. These requirements are never compromised. One of the AELB requirements that need to be complied is that the permissible dose limit anywhere outside the room must be less than 0.25 mR/hr. In designing and constructing the exposure room, many factors must be taken into account such as shielding thickness, density of shielding, thickness of lead door, the roof design of the exposure room and many more. This paper highlights problems encountered and the considerations taken to design and construct the exposure room so that the exposure room will comply with the permissible dose limit set by the regulatory body. (Author)

  13. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  14. MOBILE HOUSING AS A FUNCTIONAL-TYPOLOGICAL VARIETY OF THE INDUSTRY OF MODERN CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRONENKO V. P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Current socio-demographic conditions in Ukraine and the level of housing of different types and quality suggest the possibility of active development mobile home construction. Practical advantages of mobile homes in various regions of the world reflected in the popularity of their use, especially as a temporary, recreational, holiday and tourist accommodation. The use of mobile housing in Ukraine currently is limited functional-typological composition. Aim. Identify the features of the design and construction of mobile homes on the basis of studying the world and domestic experience based integrated assessment formative factors (environmental and fire safety, energy efficiency, reliability and sustainability, etc.. Analyzing of the resent research. In research on mobility and transform element residential buildings addressed such issues: the experience of adaptation of housing to changes in the life of their inhabitants in the form of transformation of the internal space and its versatility [1; 11]; the methodology and design of constructions differing movable , collapsible or foldable parts and features of formation of mobile home recreational purpose[19]; the evolution of human dwellings and projected a futuristic look at the structure of the living environment [14]. In the scientific development of modern authors on architectural topics most relevant topics related to energy issues: a study of the historical background of the development of energy efficient housing, development of the basic requirements and solutions, their formation, and the creation of engineering and efficient method of designing low-rise architecture [15]; an analysis of the use of alternative energy sources, identify the main ways of saving energy and the development of architecture energy-saving residential buildings of low and medium-rise [16]; the development of an integrated approach to the ecological – economic substantiation of creation of

  15. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: ► The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. ► The research is centred on the construction industry. ► Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. ► Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. ► General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  16. Development of a process maturity model for engineering, construction and maintenance projects in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldman, J.; Klingenberg, W. [Faculty of Management and Organization, University of Groningen, PO BOX 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Process improvement is a topic gaining considerable attention in literature. For the processes of Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Maintenance (i.e. EPCM) projects in the oil and gas industry, no frameworks exist that can guide these firms in the management of these processes. Using a detailed gap analysis we map the typical processes of EPCM-organisations onto the Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI), a stepwise process improvement model that is widely used in the software industry. Our main contribution is the conclusion that CMMI can benefit the management of EPCM-processes to a large degree, since it gives direction to the improvement of a considerable set of processes within EPCM-projects. Additional insight is given into the scientifically neglected area of learning between projects and the relationship between an organisation's goals and targeted areas of process improvement. These issues are absent in CMMI so further research is needed to develop framework support for, amongst others, downstream processes (construction and maintenance), learning between projects and goal driven process improvement.

  17. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassi, Andrea, E-mail: ab395@bath.co.uk [University of Bath, Faculty of Engineering and Design, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Howard, Robert, E-mail: robhoward@constcom.demon.co.uk [Construction Communications, 8 Cotton& #x27; s Field, Dry Drayton, Cambridge CB23 8DG (United Kingdom); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano, 77 38123 Trento (Italy); Ferrari, Simone, E-mail: simone.ferrari@polimi.it [Dept. BEST, Building Environment Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi, 3 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The research is centred on the construction industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  18. Process and system innovation in the building and construction industry: Developing a model for integrated value chain and life cycle management of built objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, H.A.J. de; Vrijhoef, R.

    2004-01-01

    The building and construction industry has a large contribution and impact on society, e.g. economical and environmental, involving a vast spectrum of stakeholders. However, the value delivering performance of the industry has often been criticized. The predictability of the value, price and costs o

  19. Project management : evaluation of the problems in the portuguese construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Leonel Fernandes da

    2014-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia Industrial Tem-se verificado ao longo dos anos dificuldades ao nível da gestão dos projetos de construção, com sistemáticas falhas de cumprimento em termos de prazo, custo e qualidade, tal como vários estudos demonstram, o que torna necessária uma reflecção acerca dos fatores que podem estar na origem destas falhas. Perceber a maneira como os gestores de projeto planeiam os mesmos, no sentido de melhorar o desempenho e resultados, é por isso um fator i...

  20. Dynamics of corporate strategy from a value chain perspective : A study of the Swedish telecom and construction industries during the 90’s

    OpenAIRE

    de Paula, Andes

    2006-01-01

    Changes in sectors and industries have brought new challenges to corporations as well as been important driving forces for the dynamics in strategy at the corporate level. With the dramatic developments of the 1990’s in mind, such as multilateral free-trade agreements, liberalization, privatization, sharp industry growth/decline, increased competition and globalization, in particular within the telecom and the construction industry, this study contributes to describing and understanding strat...

  1. Construction of a shaft winding installation for the Australian Olympic Dam copper and uranium mine; Bau einer Schachtfoerderanlage fuer das australische Kupfer-Uran-Bergwerk Olympic Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrmann, J. [Vertrieb Bergbautechnik, SIEMAG-GHH Bergbautechnik GmbH, Netphen (Germany)

    1999-06-07

    SIEMAG GHH Bergbautechnik has constructed a shaft winding installation, which is particularly noteworthy in some respects, for the Olympic Dam mine in Australia: - Realisation of the shaft winding installation from the planning stage to successful start-up within only two years - including planning and shaft sinking - by optimum coordination of the project schedule. - Design and construction of the installation for maximum availability and minimum maintenance by use of the latest and safest technology made possible by one company having overall responsibility for planning and execution of shaft winding, hence particularly high efficiency and rapid repayment. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die SIEMAG-GHH Bergbautechnik hat fuer die Schachtanlage Olympic Dam in Australien eine Schachtanlage gebaut, die in einigen Punkten aussergewoehnlich bemerkenswert ist: - Verwirklichung der Schachtfoerderanlage von der Planung bis zur erfolgreichen Inbetriebnahme innerhalb von nur zwei Jahren - einschliesslich Planung und Durchfuehrung des Schachtabteufens - durch optimale Abstimmung des zeitlichen Projektablaufs. - Auslegung und Ausfuehrung der Anlage fuer maximale Verfuegbarkeit und geringsten Wartungsaufwand durch Einsatz modernster und sicherster Technik, ermoeglicht durch die gesamtverantwortliche Planung und Ausfuehrung der Schachtfoerderung aus einer Hand. Dadurch besondere Wirtschaftlichkeit und schnelle Amortisation. (orig.)

  2. A comparative analysis of selected parameters of roofing used in the Polish construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radziszewska-Zielina Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Roofing is an important element in the construction of the roof. It is also one of the essential elements of the whole building. The choice of roofing should depend on technical parameters that affect the quality of the materials used and the price. The present paper is a comparative analysis of the properties of five roofing materials selected as examples with respect to twelve parameters. As can be seen from the comparative analysis of the roofing parameters, roofing tile is by far the best material, receiving the highest score in the ranking

  3. The Use of CAX Systems as a Tool for Modeling Construction Element in the Aviation Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kužma, Dalibor; Korba, Peter; Hovanec, Michal; Dulina, Ľuboslav

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the adjustment of the wing selected part of the plane Viper SD-4 from slovak producer with using environment of software Siemens NX9. The adjustment is carried out after consultation with the test pilots of this plane and tries to take into account the observations made during the test flights. The first part of the article is focused on the current construction of the wings and its parts. The second part describes how digitalize the real wing by using reverse engineeri...

  4. FIDIC new conditions of contract and their applying prospects for the construction industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何伯森

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author gives a brief introduction to the evolution of FIDIC conditions of contract,particularly the background of the 1999 new editions. A detailed discussion is made of the applying prospects referring to the new editions of FIDIC Conditions of Contract in China in 6 aspects: revisions of the existing model contract forms; finding solutions to the payment delay problem; advocating the Design/Build and EPC turnkey project delivery system; clarifying the roles of supervising engineers and opening up the new regions of their work. This paper also prepares a short form model contract for small projects in China, improving the settlement of construction disputes.

  5. Sustainability in the Brazilian Heavy Construction Industry: An Analysis of Organizational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study performs a comparison between the theoretical frameworks of sustainable development and its incorporation in the decision-making practices and models used by heavy construction companies. This study was conducted by using documentary analysis of corporate sustainability reports. Specifically, the content analysis method was used to examine the sustainability reports disclosed by the companies studied. The results indicate four main conclusions: first, the social, political and economic context directed the companies towards implementing sustainable management practices; second, human resource development follows the traditional model of training and development; third, there is an evident effort to balance economic goals and profit-making with social responsibility practices as a way to characterize the corporate commitment with sustainability; fourth, effective and indispensable measures to transform decision-making models were not adopted in the business practices analyzed, and thus the economic factor continues to be prioritized at the expense of social and environmental aspects in those models. This paper, in looking at three Brazilian multinational heavy construction companies, examines the synergy between the theoretical and the identified corporate sustainability practices. Lastly, this paper may be characterized as a descriptive study based on a literature review and an analysis of sustainability reports from the companies studied.

  6. The use of Game Theory to solve conflicts in the project management and construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón San Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A typical construction project involves a wide range of disparate professionals, in many cases geographically distributed, working together for a relatively short period of time on the design and construction of a facility. Since organizations are becoming flatter, culturally rich, geographically diverse and intensely competitive, the possibilities for conflict in such environments are greater. Negotiation is an important aspect of a project and plays an important role in resolving claims, preventing disputes, and keeping a harmonious relationship between project participants. Part of any project manager’s role as a leader is to recognize conflict, understand the sources of conflict and manage it, and to do this a project manager must be able to understand the basics of negotiation theory and have sufficient competencies to lead in such situations. To address the complex technical and human issues in negotiation, different negotiation theories and models are available which mainly include game theory, economic theory, and behavior theory. Since Game Theory provides, by its very nature, the appropriate tools for the analysis and eventual solution of conflicts of any kind, this paper uses a model based on Game Theory in order to identify the activities that are responsible for the delays in a project and divide the costs among them.

  7. Final construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V, Area 2, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessom, W.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) has finished construction of Area 2 of the Y-12 Plant Industrial Landfill (ILF-V), classified as a Class 2 Landfill. This final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Area 2 was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. This report applies specifically to the Area 2 excavation, compacted clay soil liner, geomembrane liner, granular leachate collection layer, protective soil cover, and the leachate collection system. An ``As-Built`` survey was performed and is included. The drawings provide horizontal and vertical information for Area 2, the anchor trench, the leachate collection pipe, the temporary access road, and cross-sections of Area 2. This report provides documentation of the following items: the excavation activities of Area 2; the maximum recompacted coefficient of hydraulic conductivity or permeability of the soil is less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/sec); the total thickness of the compacted clay soil liner equals a minimum of 2 feet; a 40 mil impermeable geomembrane (polypropylene) flexible membrane liner (FML) and 16 oz. geotextile fabric was placed in direct contact with the compacted clay soil liner; a 12 inch granular leachate collection layer was installed and covered with a 8 oz. geotextile separation fabric; the installation of the leachate collection piping; and the two foot protective clay soil cover.

  8. Final construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V, Area 2, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) has finished construction of Area 2 of the Y-12 Plant Industrial Landfill (ILF-V), classified as a Class 2 Landfill. This final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Area 2 was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. This report applies specifically to the Area 2 excavation, compacted clay soil liner, geomembrane liner, granular leachate collection layer, protective soil cover, and the leachate collection system. An ''As-Built'' survey was performed and is included. The drawings provide horizontal and vertical information for Area 2, the anchor trench, the leachate collection pipe, the temporary access road, and cross-sections of Area 2. This report provides documentation of the following items: the excavation activities of Area 2; the maximum recompacted coefficient of hydraulic conductivity or permeability of the soil is less than 1 x 10-7 centimeters per second (cm/sec); the total thickness of the compacted clay soil liner equals a minimum of 2 feet; a 40 mil impermeable geomembrane (polypropylene) flexible membrane liner (FML) and 16 oz. geotextile fabric was placed in direct contact with the compacted clay soil liner; a 12 inch granular leachate collection layer was installed and covered with a 8 oz. geotextile separation fabric; the installation of the leachate collection piping; and the two foot protective clay soil cover

  9. Role of Industry University in British Construction of Learning-Oriented Society and Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    One of the creations in building a learning-oriented society in the United Kingdom, the Industry University shoulders such a mission as applying new technologies to transform learning and transmit skills, thus it has been playing an im- portant role in those aspects like establishing a novel educational organizational model, stimulating greater needs for education, integrating educational resources, providing more educational opportunities, and disseminating culture of lifelong learning. British experience is of great inspiration to Chinese development of Open University based on its learning society construc- tion, for instance, 1) a common social resources platform shall be set up; 2) learning products shall meet learners' demands; 3) no efforts shall be spared to explore effective practical approaches conducive to learning; 4) learners' lifelong learning shall be combined with their personal development.

  10. Constructing Employability Indicators for Enhancing the Effectiveness of Engineering Education for the Solar Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to establish a set of employability indicators that capture the competency requirements and performance expectations that solar energy enterprises have of their employees. In the qualitative component of the study, 12 administrators and 32 engineers in the industry were interviewed, and meetings with focus groups were conducted to formulate a questionnaire for a survey of Taiwanese solar energy companies for the confirmation and prioritisation of the employability indicators. On the basis of the results of the quantitative component, an interpretational model relating competence, job performance, working attitude, and employability for solar corporation recruitment and training purposes as well as for school curricular development was developed. The interpretation model formulated effectively interprets the relationship between solar enterprises’ expectations and students’ employability. The research contributes a framework for the selection and cultivation of talent, as well as providing a basis for fundamental development of the solar engineering curriculum.

  11. Aboriginal Agency and Marginalisation in Australian Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Moore

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is often argued that while state rhetoric may be inclusionary, policies and practices may be exclusionary. This can imply that the power to include rests only with the state. In some ways, the implication is valid in respect of Aboriginal Australians. For instance, the Australian state has gained control of Aboriginal inclusion via a singular, bounded category and Aboriginal ideal type. However, the implication is also limited in their respect. Aborigines are abject but also agents in their relationship with the wider society. Their politics contributes to the construction of the very category and type that governs them, and presses individuals to resist state inclusionary efforts. Aboriginal political elites police the performance of an Aboriginality dominated by notions of difference and resistance. The combined processes of governance act to deny Aborigines the potential of being both Aboriginal and Australian, being different and belonging. They maintain Aborigines’ marginality.

  12. Defining and Measuring Safety Climate: A Review of the Construction Industry Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwatka, Natalie V; Hecker, Steven; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Safety climate measurements can be used to proactively assess an organization's effectiveness in identifying and remediating work-related hazards, thereby reducing or preventing work-related ill health and injury. This review article focuses on construction-specific articles that developed and/or measured safety climate, assessed safety climate's relationship with other safety and health performance indicators, and/or used safety climate measures to evaluate interventions targeting one or more indicators of safety climate. Fifty-six articles met our inclusion criteria, 80% of which were published after 2008. Our findings demonstrate that researchers commonly defined safety climate as perception based, but the object of those perceptions varies widely. Within the wide range of indicators used to measure safety climate, safety policies, procedures, and practices were the most common, followed by general management commitment to safety. The most frequently used indicators should and do reflect that the prevention of work-related ill health and injury depends on both organizational and employee actions. Safety climate scores were commonly compared between groups (e.g. management and workers, different trades), and often correlated with subjective measures of safety behavior rather than measures of ill health or objective safety and health outcomes. Despite the observed limitations of current research, safety climate has been promised as a useful feature of research and practice activities to prevent work-related ill health and injury. Safety climate survey data can reveal gaps between management and employee perceptions, or between espoused and enacted policies, and trigger communication and action to narrow those gaps. The validation of safety climate with safety and health performance data offers the potential for using safety climate measures as a leading indicator of performance. We discuss these findings in relation to the related concept of safety culture and

  13. Defining and Measuring Safety Climate: A Review of the Construction Industry Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwatka, Natalie V; Hecker, Steven; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Safety climate measurements can be used to proactively assess an organization's effectiveness in identifying and remediating work-related hazards, thereby reducing or preventing work-related ill health and injury. This review article focuses on construction-specific articles that developed and/or measured safety climate, assessed safety climate's relationship with other safety and health performance indicators, and/or used safety climate measures to evaluate interventions targeting one or more indicators of safety climate. Fifty-six articles met our inclusion criteria, 80% of which were published after 2008. Our findings demonstrate that researchers commonly defined safety climate as perception based, but the object of those perceptions varies widely. Within the wide range of indicators used to measure safety climate, safety policies, procedures, and practices were the most common, followed by general management commitment to safety. The most frequently used indicators should and do reflect that the prevention of work-related ill health and injury depends on both organizational and employee actions. Safety climate scores were commonly compared between groups (e.g. management and workers, different trades), and often correlated with subjective measures of safety behavior rather than measures of ill health or objective safety and health outcomes. Despite the observed limitations of current research, safety climate has been promised as a useful feature of research and practice activities to prevent work-related ill health and injury. Safety climate survey data can reveal gaps between management and employee perceptions, or between espoused and enacted policies, and trigger communication and action to narrow those gaps. The validation of safety climate with safety and health performance data offers the potential for using safety climate measures as a leading indicator of performance. We discuss these findings in relation to the related concept of safety culture and

  14. Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhim, Evan A; Hon, Carol; Xia, Bo; Stewart, Ian; Fang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    Globally, falls from height (FFH) are a substantial public health jeopardy and are among the important leading causes of serious and fatal injuries for construction workers. A comprehensive understanding of the causal factors in FFH incidents is urgently required; however, the literature appears to lack a scientific review of FFH. In this study, 297 articles that contribute to the topic of fall incidents were reviewed. Seventy-five (75) articles met the criteria for relevance and were aggregated in a database to support a critical review. A synthesis of macro-variables approach was adopted rather than a structured meta-analysis. Such a method of analysis provides the flexibility to combine previous studies' findings. The most common factors associated with FFH are risky activities, individual characteristics, site conditions, organizational characteristics, agents (scaffolds/ladders) and weather conditions. The outcomes contributed to identifying the most significant research area for safety enhancement by improving engineering facilities, behaviour investigations and FFH prevention methods. PMID:27367706

  15. Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhim, Evan A.; Hon, Carol; Xia, Bo; Stewart, Ian; Fang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    Globally, falls from height (FFH) are a substantial public health jeopardy and are among the important leading causes of serious and fatal injuries for construction workers. A comprehensive understanding of the causal factors in FFH incidents is urgently required; however, the literature appears to lack a scientific review of FFH. In this study, 297 articles that contribute to the topic of fall incidents were reviewed. Seventy-five (75) articles met the criteria for relevance and were aggregated in a database to support a critical review. A synthesis of macro-variables approach was adopted rather than a structured meta-analysis. Such a method of analysis provides the flexibility to combine previous studies' findings. The most common factors associated with FFH are risky activities, individual characteristics, site conditions, organizational characteristics, agents (scaffolds/ladders) and weather conditions. The outcomes contributed to identifying the most significant research area for safety enhancement by improving engineering facilities, behaviour investigations and FFH prevention methods. PMID:27367706

  16. Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhim, Evan A; Hon, Carol; Xia, Bo; Stewart, Ian; Fang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    Globally, falls from height (FFH) are a substantial public health jeopardy and are among the important leading causes of serious and fatal injuries for construction workers. A comprehensive understanding of the causal factors in FFH incidents is urgently required; however, the literature appears to lack a scientific review of FFH. In this study, 297 articles that contribute to the topic of fall incidents were reviewed. Seventy-five (75) articles met the criteria for relevance and were aggregated in a database to support a critical review. A synthesis of macro-variables approach was adopted rather than a structured meta-analysis. Such a method of analysis provides the flexibility to combine previous studies' findings. The most common factors associated with FFH are risky activities, individual characteristics, site conditions, organizational characteristics, agents (scaffolds/ladders) and weather conditions. The outcomes contributed to identifying the most significant research area for safety enhancement by improving engineering facilities, behaviour investigations and FFH prevention methods.

  17. ANALYSIS OF REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PRICING SYSTEM IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapin Anton Valer'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation of the pricing system and underlying investment and construction activities were analyzed by the authors in their research. It is noteworthy that the pricing system has a common basis with other human systems, as it incorporates such constituents as process, people, software, etc. Correct interaction between these elements ensures conformity between the anticipated and the practical performance of the system. The basis for the effective operation of the existing system and reduction of potential risks consists in early identification and analysis of requirements set by the user. Absent of implementation of an effective requirement management process, the pattern of the system development will look chaotic and unpredictable. In the process of the data analysis, the data set is converted into a set of the user requirements describing the anticipated behavior of the system in the course of its interaction with the operating environment. The requirements of users comprise an important constituent of the system design. They affect the entire development process from the beginning to the very end. In accordance with the principles of the system engineering, the authors have identified the key pricing system parameters; their implementation assures the appropriate functionality with a view to the formation of the contract price at various stages of the life-cycle of the investment project. Analysis of the above requirements makes it possible to convert them into a technical vision of the desired product that can demonstrate the required functionality. The methodology proposed by the authors contemplates decomposition of the levels of requirements; therefore, the authors employ a three-level model that describes the expected functionality of the system. The model includes an organizational level (basic processes, participants, information flows, a methodological level (method of calculating the cost of design, construction and operation

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MATERIAL FLOW INFORMATION BASE OF MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degaltseva Z. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the problems of using indicators of material flow in the financial accounting management accounting system. The authors have created and described the classification of material costs in building units. It allows solving the problems of object of research specifying within a given material flow and inventory control within a given logistics systems. There are different approaches to the valuation of material costs in the article. An important aspect of measures for the integration development of accounting systems is the adoption of uniform valuation of building materials and structures. It is proved that the most rational combination of these types of records achieved by an adapted classification and measurement of building materials and structures to the conditions of formation of the budget for the project volume of construction works and the reflection of the actual volume of work in the financial accounting system. On the basis of the accounting policies and the organizational structure of the object of investigation of "Kubanstroykompleks" we have identified responsibility centers (sites for costs related to the material flow: Department of logistics and packaging and warehousing, which consists of a central and railroad warehouse

  19. Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan A. Nadhim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, falls from height (FFH are a substantial public health jeopardy and are among the important leading causes of serious and fatal injuries for construction workers. A comprehensive understanding of the causal factors in FFH incidents is urgently required; however, the literature appears to lack a scientific review of FFH. In this study, 297 articles that contribute to the topic of fall incidents were reviewed. Seventy-five (75 articles met the criteria for relevance and were aggregated in a database to support a critical review. A synthesis of macro-variables approach was adopted rather than a structured meta-analysis. Such a method of analysis provides the flexibility to combine previous studies' findings. The most common factors associated with FFH are risky activities, individual characteristics, site conditions, organizational characteristics, agents (scaffolds/ladders and weather conditions. The outcomes contributed to identifying the most significant research area for safety enhancement by improving engineering facilities, behaviour investigations and FFH prevention methods.

  20. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personal and area air samples were analyzed for total dust, organic solvent vapors, and metals during spray, brush, and roller painting and paint removal operations at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Number 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut, March 1981. Solvent exposures were generally well below their relevant standards. Total dust exposures during paint removal ranged up to 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) in the containment building. The OSHA standard for total dust is 15mg/m3. Exposures to lead dusts exceeded the OSHA standard of 0.05mg/m3 in the turbine, auxiliary, and containment buildings. Chromium exposures were generally below the OSHA standard of 1mg/m3, except for 2.4mg/m3 in a personal sample taken during paint removal in the containment building. Very few engineering controls other than 3M single use respirators were observed. The authors note that the chromium exposure data is difficult to interpret as the form of the chromium is not known. If the chromium existed as hexavalent chromium exposure was excessive. The authors conclude that in view of the measured exposures to total dust, lead, and chromium, engineering controls and respiratory protection are inadequate. Recommendations include implementing better controls and respiratory protection