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Sample records for australian coastal lagoon

  1. Metagenomes of Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rohit; Hernandez, Claudia Mella; Picazo, Antonio; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ininbergs, Karolina; Díez, Beatriz; Valas, Ruben; DuPont, Christopher L; McMahon, Katherine D; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Coastal lagoons, both hypersaline and freshwater, are common, but still understudied ecosystems. We describe, for the first time, using high throughput sequencing, the extant microbiota of two large and representative Mediterranean coastal lagoons, the hypersaline Mar Menor, and the freshwater Albufera de Valencia, both located on the south eastern coast of Spain. We show there are considerable differences in the microbiota of both lagoons, in comparison to other marine and freshwater habitats. Importantly, a novel uncultured sulfur oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria was found to dominate bacterioplankton in the hypersaline Mar Menor. Also, in the latter prokaryotic cyanobacteria were almost exclusively comprised by Synechococcus and no Prochlorococcus was found. Remarkably, the microbial community in the freshwaters of the hypertrophic Albufera was completely in contrast to known freshwater systems, in that there was a near absence of well known and cosmopolitan groups of ultramicrobacteria namely Low GC Actinobacteria and the LD12 lineage of Alphaproteobacteria.

  2. Assessing confinement in coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Donata Melaku; Solidoro, Cosimo; Umgiesser, Georg; Cucco, Andrea; Ferrarin, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Measures of transport scale in aquatic systems can contribute to the formulation of definitions of indicators of the system's ecological properties. This paper addresses confinement, a specific transport scale proposed by biological scientists as a parameter that can capture and synthesize the principal properties that determine the spatial structure of biological communities in transitional environments. Currently, there is no direct experimental measure of confinement. In this study, a methodology based on the accumulation rate within a lagoon of a passive tracer of marine origin is proposed, the influences of different factors in the calculation of confinement are analyzed, and general recommendations are derived. In particular, we analyze the spatial and the temporal variability of confinement and its sensitivity to the seasonal variability of climatic forcing, the inputs from rivers and the parameterization of the tidal exchanges. The Lagoon of Venice is used as a case study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Are coastal lagoons physically or biologically controlled ecosystems? Revisiting r vs. K strategies in coastal lagoons and estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Marcos, Concepción; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Pérez-Marcos, María

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stress influences biological assemblages, with species responding to stress by adopting particular life-history strategies (e.g., r vs. K). Coastal lagoons and estuaries are considered naturally stressed and physically controlled systems with frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations. At the same time, their transitional nature (between terrestrial, freshwater and marine) makes them especially vulnerable to human impacts and land and freshwater inputs. As a result, it is hypothesised that residents of coastal lagoons would display characteristics of r-selected species. The r-strategy involves increased reproductive effort through early reproduction, small and numerous offspring with a large dispersive capability, short lifespan and small adult body size. Together, these traits provide a selective advantage in such unpredictable or short-lived environments. Alternatively, immigrants to coastal lagoons should mostly be K-strategists, with a competitive advantage over the r-strategists, at least on a temporary time scale. These hypotheses were explored using a dataset from 73 Atlanto-Mediterranean sites: 27 estuaries, 42 coastal lagoons and 4 from the sea, obtained from published sources. A detailed analysis of the distributions of the different resident fish species according to lagoon characteristics indicated that in lagoons with a higher marine influence the families Gobiidae, Blenniidae and Syngnathidae were common, while lagoons with freshwater influence are characterized by Cyprinidae and other freshwater species. In analyzing the biological strategies of lagoon species we found that fish assemblages inhabiting marine influenced lagoons were characterized by solitary, necto-benthonic sedentary species. These species are often hermaphroditic, with benthic broods and many exhibit brooding behaviour. This suggests that marine influenced lagoons are dominated by K-strategist species, while r-strategy species will be more common in

  4. Eutrophication Process on Coastal Lagoons of North of Sinaloa, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Urias, D.; Martinez-Lopez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of California support diverse and important fisheries and are reservoirs of great biological diversity. In northern Sinaloa, population growth and development, as well as increased use of these natural systems for recreation, has substantially increased the pressure placed upon marine resources. Discharge of untreated wastewaters generated by diverse human activities has been notably altered its health and integrity, principally along the lagoon's eastern shore In the late 60s, agriculture moved into a dominant role in coastal northern Sinaloa. The coastal plain encompasses more than 200,000 hectares under cultivation that now introduces large amounts of organic material, pesticides, heavy metals, and fertilizers into the lagoon systems of Topolobampo and San Ignacio-Navachiste-Macapule System at drainage discharge points and a minor grade in Colorado Lagoon. These lagoons are shallow and exhibit low water quality, lost of lagoon depth, presence of toxic substances (heavy metals) near the discharge points of wastewaters, and presence of harmful algal blooms. With the aim of evaluate the nutrients loadings (wastewaters, groundwaters) and their effects on the coastal lagoons of north of Sinaloa, the preliminary analysis of the physical, chemical and biologic variables data series are analyzed. From 1987-2007 eutrophication process is identified in Topolobampo Complex show increase tendency in annual average concentrations of DIN (Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen= NO2+NO3) from 0.5 μ M in 1987 to 2.7 μ M in 2006. Trophic Index (TRIX) values, low nutrient ratios (N: P and N: Si) and the phytoplanktonic community structure support this result. Preliminary results of nutrients loadings show a mayor contribution of wastewaters into the coastal zone.

  5. Participation and Sustainable Management of Coastal Lagoon Ecosystems: The Case of the Fosu Lagoon in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest K.A. Afrifa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation as a tool has been applied as a social learning process and communication platform to create awareness among stakeholders in the context of resource utilisation. The application of participatory processes to aquatic ecosystem management is attracting a growing body of literature. However, the application of participation as a tool for sustainable management of coastal lagoon ecosystems is recent. This paper examines the context and the extent of participation of stakeholders in the management of the Fosu lagoon in Ghana. Six hundred individuals from twenty seven stakeholder groups were randomly selected for study. Both closed and open-ended questions were used in face-to-face interviews with stakeholders. The findings indicate that the stakeholder groups were not involved in decision-making regarding the conservation of the lagoon irrespective of their expertise in planning and/or their interest in lagoon resource utilisation. This situation has created apathy among some of the stakeholders who feel neglected in the decision-making process. There is scope for broadening the base of interest groups in decision-making processes regarding the lagoon and improving stakeholder participation in the management of the lagoon to ensure the sustainability of the management process.

  6. Intertidal deposits: river mouths, tidal flats, and coastal lagoons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, D.; Boer, de P.L.; Cadee, G.C.; Dijkema, K.; Ridderinkhof, H.; Phillippart, C.

    1998-01-01

    Intertidal Deposits: River Mouths, Tidal Flats, and Coastal Lagoons combines the authors personal and professional experience with the mass of available literature to present a cohesive overview of intertidal deposits and the widely diverse conditions of their formation worldwide. This includes the

  7. Biogeochemical responses of shallow coastal lagoons to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, A.; Newton, A.; Tett, P.; Fernandes, T.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of climate change and global warming in the near future is becoming consensual within the scientific community (e.g. Kerr et al., 2008; Lloret et al., 2008). The surface temperature and sea level have increased during the last few years in the northern hemisphere (IPCC, 2007). Predictions for future changes include an increase of surface temperature and sea level for Europe. Moreover, the global warming phenomenon will also change the hydrological cycle and increase precipitation in northern and central Europe (IPCC, 2007). Sea level rise already threatens to overwhelm some lagoons, such as Venice and Moroccan lagoons (Snoussi et al., 2008). Shallow coastal lagoons are some of the most vulnerable systems that will be impacted by these changes (Eisenreich, 2005). Environmental impacts on coastal lagoons include an increase of water turbidity and therefore light attenuation. If these effects are strong enough, the lighted bottoms of shallow lagoons may loose a significant part of the benthic algal community. These communities are highly productive and are essential to control nutrient dynamics of the system by uptaking large amounts of nutrients both from the water column and from the sediments. A decrease in benthic algal communities and photosynthetic oxygen production will also contribute to increasing the vulnerability of the lagoons to hypoxia and anoxia. The flux of nutrients such as phosphate from the sediments may increase dramatically, further disrupting the nutrient balance and condition and promoting cyanobacterial blooms. Microbial activity is temperature dependent, therefore, the increase of temperature will increase the concentrations of ammonium within sediments. The release of phosphate and silicate will also increase with temperature. Coastal lagoons are valuable ecosystems and may be severely impacted, both ecologically and economically, by global change. Shallow coastal lagoons should be considered as sentinel systems and should be

  8. Plankton bioindicators of environmental conditions in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, Md A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are characterised by strong spatial gradient of environmental parameters, especially hypersalinity, and are prone to anthropogenic disturbance. The Coorong (South Australia) is an inverse estuarine coastal lagoon separated from the sea by sand dunes. It is exposed to extreme water quality changes that affect its aquatic communities. Here, we used plankton as indicators of extreme environmental fluctuations to monitor and manage the environmental health of such complex systems. We defined the relationship of different plankton communities with water quality fluctuations and determined plankton species suitable for monitoring the ecosystem health. Two distinct communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton were identified, with salinity and nutrients being the principal factors impacting species distribution. Thus, two sets of indicator species were selected based on the different communities observed. Polychaete and gastropod larvae were positive indicators, showing salinity range restriction of brackish to marine. The distribution Acartia cf. fancetti represented healthy hypersaline conditions (salinity 40-60), while Cyclophora sp. and Scrippsiella sp. were negative indicators, correlating with extreme salinity and ammonia levels. The implementation of planktonic organisms as environmental indicators provided a constructive tool for the management of ecosystem health of the Coorong and will be applicable to similar coastal lagoons.

  9. Seasonal hydrochemical variation in a tropical coastal lagoon (Açu Lagoon, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Chagas

    Full Text Available Hydrochemical conditions in the Açu Lagoon are described using spatial and temporal variations of various limnological variables (water temperature, dissolved oxygen, electric conductivity, total alkalinity, carbon dioxide, dissolved and total nutrients (N, P and Si, and chlorophyll a. Collected data was used in order to understand the structure and functioning of an enclosed coastal lagoon strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Water samples were collected monthly (November 1999-December 2000 in five sampling stations established along the lagoon. A decreasing spatial gradient of electrical conductivity was observed beginning from a sand bar region between the lagoon and the sea in the direction of the sweet-water input area. The positive correlation observed between the pH and dissolved oxygen (DO values, and the negative one observed between pH values and those of carbon dioxide (CO2, evidenced coupled biological processes, e.g., primary production and decomposition. Both spatial and temporal variation of dissolved nutrients showed fast increase and decrease in the beginning of summer, suggesting that nutrient input resulting from rainfall stimulates phytoplankton production, as reflected by chlorophyll a concentration increase.

  10. Interaction between pesticides and humic substances from tropical coastal lagoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Farias, F.; Carvalho, F.P.; Fowler, S.W.; Cotret, O.

    1999-01-01

    The HS that enter the lagoons with freshwater runoff tend to precipitate with salinity. Experiments were done in laboratory to determine the effect of HS (isolated from coastal lagoons) and humic acids (HA) (Aldrich) on the partition of selected pesticides between water and sediment phases. Due to the accurate results obtained with radio-labelled compounds, 14 C-labelled pesticides were used for the experiments. The selected pesticides were: chlorpyrifos (o,o-di-[1- 14 C]ethyl o-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridil phosphorotioate), DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chloro-[ring-U- 14 C]-phenyl)ethane) and parathion (o,o-diethyl o-4-nitro-[ring-U- 14 C]-phenyl phosphorotioate)

  11. Modelling the salinization of a coastal lagoon-aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, N.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a coastal area constituted by alternations of saline-brackish lagoons and freshwater bodies was studied and modelled to understand the hydrological processes occurring between the lagoons, the groundwater system of the Po River Delta (Italy) and the Adriatic Sea. The contribution of both evaporation and anthropogenic factors on groundwater salinization was assessed by means of soil, groundwater and surface water monitoring. Highresolution multi-level samplers were used to capture salinity gradients within the aquifer and surface water bodies. Data were employed to calibrate a density-dependent numerical transport model implemented with SEAWAT code along a transect perpendicular to the coast line. The results show that the lagoon is hydraulically well connected with the aquifer, which provides the major source of salinity because of the upcoming of paleo-seawater from the aquitard laying at the base of the unconfined aquifer. On the contrary, the seawater (diluted by the freshwater river outflow) creates only a limited saltwater wedge. The increase in groundwater salinity could be of serious concern, especially for the pinewood located in the dune near the coast, sensitive to salinity increases. This case study represents an interesting paradigm for other similar environmental setting, where the assumption of classical aquifer salinization from a saltwater wedge intruding from the sea is often not representative of the actual aquifer’s salinization mechanisms.

  12. Mangrove coservation in coastal areas Samas beach lagoon for controlling sea water abrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhayati, A.P.; Siwi, B.R.F. Raka; Muzoffar, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Lagoon is a puddle of water (like a lake/pond) near the beach that was once a part of the (united with) the sea, but because of geological events, apart from the sea and coastal wetland ecosystems forming new ones. Samas beach lagoon is one of the lagoons are located in Bantul, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta. From the perspective of the Environment, lagoon is a unique ecosystem that consists of a body of water (lagoon) is brackish, mangrove forests and land affected low tide. Ecosyste...

  13. Benthic ecology of tropical coastal lagoons: Environmental changes over the last decades in the Términos Lagoon, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenz, Christian; Fichez, Renaud; Silva, Carlos Álvarez; Benítez, Laura Calva; Conan, Pascal; Esparza, Adolfo Contreras Ruiz; Denis, Lionel; Ruiz, Silvia Díaz; Douillet, Pascal; Martinez, Margarita E. Gallegos; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Mendieta, Francisco José Gutiérrez; Origel-Moreno, Montserrat; Garcia, Antonio Zoilo Marquez; Caravaca, Alain Muñoz; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Alvarado, Rocío Torres; Zavala-Hidalgo, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    The Términos Lagoon is a 2000-km2 wide coastal lagoon linked to the largest river catchment in Mesoamerica. Economic development, together with its ecological importance, led the Mexican government to pronounce the Términos Lagoon and its surrounding wetlands as a Federal protected area for flora and fauna in 1994. It is characterized by small temperature fluctuations, but with two distinct seasons (wet and dry) that control the biological, geochemical, and physical processes and components. This paper presents a review of the available information about the Términos Lagoon. The review shows that the diversity of benthic communities is structured by the balance between marine and riverine inputs and that this structuration strongly influences the benthic metabolism and its coupling with the biogeochemistry of the water column. The paper also presents many specific drivers and recommendations for a long-term environmental survey strategy in the context of the expected Global Change in the Central American region.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of submerged macrophytes in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

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    Obrador, Biel; Pretus, Joan Lluís

    2010-03-01

    The seasonal and interannual dynamics of the biomass and spatial distribution of a macrophyte meadow were explored in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Albufera des Grau, Balearic Islands) from 2002 to 2007. The dynamics in the main physicochemical variables were also analysed to assess the factors involved in the spatiotemporal variability of the submerged macrophytes. The meadows were dominated by Ruppia cirrhosa, which showed a marked seasonal cycle with winter quiescence and complete annual regrowth. The annual production of R. cirrhosa had high interannual variability and was amongst the highest described for this species in the literature, ranging 327-919 gDW m -2. The spatial distribution of macrophytes was determined by light availability and wave exposure, with the highest abundances found in shallow and gently sloped areas sheltered from the strong northerly winds. The interannual variations in macrophyte descriptors (area of occurrence, average depth of the meadows, and maximum biomass) were mainly related to water turbidity and salinity, but the effect of these variables was constrained to the spring and summer months, respectively. A significant negative correlation between the extent of coverage of R. cirrhosa and the water level at the end of the previous annual cycle was observed, suggesting a positive effect of desiccation on the extent of coverage of the macrophytes. After six years of apparent stability, the macrophytes abruptly disappeared from the lagoon. Although the mechanisms are not clear, this shift was likely attributable to a combination of several factors.

  15. 210Pb in a tropical coastal lagoon sediment core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez-Osuna, F.; Mandelli, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Excess 210 Pb in a core from a Mexican Coastal Lagoon, which has no connection with the sea shows a small but measurable decay over the length of the core; when different approaches were compared significant differences in the values for the sedimentation rate are obtained. The best coefficient correlation was calculated when corrected 210 Pb activity for the uneven distribution of organic matter and cumulative inorganic weight is considered. Time frames in the sedimentary column were in agreement between the 210 Pb calculated time and the appearance of shell fragments probably associated with the disturbances caused by the 1961 hurricane Tara. The surface accumulation rate is equivalent to a mean deposition of 262.5 g m -2 yr -1 of organic matter which is minor but comparable to some salt marshes of United States. (author)

  16. Evidence of North Africa’s Green Revolution Preserved in Sedimentary Organic Matter Deposited in Three Coastal Lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of longer residence times and limited mixing in coastal lagoons, the impacts of anthropogenic nutrient loading to lagoon food webs are often more pronounced than in other coastal ecosystems. For these reasons, many lagoons also provide an excellent environment for the dep...

  17. Trophic–salinity gradients and environmental redundancy resolve mesozooplankton dynamics in a large tropical coastal lagoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rakesh, M.; Madhavirani, K.S.V.K.S.; Kumar, B.C.; Raman, A.V.; Kalavati, C.; Rao, Y.P.; Stephen, R.; Rao, V.R.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Subramanian, B.R.

    dynamics in a large tropical coastal lagoon wrought by human impingement, including the creation of a new mouth. Here, we hypothesised that trophic gradients and environmental redundancy resulting from the pooled effect of trophic and salinity...

  18. Metabolism and Gaseous Exchanges in Two Coastal Lagoons from Rio de Janeiro with Distinct Limnological Characteristics

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    Thomaz Sidinei M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The global metabolism and exchange of gases with the atmosphere were measured during a diel cycle in two tropical coastal lagoons, using the curves of carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen. Heterotrophic metabolism (net CO2 production and net O2 consumption was observed in a black water lagoon (Comprida, and autotrophic metabolism (net O2 production and net CO2 consumption in a clear water lagoon (Imboassica. These differences were attributed to the limnological characteristics of both ecosystems, especially to dissolved organic carbon and the attenuation coefficient of light, which are much higher in the first environment. During the diel cycle analyzed there was a net release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere in the first lagoon and a net uptake by the water in the second one. Thus, the importance of coastal lagoons for the global carbon budget deserves further study.

  19. Regulation of bacterioplankton density and biomass in tropical shallow coastal lagoons

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    Fabiana MacCord

    Full Text Available AIM: Estimating bacterioplankton density and biomass and their regulating factors is important in order to evaluate aquatic systems' carrying capacity, regarding bacterial growth and the stock of matter in the bacterial community, which can be consumed by higher trophic levels. We aim to evaluate the limnological factors which regulate - in space and time - the bacterioplankton dynamics (abundance and biomass in five tropical coastal lagoons in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHOD: The current study was carried out at the following lagoons: Imboassica, Cabiúnas, Comprida, Carapebus and Garças. They differ in morphology and in their main limnological factors. The limnological variables as well as bacterioplankton abundance and biomass were monthly sampled for 14 months. Model selection analyses were performed in order to evaluate the main variables regulating the bacterioplankton's dynamics in these lagoons. RESULT: The salt concentration and the "space" factor (i.e. different lagoons explained great part of the bacterial density and biomass variance in the studied tropical coastal lagoons. When the lagoons were analyzed separately, salinity still explained great part of the variation of bacterial density and biomass in the Imboassica and Garças lagoons. On the other hand, phosphorus concentration was the main factor explaining the variance of bacterial density and biomass in the distrophic Cabiúnas, Comprida and Carapebus lagoons. There was a strong correlation between bacterial density and biomass (r² = 0.70, p < 0.05, indicating that bacterial biomass variations are highly dependent on bacterial density variations. CONCLUSION: (i Different limnological variables regulate the bacterial density and biomass in the studied coastal lagoons, (ii salt and phosphorus concentrations greatly explained the variation of bacterial density and biomass in the saline and distrophic lagoons, respectively, and (iii N-nitrate and chlorophyll

  20. The tidal hydrodynamics modeling of the Topolobampo coastal lagoon system and the implications for pollutant dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano-Ley, Y.; Peraza-Vizcarra, R.; Paez-Osuna, F.

    2007-01-01

    The tidal hydrodynamics of the Topolobampo coastal lagoon system (Mexico) has been investigated through a modified two dimensional non-linear hydrodynamic finite difference model. The advective and diffusive process acting over a hypothetical pollutant released into the coastal lagoon have also been simulated. Maxima tidal currents (0.85 m/s) were predicted within the main channel, in agree with direct measurements. The direction of the observed fastest currents (SW), also agree quite well with the direction of the strongest tidal current predicted in this investigation, which occur during the ebb when the water of the coastal lagoon is discharged into the Gulf of California. Residual currents (0.01-0.05 m/s) were also predicted. The hypothetical pollutant released within the Topolobampo Harbor would spread to both Ohuira and Topolobampo sections, reaching the inlet after approximately 12 days. - A model has been developed to simulate the tidal hydrodynamics and the behavior of a pollutant in the Topolobampo lagoon

  1. Hydrogeologic controls on chemical transport at Malibu Lagoon, CA: Implications for land to sea exchange in coastal lagoon systems

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    N. Dimova

    2017-06-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Nearshore lagoons that are seasonally disconnected from the coastal ocean occupy about 10% of coastal areas worldwide. Lagoon systems often are poorly flushed and thus sensitive to nutrient over-enrichment that can lead to eutrophication, oxygen depletion, and/or pervasive algal blooms. This sensitivity is exacerbated in lagoons that are intermittently closed to surface water exchange with the sea and occur in populous coastal areas. Such estuarine systems are disconnected from the sea during most of the year by wave-built barriers, but during the rainy season these berms can breach, enabling direct water exchange. Using naturally-occurring 222Rn as groundwater tracer, we estimate that groundwater discharge to Malibu Lagoon during open berm conditions was one order of magnitude higher (21 ± 17 cm/day than during closed berm conditions (1.8 ± 1.4 cm/day. The SGD (submarine groundwater discharge into nearshore coastal waters at the SurferRider and Colony Malibu was 4.2 cm/day on average. The exported total dissolved nitrogen (TDN through the berm during closed berm was 1.6 × 10−3 mol/day, whereas during open berm (exported by the Creek was 3.5 × 103 mol/day. Although these evaluations are specific to the collection campaigns the 2009 and 2010 hydro years, these two distinct hydrologic scenarios play an important role in the seasonality and geochemical impact of land/sea exchange, and highlight the sensitivity of such systems to future impacts such as sea level rise and increasing coastal populations.

  2. Environmental Variability and Macrophyte Assemblages in Coastal Lagoon Types of Western Greece (Mediterranean Sea

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    Chrysoula Christia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal lagoon types of Western Greece were allocated to a spectrum of meso to polyhaline chocked lagoons; poly to euhaline restricted lagoons; and euhaline restricted lagoons along the Ionian Sea coast. This diversity comprises wide ranges of physical, chemical and environmental parameters in a seasonal and annual scale, which explains the variability in the distribution of benthic macrophytes. Four different macrophyte assemblages were distinguished, characterized by annual or perennial species. Extensive statistical analysis showed that salinity and nitrate concentrations had a great impact on the composition and distribution of macrophyte assemblages into lagoon types that also changed their abundance on a seasonal and annual scale. During the monitoring period, an important salinity shift in a chocked lagoon might cause the gradual loss of Zostera noltii and its replacement by Ruppia cirrhosa. Restricted lagoons were characterized by higher species diversity, while the other three identified macrophyte assemblages were dominated by the angiosperms Ruppia cirrhosa and Cymodocea nodosa. This integrated study of coastal lagoons is likely to be broadly applicable, since it was based on important parameters affecting such ecosystems, and the provided links between macrophyte assemblages and abiotic factors are of critical importance to improve management and environmental policies.

  3. Spatial and temporal dynamic of trophic relevant parameters in a subtropical coastal lagoon in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Mariana Coutinho; Petrucio, Mauricio Mello

    2011-10-01

    Coastal lagoons are ecologically and economically important environments but a relative low number of studies were carried out in subtropical and permanently closed coastal lagoons. The present study aimed at assessing the temporal and spatial dynamic of trophic relevant water quality parameters in the small, deep and freshwater Peri coastal lagoon, South Brazil. During the 19 sampled months (March/2008-September/2009) spatial homogeneity (horizontal and vertical) was registered in all seasons for all variables, a condition related to the strong wind influence and low human occupation in the lagoon watershed. Seasonal variations of the water quality could be observed and they can be explained mainly by variation on temperature, wind forces and direction and rainfall, characteristic from the subtropical weather. Comparing this study with two others conducted in Peri lagoon in 1996 and 1998, no critical differences that evidence alteration in the water quality were found, but climate differences may have influenced in some small variations observed. The use of four trophic state indices indicated that indices designed for temperate lakes are inappropriate for the subtropical Peri lagoon. The lagoon was classified as oligotrophic for nutrients concentrations and meso-eutrophic for transparency and chlorophyll-a, which can be explained by the high densities and monodominance of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and the high recycling rates observed in warmer water bodies, when compared to the temperate ones.

  4. Magnitude and variability of methane production and concentration in tropical coastal lagoons sediments

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    Antonella Petruzzella

    Full Text Available AIM: Coastal wetlands are potential zones for methane (CH4 production. The present study aims to evaluate the spatial variation of CH4 production and concentration in ten tropical coastal lagoons, the influence of aquatic macrophytes on the sediment CH4 concentration and how the magnitude of these potential CH4 production rates compare to those in other ecosystems. METHODS: Sediments were sampled in ten coastal lagoons, with one site in the limnetic region and another site in aquatic macrophyte stands when they were present in the littoral region. We measured the CH4 production as a potential rate, and CH4 concentration was directly measured from sediment samples. RESULTS: The highest potential CH4 production (PMP rates were found in alkaline and hypersaline lagoons. However, Cabiúnas, which is a freshwater lagoon densely colonized by aquatic macrophytes, also exhibited a high PMP rate. We also observed that the sediment CH4 concentration in the littoral region was higher than in the limnetic region in all of the investigated lagoons except Paulista, which presented the opposite pattern. The PMP rates observed in the studied lagoons were low compared to other aquatic ecosystems. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the sediments of saline lagoons are important CH4 production sites, and in general, aquatic macrophytes have a positive influence on methanogenesis, which was evident based on the CH4 concentrations present in the sediments of these lagoons. Further studies should focus on the processes underlying the CH4 patterns observed in the tropical coastal lagoons, especially concerning the coupling between CH4 production and concentration.

  5. Distributions of phytoplankton in a coastal lagoon of Mahin, Ondo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distributions of phytoplankton were investigated in Mahin Lagoon within Transgressive mud coast of Ondo, Western Nigeria. Collections and analyses of samples of phytoplankton and surface waters (for some physico-chemical parameters) were done at fifteen stations along the stretch of the lagoon in October 2013 and ...

  6. Consistency of temporal and habitat-related differences among assemblages of fish in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Charles A.; Rotherham, Douglas; Johnson, Daniel D.

    2011-12-01

    The consistency of habitat-related differences in coastal lagoon fish assemblages was assessed across different spatial and temporal scales. Multimesh gillnets were used to sample assemblages of fish on a monthly basis for 1-year in three habitats (shallow seagrass, shallow bare and deep substrata) at two locations (>1 km apart), in each of two coastal lagoons (approximately 500 km apart), in southeastern Australia. A total of 48 species was sampled with 34 species occurring in both lagoons and in all three habitats; species caught in only one lagoon or habitat occurred in low numbers. Ten species dominated assemblages and accounted for more than 83% of all individuals sampled. In both lagoons, assemblages in the deep habitat consistently differed to those in the shallow strata (regardless of habitat). Several species were caught more frequently or in larger numbers in the deep habitat. Assemblages in the two shallow habitats did not differ consistently and were dominated by the same species and sizes of fish, possibly due to habitat heterogeneity and the scale and method of sampling. Within each lagoon, very few between location differences in assemblages within each habitat were observed. Consistent differences in assemblages were detected between lagoons for the shallow bare and deep habitats, indicating there were some intrinsic differences in ichthyofauna between lagoons. Assemblages in spring differed to those in summer, which differed to those in winter for the shallow bare habitat in both lagoons, and the deep habitat in only one lagoon. Fish-habitat relationships are complex and differences in the fish fauna between habitats were often temporally inconsistent. This study highlights the need for greater testing of habitat relationships in space and time to assess the generality of observations and to identify the processes responsible for structuring assemblages.

  7. Temporal and spatial fluctuations of phytoplankton in a tropical coastal lagoon, southeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, S.; Bozelli, RL.; Esteves, FA.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community in the tropical coastal Imboassica lagoon, an environment naturally isolated from the ocean by a narrow sandbar, was analysed every two weeks for 19 months by sampling three sites. During this study, the lagoon received direct input of marine water three times, resulting in remarkable salinity, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton biomass variations in both temporal and spatial aspects. The phytoplankton biomass presented re...

  8. Spatial and temporal variation of water quality in the coastal lagoons of Sinaloa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Osuna, F.; Lopez-Aguiar, L. K.; Del Río-Chuljak, A.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A. C.

    2007-05-01

    The Mexican state of Sinaloa has 656 km of coastline and 221,600 ha of coastal lagoons, and is characterized by a high fishing and agriculture activity. It is well known that agricultural activities constitute a major factor affecting the water quality in the coastal waters. The current study focused on the 6 more important coastal lagoons of Sinaloa (Topolobampo-Ohuira-Santa María, Navachiste-San Ignacio-Macapule, Santa María-La Reforma, Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón, Ceuta and Teacapán-Agua Brava) with the aim to evaluate the water quality spatial and temporal variation at the lagoons (physico-chemical parameters, nutrients (N, P and Si), dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids and chlorophyll a) and to assess its eutrophication status. The water samples were collected in several stations at each lagoon (between 9 and 23 stations depending on the lagoon area) at low and high tides, during three different weather periods (dry-warm, rainy and dry-cold seasons) between May 2004 and April 2005. Mean concentrations of nutrients (μM), dissolved oxygen (mg/L) and chlorophyll a (mg/m3) obtained for each variable were comparable between lagoons (total N=51±45; total P= 2.5±1.5; Si=23±31; DO=6.7±1.8; Chll=1.7±1.9) although seasonal and spatial differences were observed at each lagoon. The nutrient concentrations measured fell in the typical concentration intervals for coastal lagoons; however, critical sampling points were identified and related to direct discharges of untreated effluents from municipal wastes, aquaculture farms and agriculture drain ditches.

  9. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and denitrification processes. The results presented here show that the potential activity of anaerobic nitrate

  10. Organochlorine pesticides in sediment and biological samples from the coastal lagoons of Nicaragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montenegro, S.; Lacayo, M.; Picado, F.; Lopez, A.

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua to investigate the contamination of the coastal lagoons with residues of agricultural pesticides. Samples were taken during 1995 from the areas of Estero Real, Padre Ramos, Maderas Negras, Naranjo and Paso Caballos, and during 1996 from Aposentillo to Estero Barquito - Posoltega River. Analysis of the samples of sediment and aquatic life (fishes, oysters and bivalves) showed that they were contaminated with organochlorine pesticides. The pesticides found in the highest concentrations were toxaphene (1,734 μg.kg -1 ) and p,p-DDE (275 μg kg -1 ). These data indicate widespread contamination of the ecosystem with organochlorine pesticides in the main Pacific coastal lagoons of Nicaragua, resulting from intensive agricultural use of pesticides during the past decades. The contamination has been carried from the agricultural areas to the coastal lagoons by the rivers passing through the cultivated areas. (author)

  11. The Dynamics of Mercury Speciation and Transport at a Central California Coastal Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Dimova, N. T.; Merckling, J.; Kehrlein, N. C.; Hohn, R. A.; Richardson, C. M.; Johnson, C. D.; Fisher, A. T.; Lamborg, C. H.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated spatial and temporal trends in total mercury and monomethylmercury (MMHg) in groundwater, lagoon water, and nearshore seawater to assess the drivers of MMHg production in a coastal lagoon system. Many West Coast streams transition from estuarine to lagoon conditions in the dry season when a sand berm develops at the stream mouth, restricting surface water exchange with the ocean. Because lagoons accumulate nutrients from their upstream watershed they are susceptible to eutrophication, which can promote the growth of anaerobic bacteria. In nearshore settings, these bacteria are primarily responsible for producing MMHg, a bioaccumulative neurotoxin. We found that MMHg concentrations in lagoon water (1 - 5 pM) were higher than in groundwater (0.2 - 1 pM) and coastal seawater (0.1 - 0.6 pM). Groundwater depth profiles combined with subsurface resistivity images suggest MMHg in lagoon water was transported through the sand berm to adjacent seawater. MMHg in seawater and groundwater followed similar trends, providing additional evidence of groundwater-surface water interaction. MMHg in groundwater directly below the lagoon was consistently higher where dissolved oxygen and NO3- decreased, implying MMHg production by anaerobic bacteria. Over a ~7-hour period we observed a 0.6 pM decrease in groundwater MMHg (1 to 0.4 pM) that coincided with a decrease in water temperature (16.5 to 13 °C). We hypothesize that microbial activity, and consequently MMHg production, were enhanced in warmer water. Because coastal lagoons support intricate food webs and serve as nurseries for a variety of organisms, processes that influence mercury speciation and transport in these ecosystems may have a disproportionate impact on nearshore mercury biogeochemical cycling.

  12. Trematode communities in snails can indicate impact and recovery from hurricanes in a tropical coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Macedo, María Leopoldina; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2011-11-01

    In September 2002, Hurricane Isidore devastated the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. To understand its effects on the parasites of aquatic organisms, we analyzed long-term monthly population data of the horn snail Cerithidea pliculosa and its trematode communities in Celestún, Yucatán, Mexico before and after the hurricane (February 2001 to December 2009). Five trematode species occurred in the snail population: Mesostephanus appendiculatoides, Euhaplorchis californiensis, two species of the genus Renicola and one Heterophyidae gen. sp. Because these parasites use snails as first intermediate hosts, fishes as second intermediate hosts and birds as final hosts, their presence in snails depends on food webs. No snails were present at the sampled sites for 6 months after the hurricane. After snails recolonised the site, no trematodes were found in snails until 14 months after the hurricane. It took several years for snail and trematode populations to recover. Our results suggest that the increase in the occurrence of hurricanes predicted due to climate change can impact upon parasites with complex life cycles. However, both the snail populations and their parasite communities eventually reached numbers of individuals and species similar to those before the hurricane. Thus, the trematode parasites of snails can be useful indicators of coastal lagoon ecosystem degradation and recovery. Copyright © 2011 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Organic carbon isotope ratios of recent sediments from coastal lagoons of the Gulf of Mexico, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botello, A.V.; Mandelli, E.F.; Macko, S.; Parker, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic carbon was determined in the sediments of seven coastal lagoons of the Gulf of Mexico, Mexico. For most of the lagoons the delta 13 C values for sediments ranged from -20.1 to -23.9 parts per thousand. Anomalously low values, -26.8 to 29.3 parts per thousand were determined in sediments of two of the studied lagoons, probably due to the presence of organic carbon from anthropogenic sources, naturally absent in these environments. The delta 13 C values determined in the tissues of oysters collected at the same time in the different lagoons were very similar to those recorded in the sediments. (author)

  14. Nutrient fluxes and net metabolism in a coastal lagoon SW peninsula of Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Duarte, R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluxes of nutrients and net metabolism were estimated in coastal lagoon Magdalena Bay using LOICZ biogeochemical model. In situ data were obtained from 14 sites in the lagoon and also from a fixed site in the adjacent ocean area. Intense upwelling (February to July and faint upwelling (August to January were analyzed from monthly time series. The Temperature, nitrite + nitrate, ammonium and phosphate within the lagoon showed significant differences (p<0.05 between the two periods. Salinity (p=0.408 was more homogeneous (no significantly different due to mixing processes. During the intense upwelling period, nutrients increased in and out of the lagoon due to the influence of Transitional Water and Subartic Water transported by the California Current. However, during the faint upwelling, from August to January, the Transition Water and Subtropical Surface Water were predominant. Magdalena Bay showed denitrification processes of throughout the year as it occurred in other semi-arid coastal lagoons. It also showed a net autotrophic metabolism during intense upwelling and heterotrophic metabolism during faint upwelling. Understanding nutrient flows and net metabolism through simple biogeochemical models can provide tools for better management of the coastal zone.

  15. Impact of mussel bioengineering on fine-grained sediment dynamics in a coastal lagoon: a numerical modelling investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Pernille Louise; Lumborg, Ulrik; Bundgaard, Klavs

    2017-01-01

    Rødsand lagoon in southeast Denmark is a non-tidal coastal lagoon. It is home to a wide range of marine flora and fauna and part of the Natura 2000 network. An increase in turbidity through elevated levels of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) within the lagoon may affect the ecosystem health...... of the study was to investigate the impact of a mussel reef on sediment import and SSC in a semi-enclosed lagoon through the development of a bioengineering modelling application that makes it possible to include the filtrating effect of mussels in a numerical model of the lagoonal system. The numerical...

  16. Zooplankton of an urban coastal lagoon: composition and association with environmental factors and summer fish kill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo C. e Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton may be regarded as a sensitive tool for monitoring environmental variations in coastal lagoons due to their ability to immediately react to changes in the water column trophic features and salinity levels. As a coastal lagoon with a broad history of anthropic influence, Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is widely used for water sports and artisanal fishing. The present study aimed to expand the knowledge base about zooplankton in the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon by assessing the composition and time-spatial distribution of the major zooplankton groups. Samples were collected fortnightly from at four distinct sampling points August 2001 to July 2002. At each point, salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and water transparency were measured. During the study period, the lagoon behaved as an spatially homogeneous environment in what regards the abiotic variables. However, all these variables showed significant differences along the time, mainly related to seasonality (air temperature and rainy and dry periods. The zooplankton community showed low taxonomic richness, with the predominance of species commonly found in coastal lagoons, especially with mesohaline conditions, as well as those found in estuaries. An interesting fact was the rise in zooplankton abundance at all sampling points right after a fish kill event. Such increase was caused mainly by the Brachionus plicatilis O.F. Müller 1786 species. Thus, the zooplankton community was affected by physical and chemical factors, mainly by the dissolved oxygen decline event and variations in the influx of seawater into the lagoon. In addition, phytoplankton availability and fish predation pressure were suggested as important regulating factors of the zooplankton community.

  17. Winter-summer nutrient composition linkage to algae-produced toxins in shellfish at a eutrophic coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Botelho, Maria João; Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Moita, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Célia

    2012-10-01

    The current work examines the linkage of pronounced winter-summer fluctuations on the nutrient composition with phytoplankton assemblages and mussel toxicity produced by the presence of toxic dinoflagellates. The work was performed at the Óbidos lagoon, a coastal eutrophic ecosystem that is permanently connected to an area characterized by frequent upwelling episodes. The lagoon and adjoining coastal area exhibit recurrent incidents of diarrhetic and paralytic shellfish poisoning. The conclusions are based on: (1) inorganic and organic nutrients at five sites of the lower, middle and upper Óbidos lagoon, and inorganic nutrients at two sites of the adjacent coastal area; biannual campaigns were performed in winter and summer between 2006 and 2010; (2) phytoplankton assemblages at three sites of the lagoon (located at lower and upper areas) in winter and summer of 2009; (3) algae-derived toxicity of wild mussels from the lower lagoon and coastal area, on a 1-2 week time scale, over 2006 and 2009. Nutrient molar ratios in Óbidos lagoon contrast between winter and summer. The lower median ratios DIN:P (31 and 0.8) and Si:P (11 and 3.3) in summer reflect the excess of phosphate. Excess was mainly attributed to phosphorus regeneration in sediments of the upper lagoon with accentuated symptoms of eutrophication. Dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus were also higher in summer, particularly in this area. No significant winter-summer differences were recorded for nutrient ratios in the adjacent coastal area. Phytoplankton assemblages pointed to a winter-summer contrast characterized by a shift of non-siliceous-based phytoplankton to diatoms. The toxic dinoflagellate species (Gymnodinium catenatum, Dinophysis cf. acuminata and Dinophysis acuta), presumably imported from the adjacent coast following upwelling episodes in summer, were observed in the lower lagoon. In summer of the two surveyed years, toxins produced by dinoflagellates occurred in

  18. Pan-European management of coastal lagoons: A science-policy-stakeholder interface perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillebø, Ana I.; Stålnacke, Per; Gooch, Geoffrey D.; Krysanova, Valentina; Bielecka, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of the work carried out in the scope of a three years collaborative research project was to develop science-based strategies and a decision support framework for the integrated management of coastal lagoons and their catchments and, in this context, to enhance connectivity between research and policymaking. In this paper our main objective is to share the lessons learned from the innovative methodology used throughout the project. To achieve the proposed objectives, the multidisciplinary scientific knowledge in the project team was combined and integrated with the knowledge and views of local stakeholders of four selected European coastal lagoons, using a three step participatory approach. With this innovative approach, which included the usage of eco-hydrological and water quality-modelling tools, the team developed and analyzed integrated scenarios of possible economic development and environmental impacts in four European lagoons and their catchments. These scenarios were presented and discussed with stakeholders, giving rise to management recommendations for each case study lagoon. Results show that some management options might be transferrable to other European lagoons having similar climatic, geophysical and socio-economic settings. In management terms, the project output provides a set of policy guidelines derived from the different analyses conducted and proposes initiatives concerning management implementation in a local-regional-national-European setting.

  19. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in Mugil cephalus from seven coastal lagoons of NW Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-Espericueta, Martin G; Osuna-López, J Isidro; Jiménez-Vega, Martha A; Castillo-Bueso, Daniel; Muy-Rangel, Maria D; Rubio-Carrasco, Werner; López-López, Gabriel; Izaguirre-Fierro, Gildardo; Voltolina, Domenico

    2011-11-01

    The increasing order of the mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tissues of Mugil cephalus of seven coastal lagoons of Sinaloa State (NW Mexico) was liver > gills > muscle, while for Pb it was gills > muscle ≥ liver. There were no differences between the mean concentrations of Cd and Pb of the three tissues determined in the samples of the seven lagoons and, although there were some significant differences, there was no indication of a latitude-related trend in the distribution of Cu and Zn: the Cu content of the muscle tended to be higher in the northern than in the southern lagoons, although in the case of the gills the highest and lowest mean values indicated an opposite trend, with the highest and lowest values in one southern and one northern lagoon. In the case of the liver, there were no differences and no indication of a regional trend. There were no differences in the mean Zn contents of muscle and gills; in the case of the liver, one of the lagoons of the central part of the state had a significantly higher value than one of the southern lagoons and all the rest had similar values. In addition, there was no clear indication of season-related differences in any of the three tissues. According to our results, the metal contents of the muscle of this species are not of concern for human health, since the allowable ingestion would be in the order of 0.9 kg/day.

  20. Ecological risk assessment of pesticide residues in coastal lagoons of Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Cattini, Chantal; Tolosa, Immaculada; Montenegro-Guillén, S; Lacayo, Martha; Cruz, Adela

    2002-10-01

    A detailed investigation on the contamination with chlorinated hydrocarbons and organophosphorous pesticides of the coastal lagoon system of Chinandega district, Nicaragua, allowed the identification of contaminant sources and lagoon areas currently more contaminated. The discharge of rivers into the lagoons is the main transport pathway of pesticide residues; whereas atmospheric depositions are likely to be the main pathway for the introduction of PCBs into the lagoons. Analysis of water samples indicates widespread contamination with soluble organophosphorous compounds, such as dichlorvos, up to 410 ng L(-1), diazinon, up to 150 ng L(-1), and chlorpyrifos, up to 83 ng L(-1). Analyses of suspended matter for low solubility organochlorine (OC) compounds revealed very high concentrations of toxaphene, up to 17,450 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw), total DDTs up to 478 ng g(-1), Aroclor 1254, up to 119 ng g(-1) (dw), and lower concentrations for other compounds. Lagoon sediments contain high concentrations also of toxaphene, from 7.9 to 6,900 ng g(-1) (dw), and DDTs, from 1.5 to 321 ng g(-1) (dw), and lower concentrations of chlorpyrifos, hexachlorocyclohexanes, chlordane and other residues. Concentrations of OCs in soft tissues of clams are statistically correlated with the concentrations of the same compounds in bottom sediments, indicating that sediments are a source of contaminants to biota. In some areas of the lagoon system, concentration of residues in sediments are far above recommended threshold guideline values for protection of aquatic life, and may cause acute and chronic toxic effects on more sensitive aquatic species. Despite the ban on the use of toxaphene and DDT, residues of these compounds are still entering the lagoons due to erosion of, and leaching from, agriculture soils in the region. Measures for protection of the lagoon ecosystem are discussed.

  1. Groundwater dependence of coastal lagoons: The case of La Pletera salt marshes (NE Catalonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menció, A.; Casamitjana, X.; Mas-Pla, J.; Coll, N.; Compte, J.; Martinoy, M.; Pascual, J.; Quintana, X. D.

    2017-09-01

    Coastal wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems of the world, playing an important role in coastal defense and wildlife conservation. These ecosystems, however, are usually affected by human activities, which may cause a loss and degradation of their ecological status, a decline of their biodiversity, an alteration of their ecological functioning, and a limitation of their ecosystem services. La Pletera salt marshes (NE Spain) are located in a region mainly dominated by agriculture and tourism activities. Part of these wetlands and lagoons has been affected by an incomplete construction of an urban development and in this moment is the focus of a Life+ project, whose aim is to restore this protected area. Several studies have analyzed the role of hydrological regime in nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton in this area, however, the role of groundwater was never considered as a relevant factor in the lagoon dynamics, and its influence is still unknown. In this study, the hydrogeological dynamics in La Pletera salt marshes has been analyzed, as a basis to set sustainable management guidelines for this area. In order to determine their dependence on groundwater resources, monthly hydrochemical (with major ions and nutrients) and isotopic (δ18OH2O and δD) campaigns have been conducted, from November 2014 to October 2015. In particular, groundwater from six wells, surface water from two nearby streams and three permanent lagoons, and sea water was considered in these surveys. Taking into account the meteorological data and the water levels in the lagoons, the General Lake Model has been conducted to determine, not only evaporation and rainfall occurring in the lagoons, but also the total inflows and outflows. In addition, the Gonfiantini isotopic model, together with equilibrium chemical-speciation/mass transfer models, has been used to analyze the evaporation and the physicochemical processes affecting the lagoons. Results show that during the dry

  2. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption in a tropical coastal lagoon

    OpenAIRE

    Farjalla,V. F.; Enrich-Prast,A.; Esteves,F. A.; Cimbleris,A. C. P.

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this research were to determine the main limiting nutrient to bacterial growth in Imboassica lagoon, southeastern Brazil, to estimate the percentage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) available for bacterial growth, and to determine the bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) of natural assemblages. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption were determined in batch culture experiments, in which water samples were supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus together or separately, or incubated w...

  3. Ecosystem response to human- and climate-induced environmental stress on an anoxic coastal lagoon (Etoliko, Greece) since 1930 AD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsodendris, Andreas; Brauer, Achim; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Putyrskaya, Victoria; Klemt, Eckehard; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Pross, Jörg

    To better constrain the effects of anthropogenic impact on coastal wetlands with respect to natural variability, we here analyze annually laminated sediments from Etoliko lagoon (western Greece, Mediterranean Sea) spanning the last*80 years. Subdecadal- scale palynomorph (pollen and dinoflagellate

  4. Eutrophication patterns in an eastern Mediterranean coastal lagoon: Vassova, Delta Nestos, Macedonia, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ORFANIDIS

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of an intensive monitoring study of main eutrophication parameters in relation to fish farming management, climate and hydrography in the Vassova coastal lagoon (Nestos Delta are presented. The overall aim is to produce basic knowledge in order to contribute to the management of eutrophication of coastal lagoons at local and national levels. Due to extensive spatiotemporal variability of the measured parameters correlation and regression polynomial analysis was used to identify patterns (p<0.05. Freshwater was the main source of nitrate and phosphate in the lagoon. This finding has justified the reduction of freshwater inflow in the past, which, however, has increased mean salinity to 30 PSU and reduced spatial salinity gradients. Maximum nitrate values in winter coincided with adverse climatic and hydrographic conditions (high precipitation, strong NE to E winds and low tide and fish farming management that hinder water circulation. Dissolved phosphorus variability indicated the combination of the external (freshwaters and internal (sediment P-sources. N/P water values indicated nitrogen being the most important nutrient for primary producers throughout the year, except in winter, when phosphorus was the most important nutrient. Practical measures for improving fish farming practices to decrease “eutrophication risk” during winter are suggested. Existing nutrient data from the Vassova and from other Greek lagoons in comparison were also presented and discussed.

  5. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption in a tropical coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Farjalla

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to determine the main limiting nutrient to bacterial growth in Imboassica lagoon, southeastern Brazil, to estimate the percentage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC available for bacterial growth, and to determine the bacterial growth efficiency (BGE of natural assemblages. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption were determined in batch culture experiments, in which water samples were supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus together or separately, or incubated without nutrient additions. When added together, N and P stimulated higher bacterial growth rates and production, as well as higher DOC consumption. The BGEs and DOC consumption rates were strongly dependent on the method used to determine bacterial production. The BGE ranged from 11 to 72%. However, only a minor fraction of bulk DOC was consumed by the planktonic bacteria (from 0.7 to 3.4%. The results suggest that low availability of phosphorus and nitrogen coupled with excess organic carbon was the main factor responsible for the relatively low bacterial utilization of DOC in Imboassica lagoon.

  6. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption in a tropical coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjalla, V F; Enrich-Prast, A; Esteves, F A; Cimbleris, A C P

    2006-05-01

    The aims of this research were to determine the main limiting nutrient to bacterial growth in Imboassica lagoon, southeastern Brazil, to estimate the percentage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) available for bacterial growth, and to determine the bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) of natural assemblages. Bacterial growth and DOC consumption were determined in batch culture experiments, in which water samples were supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus together or separately, or incubated without nutrient additions. When added together, N and P stimulated higher bacterial growth rates and production, as well as higher DOC consumption. The BGEs and DOC consumption rates were strongly dependent on the method used to determine bacterial production. The BGE ranged from 11 to 72%. However, only a minor fraction of bulk DOC was consumed by the planktonic bacteria (from 0.7 to 3.4%). The results suggest that low availability of phosphorus and nitrogen coupled with excess organic carbon was the main factor responsible for the relatively low bacterial utilization of DOC in Imboassica lagoon.

  7. DEVELOPING ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION BASED ON AN URBAN COASTAL LAGOON SOCIO-ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Silveira

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the development of environmental education activities focused on two public school classes at Florianópolis, SC, such activities were based on socio-environmental issues related to an urban coastal lagoon. Field trips, the built of a clay mockup and classroom dynamics were conducted from June to December 2006. Students were able to reflect about the problems and they also tried to suggest solutions.

  8. Seasonal and temporal dynamics of macrophytic assemblages and abiotic parameters of coastal lagoons in Western Greece (Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christia, Chrysoula; Papastergiadou, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Coastal lagoons are considered naturally stressed systems that experience frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations and they are usually considered as physically controlled ecosystems. Coastal lagoons of Western Greece are representative of four different lagoon types covering a wide range of physiographical and hydrological characteristics. The seasonal differences in the physico-chemical parameters monitored from 2005 to 2007 were reduced in lagoon types (II and III) which characterized by better seawater communication when compared with the chocked lagoon types (Type I and IV). The latter types showed lower salinity values and high nutrient concentrations especially during the wet period. The macrophytic assemblages of coastal lagoons are typically dominated by few genera with great environmental plasticity and salinity competition, among other structuring abiotic variables. The implementation of DCA analysis revealed five distinct macrophytic assemblages in which dominant species were the angiosperms Zostera noltii, Ruppia cirrhosa, Cymodocea nodosa, Potamogeton pectinatus, the charophytes Lamprothamnium papulosum and Chara hispida f. corfuensis, as well as species preferring more marine conditions such as Acanthophora nayadiformis and Cystoseira barbata. The lagoon type IV differs from all other distinguished lagoon types due to the dominance of the species Potamogeton pectinatus and the charophyte Chara hispida f. corfuensis. Regarding the macrophytic assemblages and the univariate variables, important differences were recorded between lagoon types. Chocked lagoons showed low number of species and Shannon diversity index comparing with restricted lagoon types (Types II and III). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that transparency, pH, nitrates, alkalinity and Chl-a could affect the values of the above variables. A decline of angiosperms was referred on a worldwide scale and recorded also in coastal lagoons of Western Greece. A gradual

  9. Environmental changes and zooplankton temporal and spatial variation in a disturbed Brazilian coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, C W C; Kozlowsky-Suzuki, B; Esteves, F A

    2007-05-01

    The Imboassica lagoon, located in the Municipality of Macaé (RJ), is separated from the sea by a sand bar, and its surroundings are partially occupied by residential areas. This coastal lagoon has undergone environmental degradation due to sewage input and artificial sand bar openings. The temporal and spatial variation of environmental variables and zooplankton were studied monthly for four years. There were five artificial openings of the sand bar during the period of study, mostly in the rainy season. Besides osmotic changes, these events caused the drainage of the water of the lagoon into the sea, loss of total organic nitrogen, and an increase of total phosphorus. The zooplankton community of Imboassica lagoon included freshwater and marine taxa, holoplanktonic, meroplanktonic and nectobenthonic forms. Polychaeta, Bivalvia and Gastropoda larvae, and the taxa of Rotifera Hexarthra spp., Lecane bulla, Synchaeta bicornis, nauplii of Cyclopoida and Calanoida copepods were considered constant taxa. Distinct zooplankton assemblages were found during zooplankton spatial surveys in oligohaline and mesohaline conditions. The successful zooplankton populations were either favored by the disturbance of the sand bar opening, such as the veligers of the gastropod Heleobia australis, or capable of fast recovery after the closing of the sand bar, during the succession from a marine into an oligohaline environment, such as Hexarthra spp.. Such populations seemed well adapted to the stress conditions usually found in the lagoon due to osmotic changes, column mixing, nutrient input, and high fish predation pressure. Rare species in the community, such as Moina minuta, presented population increases all over the lagoon under oligohaline conditions.

  10. Environmental changes and zooplankton temporal and spatial variation in a disturbed brazilian coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CWC. Branco

    Full Text Available The Imboassica lagoon, located in the Municipality of Macaé (RJ, is separated from the sea by a sand bar, and its surroundings are partially occupied by residential areas. This coastal lagoon has undergone environmental degradation due to sewage input and artificial sand bar openings. The temporal and spatial variation of environmental variables and zooplankton were studied monthly for four years. There were five artificial openings of the sand bar during the period of study, mostly in the rainy season. Besides osmotic changes, these events caused the drainage of the water of the lagoon into the sea, loss of total organic nitrogen, and an increase of total phosphorus. The zooplankton community of Imboassica lagoon included freshwater and marine taxa, holoplanktonic, meroplanktonic and nectobenthonic forms. Polychaeta, Bivalvia and Gastropoda larvae, and the taxa of Rotifera Hexarthra spp., Lecane bulla, Synchaeta bicornis, nauplii of Cyclopoida and Calanoida copepods were considered constant taxa. Distinct zooplankton assemblages were found during zooplankton spatial surveys in oligohaline and mesohaline conditions. The successful zooplankton populations were either favored by the disturbance of the sand bar opening, such as the veligers of the gastropod Heleobia australis, or capable of fast recovery after the closing of the sand bar, during the succession from a marine into an oligohaline environment, such as Hexarthra spp.. Such populations seemed well adapted to the stress conditions usually found in the lagoon due to osmotic changes, column mixing, nutrient input, and high fish predation pressure. Rare species in the community, such as Moina minuta, presented population increases all over the lagoon under oligohaline conditions.

  11. Tidal hydrodynamics in a two-inlet coastal lagoon in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, David; Ramírez-Félix, Evlin; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the effects of friction and advection in the hydrodynamics of a two-inlet coastal lagoon, Santa María La Reforma, in Northwest Mexico. A vertically integrated numerical model is used to describe sea level variations and tidal currents, and to study the dynamics inside the system. Observed sea level and current measurements were used to calibrate the model. Results show a ˜90 min phase lag of the tidal signal in the center of the system with respect to both inlets. Tidal currents greater than 1.0 m s-1 were recorded and modeled at both inlets. The sea level in the lagoon shows one-quarter of period of M2 out of phase (˜3 h) with respect to the velocity. Bottom friction generated the greatest M4 harmonic and largest tidal asymmetries at the narrowest section of the lagoon, ˜35 km away from the inlets. The tidal momentum balance along the main axis of the lagoon was dominated by pressure gradient and friction, describing a quasi-standing tidal wave in currents and in amplitude. This behavior resulted from waves traveling in opposite directions from the two tidal inlets, causing constructive interference in elevation but destructive interference inflow.

  12. Assessment of ecological quality of coastal lagoons with a combination of phytobenthic and water quality indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christia, Chrysoula; Giordani, Gianmarco; Papastergiadou, Eva

    2014-09-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecotones between continents and the sea. Coastal lagoons of Western Greece, subjected to different human pressures, were classified into four different types based on their hydromorphological characteristics and monitored over a three year period for their biotic and abiotic features. Six ecological indices based on water quality parameters (TSI-Chl-a, TSI-TP, TRIX), benthic macrophytes (E-MaQI, EEI-c) and an integrated index TWQI, were applied to assess the ecological status of studied lagoons under real conditions. The trophic status ranged from oligotrophic to hypertrophic according to the index applied. The ecological quality of transitional water ecosystems can be better assessed by using indices based on benthic macrophytes as changes in abundance and diversity of sensitive and tolerant species are the first evidence of incoming eutrophication. The multi-parametric index TWQI can be considered appropriate for the ecological assessment of these ecosystems due to its robustness and the simple application procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Will nutrient and light limitation prevent eutrophication in an anthropogenically-impacted coastal lagoon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Rita B.; Guerra, Cátia C.; Barbosa, Ana B.; Galvão, Helena M.

    2017-06-01

    The Ria Formosa coastal lagoon (southern Portugal) is a highly productive and valuable temperate ecosystem, subjected to strong anthropogenic impacts and highly vulnerable to climate change. The main goal of this work is to understand ecosystem susceptibility to eutrophication, by evaluating the isolated and combined effects of nutrient (N, P and Si) and light enrichments on phytoplankton growth and community composition during autumn, winter and spring. Microcosms of natural phytoplankton collected in the lagoon were subjected to different nutrient and light treatments and incubated in situ for 48 h. Nutrient consumption, and phytoplankton growth and community structure were evaluated using spectrophotometric methods, and inverted and epifluorescence microscopy. Diatoms were the only group potentially limited by nitrogen, and only during spring. Increased nutrient consumptions were observed for all nutrient additions in all seasons, not associated with phytoplankton growth, suggesting that luxury consumption was used to build up intracellular nutrient pools. Responses to light enrichment were inconsistent among phytoplankton groups, probably due to a high taxonomic seasonal variability. Positive responses to light enrichment were mostly observed during winter. Negative synergistic interactions between nutrients and light were also observed. We conclude that eutrophication is currently not a problem in the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon, but future nutrient enrichments may lead to accelerated growth of specific functional groups and species, if light is not limiting.

  14. Coastal lagoons and beach ridges as complementary sedimentary archives for the reconstruction of Holocene relative sea-level changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Fruergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Coastal lagoons and beach ridges are genetically independent, though non-continuous, sedimentary archives. We here combine the results from two recently published studies in order to produce an 8000-year-long record of Holocene relative sea-level changes on the island of Samsø, southern Kattegat,...... proximate occurrence of coastal lagoons and beach ridges allows us to produce seamless time series of relative sea-level changes from field sites in SW Scandinavia and in similar coastal environments.......Coastal lagoons and beach ridges are genetically independent, though non-continuous, sedimentary archives. We here combine the results from two recently published studies in order to produce an 8000-year-long record of Holocene relative sea-level changes on the island of Samsø, southern Kattegat...

  15. Zooplankton assemblages and biomass during a 4-period survey in a northern Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam-Hoai, T; Rougier, C

    2001-01-01

    The authors proposed to examine zooplankton biomass at three stations inside (T and Z) and outside (M) a coastal lagoon of the north-western Mediterranean Sea. Station T represented the lagoon central area, and station Z was positioned in a shellfish farming sector, while the seaside station (M) served as a reference of marine environment. Analyses were designed to outline the net zooplankton assemblages (taxonomic structures and length distributions) in different environmental conditions, including the farming activity. A discriminant analysis of environmental variables determined that temperature, salinity and phytoplankton implied mainly in spatial pattern of the samples. An ordination of taxa biomasses showed two main factors which might contribute to the organisation of the zooplankton assemblages: the geographical position and the thermal period. The geographical position integrated the lagoon-sea water exchange under forcing parameters (habitat, tides and winds). The thermal period reflected both the populations development cycles and the environmental constraints (temperature, salinity, trophic resources). The resulting effects appeared in structured zooplankton assemblages in space and time. The number of 50 microns interval length classes and of taxa decreased from the seaside and the lagoon central area free of farming activity to the shallower farming zone. But the biomass-length distribution profiles did not closely follow such an expected opposition between opened and confined areas: more extended profiles were observed at station Z. Biomass dominant size classes concerned the range up to 300 microns. This size category appeared to collapse in terms of biomass from the seaside or central area of the lagoon towards the farming area, similarly to zooplankton global biomass fluctuations. Difference between biomass levels and between biomass structures suggested that net zooplankton partly acted as food competitors of macro-filtering organisms, and as

  16. Light regime and components of turbidity in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrador, Biel; Pretus, Joan Lluís

    2008-03-01

    The underwater light regime of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Albufera des Grau, Balearic Islands) was studied during four years in order to characterise the spatial and temporal variations in the light attenuation coefficient ( K) and to assess the relative contribution of the different water components to total light attenuation. During the studied period K averaged 1.42 m -1 and ranged from 0.63 m -1 to 3.80 m -1. High temporal variability was observed in light attenuation coefficients, but the lagoon was spatially uniform. Percentage bottom irradiance in relation to specific requirements for the dominant macrophyte species ( Ruppia cirrhosa) was used as an indicator of benthic light limitation. Macrophyte light limitation was expected to occur in the deepest areas of the lagoon during winter, the most turbid period of the annual cycle. During the macrophyte growing season, higher bottom irradiances were observed but a significant percentage of the lagoon benthos (17% in spring and 7% in summer) was expected to be light limited. In the deepest areas of the lagoon (>2 m) changes in bottom irradiance were related more to variations in the light attenuation coefficient than to variations in water level. However, water level appeared to play an important role in determining benthic light limitation at intermediate depths (1.5 m) for the range of K from 1.8 m -1 to 3.3 m -1. The partitioning of the light attenuation coefficient showed that phytoplankton was the main driver of the temporal dynamics of K, but only accounted for 44% of total light attenuation on average. The mean contributions of the other water components to K were: DOC (47%), tripton (6%), and water (3%). At low values of K, attenuation by DOC was responsible for up to 75% of total attenuation. An equation to predict K from the concentration of water components explained 93% of the variance.

  17. Evidence of North Africa's green revolution preserved in sedimentary organic matter deposited in three coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczkowski, Autumn J; Flower, Roger J; Thompson, Julian R; Ayache, Fethi; Ahmed, Mahmoud H; Ramdani, Mohamed; Turner, Simon

    2011-07-01

    Because of longer residence times and limited mixing in coastal lagoons, the impacts of anthropogenic nutrient loading to lagoon food webs are often more pronounced than in other coastal ecosystems. For these reasons, many lagoons also provide an excellent environment for the deposition and accumulation of organic matter (OM). Sediment cores were retrieved from three North African lagoons to provide records of recent environmental changes. We measured percentage nitrogen (%N), nitrogen stable isotope values (delta15N), and percentage organic matter (%OM), and we used radiometric dating techniques (210Pb, 137Cs) to examine the evidence for the intensification of upstream agricultural practices in sediment cores from Lake Manzala (Egypt), Ghar El Melh Lagoon (Tunisia), and Lagune de Nador (Morocco). With the exception of one core collected near a sewage outfall, sediments from Lake Manzala clearly reflected the impact of agricultural intensification following completion of the Aswan High Dam and delta barrages in the mid-1960s to early 1970s. Both %N and %OM more than doubled in three Manzala sediment cores, and delta15N values declined from 5 per thousand to < 1 per thousand. These changes reflect the increasing use of synthetic fertilizers (delta15N approximately 0 per thousand) from the 1960s to the present. Sediments from Ghar El Melh show a similar trend, with %N more than tripling, %OM increasing by 50%, and delta15N declining from 6 per thousand to 2 per thousand since 1965. These changes are consistent with the increasing use of water from a nearby river for crop irrigation and agricultural fertilizer use. Lagune de Nador receives relatively little agricultural drainage water, and core data did not show the same trends as Manzala and Ghar El Melh. Overall, the sediment core data from these systems reflect environmental shifts in the quantity, quality, and isotope signature of the deposited organic matter and confirm the concerns of local scientists and

  18. Estimating Coastal Lagoon Tidal Flooding and Repletion with Multidate ASTER Thermal Imagery

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    Thomas R. Allen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Coastal lagoons mix inflowing freshwater and tidal marine waters in complex spatial patterns. This project sought to detect and measure temperature and spatial variability of flood tides for a constricted coastal lagoon using multitemporal remote sensing. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER thermal infrared data provided estimates of surface temperature for delineation of repletion zones in portions of Chincoteague Bay, Virginia. ASTER high spatial resolution sea-surface temperature imagery in conjunction with in situ observations and tidal predictions helped determine the optimal seasonal data for analyses. The selected time series ASTER satellite data sets were analyzed at different tidal phases and seasons in 2004–2006. Skin surface temperatures of ocean and estuarine waters were differentiated by flood tidal penetration and ebb flows. Spatially variable tidal flood penetration was evaluated using discrete seed-pixel area analysis and time series Principal Components Analysis. Results from these techniques provide spatial extent and variability dynamics of tidal repletion, flushing, and mixing, important factors in eutrophication assessment, water quality and resource monitoring, and application of hydrodynamic modeling for coastal estuary science and management.

  19. Implementation challenges of climate change adaptation initiatives in coastal lagoon communities in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Vázquez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper explores some key challenges the Mexican government may face when implementing climate change adaptation initiatives in coastal lagoon communities in the Mexican state of Tabasco, in the Gulf of Mexico. I discuss some challenges state initiatives of this type may encounter considering the existence of local contentious political issues among various actors – fishers and the state-owned oil industry – that are at the core of the emergence of coastal environmental changes in the study site. A close analysis of local political, economic and environmental processes in coastal lagoon communities illustrates the existence of contentious issues among powerful actors over territory and its resources. It is in the context of these local, on the ground, issues that I argue that climate change adaptation interventions become highly political. I also argue that climate change policy analysis must be done in light of past and failed state interventions in Tabasco that have had a negative impact on ecosystems and fishers’ livelihoods. My analysis of climate change adaptation initiatives and fishers’ views on their local environmental problems is based on political ecology approaches to environmental narratives and critical literature on climate change.

  20. Impact of mussel bioengineering on fine-grained sediment dynamics in a coastal lagoon: A numerical modelling investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Pernille L.; Lumborg, Ulrik; Bundgaard, Klavs; Ernstsen, Verner B.

    2017-12-01

    Rødsand lagoon in southeast Denmark is a non-tidal coastal lagoon. It is home to a wide range of marine flora and fauna and part of the Natura 2000 network. An increase in turbidity through elevated levels of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) within the lagoon may affect the ecosystem health due to reduced light penetration. Increasing SSC levels within Rødsand lagoon could be caused by increasing storm intensity or by a sediment spill from dredging activities west of the lagoon in relation to the planned construction of the Fehmarnbelt fixed link between Denmark and Germany. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a mussel reef on sediment import and SSC in a semi-enclosed lagoon through the development of a bioengineering modelling application that makes it possible to include the filtrating effect of mussels in a numerical model of the lagoonal system. The numerical implementation of an exterior mussel reef generated a reduction in the SSC in the vicinity of the reef, through the adjacent inlet and in the western part of the lagoon. The mussel reef reduced the sediment import to Rødsand lagoon by 13-22% and reduced the SSC within Rødsand lagoon by 5-9% depending on the filtration rate and the reef length. The results suggest that the implementation of a mussel reef has the potential to relieve the pressure of increasing turbidity levels within a semi-enclosed lagoonal system. However, further assessment and development of the bioengineering application and resulting ecosystem impacts are necessary prior to actual implementation.

  1. Alien species of fish parasites in the coastal lakes and lagoons of the southern Baltic

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    Jolanta Morozińska-Gogol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Alien species are now found all over the world. New fish parasites have been unintentionally introduced with infected alien fish imported for aquaculture or have sometimes spread with their intermediate invertebrate hosts transported in the ballast waters of ships. Four alien fish parasites have been recorded in Polish coastal lakes and lagoons, all parasitising eels. Three were introduced with the final host - the Japanese eel - introduced for aquaculture (Anguillicola crassus, Pseudodactylogyrus anguillae and Pseudodactylogyrus bini and one (Paratenuisentis ambiguus with its sole intermediate host (Gammarus tigrinus.

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in lagoon and coastal processes of the southern Brazilian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Herz, R.

    1980-01-01

    From a collection of information gathered during a long period, through the orbital platforms SKYLAB and LANDSAT, it was possible to establish a method for the systematic study of the dynamical regime of lagoon and marine surface waters, on coastal plain of Rio Grande do Sul. The series of multispectral images analyzed by visual and automatic techniques put in evidence spatial and temporal variations reflected in the optical properties of waters, which carry different loads of materials in suspension. The identified patterns offer a synoptic picture of phenomena of great amplitude, from which trends of circulation can be inferred, correlating the atmospheric and hydrologic variables simultaneously to the overflight of orbital vehicles.

  3. Temporal and spatial fluctuations of phytoplankton in a tropical coastal lagoon, southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Melo

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community in the tropical coastal Imboassica lagoon, an environment naturally isolated from the ocean by a narrow sandbar, was analysed every two weeks for 19 months by sampling three sites. During this study, the lagoon received direct input of marine water three times, resulting in remarkable salinity, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton biomass variations in both temporal and spatial aspects. The phytoplankton biomass presented relatively low values ranging, on average, from 0.54 mg.L-1 in the station closest to the sea (station 1 to 1.34 mg.L-1 in the station close to a macrophyte bank (station 3. Diatoms and cryptomonads dominated in stations 1 and 2 (located relatively close to station 1, yet receiving the runoff of domestic sewage, and euglenoids, cryptomonads and dinoflagellates at station 3. Stations 1 and 2 usually presented the same dominant species but station 2 presented a higher phytoplankton biomass. On the other hand, station 3 showed more similar results concerning phytoplankton biomass with station 2, however the dominant species were usually different. The high fluctuations of salinity and the reduced nutrient availability are pointed out as the main factors structuring the dynamics of the phytoplankton community at the Imboassica lagoon.

  4. Temporal and spatial fluctuations of phytoplankton in a tropical coastal lagoon, southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, S; Bozelli, R L; Esteves, F A

    2007-08-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community in the tropical coastal Imboassica lagoon, an environment naturally isolated from the ocean by a narrow sandbar, was analysed every two weeks for 19 months by sampling three sites. During this study, the lagoon received direct input of marine water three times, resulting in remarkable salinity, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton biomass variations in both temporal and spatial aspects. The phytoplankton biomass presented relatively low values ranging, on average, from 0.54 mg x L(-1) in the station closest to the sea (station 1) to 1.34 mg x L(-1) in the station close to a macrophyte bank (station 3). Diatoms and cryptomonads dominated in stations 1 and 2 (located relatively close to station 1, yet receiving the runoff of domestic sewage), and euglenoids, cryptomonads and dinoflagellates at station 3. Stations 1 and 2 usually presented the same dominant species but station 2 presented a higher phytoplankton biomass. On the other hand, station 3 showed more similar results concerning phytoplankton biomass with station 2, however the dominant species were usually different. The high fluctuations of salinity and the reduced nutrient availability are pointed out as the main factors structuring the dynamics of the phytoplankton community at the Imboassica lagoon.

  5. Using coastal lagoons to better constrain the isostatic signal in the western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, M.; Rovere, A.; Melis, R. T.; Ghilardi, M.; Marriner, N.; Giaime, M.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal lagoons represent a very common feature of the microtidal Mediterranean coastlines. They are inland waterbodies, usually developing parallel to the coast, typically separated from the open sea by a sandy barrier. One or more restricted inlets ensure their continuous or intermittent connection to the open sea. The water depth is generally less than 1 m and seldom exceeds a few meters. They represent a very useful proxy for the reconstruction of Mediterranean Relative Sea Level (RSL). However, caution should be used in the definition of a correct indicative meaning that can be obtained only with a multiproxy analysis of both sedimentary features and faunal assemblages of the cores extracted in marshy to lagoonal environment. We report here the results of a wide coring campaign we carried out in in the last 2 years in a number of Mediterranean lagoons located close to important archaeological settlements in Corsica (France) Sardinia (Italy) and Mallorca Island (Spain). The multiproxy analysis of the cores allowed defining the depositional environments and their relationship (or non relationship) with the former mean sea level. These data were chronologically supported by a significant dataset of more than 100 new 14C dating performed on organic sediments, wood, plant remains and marine/lagoonal shells. We then produced alarge amount of new data to constrain the RSL evolution in the center of Western Mediterranean where the available geophysical models predict the largest glacio-hydro isostatic (GIA) influence at basin scale. However, such models where tested only on a limited dataset mainly composed of archaeological RSL indicators (i.e. last 2 ka BP). Our new record, expanding the last 10 ka BP, significantly improves the ability to define the general anatomy of Mediterranean Holocene RSL changes and to constrain the maximal GIA magnitude in the basin.

  6. Environmental dynamics as a structuring factor for microbial carbon utilization in a subtropical coastal lagoon

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    Cecilia eAlonso

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Laguna de Rocha belongs to a series of shallow coastal lagoons located along South America. It is periodically connected to the sea through a sand bar, exhibiting a hydrological cycle where physicochemical and biological gradients are rapidly established and destroyed. Its most frequent state is the separation of a Northern zone with low salinity, high turbidity and nutrient load, and extensive macrophyte growth, and a Southern zone with higher salinity and light penetration, and low nutrient content and macrophyte biomass. This zonation is reflected in microbial assemblages with contrasting abundance, activity and community composition. The physicochemical conditions exerted a strong influence on community composition, and transplanted assemblages rapidly transformed to resembling the community of the recipient environment. Moreover, the major bacterial groups responded differently to their passage between the zones, being either stimulated or inhibited by the environmental changes, and exhibiting contrasting sensitivities to gradients. Addition of allochthonous carbon sources induced pronounced shifts in the bacterial communities, which in turn affected the microbial trophic web by stimulating heterotrophic flagellates and virus production. By contrast, addition of organic and inorganic nutrient sources (P or N did not have significant effects. Altogether, our results suggest that i the planktonic microbial assemblage of this lagoon is predominantly carbon limited, ii different bacterial groups cope differently with this constraint, and iii the hydrological cycle of the lagoon plays a key role for the alleviation or aggravation of bacterial carbon limitation. Based on these findings we propose a model of how hydrology affects the composition of bacterioplankton and of carbon processing in Laguna de Rocha. This might serve as a starting hypothesis for further studies about the microbial ecology of this lagoon, and of comparable transitional

  7. Evaluation of the lake model FLake over a coastal lagoon during the THAUMEX field campaign

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    Patrick Le Moigne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The THAUMEX measurement campaign, carried out during the summer of 2011 in Thau, a coastal lagoon in southern France, focused on episodes of marine breezes. During the campaign, three intensive observation periods (IOPs were conducted and a large amount of data were collected. Subsequently, standalone modelling using the FLake lake model was used, first to assess the surface temperature and the surface energy balance, and second to determine the energy budget of the water column at the measurement site. Surface fluxes were validated against in situ measurements, and it was determined that heat exchanges are dominated by evaporation. We also demonstrated that the model was sensitive to the light extinction coefficient at Thau, due to its shallowness and clarity nature. A heat balance was calculated, and the inclusion of a radiative temperature has improved it, especially by reducing the nocturnal evaporation. The FLake lake model was then evaluated in three-dimensional numerical simulations performed with the Meso-NH mesoscale model, in order to assess the changing structure of the boundary layer above the lagoon during the IOPs more accurately. We highlighted the first time ever when Meso-NH and FLake were coupled and proved the ability of the coupled system to forecast a complex phenomenon but also the importance of the use of the FLake model was pointed out. We demonstrated the impact of the lagoon and more precisely the Lido, a sandy strip of land between the lagoon and the Mediterranean Sea, on the vertical distribution of turbulent kinetic energy, evidence of the turbulence induced by the breeze. This study showed the complementarities between standalone and coupled simulations.

  8. Phytoplankton relationship with bacterioplankton, dissolved carbohydrates and water characteristics in a subtropical coastal lagoon

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    Pablo S. Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Release of carbohydrates by phytoplankton enhances microbial diversity, promoting associations between algae and heterotrophic organisms. Thus, this work aimed to characterise the dissolved carbohydrates at a Brazilian subtropical coastal lagoon (Merin lagoon, in addition to determining their relationships with environmental parameters and phyto/bacterioplankton communities over one year. We analysed the relationships among physical, chemical and biological parameters by a principal component analysis (PCA after normalisation of data as z scores. Chlorophyceae showed the highest richness, although Bacillariophyceae and Cyanophyceae showed the highest densities. These classes are essentially represented by centric diatoms (Aulacoseira cf. muzzanensis and filamentous cyanobacteria (Planktolyngbya limnetica and Planktolyngbya cf. contorta. Merin lagoon showed a strong seasonal behaviour for most of parameters and phytoplanktonic density was mainly correlated with temperature, specific conductance, phosphate and total bright sunshine duration. Only combined dissolved carbohydrates (CDCHOs were found and their main components were glucose (31.6%, mannose/xylose (20.6%, ribose (13.9%, arabinose (8.9% and galacturonic acid (8.1%. The CDCHO amounts were higher in November, March-April and September and the December/January and July/August periods showed lower ones. Ribose was first detected only in the warm months and it gradually decreased with bacterial density. The carbohydrate concentration was coupled to phytoplanktonic density, except in December and January, when the bacterial density was increased. These results supported the significance of dissolved carbohydrates in associations with algae and bacteria in the freshwater planktonic environment. Our data reinforced the influence of phytoplankton community on the natural dissolved carbohydrate pool, besides the significance of such carbon source on the bacterial community dynamic.

  9. Pyrite as a proxy for the identification of former coastal lagoons in semiarid NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago O.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Albuquerque, Antonia G. B. M.; Sartor, Lucas R.; Gomes, Irlene S.; Artur, Adriana G.; Otero, Xosé L.

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to test the suitability of pyrite (FeS2) as a proxy for reconstructing past marine environmental conditions along the semiarid coast of Brazil. Morphological description combined with physicochemical analyses including Fe partitioning were conducted for soil depth profiles (30 and 60 cm depths) at three sites in two contrasting lagoons of the state of Ceará: a suspected former lagoon that would have been transformed into a freshwater "lake" at a site vegetated by Juncus effusus (site P1), and another lagoon with connection to the sea at sites vegetated by J. effusus (site P2) or Portulaca oleracea (site P3). Soil samples were collected in September 2010. Site P3 had more reducing conditions, reaching Eh values of -132 mV in the surface layer (0-10 cm), whereas minimum values for the P1 and P2 sites were +219 and +85 mV, respectively. Lower pyritic Fe values were found at site P1, with a degree of pyritization (DOP) ranging from 10 to 13%. At sites P2 and P3, DOP ranged from 9 to 67% and from 55 to 72%, respectively. These results are consistent with an interruption of tidal channels by eolian dune migration inducing strong changes in the hydrodynamics and physicochemical characteristics (lower salinity, oxidizing conditions) of these sites, causing the dieback of suspected former mangroves and a succession to freshwater marshes with an intermediate salt marsh stage. Together with other physicochemical signatures, pyrite can evidently serve as a useful proxy in tracking environmental changes in such ecotones, with implications for coastal management.

  10. The potential of tidal barrages and lagoons to manage future coastal flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prime, Thomas; Wolf, Judith; Lyddon, Charlotte; Plater, Andrew; Brown, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    In the face of a changing climate, adaptation and mitigation measures are important for coastal communities that seek to maintain their resilience to extreme events. Measures that can be classed as being both adaptation and mitigation can doubly contribute to this. Tide barrages and lagoons have the capacity to generate electricity from the rise and fall of the tide, which over the assets lifetime would contribute significantly towards emission reduction targets and towards a low carbon economy. In addition to electricity generation, the barrage or lagoon can also act as a flood defence during extreme events. This means that coastal communities protected by the barrage will have adaptation benefits to the increasing frequency of storm surges that are a result of sea-level rise. Finally, the barrage also has the potential to act as a transport link with vehicles able to cross, reducing travel times and emissions. The research project RISES-AM focuses on the implications of the higher end climate scenarios, particularly those with a global average warming that is greater than 2 ⁰C with respect to pre-industrial temperatures. RISES-AM aims to produce a better quantification of the impacts and vulnerabilities associated with these high end climate scenarios, and show that adaptation to them is possible at an affordable cost when compared to the increase in risk resulting from them. We investigated the physical and economic impact of extreme flood events of on the Mersey Estuary and surrounding areas. It is thought the Mersey Estuary is likely to be more sensitive to changes in forcing factors in the future than in the past where industrial impacts where the main drivers of change. Extreme events were simulated, for the present day and in 2100 where high impact emission scenarios have resulted in SLR ranging from 0.71 m to 1.80 m depending on the higher end emission scenario selected. If built, the barrage in the Estuary or lagoon in surrounding areas such as the

  11. Pollution Impacts on Bacterioplankton Diversity in a Tropical Urban Coastal Lagoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloto, Gigliola R. B.; Cardoso, Alexander M.; Coutinho, Felipe H.; Pinto, Leonardo H.; Vieira, Ricardo P.; Chaia, Catia; Lima, Joyce L.; Albano, Rodolpho M.; Martins, Orlando B.; Clementino, Maysa M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a great number of published studies addressing estuarine, freshwater and marine bacterial diversity, few have examined urban coastal lagoons in tropical habitats. There is an increasing interest in monitoring opportunistic pathogens as well as indigenous microbial community members in these water bodies by current molecular and microbiological approaches. In this work, bacterial isolates were obtained through selective plate dilution methods to evaluate antibiotic resistances. In addition, 16S rRNA gene libraries were prepared from environmental waters and mixed cultures grown in BHI medium inoculated with Jacarepaguá lagoon waters. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses showed distinct community profiles between environmental communities from each studied site and their cultured counterparts. A total of 497 bacterial sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 245 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) grouped at 97% similarity. CCA diagrams showcased how several environmental variables affect the distribution of 18 bacterial orders throughout the three distinct habitats. UniFrac metrics and Venn diagrams revealed that bacterial communities retrieved through each experimental approach were significantly different and that only one OTU, closely related to Vibrio cholerae, was shared between them. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from most sampled environments, fifty percent of which showed antibiotic resistance. PMID:23226484

  12. Environmental influences on fish assemblage distribution of an estuarine coastal lagoon, Ria de Aveiro (Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pombo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish assemblage was examined for patterns in spatial and seasonal structure within an estuarine coastal lagoon, Ria de Aveiro. Two years of variation in abiotic conditions were recorded to identify factors responsible for maintaining the structure of fish assemblages. Nine sites were sampled monthly with a traditional “chincha” beach-seine net between November 1998 and October 2000. Fish abundance and biomass changed significantly between sites. Temperature was found to be the most important abiotic factor affecting the abundance (number of fish distribution of fish assemblage, which is more related to seasonal migrations than to spatial migrations. Salinity was the most important abiotic factor affecting the fish biomass, with temperature also having a major influence. The other abiotic parameters analysed also showed some influence on the distribution of fish, although, isolated from the other controlled and/or uncontrolled factors, they could not fully explain all the differences between assemblages. Feeding analysis indicates that fish assemblage is mostly dependent on small benthic and pelagic crustaceans and/or detritus, although they can feed opportunistically on other prey. The low spatial segregation of fish in relation to feeding preference indicates that, in a food-rich lagoon such as Ria de Aveiro, the environmental-biological interactions appear to have a greater effect on fish distribution than do biological interactions.

  13. Pollution impacts on bacterioplankton diversity in a tropical urban coastal lagoon system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigliola R B Salloto

    Full Text Available Despite a great number of published studies addressing estuarine, freshwater and marine bacterial diversity, few have examined urban coastal lagoons in tropical habitats. There is an increasing interest in monitoring opportunistic pathogens as well as indigenous microbial community members in these water bodies by current molecular and microbiological approaches. In this work, bacterial isolates were obtained through selective plate dilution methods to evaluate antibiotic resistances. In addition, 16S rRNA gene libraries were prepared from environmental waters and mixed cultures grown in BHI medium inoculated with Jacarepaguá lagoon waters. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses showed distinct community profiles between environmental communities from each studied site and their cultured counterparts. A total of 497 bacterial sequences were analyzed by MOTHUR, yielding 245 operational taxonomic units (OTUs grouped at 97% similarity. CCA diagrams showcased how several environmental variables affect the distribution of 18 bacterial orders throughout the three distinct habitats. UniFrac metrics and Venn diagrams revealed that bacterial communities retrieved through each experimental approach were significantly different and that only one OTU, closely related to Vibrio cholerae, was shared between them. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from most sampled environments, fifty percent of which showed antibiotic resistance.

  14. Fish community structure and dynamics in a coastal hypersaline lagoon: Rio Lagartos, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Cendejas, Ma. Eugenia; Hernández de Santillana, Mireya

    2004-06-01

    Rio Lagartos, a tropical coastal lagoon in northern Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, is characterized by high salinity during most of the year (55 psu annual average). Even though the area has been designated as a wetland of international importance because of its great biodiversity, fish species composition and distribution are unknown. To determine whether the salinity gradient was influencing fish assemblages or not, fish populations were sampled seasonally by seine and trawl from 1992 to 1993 and bimonthly during 1997. We identified 81 fish species, eight of which accounted for 53.1% considering the Importance Value Index ( Floridichthys polyommus, Sphoeroides testudineus, Eucinostomus argenteus, Eucinostomus gula, Fundulus majalis, Strongylura notata, Cyprinodon artifrons and Elops saurus). Species richness and density declined from the mouth to the inner zone where extreme salinity conditions are prominent (>80) and competitive interactions decreased. However, in Coloradas basin (53 average sanity) and in the inlet of the lagoon, the highest fish density and number of species were observed. Greater habitat heterogeneity and fish immigration were considered as the best explanation. Multivariate analysis found three zones distinguished by fish occurrence, abundance and distribution. Ichthyofaunal spatial differences were attributed to selective recruitment from the Gulf of Mexico due to salinity gradient and to changing climatic periods. Estuarine and euryhaline marine species are abundant, with estuarine dependent ones entering the system according to environmental preferences. This knowledge will contribute to the management of the Special Biosphere Reserve through baseline data to evaluate environmental and anthropogenic changes.

  15. Incidence of phytoplankton and environmental conditions on the bacterial ammonium uptake in a subtropical coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Pérez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the coupling between bacterioplankton and phytoplankton in Laguna de Rocha through an experimental approach. A freshwater zone of high turbidity and macrophytes growth and a brackish zone of higher light penetration and lower macrophytes biomass characterize this coastal lagoon. It has been shown that dissolved inorganic nitrogen, especially NH4+, has decreased to undetectable levels during the last decade. One hypothesis for this trend is the rapid removal by phytoplankton and bacterioplankton uptake. In an attempt to test this, we performed incubations using lagoon water from both zones split in two treatments (pre-filtered by 1.2 µm and unfiltered water and amended with 15N-NH4+. After 4 h incubation we found that in both zones bacterioplankton showed significantly higher NH4+ uptake rates when incubated together with phytoplankton and that uptake rates of both microbial communities were higher in freshwater incubations. These results suggest that bacterial NH4+ uptake would be coupled to phytoplankton-derived exudates and hence that depletion of dissolved NH4+ in this system could be linked to rapid microbial uptake. The degree of this coupling would vary according to hydrological dynamics in this ecosystem.

  16. Sub-tropical coastal lagoon salinization associated to shrimp ponds effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Mohedano, José-Gilberto; Lima-Rego, Joao; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana-Carolina; Canales-Delgadillo, Julio; Sánchez-Flores, Eric-Ivan; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2018-04-01

    Anthropogenic salinization impacts the health of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. In tropical and subtropical areas, shrimp farm aquaculture uses water from adjacent ecosystems to fill the culture ponds, where enhanced evaporation cause salinization of discharged water. In this study, we studied water salinity before and after shrimp farm harvest and implemented a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to assess the impact on a subtropical coastal lagoon that receives water releases from shrimp ponds. The shrimp pond discharge significantly increased the salinity of receiving waters, at least 3 psu over the local variation. In the worst-case salinization scenario, when harvest occurs after a long dry season, salinity could increase by up to 6 psu. The induced salinization due to shrimp pond effluents remained up to 2 tidal cycles after harvest, and could affect biota. The methodology and results of this study can be used to assess the impacts of shrimp aquaculture worldwide.

  17. Coastal lagoon sediments and benthic foraminifera as indicator for Holocene sea-level change: Samsø, southern Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Morigi, Caterina; Pejrup, Morten

    relative sea-level to drop. Originally, two Pleistocene elevations existed as separated islands, which were high enough to reach above sea-level during the transgressions. Proceeding coastal erosion produced material that was transported longshore and that was successively accommodated in a shallow sound....... Over time, an extensive beach ridge system formed, which eventually connected the islands, giving Samsø its characteristic shape. Ephemeral shallow-water lagoons evolved in topographic depressions along the shores of the island, most of which became inactive until today. A semi-enclosed coastal lagoon...... remained in the NE part of the island, which developed around an archipelago of submerged moraine hills. In the scope of this project we will study the evolution of the coastal landscape from the mid-Holocene to present day. We use a multi-proxy approach to resolve local variations in sea...

  18. Agrochemical loading in drains and rivers and its connection with pollution in coastal lagoons of the Mexican Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Aguilar, Omar; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Aguilar-Zárate, Gabriela; Ponce de Leon-Hill, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    The state of Sinaloa in Mexico is an industrialized agricultural region with a documented pesticide usage of 700 t year -1 ; which at least 17 of the pesticides are classified as moderately to highly toxic. Pollutants in the water column of rivers and drains are of great concern because the water flows into coastal lagoons and nearshore waters and thereby affects aquatic organisms. This study was done in four municipalities in the state of Sinaloa that produce food intensively. To investigate the link between pollution in the lagoons and their proximity to agricultural sites, water was sampled in three coastal lagoons and in the rivers and drains that flow into them. Seawater from the Gulf of California, 10 km from the coast, was also analyzed. Concentrations of nutrients, organochlorines, and organophosphorus pesticides were determined. Nutrient determination showed an unhealthy environment with N/P ratios of <16, thus favoring nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. The organochlorine pesticides showed a clear accumulation in the coastal lagoons from the drains and rivers, with ΣHCH showing the highest concentrations. In the southern part of the region studied, pollution of the coastal lagoon of Pabellones could be traced mainly to the drains from the agricultural sites. Accumulation of OC pesticides was also observed in the Gulf of California. Tests for 22 organophosphates revealed only five (diazinon, disulfoton, methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos, and mevinphos); diazinon was detected at all the sites, although methyl parathion was present at some sites at concentrations one order of magnitude higher than diazinon.

  19. Fish abundance and distribution patterns related to environmental factors in a choked temperate coastal lagoon (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Osvaldo Bruno

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the influence of environmental factors on the fish distribution and abundance in Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon. Seasonal fish sampling stations were distributed along the lagoon and grouped in three zones from a mixo-oligohaline waters zone with high contribution of freshwater to a mixo-eurihaline waters zone with high marine water influence. A mixo-mesohaline waters zone characterized the middle part of the lagoon. The results showed that the fish composition was dominated by marine estuarine dependent (ED species in all three zones and in all seasons: Odontesthes argentinensis, Brevoortia aurea, Mugil liza and Micropogonias furnieri were the most representative species. The following important ecological category was freshwater fishes (FW, with Platanichthys platana and Jenynsia multidentata being the most representative species. According to the best model selected, by fitting generalized linear models, abundance of ED increased as water temperature increased during summer and autumn in all three zones. The highest abundance was recorded in the mixo-eurihaline waters zone. On the other hand, FW abundance increased with high rainfall and also when easterly winds blew. In conclusion, a differential habitat use by the species that occur in the Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon was observed. A few ED species dominated the fish composition but FW species also made use of the lagoon during periods of heavy rainfall.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência de fatores ambientais sobre a distribuição e abundância de peixes na lagoa costeira Mar Chiquita. Estações sazonais de amostragem de peixes foram distribuídas ao longo da lagoa e agrupadas em três zonas de uma zona de águas Mixo-oligohalino com elevado aporte de água doce para uma zona de águas Mixo-eurihaline com alta influência da água do mar. Uma zona de águas Mixo-mesohalino caracteriza a parte do meio da lagoa. Os resultados mostraram que a

  20. A review of the influence of biogeography, riverine linkages, and marine connectivity on fish assemblages in evolving lagoons and lakes of coastal southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Whitfield, AK

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Holocene evolution of eight South African coastal lakes and lagoons is examined and related to changes in fish composition over that period. Historical and current connectivity with riverine and marine environments are the primary determinants...

  1. The Challenge of High-resolution Mapping of Very Shallow Coastal Areas: Case Study of the Lagoon of Venice, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madricardo, F.; Foglini, F.; Kruss, A.; Bajo, M.; Campiani, E.; Ferrarin, C.; Fogarin, S.; Grande, V.; Janowski, L.; Keppel, E.; Leidi, E.; Lorenzetti, G.; Maicu, F.; Maselli, V.; Montereale Gavazzi, G.; Pellegrini, C.; Petrizzo, A.; Prampolini, M.; Remia, A.; Rizzetto, F.; Rovere, M.; Sarretta, A.; Sigovini, M.; Toso, C.; Zaggia, L.; Trincardi, F.

    2017-12-01

    Very shallow coastal environments are often highly urbanized with half of the world's population and 13 of the largest mega-cities located close to the coast. These environments undergo rapid morphological changes due to natural and anthropogenic pressure that will likely be enhanced in the near future by mean sea-level rise. Therefore, there is a strong need for high resolution seafloor mapping to monitor and protect shallow coastal areas. To date, only about 5% of their seafloor has been mapped: their shallowness has prevented so far the use of underwater acoustics to reveal their morphological features; their turbidity often hindered the efficient use of LIDAR technology, particularly in lagoons and estuaries. The recent technological development of multibeam echosounder systems, however, enables these instruments to achieve very high performances also in such shallow environments. In this work, we present the results of an extensive multibeam survey carried out in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) in 2013. The Lagoon of Venice is the biggest lagoon in the Mediterranean Sea (surface area of about 550 km2, average depth of about 1 m) and it is a UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage site together with the historical city of Venice which is currently endangered by relative sea-level rise. Major engineering works are ongoing at the lagoon inlets (MOSE project) to protect Venice from flood events. In the last century, the morphology and ecology of the lagoon changed dramatically: the extent of the salt marshes was reduced by 60% and some parts of the lagoon deepened by more than 1 m with a net sediment flux exiting from the inlets. To understand and monitor the future evolution of the Lagoon of Venice in view of the inlet modifications and mean sea-level rise, CNR-ISMAR within the project RITMARE (a National Research Programme funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research) carried out an extensive survey, involving a team of more than 25 scientists, to

  2. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST) corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity condition for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity condition. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk. PMID:26236294

  3. Reactive silica fractions in coastal lagoon sediments from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jeffrey W.; Darrow, Elizabeth S.; Pickering, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Larson, Ashley M.; Basaldua, Jose L.

    2017-12-01

    Continental-margin sediments account for 50% of the oceanic biogenic silica burial despite covering < 10% of its area. In Mississippi Sound, a coastal lagoon in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), we measured sediment biogenic silica at sites removed from major freshwater discharge sources using the traditional method and a method that has been modified for deltaic systems to quantify other reactive silica pools, specifically those involved in the process of reverse weathering. The magnitude of authigenically-altered biogenic silica during our study was significant and represented, on average, 33% of the total sediment biogenic silica among core depths and sites. Additionally, there was a significant relationship between the degree to which the biogenic silica pool was authigenically altered and the source of the sediment organic matter, with lower modification in sediments corresponding with higher terrestrial organic matter. We observed no positive correlation between the magnitude of authigenic modification and sediment clay content. Thus, our findings suggest that these processes may occur within a variety of sediment compositions and add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that reverse weathering of silica in coastal systems is a significant pathway in the global silica budget.

  4. Influence of salinity regime on the food-web structure and feeding ecology of fish species from Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Patricia; Vergara, Carolina; Caiola, Nuno; Ibáñez, Carles

    2014-02-01

    Dual δ15N and δ13C analyses and estimates of biomass were used to characterize the food webs of valuable fish species in three coastal lagoons of the Ebro Delta subjected to contrasting salinity regimes (polyhaline in the Tancada lagoon, mesohaline in the Encanyissada and oligohaline in the Clot lagoon). The δ13C signatures of the entire food-web including primary producers, sediment organic matter and consumers showed the most enriched values in the Tancada lagoon (from approx. -4.8‰ in sediments to -19.7‰ in fish) and the most depleted ones in the Clot lagoon (from approx. -11.4‰ in sediments to -25.4‰ in fish), consistent with dominant contributions from marine and continental sources, respectively. For δ15N, particularly high values were detected in the submersed vegetation (11.3 ± 0.3‰) together with more enriched sediment values at lower salinities (by approx. 2.5‰), suggesting that historical loadings of agricultural fertilizers are still retained by the systems and transmitted across trophic levels. Negative relationships between δ15N and salinity were also observed for the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda and the isopod Sphaeroma hookeri, suggesting some consumption of accumulated and resuspended detrital material. In contrast, δ15N signatures of fish showed lower values and inconsistent patterns, possibly because most species have a seasonal use of the lagoons. The biomass of fish species did not show a clear effect of the salinity regime (except for the mosquitofish Gambusia holbrookii), but results for mixing models suggest a diet shift from higher contribution of zooplankton size fractions in the Encanyissada (from 57 to 73%) to macrofauna at the other lagoons (from 40 to 67%). We suggest that alterations in salinity might modify the trophic dynamics of the systems from benthic to planktonic pathways, without large-scale differences in δ15N of fish suggestive of similar trophic levels.

  5. Assessing the ecological status of Mediterranean coastal lagoons using macroinvertebrates. Comparison of the most commonly used methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. REIZOPOULOU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Benthic communities were studied twice (autumn and spring in three Mediterranean coastal lagoons located in Greece (Logarou and Italy (Cesine and Grado-Marano. The species composition and distribution, the community diversity, the species richness, the dominant taxa and their ecological identity, the benthic trophic and biomass size structure were investigated in these lagoons and the the results were correlated with environmental variables.The overall similarity based on species composition and abundance among lagoons was low due to differences in dominant environmental factors, whereas variations of community diversity and species richness were mainly related to the degree of marine influence, reflecting the natural structure. The benthic classification indices AMBI, M-AMBI, BENTIX, BO2A, ISD and ISS were applied to assess the ecological status of the lagoons studied. Results showed that the biotic indices AMBI, M-AMBI, BENTIX, and BO2A are not adequately efficient due to the natural dominance of tolerant and opportunistic species and the correlation of species diversity to natural stress. ISD and ISS on the other hand, based on size distribution frequencies and on size spectra sensitivity respectively, had a good discrimination power between impacted and unimpacted sites. Results indicate that alternatively to the species sensitivity, other traits of the communities as the biomass or size structure could be more robust, sensitive and effective in assessing the ecological quality in lagoons.

  6. Spatial distribution and biomass of aquatic rooted macrophytes and their relevance in the metabolism of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biel Obrador

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to characterise the current autotrophic compartment of the Albufera des Grau coastal lagoon (Menorca, Balearic Islands and to assess the relationship between the submerged macrophytes and the limnological parameters of the lagoon. During the study period the submerged vegetation was dominated by the macrophyte Ruppia cirrhosa, which formed dense extensive meadows covering 79% of the surface. Another macrophyte species, Potamogeton pectinatus, was also observed but only forming small stands near the rushing streams. Macroalgae were only occasionally observed. Macrophyte biomass showed a clear seasonal trend, with maximum values in July. The biomass of R. cirrhosa achieved 1760 g DW m-2, the highest biomass ever reported for this species in the literature. The seasonal production-decomposition cycle of the macrophyte meadows appears to drive the nutrient dynamics and carbon fluxes in the lagoon. Despite the significant biomass accumulation and the absence of a washout of nutrients and organic matter to the sea, the lagoon did not experience a dystrophic collapse. These results indicate that internal metabolism is more important than exchange processes in the lagoon.

  7. A model for describing the eutrophication in a heavily regulated coastal lagoon. Application to the Albufera of Valencia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio Fernández, Pilar; Gómez, Andrés García; Alba, Javier García; Díaz, César Álvarez; Revilla Cortezón, José Antonio

    2012-12-15

    A simplified two-dimensional eutrophication model was developed to simulate temporal and spatial variations of chlorophyll-a in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. This model considers the hydrodynamics of the whole study area, the regulated connexion of the lagoon with the sea, the variability of the input and output nutrient loads, the flux from the sediments to the water column, the phytoplankton growth and mortality kinetics, and the zooplankton grazing. The model was calibrated and validated by applying it to the Albufera of Valencia, a hypertrophic system whose connection to the sea is strongly regulated by a system of sluice-gates. The calibration and validation results presented a significant agreement between the model and the data obtained in several surveys. The accuracy was evaluated using a quantitative analysis, in which the average uncertainty of the model prediction was less than 6%. The results confirmed an expected phytoplankton bloom in April and October, achieving mean maximum values around 250 μg l(-1) of chlorophyll-a. A mass balance revealed that the eutrophication process is magnified by the input loads of nutrients, mainly from the sediments, as well as by the limited connection of the lagoon with the sea. This study has shown that the developed model is an efficient tool to manage the eutrophication problem in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of floods on sediment contamination in a microtidal coastal lagoon: the lagoon of Lesina, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamo, Raffaele; Specchiulli, Antonietta; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto; Fabbrocini, Adele

    2014-10-01

    The effects on the microtidal lagoon of Lesina of runoff and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities were investigated combining chemical analyses of pollutants [11 metals and 16 priority polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs)], determination of organic matter and grain size, and performance of innovative ecotoxicological tests. For metals, enrichment factors >3 for arsenic, nickel, and copper (Cu) were observed in the eastern zone of the lagoon, which is affected by nearby urban activities with discharge of water and domestic waste and by agricultural input with waters rich in fertilizers. Cu was correlated with no other metal, and its high concentrations (≤77 µg g(-1)) may result from the use of Cu-based fungicides in vineyards. Total PAHs (2,230 ± 3,150 ng g(-1)) displayed a wide range of concentrations with hot spots near freshwater inputs from the part of the catchment area exploited for wheat crops. Pyrolitic contamination also emerged, with higher-mass PAH congeners, such as asphalt, bitumen or coal, usually present in higher fractions as the dominant components. Ecotoxicological evaluations recorded moderate to high toxicity levels; the innovative MOT test bioassay showed good discriminatory ability because it identified a lagoon area whose inputs mainly depend on agricultural activities and which is impacted by metals rather than PAHs. Floods during periods of heavy rain and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities may impact vulnerable systems, such as the lagoon of Lesina, where the presence of hot spots with remarkably high pollution values was observed.

  9. Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Burgin, Shelley

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews recent research into the ecological impacts of recreation and tourism on coastal marine fauna in Australia. Despite the high and growing importance of water-based recreation to the Australian economy, and the known fragility of many Australian ecosystems, there has been relatively limited research into the effects of marine tourism and recreation, infrastructure and activities, on aquatic resources. In this paper we have reviewed the ecological impacts on fauna that are caused by outdoor recreation (including tourism) in Australian coastal marine ecosystems. We predict that the single most potentially severe impact of recreation may be the introduction and/or dispersal of non-indigenous species of marine organisms by recreational vessels. Such introductions, together with other impacts due to human activities have the potential to increasingly degrade recreation destinations. In response, governments have introduced a wide range of legislative tools (e.g., impact assessment, protected area reservation) to manage the recreational industry. It would appear, however, that these instruments are not always appropriately applied. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seismic evidence for the preservation of several stacked Pleistocene coastal barrier/lagoon systems on the Gulf of Valencia continental shelf (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Silvia; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Barranco, Andrés; Sánchez García, María José; Fontán Bouzas, Ángela; Rey Salgado, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    The focus of this study is the analysis of coastal sand barriers and associated coastal lagoons on the inner continental shelf of the Gulf of Valencia (western Mediterranean), based on two W-E seismic profiles recorded seaward of the Albufera de Valencia coastal lagoon. Seismic facies identified include a number of coastal sand barriers with landward lagoons draped by contemporary continental shelf deposits. The barrier systems have been grouped into two sedimentary systems tracts, the older one corresponding to a prograding/aggrading highstand systems tract involving at least four paleo-coastal sand barrier/lagoon systems, followed landward by a transgressive systems tract comprising three such systems. All the systems have been allocated a Tyrrhenian age, the formation of individual barrier systems having been associated with successive sea-level stillstands, and their present-day position being explained by the very high regional subsidence rate. In summary, this study demonstrates that the Quaternary stratigraphic record of the Gulf of Valencia inner continental shelf is composed of littoral sand facies, in particular coastal sand barrier and lagoon deposits. These findings are in agreement with corresponding observations on other continental shelves of the western Mediterranean, showing that the formation of coastal sand barriers was a characteristic feature of this region during the Quaternary.

  11. Response of early Ruppia cirrhosa litter breakdown to nutrient addition in a coastal lagoon affected by agricultural runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Margarita

    2009-05-01

    The response of early Ruppia cirrhosa Petagna (Grande) litter decomposition to external nitrogen and phosphorus availability in La Tancada (Ebro River, NE Spain), a coastal lagoon that receives agricultural freshwater runoff from rice fields has been examined. Recently abscised dead R. cirrhosa stems were collected and 25 g of fresh weight was placed in litter bags with a mesh size of 100 μm and 1 mm. These bags were fertilised by adding nitrogen (N), a mixture of nitrogen plus phosphorus (N + P), or phosphorus (P), or were left untreated (CT). Macroinvertebrates were retrieved from the bags and the ash-free dry weight, and carbon, and N and P content of the remaining plant material were measured after 0, 3, 7, 14, 22 and 32 days. Litter decomposition rates, k (day -1), were estimated using a simple exponential model. Litter decay was clearly accelerated by the addition of P in the fine (100 μm) litter bags (0.042), but when N was added alone (0.0099) the decomposition rate was lower than in the CT treatments (0.022). No significant difference was observed between the N (0.0099-0.018) and N + P (0.0091-0.015) treatments in either the fine or the coarse (1 mm) litter bags. These results could be attributed to the relatively high availability of external (environmental) and internal (detritus contents) N. No significant effect of macro invertebrates was observed in the CT treatment or under N or P or N + P addition. The ratio between the decomposition rates in coarse and fine litter bags (k c/k f) was lower in disturbed Tancada lagoon (0.82) than in Cesine lagoon (2.11), a similar Mediterranean coastal water body with almost pristine conditions. These results indicate that, in addition to data on macroinvertebrate community structure, decomposition rates could also be used to assess water quality in coastal lagoons.

  12. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, P. C.; Young, Megan B.; Dale, Andrew W.; Miller, Laurence G.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Porewater profiles in sediment cores from mangrove-dominated coastal lagoons (Celestún and Chelem) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, reveal the widespread coexistence of dissolved methane and sulfate. This observation is interesting since dissolved methane in porewaters is typically oxidized anaerobically by sulfate. To explain the observations we used a numerical transport-reaction model that was constrained by the field observations. The model suggests that methane in the upper sediments is produced in the sulfate reduction zone at rates ranging between 0.012 and 31 mmol m−2 d−1, concurrent with sulfate reduction rates between 1.1 and 24 mmol SO42− m−2 d−1. These processes are supported by high organic matter content in the sediment and the use of non-competitive substrates by methanogenic microorganisms. Indeed sediment slurry incubation experiments show that non-competitive substrates such as trimethylamine (TMA) and methanol can be utilized for microbial methanogenesis at the study sites. The model also indicates that a significant fraction of methane is transported to the sulfate reduction zone from deeper zones within the sedimentary column by rising bubbles and gas dissolution. The shallow depths of methane production and the fast rising methane gas bubbles reduce the likelihood for oxidation, thereby allowing a large fraction of the methane formed in the sediments to escape to the overlying water column.

  13. Anthropogenic shift of planktonic food web structure in a coastal lagoon by freshwater flow regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic modification of aquatic systems has diverse impacts on food web interactions and ecosystem states. To reverse the adverse effects of modified freshwater flow, adequate management of discharge is required, especially due to higher water requirements and abstractions for human use. Here, we look at the effects of anthropogenically controlled freshwater flow regimes on the planktonic food web of a Ramsar listed coastal lagoon that is under recovery from degradation. Our results show shifts in water quality and plankton community interactions associated to changes in water flow. These shifts in food web interactions represent modifications in habitat complexity and water quality. At high flow, phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions dominate the food web. Conversely, at low flow, bacteria, viruses and nano/picoplankton interactions are more dominant, with a substantial switch of the food web towards heterotrophy. This switch can be associated with excess organic matter loading, decomposition of dead organisms, and synergistic and antagonistic interactions. We suggest that a lower variability in flow amplitude could be beneficial for the long-term sustaining of water quality and food web interactions, while improving the ecosystem health of systems facing similar stresses as the Coorong.

  14. Diet of the clupeid fish Platanichthys platana (Regan, 1917 in two different Brazilian coastal lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguiaro Talita

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Platanichthys platana is considered a constant species in both Cabiúnas and Imboassica lagoons that are characterised by different marine and freshwater inputs, and anthropogenic influences. The stomach content analysis of P. platana captured between July 1991 and July 1993 revealed filamentous algae, detritus, eggs of benthic invertebrates, larvae of chironomids and bivalves as the main food sources in Imboassica lagoon. Small-sized cladocerans, copepods and shrimp larvae were the prevailing items in Cabiúnas lagoon. Seasonal food variations were noted for the fishes of Imboassica lagoon. Diet differences were highlighted within specimens lesser than 40 mm standard length in Imboassica lagoon, and were related to the increase of marine influence due to artificial sand barrier openings. Dissimilarities among size classes in relation to invertebrate larvae consumption were observed in fishes from Cabiúnas lagoon.

  15. Distribution and growth in adults of Macrobrachium acanthurus Wiegmann, (Decapoda, Palaemonidae in a tropical coastal lagoon, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edélti Faria Albertoni

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium acanthurus Wiegmann, 1836 is a Palaemonidae commonly found in Brazilian coastal environments. At Imboassica lagoon, located in the north of the State of Rio de Janeiro, it is found in two stages of its life cycle: as larvae and as reproductive adults. This work had as its goal the evaluation of adults distribution, estimating the weight/length relationship and the condition factor of these adults. After sampling in two regions of the lagoon, one interior and another closer to the ocean, we verified that females are found in a greater proportion close to the ocean, and males are found in greater number in the innermost region, amidst the aquatic macrophytes, suggesting that the fecundation takes place in this last area and the females then travel to the area closer to the ocean to spawn. Total and carapace weight/length relationship exhibited differences between males and females, presenting positive allometric growth. The relative growth of the cephalotorax related to total length showed that it correspond to 53% of the total length in females, and 50% in males. The average condition factor was significantly lower than the expected pattern, demonstrating that the species does not find ideal conditions in the lagoon. This may be attributed to the migration of the adults, to the spawning and/or to the impact caused by the frequent sandbar openings that took place at Imboassica lagoon during the studied period.

  16. The assessment of sediment screening risk in Venice Lagoon and other coastal areas using international sediment quality guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apitz, S.A.; Barbanti, A.; Bocci, M.; Delaney, E.; Bernstein, A.G.; Montobbio, L.

    2007-01-01

    A number of studies carried out in recent years have shown the presence of a wide range of contaminants in the Venice Lagoon. It is important to have a good understanding of the ecological quality of Venice Lagoon sediments, in order to: i) define and locate areas where a threat to the environment is present and therefore an intervention is needed (i.e. in situ assessment and management); and ii) define sustainable and environmentally correct ways of managing sediments which are to be dredged for navigational purposes or in relation to other interventions (i.e., ex situ management). Materials and Methods: To examine how various regional and international SQGs 'classed' screening risk in Venice Lagoon sediments, data on median contaminant levels in surface sediments in Venice Lagoon resulting from a literature review were compared to a range of local and international sediment quality guidelines (SQGs). Then data on sediment contaminant levels in various areas and sub-basins of Venice Lagoon (main Lagoon, Porto Marghera and Venice City Canals) and in other regional and international transitional and coastal ecosystems with various levels of human impact (urbanization and industrialization) were evaluated based upon a selected consensus-based SQG. Finally, screening sediment quality for all of Venice Lagoon was mapped and contoured, relative to this consensus-based SQG and briefly compared with direct toxicity measurement through a battery of bioassays. Results: SQGs allow the sediment areas to be put in terms of potential, or screening, risk. Although there were some differences depending upon which specific SQGs were applied, the Venice SQGs and other international SQGs provided the same general picture of screening risk in Venice Lagoon despite geographic differences. Venice Lagoon South has the lowest screening risk levels, Venice Lagoon Central/North has the highest (and is nearest to the Porto Marghera and Venice City Canals sites). Discussion: The Venice

  17. Fish composition and prey utilization of the black skimmer (Rynchops niger in mar Chiquita coastal lagoon, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Mariano-Jelicich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lagoons along the western coast of the South Atlantic Ocean shelter high densities of juvenile fish and are key areas for several seabirds that rely on the resources offered by this kind of ecosystem. The objective of this study was to analyze fish composition and abundance in shallow-water areas of the estuarine region of Mar Chiquita Coastal Lagoon (Argentina and the diet composition of the Black skimmer (Rynchops niger during its non-breeding season as well as evaluating its inter-annual variations. Fish were sampled with a beach-seine net and the skimmers' diet was analyzed from their pellets. The estuarine-dependent marine fishes were the best represented bio-ecological category followed by freshwater fishes. Significant differences were observed in fish abundance and composition between and within years. Species richness was higher during the summer season and during the first year sampled. The occurrence of freshwater fishes as an important and diverse group of the Mar Chiquita estuarine area contrasted with previous reports. The diet of the Black skimmer included freshwater, estuarine and marine fish species. Skimmers forage in the shallow waters of the estuarine area of the Mar Chiquita Coastal lagoon though little similarity was observed between its diet and local fish abundance. These results emphasize the importance of performing these evaluations in order to improve the quality of studies and the interpretations of top predators foraging ecology.

  18. Phenology of cryptomonads and the CRY1 lineage in a coastal brackish lagoon (Vistula Lagoon, Baltic Sea)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piwosz, Kasia; Kownacka, J.; Ameryk, A.; Zalewski, M.; Pernthalter, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2016), s. 626-637 ISSN 0022-3646 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11281S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Baltic Sea * chromalveolate hypothesis * coastal waters Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.608, year: 2016

  19. Hydrological behavior of coastal lagoons associated to wetlands, an example from southernmost bahía Samborombón (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada Tejada, Macarena; Carol, Eleanora; Galliari, Julieta; Richiano, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are located at a critical interface between the terrestrial and marine environments and are ideally positioned to reduce impacts from land-based sources. At the southern region of Bahía Samborombón (Argentina) the wetlands includes several small coastal lagoons developed inside of a sandy spike. The main object of this work is to analyze the hydrological behavior of the lagoons evaluating their role in the maintenances of the wetland. In order to do this, satellite image analysis was performed to identify the marshy areas, drainage features, morphology and connections of the lagoons, both with the tidal flows from the Río de la Plata estuary and from the Argentine Sea. Field surveys were carried out in one of the lagoons to define their geological and geomorphological characteristics. After that, a monitoring network was designed for sampling the superficial and the underground water, additionally electrical conductivity and pH of the water were determined in situ. In all the water samples extracted the content of majority ions was determined by standard methods. Complementary, sedimentological and malacological aspects were observed at several stations in the lagoon. The obtained results allow us to recognize that the tidal flow that enters from the sea, at least in the studied lagoon, is the main hydrological sustenance of the wetland. This flow enters mainly using one tidal channel which connects (in a semi-permanent way) the sea with the lagoon during extraordinary tide and storm events. During low tide the lagoon loses connection and the drainage towards the sea is scarce. The tidal water that accumulates in the lagoon is subsequently evaporated causing an increase in the salinity of the surface water to values higher than the sea. Groundwater that accumulates through the infiltration of rainfall in the sandy sediments of the spike also discharges to the lagoon and supports the wetland surrounding the coastal lagoon. This flow, even when it

  20. Artificial coastal lagoons at solar salt-working sites: A network of habitats for specialised, protected and alien biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Roger J. H.; Broderick, Lee G.; Ross, Kathryn; Moody, Chris; Cruz, Tamira; Clarke, Leo; Stillman, Richard A.

    2018-04-01

    There are concerns that novel structures might displace protected species, facilitate the spread of non-indigenous species, or modify native habitats. It is also predicted that ocean warming and the associated effects of climate change will significantly increase biodiversity loss within coastal regions. Resilience is to a large extent influenced by the magnitude of dispersal and level of connectivity within and between populations. Therefore it is important to investigate the distribution and ecological significance of novel and artificial habitats, the presence of protected and alien species and potential vectors of propagule dispersal. The legacy of solar salt-making in tropical and warm temperate regions is regionally extensive areas of artificial hypersaline ponds, canals and ditches. Yet the broad-scale contribution of salt-working to a network of benthic biodiversity has not been fully established. Artisanal, abandoned and historic salt-working sites were investigated along the Atlantic coast of Europe between southern England (50°N) and Andalucía, Spain (36°N). Natural lagoons are scarce along this macrotidal coast and are vulnerable to environmental change; however it is suspected that avian propagule dispersal is important in maintaining population connectivity. During bird migration periods, benthic cores were collected for infauna from 70 waterbodies across 21 salt-working sites in 5 coastal regions. Bird ringing data were used to investigate potential avian connectivity between locations. Lagoonal specialist species, some of international conservation importance, were recorded across all regions in the storage reservoirs and evaporation ponds of continental salinas, yet few non-indigenous species were observed. Potential avian propagule transport and connectivity within and between extant salt-working sites is high and these artificial habitats are likely to contribute significantly to a network of coastal lagoon biodiversity in Europe.

  1. Coastal lagoon sediments as a recorder of Holocene landscape evolution and sea-level development: Samsø, southern Kattegat Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Fruergaard, Mikkel; Johannessen, Peter N.

    Confined shallow-water environments are encountered many places along the coast of the inner Danish waters. Most of these water bodies are spatially constrained within the moraine topography left by the last glaciation of Scandinavia. Despite their common occurrence, coastal lagoons have rarely...... been studied as sedimentary archives. In this study we set out to trace back changes in relative sea-level and associated geomorphological responses of the coastal environment in sediment cores retrieved from lagoon systems on the island of Samsø. Samsø first became an island in the mid-Atlantic period......, when the post-glacial sea-level rise resulted in the inundation of the paraglacial landscapes of central Denmark. Waves, currents and tides began to erode the unconsolidated Pleistocene deposits, which initiated (amongst other processes) the formation of coastal barriers and marine lagoonal...

  2. Submarine groundwater discharge in a subsiding coastal lowland: A {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn investigation in the Southern Venice lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattacceca, Julie C., E-mail: jcg54@esc.cam.ac.uk [CEREGE, Aix-Marseille Universite, UMR 6635 CNRS-IRD-CDF, Europole Mediterraneen de l' Arbois, BP80, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Mayer, Adriano [IDPA-CNR, Via Mario Bianco 9, 20131 Milano (Italy); Cucco, Andrea [Coastal Oceanography, CNR-IAMC, Oristano Unit, Loc. Sa MArdini, 09072 Oristano (Italy); Claude, Christelle; Radakovitch, Olivier; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Hamelin, Bruno [CEREGE, Aix-Marseille Universite, UMR 6635 CNRS-IRD-CDF, Europole Mediterraneen de l' Arbois, BP80, 13545 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > Occurence/magnitude of submarine groundwater discharge investigated in Venice lagoon (Italy) using {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn isotopic tracers. > Single box mass balance compared with multi boxes mass balance coupled with hydrodynamic model. > Groundwater flux accounts for 1% of lagoon hydrological balance (1-3 times surface runoff) and 30-50% of tracers inputs. > Necessary to assess this flux impact on nutrient budget in lagoon. - Abstract: Several recent studies have suggested that submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) occurs in the Venice lagoon with discharge rates on the same order or larger than the surface runoff, as demonstrated previously in several other coastal zones around the world. Here, the first set of {sup 222}Rn data, along with new {sup 226}Ra data are reported, in order to investigate the occurrence and magnitude of SGD specifically in the southern basin of the lagoon. The independent connection with the Adriatic Sea (at the Chioggia inlet), in addition to the relative isolation of the water body from the main lagoon, make this area an interesting case study. There is probably only minimal fresh groundwater flux to the lagoon because the surrounding aquifer is subsiding and mainly has a lower hydraulic head than seawater. The data show that the Ra and Rn activities are in slight excess in the lagoon compared to the open sea, with values on the same order as those observed in the northern and central basins. Taking into account the water exchange rate between the lagoon and adjacent seawater provided by previous hydrodynamic numerical modelling, it is shown that this excess cannot be supported at steady state by only riverine input and by diffusive release from the sediment interstitial water. High activities observed in groundwater samples collected from 16 piezometers tapping into the shallow aquifer over the coastal lowland substantiate that the excess radioactivity in the lagoon may indeed be due to the advection of groundwater

  3. Biomonitoring study of an estuarine coastal ecosystem, the Sacca di Goro lagoon, using Ruditapes philippinarum (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacchi, Angela; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Bolognesi, Claudia; Sciutto, Andrea; Roggieri, Paola; Fusi, Marco; Beone, Gian Maria; Capri, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are constantly subjected to releases of chemical pollutants, and so organisms may be exposed to such toxicants. This study investigated through a multivariate approach the physiological status of bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum, farmed in Sacca di Goro lagoon. Biomarkers at different levels of biological organization (catalase, superoxide dismutase, genotoxicity, reburrowing behavior) were evaluated at three sites exposed to different environmental conditions. A seasonal trend was observed, and micronucleus frequency was significantly lowest at the relatively pristine reference site. Enzymatic activity toward oxyradicals be quite efficient since variations in responsiveness were not consistent. However, behavioral impairment was observed in reburrowing rates. Sediment concentrations showed low PAH levels and high natural levels of trace metals Cr and Ni. DistLM statistical analysis revealed a non-significant relationship between selected biomarkers and xenobiotics. Therefore other potentially toxic compounds in admixture at low doses may be involved in driving differing spatial distribution of physiological impairment. -- Highlights: ► Health status assessment of bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum, from lagoon of Sacca di Goro. ► Multiparametric approach (chemical analysis, biochemical and behavioral biomarkers). ► Impairments of burrowing kinetics in the contaminated site. ► Micronucleus genotoxicity test to detect effects of contaminants complex mixture. ► Multiple stress of chemicals in estuarine costal ecosystem. -- The bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum as a bioindicator in monitoring pollution of estuaries

  4. Landscape changes in a coastal system undergoing tourism development: implications for Barra de Navidad Lagoon, Jalisco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. Holland

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, changes in land cover and land use patterns that occurred between 1985 and 2000 in the surrounding basin of the Barra de Navidad coastal lagoon in Jalisco, Mexico are quantified and explained. Two satellite images from 1985 (Landsat TM and 2000 (Landsat ETM+ were analyzed with supervised classification and ground truthing to evaluate changes in six land use/cover categories: lagoon, agriculture, urban/tourist, tropical dry forest, mangrove and bare substratum. Changes in land use composition were evaluated using a transition matrix and changes to configuration were interpreted using landscape metrics. Results show that urban and tourist areas expanded between 1985 and 2000, mostly at the expense of forested and bare land. Mangroves showed a large relative decrease in area (-39% and experienced fragmentation. These changes appear to be related to increased sedimentation a fan progradation into Barra de Navidad lagoon. These results may serve as a model for comparison in other systems experiencing multiple stressors, especially changes related to tourism and the intensification of resource extraction.

  5. Morphology, toxin composition and pigment content of Prorocentrum lima strains isolated from a coastal lagoon in southern UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Silvia M; Purdie, Duncan A; Morris, Steven

    2005-04-01

    Prorocentrum lima was isolated from the coastal Fleet lagoon, Dorset, UK in 2000 and a number of clonal cultures established. These were analyzed for okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), DTX-2, DTX-4 and diol esters by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. OA concentrations varied from 0.4 to 17.1pg OAcell(-1) and DTX-1 from 0.4 to 11.3pg DTX-1cell(-1); DTX-2 was not detected in these isolates. OA and DTX-1 were detected in the culture media, as a result of toxin excretion. DTX-4 and a selection of DTX-4 diol esters were identified using selected ion monitoring, although not all strains produced these compounds. Cell size and number of marginal and valve pores of each strain were observed using scanning electron microscopy. OA and DTX-1 concentrations, pigment content and changes in nitrate and phosphate concentrations in the culture media were followed during growth of one strain of P. lima in batch culture. Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins have been previously detected in shellfish cultivated in the Fleet lagoon, but in the absence of any Dinophysis sp. cells. The identification of toxic P. lima strains from the Fleet suggests that this dinoflagellate is the most probable source of occasional DSP detected in the lagoon.

  6. 'Blue Carbon' and Nutrient Stocks of Salt Marshes at a Temperate Coastal Lagoon (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana I; Santos, Danielle B; Silva, Eduardo Ferreira da; Sousa, Lisa P; Cleary, Daniel F R; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Lillebø, Ana I

    2017-01-25

    Ria de Aveiro is a mesotidal coastal lagoon with one of the largest continuous salt marshes in Europe. The objective of this work was to assess C, N and P stocks of Spartina maritima (low marsh pioneer halophyte) and Juncus maritimus (representative of mid-high marsh halophytes) combined with the contribution of Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia perennis, and Bolbochenous maritimus to the lagoon ≈4400 ha marsh area. A multivariate analysis (PCO), taking into account environmental variables and the annual biomass and nutrient dynamics, showed that there are no clear seasonal or spatial differences within low or mid-high marshes, but clearly separates J. maritimus and S. maritima marshes. Calculations of C, N and P stocks in the biomass of the five most representative halophytes plus the respective rhizosediment (25 cm depth), and taking into account their relative coverage, represents 252053 Mg C, 38100 Mg N and 7563 Mg P. Over 90% of the stocks are found within mid-high marshes. This work shows the importance of this lagoon's salt marshes on climate and nutrients regulation, and defines the current condition concerning the 'blue carbon' and nutrient stocks, as a basis for prospective future scenarios of salt marsh degradation or loss, namely under SLR context.

  7. Diet of the clupeid fish Platanichthys platana (Regan, 1917) in two different Brazilian coastal lagoons

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiaro,Talita; Castelo Branco,Christina Wyss; Verani,José Roberto; Caramaschi,Érica Pellegrini

    2003-01-01

    Platanichthys platana is considered a constant species in both Cabiúnas and Imboassica lagoons that are characterised by different marine and freshwater inputs, and anthropogenic influences. The stomach content analysis of P. platana captured between July 1991 and July 1993 revealed filamentous algae, detritus, eggs of benthic invertebrates, larvae of chironomids and bivalves as the main food sources in Imboassica lagoon. Small-sized cladocerans, copepods and shrimp larvae were the prevailing...

  8. Rapid proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during freshwater flash floods in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 10(3) most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 10(3) MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 10(4) MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Competition Between Barrier Island Migration and Marsh-Upland Migration Could Determine the Fate of Coastal Lagoons Under Sea Level Rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Vinent, O.; Kirwan, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Although marshes can modulate their vertical growth to adjust to sea level rise, wave-induced marsh edge erosion seems to be unstoppable, eating away large chunks of marshes around coastal lagoons in low-sediment environments. Because lagoon size is ultimately constrained by barrier islands, a positive feedback ensues by which barrier migration decreases lagoon size and wind fetch, which in turn reduces marsh edge erosion. Under sea level rise, back-barrier marshes and bay sediments are eventually exposed at the seashore where they are eroded away by waves, thereby increasing barrier island migration rate and further mitigating fetch-driven marsh erosion. We study this feedback using a simple model that couples barrier, lagoon, marsh, and upland components of the coastal landscape. We find that the final state of the ecosystem is controlled by the relation between barrier migration rate, marsh edge erosion rate and marsh upland propagation rate. Our results suggest there are two stable, extreme long-term scenarios, which are a function of the rate of sea level rise and sediment availability: (i) a growing lagoon devoid of marshes, for slowly migrating barrier islands and limited upland marsh transgression; and (ii) a marsh filled lagoon, for fast migrating barrier islands, and unconstrained upland marsh transgression.

  10. New Caledonia surface lagoon chlorophyll modeling as coastal reef area health indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, R.; Pinazo, C.; Douillet, P.; Dupouy, C.; Faure, V.; Mangin, A.

    2010-10-01

    The major part of the New Caledonia (NC) lagoon was classified as UNESCO Natural Site of Humanity Patrimony. Indeed, 22 175 km2 of tropical coral lagoon area exhibit high biodiversity. The NC lagoon is semi enclosed and connected to the Coral Sea through a barrier reef segmented by narrow passes. The environment is oligotrophic, due to important flush during trade winds events, and bathymetry is highly variable. In order to predict eutrophication events, we used an extension of a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model recently developed on NC south western lagoon. The model is based on the Nitrogen and Carbon cycles, relating the variable stoechiometry of the elements in each biological compartment. The ecological model was developed to include an explicit description of the microbial loop. The resulting coupled model, forced by tide, wind, light, temperature and freshwater inputs, was used to calculate phytoplankton biomass, bacterial production, dissolved organic matter concentrations and nutrient recycling. Here we present results issued from the 3D coupled model ECO3M_LAGOON (biogeochemical, LOPB-IRD) and MARS3D (regional physical model, IFREMER-IRD) describing spatial and temporal interactions between water motion and biology, on larger domain including reef barrier and water exchanges through ocean-lagoon interface. To validate physical processes in the lagoon we used in situ data collected during field cruise (ValHyBio 2008, La Niña episode). Surface chlorophyll concentrations are compared with water color data from ValHyBio cruise and satellite data (MODIS/MERIS) corrected from bathymetry effects.

  11. Remote monitoring of sediment dynamics in a coastal lagoon: Long-term spatio-temporal variability of suspended sediment in Chilika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Equeenuddin, Sk. Md.; Mishra, Deepak R.; Acharya, Bhaskar C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of sediment dynamics in a coastal lagoon by synthesizing various remote sensing datasets. The goal of the study was to monitor and analyze the spatio-temporal variability of total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and associated environmental forcings in Chilika Lagoon, the largest brackish water lagoon in Asia. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance cloud free data was used to calibrate a TSS model. MODIS daily 250 m surface reflectance (MOD09GQ) and 8-day composite products (MOD09Q1) were chosen because they are atmospherically corrected and available for free thus making them widely applicable for frequent monitoring of environmental phenomena. Three variants of Miller and McKee (2004) TSS model were recalibrated to establish the relationship between in situ TSS and surface reflectance value in band 1 (Rrs at 645 nm). A significant relationship (R2 = 0.91; n = 54; p Lagoon for 14 years (2001-2014). Marked seasonal and inter-annual variations in TSS distribution were observed in different sectors (northern, central and southern) of the lagoon. It was found that the TSS variability is primarily driven by three factors: monsoon effect (precipitation and runoff), wind-driven bottom re-suspension, and river discharge into the lagoon. Further analysis of the relationship between MODIS derived time-series TSS and meteorological parameters revealed that the variability of TSS in the northern sector is highly correlated with precipitation and runoff, whereas, TSS dynamics in southern sector is mainly governed by wind induced re-suspension events. The applicability of the TSS model was demonstrated by analyzing the impact of a recent category-5 cyclone, Phailin, which showed a significant increase in TSS concentration in the lagoon. This is the first of its kind study to comprehensively examine the long term TSS dynamics of Chilika, moreover, the model developed in this research was implemented in

  12. Organic matter composition in the sediment of three Brazilian coastal lagoons: district of Macaé, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Gerhard Zink

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater lagoons comprise important coastal ecosystems and natural buffers between urbanized land areas and open ocean in the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Studies of sediment and water chemistry, zooplankton and bacterial communities to assess the extent of anthropogenic disturbance are available. Here we contribute with an organic-geochemical approach supplemented by some microbiological aspects to complete the characterization of these lagoonal ecosystems. Bulk organic matter and extractable lipids (aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids, sterols were investigated from two locations per lagoon: at the seaward site and landward ends - and at two depth intervals (0-3 and 3-6 cm per site. Urbanized Imboacica Lagoon received increased anthropogenic input over the most recent years represented by the topmost 3 cm of sediment, whereas deeper sediment layers are less affected by human influence. Eutrophication or nutrient availability favored enhanced algal/cyanobacterial growth. In remote Cabiúnas and Comprida Lagoons pristine conditions are preserved. Organic matter from vascular plants dominates (chain length of free lipids up to C36, which is exceptionally well preserved by acidic lagoonal waters. Differentiation between landward and seaward sites in these two lagoons is less well established due to much smaller surface/volume to catchment ratios. No anthropogenic influences are yet detectable in sediments of Cabiúnas and Comprida Lagoons.As lagoas costeiras são importantes ecossistemas costeiros no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, localizadas entre áreas urbanizadas da costa e o oceano aberto. Vários estudos enfocando o sedimento, a água, a comunidade zooplanctônica e comunidades bacterianas demonstraram a extensão da influência antrópica sobre estes ecossistemas aquáticos. Neste estudo foi investigada a composição da matéria orgânica presente no sedimento, assim como, alguns parâmetros microbiológicos, com o intuito de

  13. Anthropogenic nitrogen in a subtropical coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California): sources and ecological consequences using isotopes stables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Jimenez, M.; Paez-Osuna, F.

    2007-05-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of N were studied in anthropogenic effluents received by Altata-Ensenada- Pabellón lagoon (AEP), a typical coastal ecosystem along the SE GC. Human activities mobilize from 33,000 to 55,000 tons of N per year to the AEP, which the agriculture (70%), livestock (10%), and atmospheric deposition (10%) are the largest N sources. Other N sources including sewage, shrimp farming, poultry, and livestock effluents constituted less than 10% of N inputs. The N is distributed as inorganic N that accounts for an input of 72% (NO3- 65% and NH4+ 7%) and organic N for 28% (>90% of the organic N occurring as DON). The N isotopic composition in the different effluents vary 6.1-16.1‰ for 15N-NH4+ and 2.1-15.9‰ for 15N-NO3. The 15N-NO3- values in agriculture effluents are related to fertilizer, while the enriched values of 15N-NH4+ in sewage and animal effluents and 15N-NO3- in groundwater result of the high ammonification and denitrification during the transport to the lagoon. Overall the C/N ratios (5.3-21.1) and isotopic signatures (13C -30.6 to -21.4‰ and 15N 6.1-12.5‰) in the POM for the diverse effluents had measurable differences and consistent with their origins. The 15N-DIN values measured at the selected stations recording inputs into AEP lagoon waters oscillated from 4.4 to 6.5‰ for 15N- NO3-, 12.9 to 20.9‰ 15N-NH4+, and from 4.4 to 10‰ 15N-POM. Overall the 15N values predicted by mass balances are in the range of the measured isotopic composition. The N requirement in Pacific Mexican lagoons is estimated to be 155 to 400 kg N ha-1 y-1, however, the current level is 1480 kg N ha-1 y-1, with anthropogenic N inputs (1200 kg N ha-1 y-1) of 80%. This excess of primary productivity is evidenced by the phytoplankton and macroalgae blooms that occur year-round, mainly in the areas close to the nutrient discharges from AEP lagoon.

  14. Combined environmental stress from shrimp farm and dredging releases in a subtropical coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Mohedano, J G; Páez-Osuna, F; Amezcua-Martínez, F; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Ramírez-Reséndiz, G; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2016-03-15

    Nutrient pollution causes environmental damages on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Eutrophication produces impacts in coastal ecosystems, affecting biota and ecosystem services. The Urias coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California) is a sub-tropical estuary under several environmental pressures such as nutrient inputs from shrimp farm effluents and dredging related to port operations, which can release substances accumulated in sediments. We assessed the water quality impacts caused by these activities and results showed that i) nitrogen was the limiting nutrient, ii) shrimp farm effluents increased particulate organic matter and chlorophyll a in the receiving stations, and iii) dredging activities increased nitrite and reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations. The co-occurrence of the shrimp farm releases and dredging activities was likely the cause of a negative synergistic effect on water quality which mainly decreases dissolved oxygen and increases nitrite concentrations. Coastal zone management should avoid the co-occurrence of these, and likely others, stressors in coastal ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatic retinoid levels in seven fish species (teleosts) from a tropical coastal lagoon receiving effluents from iron-ore mining and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Pereira Wilken, A.; van Hattum, A.G.M.; Brouwer, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of Fe and trace element exposure on hepatic levels of retinoids in seven fish species. Concentrations of retinoids were measured in fish collected from a coastal lagoon in Brazil that receives effluents from an iron-ore mining and

  16. Dominance patterns in macroalgal and phytoplankton biomass under different nutrient loads in subtropical coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Páez-Osuna, F.; Piñón-Gimate, A.; Ochoa-Izaguirre, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nine macroalgal blooms were examined in five lagoons from SE Gulf of California. • Shrimp farms were the main point source of nutrients loads to the lagoons. • Biomass as phytoplankton ranged 40–792 mg m −2 and macroalgal of 1–296 g m −2 . • Biomass (phytoplankton + macroalgae) was the same tendency that nutrient loads. • Phytoplankton and macroalgal biomass were a significant correlation with N:P ratio. -- Abstract: Nine macroalgal blooms were studied in five coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California. The nutrient loads from point and diffuse sources were estimated in the proximity of the macroalgal blooms. Chlorophyll a and macroalgal biomass were measured during the dry, rainy and cold seasons. Shrimp farms were the main point source of nitrogen and phosphorus loads for the lagoons. High biomasses were found during the dry season for phytoplankton at site 6 (791.7 ± 34.6 mg m −2 ) and during the rainy season for macroalgae at site 4 (296.0 ± 82.4 g m −2 ). Depending on the season, the phytoplankton biomass ranged between 40.0 and 791.7 mg m −2 and the macroalgal biomass between 1 and 296.0 g m −2 . The bulk biomass (phytoplankton + macroalgal) displayed the same tendency as the nutrient loads entering the coastal lagoons. Phytoplankton and macroalgal biomass presented a significant correlation with the atomic N:P ratio

  17. Natural recovery and planned intervention in coastal wetlands: Venice Lagoon (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy) as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Chiara; Ceoldo, Sonia; Pellegrino, Nicola; Sfriso, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    The goals of conservation and sustainable use of environmental ecosystems have increased the need for detailed knowledge of ecological evolution and responses to both anthropogenic pressures and recovery measures. The present study shows the effects of natural processes and planned intervention in terms of reducing nutrient inputs in a highly exploited coastal lagoon, describing its evolution over a 16-year period from the late 1980s (when eutrophication was at its peak) until 2003. Changes in nutrient and carbon concentrations in the top layer of sediments were investigated in parallel with macroalgal and seagrass biomass in the most anthropized basin of Venice Lagoon in four surveys conducted in accordance with the same protocols in 1987, 1993, 1998, and 2003. A pronounced reduction in trophic state (mainly total nitrogen, organic phosphorus, and organic carbon concentrations) and macroalgal biomass was recorded, together with the progressive expansion of seagrass meadows. General considerations are also made on the effects of Manila clam farming and the shift from illegal to managed clam farming.

  18. ‘Blue Carbon’ and Nutrient Stocks of Salt Marshes at a Temperate Coastal Lagoon (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana I.; Santos, Danielle B.; Silva, Eduardo Ferreira Da; Sousa, Lisa P.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2017-01-01

    Ria de Aveiro is a mesotidal coastal lagoon with one of the largest continuous salt marshes in Europe. The objective of this work was to assess C, N and P stocks of Spartina maritima (low marsh pioneer halophyte) and Juncus maritimus (representative of mid-high marsh halophytes) combined with the contribution of Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia perennis, and Bolbochenous maritimus to the lagoon ≈4400 ha marsh area. A multivariate analysis (PCO), taking into account environmental variables and the annual biomass and nutrient dynamics, showed that there are no clear seasonal or spatial differences within low or mid-high marshes, but clearly separates J. maritimus and S. maritima marshes. Calculations of C, N and P stocks in the biomass of the five most representative halophytes plus the respective rhizosediment (25 cm depth), and taking into account their relative coverage, represents 252053 Mg C, 38100 Mg N and 7563 Mg P. Over 90% of the stocks are found within mid-high marshes. This work shows the importance of this lagoon’s salt marshes on climate and nutrients regulation, and defines the current condition concerning the ‘blue carbon’ and nutrient stocks, as a basis for prospective future scenarios of salt marsh degradation or loss, namely under SLR context.

  19. Total mercury in muscles and liver of Mugil spp. from three coastal lagoons of NW Mexico: concentrations and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Alvarez, C G; Frías-Espericueta, M G; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Becerra-Álvarez, M J; Osuna-Martínez, C C; Aguilar-Juárez, M; Osuna-López, J I; Escobar-Sánchez, O; Voltolina, D

    2017-07-01

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in muscles and liver of composite samples of Mugil cephalus and M. curema collected during November 2013 and in January, April, and July 2014 from the coastal lagoons Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón (AEP), Ceuta (CEU), and Teacapán-Agua Brava (TAG) of Sinaloa State. The mean Hg contents and information on local consumption were used to assess the possible risk caused by fish ingestion. Mean total mercury levels in the muscles ranged from 0.11 to 0.39 μg/g, while the range for liver was 0.12-3.91 μg/g. The mean Hg content of the liver was significantly (p mercury calculated for the younger age classes of one fishing community were >1, indicating a possible risk for some fishing communities of the Mexican Pacific coast.

  20. Long-term and high resolution measurements of bed level changes in a temperate, microtidal coastal lagoon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thorbjørn J.; Pejrup, Morten; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the results of a long-term monitoring program of bed level changes measured during 8 yr at an intertidal mudflat in a microtidal, temperate coastal lagoon. Additionally, bed level measurements obtained at a 10-min temporal resolution at the same tidal flat and at the bed...... of a nearby tidal channel are presented. Short-term changes in bed level are one or two orders of magnitude larger than the annual net-deposition rate, which shows that the environment is highly dynamic with respect to erosion, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment. Some seasonality in the bed...... level changes was observed and there is a tendency for mudflat deposition in spring, summer and early autumn and erosion during the rest of the year, but interannual variations are large and different parts of the mudflat show different seasonal signals. A close coupling between sub- and intertidal...

  1. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castelló Lagoon, NE Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, Ana; Julià, Ramon; Reed, Jane M; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marco-Barba, Javier; Riera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain), an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1) the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2) fluctuations in salinity; and 3) natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the Banyuls-sur-Mer

  2. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castello Lagoon, NE Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ejarque

    Full Text Available We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain, an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1 the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2 fluctuations in salinity; and 3 natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the

  3. Numerical and experimental investigations of submarine groundwater discharge to a coastal lagoon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Kinza

    with historical evolution of salinity in the lagoon aided in setting up a hydrogeological model to locate and quantify submarine groundwater discharge along with salinity distribution under the sediment bed to locate saltwater – freshwater interface. The results from the simulations showed that most...... and 6 % of river input into the lagoon. This large-scale study was the motivation to conduct field investigation techniques in order to understand the dynamic processes in the near-shore environment. Field campaigns were conducted every two months in order to understand the seasonal groundwater...... interface between the seasons but the groundwater discharge varied considerably being highest during winter and lowest during summer, which was also observed in field investigations. Surficial mixing zone in the discharge zone also showed seasonal changes. However the spatial distribution of simulated...

  4. I just can't put my finger on it! Approaching coastal lagoon systems with remotely sensed data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Kabuth, Alina Kristin

    “You can only discover what you have already imagined” (Gastón Bachelard) Quote seen in “Museum of Man and the Sea”, Puerto Madryn, Argentina How much geomorphology and process understanding can we get out of SRTM and Landsat data when it comes to coastal lagoon systems? Holocene sea-level fluctu......“You can only discover what you have already imagined” (Gastón Bachelard) Quote seen in “Museum of Man and the Sea”, Puerto Madryn, Argentina How much geomorphology and process understanding can we get out of SRTM and Landsat data when it comes to coastal lagoon systems? Holocene sea......-level rise stabilized in the mid Holocene and barrier spits and beach ridges started to develop. In the BRIDGES project (2011-2014) we attempt to reconstruct coastal evolution and sea-level history for a Danish site from lagoon sediments and associated beach ridges in an environment of Holocene relative sea...... foot out of the door. We compare this situation with a similar case from Argentina where our interpretation of the evolution of a mesoscale lagoon system is primarily dependent on readily-available low-resolution geospatial data. We present the results from an SRTM- and Landsat-based mapping of inter...

  5. Benthic foraminifera or Ostracoda? Comparing the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental indicators from a Pleistocene lagoon of the Romagna coastal plain (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Giulia; Vaiani, Stefano Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Integrated analyses of multiple groups of microfossils are frequently performed to unravel the palaeoenvironmental evolution of subsurface coastal successions, where the complex interaction among several palaeoecological factors can be detected with benthic assemblages. This work investigates the palaeoenvironmental resolution potential provided by benthic foraminifera and ostracoda within a Pleistocene lagoonal succession of the Romagna coastal plain (northern Italy). Quantitative approaches and statistical techniques have been applied to both groups in order to understand the main factors that controlled the composition of assemblages and compare the palaeoecological record provided by single fossil groups. The two faunal groups are characterized by the high dominance of opportunistic species (Ammonia tepida-Ammonia parkinsoniana and Cyprideis torosa); however, detailed palaeoecological information is inferred from less common taxa. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are mainly determined by the frequencies of abnormal individuals and species related to high concentrations of organic matter, showing two assemblages: a stressed assemblage, consistent with a brackish-water environment subject to salinity and oxygen fluctuations, and an unstressed assemblage, which indicates more stable conditions. Despite the lower number of species, ostracoda show more significant differences in terms of species composition and ecological structure between their three assemblages, formed in response to a salinity gradient and indicative of inner, central, and outer lagoon conditions. The stratigraphic distribution of ostracod assemblages shows a general transgressive-regressive trend with minor fluctuations, whereas benthic foraminifera highlight the presence of a significant palaeoenvironmental stress. In this case, the higher abundance along the stratigraphic succession, the higher differentiation of the assemblages, and the well-defined relationship between taxa and ecological

  6. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in populations of the clam Chione californiensis in coastal lagoons of the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-González, Héctor H; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Mendoza-Salgado, Renato A; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Arreola-Lizárraga, José A

    2016-07-02

    This study examines the potential public health risk due to the massive use of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in agriculture in the Gulf of California. Specimens of the clam Chione californiensis were collected from three coastal lagoons (Yavaros, Altata and Reforma). Sites were classified as polluted/nonpolluted based on the presence/absence of OCs as an indicator of the persistence of these pollutants; in polluted sites, the time elapsed since pesticide application (past or recent) was estimated. Screening values (SV) for protecting human health as per the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) were used for risk assessment. OCs detected were ranked according to frequency of occurrence as follows: γ-chlordane (75%) > endrin (54%) > aldrin (48%) > heptachlor, and dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDE) (37%) > β-heptachlor epoxide (30%) > lindane (α-BHC, δ-BHC) and endosulphan I (≤ 6%). Specifically, OCs detected at the highest concentration were heptachlor in Yavaros (0.0168 µgg(-1)) and Altata (0.0046 µgg(-1)), and aldrin in Reforma (0.0019 µgg(-1)). β-Heptachlor epoxide in Altata and Reforma was the only OC with a concentration exceeding the EPA Screening Value. From our results and based on the monthly consumption limit set forth by EPA, the maximum safe consumption of clams to avoid a carcinogenic risk derived from β-heptachlor epoxide in the fishing villages of Yavaros and Altata is 4 servings per month (1 serving = 0.227 kg) by a 70-kg person. These findings suggest that concentrations of OCs and their isomers in C. californiensis populations reflect environmental persistence as well as recent inputs of OCs into coastal lagoons in the Gulf of California.

  7. Coastal lagoon systems as indicator of Holocene sea-level development in a periglacial soft-sediment setting: Samsø, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse; Fruergaard, Mikkel; Johannessen, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    geomorphological responses in sediment cores retrieved from coastal lagoon systems on the island of Samsø, central Denmark. In the mid-Atlantic period, the post-glacial sea-level rise reached what is today the southern Kattegat Sea. Waves, currents and tides began to erode the unconsolidated moraine material....... Stratigraphy, grain-size distribution, fossil and organic matter content of cores retrieved from the lagoons were analyzed and compared. Age control was established using radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating. Our data produced a surprisingly consistent pattern for the sedimentary...

  8. Experimental evidence of the effect of nutrient enrichment on the zooplankton in a Brazilian coastal lagoon

    OpenAIRE

    KOZLOWSKY-SUZUKI, B.; BOZELLI, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Non-treated sewage disposal is one of the main impacts to which Imboassica Lagoon has been subjected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a potential increase in the artificial enrichment on the environmental conditions and zooplankton of this system. To this end, an experimental study was conducted in mesocosms where nutrients were added daily. Bacterial numbers, chlorophyll-a, and picoplanktonic cyanobacteria densities showed an increase with the availability of nutrients. B...

  9. Assessment of the trophic status of four coastal lagoons and one estuarine delta, eastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotovicz Junior, Luiz Carlos; Brandini, Nilva; Knoppers, Bastiaan Adriaan; Mizerkowski, Byanka Damian; Sterza, José Mauro; Ovalle, Alvaro Ramon Coelho; Medeiros, Paulo Ricardo Petter

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems continues to be one of the major environmental issues worldwide and also of Brazil. Over the last five decades, several approaches have been proposed to discern the trophic state and the natural and cultural processes involved in eutrophication, including the multi-parameter Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) index model. This study applies ASSETS to four Brazilian lagoons (Mundaú, Manguaba, Guarapina, and Piratininga) and one estuarine delta (Paraíba do Sul River), set along the eastern Brazilian coast. The model combines three indices based on the pressure-state-response (PSR) approach to rank the trophic status and forecast the potential eutrophication of a system, to which a final ASSETS grade is established. The lagoons were classified as being eutrophic and highly susceptible to eutrophication, due primarily to their longer residence times but also their high nutrient input index. ASSETS classified the estuary of the Paraíba do Sul river with a low to moderate trophic state (e.g., largely mesotrophic) and low susceptibility to eutrophication. Its nutrient input index was high, but the natural high dilution and flushing potential driven by river flow mitigated the susceptibility to eutrophication. Eutrophication forecasting provided more favorable trends for the Mundaú and Manguaba lagoons and the Paraíba do Sul estuary, in view of the larger investments in wastewater treatment and remediation plans. The final ASSETS ranking system established the lagoons of Mundaú as "moderate," Manguaba as "bad," Guarapina as "poor," and Piratininga as "bad," whereas the Paraíba do Sul River Estuary was "good."

  10. Prokaryotic diversity in one of the largest hypersaline coastal lagoons in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino, M M; Vieira, R P; Cardoso, A M; Nascimento, A P A; Silveira, C B; Riva, T C; Gonzalez, A S M; Paranhos, R; Albano, R M; Ventosa, A; Martins, O B

    2008-07-01

    Araruama Lagoon is an environment characterized by high salt concentrations. The low raining and high evaporation rates in this region favored the development of many salty ponds around the lagoon. In order to reveal the microbial composition of this system, we performed a 16S rRNA gene survey. Among archaea, most clones were related to uncultured environmental Euryarchaeota. In lagoon water, we found some clones related to Methanomicrobia and Methanothermococcus groups, while in the saline pond water members related to the genus Haloarcula were detected. Bacterial community was dominated by clones related to Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Synechococcus in lagoon water, while Salinibacter ruber relatives dominated in saline pond. We also detected the presence of Alpha-proteobacteria, Pseudomonas-like bacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Only representatives of the genus Ralstonia were cosmopolitan, being observed in both systems. The detection of a substantial number of clones related to uncultured archaea and bacteria suggest that the hypersaline waters of Araruama harbor a pool of novel prokaryotic phylotypes, distinct from those observed in other similar systems. We also observed clones related to halophilic genera of cyanobacteria that are specific for each habitat studied. Additionally, two bacterioplankton molecular markers with ecological relevance were analyzed, one is linked to nitrogen fixation (nifH) and the other is linked to carbon fixation by bacterial photosynthesis, the protochlorophyllide genes, revealing a specific genetic distribution in this ecosystem. This is the first study of the biogeography and community structure of microbial assemblages in Brazilian tropical hypersaline environments. This work is directed towards a better understanding of the free-living prokaryotic diversity adapted to life in hypersaline waters.

  11. Structure and diversity of fishes in a freshwater and coastal subtropical lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N C; Guereschi, R M; Machado, C; Lopes, C A; Nuñer, A P O

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the fish communities of Peri Lagoon in southern Brazil to aid in the development of an effective management plan because the area is under threat from human activities. Sampling of fish fauna, ichthyoplankton and limnological data were compared between sites, differing by habitat type and characteristics such as depth, substratum composition and vegetation type. Results were significantly related to site, with the highest diversity and abundance recorded at shallow vegetated sites. A total of 14 fish species were recorded throughout the lagoon, with the most abundant being Hyphessobrycon luetkenii. Of the 14 species, half were sampled at their larval stage, suggesting a healthy and protected system. Significantly more larvae and eggs were collected during colder months (autumn to winter) and at sites closer to stream flow, possibly owing to increased food sources and habitat protection. This study highlights the importance of Peri Lagoon as a nursery ground for a wide range of fish species, providing essential information for incorporation into the future protection of fish stocks throughout Brazil. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  12. Zooplankton responses to sandbar opening in a tropical eutrophic coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Jayme M.; de M. Rocha, Adriana; Bozelli, Reinaldo L.; Carneiro, Luciana S.; de A. Esteves, Francisco

    2007-02-01

    The effects of a disturbance by sandbar opening on the zooplankton community were evaluated through a long-term study in an eutrophic and oligohaline system, Imboassica Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Zooplankton samples and limnological data were collected monthly from March 2000 to February 2003. Before the sandbar was opened in February 2001, the lagoon showed eutrophic conditions, with high mean nutrient concentrations and low salinity (total nitrogen - TN = 190.28 μM, chlorophyll a content - Chl. a = 104.60 μg/L and salinity = 0.87'). During this period, the zooplankton species present, such as the rotifers Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus havanaensis, were typical of freshwater to oligohaline and eutrophic environments. After the sandbar opening, the lagoon changed to a lower trophic status and increased salinity (TN = 55.11 μM, Chl. a = 27.56 μg/L and salinity = 19.64'). As a result, the zooplankton community came to consist largely of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, marine copepods and meroplanktonic larvae, mainly Gastropoda. Salinity was the main force structuring the zooplankton community after the sandbar opening. Two years after this episode, the prior zooplankton community had not reestablished itself, indicating a low resilience to this disturbance. The conditions developed prior to a sandbar opening can be crucial to the community responses in the face of this disturbance and for the capacity of the original zooplankton community to re-establish itself.

  13. Bacterioplankton abundance, biomass and production in a Brazilian coastal lagoon and in two German lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FURTADO ANDRÉ L. S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterioplanktonic abundance, biomass, and production within a tropical lagoon (Cabiúnas, Brazil and two temperate lakes (Stechlin and Dagow, Germany were compared. Bacterial abundance and production were significantly different among the three water bodies. The lowest bacterial production ( 0.8mug C l-1 d-1 was observed in the tropical Cabiúnas Lagoon despite its higher mean temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Highest bacterioplankton abundance ( 2.6 x 10(9 cells l-1 and production ( 68.5mug C l-1 d-1 were measured in eutrophic Lake Dagow. In oligotrophic Lake Stechlin, the lowest bacterial biomass ( 48.05mug C l-1 was observed because of lower bacterial biovolume ( 0.248mum³ and lower bacterial abundance. Bacterial populations in the temperate lakes show higher activity (production/biomass ratio than in the tropical lagoon. The meaning of isotopic dilution and leucine incorporation by non-bacterial micro-organisms were evaluated in the oligotrophic temperate system. Leucine uptake by non-bacterial micro-organisms did not have significant influence on bacterial production.

  14. Introducing a Regulatory Policy Framework of Bait Fishing in European Coastal Lagoons: The Case of Ria de Aveiro in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Xenarios

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The harvesting of bait through digging in coastal mudflats is practiced for recreational and commercial purposes in European coastal systems including the Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon on the northwest Atlantic coast of Portugal. The scale of harvesting in the Ria de Aveiro has recently increased due to the current economic climate in Portugal, with targeting of the polychaete, Diopatra neapolitana species or “casulo” as it is widely known in the Aveiro region. The national authorities have attempted to control casulo digging by issuing a regulation (Ordinance in 2014 on the maximum daily catch limit to be caught by each individual. The daily catch limit is intended to represent the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY for casulo beyond which overfishing will occur. The monitoring of the regulatory measures is expected to be conducted through on-site inspections in the digging areas. However, weak law enforcement was noticed, while there is also controversy over the daily catch limit (quota stipulated by the Ordinance. To this end, the current study attempted to assess digging activities through remote monitoring and random inspections for a better policy enforcement of the national regulation. In addition, different harvesting scenarios were employed through a simplified bioeconomic model to attribute the current and future harvesting trends of bait digging in Aveiro coastal lagoon. The study findings indicate that remote monitoring coupled with some onsite interviews could be a more effective approach for the implementation of the current bait digging policy. Further, the results point to a distinctive discrepancy between the daily catch amount (MSY introduced by the national legislation and the study findings which should be further scrutinized. The diggers seem to have reached the sustainable harvest identified by the present research. The current economic hardship in Portugal and the low profitability in similar employment sectors will

  15. Salgado Lagoon and the anthropic action in its Protected Coastal Zone, Northern Region of the Brazilian State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Cabral Tudesco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is about Salgado Lagoon, the anthropic action in its Protected Coastal Zone over the years and the possible impacts arising from urbanization occurred in the Açu Superport and in future enterprises in its region, by making a comparative analysis with the case of the Vigário Lagoon in the city of Campos dos Goytacazes, which suffers problems caused by an uncontrolled growth and lack of planning. The occurrence of recent stromatolites, only found in South America, included the Salgado Lagoon as a geo-paleontological site in UNESCO World Heritage list, which makes the problem even more relevant. Consequently, urgent and drastic measures must be taken to protect this geological-paleontological site.

  16. Comparison of the seasonal variability in abundance of the copepod Pseudocalanus newmani in Lagoon Notoro-ko and a coastal area of the southwestern Okhotsk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Mitsuaki; Nakagawa, Yoshizumi; Nishino, Yasuto; Segawa, Susumu; Shiomoto, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    Replacement of the warm water of the Soya Warm Current (SWC) and the cold water of the East Sakhalin Current (ESC) occurs seasonally along the coast of the southwestern Okhotsk Sea, and sea ice covers the surface during winter. Pseudocalanus newmani is one of the dominant copepods in coastal waters of the northern hemisphere. To better understand the population dynamics of the copepod P. newmani in coastal areas of the southwestern Okhotsk Sea, this study compared the seasonal variation in P. newmani abundance in Lagoon Notoro-ko and a coastal area of the Okhotsk Sea with regard to developmental stage. We sampled P. newmani in the lagoon, including during the ice cover season, and the coastal waters. Pseudocalanus newmani was abundant at both sites in spring. During summer-fall, adults disappeared from the populations at both sites, whereas the early developmental stages were abundant and dominated the population. Total length of adult females decreased toward summer at both sites. Pseudocalanus newmani abundance in the lagoon increased in early winter, and larger females were found in the populations at both sites. These phenomena at both sites corresponded with seasonal variation in water temperature caused by seasonal water-mass replacement and sea ice.

  17. Sedimentary record of recent climate impacts on an insular coastal lagoon in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Martinez, Tomasa; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana Carolina; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Alonso-Rodríguez, Rosalba

    2017-03-01

    Sedimentary records are useful to evaluate environmental changes, either from natural or anthropogenic causes, such as global and climate change. The recent changes in accumulation rates and geochemical characteristics (grain size distribution, elemental composition, organic carbon and carbonate concentrations) recorded in a sediment core from San Jose Island Lagoon (SJIL, Gulf of California) were evaluated to determine its relationship with anthropogenic impacts and climatic variability. The 210Pb-derived chronology was corroborated with 239+240Pu and 137Cs stratigraphic markers. The mass accumulation rate increased up to ∼3 times during the past ∼100 years (0.16 ± 0.03 to 0.51 ± 0.06 g cm-2 yr-1). The contents of terrigenous and marine (salinity) indicator elements, as well as fine-grained sediments, also increased considerably, although no anthropization evidences were observed; indeed, the enrichment factor of trace elements indicated that the ecosystem is still a pristine environment. By using multivariate statistical techniques, we inferred that the larger input of fine-grained terrigenous sediments could be related to the enhancement of soil erosion from the catchment, under the influence of higher rainfall rates, especially during the last 20 years. In addition, the higher concentrations of salinity indicator elements most likely resulted from higher evaporation rates in the lagoon, caused by higher minimum atmospheric temperatures. We concluded that recent climate variability has become the main driver for sedimentary geochemical changes in San Jose Island Lagoon. These observations confirmed the usefulness of 210Pb-dated geochemical sediment records to study the impacts of recent climate variability where long-term environmental data is scarce or non-existent.

  18. Experimental evidence of the effect of nutrient enrichment on the zooplankton in a Brazilian coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowsky-Suzuki, B; Bozelli, R L

    2002-11-01

    Non-treated sewage disposal is one of the main impacts to which Imboassica Lagoon has been subjected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a potential increase in the artificial enrichment on the environmental conditions and zooplankton of this system. To this end, an experimental study was conducted in mesocosms where nutrients were added daily. Bacterial numbers, chlorophyll-a, and picoplanktonic cyanobacteria densities showed an increase with the availability of nutrients. Bacterio- and phytoplankton seemed to be regulated by the rotifers Brachionus rotundiformis and Hexarthra brandorffi.

  19. Experimental evidence of the effect of nutrient enrichment on the zooplankton in a Brazilian coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KOZLOWSKY-SUZUKI

    Full Text Available Non-treated sewage disposal is one of the main impacts to which Imboassica Lagoon has been subjected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a potential increase in the artificial enrichment on the environmental conditions and zooplankton of this system. To this end, an experimental study was conducted in mesocosms where nutrients were added daily. Bacterial numbers, chlorophyll-a, and picoplanktonic cyanobacteria densities showed an increase with the availability of nutrients. Bacterio- and phytoplankton seemed to be regulated by the rotifers Brachionus rotundiformis and Hexarthra brandorffi.

  20. Transitions in ancient inland freshwater resource management in Sri Lanka affect biota and human populations in and around coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh-Guebas, F; Hettiarachchi, S; Lo Seen, D; Batelaan, O; Sooriyarachchi, S; Jayatissa, L P; Koedam, N

    2005-03-29

    The increasing anthropogenic pressure on natural environments results in impacts that affect tropical forest areas and their biodiversity. Adverse impacts on terrestrial and oceanic environments often compound in the intertidal area, where mangrove forest ecosystems thrive. In tropical coastal areas of many developing countries where people depend on wood and other mangrove forest products and services, forest degradation leads to socioeconomic problems. At the same time, increasing freshwater needs in these areas are expected to cause additional problems. On the basis of remote sensing and ground truthing complemented by colonial archival material from the Dutch East India Company (1602-1800), we report that changes to the historic system of inland freshwater management have increased dramatically in recent times. Hydrological changes, such as interbasin transfers, have resulted in a qualitative ecological and socioeconomic degradation in three coastal lagoons in southern Sri Lanka. Variations in river hydrology have caused changes in the areas suitable as mangrove habitat and, thus, have resulted in an altered distribution. However, increases in mangrove area can mask the degradation of the site in terms of floristic composition, significance of the species, and biodiversity (this effect is termed "cryptic ecological degradation"). It is important that such changes be carefully monitored to ensure biological and socioeconomic sustainability.

  1. Water column conditions in a coastal lagoon near Jeddah, Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M. A. Albarakati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Water column conditions in a lagoon near Jeddah are investigated on the basisof changes in potential energy. Three major factors including balance ofsurface heat at the air-sea interface, wind and tidal mixing are considered.A negative potential energy change dv/dt will developstratification, whereas positive dv/dt will tend to mix the watercolumn. The tidal effect is greater in summer with wind mixing showing nogreat variations. The buoyancy effect of the heat balance at the surface isnegative from April to October. This negative buoyancy effect will tend to developstratification but the positive contributions of wind and tide counteract this andthe water column remains mixed except in September and October, when a weakstratification may develop. Generally, the water column remains practically mixedthroughout the year. The change in heat content of the water column from mid-Aprilto mid-September is about 3.3 × 108 J. During this period the netheat input at the air interface is about 2.0 × 108 J, which isabout 40% less than the heat content of the water column, showing that the heat is advected towards the central area from the shallower periphery of the lagoon.

  2. Bioprospecting Sediments from Red Sea Coastal Lagoons for Microorganisms and Their Antimicrobial Potential

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Amoudi, Soha

    2016-12-08

    Since the soils nutrient composition along with the associated biotic and abiotic factors direct the diversity of the contained microbiome and its potential to produce bioactive compounds, many studies have been focused on sediment types with unique features characteristic of extreme environments. Red Sea lagoon ecosystems are environments with such unique features as they are highly saline. However, not much is known about the potential of their microbiomes to produce bioactive compounds. Here, we explored sediment types such as mangrove mud, microbial mat, and barren soil collected from Rabigh harbor lagoon (RHL) and Al-Kharrar lagoon (AKL) as sources for antibiotic bioprospecting. Our antibiotic bioprospecting process started with a metagenomic study that provides a more precise view of the microbial community inhabiting these sites and serves as a preliminary screen for potential antibiotics. Taking the outcomes of the metagenomic screening into account, the next step we established a library of culturable strains from the analyzed samples. We screened each strain from that library for antibiotic activity against four target strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli dh5 α, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato dc3000 and Salmonella typhimurium dt2) and for the presence of polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes known to support synthesis of secondary metabolites that act like antimicrobial agents. The metagenomics study showed a shift in dominant phyla consistent with a historical exposure to hydrocarbon contamination and that AKL unexpectedly displayed more contamination than RHL. This may be due to dominant phyla in AKL being consistent with early hydrocarbon exposure (when contamination levels are still high) and the dominant phyla in RHL being consistent with late hydrocarbon exposure (when contamination levels are lower as a result of an extended period of hydrocarbon degradation). Additionally, RHL samples

  3. Distribution of Escherichia coli in a coastal lagoon (Venice, Italy): Temporal patterns, genetic diversity and the role of tidal forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, L; Quero, G M; García, E Serrano; Luna, G M

    2015-12-15

    Despite its worldwide importance as fecal indicator in aquatic systems, little is known about the diversity of Escherichia coli in the environment and the factors driving its spatial distribution. The city of Venice (Italy), lying at the forefront of a large European lagoon, is an ideal site to study the mechanisms driving the fate of fecal bacteria, due to the huge fluxes of tourists, the city's unique architecture (causing poor efficiency of sewages treatment), and the long branching network of canals crossing the city. We summarize the results of a multi-year investigation to study the temporal dynamics of E. coli around the city, describe the population structure (by assigning isolates to their phylogenetic group) and the genotypic diversity, and explore the role of environmental factors in determining its variability. E. coli abundance in water was highly variable, ranging from being undetectable up to 10(4) Colony Forming Units (CFU) per 100 ml. Abundance did not display significant relationships with the water physico-chemical variables. The analysis of the population structure showed the presence of all known phylogroups, including extra-intestinal and potentially pathogenic ones. The genotypic diversity was very high, as likely consequence of the heterogeneous input of fecal bacteria from the city, and showed site-specific patterns. Intensive sampling during the tidal fluctuations highlighted the prominent role of tides, rather than environmental variables, as source of spatial variation, with a more evident influence in water than sediments. These results, the first providing information on the genetic properties, spatial heterogeneity and influence of tides on E. coli populations around Venice, have implications to manage the fecal pollution, and the associated waterborne disease risks, in coastal cities lying in front of lagoons and semi-enclosed basins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mercury transfer in a subtropical coastal lagoon food web (SE Gulf of California) under two contrasting climatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Marini, Martin E; Soto-Jiménez, Martín F; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2012-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) transference through an established and defined food web from an urbanized subtropical coastal lagoon (SE Gulf of California) was examined by using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope and Hg analyses. Concentrations of Hg in seawater (0.045-0.078 μg L(-1)), predominantly incorporated to the particulate fraction (60% of total), were lower than those found in highly contaminated coastal areas around the world (0.18-16 μg L(-1)). Although levels of Hg available for the biota (e.g., associated to the reactive and pyrite fractions; 0.11-0.15 μg g(-1)) were within of effects range-low (ER-L, 0.15-0.71 μg g(-1)) these concentrations represented from 46.6 to 67.0% of the total Hg pool that may be transferred through food web. The sequence of bio-accumulation of Hg in studied species was according with their functional guild: tertiary consumer (0.85-1.15 μg g(-1)) > secondary consumers (0.084-0.168 μg g(-1)) > primary consumers (0.014-0.160 μg g(-1)) > primary producers (0.016-0.056 μg g(-1)). Hg concentrations increased for each successive trophic position estimate through δ(15) N isotopic values, although these relationships showed differences between dry and rainy seasons (R(2) = 0.37 and R(2) = 0.39 between δ(15) N vs. Hg in organisms, respectively). We concluded that Hg is being positively transferred (biomagnification factor >1) through the studied food web probably enhanced by the favorable environmental conditions for Hg-methylation (e.g., fine sediments rich in organic matter, and environmental conditions changes of the redox, pH, and temperature) found in this urbanized coastal water, however, the study of processes methlylation and biomagnifcation of Hg need further investigations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An update on the fish composition (Teleostei of the coastal lagoons of the Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park and the Imboassica Lagoon, northern Rio de Janeiro State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Dario

    Full Text Available AIM: We present an update on the composition of the fish species of the Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park and the Imboassica Lagoon, in the northern portion of Rio de Janeiro State, based on collecting efforts of almost two decades, historical museum records, and a review of the literature. METHODS: Specimens were collected using a variety of techniques, mostly between 1994 and 2012, and were fixed with the use of a 10% solution of formalin and subsequently stored in 70% alcohol solution. All specimens examined are deposited in the fish collections of the Núcleo em Ecologia e Desenvolvimento Socioambiental de Macaé, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPM, and Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ. Continental (freshwater fishes and some marine or estuarine species frequently collected were regarded as Resident, whereas marine species collected only sporadically were regarded as Occasional. Possible associations between the orientation of the lagoons and the composition of Resident fishes were explored through a Correspondence Analysis (CA. RESULTS: A total of 100 species, belonging to 19 orders and 41 families of the Teleostei were recorded. When both Resident and Occasional species are considered, families Carangidae and Engraulidae, with nine and eight species respectively, are the most representative. When only Resident species are considered, the Gerreidae and Gobiidae, both with seven species, are the most representative families. The Imboassica Lagoon, with 76 species, has the highest species richness among lagoons included in this study. A total of 81 species were recorded in the Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park, a number two times higher than reported on previous studies. An identification key, including 57 Resident species, is also presented. CONCLUSIONS: Parallel lagoons were characterized by a small group of continental species presumably of marine ancestry (Secondary Division, while marine species

  6. Dissolved nutrient balance and net ecosystem metabolism in a Mediterranean-climate coastal lagoon: San Diego Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo-Hinojosa, F.; Zirino, A.; Holm-Hansen, O.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Boyd, T. J.; Chadwick, B.; Rivera-Duarte, I.

    2008-02-01

    coastal waters, is transported into the bay, retained and then remineralized within the system. Our results were compared with those reported for the heterotrophic hypersaline coastal lagoons located in the semi-arid coast of California-Baja California, and with those autotrophic hypersaline systems found in the semi-arid areas of Australia. We point out that the balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in inverse estuaries is dependent on net external inputs of either inorganic nutrients or organic matter as it has been indicated for positive estuaries.

  7. Pollen deposition in tauber traps and surface soil samples in the Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon area, pampa grasslands (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Latorre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of airborne pollen loadings deposited in Tauber traps were studied in a coastal lagoon from south-eastern Pampa grasslands, Argentina, in order to assess their relationship with surface samples and to interpret the representativeness of local, regional and extraregional vegetation. Three different environments were considered: a coastal dune barrier with a psammophytic community, a salt marsh with a halophytic community in Mar Chiquita lagoon, and a freshwater community at Hinojales freshwater lake. Based on a record of surface samples taken from a previous paper, a parametric model was built to classify Tauber samples gathered from the natural vegetation communities of the study area. Results revealed that just like their surface counterparts, Tauber trap records qualitatively reflect the predominant vegetation types, although ecological groups feature different quantitative representations depending on the record type. Pollen loadings showed that airborne pollen transport was predominantly of local range, in accordance with previous results from the same study area. Airborne - surface samples relationships enrich our knowledge of the present environment that could be useful to improve paleoecological interpretations of the area.Se estimó el depósito polínico atmosférico de trampas Tauber en una laguna costera del sudeste de la estepa pampeana argentina, con el objetivo de analizar su relación con muestras de polen superficial e interpretar la representatividad de la vegetación local, regional y extraregional. Se consideraron tres ambientes diferentes: una barrera costera de dunas con vegetación psamofítica, la marisma de la laguna costera Mar Chiquita, con vegetación halofítica, y la laguna continental Hinojales, con vegetación hidrofítica. En base a las muestras de superficie y análisis de un trabajo previo, se construyó un modelo paramétrico para clasificar las muestras Tauber tomadas en la vegetación natural del

  8. Coastal Dump Sites in the Lagos lagoon and toxicity of their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings from this study indicate widespread and unregulated practice of coastal solid waste dumping with potential effects on water quality and biota. The need for improved waste ... the City of Lagos was discussed. Keywords: Aquatic Pollution; Waste Management; Environmental Policy; Solid Waste; Waste Recycling ...

  9. Estimating total alkalinity for coastal ocean acidification monitoring at regional to continental scales in Australian coastal waters

    KAUST Repository

    Baldry, Kimberlee

    2017-06-01

    Owing to a lack of resources, tools, and knowledge, the natural variability and distribution of Total Alkalinity (TA) has been poorly characterised in coastal waters globally, yet variability is known to be high in coastal regions due to the complex interactions of oceanographic, biotic, and terrestrially-influenced processes. This is a particularly challenging task for the vast Australian coastline, however, it is also this vastness that demands attention in the face of ocean acidification (OA). Australian coastal waters have high biodiversity and endemism, and are home to large areas of coral reef, including the Great Barrier Reef, the largest coral reef system in the world. Ocean acidification threatens calcifying marine organisms by hindering calcification rates, threatening the structural integrity of coral reefs and other ecosystems. Tracking the progression of OA in different coastal regions requires accurate knowledge of the variability in TA. Thus, estimation methods that can capture this variability at synoptic scales are needed. Multiple linear regression is a promising approach in this regard. Here, we compare a range of both simple and multiple linear regression models to the estimation of coastal TA from a range of variables, including salinity, temperature, chlorophyll-a concentration and nitrate concentration. We find that regionally parameterised models capture local variability better than more general coastal or open ocean parameterised models. The strongest contribution to model improvement came through incorporating temperature as an input variable as well as salinity. Further improvements were achieved through the incorporation of either nitrate or chlorophyll-a, with the combination of temperature, salinity, and nitrate constituting the minimum model in most cases. These results provide an approach that can be applied to satellite Earth observation and autonomous in situ platforms to improve synoptic scale estimation of TA in coastal waters.

  10. Effects of changes in nutrient loading and composition on hypoxia dynamics and internal nutrient cycling of a stratified coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yafei; McCowan, Andrew; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2017-10-01

    The effects of changes in catchment nutrient loading and composition on the phytoplankton dynamics, development of hypoxia and internal nutrient dynamics in a stratified coastal lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes) were investigated using a 3-D coupled hydrodynamic biogeochemical water quality model. The study showed that primary production was equally sensitive to changed dissolved inorganic and particulate organic nitrogen loads, highlighting the need for a better understanding of particulate organic matter bioavailability. Stratification and sediment carbon enrichment were the main drivers for the hypoxia and subsequent sediment phosphorus release in Lake King. High primary production stimulated by large nitrogen loading brought on by a winter flood contributed almost all the sediment carbon deposition (as opposed to catchment loads), which was ultimately responsible for summer bottom-water hypoxia. Interestingly, internal recycling of phosphorus was more sensitive to changed nitrogen loads than total phosphorus loads, highlighting the potential importance of nitrogen loads exerting a control over systems that become phosphorus limited (such as during summer nitrogen-fixing blooms of cyanobacteria). Therefore, the current study highlighted the need to reduce both total nitrogen and total phosphorus for water quality improvement in estuarine systems.

  11. Effects of changes in nutrient loading and composition on hypoxia dynamics and internal nutrient cycling of a stratified coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in catchment nutrient loading and composition on the phytoplankton dynamics, development of hypoxia and internal nutrient dynamics in a stratified coastal lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes were investigated using a 3-D coupled hydrodynamic biogeochemical water quality model. The study showed that primary production was equally sensitive to changed dissolved inorganic and particulate organic nitrogen loads, highlighting the need for a better understanding of particulate organic matter bioavailability. Stratification and sediment carbon enrichment were the main drivers for the hypoxia and subsequent sediment phosphorus release in Lake King. High primary production stimulated by large nitrogen loading brought on by a winter flood contributed almost all the sediment carbon deposition (as opposed to catchment loads, which was ultimately responsible for summer bottom-water hypoxia. Interestingly, internal recycling of phosphorus was more sensitive to changed nitrogen loads than total phosphorus loads, highlighting the potential importance of nitrogen loads exerting a control over systems that become phosphorus limited (such as during summer nitrogen-fixing blooms of cyanobacteria. Therefore, the current study highlighted the need to reduce both total nitrogen and total phosphorus for water quality improvement in estuarine systems.

  12. Land Suitability Assessment in the Catchment Area of Four Southwestern Atlantic Coastal Lagoons: Multicriteria and Optimization Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gallego, Lorena; Achkar, Marcel; Conde, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, a land suitability assessment was conducted in the basin of four Uruguayan coastal lagoons (Southwestern Atlantic) to analyze the productive development while minimizing eutrophication, biodiversity loss and conflicts among different land uses. Suitable land for agriculture, forest, livestock ranching, tourism and conservation sectors were initially established based on a multi-attribute model developed using a geographic information system. Experts were consulted to determine the requirements for each land use sector and the incompatibilities among land use types. The current and potential conflicts among incompatible land use sectors were analyzed by overlapping land suitability maps. We subsequently applied a multi-objective model where land (pixels) with similar suitability was clustered into "land suitability groups", using a two-phase cluster analysis and the Akaike Information Criterion. Finally, a linear programming optimization procedure was applied to allocate land use sectors into land suitable groups, maximizing total suitability and minimizing interference among sectors. Results indicated that current land use overlapped by 4.7 % with suitable land of other incompatible sectors. However, the suitable land of incompatible sectors overlapped in 20.3 % of the study area, indicating a high potential for the occurrence of future conflict. The highest competition was between agriculture and conservation, followed by forest and agriculture. We explored scenarios where livestock ranching and tourism intensified, and found that interference with conservation and agriculture notably increased. This methodology allowed us to analyze current and potential land use conflicts and to contribute to the strategic planning of the study area.

  13. A review of methodologies applied in Australian practice to evaluate long-term coastal adaptation options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy David Ramm

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising sea levels have the potential to alter coastal flooding regimes around the world and local governments are beginning to consider how to manage uncertain coastal change. In doing so, there is increasing recognition that such change is deeply uncertain and unable to be reliably described with probabilities or a small number of scenarios. Characteristics of methodologies applied in Australian practice to evaluate long-term coastal adaptation options are reviewed and benchmarked against two state-of-the-art international methods suited for conditions of uncertainty (Robust Decision Making and Dynamic Adaptive Policy Pathways. Seven out of the ten Australian case studies assumed the uncertain parameters, such as sea level rise, could be described deterministically or stochastically when identifying risk and evaluating adaptation options across multi-decadal periods. This basis is not considered sophisticated enough for long-term decision-making, implying that Australian practice needs to increase the use of scenarios to explore a much larger uncertainty space when assessing the performance of adaptation options. Two Australian case studies mapped flexible adaptation pathways to manage uncertainty, and there remains an opportunity to incorporate quantitative methodologies to support the identification of risk thresholds. The contextual framing of risk, including the approach taken to identify risk (top-down or bottom-up and treatment of uncertain parameters, were found to be fundamental characteristics that influenced the methodology selected to evaluate adaptation options. The small sample of case studies available suggests that long-term coastal adaptation in Australian is in its infancy and there is a timely opportunity to guide local government towards robust methodologies for developing long-term coastal adaptation plans.

  14. Nutrients and clam contamination by Escherichia coli in a meso-tidal coastal lagoon: Seasonal variation in counter cycle to external sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Maria João; Soares, Florbela; Matias, Domitília; Vale, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sources of nutrients and E. coli in Ria Formosa linked to tourism in summer. • Lower nutrient values and clam contamination by E. coli in summer. • Bactericide effect of temperature and solar radiation causes lower E. coli. • Higher biological consumption of nutrients in warmer periods. • Results mirror possible effects of climate changes on coastal lagoons. - Abstract: The clam Ruditapes decussatus was transplanted from a natural recruitment area of Ria Formosa to three sites, surveyed for nutrients in water and sediments. Specimens were sampled monthly for determination of Escherichia coli, condition index and gonadal index. Higher nutrient values in low tide reflect drainage, anthropogenic sources or sediment regeneration, emphasising the importance of water mixing in the entire lagoon driven by the tide. Despite the increase of effluent discharges in summer due to tourism, nutrient concentrations and E. coli in clams were lower in warmer periods. The bactericide effect of temperature and solar radiation was better defined in clams from the inlet channel site than from sites closer to urban effluents. High temperature in summer and torrential freshwater inputs to Ria Formosa may anticipate climate change scenarios for south Europe. Seasonal variation of nutrients and clam contamination may thus point to possible alterations in coastal lagoons and their ecosystem services

  15. Dominance patterns in macroalgal and phytoplankton biomass under different nutrient loads in subtropical coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, F; Piñón-Gimate, A; Ochoa-Izaguirre, M J; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Ramírez-Reséndiz, G; Alonso-Rodríguez, R

    2013-12-15

    Nine macroalgal blooms were studied in five coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California. The nutrient loads from point and diffuse sources were estimated in the proximity of the macroalgal blooms. Chlorophyll a and macroalgal biomass were measured during the dry, rainy and cold seasons. Shrimp farms were the main point source of nitrogen and phosphorus loads for the lagoons. High biomasses were found during the dry season for phytoplankton at site 6 (791.7±34.6 mg m(-2)) and during the rainy season for macroalgae at site 4 (296.0±82.4 g m(-2)). Depending on the season, the phytoplankton biomass ranged between 40.0 and 791.7 mg m(-2) and the macroalgal biomass between 1 and 296.0 g m(-2). The bulk biomass (phytoplankton+macroalgal) displayed the same tendency as the nutrient loads entering the coastal lagoons. Phytoplankton and macroalgal biomass presented a significant correlation with the atomic N:P ratio. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Life cycle, secondary production and nutrient stock in Heleobia australis (d'Orbigny 1835) (Gastropoda: Hydrobiidae) in a tropical coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Barros, Marcos P.; Leal, João J. F.; de A. Esteves, Francisco; de M. Rocha, Adriana; Bozelli, Reinaldo L.

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate density, biomass, life cycle, secondary production and nutrient stock of Heleobia australis population (d'Orbigny 1835) in a coastal tropical lagoon (Imboassica lagoon). Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and organic matter (OM) concentrations in the sediment were determined in order to evaluate their influence on the density, biomass and concentrations of C, N, P and OM in the biomass of H. australis population. Two sampling stations were established: one in the central part of the lagoon (station 1, not influenced directly by sewage release) and the second near the littoral region (station 2, close to the outlet of a canal discharging domestic sewage). Triplicate samples were collected monthly for one year (from May 1999 to April 2000) with a "core" sampler for determination of density, biomass, life cycle and secondary production of H. australis. For determination of C, N, P and OM in both sediment and H. australis, the samples were carried out in May and November 1999, and in April 2000. Density was significantly lower at station 1, whereas biomass did not differ significantly between the stations. Secondary production at station 1 was 28.33 g ash-free dry weight (AFDW) m -2 year -1 and at station 2 it was 49.36 g (AFDW) m -2 year -1. The concentrations of OM, C and P in the sediment and N and P in the biomass of the organisms were higher at station 2. The release of domestic effluents into this lagoon results in an increase in OM, C and P concentrations in the sediment which are reflected in H. australis chemical composition. Considering the high densities, biomass and N and P content of these snails in Imboassica lagoon, their importance for the nutrient cycling in this ecosystem must be accounted.

  17. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and metal concentration in food webs from a mining-impacted coastal lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Guirao, Lazaro [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100-Murcia (Spain)], E-mail: lamarin@um.es; Lloret, Javier; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100-Murcia (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    Two food webs from the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, differing in the distance from the desert-stream through which mining wastes were discharged, were examined by reference to essential (Zn and Cu) and non-essential (Pb and Cd) metal concentrations and stable isotopes content (C and N). The partial extraction technique applied, which reflects the availability of metals to organisms after sediment ingestion, showed higher bioavailable metal concentrations in sediments from the station influenced by the mining discharges, in agreement with the higher metal concentrations observed in organisms, which in many cases exceeded the regulatory limits established in Spanish legislation concerning seafood. Spatial differences in essential metal concentrations in the fauna suggest that several organisms are exposed to metal levels above their regulation capacity. Differences in isotopic composition were found between both food webs, the wadi-influenced station showing higher {delta}{sup 15}N values and lower {delta}{sup 13}C levels, due to the discharge of urban waste waters and by the entrance of freshwater and allochthonous marsh plants. The linear-regressions between trophic levels (as indicated by {delta}{sup 15}N) and the metal content indicated that biomagnification does not occur. In the case of invertebrates, since the 'handle strategy' of the species and the physiological requirements of the organisms, among other factors, determine the final concentration of a specific element, no clear relationships between trophic level and the metal content are to be expected. For their part, fish communities did not show clear patterns in the case of any of the analyzed metals, probably because most fish species have similar metal requirements, and because biological factors also intervened. Finally, since the study deals with metals, assumptions concerning trophic transfer factors calculation may not be suitable since the metal burden originates not only from the prey but

  18. Land suitability assessment in the catchment area of four Southwestern Atlantic coastal lagoons: multicriteria and optimization modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gallego, Lorena; Achkar, Marcel; Conde, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, a land suitability assessment was conducted in the basin of four Uruguayan coastal lagoons (Southwestern Atlantic) to analyze the productive development while minimizing eutrophication, biodiversity loss and conflicts among different land uses. Suitable land for agriculture, forest, livestock ranching, tourism and conservation sectors were initially established based on a multi-attribute model developed using a geographic information system. Experts were consulted to determine the requirements for each land use sector and the incompatibilities among land use types. The current and potential conflicts among incompatible land use sectors were analyzed by overlapping land suitability maps. We subsequently applied a multi-objective model where land (pixels) with similar suitability was clustered into "land suitability groups", using a two-phase cluster analysis and the Akaike Information Criterion. Finally, a linear programming optimization procedure was applied to allocate land use sectors into land suitable groups, maximizing total suitability and minimizing interference among sectors. Results indicated that current land use overlapped by 4.7 % with suitable land of other incompatible sectors. However, the suitable land of incompatible sectors overlapped in 20.3 % of the study area, indicating a high potential for the occurrence of future conflict. The highest competition was between agriculture and conservation, followed by forest and agriculture. We explored scenarios where livestock ranching and tourism intensified, and found that interference with conservation and agriculture notably increased. This methodology allowed us to analyze current and potential land use conflicts and to contribute to the strategic planning of the study area.

  19. Changes in bacterial community metabolism and composition during the degradation of dissolved organic matter from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Marine; Pringault, Olivier; Bouvy, Marc; Catala, Philippe; Oriol, Louise; Caparros, Jocelyne; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Intertaglia, Laurent; West, Nyree; Agis, Martin; Got, Patrice; Joux, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Spatial increases and temporal shifts in outbreaks of gelatinous plankton have been observed over the past several decades in many estuarine and coastal ecosystems. The effects of these blooms on marine ecosystem functioning and particularly on the dynamics of the heterotrophic bacteria are still unclear. The response of the bacterial community from a Mediterranean coastal lagoon to the addition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita, corresponding to an enrichment of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by 1.4, was assessed for 22 days in microcosms (8 l). The high bioavailability of this material led to (i) a rapid mineralization of the DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen from the jellyfish and (ii) the accumulation of high concentrations of ammonium and orthophosphate in the water column. DOM from jellyfish greatly stimulated heterotrophic prokaryotic production and respiration rates during the first 2 days; then, these activities showed a continuous decay until reaching those measured in the control microcosms (lagoon water only) at the end of the experiment. Bacterial growth efficiency remained below 20%, indicating that most of the DOM was respired and a minor part was channeled to biomass production. Changes in bacterial diversity were assessed by tag pyrosequencing of partial bacterial 16S rRNA genes, DNA fingerprints, and a cultivation approach. While bacterial diversity in control microcosms showed little changes during the experiment, the addition of DOM from the jellyfish induced a rapid growth of Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio species that were isolated. After 9 days, the bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes, which appeared more adapted to metabolize high-molecular-weight DOM. At the end of the experiment, the bacterial community shifted toward a higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria. Resilience of the bacterial community after the addition of DOM from the jellyfish was higher for metabolic functions than diversity

  20. Modelling ecosystem functions and properties at different time and spatial scales in shallow coastal lagoons: An application of the LOICZ biogeochemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Gianmarco; Austoni, Martina; Zaldívar, José M.; Swaney, Dennis P.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2008-04-01

    The Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) biogeochemical model (LBM) was applied at different temporal and spatial scales in 17 Italian lagoons of the LaguNet network ( http://www.dsa.unipr.it/lagunet). A series of alternative assumptions taking into account benthic vegetation and sedimentary fluxes were introduced and compared with the classical LBM approach at various time scales. The reliability of the LBM application to the seventeen Italian lagoons was tested by comparison to a pool of shallow coastal systems from the global LOICZ database with comparable depths and sizes. The nutrient loads of the Italian sites can be considered relatively low, particularly for dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP). Although the median values of estimated internal transformations (source-sink) of both dissolved inorganic phosphorous and nitrogen at the LaguNet sites were comparable with the selected LOICZ sites, the positive and negative extreme values were one order of magnitude lower. Overall, the LBM applications to the Italian sites gave good quality budgets for shallow systems subjected to relatively low nutrient inputs and with a wide range of primary producer communities, including seagrass, macroalgae and phytoplankton. Furthermore, stoichiometry of Carbon:Nitrogen:Phosphorous for the different primary producer groups allowed the integration of previous studies by identifying a series of relationships between nutrient loads and ecosystem functions. To some extent, the LBM application at monthly and seasonal time scales, as shown for the Sacca di Goro lagoon, can simulate the internal variability affected by the life cycle of the dominant primary producers. Therefore, the LBM not only allows the assessment of net ecological metabolism but seems, also, capable of representing the wide range of trophic conditions associated with shallow coastal systems. Overall, the application of alternative assumptions supports the robustness of the classical LBM, although

  1. The physiological ecology of the specialist lagoon amphipod, Gammarus insensibilis

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Andrew Russell

    2006-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are habitats of conservation importance. The characteristic fauna of lagoons includes a number of specialist species, some of which are scheduled for protection. Work on the conservation of coastal lagoons has suggested that detailed information on the ecology of lagoon specialist species is essential to ensure management strategies are relevant to the lagoonal species. This study addresses this issue by providing information about the monthly reproductive investment and energ...

  2. Metabolism of a nitrogen-enriched coastal marine lagoon during the summertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Robert W.; Hayn, Melanie; Marino, Roxanne M.; Ganju, Neil; Foreman, Kenneth H.; McGlathery, Karen; Giblin, Anne E.; Berg, Peter; Walker, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured metabolism rates in a shallow, nitrogen-enriched coastal marine ecosystem on Cape Cod (MA, USA) during seven summers using an open-water diel oxygen method. We compared two basins, one directly receiving most of the nitrogen (N) load (“Snug Harbor”) and another further removed from the N load and better flushed (“Outer Harbor”). Both dissolved oxygen and pH varied greatly over the day, increasing in daylight and decreasing at night. The more N-enriched basin frequently went hypoxic during the night, and the pH in both basins was low (compared to standard seawater) when the oxygen levels were low, due to elevated carbon dioxide. Day-to-day variation in gross primary production (GPP) was high and linked in part to variation in light. Whole-ecosystem respiration tended to track this short-term variation in GPP, suggesting that respiration by the primary producers often dominated whole-system respiration. GPP was higher in the more N-loaded Snug Harbor. Seagrasses covered over 60 % of the area of the better-flushed, Outer Harbor throughout our study and were the major contributors to GPP there. Seagrasses covered 20 % of the area in Snug Harbor for the first 5 years of our study, and their contribution to GPP was relatively small. The seagrasses in Snug Harbor died off completely in the 6th year, but GPP remained high then and in the subsequent year. Overall, rates of phytoplankton GPP were relatively low, suggesting that benthic micro- and macro-algae may be the dominant primary producers in Snug Harbor in most years. Net ecosystem production in both Snug Harbor and the Outer Harbor was variable from year to year, showing net heterotrophy in some years and net autotrophy in others, with a trend towards increasing autotrophy over the 7 years reported here.

  3. Effects of organic pollution in the distribution of annelid communities in the Estero de Urías coastal lagoon, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ferrando

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Estero de Urías coastal lagoon is subjected to several anthropogenic activities and has been characterized since 1997 through the study of benthic fauna. We analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of annelids and their relationships with environmental variables (depth, sediment temperature, grain size and organic matter in order to determine the current degree of perturbation. Density, species richness, diversity, dominance, biomass, and the application of classification and ordination techniques allowed us to distinguish 5 zones: 1 a non-perturbed zone at the mouth of the lagoon, 2 a slightly perturbed zone surrounded by mangroves and shrimp farms, 3 a temporarily perturbed zone close to the effluent of the thermoelectric plant, 4 a perturbed zone in front of the slaughterhouse and fish factory, and 5 a very perturbed zone subjected to sewage and industrial input. Only minor changes in granulometry and faunal composition were observed in comparison with previous data from the same area, suggesting that the lagoon is still perturbed due to the effect of anthropogenic activities.

  4. Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and/or Lagoons (ICOLLs) as groundwater-dominated coastal systems: Evidence from seasonal radon observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Santos, Isaac R.; Tait, Douglas R.; McMahon, Ashly; Kadel, Sean; Maher, Damien T.

    2016-04-01

    Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes or Lagoons (ICOLLs) are dynamic coastal systems that may be vulnerable to changes in catchment hydrology. However, little is known regarding the role of groundwater on the hydrological cycles of ICOLLs. Groundwater discharge in two ICOLLs (Welsby and Mermaid) and a nearby wetland (South Welsby Lagoon) located on Bribie Island (Australia) was quantified using radon (222Rn, a natural geochemical groundwater tracer) during four seasonal surveys. The distribution of radon revealed temporal and spatial changes over the study period with higher surface water radon concentrations found in winter for Welsby ICOLL and in autumn for Mermaid ICOLL. The average estimated groundwater discharge rates from a radon mass balance were 3.4 ± 2.1, 7.3 ± 8.9 and 2.6 ± 1.1 cm d-1 in Welsby, South Welsby and Mermaid Lagoons, respectively. These values are at least 8-fold greater than the average annual precipitation that falls directly over the ICOLLs (1420 mm per year, or 0.4 cm d-1), which, coupled with minimal surface water runoff due to the permeable sandy soils, demonstrates that these systems are groundwater-dominated. Overall, groundwater discharge rates in these ICOLLs were much larger than has been reported in other lake systems which is most likely due to the high permeability of regional sandy soils and their large shoreline to volume ratio.

  5. Linking the Modern and Recent Record of Cabo Frio Upwelling with Local Climate and Biogeochemical Processes in Hypersaline Coastal Lagoons, Região dos Lagos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Nascimento, G. S.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Belem, A. L.; Carreira, R.; Eglinton, T. I.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    A unique marine and lagoonal system along the coast east of Rio de Janeiro is being investigated to understand the impact of climatic variability on the South Atlantic carbon cycle and biomineralisation processes involved in carbonate precipitation in the hypersaline coastal lagoons. The region is dominated by a semi-arid microclimate attributed to the local coastal upwelling phenomenon near Cabo Frio. The intensity of the upwelling affects the hydrology of the annual water and biogeochemical cycles in the lagoons, as well as biogeochemical signals of environmental change recorded in both onshore and offshore sediments. Preliminary results of δ18O and δD values of water samples collected monthly in Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho from 2011 to 2014 show lower values for waters corresponding to the wet season, reflecting increased input of meteoric water. The higher values for waters collected during the dry season reflect the greater amount of evaporation with increased seasonal aridity. Radiocarbon dating of Holocene marine and lagoonal cores indicates that Mg-carbonate precipitation in the lagoons is associated with high evaporation. Modern field observations for the last 3 years suggest that the amount of carbonate precipitation is correlated with evaporitic conditions associated with the upwelling phenomenon. A calibration study of hydrogen isotopic fractionation in the modern lagoons is underway to define a relationship between δDlipid of suspended particles and δDwater of associated water. This isotopic relationship will be applied to material obtained in cores from the lagoons. Offshore cores will be studied using well-tested paleotemperature proxies to evaluate the intensity of the upwelling during the Holocene. In summary, linking the coastal upwelling with the lagoonal hydrology has the potential to furnish important insights about the relationship between the local climate and paleoceanographic circulation associated with the regional carbon cycle.

  6. Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages in a coastal lagoon of the Biosphere Reserve La Encrucijada, Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Velázquez-Velázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Composition and abundance of the ichthyofauna in estuarine and coastal lagoon systems of the South Pacific in Mexico have been scarcely studied. In particular, there is a lack of information on how environmental variables determine the spatio-temporal structure of fish assemblages in those habitats. In this study, fishes were sampled by drop net during twelve months (May 2004 -April 2005 in 22 sites distributed along the Carretas-Pereyra lagoon, located in the Biosphere Reserve La Encrucijada, Chiapas, Mexico. We recorded 11 797 individuals (40 species, in 30 genera and 21 families. Dormitator latifrons was the most dominant species in terms of the Importance Value index, IV (23.05 %, followed by Lile gracilis (10.31 %, Poecilia sphenops (8.60 % and Poecilia butleri (7.30 %. D. latifrons also accounted for more than one half of the total biomass (50.14 %. Species richness and Shannon-Wiener’s diversity indexes showed similar temporal fluctuations, reaching their highest values during the dry season. The system evidenced temporal variations in salinity, having observed four different regimes: freshwater, oligohaline, mesohaline and polyhaline. Mean richness and diversity indexes achieved their highest values during the mesohaline period. On the other hand, mean abundances (CPUE were highest during the freshwater period. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that salinity and temperature were the most important environmental parameters affecting associations of fishes in terms of their abundances. Correlation analyses revealed that among the environmental variables measured in this study, transparency showed the most significant negative correlation with fish richness and Shannon-Wiener’s diversity index. At a local scale, results suggest that spatial and temporal distribution of fish assemblages are determined by differences in the regimes of salinity and transparency, primarily driven by freshwater input from rivers. Rev. Biol

  7. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  8. Modelaje de la interacción entre la laguna costera tropical las Marites (Isla de Margarita, Venezuela y el mar caribe adyacente | Interaction model between the coastal tropical lagoon las Marites (Margarita Island, Venezuela and the adjacent caribbean sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola López Monroy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological balance and the flow of materials in the coastal lagoons are strongly dependent on the exchange with other bodies of water. The evaluation of these exchanges is an important tool for the management of these ecosystems. This study aimed to estimate the interaction between a tropical coastal lagoon, Las Marites, located in Margarita Island, Venezuela and the adjacent Caribbean Sea. The Land Ocean Interactions in Coastal Zone (LOICZ method was used to establish budgets of water, salt, nutrients and calculate their respective flows. The results indicated that Las Marites is a permanent source of fertilizers to adjacent sea. This process intensifies during the dry season. In its interaction with the adjacent sea, the lagoon also exchanges more water in this season. The western side of the lagoon ecosystem is heterotrophic and denitrification process dominates, while the east side is autotrophic and N2 fixation is favored. Temporarily, dry years favor the residual flow of water, salt and nitrogen from the ocean to the lagoon. In wet years, the residual phosphorus flow increases from the outside. The hydraulic residence time was 31 d during dry season and 38 d in the rainy season, and this can be increased by about 50 additional days in the years of greatest rainfall.

  9. Effect of salinity on the concentrations of radioisotopes in the aquatic environment of a hypersaline coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Khaled A; Seddeek, Mostafa K; Sharshar, Taher; Elnimr, Tarek; Badran, Hussein M

    2014-06-01

    Research of the effect of salinity on the fate of radionuclides has been focused on seas or estuarine systems while there is almost no information on marine environments with a salinity higher than that of sea water. The hypersaline Bardawil lagoon is a concentration basin, with evaporation exceeding precipitation. This study presents the characteristics of some environmental factors including salinity and their influence on the distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in different compartments of the lagoon. The concentrations of (238)U, (234)Th, (228)Ra and (137)Cs in sediments show some degree of dependency on the water's salinity. Migration of these radionuclides in the lagoon's sediments must take place from high salinity to low-salinity regions. Cluster analysis revealed the data structure for sediment by separating (137)Cs and (40)K from (232)Th, (226)Ra, and (234)Th and for sand by separating (40)K from the other radioisotopes.

  10. Factors determining parasite community richness and species composition in black snook Centropomus nigrescens (Centropomidae) from coastal lagoons in Guerrero, Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Violante-González, J.; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F.; Rojas-Herrera, A.; Guerrero, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2010), 59-66 ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : TRES-PALOS LAGOON * HELMINTH COMMUNITIES * PACIFIC COAST * BALTIC SEA * FISHES * SIMILARITY * COLONIZATION * TELEOSTEI * BRAZIL * GILLS Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.812, year: 2010

  11. Breaching vulnerability of coastal barriers under effects of tropical cyclones : A model study on the Hue lagoon - Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, T.Q.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Under effects of tropical cyclones, the coast is subjected to attack both by surge and wave from the sea and by flooding from the bay. These forces pose a serious breaching threat to natural sea-defence works such as barrier spits, barrier islands, lagoon barriers, etc. on the coast. Unintended

  12. Influence of piers on functional groups of benthic primary producers and consumers in the channel of a subtropical coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Pagliosa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial habitats have become common in coastal areas worldwide and may influence the structure and functioning of benthic ecosystems. We analyze the influence of piers on the benthic morphofunctional groups of rocky seaweeds and of soft bottom macrofauna in the channel of Conceição Lagoon (southern Brazil. The main impact is a reduction in the luminosity available for photosynthetic activity which is directly related to a decrease in the biomasses of sediment microphytobenthos and of more highly structured macroalgae life-forms. Contrary to expectations, the morphotypes of potentially high biomass productivity, such as articulated coralline, corticated and leathery macroalgae, were in general less abundant and the low biomass foliose and filamentous macroalgae occurred in reference areas but not under the piers. The piers' effects on motile epifauna and infauna functional groups were site-specific and probably related to the general reduction in primary producer organisms in the new habitats. The discretely motile infauna was the only functional group able to thrive under the piers due to their reduced motility and fragile morphological structures, being benefited by the shelter provided by the artificial habitats. Our results showed that the piers might have a negative effect on the base-trophic level organisms responsible for bottom-up controls.Hábitats artificiais têm se tornado comum em áreas costeiras no mundo todo, podendo influenciar a estrutura e funcionamento de ecossistemas bênticos. Nós analisamos a influência de trapiches nos grupos morfofuncionais bênticos de algas associadas a substrato consolidado e de macrofauna em substrato inconsolidado, no canal da Lagoa da Conceição (sul do Brasil. O principal impacto da presença de trapiches é a redução da irradiação disponível para atividade fotossintética, o que está diretamente relacionado com o decréscimo na biomassa microfitobentônica no sedimento e de macroalga

  13. Export of materials along a tidal river channel that links a coastal lagoon to the adjacent sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aldeco Ramírez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intratidal variability and flux of salt, chlorophyll-a and suspended materials were evaluated in a shallow tropical tidal channel linking a coastal lagoon to the western Gulf of Mexico. Velocity, temperature and conductivity were used to calculate the fluxes. Data were recorded during three tidal velocity cycles (tvc under extreme river discharge conditions. Chlorophyll-a and suspended materials were determined below the surface. In both seasons (dry and rainy, the flow was ebb-dominated and with longer duration than when in flood. Maximum current velocities were 0.30 m s-1 in May (dry season and 0.60 m s-1 in September (rainy season. In the dry season the mean chlorophyll-a export was of 7.56 Kg over tvc while the import was of 3.32 Kg. In the rainy season mean export (47.3 Kg was 6 times greater than the import (7.93 Kg over tvc. Phytoplankton was dominated by organisms of marine origin. The mean of exported, suspended materials in the rainy season (111.3 Kg was 4.6 times greater (859 Kg than that in the dry season (184.7 Kg over tvc. Tidal velocity asymmetry is an effective mechanism of exportation, introducing relatively warm and saltier water into the river through the tidal channel.A variabilidade intramaré, o fluxo de salinidade, a clorofila-a e material em suspensão foram avaliados em um canal superficial de maré tropical em uma lagoa costeira ao oeste do Golfo do México. Os dados de velocidade, temperatura e condutividade foram usados para cálculo dos fluxos durante três ciclos de velocidades das marés (tvc sob condições extremas de descarga. A Clorofila-a e material em suspensão foram determinados abaixo em subsuperfície. Em ambas as estações (seca e chuvosa, o fluxo dominante foi durante o refluxo e com duração maior durante o fluxo de entrada. A máxima velocidade encontrada foi 0.30 m s-1 em maio (estação seca e 0.60 m s-1 em setembro (estação chuvosa. Durante a época seca foram exportadas 7.56 Kg de clorofila

  14. GIS-based multi-criteria site selection for zebra mussel cultivation: Addressing end-of-pipe remediation of a eutrophic coastal lagoon ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdanavičiūtė, Ingrida; Umgiesser, Georg; Vaičiūtė, Diana; Bresciani, Mariano; Kozlov, Igor; Zaiko, Anastasija

    2018-04-11

    Farming of shellfish and seaweeds is a tested tool for mitigating eutrophication consequences in coastal environments, however as many other marine economic activities it should be a subject of marine spatial planning for designating suitable sites. The present study proposes site selection framework for provisional zebra mussel farming in a eutrophic lagoon ecosystem, aimed primarily at remediation purposes. GIS-based multi-criteria approach was applied, combining data from empirical maps, numerical models and remote sensing to estimate suitability parameters. Site selection and prioritisation of suitable areas considered 15 environmental and socio-economic criteria, which contributed to 4 optimisation models (settlement, growth and survival of mussels, environmental and socio-economic) and 3 predefined scenarios representing provisional goals of mussel cultivation: spat production, biomass production and bioremediation. The relative importance of each criterion was assessed utilizing the Analytical Hierarchy Process. Site suitability index was calculated and the final result of the site selection analysis was summarized for 3 scenarios and overall suitability map. Four suitability classes (unsuitable, least, moderately and most suitable) were applied, and 3 most suitable zones for provisional zebra mussel cultivation with 12 candidate sites were selected accordingly. The integrated approach presented in this study can be adjusted for designating zebra mussel farming sites in other estuarine lagoon ecosystems, or cultivation of other mussel species for bioremediation purposes. The analytical framework and the workflow designed in this study are also adoptable for addressing other aquaculture-related spatial planning issues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. X-ray microtomography characterization of carbonate microbialites from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State—Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, A.S., E-mail: alemachado@lin.ufrj.br [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dal Bó, P.F.F. [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, I. [Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Borghi, L. [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R. [Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to apply the micro-CT technique to assess recent microbialite samples from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State. The study comprises structural assessment, mineralogical characterization and porosity distribution of each sample. Micro-CT is increasingly present in geological reservoir analyses, and has advantages over other laboratory techniques since it is non-invasive and allows 2D/3D visualization of inner structures without previous preparation method, such as slabbing, polishing, thinning or impregnation. This technique renders structural analyses which can be spatially resolved to a scale of micrometers. Results show that micro-CT technique is also adequate for the characterization of carbonate microbialites, providing excellent high resolution 3D images, that enabled to distinguish different mineralogies and porosity distribution beyond it is inner structure.

  16. Trophic relationships and transference of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc in a subtropical coastal lagoon food web from SE Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Marini, M E; Soto-Jiménez, M F; Páez-Osuna, F

    2009-11-01

    Trophic relationships and heavy metal transference in a coastal subtropical lagoon marine food web were investigated through the use of stable isotopes in food sources and biota. A selective extraction scheme was applied to the surface sediments as an indirect way to evaluate the potential of toxicity of metals. Results showed that cadmium, copper, lead and zinc concentrations were within sediment quality guidelines criteria. Concentrations of these metals in organisms varied widely among functional groups and within the same and closely related taxa. delta(13)C values varied significantly among organisms from different functional groups, while the delta(15)N values varied according with their feeding habits. Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were not positively transferred (biomagnification factor <1) through entire food web. However, a partial positive transference was observed for Cu and Zn involving three trophic levels (from the phytoplankton to crab as secondary consumer).

  17. Charophytes as a nutrient and energy reservoir in a tropical coastal Lagoon impacted by humans (RJ, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Silva, C; Albertoni, E F; Esteves, F A

    2004-08-01

    In the Imboassica Lagoon (22 degrees 24'S and 42 degrees 42'W) (Macaé, RJ, Brazil), two species of macroalgae of the genus Chara (C. angolensis and C. fibrosa) registered in large areas were identified. The lagoon is subject to several relevant anthropic impacts, of which untreated sewage is one of the most important. Results of the biomass distribution as analyzed in different areas of the lagoon showed values ranging from 172 to 510 gDW x m(-2). As for the nutrient concentration, the results presented large fluctuations, with carbon values ranging from 325 to 392 mg x g(-1)DW, those of nitrogen, from 14 to 27 mg x g DW, and of phosphorus from 0.45 to 0.85 mg.g(-1) DW. This led to large fluctuations of the C:N:P ratio (from 387:24:1 to 872:47:1). The minimum and maximum energetic values of the biomass were 9.54 e 12.34 kJ x g(-1)DW. Smaller C:N:P ratios tended to occur in more eutrophic areas. The association between biomass and nutrient concentration showed that the highest quantities in the beds are found in oligotrophic areas. The Spearman correlation between nutrient concentration in the water column and biomass was r(s) = 0.45 (p < 0.05) for nitrogen and r(s) = 0.50 (p < 0.01) for phosphorus (n = 30). The large total biomass associated with nutrient concentration and energy content indicates that Charophytes are an important biological compartment in the structure and metabolism of the lagoon.

  18. Charophytes as a nutrient and energy reservoir in a tropical coastal lagoon impacted by humans (RJ, Brazil

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    C. Palma-Silva

    Full Text Available In the Imboassica Lagoon (22º24'S and 42º42'W (Macaé, RJ, Brazil, two species of macroalgae of the genus Chara (C. angolensis and C. fibrosa registered in large areas were identified. The lagoon is subject to several relevant anthropic impacts, of which untreated sewage is one of the most important. Results of the biomass distribution as analyzed in different areas of the lagoon showed values ranging from 172 to 510 gDW.m-2. As for the nutrient concentration, the results presented large fluctuations, with carbon values ranging from 325 to 392 mg.g-1DW, those of nitrogen, from 14 to 27 mg.g-1DW, and of phosphorus from 0.45 to 0.85 mg.g-1DW. This led to large fluctuations of the C:N:P ratio (from 387:24:1 to 872:47:1. The minimum and maximum energetic values of the biomass were 9.54 e 12.34 kJ.g-1DW. Smaller C:N:P ratios tended to occur in more eutrophic areas. The association between biomass and nutrient concentration showed that the highest quantities in the beds are found in oligotrophic areas. The Spearman correlation between nutrient concentration in the water column and biomass was r s = 0.45 (p < 0.05 for nitrogen and r s = 0.50 (p < 0.01 for phosphorus (n = 30. The large total biomass associated with nutrient concentration and energy content indicates that Charophytes are an important biological compartment in the structure and metabolism of the lagoon.

  19. Diversity and biomass of Chironomidae (Diptera larvae in an impacted coastal lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    M. CALLISTO

    Full Text Available Diversity and biomass of Chironomidae larvae were studied between January-November 1993 and March-November 1994 in an impacted lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil, in an attempt to establish the ecological consequences of anthropogenic eutrophication processes. Nine hundred and seventy-five organisms belonging to the Tanypodinae, Orthocladiinae, and Chironominae were collected. Polypedilum (62% and Chironomus (58% were the most common genera found in the limnetic and littoral zones.

  20. Diversity and biomass of Chironomidae (Diptera larvae in an impacted coastal lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    CALLISTO M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity and biomass of Chironomidae larvae were studied between January-November 1993 and March-November 1994 in an impacted lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil, in an attempt to establish the ecological consequences of anthropogenic eutrophication processes. Nine hundred and seventy-five organisms belonging to the Tanypodinae, Orthocladiinae, and Chironominae were collected. Polypedilum (62% and Chironomus (58% were the most common genera found in the limnetic and littoral zones.

  1. In situ measurements of benthic primary production, respiration and nutrient fluxes in a hypersaline coastal lagoon of SE Brazil

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    Bastiaan Knoppers

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentbic oxygen and nutrient ftuxes were measured in a section of the hypersaline carbonate-rich coastal lagoon of Araruama, SE-Brazil. In situ incubations of the sediment surface (Zm - 1.5 were performed at one station with light/dark chambers during september 1993 (early spring period and april 1995 (earlyautumn period. The carbonate..rich aediments were covered by 1-3 mm thick microalgal mats, dominated by the cyanobaeteria Phormidium sp, Oscillatoria sp, and Lyngbya sp. Benthic net primary production rates were 15.4 ± 0.7 mmolC/m²/d in early spring and 33.8 ± 8.8 mmolC/m²/d in early autumn, total community respiration rates attained 35.3 ± 7.2 and 65.7 ± 16.9 mmolC/m²/d, and pelagic primary production rates 1.7 ± 0.7 and 4.0 ± 1.4 mmolC/m²/d, respectively. Total community metabolism was thus heterauophic and mainly driven by benthic metabolism. The benthic release rates af ammonia were 0.65 ± 0.32 mmolC/m²/day in early spring and 0.58± 0.42mmoVm ldaym early autumn, butwere near to negligible for orthophosphate. Pelagic primaryproduction was limited byphosphorous, in part, by the preferential release of étmmonia over orthophosphate from the sediment-water interface. The benthic primary production and nutrient release rates were within the range of other eury-to hypersaline carbonate-rich environments characterized by non- consolidated algat rats.Fluxos bênticos de oxigênio e nutrientes foram medidos numa seção da lagoa hipersalina e carbonática de Araruama, SE-Brasil Incubações in situ da superfície do sedimento (Zm = 1,5 foram realizadas em uma estação com câmaras claras/escuras nos meses de setembro de 1993 (início da primavera e abril de 1995 (início do outono. Os sedimentos ricos em carbonatos eram recobertos por um tapete microalgal de 1-3 mm, dominados pelas cianobactérias Phormidium sp,Oscillatoria spLyngbya sp. As taxas de produção primária yquida foram 15,4 ± 0,7 mmolC/m²/d Id no iníCIO da primavera e

  2. Sewage input effects on the macroinvertebrate community associated to Typha domingensis Pers in a coastal lagoon in southeastern Brazil.

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    Henriques-de-Oliveira, C; Baptista, D F; Nessimian, J L

    2007-02-01

    This study was carried out at Imboassica Lagoon, located in an urban zone in the municipality of Macaé, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. This lagoon has been subject to anthropogenic impacts due to the increasing city population, such as the input of sewage. Areas of variable degree of anthropogenic influence in the lagoon were compared regarding the structure of the macroinvertebrate community associated to Typha domingensis leaves. For sampling, we used 35 x 20 cm net plastic bags, with 6.8 mm mesh containing T. domingensis leaves for colonization. Two different sampling stations were selected: station A, under direct input of sewage; and station B with lesser sewage influence. The bags were removed after 20, 40 and 75 days of colonization. For each sample the Shannon-Wiever Diversity, Pielou Evenness, Jaccard Similarity Indices, Correspondence Analysis and taxonomic richness were calculated. A total of 31,874 individuals were sampled, belonging to 34 taxa. The main taxonomical groups were: Oligochaeta (41%), Chironomidae (40%), Ancylidae (4.6%), Polymitarcyidae (4%) and Thiaridae (3%). At station A, the taxonomic richness, the Evenness and Diversity values were lower than in station B. On the other hand, the total density was three times higher in station A than in B. It was already possible to discriminate the community structure of each sampling station in the first sampling. Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera were the main exclusive groups of station B and are considered good water quality indicators due to their high sensibility to contamination. The major contribution to discriminate between the macroinvertebrate communities of the two sample stations came from Chironomidae, Oligochaeta and Ephemeroptera.

  3. Temporal variation in the abundance of waterbird species in a coastal lagoon in the northern Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil

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    Davi Castro Tavares

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of different rainfall regimes on numerical fluctuations of waterbird species in Ribeira Lagoon, Quissamã, northern Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Bird counts were conducted on a monthly basis between August 2008 and July 2009, totaling 12 visits. Rainfall data were obtained at the nearest meteorological automatic station. A total of 50 species were classified into 6 functional groups. Bird richness and abundance were greater during the dry season (May/August. Spearman’s coefficient between bird abundance and monthly rainfall was -0.77 (P = 0.003. Similarly, there was a significant negative correlation between rainfall values and the abundance of dabbling, diving, and gleaning bird groups. The exponential prediction model was the most appropriate to the dataset (R² = 0.53, with a correlation coefficient between predicted and observed abundance values of 0.76 (P = 0.006. The model obtained predicts a significant decline in the total number of birds in months with rainfall over 100 mm in Ribeira Lagoon.

  4. Whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri, trapped in a freshwater coastal lagoon: a natural comparison of freshwater and marine influences on otolith chemistry

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    Cristiano Q. de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available Strontium and barium incorporation into otoliths was compared between whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri, collected from an entrapped freshwater population (Mirim Lagoon and a normal marine/estuarine population in southern Brazil. Chemical analysis was performed using LA-ICPMS with the objective of validating the effects of marine and freshwater environments on Sr and Ba incorporation as a basis for further investigation of marine and freshwater connectivity of M. furnieri. The freshwater population was dominated by older fish with mean ±SD age of 34±1 y, whereas the coastal samples were dominated by younger fish of 14±7 y. Comparison of strontium and barium incorporation among otolith life-history profiles indicated significantly higher barium and lower strontium for the freshwater population compared to the marine population. Furthermore, comparison of otolith material deposited in the freshwater, estuarine and marine life-history phases demonstrated clear differences among these environments. Mean concentrations of strontium and barium in otoliths of M. furnieri were respectively 710 and 112 µg g-1 for freshwater, 2069 and 16.7 µg g-1 for estuarine, and 2990 and 2.7 µg g-1 for marine life-history phases. Barium concentrations in otoliths from the freshwater population of M. furnieri appeared high relative to other freshwater species. Strontium levels across life-history profiles of marine fish increased with age from 2000 to 2900 µg g-1, possibly indicating more time spent in marine than estuarine waters with age. In contrast, for the freshwater population, strontium levels decreased during the first year of life approximately to 700 µg g-1, and remained low and stable thereafter, consistent with the early life-history occurring in an estuarine environment prior to entrapment in Mirim Lagoon. The results confirm the strong and opposite effects of marine and freshwater environments on incorporation of barium and strontium into

  5. Habitat engineering by the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) in a boreal coastal lagoon: impact on biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiko, Anastasija; Daunys, Darius; Olenin, Sergej

    2009-03-01

    Habitat engineering role of the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) was studied in the Curonian lagoon, a shallow water body in the SE Baltic. Impacts of live zebra mussel clumps and its shell deposits on benthic biodiversity were differentiated and referred to unmodified (bare) sediments. Zebra mussel bed was distinguished from other habitat types by higher benthic invertebrate biomass, abundance, and species richness. The impact of live mussels on biodiversity was more pronounced than the effect of shell deposits. The structure of macrofaunal community in the habitats with >103 g/m2 of shell deposits devoid of live mussels was similar to that found within the zebra mussel bed. There was a continuous shift in species composition and abundance along the gradient ‘bare sediments—shell deposits—zebra mussel bed’. The engineering impact of zebra mussel on the benthic community became apparent both in individual patches and landscape-level analyses.

  6. Multi-scale functional and taxonomic β-diversity of the macroinvertebrate communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

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    D. CABANA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroinvertebrate communities form the basis of the intricate lagoonal food web. Understanding their functional and taxonomic response, from a β-diversity perspective, is essential to disclose underlying patterns with potential applicability in conservation and management actions. Within the central lagoon of Messolonghi we studied the main environmental components structuring the macroinvertebrate community. We analyzed the β-taxonomic and β-functional diversity across the main habitats and seasons, over a year time frame. Our results outline habitat type and vegetation biomass as the major factors structuring the communities. We found environmental variability to have a positive correlation with functional β-diversity, however no correlation was found with taxonomic β-diversity. Across the seasons an asynchronous response of the functional and taxonomic β-diversity was identified. The taxonomic composition displayed significant heterogeneity during the driest period and the functional during the rainy season. Across the habitats the unvegetated presented higher taxonomic homogeneity and functionally heterogeneity, contrary the vegetated habitats present higher taxonomic variability and functional homogeneity. Across the seasons and habitats a pattern of functional redundancy and taxonomic replacement was identified. Besides high functional turnover versus low taxonomic turnover was documented in an anthropogenic organically enriched habitat We conclude that habitats display independent functional and taxonomic seasonal patterns, thus different processes may contribute to their variability. The framework presented here highlights the importance of studying both β-diversity components framed in a multiscale approach to better understand ecological processes and variability patterns. These results are important to understand macroinvertebrate community assembly processes and are valuable for conservation purposes.

  7. Monitoring Sea Level and Topography of Coastal Lagoons Using Satellite Radar Altimetry: The Example of the Arcachon Bay in the Bay of Biscay

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    Edward Salameh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Radar altimetry was initially designed to measure the marine geoid. Thanks to the improvement in the orbit determination from the meter to the centimeter level, this technique has been providing accurate measurements of the sea surface topography over the open ocean since the launch of Topex/Poseidon in 1992. In spite of a decrease in the performance over land and coastal areas, it is now commonly used over these surfaces. This study presents a semi-automatic method that allows us to discriminate between acquisitions performed at high tides and low tides. The performances of four radar altimetry missions (ERS-2, ENVISAT, SARAL, and CryoSat-2 were analyzed for the retrieval of sea surface height and, for the very first time, of the intertidal zone topography in a coastal lagoon. The study area is the Arcachon Bay located in the Bay of Biscay. The sea level variability of the Arcachon Bay is characterized by a standard deviation of 1.05 m for the records used in this study (2001–2017. Sea surface heights are very well retrieved for SARAL (R~0.99 and RMSE < 0.23 m and CryoSat-2 (R > 0.93 and RMSE < 0.42 m missions but also for ENVISAT (R > 0.82 but with a higher RMSE >0.92 m. For the topography of the intertidal zone, very good estimates were also obtained using SARAL (R~0.71 and CryoSat-2 (R~0.79 with RMSE lower than 0.44 m for both missions.

  8. Combining L- and X-Band SAR Interferometry to Assess Ground Displacements in Heterogeneous Coastal Environments: The Po River Delta and Venice Lagoon, Italy

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    Luigi Tosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available From leveling to SAR-based interferometry, the monitoring of land subsidence in coastal transitional environments significantly improved. However, the simultaneous assessment of the ground movements in these peculiar environments is still challenging. This is due to the presence of relatively small built-up zones and infrastructures, e.g., coastal infrastructures, bridges, and river embankments, within large natural or rural lands, e.g., river deltas, lagoons, and farmland. In this paper we present a multi-band SAR methodology to integrate COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-PALSAR images. The method consists of a proper combination of the very high-resolution X-band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI, which achieves high-density and precise measurements on single structures and constructed areas, with L-band Short-Baseline SAR Interferometry (SBAS, properly implemented to raise its effectiveness in retrieving information in vegetated and wet zones. The combined methodology is applied on the Po River Delta and Venice coastland, Northern Italy, using 16 ALOS-PALSAR and 31 COSMO-SkyMed images covering the period between 2007 and 2011. After a proper calibration of the single PSI and SBAS solution using available GPS records, the datasets have been combined at both the regional and local scales. The measured displacements range from ~0 mm/yr down to −35 mm/yr. The results reveal the variable pattern of the subsidence characterizing the more natural and rural environments without losing the accuracy in quantifying the sinking of urban areas and infrastructures. Moreover, they allow improving the interpretation of the natural and anthropogenic processes responsible for the ongoing subsidence.

  9. Comparative analysis of diet composition and its relation to morphological characteristics in juvenile fish of three lutjanid species in a Mexican Pacific coastal lagoon

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    Consuelo M. Aguilar-Betancourt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The main goal of this research was to investigate the differences in diet composition among three species of the genus Lutjanus inhabiting a coastal lagoon as juveniles. The working hypothesis was that these species feed on a common base of food resources and therefore, some niche overlap is present in terms of general diet composition. However, changes in the trophic niche with size and differences in some morphological traits among species explain observed differences in diet. Fish were collected during 42 sampling trips conducted regularly from February 2011 to January 2012 using several types of fishing gear. Total number of analyzed stomachs was 288 for Lutjanus argentiventris from 2.3 to 19.9 cm total length (TL; 178 for Lutjanus colorado ranging from 2.4 to 30.1 cm TL; and 183 for Lutjanus novemfasciatus with 1.2 to 20.0 cm TL. Results indicate that juveniles of all three lutjanid species share a general diet based on decapods and fishes. However, L. novemfasciatus has a more piscivorous habit, which can be explained by a more slender body shape and larger teeth, characteristics, which increase fish catching performance. Larger fish of all three species eat larger prey, which is consistent with the optimum foraging theory.

  10. Composition, biomass and secondary production of the macrobenthic invertebrate assemblages in a coastal lagoon exploited for extensive aquaculture: Valle Smarlacca (northern Adriatic Sea)

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    Ponti, Massimo; Antonia Colangelo, Marina; Ugo Ceccherelli, Victor

    2007-10-01

    Macrobenthic invertebrate assemblages were investigated monthly, from June 1998 to October 1999, at four sites in Valle Smarlacca pond, a north-western Adriatic coastal lagoon, in order to estimate secondary production exploitable for extensive fish aquaculture and to investigate the factors affecting this production. Benthic assemblages comprised 28 taxa, of which Hydrobia sp., Chironomus salinarius and Abra segmentum were the main contributors to both overall biomass and secondary production. Annual secondary production varied from 102.7 g AFDM m -2 y -1, in the unvegetated perimeter channel, to 152.6 g AFDM m -2 y -1 in the shallowest area where a Ruppia cirrhosa meadow was present. Multivariate correlations between environmental variables and the macrobenthic assemblage biomass highlighted the role of the water level, temperature, sediment organic carbon content and dissolved oxygen in the differentiation of the communities in the pond. Composition, biomass and secondary annual production of macrobenthic communities were dramatically affected by summer dystrophic crises. The isolation of this habitat limits the recovery of the invertebrate benthic assemblages. Only populations of two species, Hydrobia sp. and C. salinarius, seemed to be able to recover quickly after the dystrophic crises, which, in turn, could compromise the overall secondary production, with negative effects on the aquaculture activities. Water renewal and nutrient inputs should be regulated in this pond to reduce the risk of zoobenthic mass mortality and to ensure a sustainable extensive aquaculture based on natural primary and secondary production.

  11. Macroalgae blooms and δ15N in subtropical coastal lagoons from the Southeastern Gulf of California: Discrimination among agricultural, shrimp farm and sewage effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinon-Gimate, Alejandra; Soto-Jimenez, Martin F.; Ochoa-Izaguirre, Maria Julia; Garcia-Pages, Eynar; Paez-Osuna, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Macroalgae blooms of Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Hypnea spinella and Spyridia filamentosa have been found in coastal lagoons in the SE Gulf of California. Agriculture, livestock, shrimp and poultry farms and sewage contribute anthropogenic nitrogen to the systems. The δ 15 N of these sources, water column and macroalgae were studied in order to identify the N supply for macroalgae blooms. δ 15 N of three species of macroalgae (4.3-13.6 per mille ) were enriched compared to the water column (δ 15 N-NO 3 - 3.7-6.8 per mille ), probably because of fractioning from the macroalgae. δ 15 N of POM (1.4-10.3 per mille ) was similar to the water column but the relationship was unclear. Depending on the site, macroalgae showed different δ 15 N values since some sites receive more or less influence from one given source of the associated watershed, which is reflected in the different δ 15 N values of the macroalgae of the same system and in the relative contributions of the sources.

  12. Phytoplankton absorption predicts patterns in primary productivity in Australian coastal shelf waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. M.; Cherukuru, N.; Hardman-Mountford, N. J.; Everett, J. D.; McLaughlin, M. J.; Davies, K. P.; Van Dongen-Vogels, V.; Ralph, P. J.; Doblin, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    The phytoplankton absorption coefficient (aPHY) has been suggested as a suitable alternate first order predictor of net primary productivity (NPP). We compiled a dataset of surface bio-optical properties and phytoplankton NPP measurements in coastal waters around Australia to examine the utility of an in-situ absorption model to estimate NPP. The magnitude of surface NPP (0.20-19.3 mmol C m-3 d-1) across sites was largely driven by phytoplankton biomass, with higher rates being attributed to the microplankton (>20 μm) size class. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aPHY for PAR (photosynthetically active radiation; āPHY)) ranged from 0.003 to 0.073 m-1, influenced by changes in phytoplankton community composition, physiology and environmental conditions. The aPHY coefficient also reflected changes in NPP and the absorption model-derived NPP could explain 73% of the variability in measured surface NPP (n = 41; RMSE = 2.49). The absorption model was applied to two contrasting coastal locations to examine NPP dynamics: a high chlorophyll-high variation (HCHV; Port Hacking National Reference Station) and moderate chlorophyll-low variation (MCLV; Yongala National Reference Station) location in eastern Australia using the GIOP-DC satellite aPHY product. Mean daily NPP rates between 2003 and 2015 were higher at the HCHV site (1.71 ± 0.03 mmol C m-3 d-1) with the annual maximum NPP occurring during the austral winter. In contrast, the MCLV site annual NPP peak occurred during the austral wet season and had lower mean daily NPP (1.43 ± 0.03 mmol C m-3 d-1) across the time-series. An absorption-based model to estimate NPP is a promising approach for exploring the spatio-temporal dynamics in phytoplankton NPP around the Australian continental shelf.

  13. Short Term CO2 Enrichment Increases Carbon Sequestration of Air-Exposed Intertidal Communities of a Coastal Lagoon

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    Amrit K. Mishra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ production responses of air-exposed intertidal communities under CO2 enrichment are reported here for the first time. We assessed the short-term effects of CO2 on the light responses of the net community production (NCP and community respiration (CR of intertidal Z. noltei and unvegetated sediment communities of Ria Formosa lagoon, when exposed to air. NCP and CR were measured in situ in summer and winter, under present and CO2 enriched conditions using benthic chambers. Within chamber CO2 evolution measurements were carried out by a series of short-term incubations (30 min using an infra-red gas analyser. Liner regression models fitted to the NCP-irradiance responses were used to estimate the seasonal budgets of air-exposed, intertidal production as determined by the daily and seasonal variation of incident photosynthetic active radiation. High CO2 resulted in higher CO2 sequestration by both communities in both summer and winter seasons. Lower respiration rates of both communities under high CO2 further contributed to a potential negative climate feedback, except in winter when the CR of sediment community was higher. The light compensation points (LCP (light intensity where production equals respiration of Z. noltei and sediment communities also decreased under CO2 enriched conditions in both seasons. The seasonal community production of Z. noltei was 115.54 ± 7.58 g C m−2 season−1 in summer and 29.45 ± 4.04 g C m−2 season−1 in winter and of unvegetated sediment was 91.28 ± 6.32 g C m−2 season−1 in summer and 25.83 ± 4.01 g C m−2 season−1 in winter under CO2 enriched conditions. Future CO2 conditions may increase air-exposed seagrass production by about 1.5-fold and unvegetated sediments by about 1.2-fold.

  14. Fast shoreline erosion induced by ship wakes in a coastal lagoon: Field evidence and remote sensing analysis.

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    Luca Zaggia

    Full Text Available An investigation based on in-situ surveys combined with remote sensing and GIS analysis revealed fast shoreline retreat on the side of a major waterway, the Malamocco Marghera Channel, in the Lagoon of Venice, Italy. Monthly and long-term regression rates caused by ship wakes in a reclaimed industrial area were considered. The short-term analysis, based on field surveys carried out between April 2014 and January 2015, revealed that the speed of shoreline regression was insignificantly dependent on the distance from the navigation channel, but was not constant through time. Periods of high water levels due to tidal forcing or storm surges, more common in the winter season, are characterized by faster regression rates. The retreat is a discontinuous process in time and space depending on the morpho-stratigraphy and the vegetation cover of the artificial deposits. A GIS analysis performed with the available imagery shows an average retreat of 3-4 m/yr in the period between 1974 and 2015. Digitization of historical maps and bathymetric surveys made in April 2015 enabled the construction of two digital terrain models for both past and present situations. The two models have been used to calculate the total volume of sediment lost during the period 1968-2015 (1.19×106 m3. The results show that in the presence of heavy ship traffic, ship-channel interactions can dominate the morphodynamics of a waterway and its margins. The analysis enables a better understanding of how shallow-water systems react to the human activities in the post-industrial period. An adequate evaluation of the temporal and spatial variation of shoreline position is also crucial for the development of future scenarios and for the sustainable management port traffic worldwide.

  15. Fast shoreline erosion induced by ship wakes in a coastal lagoon: Field evidence and remote sensing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaggia, Luca; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Manfé, Giorgia; Scarpa, Gian Marco; Molinaroli, Emanuela; Parnell, Kevin Ellis; Rapaglia, John Paul; Gionta, Maria; Soomere, Tarmo

    2017-01-01

    An investigation based on in-situ surveys combined with remote sensing and GIS analysis revealed fast shoreline retreat on the side of a major waterway, the Malamocco Marghera Channel, in the Lagoon of Venice, Italy. Monthly and long-term regression rates caused by ship wakes in a reclaimed industrial area were considered. The short-term analysis, based on field surveys carried out between April 2014 and January 2015, revealed that the speed of shoreline regression was insignificantly dependent on the distance from the navigation channel, but was not constant through time. Periods of high water levels due to tidal forcing or storm surges, more common in the winter season, are characterized by faster regression rates. The retreat is a discontinuous process in time and space depending on the morpho-stratigraphy and the vegetation cover of the artificial deposits. A GIS analysis performed with the available imagery shows an average retreat of 3-4 m/yr in the period between 1974 and 2015. Digitization of historical maps and bathymetric surveys made in April 2015 enabled the construction of two digital terrain models for both past and present situations. The two models have been used to calculate the total volume of sediment lost during the period 1968-2015 (1.19×106 m3). The results show that in the presence of heavy ship traffic, ship-channel interactions can dominate the morphodynamics of a waterway and its margins. The analysis enables a better understanding of how shallow-water systems react to the human activities in the post-industrial period. An adequate evaluation of the temporal and spatial variation of shoreline position is also crucial for the development of future scenarios and for the sustainable management port traffic worldwide.

  16. Short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae compared with some environmental factors in a coastal lagoon (South Portugal

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    Luis M.Z. Chícaro

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae were compared with some triggering factors for a period of sixteen months. Data on the abundance of planktonic larvae, collected two to three times a week were related to water temperature, salinity, wind velocity, tidal amplitude and chlorophyll a. Higher densities of planktonic bivalve larvae were caught between May and August, but intense fluctuations in abundance were observed. Planktonic bivalve larvae of eighteen taxa were identified. Larvae of Mytilus galloprovincialis, Cerastoderma edule, Ruditapes decussates and Venerupis spp. were the most abundant. The seasonal fluctuations of bivalve abundance seem to be controlled by temperature, the major factor in the timing of the reproduction of bivalves. Nevertheless, advection may be also a key factor during the planktonic life of bivalve species in coastal systems, such as the Ria Formosa.

  17. Growth, mortality and migratory pattern of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei, Crustacea, Penaeidae in the Carretas-Pereyra coastal lagoon system, Mexico

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    G Rivera-Velázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth, mortality and migration pattern of the population of Litopenaeus vannamei Boone 1931 in the Carretas-Pereyra coastal lagoon system, Mexico, were studied. The shrimp spatial distribution and abundance were analyzed in relation to salinity, water temperature, and substrate. A total of 2 669 shrimps was collected at 22 sites sampled monthly from March 2004 to August 2005. Juvenile shrimps of L. vannamei were present in the coastal lagoon system throughout the year, reaching densities from 0.001 to 0.302 ind/m². The estimated daily growth rate was 0.06 to 0.27 mm carapace length (CL. No significant seasonal differences were appreciated. Weekly total mortality (Z was between 0.04 and 0.34. Recruits, juveniles and sub-adults displayed a bimodal distributional pattern regulated by the prevailing conditions during the dry season. The peak abundance of juvenile stages occurred in December-January and March-May. The abundance presented an inverse correlation with salinity (r=-0.42; pSe estudió el crecimiento, la mortalidad y el patrón de migración del camarón Litopenaeus vannamei Boone 1931 en el sistema lagunar costero Carretas Pereyra, México. La distribución espacial y la abundancia fueron analizadas con relación a la salinidad, temperatura y substrato. De marzo de 2004 a agosto de 2005 se recolectó un total de 2669 camarones con un muestreo mensual en 22 sitios. Los jóvenes se hallaron todo el año en el sistema lagunar costero, con densidades entre 0.001 y 0.302 ind/m². La tasa de crecimiento diaria fue de 0.06 a 0.27 mm longitud del cefalotórax (CL y no se apreciaron diferencias significativas entre estaciones. La mortalidad total (Z semanal estuvo entre 0.04 y 0.34. Reclutas, jóvenes y subadultos presentan un patrón de distribución bimodal regulado por las condiciones prevalecientes durante la estación de estío. Los valores máximos de abundancia de los estadios juveniles se presentan en diciembre-enero y marzo-mayo. La

  18. Oxidative stress status, antioxidant metabolism and polypeptide patterns in Juncus maritimus shoots exhibiting differential mercury burdens in Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed the oxidative stress status, antioxidant metabolism and polypeptide patterns in salt marsh macrophyte Juncus maritimus shoots exhibiting differential mercury burdens in Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon at reference and the sites with highest, moderate and the lowest mercury contamination. In order to achieve these goals, shoot-mercury burden and the responses of representative oxidative stress indices, and the components of both non-glutathione- and glutathione-based H2O2-metabolizing systems were analyzed and cross-talked with shoot-polypeptide patterns. Compared to the reference site, significant elevations in J. maritimus shoot mercury and the oxidative stress indices such as H2O2, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage and reactive carbonyls were maximum at the site with highest followed by moderate and the lowest mercury contamination. Significantly elevated activity of non-glutathione-based H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase and catalase accompanied the studied damage-endpoint responses, whereas the activity of glutathione-based H2O2-scavenging enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione sulfo-transferase was inhibited. Concomitantly, significantly enhanced glutathione reductase activity and the contents of both reduced and oxidized glutathione were perceptible in high mercury-exhibiting shoots. It is inferred that high mercury-accrued elevations in oxidative stress indices were obvious, where non-glutathione-based H2O2-decomposing enzyme system was dominant over the glutathione-based H2O2-scavenging enzyme system. In particular, the glutathione-based H2O2-scavenging system failed to coordinate with elevated glutathione reductase which in turn resulted into increased pool of oxidized glutathione and the ratio of oxidized glutathione-to-reduced glutathione. The substantiation of the studied oxidative stress indices and antioxidant metabolism with approximately 53-kDa polypeptide warrants further studies.

  19. Effects of food web structure and resource subsidies on the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence in a tropical coastal lagoon: an experimental mesocosm approach

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    Luciana Silva Carneiro

    Full Text Available AIM: The study of the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence of ecological variables among lakes has become an important area of limnology. However, no study to date has experimentally tested whether and how resource subsidies and food web configuration affect the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coherence of limnological variables. We conducted a field mesocosm experiment to test the following hypotheses: (i nutrient enrichment would reduce the temporal coherence of system variables; (ii fish predation would enhance the temporal coherence of system variables; and (iii the strength of temporal coherence decreases from physical (water transparency, to chemical (dissolved oxygen concentration [DO] to biological variables (total zooplankton biomass. METHODS: For 11 weeks, we manipulated fish presence and nutrient (N and P concentration in a 2 × 2 factorial design in sixteen within-lake enclosures installed in a tropical coastal lagoon. Coherence was estimated by pair-to-pair Pearson's moment correlations of the temporal trajectories of each response variable among enclosures of the same treatment. RESULTS: Fish presence only enhanced the temporal coherence of zooplankton biomass, whereas contrary to our expectations, nutrient addition enhanced the temporal coherence of [DO]. The strength of the individual effects of fish and nutrients on temporal coherence was affected by variable identity, but this variation did not occur in a consistent pattern across variables. However, the interactive effects of fish and nutrients on the temporal coherence of the three variables monitored were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that local factors, such as fish presence and nutrient availability, may affect the temporal coherence of several system variables, but these effects are better predicted by the strength of direct interactions between the local factor and the variable than by the identity of the variable itself

  20. Seasonal and inter-annual eutrophication dynamics in a hypereutrophic shallow coastal lagoon from ten years of satellite observations and in-situ data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitarch, Jaime; Ruiz-Verdú, Antonio; Soria, Juan M.; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-04-01

    The Albufera de Valencia (39.33 N, 0.37 W) is a hypereutrophic shallow coastal lagoon, having a near round shape of ~ 5 km diameter and ~ 1 m average depth. At the west side, the lake is separated from the sea by a narrow land strip, but three artificial channels allow connection to the sea, regulated by gates. The rest of the lake is surrounded by rice fields that were made by gaining surface from the lake around a century ago. Nowadays, the ecological state of the lake is very degraded. Freshwater inflow is insufficient and residence time is too high. Despite some improvements in waste water treatment, high loads of sediment-stored nutrients are often resuspended due to habitual strong winds and made available for primary production. The previously abundant bottom vegetation disappeared decades ago and secchi depth does not reach more than few tens of centimeters. The lake suffers from cyanobacterial blooms and massive fish deaths. Despite its vital importance as a coastal wetland in the western Mediterranean region, its water quality is not routinely monitored, so its seasonality and eventual blooming events have not been sistematically studied. In this study, we aim at filling this gap using satellite data. Medium-resolution satellite-borne sensors constitute an appropriate tool for this sake due to the lake's medium size and little cloud cover time over the region. In particular, the European MERIS sensor (2002-2012) is specially well suited due to its unique spectral bands configuration for cyanobacterial detection. Apart from the utility of the results themselves, study of this sensor provides a strong baseline for operational utilization of its successor, the new-coming European Sentinel 3-OLCI sensor. We have processed the full archived MERIS archived data. By adequate choice of band ratios and posterior calibration to in-situ samples, the time series of chlorophyll concentration is derived. Derived seasonality reveals a pattern that is determined by the

  1. Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of mercury and methylmercury in four sympatric coastal sharks in a protected subtropical lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulik, Adam G; Kerstetter, David W; Hammerschlag, Neil; Divoll, Timothy; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Evers, David C

    2017-03-15

    Mercury bioaccumulation is frequently observed in marine ecosystems, often with stronger effects at higher trophic levels. We compared total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) from muscle with length, comparative isotopic niche, and diet (via δ 13 C and δ 15 N) among four sympatric coastal sharks in Florida Bay (USA): blacknose, blacktip, bull, and lemon. Mercury in blacknose and blacktip sharks increased significantly with size, whereas bull and lemon sharks had a high variance in mercury relative to size. Both δ 13 C and δ 15 N were consistent with general resource use and trophic position relationships across all species. A significant relationship was observed between δ 13 C and mercury in blacktip sharks, suggesting an ontogenetic shift isotopic niche, possibly a dietary change. Multiple regression showed that δ 13 C and δ 15 N were the strongest factors regarding mercury bioaccumulation in individuals across all species. Additional research is recommended to resolve the mechanisms that determine mercury biomagnification in individual shark species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing the impact of dairy waste lagoons on groundwater quality using a spatial analysis of vadose zone and groundwater information in a coastal phreatic aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S; Kurtzman, D; Ronen, Z; Peeters, A; Dahan, O

    2014-01-01

    Dairy waste lagoons are considered to be point sources of groundwater contamination by chloride (Cl(-)), different nitrogen-species and pathogens/microorganisms. The objective of this work is to introduce a methodology to assess the past and future impacts of such lagoons on regional groundwater quality. The method is based on a spatial statistical analysis of Cl(-) and total nitrogen (TN) concentration distributions in the saturated and the vadose (unsaturated) zones. The method provides quantitative data on the relation between the locations of dairy lagoons and the spatial variability in Cl(-) and TN concentrations in groundwater. The method was applied to the Beer-Tuvia region, Israel, where intensive dairy farming has been practiced for over 50 years above the local phreatic aquifer. Mass balance calculations accounted for the various groundwater recharge and abstraction sources and sinks in the entire region. The mass balances showed that despite the small surface area covered by the dairy lagoons in this region (0.8%), leachates from lagoons have contributed 6.0% and 12.6% of the total mass of Cl(-) and TN (mainly as NO3(-)-N) added to the aquifer. The chemical composition of the aquifer and vadose zone water suggested that irrigated agricultural activity in the region is the main contributor of Cl(-) and TN to the groundwater. A low spatial correlation between the Cl(-) and NO3(-)-N concentrations in the groundwater and the on-land location of the dairy farms strengthened this assumption, despite the dairy waste lagoon being a point source for groundwater contamination by Cl(-) and NO3(-)-N. Mass balance calculations, for the vadose zone of the entire region, indicated that drying of the lagoons would decrease the regional groundwater salinization process (11% of the total Cl(-) load is stored under lagoons). A more considerable reduction in the groundwater contamination by NO3(-)-N is expected (25% of the NO3(-)-N load is stored under lagoons). Results

  3. Spatial distribution patterns and relationship between recent vegetation and diaspore bank of a brackish coastal lagoon on the southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Tim; Selig, Uwe

    2007-08-01

    Submerged vegetation and the diaspore bank were investigated in the shallow brackish lagoon Salzhaff (southern Baltic Sea). The distribution, density and coverage of vegetation and diaspores were analysed at seven water depths along five transects. The submerged vegetation was dominated by the angiosperms Zostera marina, Zannichellia palustris and Potamogeton pectinatus and its depth limit varied between 2.5 and 4 m. The vegetation varied along the nutrient and Secchi depth gradient in the lagoon: charophytes were absent in the inner part of the lagoon and the depth limit of the submerged vegetation was lower than in the outer part. In contrast to the vegetation, oospores of charophytes dominated the diaspore bank independent of location and water depth on all transects. Diaspores of all recent macrophytes, except Zostera noltii, were found in the sediment surface layer. The species composition of the diaspore bank (Bray-Curtis similarity) showed differences both between wave-exposed and sheltered parts of the lagoon as well as along the nutrient and Secchi depth gradient. Oospore density in the sediment and the vegetation cover was correlated in Tolypella nidifica, Zostera marina, Ruppia cirrhosa and Zannichellia palustris. The distribution of charophyte oospores is characterised by translocation to deeper areas, whereas seeds of Z. marina and R. cirrhosa were accumulated in vegetation stands. Furthermore, diaspore deposition of Z. palustris, R. cirrhosa, Chara baltica and T. nidifica depended on wave exposure. Zannichellia palustris showed the most wide-ranging generative recolonisation potential of all macrophytes in the lagoon.

  4. Aspergillus Sydowii Marine Fungal Bloom in Australian Coastal Waters, Its Metabolites and Potential Impact on Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates

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    Aiko Hayashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dust has been widely recognised as an important source of nutrients in the marine environment and as a vector for transporting pathogenic microorganisms. Disturbingly, in the wake of a dust storm event along the eastern Australian coast line in 2009, the Continuous Plankton Recorder collected masses of fungal spores and mycelia (~150,000 spores/m3 forming a floating raft that covered a coastal area equivalent to 25 times the surface of England. Cultured A. sydowii strains exhibited varying metabolite profiles, but all produced sydonic acid, a chemotaxonomic marker for A. sydowii. The Australian marine fungal strains share major metabolites and display comparable metabolic diversity to Australian terrestrial strains and to strains pathogenic to Caribbean coral. Secondary colonisation of the rafts by other fungi, including strains of Cladosporium, Penicillium and other Aspergillus species with distinct secondary metabolite profiles, was also encountered. Our bioassays revealed that the dust-derived marine fungal extracts and known A. sydowii metabolites such as sydowic acid, sydowinol and sydowinin A adversely affect photophysiological performance (Fv/Fm of the coral reef dinoflagellate endosymbiont Symbiodinium. Different Symbiodinium clades exhibited varying sensitivities, mimicking sensitivity to coral bleaching phenomena. The detection of such large amounts of A. sydowii following this dust storm event has potential implications for the health of coral environments such as the Great Barrier Reef.

  5. Aspergillus Sydowii Marine Fungal Bloom in Australian Coastal Waters, Its Metabolites and Potential Impact on Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Aiko; Crombie, Andrew; Lacey, Ernest; Richardson, Anthony J; Vuong, Daniel; Piggott, Andrew M; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf

    2016-03-16

    Dust has been widely recognised as an important source of nutrients in the marine environment and as a vector for transporting pathogenic microorganisms. Disturbingly, in the wake of a dust storm event along the eastern Australian coast line in 2009, the Continuous Plankton Recorder collected masses of fungal spores and mycelia (~150,000 spores/m³) forming a floating raft that covered a coastal area equivalent to 25 times the surface of England. Cultured A. sydowii strains exhibited varying metabolite profiles, but all produced sydonic acid, a chemotaxonomic marker for A. sydowii. The Australian marine fungal strains share major metabolites and display comparable metabolic diversity to Australian terrestrial strains and to strains pathogenic to Caribbean coral. Secondary colonisation of the rafts by other fungi, including strains of Cladosporium, Penicillium and other Aspergillus species with distinct secondary metabolite profiles, was also encountered. Our bioassays revealed that the dust-derived marine fungal extracts and known A. sydowii metabolites such as sydowic acid, sydowinol and sydowinin A adversely affect photophysiological performance (Fv/Fm) of the coral reef dinoflagellate endosymbiont Symbiodinium. Different Symbiodinium clades exhibited varying sensitivities, mimicking sensitivity to coral bleaching phenomena. The detection of such large amounts of A. sydowii following this dust storm event has potential implications for the health of coral environments such as the Great Barrier Reef.

  6. An assessment of fecal indicator and other bacteria from an urbanized coastal lagoon in the City of Los Angeles, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John H; Carmona-Galindo, Víctor D; Leary, Christopher; Huh, Julie; Valdez, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    A study was performed in Del Rey Lagoon, City of Los Angeles, to determine if the lagoon was as a source or sink for fecal indicator bacteria (FIB: total coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci) and to screen for the presence of other potentially pathogenic bacteria. The lagoon receives tidal flows from the adjacent Ballona Estuary whose water usually is contaminated with FIB originating from the highly urbanized Ballona Creek Watershed. During 16 sampling events from February 2008 through March 2009, replicate water samples (n = 3) were collected 1 h prior to the high tide and 1 h prior to the following low tide. FIB concentrations were measured by the defined substrate method (IDEXX, Westbrook, Me) followed by culturing of bacterial isolates sampled from positive IDEXX Quanti-Tray wells and were identified using the Vitek 2 Compact (bioMérieux, Durham, NC). Mean concentrations of FIB often differed by an order of magnitude from flood to ebb flow conditions. The lagoon tended to act as a sink for total coliforms based on the ratio of mean flood to ebb densities (R (F/E)) >1.0 during 56 % of the sampling events and during ebb flows, as a source for E. coli and enterococci (R (F/E) <1.69 % of events). Approximately 54 species were identified from 277 isolates cultured from the IDEXX Quanti-Trays. Of these, 54 % were species known to include pathogenic strains that can be naturally occurring, introduced in runoff, or originated from other sources. Diversity and cluster analyses indicated a dynamic assemblage that changes in species composition with day-to-day fluctuations as well as tidal action. The concept of monitoring the lagoon and estuary as a sentinel habitat for pathogenic assemblages is discussed.

  7. How is shrimp aquaculture transforming coastal livelihoods and lagoons in Estero Real, Nicaragua? The need to integrate social-ecological research and ecosystem-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benessaiah, Karina; Sengupta, Raja

    2014-08-01

    Ecosystem-based approaches to aquaculture integrate environmental concerns into planning. Social-ecological systems research can improve this approach by explicitly relating ecological and social dynamics of change at multiple scales. Doing so requires not only addressing direct effects of aquaculture but also considering indirect factors such as changes in livelihood strategies, governance dynamics, and power relations. We selected the community of Puerto Morazán, Nicaragua as a case study to demonstrate how the introduction of small-scale aquaculture radically transformed another key livelihood activity, lagoon shrimp fishing, and the effects that these changes have had on lagoons and the people that depend on them. We find that shrimp aquaculture played a key role in the collapse, in the 1990s, of an existing lagoon common-property management. Shrimp aquaculture-related capital enabled the adoption of a new fishing technique that not only degraded lagoons but also led to their gradual privatization. The existence of social ties between small-scale shrimp farmers and other community members mitigated the impacts of privatization, illustrating the importance of social capital. Since 2008, community members are seeking to communally manage the lagoons once again, in response to degraded environmental conditions and a consolidation of the shrimp industry at the expense of smaller actors. This research shows that shrimp aquaculture intersects with a complex set of drivers, affecting not only how ecosystems are managed but also how they are perceived and valued. Understanding these social-ecological dynamics is essential to implement realistic policies and management of mangrove ecosystems and address the needs of resource-dependent people.

  8. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus supply on growth, chlorophyll content and tissue composition of the macroalga Chaetomorpha linum (O.F. Müll, Kütz, in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon

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    Margarita Menéndez

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dissolved nutrients on growth, nutrient content and uptake rates of Chaetomorpha linum in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Tancada, Ebro delta, NE Spain was studied in laboratory experiments. Water was enriched with distinct forms of nitrogen, such as nitrate or ammonium and phosphorus. Enrichment with N, P or with both nutrients resulted in a significant increase in the tissue content of these nutrients. N-enrichment was followed by an increase in chlorophyll content after 4 days of treatment, although the difference was only significant when nitrate was added without P. P-enrichment had no significant effect on chlorophyll content. In all the treatments an increase in biomass was obseved after 10 days. This increase was higher in the N+P treatments. In all the treatments the uptake rate was significantly higher when nutrients were added than in control jars. The uptake rate of N, as ammonium, and P were significantly higher when they were added alone while that of N as nitrate was higher in the N+P treatment. In the P-enriched cultures, the final P-content of macroalgal tissues was ten-fold that of the initial tissue concentrations, thereby indicating luxury P-uptake. Moreover, at the end of the incubation the N:P ratio increased to 80, showing that P rather than N was the limiting factor for C. linum in the Tancada lagoon. The relatively high availability of N is related to the N inputs from rice fields that surround the lagoon and to P binding in sediments.

  9. Spatio-temporal variation of CO2 emission from Chilika Lake, a tropical coastal lagoon, on the east coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muduli, Pradipta R.; Kanuri, Vishnu Vardhan; Robin, R. S.; Charan Kumar, B.; Patra, Sivaji; Raman, A. V.; Nageswarara Rao, G.; Subramanian, B. R.

    2012-11-01

    Biogeochemical Carbon cycling was studied in Asia's largest brackish lagoon, Chilika on the east coast of India. Systematic time-series observations were made at 35 hydrologically different stations over the entire lagoon. The first of these kinds of measurements reveal, inter and intra annual variability of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). A comparative analysis of pCO2, CO2 flux over four years (2005, 2009, 2010 and 2011) showed that the northern part of the lagoon maintained the highest levels of pCO2, with maximum CO2 efflux to the atmosphere associated with peak monsoon period. The high pCO2 corresponded to a significant decrease in pH (˜0.8) from the low to high flow periods. Higher bacterial abundance (1.55 ± 0.28 × 109 cells L-1) and bacterial respiration (185.31 ± 105.37 μg C L-1 d-1), suggested high levels of organic carbon decomposition during the high flow period. In contrast, the southern sector was least affected by river discharge, with low pCO2 values and CO2 flux as in the dry period. The central part and outer channel of the lagoon had intermediate characteristics. During high flow, the air-water CO2 flux from the entire lagoon was estimated to be 31.2 mol C m-2 y-1, which was comparatively very high with respect to the mean CO2 emission from the entire subtropical and tropical estuaries. Highest CO2 flux (65.98 mol C m-2 y-1) was observed in the northern sector, followed by the outer channel (17.61 mol C m-2 y-1), central sector (15.69 mol C m-2 y-1) and southern sector (14.44 mol C m-2 y-1). The northern part of Chilika lagoon being an important river-influenced region was responsible for the biological transformation of organic carbon to inorganic carbon and emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. Such a sectoral approach would reveal zonal influences of CO2 within a water body along with conditions leading to sink or a source.

  10. A new dolphin species, the Burrunan Dolphin Tursiops australis sp. nov., endemic to southern Australian coastal waters.

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    Charlton-Robb, Kate; Gershwin, Lisa-ann; Thompson, Ross; Austin, Jeremy; Owen, Kylie; McKechnie, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Small coastal dolphins endemic to south-eastern Australia have variously been assigned to described species Tursiops truncatus, T. aduncus or T. maugeanus; however the specific affinities of these animals is controversial and have recently been questioned. Historically 'the southern Australian Tursiops' was identified as unique and was formally named Tursiops maugeanus but was later synonymised with T. truncatus. Morphologically, these coastal dolphins share some characters with both aforementioned recognised Tursiops species, but they also possess unique characters not found in either. Recent mtDNA and microsatellite genetic evidence indicates deep evolutionary divergence between this dolphin and the two currently recognised Tursiops species. However, in accordance with the recommendations of the Workshop on Cetacean Systematics, and the Unified Species Concept the use of molecular evidence alone is inadequate for describing new species. Here we describe the macro-morphological, colouration and cranial characters of these animals, assess the available and new genetic data, and conclude that multiple lines of evidence clearly indicate a new species of dolphin. We demonstrate that the syntype material of T. maugeanus comprises two different species, one of which is the historical 'southern form of Tursiops' most similar to T. truncatus, and the other is representative of the new species and requires formal classification. These dolphins are here described as Tursiops australis sp. nov., with the common name of 'Burrunan Dolphin' following Australian aboriginal narrative. The recognition of T. australis sp. nov. is particularly significant given the endemism of this new species to a small geographic region of southern and south-eastern Australia, where only two small resident populations in close proximity to a major urban and agricultural centre are known, giving them a high conservation value and making them susceptible to numerous anthropogenic threats.

  11. Carbon budgets for three autotrophic Australian estuaries: Implications for global estimates of the coastal air-water CO2 flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-03-01

    Estuaries are `hot spots' in the global carbon cycle, yet data on carbon dynamics, in particular air-sea CO2 fluxes, from autotrophic systems are rare. Estuarine carbon budgets were constructed for three geomorphically distinct warm temperate Australian estuaries over an annual cycle. All three estuaries were net autotrophic, with annual net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) ranging from 8 ± 13.4 molC m-2 yr-1 to 10 ± 14 molC m-2 yr-1. There was a net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the estuaries of between 0.4 ± 0.6 molC m-2 yr-1 and 2 ± 0.9 molC m-2 yr-1. Loading of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the estuaries varied markedly within and between the estuaries, and was directly related to freshwater inflow. While NEM was similar in all three estuaries, the ratio of benthic versus pelagic contributions to NEM differed, with NEM dominated by pelagic production in the river dominated system, benthic production dominating in the intermediate estuary, and equal contributions of benthic and pelagic production in the marine dominated lagoon. All three estuaries exported more organic carbon than was imported, fueled by additional organic carbon supplied by NEM. The estuaries essentially acted as bioreactors, transforming DIC to organic carbon. Burial of organic carbon ranged from 1.2 ± 0.3 molC m-2 yr-1 to 4.4 ± 1.2 molC m-2 yr-1 and represented up to half of NEM. The annual net uptake of atmospheric CO2 in these systems, along with previous estimates of the global estuarine CO2flux being based predominantly on heterotrophic, large river dominated estuarine systems, indicates that the global estimate of the estuarine air-water CO2flux may be over-estimated due to the lack of studies from autotrophic marine dominated estuaries.

  12. The use of antioxidative stress enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and red blood cell abnormalities as biomarkers of stress in Periphthalmus papilio of the polluted coastal Lagos lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamdi, Amaeze H; Olumide, Adebesin A; Adeladun, Adepegba E; Oyenike, Kolapo; Rosemary, Egonmwan I

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the mudskipper, Periphthalmus papilio inhabiting the coast line of the Lagos lagoon, Gulf of Guinea, to determine suitable biomarkers of stress due to its current status as a polluted water body. The gill and liver samples showed evidence of some activities of antioxidative stress enzymes including catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-s-transferase, reduced glutahthione, as well as some detectable levels of lipid peroxidation product. The stress status of the fishes was also elucidated by nuclear abnormalities especially micronucleus formation and the presence of numerous vacuolated red blood cells. Given the current need for more sensitive bioindicators in monitoring pollution in this lagoon, we hereby present these inherent responses in P. papilio as a suitable candidate for incorporation into the current repertoire for ecotoxicological investigations in polluted water bodies of the Gulf of Guinea coastline.

  13. PCDD/F and PCB multi-media ambient concentrations, congener patterns and occurrence in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Etang de Thau, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Jimenez, J. [European Commission-DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability(IES), TP 290, Via Enrico Fermi, 1. 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)], E-mail: javier.castro-jimenez@jrc.it; Deviller, G.; Ghiani, M.; Loos, R.; Mariani, G.; Skejo, H.; Umlauf, G.; Wollgast, J. [European Commission-DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability(IES), TP 290, Via Enrico Fermi, 1. 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Laugier, T. [Ifremer, Laboratory of Environmental Resources, Bd Jean Monnet, BP 171, 34203 Sete Cedex (France); Heas-Moisan, K.; Leaute, F.; Munschy, C.; Tixier, C.; Tronczynski, J. [Ifremer, Laboratory of Biogeochemistry of Organic Contaminants, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2008-11-15

    Ambient concentrations, congener patterns and multi-media distribution of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were determined in air, water, sediment and mussels in a semi-enclosed marine ecosystem (Thau lagoon, France). {sigma}2,3,7,8-PCDD/F and {sigma}7ICES PCB air concentrations (0.2-1.4 and 31-57 pg m{sup -3}, respectively) were typical of rural areas. Concentrations in the water column were very low for PCDD/Fs (163-476 fg L{sup -1}) and low for PCBs (138-708 pg L{sup -1}). PCDD/F and PCB concentrations found in surface sediment (0.15-1.6 and 2.5-33 ng g{sup -1} d.w., respectively) and mussel (13-21 pg g{sup -1} d.w. and 10-39 ng g{sup -1} d.w., respectively) were medium levels. PCDD/F congener patterns observed in air, water particulate phase and sediments were similar suggesting direct coupling among these compartments and atmospheric inputs of PCDD/Fs into the lagoon. Conversely, for the same set of samples, similar patterns were not observed for PCBs in the mentioned compartments. - Multi-media ambient concentrations and distribution of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in Thau Lagoon provide insight into the POPs behavior in semi-enclosed marine ecosystems.

  14. Juvenile growth of white mullet Mugil curema (Teleostei: Mugilidae in a coastal lagoon southwest of the Gulf of California Crecimiento de juveniles de la lisa blanca Mugil curema (Teleostei: Mugilidae en una laguna costera del suroeste del golfo de California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casimiro Quiñonez-Velázquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Otolith micro structure was used to determine the age and evaluate the growth of juvenile white mullet (Mugil curema during their residence in the coastal lagoon El Conchalito, B.C.S., Mexico, from May 1997 to May 1998. Juveniles were sampled monthly during the full and ebbing phases of the maximum high tide. The juveniles studied were between 16 and 42 mm standard length (SL and from 22 to 109 days old. The Gompertz growth model appropriately described the relationship between age and SL (r = 0.94. The average growth rate was 0.29 mm d-1 between 20 and 110 days of age, which was lower than the growth rate of the juveniles prior to entering the lagoon. This suggests that growth is faster along the coast than in the lagoon. The strategy of entering protected areas allows individuals to reach a size that maximizes escape from predators and, therefore, the probability of survival when reentering the coastal habitat.Utilizando la microestructura de los otolitos se determinó la edad y se evaluó el crecimiento de juveniles de lisa blanca Mugil curema durante su permanencia en la laguna costera El Conchalito, B.C.S., México, de mayo de 1997 a mayo de 1998. Los juveniles se recolectaron durante la fase estacionaria y de descenso de la maxima pleamar de cada mes. Durante el estudio, se analizaron juveniles de 16 a 42 mm de longitud estándar (LE con edad entre 22 y 109 días. El modelo de Gompertz describió adecuadamente la relación entre la edad y LE (r² = 0,94. La tasa promedio de crecimiento entre 20 y 110 días de edad fue de 0,29 mm día-1 , menor que la tasa de crecimiento de los juveniles antes de incorporarse a la laguna. Esto sugiere que el crecimiento es más rápido en la costa que en la laguna, y la estrategia de introducirse a zonas protegidas es para alcanzar una longitud que maximice el escape a la depredación y maximice la probabilidad de supervivencia cuando se reincorporen al ambiente costero.

  15. Grain size analysis of beach sediment along the barrier bar lagoon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain size analysis of beach sediment along the barrier bar lagoon coastal system, Lagos, Nigeria; its implication on coastal erosion. R Abdulkarim, EA Akinnigbagbe, DO Imo, MT Imhansoloeva, VO Aniebone, MP Ibitola, BR Faleye, O Shonde, YJ Appia ...

  16. Overlap of dietary niche and electivity of three shrimp species (Crustacea, Decapoda in a tropical coastal lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edélti Faria Albertoni

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Three species of shrimp, Farfantepenaeus brasiliensis (Latreille, 1817, F. paulensis (Pérez-Farfante, 1967 (Penaeidae and Macrobrachium acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836 (Palaemonidae were sampled at the Imboassica lagoon (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in order to estimate the overlap of dietary niches and electivity of their prey, through the analysis of the fauna associated with the macroalgae Chara and of the benthic fauna on the sediment. The overlap of dietary niches was estimated using five indexes. A total of 495 F. brasiliensis, 131 F. paulensis and 102 M. acanthurus stomachs were examined. The results of the different indexes of niche overlap exhibited the same general trend in the three species, indicating a high degree of homogeneity in the diet of the two species of Penaeidae (between 75 and 100% and a smaller overlap between each Penaeidae species and M. acanthurus (between 23 and 68%. The species presented selective predation, with differences in the two studied habitats. The results show that the three species are omnivorous, with a varied diet including components of benthic macrofauna and those associated with the macroalgae Chara, plant fragments and detritus, and that there are good conditions in the Imboassica lagoon for the development of these species.

  17. A comparative analysis of three habitat suitability models for commercial yield estimation of Tapes philippinarum in a North Adriatic coastal lagoon (Sacca di Goro, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Caramori, Graziano; Rossi, Remigio; De Leo, Giulio A

    2007-01-01

    Habitat Suitability (HS) models have been extensively used by conservation planners to estimate the spatial distribution of threatened species and of species of commercial interest. In this work we compare three HS models for the estimation of commercial yield potential and the identification of suitable sites for Tapes philippinarum rearing in the Sacca di Goro lagoon (Italy) on the basis of six environmental factors. The habitat suitability index (HSI) is based on expert opinion while the habitat suitability conditional (HSC) is calibrated on observational data. The habitat suitability mixed (HSM) model is a two-part model combining expert knowledge and regression analysis: the first component of the model uses logistic regression to identify the areas in which clams are likely to be present; the second part applies the same parameter-specific suitability functions of the HSI model only in the areas previously identified as productive by the logistic component. The HS models were validated on an independent data set and estimates of potential yield of the Goro lagoon were compared. The effectiveness of the three approaches is then discussed in terms of predicted yield and identification of suitable sites for farming.

  18. Phytoplankton composition and functional groups in a tropical humic coastal lagoon, Brazil Composição e grupos funcionais do fitoplâncton de uma lagoa costeira tropical húmica, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Alves-de-Souza

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the composition and functional groups of the phytoplankton from Comprida lagoon, a tropical humic coastal Lagoon located in Southeast Brazil. A total of 28 taxa was found, distributed in eight taxonomic divisions as follows: 26% Heterokontophyta, 21% Chlorophyta, 21% Cyanophyta, 14% Bacillariophyta, 14% Cryptophyta, and 4% Prymnesiophyta. Twenty-three taxa were identified at the specific and infraspecific levels, from which four are new records for Brazil and two for Rio de Janeiro State. Phytoplankton of the Comprida lagoon was comprised of several flagellates, but also eukaryote and prokaryote picoplankton, filamentous cyanobacteria and several diatoms. The biomass was lower than that found in other lacustrine systems, and showed remarkable temporal variability. According to the functional-group approach, the populations formed eight groups: Q, Z, E, N, X3, X2, S1 and Y, most typical of oligo- or mesotrophic systems, tolerant to nutrient deficiency and sensitive to increased pH.Este trabalho apresenta a composição e os grupos funcionais do fitoplâncton da lagoa Comprida, uma lagoa costeira tropical húmica localizada no sudeste brasileiro. Foi registrado um total de 28 táxons distribuídos em oito divisões taxonômicas: 26% Heterokontophyta, 21% Chlorophyta, 21% Cyanophyta, 14% Bacillariophyta, 14% Cryptophyta e 4% Prymnesiophyta. Vinte e três táxons foram identificados em nível específico e intraespecíficos, dos quais quatro constituem novos registros para o Brasil e dois para o estado do Rio de Janeiro. O fitoplâncton da lagoa Comprida esteve constituído por alguns flagelados, mas também por organismos picoplanctônicos eucariontes e procariontes, cianobactérias filamentosas e algumas diatomáceas. A biomassa foi menor que a comumente encontrada em outros sistemas lacustres e mostrou uma notável variabilidade temporal. Em relação aos grupos funcionais, as populações foram agrupadas em oito grupos: Q, Z

  19. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2015-10-02

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~. 100 years ago (AD ~. 1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~. 1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~. 1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~. 115 cal. years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements.

  20. Urban Recreational Fisheries in the Australian Coastal Zone: The Sustainability Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl P. McPhee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recreational fishing is an important wildlife harvesting activity in urban coastal areas, and recreational harvest in these areas can frequently exceed the commercial harvest. Recreational fishing is a key way that many members of the public experience the environment. The activity enhances social capital, promotes respect for nature, provides health benefits and can provide economic benefits to coastal communities. It is also an important driver of the science on aquatic animals and habitats, and an important tangible reason for many members of the public to conserve and protect aquatic resources. Overall, there has been little specific consideration of urban recreational fisheries management in Australia, despite the paramount importance of urban areas as a focus of recreational fishing activity. This paper identifies that in order to maximize individual and societal benefits from recreational fishing, there needs to be a refocussing of management with the aim of being more holistic. Historically, fisheries management in Australia has focused on maximum sustainable yield (MSY or maximum economic yield (MEY which is relevant for the commercial fishing sector, but neither of these is directly relevant to recreational fisheries. This paper identifies that Urban Fisheries Management Plans are required that recognize the specific issues associated with urban recreational fisheries. These plans need to coordinate within and between levels of government and have clear management objectives relevant to urban recreational fisheries. Enhanced opportunities for meaningful citizen science can be incorporated at multiple levels within these plans and this can engender public support for environmental stewardship, as well as fill a very important gap in the knowledge base necessary for managing the activity. As urban recreational fisheries are often occurring in highly modified or degraded habitats, a central element of these plans needs to be habitat

  1. Aspects of the uptake of dissolved oxygen in Cabiúnas and Imboassica Lagoons (Macaé, RJ)

    OpenAIRE

    Brum,Paulo R.; Farjalla,Vinicius F.; Gonçalves Jr.,José F.; Santos,Anderson M. dos; Pôrto,Maurício T.; Vieira,Elisa D. R.; Ferreira,Flávia M.; Bianchini Jr.,Irineu

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we describe qualitative and quantitative aspects of the cycling of detritus of aquatic macrophytes and carbohydrates in two coastal lagoons of the northeastern part of the State of Rio de Janeiro. Samples of water of the Imboassica and Cabiúnas lagoons were enriched with sucrose. Samples of water of the Cabiúnas lagoon were also utilized to arrange mineralization chambers with fragments of three species of aquatic macrophytes found in these lagoons (Typha domingensis, Potamogeto...

  2. The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Mortlock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an unusual East Coast Low storm affected some 2000 km of the eastern seaboard of Australia bringing heavy rain, strong winds and powerful wave conditions. While wave heights offshore of Sydney were not exceptional, nearshore wave conditions were such that beaches experienced some of the worst erosion in 40 years. Hydrodynamic modelling of wave and current behaviour as well as contemporaneous sand transport shows the east to north-east storm wave direction to be the major determinant of erosion magnitude. This arises because of reduced energy attenuation across the continental shelf and the focussing of wave energy on coastal sections not equilibrated with such wave exposure under the prevailing south-easterly wave climate. Narrabeen–Collaroy, a well-known erosion hot spot on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, is shown to be particularly vulnerable to storms from this direction because the destructive erosion potential is amplified by the influence of the local embayment geometry. We demonstrate the magnified erosion response that occurs when there is bi-directionality between an extreme wave event and preceding modal conditions and the importance of considering wave direction in extreme value analyses.

  3. Catch variability and growth of pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus paulensis in two coastal lagoons of uruguay and their relationship with ENSO events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Santana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Pérez Farfante, 1967 is distributed along the Atlantic Coast from Bahia (Brazil to Mar del Plata (Argentina. The larval stages enter the Uruguayan brackish water lagoons during late spring to summer associated with tidal currents of the Brazilian Current. In such environments the growth is accelerated and in early autumn the individuals attain commercial size, supporting important regional artisanal fisheries. The pink shrimp catches from 1988 to 2013 were analyzed and related to phenomena of climate variability in ENSO events and to the growth of the species. The total catch ranges from 0.7 to 162 tons. The variation in catches has a negative relationship with the varied climatic events caused by El Niño. Growth parameters yielding values of L ∞ = 177 mm (total carapace length and K = 1.48 for the period 2009-2013. These values differ slightly from those calculated for natural populations in southern Brazil, suggesting that the population is the same and thus implying the need for coordinated fisheries management between the two countries.

  4. Scottish saline lagoons: Impacts and challenges of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Stewart

    2017-11-01

    The majority of Scotland's saline lagoons are located on the low-lying coastlines of the Western Isles and the northern archipelagos of Orkney and Shetland, where recorded annual relative sea level rise rates are among the highest in Scotland. The sediment-impounded lagoons of Orkney and Shetland will either lose their impoundment and become incorporated in marine coastal waters, or become increasingly saline, as relative sea levels rise. The rock-basin lagoons of the Western Isles will retain their restricted exchange with the sea but will also become more saline with rising sea level. Specialist lagoonal organisms tend to have wide salinity tolerances but may succumb to competition from marine counterparts. In all areas, there are sufficient fresh-water inland water bodies with potential to be captured as lagoons to compensate for loss of extent and number, but the specialist lagoon biota tend to have limited dispersal powers. It is thus possible that they will be unable to transfer to their analogue sites before existing lagoons become fully marine, giving conservation managers the problem of deciding on management options: leave natural processes to operate without interference, manage the saline inflow to maintain the current salinity regime, or translocate lagoon organisms perceived as threatened by rising salinities. Timing of conversion and capture is unpredictable due to local topography and complications caused by variable stratification.

  5. Incidence of Vibrio cholerae and related vibrios in a coastal lagoon and seawater influenced by lake discharges along an annual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, E; Arnau, A; Amaro, C

    1985-08-01

    Most probable numbers of Vibrio cholerae and related vibrios were determined in Albufera Lake, Valencia, Spain, and in coastal waters under the influence of the lake discharges over the course of an annual cycle. The influence of temperature, kind of water, and characteristics of the different sampling sites on the numbers of vibrios recovered was evaluated. Maximum recovery of vibrios reached 10(3)/ml in both types of waters analyzed. V. cholerae numbers reached 10(3)/ml in the lake and 10(2) in one of the coastal sites. Frequently during the warm season, all vibrios isolated were identified as V. cholerae. Occasionally, no V. cholerae was recovered. The recovery of vibrios was significantly influenced by the temperature of the water and the type of water analyzed. Most of the V. cholerae isolates were included in Heiberg groups I and II, and nearly 50% of the strains used chitin as sole carbon source. Indole was not produced by 100% of the strains. All strains tested were non-O1 serovars.

  6. Total mercury concentrations in white and striped Mullet (Mugil curema and M. cephalus) from a coastal lagoon in the SE Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Kohen-Sandoval, Cinthia K; Ramos-Osuna, Mauricio A; Sánchez-Osuna, Karla G; Spanopoulos-Zarco, Pamela; Delgado-Alvarez, Carolina G; Amezcua-Martínez, Felipe

    2017-04-16

    The White and Striped mullets (Mugil curema and M. cephalus) are highly abundant and commercially important estuarine fish in northwest (NW) Mexico. Because of their feeding habits and habitat, they are likely to accumulate mercury (Hg) in their muscle and liver. The objectives of this study were to determine total Hg distribution in the tissues of interest, to correlate Hg levels between tissues and with length and weight of fish, to estimate the percentage weekly intake (PWI) of total Hg and methyl Hg (MeHg) through consumption of both mullet species, and to compare total Hg levels with mullets from other areas. The highest total Hg concentration (1.031 µg g -1 dry weight) was measured in liver of White mullet. In both species, the order of averaged Hg concentrations (M. curema liver 0.272, muscle 0.184; M. cephalus liver 0.211, muscle 0.129 µg g -1 dry weight) were liver>muscle. Correlations of Hg in muscle and liver with total weight of M. curema were significant. In M. cephalus, Hg levels in liver were significantly correlated with total length and weight. The PWI of THg (<4%) and MeHg (<10%) were not elevated for both species. Concentration of Hg in the studied mullets was comparable to levels in similar species from Mexican waters but lower than results in mugilids from other coastal areas.

  7. Western rock lobsters ( Panulirus cygnus) in Western Australian deep coastal ecosystems (35-60 m) are more carnivorous than those in shallow coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Kris I.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Walker, Diana I.

    2008-08-01

    The western rock lobster ( Panurilus cygnus George.) is a conspicuous consumer in the coastal ecosystems of temperate Western Australia. We used stable isotope analysis and gut content analysis to determine the diet and trophic position of western rock lobsters from mid-shelf coastal ecosystems (35-60 m depth) at three locations. Lobsters were primarily carnivorous, and no consistent differences in diet were detected with varying lobster size, sex or among locations. The main components of the diet were bait (from the fishery) and small crustaceans - crabs and amphipods/isopods. Foliose red algae, bivalves/gastropods and sponges were minor contributors to diet. The diet of lobsters in deep coastal ecosystems differed from the results of previous studies of diets of lobsters from shallow coastal ecosystems. In particular, coralline algae and molluscs - important prey in studies of lobsters from shallow coastal ecosystems - were minor components of the diet. These differences are likely to reflect differences in food availability between these systems and potentially, differences in choice of prey by lobsters that inhabit deeper water. Given the high contribution of bait to lobster diet, bait is likely to be subsidizing lobster production in deep coastal ecosystems during the fishing season.

  8. Nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter from a 168 year-old coral skeleton: Implications for coastal nutrient cycling in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Dirk V.; Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Scheffers, Sander R.; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Haug, Gerald H.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing human activities are known to affect nitrogen cycling on coral reefs, but the full history of anthropogenic impact is unclear due to a lack of continuous records. We have used the nitrogen isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic matter (CS-δ15N) in a coastal Porites coral from Magnetic Island in the Great Barrier Reef as a proxy for N cycle changes over a 168 yr period (1820-1987 AD). The Magnetic Island inshore reef environment is considered to be relatively degraded by terrestrial runoff; given prior CS-δ15N studies from other regions, there was an expectation of both secular change and oscillations in CS-δ15N since European settlement of the mainland in the mid 1800s. Surprisingly, CS-δ15N varied by less than 1.5‰ despite significant land use change on the adjacent mainland over the 168-yr measurement period. After 1930, CS-δ15N may have responded to changes in local river runoff, but the effect was weak. We propose that natural buffering against riverine nitrogen load in this region between 1820 and 1987 is responsible for the observed stability in CS-δ15N. In addition to coral derived skeletal δ15N, we also report, for the first time, δ15N measurements of non-coral derived organic N occluded within the coral skeleton, which appear to record significant changes in the nature of terrestrial N inputs. In the context of previous CS-δ15N records, most of which yield CS-δ15N changes of at least 5‰, the Magnetic Island coral suggests that the inherent down-core variability of the CS-δ15N proxy is less than 2‰ for Porites.

  9. Recent Trends in Marine Phycotoxins from  Australian Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Ajani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Phycotoxins, which are produced by harmful microalgae and bioaccumulate in the  marine food web, are of growing concern for Australia. These harmful algae pose a threat to  ecosystem and human health, as well as constraining the progress of aquaculture, one of the fastest  growing food sectors in the world. With better monitoring, advanced analytical skills and an  increase in microalgal expertise, many phycotoxins have been identified in Australian coastal  waters in recent years. The most concerning of these toxins are ciguatoxin, paralytic shellfish  toxins, okadaic acid and domoic acid, with palytoxin and karlotoxin increasing in significance. The  potential for tetrodotoxin, maitotoxin and palytoxin to contaminate seafood is also of concern,  warranting future investigation. The largest and most significant toxic bloom in Tasmania in 2012  resulted in an estimated total economic loss of~AUD$23M, indicating that there is an imperative to  improve  toxin  and  organism  detection  methods,  clarify  the  toxin  profiles  of  species  of  phytoplankton and carry out both intra‐ and inter‐species toxicity comparisons. Future work also  includes the application of rapid, real‐time molecular assays for the detection of harmful species  and toxin genes. This information, in conjunction with a better understanding of the life histories  and  ecology  of  harmful  bloom  species,  may  lead  to  more  appropriate  management  of  environmental, health and economic resources.

  10. Benthic primary production budget of a Caribbean reef lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik S Naumann

    Full Text Available High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn and gross (Pg primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico via measurement of O₂ fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%, seagrasses (29% and macroalgae (27%, while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%. Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O₂ m(-2 specimen area d(-1, respectively, however seagrasses contributed highest (59% to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51% of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%. These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O₂ m(-2 lagoon area d(-1 and overall Pg:R (1.6 indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems.

  11. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  12. The marsh vegetation of Kleinmond Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O'Callaghan

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of Kleinmond Lagoon suggests that this system is in transition from an estuary to a coastal lake. Two major types of vegetation were recognized, one which is subjected to soil and water conditions of marine origin and the other which is subjected to conditions of terrestrial origin. These vegetation types are discussed and compared to the vegetation of other estuarine systems. Artificial manipulations of the mouth seem to have resulted in sediment deposition and a freshening of the system. These unseasonable manipulations also threaten the continued existence of a number of species in the system.

  13. Salinity levels as a factor of phyto planktonic structure and diversity remediation in a lagoon impact by human activities. (Bolmon Lagoon, Mediterranean Coast, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, S.; Charpy-Roubaud, C.; Ollivier, A.; Maasri, A.; Franquet, E.

    2009-01-01

    The Bolmon lagoon (south-eastern France) is located in the coastal hinterland of the Mediterranean Sea. It is connected to the salty Berre pond and in the other hand receives fresh waters from the La Cadiere River. This hyper-shallow lagoon has been classified in the early 70's as β mixo-mesohaline. Bolmon lagoon is important for human activities (tourism, fishing) and for the preservation of the diversity of marine and birds species. In the last decades, the intensive urbanisation of its drainage basin induced a high eutrophication of its waters and, as a consequence, drastic modifications in the biodiversity and in the functioning os this ecosystem. (Author)

  14. Integrated Approach to Transboundary Waters Management, such as a Rivermouth and a Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.H.; Lee, B.K.; Yoo, H.J. [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea); Kang, D.S.; Nam, J.H. [Korea Maritime Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-12-01

    Estuaries and coastal lagoons (estuarine environments) are typical transitional ecosystems between land and sea, where sea water is mixed with fresh water. It is well known that estuarine environments are very valuable ecosystems because of their unique ecological functions and geographical features, as well as socioeconomic values. These precious estuaries, however, have become severely deteriorated and damaged by human activities through watersheds and intensive coastal developments. In this respect, this study aims to develop integrated management strategies for protection, improvement, and restoration of estuarine environments that would support sustainable uses of those precious natural resources. This study found that regardless of their ecological value, estuaries and coastal lagoons in Korea have deteriorated due to a lack of appropriate management systems and imprudent development and utilization. Furthermore, considering the fact that destruction of the estuaries has been caused by national development projects, the study urges the Korean government to change its development-oriented policies on estuaries and coastal lagoons to more sustainable ones so that future generations may enjoy the benefits from healthy natural estuaries and coastal lagoons. The Korean government, thus, needs to declare that it will no longer promote any development-oriented policy that might destroy valuable estuaries and coastal lagoons, in preparing for the 2002 WSSD which will be held in South Africa in 2002. (author). 175 refs., 72 figs., 95 tabs.

  15. APPLICATION OF SEDIMENT QUALITY GUIDELINES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MANGROVE SURFACE SEDIMENT IN MENGKABONG LAGOON, SABAH, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Praveena, M. Radojevic, M. H. Abdullah, A. Z. Aris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous sediment quality guidelines developed to monitor the sediments. Sediment quality guidelines are very useful to screen sediment contamination by comparing sediment contaminant concentration with the corresponding quality guideline, provide useful tools for screening sediment chemical data to identify pollutants of concern and prioritise problem sites and relatively good predictors of contaminations. However, these guidelines are chemical specific and do not include biological parameters. Aquatic ecosystems, including sediments, must be assessed in multiple components (biological data, toxicity, physicochemistry by using intregrated approaches in order to establish a complete and comprehensive set of sediment quality guidelines. Numerous sediment quality guidelines Washington Department of Ecology Sediment Quality Guideline, Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council, Swedish Environmental Sediment Quality, Screening Quick Reference Table, Portuguese Legislation on the Classification of Dredged Materials in Coastal Zones and Interim Sediment Quality Guideline for Hong Kong have been applied to the Mengkabong lagoon mangrove sediment and discussed. The most appropriate guideline that meets the prioritization criteria consistent with international initiatives and regulations is interim sediment quality values for Hong Kong. The guideline verifies that all the metals are below the Interim Sediment Quality Value-low. However, site-specific, biological testing and ecological analysis of exisiting benthics community structure related to sediment contamination are needed for final decision making in the case of Mengkabong lagoon.

  16. Anthropogenic Enrichment and Nutrients in Some Tropical Lagoons of Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of a larger study of demographic change in coastal Ghana, we measured the concentrations of major plant nutrients and phytoplankton chlorophyll in eight coastal lagoons with different land use and human population density. The purpose of our study was to relate human acti...

  17. Seasonal changes in a fish assemblage associated with mangroves in a coastal lagoon of Baja California Sur, Mexico Cambios estacionales de la comunidad de peces asociada a zonas de manglar en una laguna costera de Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Romero

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The fish assemblage in a coastal lagoon with mangroves known as "Rancho Bueno" was determined and associated with environmental parameters. We used an experimental otter trawl net to catch the fish, and 62 fish species were identified from 48 genera and 30 families. The most abundant species were: Etropus crossotus, Eucinostomus gracilis, Paralabrax maculatofasciatus, Sphoeroides annulatus, and Eucinostomus dowii. The water temperature changed seasonally, being warm from July through December and cold from January through June. We found more fish species during the warm season than during the cold season. The southern area of the coastal lagoon had the highest diversity and species richness. The small size of the fishes registered confirms the ecological role of coastal lagoons as nursery areas that offer protection and feeding to commercially important fish near Bahía Magdalena, Mexico.Se determinó la estructura de peces asociada a factores ambientales en una laguna costera con manglar denominada "Rancho Bueno". Se utilizó una red de arrastre experimental para la captura y se identificaron 62 especies de peces de 48 géneros y 30 familias. Las especies más importantes fueron Etropus crossotus, Eucinostomus gracilis, Paralabrax maculatofasciatus, Sphoeroides annulatus y Eucinostomus dowii. La temperatura del agua varió estacionalmente, siendo cálida de julio a diciembre y fría de enero a junio. Se registró un mayor número de especies de peces durante la época cálida comparada con la época fría. La zona sur de la laguna costera presentó una mayor diversidad y riqueza específica. El menor tamaño de los peces registrados, confirma el papel ecológico de las lagunas costeras, consideradas como áreas de crianza las cuales proporcionan protección y alimentación a los peces de importancia comercial cerca de Bahía Magdalena, México.

  18. Fauna of gastropod molluscs in the Curonian Lagoon littoral biotopes (Baltic Sea, Kaliningrad region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Filippenko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the gastropod mollusc fauna in the coastal waters of the southern part of the Curonian Lagoon (Kaliningrad region, Russia were carried out. Study revealed 34 aquatic gastropods representing 30% of Prosobranchia and 70% of Pulmonata. Obtained data showed higher mollusc diversity in the littoral biotopes in comparison with open areas of the Lagoon. The fauna is represented by a typical Central European species complex of freshwater gastropods. The reed zone along the coastline in the Lagoon functions as a barrier and provides shallow water habitats with slow moving and warmer water, where maximum gastropod species concentrate.

  19. Is economic valuation of ecosystem services useful to decision-makers? Lessons learned from Australian coastal and marine management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marre, Jean-Baptiste; Thébaud, Olivier; Pascoe, Sean; Jennings, Sarah; Boncoeur, Jean; Coglan, Louisa

    2016-08-01

    Economic valuation of ecosystem services is widely advocated as being useful to support ecosystem management decision-making. However, the extent to which it is actually used or considered useful in decision-making is poorly documented. This literature blindspot is explored with an application to coastal and marine ecosystems management in Australia. Based on a nation-wide survey of eighty-eight decision-makers representing a diversity of management organizations, the perceived usefulness and level of use of economic valuation of ecosystem services, in support of coastal and marine management, are examined. A large majority of decision-makers are found to be familiar with economic valuation and consider it useful - even necessary - in decision-making, although this varies across groups of decision-makers. However, most decision-makers never or rarely use economic valuation. The perceived level of importance and trust in estimated dollar values differ across ecosystem services, and are especially high for values that relate to commercial activities. A number of factors are also found to influence respondent's use of economic valuation. Such findings concur with conclusions from other studies on the usefulness and use of ESV in environmental management decision-making. They also demonstrate the strength of the survey-based approach developed in this application to examine this issue in a variety of contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface Water Quality Survey of Northern Indian River Lagoon from Sebastian Inlet to Mosquito Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. J.; Webb, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Following news of an emerging brown tide algal bloom in the northern Indian River Lagoon (IRL), researchers sought to gain insight into the surface water quality in the IRL, as well as the extent of the algae coverage. A Portable SeaKeeper from YSI, mounted to a personal watercraft-based coastal profiling system, autonomously collected and analyzed the surface water. The system operates by recording sample data every 12 seconds while continuously underway at speeds up to and greater than 50 km/hr. The researchers covered a transect that started at Sebastian Inlet and followed a zig-zag path extending up through the Haulover Canal and into the Mosquito Lagoon. The survey path covered 166.7 km, and collected 2248 samples. Along the way stops were made at water quality stations used by the Saint John's River Water Management District, so that the data collected can be incorporated into ongoing monitoring efforts. The system analyzed the surface water for dissolved oxygen, pH, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature, turbidity, refined fuels, and CDOM. In the two days following the lagoon survey, the inlets at Port Canaveral and Sebastian were also surveyed for tidal currents and hydrography. The IRL transect survey data recorded evidence of the southern extent of the algae bloom in both chlorophyll-a and pH levels. Visual evidence of the bloom was striking as the water in the northern IRL turned a milk chocolaty brown color. Chlorophyll-a levels in the two inlets suggested bloom activity at these locations; however this bloom was different. This oceanic bloom was a result of a persistent upwelling event along the East Florida shelf, and the color was a paler green-yellow. The near-synoptic nature of the comprehensive lagoon survey, conducted in just over 7 hours, allows researchers to obtain a better understanding of water quality in coastal lagoons. Elevated levels of salinity, temperature, and refined fuels in the northern IRL indicate a low exchange rate and absence

  1. Fingerprints of lagoonal life: Migration of the marine flatfish Solea solea assessed by stable isotopes and otolith microchemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Jan; Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The commercially important marine flatfish common sole (Solea solea) facultatively uses NW Mediterranean lagoons as nurseries. To assess the imprint left by the lagoonal passage, muscle carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope values of S. solea juveniles caught in Mauguio lagoon in spring (shortly after arrival from the sea) and in autumn (before the return to the sea) were compared with values of juveniles from adjacent coastal marine nurseries. In addition, in the lagoon, sole otolith stable isotope (C and oxygen (O)) and elemental (11 elements) composition in spring and autumn, and the stable isotope composition (C and N) of organic matter sources in autumn, were determined. Overall, our data indicate that a distinct lagoonal signature existed. Specifically, lagoon soles showed a strong enrichment in muscle tissue 15N (>6‰) compared to their coastal relatives, likely linked to sewage inputs (see below), and a depletion in 13C (1-2‰), indicative of higher importance of 13C depleted terrestrial POM in the lagoon compared to coastal nurseries. In addition, over the time spent in the lagoon, sole otolith δ13C and δ18O values and otolith elemental composition changed significantly. Analysis of the lagoon sole foodweb based on C and N isotopes placed sediment particulate organic matter (POM) at the base. Seagrasses, formerly common but in decline in Mauguio lagoon, played a minor role in the detritus cycle. The very strong 15N enrichment of the entire foodweb (+7 to +11‰) compared to little impacted lagoons and coastal areas testified of important human sewage inputs. Regarding the S. solea migration, the analysis of higher turnover and fast growth muscle tissue and metabolically inert and slower growth otoliths indicated that soles arrived at least several weeks prior to capture in spring, and that no migrations took place in summer. In the autumn, the high muscle δ15N value acquired in Mauguio lagoon would be a good marker of recent return to the sea, whereas

  2. Copper complexation capacity in surface waters of the Venice Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Zirino, Alberto; Nasci, Cristina

    2008-10-01

    Total copper (Cu(T)), copper ion activity (pCu) and the copper complexation capacity (CuCC) were determined in samples of seawater collected in July 2003 from the Venice Lagoon. Cu(T) and CuCC showed considerable spatial variability: Cu(T) ranged from 1.8 to 70.0nM, whereas the CuCC varied from 195 to 573nM. pCu values varied from 11.6 to 12.6 and are consistent with those previously reported in estuarine and coastal areas (10.9-14.1). The range of Cu(T) values compares well with those reported in the past in the lagoon and in the adjacent Adriatic Sea. The highest concentrations of Cu(T) were found in samples collected near the industrial area of Porto Marghera, whereas the lowest were measured near the Chioggia and Malamocco inlets, where an intense tidally-driven renewal of seawater takes place. Although CuCC showed a high degree of spatial variability, the values recorded in the Venice Lagoon are comparable to those reported in other estuarine systems. In addition, CuCC was positively correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), suggesting that organic ligands responsible for Cu complexation are part of the bulk organic matter pool in the lagoon. The CuCC:Cu(T) molar ratio was, on average 55:1, indicating that a large excess of complexation capacity exists in the Venice Lagoon. The high levels of CuCC and the narrow range of pCu indicates the importance of the role played by organic ligands in controlling the free ion Cu concentrations in the lagoon, and as a consequence, regulating its availability and/or toxicity.

  3. The high resolution mapping of the Venice Lagoon tidal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madricardo, Fantina; Foglini, Federica; Kruss, Aleksandra; Bellafiore, Debora; Trincardi, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges of the direct observation of the ocean is to achieve a high resolution mapping of its seafloor morphology and benthic habitats. So far, sonars have mapped just 0.05% of the ocean floor with less than ten-meter resolution. The recent efforts of the scientific community have been devoted towards the mapping of both Deep Ocean and very shallow coastal areas. Coastal and transitional environments in particular undergo strong morphological changes due to natural and anthropogenic pressure. Nowadays, only about 5% of the seafloor of these environments † have been mapped: the shallowness of these environments has prevented the use of underwater acoustics to reveal their morphological features. The recent technological development of multibeam echosounder systems, however, enables these instruments to achieve very high performances also in such shallow environments. In this work, we present results and case studies of an extensive multibeam survey carried out in the Lagoon of Venice in 2013. The Lagoon of Venice is the biggest lagoon in the Mediterranean Sea with a surface of about 550 km2 and with an average depth of about 1 m. In the last century, the morphological and ecological properties of the lagoon changed dramatically: the surface of the salt marshes was reduced by 60% and some parts of the lagoon are deepening with a net sediment flux exiting from the inlets. Moreover, major engineering interventions are currently ongoing at the inlets (MOSE project). These changes at the inlets could affect substantially the lagoon environment. To understand and monitor the future evolution of the Lagoon of Venice, ISMAR within the project RITMARE (a National Research Programme funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research) carried out an extensive survey, involving a team of more than 25 scientists, to collect high resolution (0.5 m) bathymetry of key study areas such as the tidal inlets and channels. Following a broad

  4. Bromide in some coastal and oceanic waters of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.; Dalal, V.N.K.

    Bromide concentration and bromide/chlorinity ratio are estimated in coastal waters of Goa, Minicoy Lagoon, Western Arabian Sea and Western Bay of Bengal. The influence of precipitation and river runoff on bromide and bromide/chlorinity ratio...

  5. Lagoon-sea exchanges, nutrient dynamics and water quality management of the Ria Formosa (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Alice; Mudge, Stephen M.

    2005-02-01

    Historical data from the Ria Formosa lagoon are classified according to the EEA 2001 guidelines to provide a frame of reference to evaluate the effect of management during the implementation of the environmental legislative Directives. Water samples from the Ria Formosa lagoon were significantly enriched in nitrogen (NH 4+ NO 2- and NO 3-) with respect to the adjacent coastal waters indicating that inputs from sewage, agricultural runoff and benthic fluxes were not fully assimilated within the lagoon. Tidal flushing was insufficient in the inner areas of the lagoon to remove or effectively dilute these inputs. Enrichment was most severe close to the urban centres of Faro and Olhão, as well as in the Gilão Estuary and the shallow extremities. Dissolved oxygen undersaturation (mean 75% during daylight hours) was associated with the area close to the sewage outlets of Faro. In the shallow west end of the lagoon during summer, dissolved oxygen supersaturation reached 140% during the day but fell to 50% at night. Classification using the EEA (2001) guidelines suggests the system is "poor" or "bad" with respect to phosphate concentrations for the majority of the year and "poor" in nitrogen contamination during the autumn rainy period. Due to the high overall nitrogen load in the lagoon, there is a net export to the coastal waters, especially during November and December, and phosphate only becomes limiting briefly during the spring bloom (April). Therefore, substantial phytoplankton populations may be supported year-round in the lagoon. The consequences of water quality deterioration in the Ria Formosa would negatively affect the lagoon as a regional resource, important for its ecological, economic and recreational value. The industries most affected would be tourism, fisheries and aquaculture. Management options include Urban Waste Water Treatment, dredging, artificial inlets, limits on urban development and changes in agricultural practices.

  6. The Unare lagoon - A recent example of sequence stratigraphic control in reservoir patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, C. (Corpoven, S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela))

    1993-02-01

    The Unare lagoon constitutes a barred coastal lagoon formed during the Holocene transgression on a moderate wave energy, microtidal coast. An extensive surface sampling and core drill program has been carried out in the lagoon in order to develop a reservoir sedimentology and sequence stratigraphic model applicable to similar subsurface deposits. During the rapid Halocene sea level rise, more than 70 m of fluvial and delta plain sediments have aggraded behind the landward stepping coastal barrier. These sediments are truncated seaward by a transgressive wave ravinement surface, and are capped by widespread lagoonal muds which accumulated between 8300 and 7250 yBP. These muds constitute the Holocene Maximum Flooding Surface which preceded the onset of the post Holocene stillstand (c. 500[approximately] yBP), probably as a result of the high rate of sediment supply and the confined nature of the lagoon which acted as an efficient sediment trap. During the post Holocene stillstand, a fluvial-dominated delta has prograded across the lagoon and attained the coastal barrier. This delta constitutes a Highstand Systems Tract. The major reservoir sands comprise distributary channel meanderbelts and the transgressive barrier. The channels form sand ribbons 5-7 m thick, and up to 2 km wide. The barrier and shoreface sands forms a strike-elongate deposits less than 5 m thick, up to 150-600 m wide, and 5-10 km long. The lagoonal facies of the Maximum Flooding Surface form a good reservoir seal overlying the aggrading transgressive fluvial and delta plain sands and muds.

  7. Beach Ridge and Lagoon Systems as Indicator of Sea-Level Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lasse

    geology, and land-sea distribution of the glacial land-scapes around Samsø are primarily influenced by short periods of ice advance in the mid- and late Weichselian. The involved processes and deposits determine the presence of basins within an undulating topography as well as the presence of large...... uplift. It is concluded that the combination of coastal lagoons and beach ridges as sedimentary ar-chives for the reconstruction of Holocene RSL development bears great potential in the ice-marginal areas of the late Quaternary glaciations in SW Scandinavia and in other coastal land-scapes in periglacial...... dating of Holocene marine deposits on the island of Samsø, southern Kattegat Sea, Denmark. Coastal lagoons and beach ridges are common features of the coastal landscape and are found distributed along and across gradients of isostatic uplift. Their widespread occurrence gives these systems certain...

  8. Genesis, distribution, and dynamics of lagoon marl extrusions along the Curonian Spit, southeast Baltic Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander; Zhamoida, Vladimir; Ryabchuk, Daria; Buynevich, Ilya; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhov, Dmitry; Bitinas, Albertas; Pupienis, Donatas

    2016-04-01

    The unique geological process of extrusion of lagoon marl from beneath the massive migrating sand dunes is characteristic for large segments of the Curonian Spit - a ~100-km-long sandy barrier that separates the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea. The exposures of a composite set of Holocene organic sediments such as gyttja, clayey gyttja, and gyttja clay, commonly referred to as "lagoon marl", are common along the northern half of the lagoon coast of the spit. These outcrops of lagoon marl rise up to 3-4 m above the lagoon level and were formed by extrusion from their 7-8 m in situ depth beneath the present regional water table. New detailed investigations of the Baltic Sea bottom along the southern half of the Curonian Spit using side-scan sonar, multibeam echosounder, seismic imaging, sediment sampling, and video observations allowed identification and mapping of a unique underwater landscape formed by extensive outcrops of laminated and folded lagoon marl at water depths of 5-15 m. The combined onshore-offshore database indicates that the relict lagoon marl was deformed, compacted, and dehydrated by a massive dune-covered coastal barrier migrating landward (retrograding) over these sediments during the Litorina Sea transgression in a processes termed "dune tectonics". Spatial analysis of structures of the relict sediments traced in offshore geophysical data help constrain the rates of the southeastly migration of the dune massif. A conceptual dynamic model is presented to explain the present occurrence of marl exposures above the regional water table, as well as the occurrence of relict lagoon marl extrusions (diapirs) on the underwater marine slope of the Curonian Spit. This research was funded by a RFBR project 13-05-90711 and RSF project 14-37-00047 «Geoenvironmental conditions of marine management of natural recourses of the Russian sector of South-Eastern Baltic».

  9. Socio-Economic analysis and fishing activites of lagoon and marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fishermen have distinctive social and economic features which affect their fishing operations. The study was therefore designed to identify the socio-economic characteristics of fisher-folks living in lagoon and coastal communities and assesses the fishing activities. Frequency distribution, percentages, chi-square and ...

  10. Integrated water pollution assessment of the Ebrié Lagoon, Ivory Coast, West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheren, P.A.G.M.; Kroeze, C.; Jansen, F.J.J.G.; Hordijk, L.; Ptasinski, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    An environmental pollution assessment of the Ebrie lagoon, the largest coastal ecosystem in Western Africa, was executed by applying the Driving force-Pressure-State-Impacts-Response (DPSIR) framework. The domestic and industrial activities in Abidjan and agricultural activities in the wider

  11. Zebra Mussel Farming in the Szczecin (Oder Lagoon: Water-Quality Objectives and Cost-Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schernewski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Oder (Szczecin Lagoon in the southern Baltic Sea is a heavily eutrophicated and degraded coastal ecosystem. We applied a systems approach framework to critically evaluate whether existing water-management measures achieve water-quality objectives for the river and lagoon systems. Our simulations reveal that the existing water-quality objectives for the river and the coastal waters are not sufficiently complementary. We suggest new water-quality threshold concentrations, which are in agreement with the European Water Framework Directive, and we calculate acceptable maximum nutrient loads for the Oder River. These calculations suggest that external nutrient-load reductions in the river basin alone seem insufficient to achieve good water quality in the lagoon. A comprehensive eutrophication management approach should also include internal nutrient-retention and nutrient-removal measures in the lagoon. We focus on mussel farming, i.e., that of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, because they are efficient in removing nutrients and improving water transparency in the Oder Lagoon. For this purpose, the ecosystem model ERGOM is extended by a mussel module and an economic model. The economic model describes costs and benefits of mussel cultivation depending on the the farm size. We included additional potential sources of income such as water-quality tax or emission certificates. The simulations show that mussel farming in the lagoon is a suitable supportive measure and, at a load-reduction target of 50% or more, it is a cost-efficient measure for removing nutrients and for implementing the Baltic Sea Action Plan. In the Oder Lagoon, mussel farming could potentially remove nearly 1000 t of N (70 t of P/year, or about 2% of the present N and P loads, and it would have the additional benefit of improving water transparency.

  12. Metals in some lagoons of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, F G; Sharma, V K; Alexander, V H; Frausto, C A

    1995-02-01

    The concentrations of metals, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in some lagoons to establish the level of metal pollution. The lagoons studied were Alvarado lagoon, Veracruz; San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas; and Terminos lagoon, Campeche. The concentrations were determined in water, oyster (Crassostrea virginica), and sediments. Metals were accumulated in either oysters or sediments. Cu and Zn were higher in oysters and Fe and Mn were higher in sediments. The results in water samples were compared with the limit established by the Secretaria de Ecologia and Desarrollo Urbano Report and briefly discussed.

  13. The ecofunctional quality index (EQI): a new tool for assessing lagoonal ecosystem impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fano, E. A.; Mistri, M.; Rossi, R.

    2003-03-01

    A multimetric index for the evaluation of environmental quality (the ecofunctional quality index, EQI) has been developed using biotic data from three Italian coastal lagoons. Sampling programs were conducted between 1998 and 2000, on a yearly basis, with seasonal frequency at diverse sites in each lagoon. The rationale of the index is that certain attributes, selected on the basis of established principles of benthic ecology, are fundamental for lagoon ecosystem function. The chosen attributes were primary productivity, expressed as phytoplankton, seaweed and seagrass biomasses; structure and productivity of the benthic community, expressed as numerical abundance, biomass density, number of species, and taxonomic diversity of macrozoobenthos; and finally, trophic complexity, expressed as macrozoobenthic functional diversity. The EQI is constituted by the sum of weights given to these eight attributes, each transformed onto a dimensionless 0-100 quality scale. In this way, the use of EQI can derive a series of values yielding a 'functional classification' of sites within a lagoon or between different lagoons. The proposed index is a low cost, flexible and robust routine indicator of lagoon ecosystem impairment and could be of particular benefit to environmental managers and policymakers who require tools capable of expressing the degree of degradation or environmental quality of different lagoon habitats. The process of developing and the initial testing of EQI reported in this paper is intended as preliminary, and until validation of this index is accomplished by incorporating data from a wider range of lagoon environments, we caution the use of this index in anything other than an exploratory manner.

  14. Natural revegetation of coal fly ash in a highly saline disposal lagoon in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, L.M. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Biology

    2008-08-15

    Question: What is the relationship of the naturally colonizing vegetation and substrate characteristics in fly ash lagoons? Location: West lagoon, Deep Bay, a 13-ha coastal lagoon in Hong Kong in subtropical Southeast Asia. Methods: Vegetation establishment was examined in a coal fly ash lagoon two years after its abandonment to investigate the distribution of vegetation in relationship to the chemical properties of the fly ash in the lagoon. A greenhouse experiment assessed the limits imposed on plant growth in fly ash. Results: The fly ash was saline, slightly alkaline and very poor in organic matter and nitrogen. Ash from bare and vegetated areas differed significantly in their salinity and extractable concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and various metals. Bare ash had a significantly higher conductivity and extractable sodium, aluminum, manganese, potassium. and lead. In total 11 plant species that belonged to seven families were found growing on the fly ash: all species except the shrub Tamarix chinensis were herbaceous. Using discriminant analysis, the most important factors in distinguishing bare and vegetated ashes were conductivity and sodium. Cluster analysis of bare samples gave two distinct groups, one from the periphery of the lagoon, which had lower sodium, conductivity, organic carbon, potassium and copper, and the other from a second group that contained ashes from the central region of the lagoon. Results of the greenhouse experiment showed that the inhibition of plant growth was significantly correlated with the presence of soluble toxic elements in ash. Conclusion: Toxicity and salinity seem to be the major limiting factors to plant establishment in fly ash, and these factors must be ameliorated for the successful reclamation of these fly ash lagoons.

  15. Distribution and ecological relevance of fine sediments in organic-enriched lagoons: The case study of the Cabras lagoon (Sardinia, Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magni, P. [CNR-IAMC, National Research Council - Institute for Coastal Marine Environment Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); International Marine Centre, Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.magni@iamc.cnr.it; De Falco, G. [CNR-IAMC, National Research Council - Institute for Coastal Marine Environment Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); International Marine Centre, Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); Como, S. [International Marine Centre, Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); Casu, D. [Dip. di Botanica ed Ecologia vegetale, Universita di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Floris, A. [Dip. di Zoologia e Genetica evoluzionistica, Universita di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Petrov, A.N. [Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas NASU, 99011 Sevastopol (Ukraine); Castelli, A. [Dip. di Biologia, Universita di Pisa, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Perilli, A. [CNR-IAMC, National Research Council - Institute for Coastal Marine Environment Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy); International Marine Centre, Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, 09072 Oristano (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    In organic-enriched sedimentary systems, like many Mediterranean coastal lagoons, a detailed analysis of sediment grain size composition and partitioning within the muds is crucial to investigate sedimentological trends related to both hydrodynamic energy and basin morphology. In these systems, sediment dynamics are particularly important because the partitioning and transport of fine sediments can strongly influence the redistribution and accumulation of large amounts of organic matter, and consequently the distribution of benthic assemblages and the trophic status and functioning of a lagoon. Nevertheless, studies on benthic-sediment relationships have been based mainly on a rather coarse analysis of sediment grain size features. In muddy systems, however, this approach may impede a proper evaluation of the relationships and effects of the distribution of fine sediment and organic matter on the biotic benthic components. Here we show that the distribution of sedimentary organic matter (OM) and total organic carbon (TOC) in the Cabras lagoon (Sardinia, Italy) can be explained (i.e., predicted) as a function of a nonlinear increase in the amount of the cohesive fraction of sediments ({<=}8 {mu}m grain size particles) and that this fraction strongly influences the structure, composition and distribution of macrobenthic assemblages. Even in such a homogeneously muddy system, characterized by 'naturally' occurring impoverished communities, impaired benthic assemblages were found at {<=}8 {mu}m, OM, TOC contents of about 77%, 11% and 3.5%, respectively. A review of studies conducted in Mediterranean coastal lagoons highlighted a lack of direct integrated analysis of sediment features and the biotic components. We suggest that, especially in organic-enriched coastal lagoons, monitoring programs should primarily investigate and consider the cohesive fraction of sediments in order to allow a better assessment of benthic-sediment relationships and ecological

  16. Aquatic macrophytes drive sediment stoichiometry and the suspended particulate organic carbon composition of a tropical coastal lagoon Macrófitas aquáticas determinam a estequiometria do sedimento e a composição do carbono orgânico particulado em suspensão de uma lagoa costeira tropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Cardoso Marinho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This research aimed to evaluate (1 the influence of the aquatic macrophytes Typha domingensis Pers., Eleocharis interstincta (Vahl Roem. & Schult. (emergent and Potamogeton stenostachys K. Schum. (submersed on sediment stoichiometry and (2 the contribution of these aquatic macrophytes to organic carbon composition in different compartments of a tropical coastal lagoon (Cabiúnas Lagoon, Macaé-RJ; METHODS: The concentration of carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P was determined in 2-cm intervals in the first 10 cm of sediment in both littoral and limnetic regions. In the littoral region, the sediment was collected in three different sites: T. domingensis, E. interstincta and P. stenostachys stands. In order to know the pathways of C in Cabiunas lagoon, the isotopic signature (δ13C of restinga terrestrial vegetation, zooplankton, phytoplankton, macrophytes, dissolved and suspended material on water were evaluated; RESULTS: The concentrations of C and N in the sediment of the E. interstincta and T. domingensis stands were significantly higher than in the sediment of the limnetic region. The concentration of phosphorus in the sediment colonized by T. domingensis was higher than in the limnetic region and in P. stenostachys stand. The highest molar C:P ratios were found in E. interstincta and P. stenostachys stands. The highest N:P ratios were also found in the littoral region. Carbon stable isotopic analysis (δ13C signatures showed that a majority of the particulate organic carbon (POC in the water column had aquatic macrophyte tissues origin; CONCLUSIONS: Emergent macrophytes strongly contribute to nutrient enrichment of the sediment of Cabiúnas lagoon. In general, macrophyte detritus alters the littoral region sediment stoichiometry and quality for decomposers, by accumulating much more C in relation to N and P when compared to limnetic region. However, macrophytes importance isn't restricted to the sediment once they have a central

  17. Anthropogenic changes to a billabong in New South Wales. 1. lagoon evolution and phosphorus dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, T.H.; Ford, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes detected in the sediment of a shallow (∼1.6 m) billabong (Horseshoe Lagoon) are the result of a Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) connection in 1958 and catchment urbanization around 1974. Nutrient-rich water caused the collapse of macrophyte populations, algal blooms became common, and urbanization increased sediment deposition (∼1 cm year -1 ). Changes in P retention were investigated by using dated cores, pore-water element profiles, and water quality records. Two of the cores were examined by analyses of pollen, 137 Cs, elemental analyses by XRF, C and N stable isotope ratio, and organic concentrations. The lagoon is the last of three STP holding ponds. Ponds 1 and 2 were sand-mining pits; they receive no sediment input and have negligible P adsorption. The Fe:P ratios in sediments from three Australian rivers have a common slope and this relationship was used to examine Fe:P ratios in the anoxic bottom sediments of the lagoon. A potential for effluent P adsorption developed in the lagoon through Fe mobilization and enrichment in the upper sediments and a strong clay-Fe-P association. The mean long- term P adsorption in the lagoon (35±) was the result of maintaining clay input to an oxic waterbody. Bacterial sulfate reduction is the main process decreasing available Fe for effluent P adsorption. Appropriately designed systems could expect to maintain effluent P adsorption efficiencies of around 70%. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Publishing

  18. Effect of climate change and mollusc invasion on eutrophication and algae blooms in the lagoon ecosystems of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia; Rudinskaya, Lilia

    2015-04-01

    Coastal lagoons are most vulnerable to impacts of natural environmental and anthropogenic factors. The Curonian Lagoon and Vistula Lagoon are the largest coastal lagoons of the Baltic Sea, relating to the most highly productive water bodies of Europe. The Curonian Lagoon is choke mostly freshwater lagoon, while the Vistula Lagoon is restricted brackish water lagoon. In the last decades the nutrients loading changes, warming trend and biological invasions are observed. The researches (chlorophyll, primary production, nutrients, phytoplankton, benthos, etc) were carried out monthly since 1991 to 2014. The database includes 1600 stations in the Curonian Lagoon, 1650 stations in the Vistula Lagoon. Eutrophication and algae blooms are most important problems. Multiple reductions of nutrients loading from the watershed area in 1990s did not result in considerable improvement of the ecological situation in the lagoons. The Curonian Lagoon may be characterized as hypertrophic water body with "poor" water quality. Climate change in 1990s-2000s combined with other factors (freshwater, slow-flow exchange, high nutrients concentrations) creates conditions for Cyanobacteria "hyperblooms". Hyperbloom of Cyanophyta (average for the growing season Chl > 100 μg/l) were observed during 4 years in 1990s and 7 years in 2000s. The summer water temperature is the key environmental factor determining the seasonal and long-term variability of the primary production and algae blooms. Mean annual primary production in 2010-2014 (600 gC·m-2·year-1) is considerable higher, than in the middle of 1970s (300 gC·m-2·year-1). The local climate warming in the Baltic region caused ongoing eutrophication and harmful algae blooms in the Curonian Lagoon despite of significant reduction of nutrients loading in 1990s-2000s. Harmful algal blooms in July-October (chlorophyll to 700-3400 μg/l) result in deterioration of the water chemical parameters, death of fish in the coastal zone and pollution

  19. Before-after environmental impact assessment of an artificial channel opening on a south-western Atlantic choked lagoon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestrelo, L; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the human induced impact of a channel opening in a choked lagoon and attempted to establish the cause-effect links for the observed changes. The same lagoon system was sampled before and after the channel opening event, and the differences in fish and crustacean assemblages and environmental variables between these periods analysed. The opening of the artificial channel resulted in salinity increases, leading to a shift in species composition, favouring marine species and reducing abundance and diversity of previously dominant freshwater species. Furthermore, saltwater entrance into the choked lagoon caused an unexpected decrease in species richness and biomass, plus deterioration of ecosystem processes, reducing fishing capacity. The effects of salinity on the ecosystem vary depending on the ecosystem's composition and capacity to overcome salinity changes, thus specific monitoring projects are important strategies for developing coastal lagoon conservation management. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Coastal erosion problem, modelling and protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Nihal; Balas, Lale; İnan, Asu

    2015-09-01

    Göksu Delta, located in the south of Silifke County of Mersin on the coastal plain formed by Göksu River, is one of the Specially Protected Areas in Turkey. Along the coastal area of the Delta, coastline changes at significant rates are observed, concentrating especially at four regions; headland of İncekum, coast of Paradeniz Lagoon, river mouth of Göksu and coast of Altınkum. The coast of Paradeniz Lagoon is suffering significantly from erosion and the consequent coastal retreating problem. Therefore, the narrow barrier beach which separates Paradeniz Lagoon from the Mediterranean Sea is getting narrower, creating a risk of uniting with the sea, thus causing the disappearance of the Lagoon. The aim of this study was to understand the coastal transport processes along the coastal area of Göksu Delta to determine the coastal sediment transport rates, and accordingly, to propose solutions to prevent the loss of coastal lands in the Delta. To this end, field measurements of currents and sediment grain sizes were carried out, and wind climate, wave climate, circulation patterns and longshore sediment transport rates were numerically modeled by HYDROTAM-3D, which is a three dimensional hydrodynamic transport model. Finally, considering its special importance as an environmentally protected region, some coastal structures of gabions were proposed as solutions against the coastal erosion problems of the Delta. The effects of proposed structures on future coastline changes were also modeled, and the coastlines predicted for the year 2017 are presented and discussed in the paper.

  1. Identification of pollution of Tapeng Lagoon from neighbouring rivers using multivariate statistical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shao-Wei; Gau, Hwa-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Liang; Chen, Jen-Jeng; Lee, Chang-Gai

    2008-07-01

    This work investigated water samples collected from Tapeng Lagoon and three neighbouring rivers (the Kaoping River, Tungkang River and Lingbeng River) in Taiwan, Republic of China. Canonical discriminant analysis was applied to identify the source of pollution in neighbouring rivers outside Tapeng Lagoon. The two constructed discriminant functions showed a marked contribution to all discriminant variables, and the total nitrogen, algae, dissolved oxygen and total phosphate were combined as the nutrient effect factor. The recognition capacities of the two discriminant functions were 95.6% and 4.4%, respectively. The water quality in the Kaoping River most strongly controlled the water quality in Tapeng Lagoon. Disassembling the oyster frames and fishery boxes had improved the water quality markedly. The methodology and results provide useful information concerning watershed management and may be applicable to other basins with similar properties that are experiencing similar coastal environmental issues.

  2. Storms do not alter long-term watershed development influences on coastal water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    A twelve year (2000 − 2011) study of three coastal lagoons in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted to assess the impacts of local watershed development and tropical storms on water quality. The lagoons have similar physical and hydrological characteristics, but differ substanti...

  3. A new model evaluating Holocene sediment dynamics: Insights from a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lagoon (Bora Bora, Society Islands, French Polynesia, South Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaack, Anja; Gischler, Eberhard; Hudson, J. Harold; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Lohner, Andreas; Vogel, Hendrik; Garbode, Eva; Camoin, Gilbert F.

    2016-08-01

    Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lagoons of barrier reefs provide great potential as sedimentary archives focusing on paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic changes as well as on event deposition. Sediment sources include lagoonal carbonate production, the marginal reef and the volcanic hinterland. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic continent-attached coastal lagoons have been intensively studied, however, their isolated oceanic counterparts have been widely disregarded. Here, we present a new model of Holocene sediment dynamics in the barrier-reef lagoon of Bora Bora based on sedimentological, paleontological, geochronological and geochemical data. The lagoonal succession started with a Pleistocene soil representing the Lowstand Systems Tract. As the rising Holocene sea inundated the carbonate platform, peat accumulated locally 10,650-9400 years BP. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation started ca. 8700-5500 years BP and represents the Transgressive Systems Tract. During that time, sediments were characterized by relatively coarse grain size and contained high amounts of terrestrial material from the volcanic hinterland as well as carbonate sediments mainly produced within the lagoon. Siliciclastic content decreases throughout the Holocene. After the rising sea had reached its modern level, sand aprons formed between reef crest and lagoon creating transport pathways for reef-derived material leading to carbonate-dominated sedimentation ca. 6000-3000 years BP during the Highstand Systems Tract. However, mainly fine material was transported and accumulated in the lagoon while coarser grains were retained on the prograding sand apron. From ca. 4500-500 years BP, significant variations in grain-size, total organic carbon as indicator for primary productivity, Ca and Cl element intensities as qualitative indicators for carbonate availability and lagoonal salinity are seen. Such patterns could indicate event (re-)deposition and correlate with contemporaneous event deposits

  4. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, D.; Norville, C. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  5. Hydrogeological effects of dredging navigable canals through lagoon shallows. A case study in Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Teatini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a comprehensive investigation has been carried out to quantify the possible effects of dredging a navigable canal on the hydrogeological system underlying a coastal lagoon. The study is focused on the Venice Lagoon, Italy, where the port authority is planning to open a new 10 m deep and 3 km long canal to connect the city passenger terminal to the central lagoon inlet, thus avoiding the passage of large cruise ships through the historic center of Venice. A modeling study has been developed to evaluate the short (minutes, medium (months, and long (decades term processes of water and pollutant exchange between the shallow aquifer system and the lagoon, possibly enhanced by the canal excavation, and ship wakes. An in-depth characterization of the lagoon subsurface along the channel has supported the numerical modeling. Piezometer and sea level records, geophysical acquisitions, laboratory analyses of groundwater and sediment samples (chemical analyses and ecotoxicity testing, and the outcome of 3-D hydrodynamic and computational fluid dynamic (CFD models have been used to set up and calibrate the subsurface multi-model approach. The numerical outcomes allow us to quantify the groundwater volume and estimate the mass of anthropogenic contaminants (As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Se likely leaked from the nearby industrial area over the past decades, and released into the lagoon from the canal bed by the action of depression waves generated by ships. Moreover, the model outcomes help to understand the effect of the hydrogeological layering on the propagation of the tidal fluctuation and salt concentration into the shallow brackish aquifers underlying the lagoon bottom.

  6. Chasing boundaries and cascade effects in a coupled barrier - marshes - lagoon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Trueba, J.; Mariotti, G.

    2015-12-01

    Low-lying coasts are often characterized by barriers islands, shore-parallel stretches of sand separated from the mainland by marshes and lagoons. We built an exploratory numerical model to examine the morphological feedbacks within an idealized barrier - marshes -lagoon system and predict its evolution under projected rates of sea level rise and sediment supply to the backbarrier environment. Our starting point is a recently developed morphodynamic model, which couples shoreface evolution and overwash processes in a dynamic framework. As such, the model is able to capture dynamics not reproduced by morphokinematic models, which advect geometries without specific concern to processes. These dynamics include periodic barrier retreat due to time lags in the shoreface response to barrier overwash, height drowning due to insufficient overwash fluxes as sea level rises, and width drowning, which occurs when the shoreface response rate is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry during overwash-driven landward migration. We extended the model by coupling the barrier model with a model for the evolution of the marsh platform and the boundary between the marsh and the adjacent lagoon. The coupled model explicitly describes marsh edge processes and accounts for the modification of the wave regime associated with lagoon width (fetch). Model results demonstrate that changes in factors that are not typically associated with the dynamics of coastal barriers, such as the lagoon width and the rate of export/import of sediments from and to the lagoon, can lead to previously unidentified complex responses of the coupled system. In particular, a wider lagoon in the backbarrier, and/or a reduction in the supply of muddy sediments to the backbarrier, can increase barrier retreat rates and even trigger barrier drowning. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating backbarrier dynamics in models that aim at predicting the response of barrier systems.

  7. Reconstruction of historic sea ice conditions in a sub-Arctic lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrich, Chris; Tivy, Adrienne C.; Ward, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Historical sea ice conditions were reconstructed for Izembek Lagoon, Bering Sea, Alaska. This lagoon is a crucial staging area during migration for numerous species of avian migrants and a major eelgrass (Zostera marina) area important to a variety of marine and terrestrial organisms, especially Pacific Flyway black brant geese (Branta bernicla nigricans). Ice cover is a common feature of the lagoon in winter, but appears to be declining, which has implications for eelgrass distribution and abundance, and its use by wildlife. We evaluated ice conditions from a model based on degree days, calibrated to satellite observations, to estimate distribution and long-term trends in ice conditions in Izembek Lagoon. Model results compared favorably with ground observations and 26 years of satellite data, allowing ice conditions to be reconstructed back to 1943. Specifically, periods of significant (limited access to eelgrass areas) and severe (almost complete ice coverage of the lagoon) ice conditions could be identified. The number of days of severe ice within a single season ranged from 0 (e.g., 2001) to ≥ 67 (e.g., 2000). We detected a slight long-term negative trend in ice conditions, superimposed on high inter-annual variability in seasonal aggregate ice conditions. Based on reconstructed ice conditions, the seasonally cumulative number of significant or severe ice days correlated linearly with mean air temperature from January until March. Further, air temperature at Izembek Lagoon was correlated with wind direction, suggesting that ice conditions in Izembek Lagoon were associated with synoptic-scale weather patterns. Methods employed in this analysis may be transferable to other coastal locations in the Arctic.

  8. Environmental quality of transitional waters: the lagoon of Venice case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, C; Gottardo, S; Critto, A; Chiarato, S; Marcomini, A

    2011-01-01

    The health status of European aquatic environments, including transitional waters such as coastal lagoons, is regulated by the Water Framework Directive (WFD), which requires the classification of the water bodies' environmental quality and the achievement of a good ecological status by 2015. In the Venice lagoon, a transitional water body located in the northeastern part of Italy, the achievement of a good ecological status is hampered by several anthropogenic and natural pressures, such as sediment and water chemical contamination, and sediment erosion. In order to evaluate the lagoon's environmental quality according to the WFD (i.e. 5 quality classes, from High to Bad), an integrated Weight-of-Evidence methodology was developed and applied to classify the quality of the lagoon water bodies, integrating biological, physico-chemical, chemical, ecotoxicological, and hydromorphological data (i.e. Lines of Evidence, LOE). The quality assessment was carried out in two lagoon habitat typologies (previously defined on the basis of morphological, sediment, and hydrodynamic characteristics) which were selected taking into account the ecological gradient from sea to land, and the differences in anthropogenic pressure and contamination levels. The LOE classification was carried out by using indicators scored by comparing site specific conditions to reference conditions measured in lagoon reference sites, or provided by local, national or European regulations (e.g. Environmental Quality Standards, EQS, for chemicals). Finally, the overall quality status for each water body was calculated by a probabilistic approach, i.e. by reporting the final result as the frequency distribution of quality classes. The developed procedure was applied by using data and information concerning selected LOE and collected from monitoring programs and research studies carried out in the last 15 years in the lagoon of Venice. A set of sampling stations characterized by spatially and temporally

  9. CISOCUR - Hydrodynamic circulation in the Curonian Lagoon inferred through stable isotope measurements and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Razinkovas-Baziukas, Arturas; Barisevičiūtė, Ruta; Baziukė, Dalia; Ertürk, Ali; Gasiūnaitė, Jovita; Gulbinskas, Saulius; Lubienė, Irma; Maračkinaite, Jurgita; Petkuvienė, Jolita; Pilkaitytė, Renata; Ruginis, Tomas; Zemlys, Petras; Žilius, Mindaugas

    2013-04-01

    The spatial pattern of the hydrodynamic circulation of the Curonian lagoon, the largest European coastal lagoon, is still little understood. In absence of automatic current registration data all the existing models relied mostly on such data as water levels leaving high level of uncertainty. Here we present CISOCUR, a new project financed by the European Social Fund under the Global Grant measure. The project applies a new methodology that uses the carbon stable isotope (SI) ratio of C12 and C13 that characterize different water sources entering the lagoon and may be altered by internal kinetic processes. Through the tracing of these isotope ratios different water masses can be identified. This gives the possibility to validate several hypotheses of water circulation and validate hydrodynamic models. In particular it will be possible to 1) trace water masses entering the lagoon through the Nemunas and the Klaipeda strait; 2) test the hypothesis of sediment transport mechanisms inside the lagoon; 3) evaluate the importance of physical forcing on the lagoon circulation. The use of a hydrodynamic finite element model, coupled with the SI method, will allow for a realistic description of the transport processes inside the Curonian lagoon. So the main research goal is to apply the stable isotope tracers and a finite element model to determine the circulation patterns in the Curonian lagoon. Overall, the project will develop according to 4 main phases: 1) A pilot study to measure the isotope composition of different carbon compounds (dissolved and suspended) in different water bodies that feed water into the central lagoon. Through this pilot study the optimal study sites for the seasonal campaign will be identified as well. 2) Seasonal field campaigns in the monitoring stations identified in phase 1 to measure the carbon isotope ratio. 3) Development of a model that describes the kinetics of carbon isotopes and its transformation. 4) Application of a hydrodynamic model

  10. Analysis of Lagoonal Ecosystems in the Po River Delta Associated with Intensive Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Sorokin, P. Yu.; Ravagnan, G.

    1999-03-01

    Observations on structure and functioning of coastal lagoon ecosystems experiencing a high level of eutrophication impact were accomplished in three lagoons of Ca'Pisani integrated within an experimental aquaculture enterprise variously fertilized by waste effluents discharged from and intensive fish culture plant. During August and early September an extremely dense bloom of dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarensewas recorded in these lagoons with the density of phytoplankton up to 190 g m -3of wet biomass, and primary production 2 to 6 mg Cl -1 day -1. The diel dissolved oxygen fluctuations in water column during the bloom reached 15-20 mg O 2 l -1. The wet biomass of bacterioplankton in the lagoons attained 5-9 g m -3. The microzooplankton was dominated by ciliates with biomass 1 to 19 g m -3. The daytime mesozooplankton was dominated by calanoid copepods with a biomass 0·05-0·25 g m -3, while the biomass of the demersal zooplankton at night attained 2 to 14 g m -3. In the lagoon of Ocaro, the phototrophic plankton was dominated by the symbiotic ciliate Mesodinium.The labile sulphides content in the upper layer of the bottom attained over 1 g S dm -3of wet silt. The rate of microbial sulphate reduction was 5-10 mg S dm -3day -1. The data are generalized within the energy balance in these specific anthropogenically transformed pelagic communities.

  11. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of a Late Quaternary lagoon system in southern Brazil (Jaguaruna region, Santa Catarina state) based on multi-proxy analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, P. G. C.; Giannini, P. C. F.; Sylvestre, Florence; Pessenda, L. C. R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a paleoenvironmental reconstruction of a Late Quaternary lagoon system in the Jaguaruna region of Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. Integrated results of bulk sedimentary organic matter characterization (delta C-13, delta N-15 and C/N), microfossil (pollen and diatom) and grain-size analysis from three shallow cores (similar to 2.5m depth) allowed us to propose an evolving paleogeographic scenario in this coastal region for the last ca. 5500 cal a BP. The lagoonal sys...

  12. Study of the subterranean estuary of Venice lagoon using radium and radon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattacceca, J.

    2009-02-01

    This study focuses on hydrological processes in the southern part of Venice lagoon (Italy), and more specifically on the interactions between surface waters and groundwater of superficial coastal aquifers. These aquifers present a hydraulic head and a ground level below sea level. Major elements and stable isotopes were used to characterize mixing processes into the superficial aquifer. Our results, in agreement with hydrodynamic modelling, evidenced the restriction of saline intrusion to a narrow coastal fringe (≤ 1 km). Submarine groundwater discharge fluxes into the lagoon were quantified using radium and radon natural isotopes. Their activities in the lagoon are in excess compared to the sea. Our results and preliminary modelling work evidence that the system requires an input from groundwater enriched in these isotopes to explain measured activities. A mass balance at steady state is used to quantify the flux. Results vary between 8.1*10 5 and 1.5*10 7 m 3 .d -1 . This flux is mainly due to recirculation of lagoon water into the sediments, and is 2 to 10 times higher than surface runoff, and may have significant environmental consequences by releasing contaminants. (author)

  13. Groundwater Discharge into Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and/or Lagoons (ICOLLs) via Radon-222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Noori, M.; Santos, I. R.; Tait, D. R.; McMahon, A.; Kadel, S.; Maher, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and Lagoons (ICOLLs) are brackish coastal water bodies with an intermittent connection to the ocean that is closed periodically due to the accumulation of marine sediment forming an entrance berm. ICOLLs have dynamic coastal systems that may be vulnerable to minor changes in catchment hydrology. However, little is known regarding the impacts of groundwater on the hydrological cycles of ICOLLs. The relative contribution of rainfall versus groundwater discharge in two ICOLLs (Welsby, and Mermaid Lagoon) and a nearby wetland (South Welsby Lagoon) located on Bribie Island (Australia) were investigated using radon (222Rn) as natural geochemical groundwater tracer. Four seasonal surveys were undertaken to quantify the temporal and spatial groundwater dynamics of the ICOLLs. Radon contour maps revealed temporal and spatial changes over the study period. The estimated groundwater discharge rates from a radon-mass balance were 3.4±3.1, 7.3±9.8 and 2.6±3.8 cm d-1 in Weslby, South Weslby and Mermaid Lagoons, respectively. These values are at least 8-fold greater than rainfall (1420 mm per year, or 0.4 cm d-1). Assuming very minor surface water flows (not perceived during field surveys), this demonstrates that these systems are groundwater-dominated and their hydrology can be influenced by regional changes in groundwater level.

  14. Seasonal phytoplankton response to increased temperature and phosphorus inputs in a freshwater coastal lagoon, Southern Brazil: a microcosm bioassay Resposta sazonal do fitoplâncton ao aumento de temperatura e aporte de fósforo em uma lagoa costeira de água doce no sul do Brasil: um bioensaio em microcosmo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Coutinho Hennemann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: the present study aimed at assessing the response of phytoplankton biomass (as chlorophyll-a to simulated conditions of increased water temperature and phosphorus (P inputs in Peri lagoon, a subtropical coastal lagoon dominated by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii most of the year; METHODS: microcosm experiments were conducted in thermostatic light chambers during 3 and 7 days in austral summer, autumn and winter 2009. Control temperatures were tested against 3 and 5 °C rises in water temperature in each season. In each temperature treatment, three P concentrations were tested: control (non-enriched, ~1.5 μg.L-1 PO4(3+ and enrichments of four (+6 μg.L-1 PO4(3+ and eight (+12 μg.L-1 PO4(3+ times natural concentrations; RESULTS: the results showed that P enrichments alone did not increase chlorophyll-a concentrations, but temperature increases significantly elevated phytoplankton biomass in autumn and winter microcosms. Water temperature increases were followed by significant elevations in the oxygen saturation levels in all microcosms and seasons. The combined effect of increased temperature and P enrichments resulted in the highest chlorophyll-a levels also in autumn and winter. Summer microcosms seem to have been negatively affected by the experimental conditions (too high water temperatures; CONCLUSIONS: the bioassays showed that global temperature rises can significantly elevate the phytoplankton biomass in Peri coastal lagoon, especially in colder months and if followed by increased P inputs, what can lead to major ecological consequences to the water body and to water supply issues in the region.OBJETIVOS: o presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a resposta da biomassa fitoplanctônica (como clorofila-a a condições simuladas de aumento da temperatura da água e do aporte de fósforo (P na lagoa do Peri, uma lagoa subtropical costeira dominada por Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii; MÉTODOS: experimentos em microcosmo foram

  15. Australian Government Information Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Provides an overview of Australian Government information resources. Features content from Australian Government agency websites such as the Department of Environment and Energy, Department of Defence, Australian National Maritime Museum, ANZAC Memorial in Sydney, Department of Immigration & Border Protection, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Dept. of Agriculture and Water Resources, Australian Parliament, Australian Treasury, Australian Transport Safety Board, and Australian Parl...

  16. Copper, Cadmium and Lead in superficial sediment, water and the fish Cyprinodon Dearborni, in two Lagoons of Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, J.; Lemus, M.; Chung, K. S

    2000-01-01

    The concentration of copper, cadmium and lead in superficial sediment, water and the fish Cyprenodon dearborni was determined in two coastal lagoons of Sucre State, Venezuela. Chacopata lagoon is hyper saline while Los Patos Lagoon is hypo saline and receives significant waste water from Cumana city. Water, sediment and fish samples were collected in Frebruary 1998. In the laboratory, samples underwent acid digestion and were analysed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean values of the metals in C dearborni from the Chacopata lagoon were: 159.26± 210.68 μg/g for Cu, 44.71±45.58 μg/g for Cd, and 9.31±23.34 μg/g for Pb, while for Los Patos lagoon the mean values were: 64.88±16.30, 19.48± 5.81 and 22.85±20.00, respectively. In the water column, the metal concentration ranges were: 2.3-11.6, 3.9-5.4 and 21-32 mg/l for cooper, cadmium and lead, respectively. These results suggest that metal levels in sediment, water column and organisms in both lagoons do not differ, except for lead, even though only Los Patos receives waste water. (Author) [es

  17. Biodiversity patterns of macrophyte and macroinvertebrate communities in two lagoons of Western Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyttis, G.; Reizopoulou, S.; Papastergiadou, E.

    2012-04-01

    Aquatic macrophytes and benthic macroinvertebrates were studied seasonally (Spring, Autumn, Summer) between the years 2009 - 2011 in two coastal lagoons (Kotychi and Prokopos) located in Peloponnese, Greece, in order to investigate spatial and temporal biodiversity trends related to hydrological processes (degree of confinement, nitrates, phosphates, chl-a, total suspended materials, light irradiance, pH, salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen). Kotychi lagoon presents a better communication with the sea, while Prokopos has a high degree of confinement. Both ecosystems seasonally receive freshwater input from streams. The submerged aquatic macrophytes constituted a major component of the ecosystems studied. In total, 22 taxa of aquatic macrophytes (angiosperms and macroalgae), 16 taxa for Kotychi (2 Rhodophyta, 8 Chlorophyta, 5 Magnoliophyta, 1 Streptophyta) and 14 taxa for Prokopos (1 Rhodophyta, 5 Chlorophyta, 5 Magnoliophyta, 3 Streptophyta) were found. Ruppia cirrhosa, and Potamogeton pectinatus were dominant in both lagoons. Kotychi lagoon was also dominated by Zostera noltii and Prokopos by Zannichellia pallustris ssp. pedicellata, while the biomass of aquatic species peaked during the summer periods, in both lagoons. The total number of macroinvertebrates found in the lagoons was 28 taxa for Kotychi and 19 for Prokopos. Chironomidae were dominant in both lagoons, while Kotychi was also dominated by Lekanesphaera monodi and Monocorophium insidiosum, and Prokopos by Ostracoda and Lekanesphaera monodi. Benthic diversity ranged from 1.33 to 2.57 in Kotychi and from 0.67 to 2.48 in Prokopos. Species richness, diversity, and abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates were strongly related to aquatic vegetation and to the degree of communication with the marine environment. Moreover, species richness and abundance of both macrophytes and macroinvertebrates were mainly dependent on depth, temperature, pH and concentration of total suspended materials (TSM). Results

  18. Mud deposit formation on the open coast of the larger Patos Lagoon-Cassino Beach system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzon, S. B.; Winterwerp, J. C.; Nogueira, R.; de Boer, G. J.

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes an explanation of the mud deposits on the inner Shelf of Cassino Beach, South Brazil, by using computational modeling. These mud deposits are mainly formed by sediments delivered from Patos Lagoon, a coastal lagoon connected to the Shelf, next to Cassino Beach. The deposits are characterized by (soft) mud layers of about 1 m thick and are found between the -5 and -20 isobaths. Two hydrodynamic models of the larger Patos Lagoon-Cassino Beach system were calibrated against water elevation measured for a 5 months period, and against currents and salinity measured for a week period. The circulation patterns and water exchange through the mouth were analyzed as a function of local and remote wind effects, and river discharges. The remote wind effect mainly governs the quantity of water exchange with the Lagoon through its effect on mean sea level as a result of Ekman dynamics, while river discharges are important for the salinity of the exchanged water masses. Local winds augment the export-import rates by set-up and set-down within the Lagoon, but their effects are much smaller than those of the remote wind. Currents patterns on the inner Shelf during water outflow revealed a recirculation zone south of the Lagoon, induced by the local geometry and bathymetry of the system. This recirculation zone coincides with observed locations of mud deposition. Water, hence suspended sediment export occurs when remote and local winds are from the N-E, which explains why fine sediment deposits are mainly found south of the Lagoon's breakwater. A sensitivity analysis with the numerical model quantified the contribution of the various mechanisms driving the transport and fate of the fine suspended sediments, i.e. the effects of remote and local wind, of the astronomical tide, of river discharge and fresh-salt water-induced density currents, and of earth rotation. It is concluded that gravitational circulation and earth rotation affects the further dispersion of

  19. Venice, the city and the lagoon: a lost relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Pedrocco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2011, the Venetians Engineers organized a conference entitled: The Eighth district. The Laguna as a connection matrix. In a world where the concept of “city”, which has become improper, applies to so-called historical centers that increasingly large conurbations, much of the Laguna is peripheral space, where inedited stories and resonant events living with full-blown environmental degradation and decay culture, make it a place of margin. Today, the lagoon and coastal areas are a continuous with the water spaces and islands that separate them, facing with unfinished waterfront towards brackish non-places. In this context, the debates and choices around the Laguna alternate without a unified design. Venice is always less connected with the surroundings by water, and the water itself become a limit to mobility, where, on the contrary, it was the element that guaranteed it.In the renewed debate on development strategies, realized the MOSE, it will be asked for which city it has been made. The conference drew attention to the rediscovery of the central role of the Lagoon. Between local development and global challenges, including heritage and environmental protection. Is it possible to envisage a revitalization of the lagoon system as a matrix of physical and cultural connection? Which opportunities are offered today to the city of Venice to rediscover its amphibious and cosmopolitan size and discover the Laguna as an Eighth District? A place of sites for residence, recreation, work, in a renovated urban dimension across the board, opened towards the spaces of the islands.

  20. The impact of fire on sand dune stability: Surface coverage and biomass recovery after fires on Western Australian coastal dune systems from 1988 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumack, Samuel; Hesse, Paul; Turner, Liam

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to determine the common response of coastal sand dunes in Western Australia (WA) to fire on decadal time-scales, in terms of ecological-geomorphic-climatic interactions to test the hypothesis that fire plays a role in coastal dune destabilisation. Fires are commonly suggested to have contributed to widespread dune reactivation in Australia and globally, a hypothesis that is relatively untested. We used data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper, Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, and Operational Land Imager missions to monitor changes in surface coverage on coastal sand dunes in south-west WA after fires. We analysed 31 fire scars from 1988 to 2016 in two Landsat scenes on the west and south coast of WA. Recovery ratios derived from the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were used to monitor patterns in post-fire biomass and surface cover. Recovery ratios are correlated with indices of burn severity, and meteorological data to investigate relationships. We also used Maximum Likelihood Classification to monitor changes in bare sand area. Results suggest that recovery followed a strongly consistent pattern, and is characterised by rapid vegetation cover re-establishment within six to twelve months. Prior to this, some aeolian activity may have occurred but without substantial surface changes. Initial germination and/or resprouting were followed by steady growth up to seven years, where NDVI typically neared pre-fire values. Some variation in early recovery occurred between the west and south coast, possibly owing to relative proportions of reseeding and resprouting plants. A log regression explained 75% of the recovery pattern (79% on the south coast). Precipitation had some ability to explain recovery up to nine months post-fire (r2 = 0.29 to 0.54). No relationships were observed between estimates of burn severity and recovery. After nine months, the biggest cause of spatial variation in recovery was the pre-fire community composition and related

  1. State-of-the-lagoon reports as vehicles of cross-disciplinary integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaucha, Jacek; Davoudi, Simin; Slob, Adriaan; Bouma, Geiske; van Meerkerk, Ingmar; Oen, Amy Mp; Breedveld, Gijs D

    2016-10-01

    An integrative approach across disciplines is needed for sustainable lagoon and estuary management as identified by integrated coastal zone management. The ARCH research project (Architecture and roadmap to manage multiple pressures on lagoons) has taken initial steps to overcome the boundaries between disciplines and focus on cross-disciplinary integration by addressing the driving forces, challenges, and problems at various case study sites. A model was developed as a boundary-spanning activity to produce joint knowledge and understanding. The backbone of the model is formed by the interaction between the natural and human systems, including economy and governance-based subsystems. The model was used to create state-of-the-lagoon reports for 10 case study sites (lagoons and estuarine coastal areas), with a geographical distribution covering all major seas surrounding Europe. The reports functioned as boundary objects to build joint knowledge. The experiences related to the framing of the model and its subsequent implementation at the case study sites have resulted in key recommendations on how to address the challenges of cross-disciplinary work required for the proper management of complex social-ecological systems such as lagoons, estuarine areas, and other land-sea regions. Cross-disciplinary integration is initially resource intensive and time consuming; one should set aside the required resources and invest efforts at the forefront. It is crucial to create engagement among the group of researchers by focusing on a joint, appealing overall concept that will stimulate cross-sectoral thinking and focusing on the identified problems as a link between collected evidence and future management needs. Different methods for collecting evidence should be applied including both quantitative (jointly agreed indicators) and qualitative (narratives) information. Cross-disciplinary integration is facilitated by functional boundary objects. Integration offers important

  2. Bacterioplankton diversity and community composition in the Southern Lagoon of Venice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonato, Francesca; Gómez-Pereira, Paola R; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf

    2010-04-01

    The Lagoon of Venice is a large water basin that exchanges water with the Northern Adriatic Sea through three large inlets. In this study, the 16S rRNA approach was used to investigate the bacterial diversity and community composition within the southern basin of the Lagoon of Venice and at one inlet in October 2007 and June 2008. Comparative sequence analysis of 645 mostly partial 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated high diversity and dominance of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes at the lagoon as well as at the inlet station, therefore pointing to significant mixing. Many of these sequences were close to the 16S rRNA of marine, often coastal, bacterioplankton, such as the Roseobacter clade, the family Vibrionaceae, and class Flavobacteria. Sequences of Actinobacteria were indicators of a freshwater input. The composition of the bacterioplankton was quantified by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) with a set of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. CARD-FISH counts corroborated the dominance of members of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. When assessed by a probe set for the quantification of selected clades within Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, bacterioplankton composition differed between October 2007 and June 2008, and also between the inlet and the lagoon. In particular, members of the readily culturable copiotrophic gammaproteobacterial genera Vibrio, Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas were enriched in the southern basin of the Lagoon of Venice. Interestingly, the alphaproteobacterial SAR11 clade and related clusters were also present in high abundances at the inlet and within the lagoon, which was indicative of inflow of water from the open sea.

  3. Chasing boundaries and cascade effects in a coupled barrier-marsh-lagoon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Trueba, Jorge; Mariotti, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    The long-term dynamic evolution of an idealized barrier-marsh-lagoon system experiencing sea-level rise is studied by coupling two existing numerical models. The barrier model accounts for the interaction between shoreface dynamics and overwash flux, which allows the occurrence of barrier drowning. The marsh-lagoon model includes both a backbarrier marsh and an interior marsh, and accounts for the modification of the wave regime associated with changes in lagoon width and depth. Overwash, the key process that connects the barrier shoreface with the marsh-lagoon ecosystems, is formulated to account for the role of the backbarrier marsh. Model results show that a number of factors that are not typically associated with the dynamics of coastal barriers can enhance the rate of overwash-driven landward migration by increasing backbarrier accommodation space. For instance, lagoon deepening could be triggered by marsh edge retreat and consequent export of fine sediment via tidal dispersion, as well as by an expansion of inland marshes and consequent increase in accommodation space to be filled in with sediment. A deeper lagoon results in a larger fraction of sediment overwash being subaqueous, which coupled with a slow shoreface response sending sediment onshore can trigger barrier drowning. We therefore conclude that the supply of fine sediments to the back-barrier and the dynamics of both the interior and backbarrier marsh can be essential for maintaining the barrier system under elevated rates of sea-level rise. Our results highlight the importance of considering barriers and their associated backbarriers as part of an integrated system in which sediment is exchanged.

  4. EPA GOMEX Wild Goose Lagoon 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We compared nekton use of prominent habitat types within a lagoonal system of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). These habitat types were defined by combinations...

  5. Ecological assessment of a coastal shallow lagoon in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    insects such as stonefly and mayfly nymphs. These organisms form a major link in the food chain as most estuarine and marine fishes, birds and mammals depend directly or indirectly on the benthos for their food supply (Barnes and Hughes, 1988). Benthic macro-invertebrates can be used as indicators of water quality.

  6. Macroinvertebrates communities of a coastal lagoon in southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The macroinvertebrate, assemblage investigated were collected in eight seasonal samplings from July 2007 through June 2009. A total of 4,179 individual macroinvertebrates were gathered, comprising 182 taxa belonging to 25 orders and 114 families. The most predominant groups were Molluscs and Crustacean which ...

  7. Transportation of natural radionuclides and rare earth light elements in the lagoon system of Buena, RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, Dejanira da Costa

    1999-03-01

    it was investigated the transport of the series natural radionuclides and the earth rare light elements in a coastal lagoon system, located in a monazite rich region, in the coast north region of Rio de Janeiro state. The lagoon water showed off abnormal concentrations of radium isotopes and of the earth rare light elements (ERLEs). The longitudinal gradient of the Ra, of the ERLEs and of the major ion concentration's, whose data were obtained during two and half years of the research at the place, and the statistical analysis pointed to two mainly source as responsible for the water lagoon composition - the marine and the underground waters. The underground water supplies the radionuclides and ERLEs, possibly originated by monazite lixiviation. Based on the water speciation modeling, the results of laboratory adsorption on sediment experiments and the sediment characterization, the behavior of the radio isotopes, the ERLEs, U, Th e Pb-210, along of the lagoon, are discussed. It is also discussed the role of the aquatic macrophyte Typha dominguesis Pers in the nuclide uptake and the following liberation. (author)

  8. Sedimentation rate and lateral migration of tidal channels in the Lagoon of Venice (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnici, Sandra; Madricardo, Fantina; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana

    2017-11-01

    Tidal channels are crucial for the functioning of highly valuable coastal environments, such as estuaries and lagoons. Their properties, however, are currently less understood than those of river systems. To elucidate their past behaviour, an extensive geophysical investigation was performed to reconstruct the evolution of channels and tidal surfaces in the central part of the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) over the past 5000 years. Comparing high-spatial-resolution acoustic data and sedimentary facies analyses of 41 cores, 29 of which were radiocarbon dated, revealed the sedimentation rates in different lagoonal environments and allowed the migration of two large meanders to be reconstructed. The average sedimentation rate of the study succession in the different sedimentary environments was 1.27 mm yr-1. The lateral migration rates were 13-23 m/century. This estimate is consistent with the lateral migration rates determined by comparing aerial photographs of recent channels. Comparing the buried channels with historical and current maps showed that, in general, the number of active channels is now reduced. Their morphology was sometimes simplified by artificial interventions. An understanding of the impact of the artificial interventions over time is useful for the management and conservation of tidal environments, particularly for the Lagoon of Venice, where management authorities are currently debating the possible deepening and rectification of large navigation channels.

  9. Transcriptomic resources for environmental risk assessment: a case study in the Venice lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milan, M.; Pauletto, M.; Boffo, L.; Carrer, C.; Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Pavan, L.; Patarnello, T.; Bargelloni, L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new resources to evaluate the environmental status is becoming increasingly important representing a key challenge for ocean and coastal management. Recently, the employment of transcriptomics in aquatic toxicology has led to increasing initiatives proposing to integrate eco-toxicogenomics in the evaluation of marine ecosystem health. However, several technical issues need to be addressed before introducing genomics as a reliable tool in regulatory ecotoxicology. The Venice lagoon constitutes an excellent case, in which the assessment of environmental risks derived from the nearby industrial activities represents a crucial task. In this context, the potential role of genomics to assist environmental monitoring was investigated through the definition of reliable gene expression markers associated to chemical contamination in Manila clams, and their subsequent employment for the classification of Venice lagoon areas. Overall, the present study addresses key issues to evaluate the future outlooks of genomics in the environmental monitoring and risk assessment. - Highlights: • Growing need to develop new resources for the evaluation of the environmental status. • Identification of gene expression markers associated to chemical contamination. • Employment of genomics to evaluate the environmental status of Venice lagoon areas. • Hurdles and future outlooks of genomic tools in environmental risk assessment. - Genomics in risk assessment of Venice lagoon

  10. Nitrogen enrichment and speciation in a coral reef lagoon driven by groundwater inputs of bird guano

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Ashly; Santos, Isaac R.

    2017-09-01

    While the influence of river inputs on coral reef biogeochemistry has been investigated, there is limited information on nutrient fluxes related to submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Here, we investigate whether significant saline groundwater-derived nutrient inputs from bird guano drive coral reef photosynthesis and calcification off Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia). We used multiple experimental approaches including groundwater sampling, beach face transects, and detailed time series observations to assess the dynamics and speciation of groundwater nutrients as they travel across the island and discharge into the coral reef lagoon. Nitrogen speciation shifted from nitrate-dominated groundwater (>90% of total dissolved nitrogen) to a coral reef lagoon dominated by dissolved organic nitrogen (DON; ˜86%). There was a minimum input of nitrate of 2.1 mmol m-2 d-1 into the lagoon from tidally driven submarine groundwater discharge estimated from a radon mass balance model. An independent approach based on the enrichment of dissolved nutrients during isolation at low tide implied nitrate fluxes of 5.4 mmol m-2 d-1. A correlation was observed between nitrate and daytime net ecosystem production and calcification. We suggest that groundwater nutrients derived from bird guano may offer a significant addition to oligotrophic coral reef lagoons and fuel ecosystem productivity and the coastal carbon cycle near Heron Island. The large input of groundwater nutrients in Heron Island may serve as a natural ecological analogue to other coral reefs subject to large nutrient inputs from anthropogenic sources.

  11. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Diego Garcia Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    relative humidity, rainfall rate (m/s), evapotranspiration rate (m/s), net solar shortwave radiation (J/m2/s), cloud cover, wind speed (m/s), and...salinity and water temperature, wind velocity, precipitation, and solar radiation , as well as lagoon bathymetry. Most of the necessary data were available...water temperature, wind velocity, precipitation, solar radiation , and lagoon bathymetry. Most of the necessary data were available though the field

  12. Seasonal succession of cyanoprokaryotes in a hypereutrophic oligo-mesohaline lagoon from the South of France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomérat, Nicolas; Garnier, Robert; Bertrand, Céline; Cazaubon, Arlette

    2007-05-01

    The Bolmon lagoon (South of France) is an oligo-mesohaline coastal lagoon that has undergone intense eutrophication in the past decades, resulting from a strong concentration of human activities in its drainage basin. Consequently, it exhibits some characteristics typical of an advanced trophic state; namely, the disappearance of submerged vegetation, the permanently intense phytoplankton growth and the recurrence of cyanoprokaryote blooms. As cyanoprokaryote dominance in south-temperate saline lagoons is little reported, we carried out this study in order to understand the seasonal variations in the phytoplankton composition and biomass, and to analyse the influence of environmental parameters such as salinity, nutrients and climate on the seasonal succession of species. In this lagoon, the phytoplankton was permanently dominated by cyanoprokaryotes, probably because of high availability of nutrients, low light penetration in the water column and frequent turbulent mixing induced by wind. The two most abundant species Planktothrix agardhii (in winter-spring) and Pseudanabaena limnetica (in summer) have low light requirements and are well adapted to a high mixing frequency, which defines the S1 functional group in Reynolds' typology for phytoplankton. Although widely studied in north-temperate lakes, blooms of these typically freshwater species are almost unreported in the Mediterranean area, especially in brackish ecosystems that are not their normal habitat. In the Bolmon lagoon, all their requirements for nutrients, light and mixing are satisfied and they seem to cope with a moderate presence of salt but P. agardhii was less competitive than P. limnetica at highest salinities, the latter being probably more halophytic. Contrary to the observations in lakes located at higher latitudes, the Mediterranean climate seems to induce a typical seasonal pattern of succession characterised by the dominance of P. agardhii (winter) - Chroococcales (spring

  13. Support mechanisms for oil spill accident response in costal lagoon areas (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eduardo R.; Silveira, Bruno; Alves, Fátima L.

    2014-10-01

    Oil spill accidents can be caused by several risk factors associated to maritime transport and port activities, which cannot always be predicted or controlled. Therefore, it is essential to support prevention and contingency plans, whose effectiveness is crucial to produce adequate responses and minimize resulting impacts. Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) is a wide coastal lagoon, within a densely populated area, representing a concentration of important biodiversity resources and several economic activities. This paper presents alternative methodologies to support the optimization of civil protection assets in the occurrence of oil spill events and the results of their application on a section area of the Aveiro Lagoon, using an established geographic information system database containing crucial data. The presented methodologies are based on the Environmental Sensitivity Index developed by the North American National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (USA) and the Global Vulnerability Index which were applied on the Bay of Biscay (Spain). However, during the development of this work, neither of these methodologies was considered to entirely assess the study area in its full extent, which led to the need to adapt and define a bespoke approach. The introduced changes include extra categories in shoreline classification, an adapted physical vulnerability index for coastal lagoons, differentiated aspects for highly protected status areas, qualitative assessment of socioeconomic features and an access and operability index created to support emergency operation response. The resulting maps are the subject of analysis, in which considerations regarding control and cleanup methods are introduced, together with guidelines for further integration in local risk management strategies.

  14. Storms do not alter long-term watershed development influences on coastal water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yushun; Cebrian, Just; Lehrter, John; Christiaen, Bart; Stutes, Jason; Goff, Josh

    2017-09-15

    A twelve year (2000-2011) study of three coastal lagoons in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted to assess the impacts of local watershed development and tropical storms on water quality. The lagoons have similar physical and hydrological characteristics, but differ substantially in the degree of watershed urban development and nutrient loading rates. In total the lagoons experienced 22 storm events during the period studied. Specifically, we examine (1) whether there are influences on water quality in the lagoons from watershed development, (2) whether there are influences on water quality in the lagoons from storm activity, and (3) whether water quality is affected to a greater degree by watershed development versus storm activity. The two urbanized lagoons typically showed higher water-column nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, and phosphate compared with the non-urbanized lagoon. One of the urbanized lagoons had higher water-column chlorophyll a concentrations than the other two lagoons on most sampling dates, and higher light extinction coefficients on some sampling dates. The non-urbanized lagoon had higher water-column dissolved oxygen concentrations than other lagoons on many sampling dates. Our results suggest long-term influences of watershed development on coastal water quality. We also found some evidence of significant storm effects on water quality, such as increased nitrate, phosphate, and dissolved oxygen, and decreased salinity and water temperature. However, the influences of watershed development on water quality were greater. These results suggest that changes in water quality induced by human watershed development pervade despite the storm effects. These findings may be useful for environmental management since they suggest that storms do not profoundly alter long-term changes in water quality that resulted from human development of watersheds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of environmental variation on the bacterioplankton community and its loss to viral lysis in the Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulčius, Sigitas; Reunamo, Anna; Paškauskas, Ričardas; Leskinen, Piia

    2018-05-01

    Coastal lagoons are continuously exposed to strong environmental gradients that determine the distribution and trophic interactions of microbial communities. Therefore, in this study we assessed whether and how environmental changes influence the bacterial community and its vulnerability to viral infection and lysis along the major environmental gradient in the Curonian Lagoon. We found significant differences in bacterial community profiles, their richness and evenness between the riverine, freshwater southern part and the Baltic Sea water intrusion-influenced northern part of the lagoon, suggesting strong environmental control of the structure of bacterial communities. Viruses were found to be play an important role in bacterial mortality in the Curonian Lagoon, being responsible for the removal of 20-50% of the bacterial standing stock. We observed differences in virioplankton decay rates and virus burst sizes between the northern and southern parts of the lagoon. However, no relationships were found between viral activity and bacterial communities within the lagoon ecosystem. The frequency of infected cells and virus-mediated bacterial mortality (VMBM) remained constant among the sampling sites irrespective of differences in bacteria community assemblages and environmental conditions. The results indicate that factors determining changes in bacterial diversity are different from the factors limiting their vulnerability to viral infection and lysis. This study also suggests that under changing environmental conditions, virus-bacteria interactions are more stable than the interacting viral and bacterial communities themselves. These findings are important for understanding the functioning of the coastal ecosystems under the rapidly changing local (spatial and temporal) and global (e.g. eutrophication, climate change) conditions.

  16. The dynamics of coastal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Clifford J.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal basins are defined as estuaries, lagoons, and embayments. This book deals with the science of coastal basins using simple models, many of which are presented in either analytical form or Microsoft Excel or MATLAB. The book introduces simple hydrodynamics and its applications, from the use of simple box and one-dimensional models to flow over coral reefs. The book also emphasizes models as a scientific tool in our understanding of coasts, and introduces the value of the most modern flexible mesh combined wave-current models. Examples from shallow basins around the world illustrate the wonders of the scientific method and the power of simple dynamics. This book is ideal for use as an advanced textbook for graduate students and as an introduction to the topic for researchers, especially those from other fields of science needing a basic understanding of the basic ideas of the dynamics of coastal basins.

  17. The use of aquatic environments for Scientific Education purposes: the case of the Imboassica Lagoon, Macaé, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laísa Maria Freire dos Santos

    Full Text Available AIM: The present work aims to discuss the potential use of aquatic environments for teaching purposes, taking the Imboassica Lagoon and its environmental problems as an example. METHODS: A case study method including a literature review focused on Limnology and Science Education fields (SE. The case study was developed by describing and evaluating activities performed in the Imboassica Lagoon, considering contemporary SE approaches. MAJOR RESULTS: We featured environmental problems in the Imboassica Lagoon and discussed questions related to facing the problems and the construction of educational processes that generate concepts able to change reality. The activities performed in the Imboassica Lagoon provided the opportunity to set a discussion among teachers and students about different themes related to coastal lagoons' ecology based on a politicized SE viewpoint. Among some of the key aspects related to the practices performed, we could identify: the partnership between universities and schools; the contribution to develop individuals aware of citizen senses, integrating aspects of science, technology and society in field activities. The following limits were identified: the need to develop an integrated action with the school curriculum and the need to develop a plan of action with the active participation of elementary school teachers. CONCLUSIONS: The current study presented challenges for the limnologists, in order to reflect upon the social implications of their research practice seeking interaction with other sectors of society and other knowledge fields, to enhance the horizons of scientific education.

  18. Harmful algae records in Venice lagoon and in Po River Delta (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Chiara; Bilaničovà, Dagmar; Pojana, Giulio; Sfriso, Adriano; Marcomini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in northern Adriatic Sea lagoons (Po River Delta and Venice lagoon) is presented to provide "updated reference conditions" for future research and monitoring activities. In the study areas, the high mollusc production requires the necessity to identify better methods able to prevent risks for human health and socioeconomical interests. So, an integrated approach for the identification and quantification of algal toxins is presented by combining microscopy techniques with Liquid Chromatography coupled with High Resolution Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-HR-TOF-MS). The method efficiency was first tested on some samples from the mentioned coastal areas, where Dinophysis spp. occurred during summer in the sites directly affected by seawaters. Although cell abundance was always <200 cells/L, the presence of Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2), detected by HPLC-HR-TOF-MS, indicated the potential release of detectable amounts of toxins even at low cell abundance.

  19. Transcriptomic resources for environmental risk assessment: a case study in the Venice lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, M; Pauletto, M; Boffo, L; Carrer, C; Sorrentino, F; Ferrari, G; Pavan, L; Patarnello, T; Bargelloni, L

    2015-02-01

    The development of new resources to evaluate the environmental status is becoming increasingly important representing a key challenge for ocean and coastal management. Recently, the employment of transcriptomics in aquatic toxicology has led to increasing initiatives proposing to integrate eco-toxicogenomics in the evaluation of marine ecosystem health. However, several technical issues need to be addressed before introducing genomics as a reliable tool in regulatory ecotoxicology. The Venice lagoon constitutes an excellent case, in which the assessment of environmental risks derived from the nearby industrial activities represents a crucial task. In this context, the potential role of genomics to assist environmental monitoring was investigated through the definition of reliable gene expression markers associated to chemical contamination in Manila clams, and their subsequent employment for the classification of Venice lagoon areas. Overall, the present study addresses key issues to evaluate the future outlooks of genomics in the environmental monitoring and risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The distribution of micro zooplankton in the lagoon environments; La distribuzione del microzooplancton negli ambienti lagunari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenni, P.; Creo, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the possible use of micro zooplankton as a biological indicator in aquatic environments. In particular, studies carried out in lagoon environments are reported, relatively to the Venice lagoon and the Pontine coastal lakes (Italy). New methodologies to assess the micro plankton component are developed and tested, particularly the concentration and count steps. The use of the same methodologies to assess nano plankton component, as biological indicator. are reported. [Italian] Nel presente lavoro viene analizzata la possibilita' di utilizzare il microzooplancton quale indicatore biologico negli ambienti acquatici (mmarini, acquadulcicoli, salmastri). In particolare, vengono riportati gli studi effettuati dall'ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) su tale componente in ambienti lagunari, con riferimento alla laguna di Venezia e alle lagune pontine.

  1. Assessment of sedimentation rate and hydrodynamics of Vembanad lagoon, Southern India, using isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Noble; Joseph, T.B.; Hari Kumar, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are natural ecosystems that contribute to flood mitigation, fish and wildlife habitat protection and natural retention of pollutants and nutrients. Despite the importance, wetlands all over the world are undergoing severe degradation in the recent years, because of pollution and human interventions. Hydrology and water quality are the important factors controlling the ecological processes of wetlands and their understanding is essential for the wetlands restoration and management. Vembanad Lagoon, a major component of the Vembanad wetland system, is one of the largest coastal ecosystems in the southwestern part of India. Currently, it is facing numerous problems such as water quality deterioration due to ingression of saltwater, heavy metal contamination, weed infestation etc. and sedimentation due to large scale reclamation, intensive agriculture practices together with deforestation in its catchments. Hence, an isotope investigation was carried out to assess the sedimentation rate, pollution levels in sediments and hydrodynamics of Vembanad Lagoon

  2. Nutrients fluxes from groundwater discharge into Mangueira Lagoon (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil); Fluxos de nutrientes associados as descargas de agua subterranea para a Lagoa Mangueira (Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Carlos F.F.; Niencheski, Luis F.H.; Attisano, Karina K.; Milani, Marcio R., E-mail: pgofcfa@furg.br [Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Campus Carreiros, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Santos, Isaac R. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Milani, Idel C. [Departamento de Engenharia Hidrica, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Porto, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This study assesses the importance of groundwater discharge to dissolved nutrient levels in Mangueira Lagoon. A transect of an irrigation canal in the margin of Lagoon demonstrated a strong geochemical gradient due to high groundwater inputs in this area. Using {sup 222}Rn as a quantitative groundwater tracer, we observed that the flux of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), silicate and phosphate (1178 and 1977; 26190 and 35652; 167 and 188 mol d{sup -1} for winter and summer, respectively) can continually supply/sustain primary production. The irrigation canals act as an artificial underground tributary and represent a new source of nutrients to coastal lagoons. (author)

  3. Punctuated sediment record resulting from channel migration in a shallow sand-dominated micro-tidal lagoon, Northern Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Facies analysis of five sediment cores and a detailed absolute chronology, consisting of 35 optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages, form the basis for reconstruction of the paleoenvironmental evolution of the coastal lagoon behind the barrier island of Fanø, in the Northern Wadden Sea, SW D...

  4. Punctuated sediment record resulting from channel migration in a shallow sand-dominated micro-tidal lagoon, Northern Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, M.; Andersen, T.J.; Nielsen, L.H.

    2011-01-01

    Facies analysis of five sediment cores and a detailed absolute chronology, consisting of 35 optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages, form the basis for reconstruction of the paleoenvironmental evolution of the coastal lagoon behind the barrier island of Fanø, in the Northern Wadden Sea, SW...

  5. Early chemical and ecotoxicological responses of the Varano lagoon (SE Italy) to a flood event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbrocini, Adele; Cassin, Daniele; Santucci, Angela; Scirocco, Tommaso; Specchiulli, Antonietta; D'Adamo, Raffaele

    2017-10-01

    The effects on coastal lagoons of floods resulting from intense rainfall need to be assessed using a multidisciplinary approach, able to describe in real time the occurrence of changes in sediment quality, anticipating risk situations. In the present study the effectiveness as pre-screening tool of the MOT-test, an innovative bioassay that uses sperm motility as endpoint, has been evaluated; its response has been compared with the sediment chemical characterization, in order to determine the effects of a flood event occurred in the Varano lagoon, a poorly anthropized Mediterranean coastal lagoon. The MOT-test effect percentages ranged from 10% to 30%, fully reflecting data from chemical analyses. Organic pollutants showed concentrations always below the critical levels. The highest metal values were found in the south-eastern area; however, only for few metals (mainly Cd), and in few sites, they reached the limits defined by the sediment quality guidelines; consistently, these sites are located in the area where a higher stressors' impact was expected and the highest MOT-test effect percentages were recorded. In conclusion, even if results exclude the occurrence of serious contamination events as a consequence of the flood, the runoff resulting from the intense rainfall event has caused a pollutant load in the lagoon, consistent with the localization of the main anthropogenic activities in the catchment area. Moreover, preliminary data indicate the validity of the approach adopted for the post-flood quality assessment, proving the usefulness of the MOT-test as early-screening tool in the case of extreme events. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Assessment of the pollution in Aghien lagoon and its tributaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Aghien lagoon, heavy metals, nutrients, organic matter, pollution, surface water. ... source hygiene. In Africa, especially in Côte d'Ivoire, lagoon environment is generally the outlet of pollution. Sewage treatment plants of urban lagoons have failed so that environment ...... contamination métallique des eaux de.

  7. Application of the activated sludge model to aerated lagoons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The different kinds of aerated lagoons, which exclude anaerobic pre-treatment ponds, are described and the design approach for aerated lagoons is explained. This hinges around ensuring that the 1st lagoon is suspension mixed and the second and any additional are facultative. Selection of the retention time for the 1st ...

  8. Coastal geomorphology of Mahe Island, Seychelles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wagle, B.G.; Hashimi, N.H.

    of landforms it is surmised that the coastal features are controlled by the regional structures and erosion is more common than the progradation, especially on the west coast. 1. Introduction Geological and geophysical surveys of the exclusive economic zone... the lagoons. Such reefs have broad platforms, some of which are without coral growth and are superficially covered by unconsolidated skeletal sediments. The reef margins are well defined and they are only occasionally broken by reef passes. The east coast...

  9. [Bacterial pollution of the lagoon of Tunis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadli, A; Capape, C

    1985-12-01

    The authors present in this paper a study about the bacterian pollution of the lagoon of Tunis based on 120 samples collected in 10 different stations. This study points out that the lagoon is polluted (50.8% of the samples) mostly in autumn and in winter. The pollution is exogenous, chiefly caused by the rain spreading over polluted waters of wastes and of rivers, and also by the action of the winds and of the currents on the sediments hosting microbiological parameters of faecal pollution.

  10. Environmental changes in the Moulay Bousselham lagoon (Morocco) during the last 7 000 years using a multiproxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourarah, Bendahhou; Maanan, Mohamed; Conceição Freitas, Maria; Leroy, Suzanne; Andrade, César; Cearreta, Alejandro; Cruces, Anabela

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research is to reconstruct Holocene environmental changes in Moulay Bousselham lagoon using a multi-proxy approach to the study of sediments of two short cores: biological (e.g., pollen, foraminifera and diatoms), physicochemical (isotopes, chemical composition) and sedimentary (grain size, clay minerals). The research highlights the role of climatic variations and human interference in the evolution of this lagoon. The results show that at the beginning of the Holocene this area corresponded to a wide coastal bay, including the surface of Moulay Bousselham present-day lagoon and Merja Ras Ed-Dora. The dating's obtained in the base of the sediment cores range from 6790-6640 BP (end of the Atlantic and early Sub-boreal). Sand predominates in this section of the cores, with low content of organic matter and high content of bioclasts. Ammonia tepida is the predominant species but Haynesina germânica, Quinqueloculina semínula,Cibicides lobatulus,Criboelphidium oceanensis and Miliolinella sobrotunda are also presente. At the base, foraminifera assemblages show a relative abundance of Planorbulina mediterranensis, Rosalina anomala, Rosalina irregularis, Miliolinella subrotunda and Cibicides lobatulus. These are typical of a shallow environment with normal marine salinity. During the sub-boreal period (6640-4520 BP), a sandy barrier developed and the lagoon evolved to a brackish lagoon with low salinity. Sedimentation is homogeneous, the content of silt and clay is high (90%), calcium carbonate content is usually lower than 20% and the organic material exhibited the highest values (> 10%). Ammonia tepida is also the dominant species but C. oceanensis and H. germanica are secondary. The lagoon was closed in drier conditions and has gradually filled by sediments coming from the watershed, represented by an illite-chlorite association. The lagoon evolved to a sabkha. We must emphasize the role of deforestation caused by the Romans (2100 BP) in that period

  11. Analysis of land use in Açu Lagoon State Park, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxoel Barros Costa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Large extensions of the coastal sandy soils (restinga vegetation of the northern region of Rio de Janeiro had been eliminated since the colonization, with replacement of the native vegetation by sugarcane cultivation followed by agricultural expansion. The Açu Lagoon State Park (PELAG was created with the goal of preserve part of the remaining ecosystem, sandbanks, swamps, marshes and coastal lagoons, reminiscent of ecosystems that existed in the region before its degradation. In order to have a better characterization of the area delimited for its implantation, the present work has the objective of mapping the land use in the Park. The classification was performed through supervised classification with visual interpretation pixel by pixel and applying the maximum likelihood, where the following categories were considered: water, wet soils, vegetation, exposed soils and pastures. The results obtained were consistent with the reality observed in the field. It was observed that the highest percentage of soil cover is composed of pasture (27.8%, followed by wetlands (25.74% and wet soil (22.22%. Approximately 16.0% of the area of the park is covered by vegetation, characterized mainly by coastal sandy soils (restinga. A large part of the park area is devoid of vegetation cover, and it is necessary to recompose it, mainly that from the permanent preservation areas.

  12. Comparison of the performance of two indices of trophic status for depicting the status of Pulicat lagoon ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Harini; Raj, S Amal; Thanasekaran, K

    2011-10-01

    In the recent years, several indices of trophic status of coastal ecosytems are being used worldwide. However, not all of them can be applied successfully to depict the true trophic status of shallow coastal ecosystems due to their inherent complexities in nutrient circulation and interactions between biotic organisms. The most widely used index is Carlson's Trophic State Index (TSI), while more recently, several environmental indices have been constructed using soft computing techniques such as fuzzy logic. In the present investigation, a comparison of the performances of a conventional trophic state index and a newly developed fuzzy-based trophic state index has been presented in detail. The aim of the work was to highlight the advantages of the newer technique over the existing techniques in light of the inherent variability of both data as well as the sampling procedures undertaken for studying a coastal lagoon ecosystem called Pulicat lagoon in the southeast coast of India. The results of the study have shown that while there are discrepancies in depicting the trophic status of the lagoon using Carlson's index, the newer logic-based index predicted the trophic status accurately which was verified by field assessments. Thus the successful application of a more reliable index to estimate trophic status has been presented.

  13. Study of water chlorophyl content in the Venice Lagoon through hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfagnoli, Francesca; Bizzaro, Beatrice; Moretti, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the HICO Project (http://hico.coas.oregonstate.edu/), a number of radiance and reflectance images of the Venice Lagoon were used to evaluate the possibility of performing quick and reliable mapping of water quality parameters. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO™) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer specifically designed to sample the coastal areas, with 128 spectral bands, a 90 m spatial resolution, full spectral coverage (380 to 960 nm sampled at 5.7 nm) and a very high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. Eutrophication is one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. The concentration of chlorophyll-a found in water can be used to trace the abundance of planktonic algae in rivers, lakes or lagoons. The Venice Lagoon, famous worldwide, represents one of the most fragile and vulnerable ecosystems, which is being constantly threatened by factors of stress, both human and natural, such as erosion, presence of urban and agricultural sources of pollution, stress from fishing, pollution produced by the industrial area of Porto Marghera and by the city of Venice itself, downwash of sediments from the hinterland and eutrophication. Traditional methods of water quality estimation are often time consuming and involve periodical sampling and plenty of laboratory analyses. In this study the possibility of using imaging spectroscopy to rapidly obtain raster-based maps of chlorophyll concentration by comparing the results obtained through five different literature bio-optical models, which permit the retrieval of mathematical relations between the water's spectral properties and physicochemical parameters; pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and chlorophyll concentration. Evaluation of performances is achieved by comparing the hyperspectral based maps with maps of kriged concentration values, provided by the Magistrato delle Acque di Venezia (http

  14. Comparison of Water Flows in Four European Lagoon Catchments under a Set of Future Climate Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Hesse

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is supposed to remarkably affect the water resources of coastal lagoons as they are highly vulnerable to changes occurring at their catchment and/or ocean or sea boundaries. Probable impacts of projected climate changes on catchment hydrology and freshwater input were assessed using the eco-hydrological model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model for the drainage areas of four European lagoons: Ria de Aveiro (Portugal, Mar Menor (Spain, Tyligulskyi Liman (Ukraine and Vistula Lagoon (Poland/Russia under a set of 15 climate scenarios covering the time period until the year 2100. Climate change signals for all regions show continuously increasing trends in temperature, but various trends in precipitation. Precipitation is projected to decrease in two catchments on the Iberian Peninsula and increase in the Baltic region catchment, and does not show a clear trend in the catchment located near the Black Sea. The average projected changes in freshwater inputs reflect these changes in climate conditions, but often show variability between the scenarios, in future periods, and within the catchments. According to the individual degrees of water management influences in the four drainage basins, the climate sensitivity of river inflows is differently pronounced in each.

  15. Sedimentation rate at Olho d'agua Lagoon in Pernambuco State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentim, Eliane; Hazin, Clovis A.; Khoury, Helen J.; Lima, Ricardo A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the dynamic of sediments in coastal estaurine areas has attracted rthe attenition of a great number of scientists, due to its role in determining the impact of human activities on the ecosystem. A knowledge of the rate at which sediments have been accumulating can be a useful parameter in quantifying the amount of polltuants that reach the marine environment. This study had thge objective of determining the sediment accumulation rate at the Olho D'agua Lagoon, located at the Jabotao dos Guararapes District, in the metropolitan region of Recife, the capital of the State of Pernambuco -Brazil. This lagoon was selected by the Brazilian government to benefit from the Habitat II Program, which is sponsored by the United Nations Organization. Sedimentation rates were estimated by measuring the vertical distribution of 210 Pb in sediment cores collected in two different areas of the lagoon. The determination of the 210 Pb content was based upon the measurement of its descendent 210 Po which was deposited in a cooper disk. The results indicated rates of accumulation of 0.6 cm/year and 1.5 cm/year at points near the Olho D'agua and Setubal channels, respectively. These channels are important conveyors of sediments to this estuary. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Sources and fate of sediment organic matter in Asia's largest brackish water lagoon and nearby mangrove ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, R.; Muduli, P. R.; Barik, S.; Kumar, S.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal lagoons and mangrove ecosystems regularly undergo natural (tidal) and anthropogenic (riverine inputs) forcings. After effects of these forcings cause coastal environments to sustain high biological production leading to high suspended organic matter (OM) and hence fast sedimentation and accumulation of OM in sediments.The different sources of OM and its burial in tropical lacustrine and mangrove systems have been rarely studied in detail with a few reports from Indian estuaries. The present study attempts to understand the sources and fate organic matter at two Ramsar sites, viz. Chilika Lake (Asia's largest brackish water lagoon) and nearby Bhitarkanika mangroves, located in the east coast of India. We measured nitrogen and carbon content (% N and % C) and isotopic composition (δ13Corg and δ15N) of OM at different depths in eight and three sediment cores collected from the Chilika lagoon and Bhitarkanika mangroves, respectively. Overall, the mean δ13Corg and % C in the lagoon were ‒21.10 ± 0.79 ‰ and 0.84 ± 0.47 %, respectively; whereas the same for mangrove cores were ‒24.56 ± 0.80 ‰ and 1.04 ± 0.26 %, respectively. Similarly, average δ15N and % N in the lagoon cores were 4.15 ± 0.63 ‰ and 0.11 ± 0.05 %, respectively; for mangrove cores the values were 4.28 ± 0.50 ‰ and 0.07 ± 0.01 %, respectively. Preliminary analysis of the isotopic composition (δ13Corg and δ15N) and elemental ratios indicates that organic carbon in the sediment at Bhitarkanika mangrove was of terrigenous, marine and in situ origin, whereas cores of Chilika lagoon showed predominantly marine signature. No relationship between δ13Corg of suspended and sediment in the Chilika lagoon indicates these two organic pools to be not directly coupled. End member mixing model in the mangrove ecosystem indicate on an average 50 % terrestrial contribution to the OM pool.

  17. Curonian Lagoon drainage basin modelling and assessment of climate change impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Čerkasova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Curonian Lagoon, which is the largest European coastal lagoon with a surface area of 1578 km2 and a drainage area of 100,458 km2, is facing a severe eutrophication problem. With its increasing water management difficulties, the need for a sophisticated hydrological model of the Curonian Lagoon's drainage area arose, in order to assess possible changes resulting from local and global processes. In this study, we developed and calibrated a sophisticated hydrological model with the required accuracy, as an initial step for the future development of a modelling framework that aims to correctly predict the movement of pesticides, sediments or nutrients, and to evaluate water-management practices. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool was used to implement a model of the study area and to assess the impact of climate-change scenarios on the run-off of the Nemunas River and the Minija River, which are located in the Curonian Lagoons drainage basin. The models calibration and validation were performed using monthly streamflow data, and evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2 and the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE. The calculated values of the R2 and NSE for the Nemunas and Minija Rivers stations were 0.81 and 0.79 for the calibration, and 0.679 and 0.602 for the validation period. Two potential climate-change scenarios were developed within the general patterns of near-term climate projections, as defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report: both pessimistic (substantial changes in precipitation and temperature and optimistic (insubstantial changes in precipitation and temperature. Both simulations produce similar general patterns in river-discharge change: a strong increase (up to 22% in the winter months, especially in February, a decrease during the spring (up to 10% and summer (up to 18%, and a slight increase during the autumn (up to 10%.

  18. Assessment of the Trophic State of Saquarema Lagoonal System, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippe Belart Brandão Dias

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work intends to apply new ecological descriptors to a coastal marine area aiming to assess its environmental trophic status. This approach makes possible to identify relevant variables associated with eutrophication process applicable and valid worldwide. The aim of this work is to study the organic matter (OM quality and quantity, in terms of biopolymers, in Saquarema Lagoonal System (SLS located in Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil. Sediment samples collected in SLS were analyzed in this study for granulometric and geochemical data such as total organic carbon (TOC, total sulfur (TS and biopolimeric carbon (BPC concentrations, including proteins (PTN, carbohydrates (CHO and lipids (LIP. These data were combined with additional environmental parameters measured in water of the four linked lagoons that compose SLS. Data analyses allowed the identification of four distinct regions in SLS: an inner and impacted zone characterized by sediment particularly enriched in TOC, with lowest quality of OM most probably provided by contaminated effluents and rivers runoff; an outer-less impacted lagoonal area with relatively low TOC content and submitted to high hydrodynamic forces; an intermediate area characterized by transitional features between the two previously mentioned and a zone that is influenced mainly by salinity. The organic matter accumulation depends on the hydrodynamic conditions mostly governed by tidal currents. The quality of organic matter seems to be mainly influenced by the water renewal, rivers inputs and mangroves contributions as well as by the autochthonous lagoonal biological productivity. Results of this work indicate that the inner zone of SLS is being affected by eutrophication not necessarily caused by anthropic factors.

  19. Digging navigable waterways through lagoon tidal flats: which short and long-term impacts on groundwater dynamics and quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teatini, Pietro; Isotton, Giovanni; Nardean, Stefano; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Tosi, Luigi; Da Lio, Cristina; Zaggia, Luca; Bellafiore, Debora; Zecchin, Massimo; Baradello, Luca; Corami, Fabiana; Libralato, Giovanni; Morabito, Elisa; Broglia, Riccardo; Zaghi, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Coastal lagoons are highly valued ephemeral habitats that have experienced in many cases the pressure of human activities since the development of urbanisation and economic activities within or around their boundaries. One typical intervention is dredging of canals to increase the exchange of water with the sea or for navigation purposes. In order to divert the route of large cruise liners from the historic center of Venice, Italy, the Venice Port Authority has recently proposed a project for the dredging of a new 3-km long and 10-m deep navigation canal (called Marghera-Venice Canal, MVC, in the sequel) through the shallows of the Venice Lagoon. The MVC will connect the passenger terminal located in the southwestern part of the historic center to a main channel that reaches the industrial area on the western lagoon margin. Can the new MVC facilitate saltwater intrusion below the lagoon bottom? Can the release into the lagoon of the chemicals detected in the groundwater around the industrial site be favoured by the MVC excavation? Can the depression waves generated by the ship transit (known as ship-wakes) along the MVC affect the flow and contaminant exchange between the subsurface and surficial systems? A response to these questions has been provided by the use of uncoupled and coupled density-dependent groundwater flow and transport simulators. The hydrogeological modelling has been supported by an in-depth characterization of the Venice lagoon subsurface along the MVC. Geophysical surveys, laboratory analyses on groundwater and sediment samples, in-situ measurements through piezometers and pressure sensors, and the outcome of 3D hydrodynamic and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models have been used to set-up and calibrate the subsurface multi-model approach. The modelling results can be summarized as follows: i) the MVC has a negligible effect in relation to the propagation of the tidal regime into the subsoil; ii) the depression caused by the ship transit

  20. Partitioning, bioavailability and origin of heavy metals from the Nador Lagoon sediments (Morocco) as a basis for their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, I.; Águila, E.; Galán, E.

    2007-08-01

    Nador Lagoon sediments show low trace element concentrations, and, in relation to the lagoon geochemical baseline, only some anomalies for As, Cd, Cu and Pb in the NW of the lagoon deserve to be outstanding. The distribution of major, minor and trace elements in the lagoon allows a breakdown in four zones. Between “Beni Ensar” and “Atelouane” (zone A), a quite confined zone rich in organic matter and S, the most important trace-element anomalies (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn) were found, mainly around industry and old mining activities. In the surrounding of the city of Nador (zone B), the anomalies correspond to Mn, Cu and Zn. The coastal barrier and Kebdana channel (zone C) show moderately concentrations of Cd, Cr and Ni at specific sites. The less polluted area is the SE of the lagoon (zone D), with no outstanding anomaly. In lagoon sediments, metal bioavailability is very low. The metal partitioning patterns show that Cu, Pb and Zn present a low availability because they are bounded to the residual, non-mobile phases of the sediments. Only in some sites, the fraction was associated with organic matter, which could be liberated easily. Arsenic is concentrated in both the residual phases and the organic matter, the latter being more available. Cadmium is mainly concentrated in some samples in the interchangeable fraction, which could be considered as a potentially toxic element because it is easily released. Concerning the origin of these trace elements, those found in zone A correspond mostly to a natural source by weathering of mount Gourougou volcanic rocks (As, Co, Cu, Pb and Zn), and to an anthropogenic origin (Cd) owing to the presence of industry and old mines. In zone B, contributions of Cu and Zn enter the lagoon through soil weathering and river-borne, and as anthropogenic pollution from urban wastes. In zone C the most important pollutant is Cd deduced to be of anthropogenic origin from the close industry and intensive agriculture area. In spite

  1. Diversity and composition of estuarine and lagoonal fish assemblages of Socotra Island, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, E; Zajonz, U; Krupp, F; Naseeb, F; Aideed, M S

    2016-05-01

    Estuarine and lagoonal surveys of Socotra Island and selected sites on the Hadhramout coast of Yemen were conducted with the objective of documenting and analysing fish diversity and assemblage structure. A total of 74 species in 35 families were recorded, among which 65 species in 32 families were from Socotra and 20 species in 17 families were from mainland Yemen. Twenty-one species represent new faunal records for Socotra. Including historic records re-examined in this study, the total fish species richness of estuaries and lagoons of Socotra Island reaches 76, which is relatively high compared to species inventories of well-researched coastal estuaries in southern Africa. Five species dominate the occurrence and abundance frequencies: Terapon jarbua, Hyporhamphus sindensis, Aphanius dispar, Ambassis gymnocephala and Chelon macrolepis. Rarefaction and extrapolation analyses suggest that the actual number of fish species inhabiting some of those estuaries might be higher than the one observed. Thus, additional sampling at specific sites should be conducted to record other less conspicuous species. Ordination and multivariate analyses identified four main distinct assemblage clusters. Two groups are geographically well structured and represent northern Socotra and mainland Yemen, respectively. The other two assemblage groups tend to be determined to a greater extent by the synchrony between physical (e.g. estuary opening periods) and biological (e.g. spawning and recruitment periods) variables than by geographical location. Finally, the single intertidal lagoon of Socotra represents by itself a specific fish assemblage. The high proportion of economically important fish species (38) recorded underscores the paramount importance of these coastal water bodies as nursery sites, and for sustaining vital provisioning ecosystem services. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Integrated analysis of beach ridge and lagoon systems as indicator of sea-level changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse; Hede, Mikkel U.; Fruergaard, Mikkel; Morigi, Caterina; Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars; Clemmensen, Lars B.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Pejrup, Morten

    2015-04-01

    Beach ridges and lagoons are common features of the modern coastal landscape in much of Denmark and represent an important part of the Holocene raised marine deposits. We here present our results from investigations into the possibilities of retrieving continuous relative sea-level (RSL) information from these sedimentary archives, as facilitated by the analysis of surface morphology, coring, subsurface imaging, absolute chronology, and modern analogues. The island of Samsø (55˚51'N, 10˚36'E) was chosen as a case study example. While each of the used archives merely covers a part of the mid to late Holocene developments, their joint analysis allows identifying and separating periods of rapid RSL rise, stability and fall over most of the island's marine stage. We present possible correlations of the data from the lagoons with data from a wide beach-ridge system and suggest causal relations of the RSL reconstruction with the spatial arrangements of marine and glacial landforms on Samsø. The integrated use of a geographical perspective combined with geological precision and methodology has proven to be of great value for understanding temporal, spatial, and process relations in the investigated coastal environment. The study stresses the value of analyzing genetically independent though complementary sedimentary archives to retrieve more complete and potentially more robust results. The presented approach may be useful in microtidal, sediment-surplus environments with a transgressive-regressive Holocene RSL history.

  3. Coastal Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction, waves, sediment transport, littoral transport, lonshore sediment transport, onshore-offshore sediment transport, coastal changes, dune erosion and storm surges, sedimentation in channels and trenches, coastal engineering in practice.

  4. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  5. Spatial variability of primary organic sources regulates ichthyofauna distribution despite seasonal influence in Terminos lagoon and continental shelf of Campeche, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo Rios, J. A.; Aguíñiga-García, S.; Sanchez, A.; Zetina-Rejón, M.; Arreguín-Sánchez, F.; Tripp-Valdéz, A.; Galeana-Cortazár, A.

    2013-05-01

    Human activities have strong impacts on coastal ecosystems functioning through their effect on primary organic sources distributions and resulting biodiversity. Hence, it appears to be of utmost importance to quantify contribution of primary producers to sediment organic matter (SOM) spatial variability and its associated ichthyofauna. The Terminos lagoon (Gulf of Mexico) is a tropical estuary severely impacted by human activities even though of primary concern for its biodiversity, its habitats, and its resource supply. Stable isotope data (d13C, d15N) from mangrove, seaweed, seagrass, phytoplankton, ichthyofauna and SOM were sampled in four zones of the lagoon and the continental shelf through windy (November to February), dry (March to June) and rainy (July to October) seasons. Stable Isotope Analysis in R (SIAR) mixing model were used to determine relative contributions of the autotrophic sources to the ichthyofauna and SOM. Analysis of variance of ichthyofauna isotopic values showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in the four zones of lagoon despite the variability introduced by the windy, dry and rainy seasons. In lagoons rivers discharge zone, the mangrove contribution to ichthyofauna was 40% and 84% to SOM. Alternative use of habitat by ichthyofauna was evidenced since in the deep area of the lagoon (4 m), the contribution of mangrove to fish is 50%, and meanwhile contribution to SOM is only 77%. Although phytoplankton (43%) and seaweed (41%) contributions to the adjacent continental shelf ichthyofauna were the main organic sources, there was 37% mangrove contribution to SOM, demonstrating conspicuous terrigenous influence from lagoon ecosystem. Our results point toward organic sources spatial variations that regulate fish distribution. In Terminos lagoon, significant correlation (p-value = 0.2141 and r=0.79) of Ariopsis felis and Sphoeroides testudineus abundances and seaweed and seagrasses contributions (30-35%) during both dry and rainy seasons

  6. Man-induced hydrological changes, metazooplankton communities and invasive species in the Berre Lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpy, Floriane; Pagano, Marc; Blanchot, Jean; Carlotti, François; Thibault-Botha, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    The Berre Lagoon has been under strong anthropogenic pressure since the early 1950s. The opening of the hydroelectric EDF power plant in 1966 led to large salinity drops. The zooplankton community was mainly composed of two common brackish species: Acartia tonsa and Brachionus plicatilis. Since 2006, European litigation has strongly constrained the input of freshwater, maintaining the salinity above 15. A study was performed between 2008 and 2010 to evaluate how these modifications have impacted the zooplankton community. Our results show that the community is more diverse and contains several coastal marine species (i.e., Centropages typicus, Paracalanus parvus and Acartia clausi). A. tonsa is still present but is less abundant, whereas B. plicatilis has completely disappeared. Strong predatory marine species, such as chaetognaths, the large conspicuous autochtonous jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, are now very common as either seasonal or permanent features of the lagoon.

  7. Silica in invasive wetland plant species of lagoons, Côte d'Ivoire: Spatio-temporal patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    José-mathieu Koné, Yéfanlan; Schoelynck, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Tropical wetlands are known to accumulate a large quantity of Biogenic Silica (BSi) produced by wetland plant species (Struyf et al., 2015), and approximately 70-80% of the total supply of Dissolved Si (DSi) to the coastal zone occurs in (sub) tropical river systems (Jennerjahn et al. 2006). However, the data at these latitudes are limited. Here, we present the BSi concentration from eleven invasive macrophyte species randomly collected in three small ( 800ha) lagoons of Côte d'Ivoire during 12 months. Our data showed a large spatio-temporal variability of BSi in the three lagoons with no consistent trends. In general, the BSi concentrations obtained were high and values ranged from 0 to 54 mg g-1 through the entire sampling period, with the highest values found in Acroceras zizaniodes (emergent species of Poaceae). In general, free floating species had significantly less BSi than emergent species (POkavango Delta silica sink. Wetlands, 5: 171-181.

  8. Mussel farming as a large-scale bioengineering tool: a numerical modelling case study in Rødsand lagoon, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Pernille Louise; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Lumborg, Ulrik

    spill of sediment, which could increase the longshore sediment influx to Rødsand lagoon. Mussels can reduce the SSC in marine environments (Schröder et al., 2014), why the implementation of a mussel farm has been considered as a management option. In the present study we developed a module to include....... and Krost P. (2014). The impact of a mussel farm on water transparency in the Kiel Fjord. Ocean & Coastal Management, 101:42-52....... mussels as a bioengineering measure in a numerical sediment transport model and investigated how the implementation of an exterior mussel farm affect the sediment dynamics within Rødsand lagoon. On the basis of 2D modelling (MIKE21 by DHI) and field measurements, the flow and sediment dynamics to and from...

  9. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Bridger [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  10. Extreme flood event reconstruction spanning the last century in the El Bibane Lagoon (southeastern Tunisia): a multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affouri, Aida; Dezileau, Laurent; Kallel, Nejib

    2017-06-01

    Climate models project that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will increase the frequency and the severity of some extreme weather events. The flood events represent a major risk for populations and infrastructures settled on coastal lowlands. Recent studies of lagoon sediments have enhanced our knowledge on extreme hydrological events such as palaeo-storms and on their relation with climate change over the last millennium. However, few studies have been undertaken to reconstruct past flood events from lagoon sediments. Here, the past flood activity was investigated using a multi-proxy approach combining sedimentological and geochemical analysis of surfaces sediments from a southeastern Tunisian catchment in order to trace the origin of sediment deposits in the El Bibane Lagoon. Three sediment sources were identified: marine, fluvial and aeolian. When applying this multi-proxy approach on core BL12-10, recovered from the El Bibane Lagoon, we can see that finer material, a high content of the clay and silt, and a high content of the elemental ratios (Fe / Ca and Ti / Ca) characterise the sedimentological signature of the palaeo-flood levels identified in the lagoonal sequence. For the last century, which is the period covered by the BL12-10 short core, three palaeo-flood events were identified. The age of these flood events have been determined by 210Pb and 137Cs chronology and give ages of AD 1995 ± 6, 1970 ± 9 and 1945 ± 9. These results show a good temporal correlation with historical flood events recorded in southern Tunisia in the last century (AD 1932, 1969, 1979 and 1995). Our finding suggests that reconstruction of the history of the hydrological extreme events during the upper Holocene is possible in this location through the use of the sedimentary archives.

  11. Extreme flood event reconstruction spanning the last century in the El Bibane Lagoon (southeastern Tunisia: a multi-proxy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Affouri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate models project that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will increase the frequency and the severity of some extreme weather events. The flood events represent a major risk for populations and infrastructures settled on coastal lowlands. Recent studies of lagoon sediments have enhanced our knowledge on extreme hydrological events such as palaeo-storms and on their relation with climate change over the last millennium. However, few studies have been undertaken to reconstruct past flood events from lagoon sediments. Here, the past flood activity was investigated using a multi-proxy approach combining sedimentological and geochemical analysis of surfaces sediments from a southeastern Tunisian catchment in order to trace the origin of sediment deposits in the El Bibane Lagoon. Three sediment sources were identified: marine, fluvial and aeolian. When applying this multi-proxy approach on core BL12-10, recovered from the El Bibane Lagoon, we can see that finer material, a high content of the clay and silt, and a high content of the elemental ratios (Fe ∕ Ca and Ti ∕ Ca characterise the sedimentological signature of the palaeo-flood levels identified in the lagoonal sequence. For the last century, which is the period covered by the BL12-10 short core, three palaeo-flood events were identified. The age of these flood events have been determined by 210Pb and 137Cs chronology and give ages of AD 1995 ± 6, 1970 ± 9 and 1945 ± 9. These results show a good temporal correlation with historical flood events recorded in southern Tunisia in the last century (AD 1932, 1969, 1979 and 1995. Our finding suggests that reconstruction of the history of the hydrological extreme events during the upper Holocene is possible in this location through the use of the sedimentary archives.

  12. Succession within the prokaryotic communities during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Van Wambeke, France; Caffin, Mathieu; Bonnet, Sophie; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-04-01

    N2 fixation fuels ˜ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE experiment has been designed to track the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) and carbon within a coastal lagoon ecosystem in a comprehensive way. For this, large-volume ( ˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed in the New Caledonian lagoon and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. This study examined the temporal dynamics of the prokaryotic community together with the evolution of biogeochemical parameters for 23 consecutive days in one of these mesocosms (M1) and in the Nouméa lagoon using MiSeq 16S rRNA gene sequencing and flow cytometry. Combining these methods allowed for inference of absolute cell numbers from 16S data. We observed clear successions within M1, some of which were not mirrored in the lagoon. The dominating classes in M1 were Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, Flavobacteriia, and Acidimicrobia. Enclosure led to significant changes in the M1 microbial community, probably initiated by the early decay of Synechococcus and diatoms. However, we did not detect a pronounced bottle effect with a copiotroph-dominated community. The fertilization with ˜ 0.8 µM DIP on day 4 did not have directly observable effects on the overall community within M1, as the data samples obtained from before and 4 days after fertilization clustered together, but likely influenced the development of individual populations later on, like Defluviicoccus-related bacteria and UCYN-C-type diazotrophic cyanobacteria (Cyanothece). Growth of UCYN-C led to among the highest N2-fixation rates ever measured in this region and enhanced growth of nearly all abundant heterotrophic groups in M1. We further show that different Rhodobacteraceae were the most efficient heterotrophs in the investigated system and we observed niche partitioning within the SAR86 clade

  13. Distribution pattern of enteric organisms in the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A wide range of organisms was encountered in the 24 sampled sites of the Lagos Lagoon. The enteric gram-negative shortrods, Lactose fermenting organisms such as Klebsiella spp, Enterobacter spp and Escherichia coli were prevalent in most of the Lagoon sites studied. The in vitro antibiotic sensitivity profile of the ...

  14. Assessment of Water Quality Parameters of Kpeshie Lagoon of Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the Kpeshi Lagoon to identify the chemical and physical characteristics of the water. A lot of industrial activities are carried out around the Lagoon and it is being gradually turned into a place of refuse damp. Standard methods were used for determining of chemical and physical characteristics of ...

  15. assessment of water quality parameters of kpeshi lagoon of ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT: A study was carried out on the Kpeshi Lagoon to identify the chemical and physical characteris- tics of the water. A lot of industrial activities are carried out around the Lagoon and it is being gradually turned into a place of refuse damp. Standard methods were used for determining of chemical and physical ...

  16. Trend of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Lagos Lagoon Ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    The distribution and occurrence of heavy metals in the sediment, water and benthic animals of the Lagos lagoon ... sediment, water and animal samples collected from zones 1-3 of the lagoon that received most of the industrial effluents ..... drainage channels and streams continued increasing concentrations of heavy metals.

  17. Sewage input effects on the macroinvertebrate community associated to Typha domingensis Pers in a coastal lagoon in southeastern Brazil Efeitos do aporte de esgotos sobre a comunidade de macroinvertebrados associada à Typha domingensis Pers em uma lagoa costeira no Sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Henriques-de-Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out at Imboassica Lagoon, located in an urban zone in the municipality of Macaé, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. This lagoon has been subject to anthropogenic impacts due to the increasing city population, such as the input of sewage. Areas of variable degree of anthropogenic influence in the lagoon were compared regarding the structure of the macroinvertebrate community associated to Typha domingensis leaves. For sampling, we used 35 x 20 cm net plastic bags, with 6.8 mm mesh containing T. domingensis leaves for colonization. Two different sampling stations were selected: station A, under direct input of sewage; and station B with lesser sewage influence. The bags were removed after 20, 40 and 75 days of colonization. For each sample the Shannon-Wiever Diversity, Pielou Evenness, Jaccard Similarity Indices, Correspondence Analysis and taxonomic richness were calculated. A total of 31,874 individuals were sampled, belonging to 34 taxa. The main taxonomical groups were: Oligochaeta (41%, Chironomidae (40%, Ancylidae (4.6%, Polymitarcyidae (4% and Thiaridae (3%. At station A, the taxonomic richness, the Evenness and Diversity values were lower than in station B. On the other hand, the total density was three times higher in station A than in B. It was already possible to discriminate the community structure of each sampling station in the first sampling. Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera were the main exclusive groups of station B and are considered good water quality indicators due to their high sensibility to contamination. The major contribution to discriminate between the macroinvertebrate communities of the two sample stations came from Chironomidae, Oligochaeta and Ephemeroptera.O presente estudo foi realizado na Lagoa Imboassica, localizada no perímetro urbano da cidade de Macaé, RJ, Brasil. Esta lagoa vem sofrendo impactos antrópicos com o aumento da cidade, como o aporte de esgotos sem tratamento. Áreas com

  18. Essential coastal habitats for fish in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraufvelin, Patrik; Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep; Bergström, Ulf

    2018-01-01

    Many coastal and offshore fish species are highly dependent on specific habitat types for population maintenance. In the Baltic Sea, shallow productive habitats in the coastal zone such as wetlands, vegetated flads/lagoons and sheltered bays as well as more exposed rocky and sandy areas are utili......Many coastal and offshore fish species are highly dependent on specific habitat types for population maintenance. In the Baltic Sea, shallow productive habitats in the coastal zone such as wetlands, vegetated flads/lagoons and sheltered bays as well as more exposed rocky and sandy areas...... are utilized by fish across many life history stages including spawning, juvenile development, feeding and migration. Although there is general consensus about the critical importance of these essential fish habitats (EFH) for fish production along the coast, direct quantitative evidence for their specific...... roles in population growth and maintenance is still scarce. Nevertheless, for some coastal species, indirect evidence exists, and in many cases, sufficient data are also available to carry out further quantitative analyses. As coastal EFH in the Baltic Sea are often found in areas that are highly...

  19. The Gyra washover fan in the Lefkada Lagoon, NW Greece—possible evidence of the 365 AD Crete earthquake and tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Simon Matthias; Vött, Andreas; Brückner, Helmut; Smedile, Alessandra

    2012-10-01

    Coastal geomorphological and geological archives store valuable information about the geodynamic evolution of coastal areas and the contributing geomorphodynamic processes. The coastal geomorphology of the Lefkada- Preveza coastal zone, NW Greece, holds evidence for the influence of both gradual, low-energy and episodic, high-energy coastal processes. Situated close to the Hellenic Arc and the Cefalonia transform fault, the area belongs to one of the seismically most active regions in the Mediterranean. Thus, tsunami events are assumed to have contributed to the coastal evolution in the study area according to tsunami catalogues and field evidence from previous investigations. The northern part of the Lefkada Lagoon, separated from the Ionian Sea by an extensive barrier beach system, is characterized by a number of fan-like washover structures, formed by different washover generations. In this paper, we present detailed geomorphological, sedimentological, geochemical and foraminiferal investigations on the most prominent fan structure, the Gyra fan, based on terrestrial and lagoonal sediment cores. The Gyra fan consists of a coarse-grained sequence of fully marine origin on top of lagoonal mud and a palaeosol, respectively. The sequence shows numerous characteristics of extreme wave deposits. Due to the dimension and morphology of the fan, the existence of up to four consistent and correlative stratigraphic subunits, their landward thinning and their comparable sedimentary characteristics, we argue that a tsunami event induced the formation of the Gyra fan, comprising at least four major inundation impulses. According to radiocarbon dates, this geomorphological structure was most likely formed by teletsunami effects triggered by the 365 AD earthquake off western Crete.

  20. Holocene paleogeographies of the Palairos coastal plain (Akarnania, northwest Greece) and their geoarchaeological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vött, A.; Brückner, H.; Schriever, A.; Luther, J.; Handl, M.; van der Borg, K.

    2006-01-01

    Sediments from the Palairos coastal plain (Akarnania, northwest Greece) were studied to establish paleogeographical scenarios of Holocene landscape evolution. Near coast vibracore profiles revealed regressive sedimentary sequences, the base of which is dominated by marine sand and/or lagoonal mud.

  1. Climate change, sea level rise and coastal inundation along part of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate change, sea level rise and coastal inundation along part of Nigeria Barrier Lagoon Coast. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... The study uses an iterative GIS-based simulation that mapped area inundated based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - Special Report on ...

  2. Gill net selectivity and catch rates of pelagic fish in tropical coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Gill net selectivity and catch rates of pelagic fish in tropical coastal lagoonal ecosystem ... index (phytoplankton primary productivity, total phospho- rus) have been preferred. Albaret and Lae (2003) ..... time in relation to availability of food and environmental favourability, since nutrients are flushed form ...

  3. Primary production of phytoplankton in the estuaries of different types (by the example of the Curonian and Vistula Lagoons of the Baltic Sea and the Volga delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to analyze the long-term change of the primary production in large estuaries of different types (Volga delta, Curonian and Vistula Lagoons) under the impact of environmental factors (e.g. climate changes, algal blooms, invasion mollusk). The researches (primary production, chlorophyll, nutrients and others) were carried out monthly from March-April to November in the Vistula and Curonian Lagoons since 1991 to 2015, and in the Lower part of the Volga Delta and fore-delta since 1996 to 2007. The Volga River is the largest river in Europe that flows into the Caspian Sea and it forms a great delta. According to the analysis of long-term data (from the 1960s), the maximum eutrophication and primary production (85-100 gCṡm-2ṡyear-1) in the Volga Delta was observed in the 1980s. In the 1990s, fertilizers use and the input of nutrients into the Volga Delta decreased significantly. Due of the high-flow exchange in the delta, especially during high-water years, observed in the 1980s - early 2000s, this led to a significant decrease in the concentration of nutrients in the water in the Volga Delta. As a result, in the 1990-2000s, the primary production has decreased to the level of 1960s-1970s (40-60 gCṡm-2ṡyear-1) and the process of eutrophication was replaced by de-eutrophication. At present, the trophic status of the Volga delta assessed as mesotrophic. The future trend of phytoplankton primary production of the Volga delta will greatly depend on the scenario of nutrients loading and river runoff. The Curonian Lagoon and Vistula Lagoon are the largest coastal lagoons of the Baltic Sea, relating to the most highly productive water bodies of Europe. The Curonian Lagoon is choke mostly freshwater lagoon, while the Vistula Lagoon is restricted brackish water lagoon. In the last decades the nutrients loading changes, warming trend and biological invasions are observed. The Curonian Lagoon may be characterized as hypertrophic water body. The local climate

  4. Acid Tar Lagoons: Management and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohers, Anna; Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents the issue with possibility of definitive removal of dangerous environmental burden in Slovakia - serious historical problem of two acid tar lagoons. In relation to their removal, no technology has been found so far - technologically and economically suitable, what caused problems with its management. Locality Predajná is well known in Slovakia by its character of contrasts: it is situated in the picturesque landscape of National Park buffer zone of Nízke Tatry, on the other site it is contaminated by 229 211m3 of acid tar with its characteristics of toxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity and toxicity especially for animals and plants. Acid tar in two landfills with depth of 1m in case of the first lagoon and 9,5m in case of the second lagoon is a waste product derived from operation of Petrochema Dubová - refinery and petrochemical plant whose activity was to process the crude oil through processes of sulfonation and adsorption technology for producing lubricating and special oils, synthetic detergents and special white oils for cosmetic and medical purposes. A part of acid tar was incinerated in two incineration plats. Concentration of SO2 in combustion gases was too high and it was not possible to decrease it under the value of 2000 mg.mn-3 [LADOMERSKÝ, J. - SAMEŠOVÁ, D.: Reduction in sulfur dioxide emissions waste gases of incineration plant. Acta facultatis ecologiae. 1999, p. 217-223]. That is why it was necessary to put them out of operation. Later, because of public opposition it was not possible to build a new incineration plat corresponding to the state of the art. Even though actual Slovak and European legislative for protection of environment against such impacts, neither of tried methods - bio or non-biologic treatment methods - was proved as suitable for processing or for recovery in the reason of different factors admission: i.e. strong aggressivity, difficulty with handling because of its sludgy and

  5. Geochemical behavior of heavy metals in differents environments in Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon - RJ/Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefan M Fonseca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated urbanisation without a planning, brought several environmental problems to Rio de Janeiro coastal zone, especially in areas such as Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon, which receives a great amount of untreated sewage every day. To assess the nature, potentially sources and extent of heavy metal pollution in the lagoon, sediments from the surrounding streets, from the entrance of the main canal that drains to the lagoon and from the bottom of the lagoon were collected and analysed by a modified selective extraction procedure in order to study the geochemical partitioning and bioavailability of Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni and Pb in these three compartments. The present study verified an increase in the Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the north of the Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon. Despite the different levels of oxidation between the sediments accumulated in the streets and in the bottom of the lagoon, the geochemical partitioning of the heavy metals did not show any pattern of variation for the metals, except for the element Cu. No concentrations were found in the soluble phase of samples collected in the surfacial sediments of the lagoon, suggesting no bioavailability of heavy metalsA urbanização acelerada, sem planejamento, resultou em uma série de problemas à zona costeira do Rio de Janeiro, especialmente em áreas como a Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, a qual recebe uma grande descarga de esgoto não tratado todos os dias. No intuito de avaliar a natureza, as fontes potenciais e a extensão da poluição por metais pesados na lagoa, sedimentos das ruas do entorno, das entradas do principal canal de drenagem e de superfície de fundo foram coletados. As análises se deram através de um método modificado de extração sequencial, com o objetivo de estudar o fracionamento geoquímico e a biodisponibilidade de Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni e Pb, nestes três compartimentos. O presente estudo verificou um aumento nas concentrações de Cu, Pb, e Zn no setor norte da

  6. Sediment geochronology and geochemical behavior of major and rare earth elements in the Oualidia Lagoon in the western Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejjad, N.; El-Hammoumi, O.; Fekri, A.; Laissaoui, A.; Benmansour, M.; Bounouira, H.; Benkdad, A.; Bounakhla, M.; Benbrahim, S.; Bouthir, F.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides and 137 Cs were measured in a sediment core and surface deposit collected from the bed channel of the Oualidia Lagoon located in the western Morocco. Major and rare earth elements (REE) profiles were determined by instrumental NAA technique. 210 Pb and 137 Cs were used to establish the sedimentation chronology over the last decades by using conventional models. 210 Pb displayed relatively higher concentrations and rate of supply to the sediment than typical levels found in other coastal areas in Morocco. REE ratios and Ce anomalies showed that the direct incorporation of particles from seawater to the bed sediment is the most important, followed by the terrigenous component. (author)

  7. Overview of ecotoxicological studies performed in the Venice Lagoon (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losso, C; Ghirardini, A Volpi

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the state of the art of the bioindicators used to assess environmental quality (regarding chemical pollutant impacts) in the Venice lagoon. After a brief description of the roles, advantages and limitations of bioindicators in marine and transitional environments and a summary of the Venice lagoon characteristics, the ecotoxicological methods used during scientific studies and research projects in the Lagoon are reported. Since not all data are available and no database can be formulated, the main evidence from toxicity bioassays, biomarkers and bioaccumulation analyses since the end of the 1970s is spatially synthesized using maps and discussed according to the four Venice lagoon basins. The majority of indicators showed that the Lido basin (north-central lagoon), affected by the presence of the industrial area and the city of Venice, is the one most highly impacted (particularly in the sites located within or in front of the industrial area, which showed very high sediment toxicity and high levels of DNA damage). The Malamocco basin (south-central lagoon) seems to be the least problematic. The southern basin (Chioggia basin) was shown to be impacted by urban contaminants from the town of Chioggia. The northern basin (Treporti basin) presented both impacted sites (high toxicity and high bioaccumulation factor) and relatively unpolluted sites (absence of toxicity, absence of imposex and low levels of bioaccumulation). This review can serve as a basis on which to select pragmatic, cost-effective biomonitoring techniques for environmental effects in lagoon ecosystems.

  8. Hydrodynamics Modeling of Khung Krabaen Lagoon, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuspong Pokavanich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Khung Krabaen Lagoon (KKBL is a small low-inflow water body. There are vast areas of tidal flat occupied nearly 60% of the lagoon that host some of the most productive seagrass habitats in the region. The lagoon is surrounded by mangrove forest and intensive shrimp farms behind it. The KKBL was used as an intake and recipient water for the farms. However due some shrimp disease epidemics and possibly deteriorated water quality, the farms are now taking the intake water from the outer sea through very expensive (to construct and to maintain irrigation system. Objective of this study is to investigate the KKBL’s hydrodynamics using a numerical simulation model validated with measured data. The simulation model was setup two-dimensionally based on the Delft3D model. Results suggested that water currents inside, at the mouth and at the outer sea of the lagoon are mainly governed by tide and wind. Offshore of the lagoon, there are strong tidal currents flowing along northwest and southeast direction. The tidal currents flow into the lagoon through its mouth before dispersion rapidly inside the lagoon. Mean circulation largely varied seasonally and had direct correlations outer sea seasonal mean currents and the monsoons.

  9. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelvink, J.A.; Steetzel, H.J.; Bliek, A.; Rakhorst, H.D.; Roelse, P.; Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  10. Inhomogeneity of methane emissions from a dairy waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Richard H; Boehm, Matthew T

    2015-11-01

    Methane (CH4) is the dominant greenhouse gas emitted by animal agriculture manure. Since the gas is relatively insoluble in water, it is concentrated in discrete bubbles that rise through waste lagoons and burst at the surface. This results in lagoon emissions that are inhomogeneous in both space and time. Emissions from a midwestern dairy waste lagoon were measured over 2 weeks to evaluate the spatial homogeneity of the source emissions and to compare two methods for measuring this inhomogeneous emission. Emissions were determined using an inverse dispersion model based on CH4 concentrations measured both by a single scanning tunable diode laser (TDL) aimed at a series of reflectors and by flame ionization detection (FID) gas chromatography on line-sampled air. Emissions were best estimated using scanned TDL concentrations over relatively short optical paths that collectively span the entire cross-wind width of the source, so as to provide both the best capture of discrete plumes from the bursting bubbles on the lagoon surface and the best detection of CH4 background concentrations. The lagoon emissions during the study were spatially inhomogeneous at hourly time scales. Partitioning the inhomogeneous source into two source regions reduced the estimated emissions of the overall lagoon by 57% but increased the variability. Consequently, it is important to assess the homogeneity of a source prior to measurements and final emissions calculation. Plans for measuring methane emissions from waste lagoons must take into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the source strength. The assumption of emission source homogeneity for a low-solubility gas such as CH4 emitted from an animal waste lagoon can result in significant emission overestimates. The entire breadth and length of the area source must be measured, preferably with multiple optical paths, for the detection of discrete plumes from the different emitting regions and for determining the background concentration

  11. Organic micropollutants in wet and dry depositions in the Venice Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaro, Andrea; Radaelli, Marta; Piazza, Rossano; Stortini, Angela Maria; Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco; Zangrando, Roberta; Cescon, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Atmospheric transport is an important route by which pollutants are conveyed from the continents to both coastal and open sea. The role of aerosol deposition in the transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and polybromodiphenyls ethers (PBDEs) to water and soil systems has been evaluated by measuring their concentrations in wet and dry depositions to the Venice Lagoon. The organic micropollutant flux data indicate that they contribute to the total deposition flux in different ways through wet and dry deposition, showing that the prevalent contribution derives from wet deposition. The fluxes calculated for PBDEs, showed the prevalence of 47, 99, 100 and 183 congeners, both in dry and wet fluxes. With regard to PCBs, the flux of summation operatorPCB for wet deposition is in the same order of magnitude of the diffusive flux at the air-water interface. The PAH fluxes obtained in the present study are similar to those obtained in previous studies on the atmospheric bulk deposition to the Venice Lagoon. The ratios between Phe/Ant and Fl/Py indicate that the pollutants sources are pyrolytic, deriving from combustion fuels.

  12. Modeling habitat suitability of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a Neotropical shallow lagoon, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, T C L; Gama, A M S; Alves, T P; Fontoura, N F

    2016-04-19

    This study aimed to model the habitat suitability for an invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a coastal shallow lagoon in the southern Neotropical region (-30.22, -50.55). The lagoon (19km2, maximum deep 2.5m) was sampled with an Ekman dredge in an orthogonal matrix comprising 84 points. At each sampling point, were obtained environmental descriptors as depth, organic matter content (OMC), average granulometry (Avgran), and the percentage of sand (Pcsand). Prediction performance of Generalized Linear Models (GLM), Generalized Additive Models (GAM) and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) were compared. Also, niche overlapping with other native clam species (Castalia martensi, Neocorbicula limosa and Anodontites trapesialis) was examined. A BRT model with 1400 trees was selected as the best model, with cross-validated correlation of 0.82. The relative contributions of predictors were Pcsand-42.6%, OMC-35.8%, Avgran-10.9% and Depth-10.8%. Were identified that C. fluminea occur mainly in sandy sediments with few organic matter, in shallow areas nor by the shore. The PCA showed a wide niche overlap with the native clam species C. martensi, N. limosa and A. trapesialis.

  13. Modeling habitat suitability of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a Neotropical shallow lagoon, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. L. Silveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to model the habitat suitability for an invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a coastal shallow lagoon in the southern Neotropical region (–30.22, –50.55. The lagoon (19km2, maximum deep 2.5m was sampled with an Ekman dredge in an orthogonal matrix comprising 84 points. At each sampling point, were obtained environmental descriptors as depth, organic matter content (OMC, average granulometry (Avgran, and the percentage of sand (Pcsand. Prediction performance of Generalized Linear Models (GLM, Generalized Additive Models (GAM and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT were compared. Also, niche overlapping with other native clam species (Castalia martensi, Neocorbicula limosa and Anodontites trapesialis was examined. A BRT model with 1400 trees was selected as the best model, with cross-validated correlation of 0.82. The relative contributions of predictors were Pcsand-42.6%, OMC-35.8%, Avgran-10.9% and Depth-10.8%. Were identified that C. fluminea occur mainly in sandy sediments with few organic matter, in shallow areas nor by the shore. The PCA showed a wide niche overlap with the native clam species C. martensi, N. limosa and A. trapesialis.

  14. An integrated approach to prevent the erosion of salt marshes in the lagoon of Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Barausse

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss of coastal habitats is a widespread problem in Europe. To protect the intertidal salt marshes of the lagoon of Venice from the erosion due to natural and human causes which is diffusely and intensely impacting them, the European Commission has funded the demonstrative project LIFE VIMINE. LIFE VIMINE aims to protect the most interior, hard-to-access salt marshes in the northern lagoon of Venice through an integrated approach, whose core is the prevention of erosion through numerous, small but spatially-diffuse soil-bioengineering protections works, mainly placed through semi-manual labour and with low impact on the environment and the landscape. The effectiveness of protection works in the long term is ensured through routine, temporally-continuous and spatially-diffuse actions of monitoring and maintenance. This method contrasts the common approach to managing hydraulic risk and erosion in Italy which is based on large, one-off and irreversible protection actions. The sustainability of the LIFE VIMINE approach is ensured by the participatory involvement of stakeholders and the recognition that protecting salt marshes means defending the benefits they provide to society through their ecological functions, as well as protecting the jobs linked to the existence or conservation of this habitat.

  15. The dominance of cyanobacteria in Mediterranean hypereutrophic lagoons: a case study of Cabras Lagoon (Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pulina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An intense proliferation of cyanobacteria in Cabras Lagoon was investigated over a period of two years (July 2007 to June 2009. The influence of environmental and meteorological parameters in the lagoon on temporal variations in cyanobacteria orders was assessed. For 17 months, Chroococcales was the only cyanobacterial order observed in the lagoon. Cyanobium-type cells (Reynolds functional group Z were the most abundant phytoplankton taxon during this period. In the following months, drastic changes in the cyanobacteria assemblages occurred simultaneously with constant, intense rainfall that led to a sudden drop in the lagoon’s salinity. The succession of autumn–winter Oscillatoriales (Planktothrix sp. and Pseudanabaena catenata; Reynolds functional group S1 and late spring growth of Nostocales (Aphanizomenon gracile, Aphanizomenon aphanizomenoides, and Anabaenopsis circularis; Reynolds functional group H1 was monitored. Canonical Correspondence Analysis was carried out to quantify the influence of environmental variables, and indicated strong relationships between Chroococcales and salinity, Oscillatoriales and higher values of SRP and the DIN/SRP ratio, and Nostocales and lower nutrient concentrations, the DIN/SRP ratio and salinity.

  16. Sea-level rise and coastal groundwater inundation and shoaling at select sites in California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Daniel J.; Odigie, Kingsley; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Barnard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Study regionThe study region spans coastal California, USA, and focuses on three primary sites: Arcata, Stinson Beach, and Malibu Lagoon.Study focus1 m and 2 m sea-level rise (SLR) projections were used to assess vulnerability to SLR-driven groundwater emergence and shoaling at select low-lying, coastal sites in California. Separate and combined inundation scenarios for SLR and groundwater emergence were developed using digital elevation models of study site topography and groundwater surfaces constructed from well data or published groundwater level contours.New hydrological insights for the regionSLR impacts are a serious concern in coastal California which has a long (∼1800 km) and populous coastline. Information on the possible importance of SLR-driven groundwater inundation in California is limited. In this study, the potential for SLR-driven groundwater inundation at three sites (Arcata, Stinson Beach, and Malibu Lagoon) was investigated under 1 m and 2 m SLR scenarios. These sites provide insight into the vulnerability of Northern California coastal plains, coastal developments built on beach sand or sand spits, and developed areas around coastal lagoons associated with seasonal streams and berms. Northern California coastal plains with abundant shallow groundwater likely will see significant and widespread groundwater emergence, while impacts along the much drier central and southern California coast may be less severe due to the absence of shallow groundwater in many areas. Vulnerability analysis is hampered by the lack of data on shallow coastal aquifers, which commonly are not studied because they are not suitable for domestic or agricultural use. Shallow saline aquifers may be present in many areas along coastal California, which would dramatically increase vulnerability to SLR-driven groundwater emergence and shoaling. Improved understanding of the extent and response of California coastal aquifers to SLR will help in preparing for mitigation

  17. Cadmium assessment on the intertidal water margins from the Óbidos Lagoon (western coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia S.S. Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Óbidos Lagoon is the largest shallow coastal lagoon in Portugal. Like any other brackish water system, it has been potentially exposed to different sources of contamination (e.g. livestock farming, domestic and industrial sewage. Trace metals are persistent elements present in the water and sediments in their elemental and organic/inorganic forms. In fact, Cadmium is extremely pollutant due to its great solubility in water and high toxicity for organisms. Also, it is classified as a priority substance according to the European Union Water Frame directive. In this context, a seasonal environmental monitoring program was implemented in the intertidal water margins of the Óbidos Lagoon to assess the presence of Cadmium. In 2009 and 2010, eight sampling stations (S distributed on the shores of the Óbidos Lagoon were chosen and water and sediments were seasonally collected. In all samples, cadmium concentrations were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, with Graphite Furnace Technique. Cadmium dissolved in the water samples was only detected during summer months, with the highest values in the Barrosa’s arm (S3: 0.35 mg/l in 2009, and at the station further downstream (S1: 0.19 mg/l in 2010. In the suspended fraction of the water samples the trace metal was detectable in all seasons, with the maximum concentration at the Barrosa’s arm (S4: 1.04 mg/l in the winter of 2010. Cadmium was not detectable in the sediments during the summers and was sporadically present in the autumn and in the winter of 2009. The highest concentration in the sediments was observed at the Barrosa´s arm (S4: 140.78 mg/kg in the spring of 2010. As a whole, cadmium contamination appears to be mostly focused on the inner areas of the lagoon, at the Barrosa´s arm, but a clear seasonal pattern of variation was not detectable. These results allow a better understanding of the environmental quality of this ecosystem and may assist in the definition of coastal

  18. Ship-induced solitary Riemann waves of depression in Venice Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parnell, Kevin E.; Soomere, Tarmo; Zaggia, Luca; Rodin, Artem; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Rapaglia, John; Scarpa, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that ships of moderate size, sailing at low depth Froude numbers (0.37–0.5) in a navigation channel surrounded by shallow banks, produce depressions with depths up to 2.5 m. These depressions (Bernoulli wakes) propagate as long-living strongly nonlinear solitary Riemann waves of depression substantial distances into Venice Lagoon. They gradually become strongly asymmetric with the rear of the depression becoming extremely steep, similar to a bore. As they are dynamically similar, air pressure fluctuations moving over variable-depth coastal areas could generate meteorological tsunamis with a leading depression wave followed by a devastating bore-like feature. - Highlights: • Unprecedently deep long-living ship-induced waves of depression detected. • Such waves are generated in channels with side banks under low Froude numbers. • The propagation of these waves is replicated using Riemann waves. • Long-living waves of depression form bore-like features at rear slope

  19. Ship-induced solitary Riemann waves of depression in Venice Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, Kevin E. [College of Marine and Environmental Sciences and Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Soomere, Tarmo, E-mail: soomere@cs.ioc.ee [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Estonian Academy of Sciences, Kohtu 6, 10130 Tallinn (Estonia); Zaggia, Luca [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rodin, Artem [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lorenzetti, Giuliano [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rapaglia, John [Sacred Heart University Department of Biology, 5151 Park Avenue, Fairfield, CT 06825 (United States); Scarpa, Gian Marco [Università Ca' Foscari, Dorsoduro 3246, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrate that ships of moderate size, sailing at low depth Froude numbers (0.37–0.5) in a navigation channel surrounded by shallow banks, produce depressions with depths up to 2.5 m. These depressions (Bernoulli wakes) propagate as long-living strongly nonlinear solitary Riemann waves of depression substantial distances into Venice Lagoon. They gradually become strongly asymmetric with the rear of the depression becoming extremely steep, similar to a bore. As they are dynamically similar, air pressure fluctuations moving over variable-depth coastal areas could generate meteorological tsunamis with a leading depression wave followed by a devastating bore-like feature. - Highlights: • Unprecedently deep long-living ship-induced waves of depression detected. • Such waves are generated in channels with side banks under low Froude numbers. • The propagation of these waves is replicated using Riemann waves. • Long-living waves of depression form bore-like features at rear slope.

  20. Is the Venice Lagoon Noisy? First Passive Listening Monitoring of the Venice Lagoon: Possible Effects on the Typical Fish Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolgan, Marta; Picciulin, Marta; Codarin, Antonio; Fiorin, Riccardo; Zucchetta, Matteo; Malavasi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Three passive listening surveys have been carried out in two of the three Venice lagoon tide inlets and inside the Venice island. The spectral content and the intensity level of the underwater noise as well as the presence or absence of Sciaena umbra and the distribution of its different sound patterns have been investigated in all the recording sites. The passive listening proved to be successful in detecting S. umbra drumming sounds in both Venice lagoon tide inlets. Our results indicate that the spectral content and the level of underwater noise pollution in the Venice lagoon could affect fish acoustic communication.

  1. Radioecology of the Kuecuek Cekmece lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, Y.M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to understand the physical-chemical conditions of the Kuecuekcekmece Lagon starting with its creation, meteorological, physical, chemical and biological conditions were determined. Radiometric analyses have been done on the dissected organs of animals which lives in the lagoon and sediments. The effect of the variation of salinity on the accumulationloss and distribution of 65 Zn in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam.) were investigated. Besides of this, determination and comparison of 65 Zn flux rates in Mytilus galloprovincialis in the field and laboratory conditions are made. The results shows that, mixing of both marine and stream water the salinity and elemental composition of the Lagoon change frequently. This events has an influence on the 65 Zn precipitation. Remaining the salinities under the 10 ppt and the pH as an alkali, the 65 Zn adsorption to the small particle became to conciderable quantities. Since Mytilus galloprovincialis feeds itself by fittering the water, we would expect that it would accumulate more activity in such a medium. In contrast to this, less activities accumulated in low salinities and this accumulation is seen mostly in the shells. although the reason for this event cannot be explained as a whole, it can be expressed in two way according to : During adaptation of organisms to the new conditions by its isosmotical ability, some events takes place in the organisms which cause more strongly bounding of the existing zinc in the body. It is for this reason, 65 Zn cannot be able to change with body Zn. The radioactive zinc is not biologically available to the M. galloprovincialis at low salinities

  2. Microbial Mg-carbonate Precipitation and Early Diagenetic Dolomite Crust Formation at Hypersaline Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Perri, E.; Vögeli, N.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary dolomite rocks are commonly considered to be primarily a replacement product of the calcium carbonate components comprising the original limestone, a process known as secondary replacement dolomitization. Although numerous dolomite formations in the geologic record are composed of fine-grained crystals of micritic dolomite, an alternative process, i.e., direct precipitation, is often excluded because of the absence of visible or geochemical indicators supporting primary precipitation. We present a study of a modern coastal hypersaline lagoon, Brejo do Espinho, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, which is located in a special climatic regime where a well-defined seasonal cycle of wet and dry conditions occur. The direct precipitation of modern high-Mg calcite and Ca-dolomite mud from the lagoonal waters under low-temperature hypersaline conditions is associated with the activity of microbial organisms living in this restricted environment. The mud undergoes an early diagenetic transformation into a 100% dolomite crust on the margins of the lagoon. The biomineralization process, characterized by the variations of the physico-chemical conditions in this environment during the annual hydrologic cycle, is integrated with isotopic analysis to define the early diagenetic processes responsible for the formation of both dolomitic mud and crust. The carbon isotope values indicate a contribution of respired organic carbon, which is greater for the crust (δ13C = -9.5‰ VPDB) than mud (δ13C = -1.2‰ VPDB). The oxygen isotope values reflect a moderate degree of evaporation during mud formation (δ18O = 1.1‰ VPDB), whereas it is greatly enhanced during early diagenetic crust formation (δ18O = 4.2‰ VPDB). The clumped isotope formation temperatures derived for the Brejo do Espinho mud is 34°C and 32°C for the crust. These temperatures are consistent with the upper range of measured values during the dry season when the lagoon experiences the most hypersaline

  3. Seasonal distribution of phytoplankton in the Aby lagoon system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main phytoplankton taxa responsible for this high abundance were Microcystis aeruginosa, Oscillatoria princeps, Pseudanabaena limnetica, Aphanizomenon sp. 2 and Anabaena planctonica. Keywords: abundance, choked lagoon, community distribution, diversity, environmental variables, river inputs. African Journal ...

  4. Spatial assessment of radiocaesium in the largest lagoon in Fukushima after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Shota; Zhang, Jing; Narita, Hisashi

    2017-09-15

    Radionuclides deposited on land by global fallouts and nuclear power station accidents spread over coastal environments through estuarine areas connecting land to ocean. In this study, we monitored activity concentration of radiocaesium in surface sediment and re-suspended particles in Matsukawa-ura lagoon, the largest lagoon in Fukushima, after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident. Radiocaesium distribution in surface sediment varied spatiotemporally and irregularly due to the effect of tidal waves. The effective half-life was significantly shorter than physical half-life, suggesting some system of radiocaesium discharge in the lagoon. Sediment trap observation revealed re-suspended particles from sediment were transported to the ocean. For these reasons, it is suggested that re-suspension of particles in the lagoon and their transportation to the ocean by the seawater exchange process are important processes of radiocaesium discharge. Moreover, our results show that seawater exchange process contributes to the dispersion of radiocaesium in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphate gypsum wastes in Venice lagoon. Radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M; Blasi, M; Guogang, J.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U.; Biancotto, R.; Bidoli, P.; Sepulcri, D.

    2000-03-01

    The phosphoric minerals utilized in phosphoric acid production, presents high concentrations of radioactive materials: U238, Th 232, K 40. The phosphogypsum is the waste material obtained in the phosphoric acid production in wet process. This type of production method is employed for many years in Venice lagoon (Porto Marghera chemical plants). In this paper are reported evaluations of radiological impact on aquatic environment of lagoon [it

  6. Gaining insight into Clipperton's lagoon hydrology using tritium

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-baptiste, Philippe; Fourre, Elise; Charlou, Jean-luc; Donval, Jean-pierre; Correge, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Historical descriptions of the Clipperton lagoon appear to converge on the fact that it became isolated from the surrounding ocean around 1858. Since then, because of the high precipitation rate which largely exceeds evaporation in this region of the eastern tropical Pacific, a brackish lens has formed on top of the saline oceanic waters. In 1980, literature data show that the thickness of this water body was reaching 14 m. During the 2005 Etienne's Clipperton expedition, we collected lagoon ...

  7. Influence of the surface drag coefficient (young waves) on the current structure of the Berre lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Roux, Bernard; Kharif, Christian; Sukhinov, Alexander; Kotarba, Richard; Fougere, Dominique; Chen, Paul Gang

    2013-04-01

    Due to the shallowness, currents and hydrodynamics of Berre lagoon (South of France) are closely conditioned by the bottom topography, and wind affects the entire water column, as for many other Mediterranean lagoons (Perez-Ruzafa, 2011). Wind stress, which is caused by moving atmospheric disturbance, is known to have a major influence in lagoon water circulation. According to the numerical simulation for the main directions of the wind: N-NW, S-SE and W (wind speed of 80 km/h) it is observed that the current is maximal alongshore in the wind direction; the bottom nearshore current being larger in shallower area. This fact is coherent with fundamental principle of wind-driven flows in closed or partially closed basins which states that in shallow water the dominant force balance is between surface wind stress and bottom friction, yielding a current in the direction of the wind (Mathieu et al, 2002, Hunter and Hearn, 1987; Hearn and Hunter,1990). A uniform wind stress applied at the surface of a basin of variable depth sets up a circulation pattern characterized by relatively strong barotropic coastal currents in the direction of the wind, with return flow occurring over the deeper regions (Csanady, 1967; Csanady, 1971). One of the key parameters characterizing the wind stress formulation is a surface drag coefficient (Cds). Thus, an effect of a surface drag coefficient, in the range 0.0016 - 0.0032, will be analyzed in this work. The value of surface drag coefficient Cds = 0.0016 used in our previous studies (Alekseenko et al., 2012), would correspond to mature waves (open sea). But, in the case of semi-closed lagoonal ecosystem, it would be more appropriate to consider "young waves" mechanism. A dependency of this coefficient in terms of the wind speed is given by Young (1999) in both cases of mature waves and young waves. For "young waves" generated at a wind speed of 80 km/h, Cds = 0.0032. So, the influence of Cds on the vertical profile of the velocity in the

  8. Chemical composition of sediments from the Patos Lagoon, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baisch, P.R.M.; Asmus, H.E.; Jounneau, J.-M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of major elements (Si,Al,Fe,Mg,Mn,Ca,Ti,K,Na), trace elements (Pb,Cu,Zn,Ni,Cr,Zr,Ba,Rb,Sr,Co,Ga) and organic matter (C-org.; N-org., S and P), and of bottom sediments from the Patos Lagoon, aim to define the regional geochemical variables of this lagoon. The results identified three main groups of trace elements: 1) trace elements associated with argillo-mineral and with organic matter: Zn, Ni, Cr, Rb; 2) trace elements of detrital origin: Ti, Za, Ba; and 3) trace elements connected exclusively to organic matter: Mn, Cu, Co. The results of this study also demonstrate the main regional variations of the major and trace elements, of the organic matter and of the sedimentary grain size along a north-south profile in the lagoon. Organic matter is the most important factor for the distribution of trace elements. The Guaiba hydrographic system is the main source for the detrital and non-detrital trace elements in the lagoon. Gradual sedimentation along the Patos Lagoon can be pointed to as the cause of higher concentrations of Pb, Cu and Cr (partial fraction) in the southern part of the lagoon. (author) [pt

  9. METALS POLLLUTION IN EL LIMON LAGOON, CHIAPAS, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Teresa Leal-Ascencio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El Limón Lagoon belongs to the Reforma county, in the State of Chiapas, Mexico. Massive fish killings have occurred in the lagoon, demanding a deeper study to determine the pollution state of the lagoon, as well as the possible cause of the deaths. Results show that the average concentrations of Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd and Cu in the lagoon are beyond the recommended limits in Canada and USA to avoid deleterious biological effects in aquatic species. Special mention has to be done for the case of Zn, with a maximum concentration of 1360 mg/kg, presumably associated with the use of this metal as a catalyst in a natural gas plant close to the lagoon. Although the industrial discharges comply with the Mexican Standards for metals in wastewaters, this has not been enough to avoid the accumulation of metals in sediments, which is a demonstration of failure of the Mexican Wastewater Standards that should be more restrictive especially in the case of lagoons with a low water recharge, taking into account the type of water body where the wastewater is loading. In the case of the application of this water for agriculture, the metals can accumulate in soils, with unwanted effects on crops.

  10. Pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and pesticides in Mediterranean coastal waters: Results from a pilot survey using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaron, Dominique; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Andral, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    21 pharmaceuticals, 6 alkylphenols and 27 hydrophilic pesticides and biocides were investigated using polar organic contaminant integrative samplers (POCIS) during a large-scale study of contamination of French Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine and transitional water-bodies, defined under the EU Water Framework Directive were monitored. Our results show that the French Mediterranean coastal waters were contaminated with a large range of emerging contaminants, detected at low concentrations during the summer season. Caffeine, carbamazepine, theophilline and terbutaline were detected with a detection frequency higher than 83% in the coastal waters sampled, 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) were detected in all coastal waters sampled, and diuron, terbuthylazine, atrazine, irgarol and simazine were detected in more than 77% of samples. For pharmaceuticals, highest time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations were measured for caffeine and carbamazepine (32 and 12 ng L-1, respectively). For alkylphenols, highest TWA concentrations were measured for 4-nonylphenol mono-ethoxylate and 4-nonylphenol (41 and 33 ng L-1, respectively), and for herbicides and biocides, they were measured for diuron and irgarol (33 and 2.5 ng L-1, respectively). Except for Diana lagoon, lagoons and semi-enclosed bays were the most contaminated areas for herbicides and pharmaceuticals, whilst, for alkylphenols, levels of contamination were similar in lagoons and coastal waters. This study demonstrates the relevance and utility of POCIS as quantitative tool for measuring low concentrations of emerging contaminants in marine waters.

  11. Lake Superior Coastal Wetland Fish Assemblages and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of the coastal margin and the watershed context in defining the ecology of even very large lakes is increasingly being recognized and examined. Coastal wetlands are both important contributors to the biodiversity and productivity of large lakes and important mediators of the lake-basin connection. We explored wetland-watershed connections and their relationship to wetland function and condition using data collected from 37 Lake Superior wetlands spanning a substantial geographic and geomorphic gradient. While none of these wetlands are particularly disturbed, there were nevertheless clear relationships between watershed landuse and wetland habitat and biota, and these varied consistently across wetland type categories that reflected the strength of connection to the watershed. For example, water clarity and vegetation structure complexity declined with decreasing percent natural land cover, and these effects were strongest in riverine wetlands (having generally large watersheds and tributary-dominated hydrology) and weakest in lagoon wetlands (having generally small watersheds and lake-dominate hydrology). Fish abundance and species richness both increased with decreasing percent natural land cover while species diversity decreased, and again the effect was strongest in riverine wetlands. Lagoonal wetlands, which lack any substantial tributary, consistently harbored the fewest species of fish and a composition different from the more watershed-lin

  12. Impact of nutrient enrichment and fish introductions on the structure and function of experimental shallow littoral lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Cano-Rocabayera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean coastal lagoons are probably one of the most singular and endangered ecosystems worldwide. Common threats to other aquatic ecosystems are nutrient enrichment and species introductions. In shallow and warm areas, the environmental concern may be even exacerbated by an increase in nutrient levels and biotic interactions due to the low water flow, coupled to the temperature-sensitivity of ectotherms’ metabolism and hence ecological processes. Nutrient enrichment can benefit ecosystem productivity when the bottom-up effect of nutrients is counteracted by top-down controllers such as macro-invertebrates and/or fish. This balance can, however, be directly and indirectly disrupted by excessive fertilization and/or the release of exotic species. Ammonia and nitrite has long been considered a water quality hazard but the toxic effects of nitrates are still poorly studied. The present study examined experimentally the multi-trophic impacts of chronic nitrate exposure and/or the invasive eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki on the structure and function of shallow littoral lagoons. Specifically, we monitored ecosystem metabolism (primary production and leaf litter decomposition and the community structure of pelagic and benthonic macro-invertebrates during 2 months. Preliminary results show that chronic nitrate pollution and/or G. holbrooki can profoundly alter the structure and function of coastal lagoon ecosystems, and that pelagic and benthonic sub-systems are coupled in response to these anthropogenic stressors. Although the long-term consequences of these findings remain to be examined in detail, this study will increase our mechanistic understanding of how the top-down and bottom-up controllers of aquatic ecosystems are affected by major drivers of global change typified by nitrate pollution and an invasive species.

  13. Abundance of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus (Cetacea: Delphinidae, inhabiting the Patos Lagoon estuary, southern Brazil: implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro F Fruet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new mark-recapture abundance estimate and a photographic census were carried out to investigate the possible decline in the abundance of the bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus (Montagu, 1821, in the Patos Lagoon estuary due to the high levels of bycatch mortality which occurred between 2002 and 2006 in oceanic coastal areas close to the estuary. Fourteen systematic boat surveys were conducted between August and early December 2005 to photo-identify the bottlenose dolphins. The estimated number of animals, with long-lasting marks, in the population obtained from Chapman's and Mth models were 51 (95% CI = 49-53 and 52 (95% CI = 51-60, respectively. Taking into account the proportion of dolphins with long-lasting marks in the population, the total estimated population size ranged between 84 (95% CI = 76-93 and 86 (95% CI = 78-95 individuals, respectively, which was very similar to the 84 individuals revealed by the population census. Our results did not differ from the abundance estimate carried out in 1998, prior to the high fishing-related mortality event, suggesting that the population is stable. Plausible argument to explain the stability of the population is that some carcasses found on the oceanic coastal beaches near Patos Lagoon estuary come from animals that do not belong to the estuary community. Future studies should investigate fine-scale habitat partition between estuarine and adjacent coastal dolphins. If the existence of different communities living in close proximity (estuarine and coastal areas near to the estuary is confirmed, a new abundance estimate is needed to access the conservation status of bottlenose dolphins in this region.

  14. The lagoon a study in imagery The lagoon a study in imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gago Alvarez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to prove that, through exuberant sensuous imagery - the strange tropical setting, the mystery of elements, light and darkness - Joseph Conrad, in his short-story "The Lagoon" describes and transmits Impressionistically, the dramatic story of a men surprised by his own act of cowardice, a man divided between loyalty to his own blood and love. This man, Arsat suffers a blockaded feeling towards himself because he failed to act when he had the occasion, and he missed it: he left his brother to die in the hands of the enemy while he. Arsat, escaped with his love Diamelen, to live in the "shadows" of "The Lagoon" - his own psychological, subconscious guilty conscience. The story starts with a description of nature, as motionless, and undefined as the plot still is: The forests, somber and dull, stood motionless and silent... In the stillness of the air ... minute blossoms seemed do have been bewitched into an immobility perfect and final. Nothing moved on the river (1 The purpose of this paper is to prove that, through exuberant sensuous imagery - the strange tropical setting, the mystery of elements, light and darkness - Joseph Conrad, in his short-story "The Lagoon" describes and transmits Impressionistically, the dramatic story of a men surprised by his own act of cowardice, a man divided between loyalty to his own blood and love. This man, Arsat suffers a blockaded feeling towards himself because he failed to act when he had the occasion, and he missed it: he left his brother to die in the hands of the enemy while he. Arsat, escaped with his love Diamelen, to live in the "shadows" of "The Lagoon" - his own psychological, subconscious guilty conscience. The story starts with a description of nature, as motionless, and undefined as the plot still is: The forests, somber and dull, stood motionless and silent... In the stillness of the air ... minute blossoms seemed do have been bewitched into an

  15. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Mark R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  16. Intermittent Flooding of Arctic Lagoon Wet Sedge Areas: an investigation of past and future conditions at Arey Lagoon, Eastern Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, A.; Erikson, L. H.; Richmond, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic lagoons and mainland coasts support highly productive ecosystems, where soft substrate and coastal wet sedge fringing the shores act as feeding grounds and nurseries for a variety of marine fish and waterfowl. Much tundra vegetation is intolerant to saltwater flooding, but some vegetation cherished by geese for example, is maintained by flooding one to two times per month. The balance of northern ecosystems such as these may be in jeopardy as the Arctic climate is rapidly changing. In this study, sea level rise and 21st century storms are simulated with a numerical model to evaluate changes in ocean-driven flooding of low-lying tundra and coastal wet sedge that fringe the shores of Arey Lagoon, located in eastern Arctic Alaska. Numerically modeled extreme surge levels are projected to increase from a historical range of 0.5 m - 1.3 m (1976-2010) to 1.0 m - 2.0 m by end-of-century (2011-2100). The maximum storm surge of the projected time-period translates to > 6 km2 of flooded tundra, much of which consists of salt-intolerant vegetation. Monthly flood extents that might be expected to maintain halophytic vegetation were calculated by extracting the maximum monthly water levels of months that had more than 21 days ( 70%) of ice-free conditions. Median monthly water levels are shown to range from 0.46 m in 1981-1990 to 0.91 m by the final decades of the 21st century. The temporal trend is strongly linear (r2 = 0.82). An overlay of these water elevations onto a 10 m resolution elevation model shows that monthly flood extents will increase by 26% by the end of the century compared to the present decade (2011 to 2020) (from 2.86 km2 to 3.60 km2). The rate at which the flood extents are projected to increase will dictate if inland succession of salt-tolerant vegetation will survive. By combining the frequency and magnitude of extreme storm surge events with the progression of modeled monthly inland flood extents, it might be possible to identify areas along this

  17. Biogeochemical cycling and phyto- and bacterioplankton communities in a large and shallow tropical lagoon (Términos Lagoon, Mexico) under 2009-2010 El Niño Modoki drought conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Agab, Marina; Calva-Benítez, Laura; Chifflet, Sandrine; Douillet, Pascal; Dussud, Claire; Fichez, Renaud; Grenz, Christian; Gutierrez Mendieta, Francisco; Origel-Moreno, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Blanco, Arturo; Sauret, Caroline; Severin, Tatiana; Tedetti, Marc; Torres Alvarado, Rocío; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    The 2009-2010 period was marked by an episode of intense drought known as the El Niño Modoki event. Sampling of the Términos Lagoon (Mexico) was carried out in November 2009 in order to understand the influence of these particular environmental conditions on organic matter fluxes within the lagoon's pelagic ecosystem and, more specifically, on the relationship between phyto- and bacterioplankton communities. The measurements presented here concern biogeochemical parameters (nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic matter [POM], and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]), phytoplankton (biomass and photosynthesis), and bacteria (diversity and abundance, including PAH degradation bacteria and ectoenzymatic activities). During the studied period, the water column of the Términos Lagoon functioned globally as a sink and, more precisely, as a nitrogen assimilator. This was due to the high production of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM), even though exportation of autochthonous matter to the Gulf of Mexico was weak. We found that bottom-up control accounted for a large portion of the variability of phytoplankton productivity. Nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry mostly accounted for the heterogeneity in phytoplankton and free-living prokaryote distribution in the lagoon. In the eastern part, we found a clear decoupling between areas enriched in dissolved inorganic nitrogen near the Puerto Real coastal inlet and areas enriched in phosphate (PO4) near the Candelaria estuary. Such a decoupling limited the potential for primary production, resulting in an accumulation of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC and DON, respectively) near the river mouths. In the western part of the lagoon, maximal phytoplankton development resulted from bacterial activity transforming particulate organic phosphorus (PP) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) to available PO4 and the coupling between Palizada River inputs of nitrate (NO3) and PP. The

  18. Coastal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The report entitled Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation : A Canadian Perspective, presents a summary of research regarding the impacts of climate change on key sectors over the past five years as it relates to Canada. This chapter on the coastal zone focuses on the impact of climate change on Canada's marine and Great Lakes coasts with tips on how to deal with the impacts associated with climate change in sensitive environments. This report is aimed at the sectors that will be most affected by adaptation decisions in the coastal zone, including fisheries, tourism, transportation and water resources. The impact of climate change in the coastal zone may include changes in water levels, wave patterns, storm surges, and thickness of seasonal ice cover. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects global average sea level will rise between 9 and 88 centimetres between 1990 to 2100, but not all areas of Canada will experience the same rate of future sea level change. The main physical impact would be shoreline change that could result in a range of biophysical and socio-economic impacts, some beneficial, some negative. The report focuses on issues related to infrastructure and communities in coastal regions. It is noted that appropriate human adaptation will play a vital role in reducing the extent of potential impacts by decreasing the vulnerability of average zone to climate change. The 3 main trends in coastal adaptation include: (1) increase in soft protection, retreat and accommodation, (2) reliance on technology such as geographic information systems to manage information, and (3) awareness of the need for coastal adaptation that is appropriate for local conditions. 61 refs., 7 figs

  19. Contribution of the thraustochytrid Corallochytrium limacisporum Raghu-kumar to microbial biomass in coral reef lagoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Chandramohan, D.; Ramaiah, N.

    on the number of C limacisporum, total viable bacteria (saprophyte numbers), chlorophyll a content and total ATP in the lagoon waters, the contribution of C limacisporum to the microbial biomass in coral reef lagoons of the Lakshadweep islands was calculated...

  20. Zooplankton of the lagoons of the Laccadives: diel patterns and emergence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    of epibenthic forms are much higher than those observed in traps. Densities of emerging plankton varied geographically. Most of the zooplankton organisms which contribute to the lagoon fauna are resident in the lagoons and rarely occurred in the surrounding sea....

  1. Mechanism of nitrogen removal in wastewater lagoon: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramelli, Richard A; Vijay, Saloni; Yuan, Qiuyan

    2017-06-01

    Ammonia being a nutrient facilitates the growth of algae in wastewater and causes eutrophication. Nitrate poses health risk if it is present in drinking water. Hence, nitrogen removal from wastewater is required. Lagoon wastewater treatment systems have become common in Canada these days. The study was conducted to understand the nitrogen removal mechanisms from the existing wastewater treatment lagoon system in the town of Lorette, Manitoba. The lagoon system consists of two primary aerated cells and two secondary unaerated cells. Surface samples were collected periodically from lagoon cells and analysed from 5 May 2015 to 9 November 2015. The windward and leeward sides of the ponds were sampled and the results were averaged. It was found that the free ammonia volatilization to the atmosphere is responsible for most of the ammonia removal. Ammonia and nitrate assimilation into biomass and biological growth in the cells appears to be the other mechanisms of nitrogen removal over the monitoring period. Factors affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency were found to be pH, temperature and hydraulic residence time. Also, the ammonia concentration in the effluent from the wastewater treatment lagoon was compared with the regulatory standard.

  2. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  3. Progress report for project modeling Arctic barrier island-lagoon system response to projected Arctic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Li H.; Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Storlazzi, Curt; B.M. Jones,

    2012-01-01

    Changes in Arctic coastal ecosystems in response to global warming may be some of the most severe on the planet. A better understanding and analysis of the rates at which these changes are expected to occur over the coming decades is crucial in order to delineate high-priority areas that are likely to be affected by climate changes. In this study we investigate the likelihood of changes to habitat-supporting barrier island – lagoon systems in response to projected changes in atmospheric and oceanographic forcing associated with Arctic warming. To better understand the relative importance of processes responsible for the current and future coastal landscape, key parameters related to increasing arctic temperatures are investigated and used to establish boundary conditions for models that simulate barrier island migration and inundation of deltaic deposits and low-lying tundra. The modeling effort investigates the dominance and relative importance of physical processes shaping the modern Arctic coastline as well as decadal responses due to projected conditions out to the year 2100.

  4. High resolution multibeam and hydrodynamic datasets of tidal channels and inlets of the Venice Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madricardo, Fantina; Foglini, Federica; Kruss, Aleksandra; Ferrarin, Christian; Pizzeghello, Nicola Marco; Murri, Chiara; Rossi, Monica; Bajo, Marco; Bellafiore, Debora; Campiani, Elisabetta; Fogarin, Stefano; Grande, Valentina; Janowski, Lukasz; Keppel, Erica; Leidi, Elisa; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Maicu, Francesco; Maselli, Vittorio; Mercorella, Alessandra; Montereale Gavazzi, Giacomo; Minuzzo, Tiziano; Pellegrini, Claudio; Petrizzo, Antonio; Prampolini, Mariacristina; Remia, Alessandro; Rizzetto, Federica; Rovere, Marzia; Sarretta, Alessandro; Sigovini, Marco; Sinapi, Luigi; Umgiesser, Georg; Trincardi, Fabio

    2017-09-05

    Tidal channels are crucial for the functioning of wetlands, though their morphological properties, which are relevant for seafloor habitats and flow, have been understudied so far. Here, we release a dataset composed of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) extracted from a total of 2,500 linear kilometres of high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) data collected in 2013 covering the entire network of tidal channels and inlets of the Venice Lagoon, Italy. The dataset comprises also the backscatter (BS) data, which reflect the acoustic properties of the seafloor, and the tidal current fields simulated by means of a high-resolution three-dimensional unstructured hydrodynamic model. The DTMs and the current fields help define how morphological and benthic properties of tidal channels are affected by the action of currents. These data are of potential broad interest not only to geomorphologists, oceanographers and ecologists studying the morphology, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and benthic habitats of tidal environments, but also to coastal engineers and stakeholders for cost-effective monitoring and sustainable management of this peculiar shallow coastal system.

  5. High resolution multibeam and hydrodynamic datasets of tidal channels and inlets of the Venice Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madricardo, Fantina; Foglini, Federica; Kruss, Aleksandra; Ferrarin, Christian; Pizzeghello, Nicola Marco; Murri, Chiara; Rossi, Monica; Bajo, Marco; Bellafiore, Debora; Campiani, Elisabetta; Fogarin, Stefano; Grande, Valentina; Janowski, Lukasz; Keppel, Erica; Leidi, Elisa; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Maicu, Francesco; Maselli, Vittorio; Mercorella, Alessandra; Montereale Gavazzi, Giacomo; Minuzzo, Tiziano; Pellegrini, Claudio; Petrizzo, Antonio; Prampolini, Mariacristina; Remia, Alessandro; Rizzetto, Federica; Rovere, Marzia; Sarretta, Alessandro; Sigovini, Marco; Sinapi, Luigi; Umgiesser, Georg; Trincardi, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Tidal channels are crucial for the functioning of wetlands, though their morphological properties, which are relevant for seafloor habitats and flow, have been understudied so far. Here, we release a dataset composed of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) extracted from a total of 2,500 linear kilometres of high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) data collected in 2013 covering the entire network of tidal channels and inlets of the Venice Lagoon, Italy. The dataset comprises also the backscatter (BS) data, which reflect the acoustic properties of the seafloor, and the tidal current fields simulated by means of a high-resolution three-dimensional unstructured hydrodynamic model. The DTMs and the current fields help define how morphological and benthic properties of tidal channels are affected by the action of currents. These data are of potential broad interest not only to geomorphologists, oceanographers and ecologists studying the morphology, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and benthic habitats of tidal environments, but also to coastal engineers and stakeholders for cost-effective monitoring and sustainable management of this peculiar shallow coastal system.

  6. Australian uranium mining policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, B.

    1985-01-01

    Australian government policy is explained in terms of adherence to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Two alleged uncertainties are discussed: the future of Australian mining industry as a whole -on which it is said that Australian uranium mines will continue to be developed; and detailed commercial policy of the Australian government - on which it is suggested that the three-mines policy of limited expansion of the industry would continue. Various aspects of policy, applying the principles of the NPT, are listed. (U.K.)

  7. Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oumeraci, H.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rouck, J. De

    1995-01-01

    The paper attempts to present an overview of five research projects supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General XII, under the MAST 2- Programme (Marine Sciences and Technology), with the overall objective of contributing to the development of improved rational me...... methods for the design of coastal structures....

  8. Ocean-lagoon water and plankton exchanges in a semi-closed pearl farming atoll lagoon (Ahe, Tuamotu archipelago, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, M.; Rodier, M.; Guillaumot, C.; Thomas, Y.; Henry, K.; Andréfouët, S.

    2017-05-01

    In atoll lagoons, plankton richness is highly dependent on water exchange with the ocean through the atoll rim. However, the dynamics of the physical and biological fluxes at the lagoon-ocean interface remain poorly characterized. Here, we studied the combined effects of lagoon-ocean water exchanges and local environmental conditions on the phyto- and zooplankton abundance and community structure across the atoll lagoon rim of Ahe (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia). Plankton and environmental variables were monitored in May 2013 (i) at several stations inside and outside the lagoon and (ii) during time-series corresponding to ebb-flood tidal cycles in the two types of channels connecting the lagoon to the ocean: at the passage (300 m long and about 11 m deep) and in hoa (i.e reef-flat less than 50 cm depth). Our results highlight tidally-driven selective plankton exchanges between the lagoon and external ocean. Phytoplankton (chlorophyll-a) and zooplankton biomass were respectively 4 times and 7 times higher in the lagoon than at stations outside the atoll lagoon. Copepoda was the dominant zooplankton group at the oceanic station (>75% abundance) whereas meroplankton (with bivalve larvae most common) was dominant at the lagoon stations (54%), in the passage (55-82%) and in hoa (>80%). These differences between sites suggest a loss of bivalve larvae through export to the ocean and retention and/or increased production of copepods in the lagoon. The daily export of bivalve larvae represents a low percentage of the lagoon stock, in agreement with previously published larval dispersal numerical models. The retention of copepods could constitute a significant input of nutrients and organic matter (through excretion, feces release, decomposition, and remineralization) into the lagoon.

  9. On the Hydrodynamic Geometry of Flow-Through versus Restricted Lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Th. Fourniotis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The classification of a lagoon as a restricted lagoon is shown to depend not solely on its geometry but also on the tidal hydraulics. By numerically simulating the tidal exchange of two lagoons of similar geometrical dimensions, the Nidova lagoon and the Papas lagoon, in Western Greece, subject to very similar tidal forcing, applied to the two tidal inlets in the first case and three in the second, very different residence times are found, namely 2.5 days for the Nidova and 25–30 days for the Papas lagoon. This large difference is attributed to the fact that whereas the Papas lagoon functions as a typical restricted lagoon, in which the water renewal is achieved by mixing in the lagoon of the tidal prism water exchanged within a tidal cycle, the Nidova lagoon functions as a flow-through system because of the differential arrival of the tide at its two tidal inlets. It is suggested that this way of enhancing the flushing rate of a lagoon be considered, whenever possible, when creating a new tidal inlet to the lagoon.

  10. 75 FR 53960 - Chignik Lagoon Power Utility; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Project will be located on Packers Creek, near the community of Chignik Lagoon, Lake and Peninsula Borough... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. DI10-15-000] Chignik Lagoon....: DI10-15-000. c. Date Filed: August 9, 2010. d. Applicant: Chignik Lagoon Power Utility. e. Name of...

  11. Comparison between different methodologies of environmental sensitivity classification for lagoons; Comparacao entre diferentes metodologias de classificacao do indice de sensibilidade do litoral a derramamentos de oleo para ambientes lagunares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Carine; Cabral, Alexandre; Griep, Gilberto Henrique [Fundacao Universidade do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper aims to show a brief presentation about the variation of Environmental Sensibility Index (ISL) to west coast of Patos Lagoon, in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, between the seasons winter and summer. Furthermore, it compares two different methodologies for Sensibility Classification: the first one, for fluvial environments, which was suggested by PETROBRAS, 2006 and other one for either coastal and tidal environments, suggested by Environmental Ministry, 2002. (author)

  12. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  13. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond

  14. [Spatial and temporal mangrove litter production in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Jalisco, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Morales, Alma J; González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo

    2016-03-01

    Barra de Navidad lagoon is a coastal wetland of international importance (Ramsar site) and it is included among the 81 Mexican mangrove priority sites. One of the most valued characteristics of this lagoon is the presence of mangrove forest in a good conservation state. The goal of our research was the measurement of mangrove litter production and environmental factors influencing its dynamics. The mangrove area was divided into seven zones and litterfall was monthly sampled from November 2011 to October 2012 using 0.25 m(2) square collectors made with mosquito mesh (1 mm) and positioned at 1.3 m above the ground. Abiotic variables of the interstitial water were measured simultaneously at each zone in permanent plots using a multi-parameter probe, YSI-556-M. Total mean value of litterfall production, weighted by zone surface, was 19.12 ± 1.23 gPS/m(2).mo (2.29 t/ha.year). This low productivity is a consequence of the region’s dry climate and low tide range. The species Avicennia germinans and Laguncularia racemosa produced more than 80 % of total litterfall, while Rhizophora mangle contributed only 16 % and Conocarpus erectus abiotic variables was found (e.g. salinity and interstitial water depth). We concluded that there are significant spatial variations in soil abiotic variables which are correlated with differences in mangrove species composition, and produce, together with the life cycles stages of those species, significant variations in the quantity and composition of litterfall. Future research will be focused on quantifying spatial variations in forest structure and their relationship with litterfall production.

  15. Spatial patterns of diversity at local and regional scales in a tropical lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adán Caballero-Vázquez

    Full Text Available The present study reports estimates of alpha (α, beta (β and gamma (Γ diversity for the fish community of Chacmochuch Lagoon (SE Mexico, a natural protected area located in the northern portion of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System. Fish specimens were sampled in 2004 and 2006. Field work was carried out at three climatic peaks: at 13 stations using a 70 m-long beach seine. The collected data were supplemented with information obtained from a previous work conducted in 2002 and were then analyzed with multivariate statistical methods. In addition, fish composition results from this study were compared to those reported for other similar ecosystems of the region. A total of 68 fish species were recorded, determined as peripheral (high-salinity species, usually marine affinity most of them. Most of the fish species collected were determined as rare, and a few number of species were determined as common and dominant. Salinity, TSD, temperature, dissolved oxygen and other variables were measured to determine the influence over the fish communities, four groups of sites where determined. Results indicated a gradual decrease in the degree of species replacement towards the interior of the system (away from the coast. The estimated value of gamma diversity was high compared to that reported for other coastal systems of the region and, due to the high degree of habitat heterogeneity found in this system; beta diversity had a greater contribution to gamma diversity than alpha diversity. This lagoon acts as a nursing area for many of the fish species collected in this study as indicated by the presence of juvenile stages.

  16. Fishing Across the Centuries: What Prospects for the Venice Lagoon?

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestri, Silvia; Pellizzato, M.; Boatto, V.

    2006-01-01

    Fishing has always been an important activity for those Venetians who live near the Lagoon, and it still enjoys an important economic and social role in the region. Over the last few years, however, the fishing industry has been subject to a profound transformation both in the reduction of the variety and the abundance of the species found in the lagoon, and in the change from a complex and well-structured type of activity to one which has become monospecialist, that is based principally on t...

  17. Linking integrated water resources management and integrated coastal zone management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, P S; Ipsen, N; Malmgren-Hansen, A; Mogensen, B

    2005-01-01

    Some of the world's most valuable aquatic ecosystems such as deltas, lagoons and estuaries are located in the coastal zone. However, the coastal zone and its aquatic ecosystems are in many places under environmental stress from human activities. About 50% of the human population lives within 200 km of the coastline, and the population density is increasing every day. In addition, the majority of urban centres are located in the coastal zone. It is commonly known that there are important linkages between the activities in the upstream river basins and the environment conditions in the downstream coastal zones. Changes in river flows, e.g. caused by irrigation, hydropower and water supply, have changed salinity in estuaries and lagoons. Land use changes, such as intensified agricultural activities and urban and industrial development, cause increasing loads of nutrients and a variety of chemicals resulting in considerable adverse impacts in the coastal zones. It is recognised that the solution to such problems calls for an integrated approach. Therefore, the terms Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) are increasingly in focus on the international agenda. Unfortunately, the concepts of IWRM and ICZM are mostly being developed independently from each other by separate management bodies using their own individual approaches and tools. The present paper describes how modelling tools can be used to link IWRM and ICZM. It draws a line from the traditional sectoral use of models for the Istanbul Master Planning and assessment of the water quality and ecological impact in the Bosphorus Strait and the Black Sea 10 years ago, to the most recent use of models in a Water Framework Directive (WFD) context for one of the selected Pilot River Basins in Denmark used for testing of the WFD Guidance Documents.

  18. Mapping saline water intrusion into the coastal aquifer with geophysical and geochemical techniques: the University of Lagos campus case (Nigeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayolabi, Elijah A; Folorunso, Adetayo F; Odukoya, Abiodun M; Adeniran, Adelere E

    2013-01-01

    Saltwater intrusion into the coastal aquifer, a phenomenon brought by the flow of seawater into freshwater aquifers originally caused by groundwater extraction near the coast, has long been recognised as a major concern around the world. In this study, we employed geophysical and geochemical techniques to map and provide evidences that the coastal aquifers in the study area have been intruded by saltwater from the adjacent Lagos lagoon. The resistivity data were acquired with an electrode spacing (a) that vary between 1.6 to 8 m, and expansion factor n of 30. The depth inverted models obtained from inversion of the fifteen resistivity data obtained in the area revealed significant impact of the lagoon water on the aquifers indicated as low resistivity usually below 7 Ωm. A combination of four different electrode arrays - Schlumberger, Wenner, Dipole-dipole and pole-dipole, with at least three deployed at each site ( except for three traverses - traverses 13, 14 and 15), yield better horizontal and vertical resolution, having depth range of 36-226 m with 1.6-8 m electrode spacing used. The delineated geoelectric layers were juxtaposed with logs from both boreholes located within the campus. Evidence from geochemical study of borehole and the lagoon water samples corroborated the ERT result. Progressive decrease in total dissolved solute (TDS) and electrical conductivity (EC) from the lagoon to the coastal aquifer buttresses gradual encroachment of the inland aquifers by the intruding lagoon water. In addition, similar trend was observed in heavy metal distribution Pollution Index (PI) plot suggesting possible underground flow of water from the lagoon to the aquifers. From this study, we deduced that excessive groundwater extraction and possibly the reduction of groundwater gradients which allows saline-water to displace fresh water in the aquifer of the investigated area are responsible for the saline water intrusion observed.

  19. Understanding relationships between morphology and ecosystem structure in a shallow tidal basins of Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Taramelli, Andrea; Valentini, Emiliana; Filipponi, Federico; Meisina, Claudia; Zucca, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Coastal wetlands represent complex ecosystems prone to continue fluctuation of their internal equilibrium. They are valuable natural resources characterized by the continue interactions between geomorphological and biological components. Their adaptation to changing conditions is highly dependent on the rate and extent of spatial and temporal processes and their responses are still poorly understood. According to this, the vulnerability assessment to natural and human made hazard have became fundamental to analyse the resilience of these areas, their ability to cope with the impacts from externally driven forces or the efforts needed to minimize the impacts (Gitay et al., 2011). The objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive and replicable method through the application of Multi-Source data analysis, based on the integration of Earth Observation data and field survey, to analyse a shallow tidal basin of salt marshes, located in the northern part of the Venice lagoon. The study site is characterised by relatively elevated areas colonized by halophytic vegetation, and tidal flats, with not vegetated areas, characterized by lower elevations. Sub-pixel processing techniques (Spectral Mixing Analysis - SMA) were used to analyse the spatial distribution of both vegetation and sediments typology. Furthermore the classifications were assayed in terms of spatial (Power law) and temporal (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) patterns, in order to find the main characteristics of the aforementioned spatial trends and their variation over time. The principal aim is to study the spatio-temporal evolution of this coastal wetland area, in order to indentify tipping points, namely thresholds, beyond which the system reaches critical state and the main climatic, hydrodynamic and morphological variables that may influence and increase this behaviour. This research represents a new approach to study the geomorphological processes and to improve the management and

  20. Early Australian Pronunciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, John S.

    Comparative research indicates that almost without exception, late eighteenth century non-standard English pronunciation was very close to what is called Broad Australian. Present Australian English is closely akin to the blended, popular colloquial London English, spoken by the largest group of Australia's first settlers. This pronunciation…

  1. Australian Asian Options

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Moreno; Javier F. Navas

    2003-01-01

    We study European options on the ratio of the stock price to its average and viceversa. Some of these options are traded in the Australian Stock Exchange since 1992, thus we call them Australian Asian options. For geometric averages, we obtain closed-form expressions for option prices. For arithmetic means, we use different approximations that produce very similar results.

  2. Determination of the grow-out density of Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Perez-Farfante, 1967 shrimp juveniles with a view to providing alternative culture structures (pens in Ibiraquera Lagoon, Imbituba, Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vinatea

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ibiraquera Lagoon, which is located between the municipalities of Garopaba and Imbituba, both in Santa Catarina, a state of southern Brazil, was set up in the last decade as part of a Program for the Restocking of Coastal Lagoons. This program obtained successful results for several years. However, nowadays the productivity of this natural environment has probably been reduced because of its overfishing, specially of the pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Perez-Farfante, 1967, and above all the effect of anthropogenic factors. Such facts have led some researchers to question the viability of successfully restocking the lagoon, since eutrophication would be accelerated by several other factors. Thus, to discover whether the young of F. paulensis could grow and survive feeding only on the natural food of the lagoon´s environment, and whether they were able to tolerate the quality of the water, an experiment was designed to calculate how the lagoon would support future restocking. To this end a farming process was set up which lasted 93 days, testing 3 different densities: 1, 1.5, and 2 shrimps/m2 in standard circular pens of 50 m2. Results after the farming period regarding growth the physico-chemical parameters indicated values in the expected range that fell within the tolerance limits for the survival and satisfactory development of the young of F. paulensis, since significant differences in the daily fluctuations of the dissolved oxygen (OD were not found. Results on the growth were also found to have similar values to those found by other researchers in the dos Patos Lagoon, in the neighboring state of Rio Grande do Sul. Treatment with a density of 1 shrimp/m2 was significantly different (p<0.05 in relation to the other two treatments with densities of 1.5 and 2, both of which had very similar values. However, the final results of shrimp survival and polychaeta biomass throughout the experiment did not present significant differences (p

  3. Atmospheric concentrations, occurrence and deposition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in a Mediterranean coastal site (Etang de Thau, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Jimenez, J., E-mail: javier.castro-jimenez@idaea.csic.es [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Mariani, G.; Vives, I.; Skejo, H.; Umlauf, G. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Zaldivar, J.M. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Dueri, S. [CRH, UMR 212 EME, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Avenue Jean Monnet BP 171, 34203 Sete Cedex (France); Messiaen, G.; Laugier, T. [Ifremer, Environment and Resources Laboratory, Avenue Jean Monnet BP 171, 34203 Sete Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes of PCDD/F and PCB have been evaluated over a 1-year period in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Etang de Thau, France). Indicative PBDE air concentrations in the hot season are also reported in this work. {Sigma}2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs and {Sigma}18PCBs (gas + particulate) air concentrations ranged from 67 to 1700 fg m{sup -3} and from 13 to 95 pg m{sup -3}, respectively whereas {Sigma}8PBDEs (gas + particulate) summer time levels varied from 158 to 230 pg m{sup -3}. The PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric occurrence over Thau lagoon and subsequent inputs to the surface waters are determined by an assemble of factors, being the seasonality of atmospheric concentration, the air mass origin and meteorological conditions important drivers. Total (wet + dry) {Sigma}2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs and {Sigma}18PCBs deposition fluxes to Thau Lagoon waters are 117 and 715 pg m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. - Highlights: > PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations in Thau lagoon are typical from rural/semi-rural areas. > PBDE atmospheric concentrations in Thau lagoon are typical from urban/industrial sites. > PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations over Thau lagoon and inputs to surface waters are very variable, even changing between the same week of the month in two consecutive years. > Metallurgical industry may be a possible local source of PCDD/Fs in the Thau lagoon basin. > Annual PCBs and PCDD/Fs atmospheric inputs are dominated by dry deposition - PCDD/F and PCB atmospheric concentrations over Thau lagoon and inputs to surface waters are very variable, even changing between the same week of the month in two consecutive years.

  4. Coastal resuspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, J.A.

    1991-11-01

    There are several potential mechanisms for the suspension in air of radioactive or other pollutants from coastal sea water, beaches, mud banks and salt marshes. Available measurements rarely allow these mechanisms to be distinguished. The limited data show a broad spread of results. When normalised by the concentration of radionuclides in beach sediments most of the data indicate concentrations equivalent to 1 to 30 μg m -3 of sediment suspended in air, both for sampling sites on open coasts and near estuaries. Limited evidence for sampling sites located on salt marshes indicates about 0.2 μg m -3 of suspended sediment. These values represent the aggregate effect of the mechanisms that operate at a limited number of coastal locations. At other locations it is possible that additional mechanisms will contribute to the suspension of sediment. (Author)

  5. PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE WATER AND FISH (LAGOON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    technique was employed to extract pesticide residues in water and fish samples, respectively, using 1:1 (v/v) ethyl acetate/dichloromethane .... species in the Chemu and Korle lagoons due to excessive pollution. The fish samples were ... reagents were of analytical (HPLC) grade supplied by BDH, London, UK. Extraction of ...

  6. Carrying capacity of Chaetoceros gracilis in Homa Lagoon and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possibility for nutrient limitation to affect C. gracilis was assessed from two different ecosystems (Izmir Bay and Homa Lagoon). Our goal was to determine the growth rate of all nutrients and the maximum levels of the C. gracilis phytoplankton biomass (the maximum biomass carrying capacity) on the extent of its full ...

  7. Boron, calcium and magnesium in Kavaratti lagoon water, Lakshadweep Archipelago

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nasnolkar, C.M.; Salkar, V.R.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Abidi, S.A.H.

    1228.8 to 1319.8 mg kg sup(-1) (av. 1280.19 mg kg sup(-1)) and the salinity varied from 35.01 to 35.10 x 10 sup(-3) (av. 35.04 x 10 sup(-3)). The ratios of boron, calcium and magnesium to chlorinity in the lagoon water showed wide variation and were...

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyl in fish samples from Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Several fish samples from the Lagos lagoon, Nigeria were analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The fish species analyzed include Tilapia zilli (red belly Tilapia), Ethmalosa fimbriata. (Bonga shad) and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus (catfish). Eight PCB congeners were identified and.

  9. Antibiotic resistance among heterotrophic bacteria in Lagos Lagoon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the aquatic environment are considered reservoirs for drug-resistant genes. Therefore, culturable heterotrophic bacteria isolated from Lagos Lagoon surface waters between 2011 and 2012 were screened for their susceptibility to 14 commonly used antibiotics belonging to six major classes.

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl in fish samples from Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several fish samples from the Lagos lagoon, Nigeria were analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The fish species analyzed include Tilapia zilli (red belly Tilapia), Ethmalosa fimbriata (Bonga shad) and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus (catfish). Eight PCB congeners were identified and quantified in ...

  11. Invasion of Langebaan Lagoon, South Africa, by Mytilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1992 the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis began establishing beds on the centre sandbanks of Langebaan Lagoon. This global invader had previously been restricted to rocky shores along the South African coastline. In order to investigate the effect of the invasion on naturally-occurring communities, ...

  12. Assessment of the pollution in Aghien lagoon and its tributaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of the pollutants in surface water quality when used for drinking water is of great concern in many developing countries. This study seeks to characterize the types of pollution in Aghien lagoon and its tributaries. For the sampling, water was taken at a depth of 50 cm from the earth surface. Samples were ...

  13. Oualidia lagoon, Morocco: an estuary without a river | Hilmi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harmonic analysis indicated that tidal currents were mainly semi-diurnal, with a predominance of the M2 harmonic, but included M4 and M6 sub-harmonics, possibly resulting from non-linear interactions of the flow with the shallow bottom and channel curvatures. Close to the lagoon entrance the water is of marine character ...

  14. PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE WATER AND FISH (LAGOON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid extraction technique was employed to extract pesticide residues in water and fish samples, respectively, using 1:1 (v/v) ethyl acetate/dichloromethane mixture before being analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest level of pesticide contaminations was recorded in the Chemu lagoon as ...

  15. A Field Study Training Program on Wastewater Lagoon Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and Wastewater Technical School, Neosho, MO.

    This publication is a text and reference manual for operating personnel of both large and small wastewater lagoon systems with support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a text, this inservice training manual is intended to be used in a correspondence course wherein the trainee or operator would read and study each chapter before…

  16. 9 Nutrient Load of the Sakumo Lagoon.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    cycles of marine fish and prawn species, as well as fisheries further ... Pollution of the lagoon with nutrients can affect biodiversity of plant and animal species, especially water fowls and birds ecology, since the site is noted for its large number of birds (Ntiamoa- ... found along most of the river courses within the Ramsar site.

  17. Comparison and Validation of Long Time Serial Global GEOV1 and Regional Australian MODIS Fractional Vegetation Cover Products Over the Australian Continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Ding

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractional vegetation cover (FVC is one of the most critical parameters in monitoring vegetation status. Comprehensive assessment of the FVC products is critical for their improvement and use in land surface models. This study investigates the performances of two major long time serial FVC products: GEOV1 and Australian MODIS. The spatial and temporal consistencies of these products were compared during the 2000–2012 period over the main biome types across the Australian continent. Their accuracies were validated by 443 FVC in-situ measurements during the 2011–2012 period. Our results show that there are strong correlations between the GEOV1 and Australian MODIS FVC products over the main Australian continent while they exhibit large differences and uncertainties in the coastal regions covered by dense forests. GEOV1 and Australian MODIS describe similar seasonal variations over the main biome types with differences in magnitude, while Australian MODIS exhibit unstable temporal variations over grasslands and shifted seasonal variations over evergreen broadleaf forests. The GEOV1 and Australian MODIS products overestimate FVC values over the biome types with high vegetation density and underestimate FVC in sparsely vegetated areas and grasslands. Overall, the GEOV1 and Australian MODIS FVC products agree with in-situ FVC values with a RMSE around 0.10 over the Australian continent.

  18. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband) stations (see fig. 1 and table 1). The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  19. The Australian National Seismograph Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jepsen

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Seismological Centre of the Australian Geological Survey Organisation, operates and co-operates a national seismograph network consisting of 24 analogue and 8 digitally telemetred (3 broadband stations (see fig. 1 and table 1. The network covers the Australian continent and the Australian Antarctic Territory.

  20. New evidences in the complexity of contamination of the lagoon of Venice: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea; Marin, Maria Gabriella; Matozzo, Valerio; Masiero, Luciano; Provini, Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    This study presents the first evaluation of the current pollution by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) of surface sediments from the Lagoon of Venice. We focused the research on tri-to hepta-BDEs, the main components of penta- and octa-mixtures, which are considered to be the most toxic for the biocoenosis. The results pointed out a quite homogeneous contamination of this keystone European transitional environment, with ∑ (13)PBDEs values ranging from 0.39 to 6.78 ng/g dry weight; these values reflect low to moderate pollution levels, which is in conformity to other coastal European ecosystems. The average PBDE profile of the lagoon sediments follows this decreasing trend of congeners: BDE-47>BDE-99> >BDE-190>BDE-28>BDE-153>BDE-154>BDE-138, BDE-183, and BDE-17, which is similar to the worldwide distribution pattern. BDE-47 and BDE-99 revealed a recent use of a penta-BDE mixture, while the presence of hepta-BDEs (BDE-183 and BDE-190) in all of the sites can indicate the actual use of a deca-BDE formulation, because these congeners are considered to be debrominated byproducts of BDE-209 degradation.

  1. Integration of biological responses from a suite of bioassays for the Venice Lagoon (Italy) through sediment toxicity index - Part A: Development and comparison of two methodological approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losso, Chiara; Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi; De Salvador, Davide; Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2010-01-01

    Marine and coastal quality assessment, based on test batteries involving a wide array of endpoints, organisms and test matrices, needs for setting up toxicity indices that integrate multiple toxicological measures for decision-making processes and that classify the continuous toxicity response into discrete categories according to the European Water Framework Directive. Two toxicity indices were developed for the lagoon environment such as the Venice Lagoon. Stepwise procedure included: the construction of a database that identified test-matrix pairs (indicators); the selection of a minimum number of ecotoxicological indicators, called toxicological core metrics (CMs-tox) on the basis of specific criteria; the development of toxicity scores for each CM-tox; the integration of the CMs-tox into two indices, the Toxicity Effect Index (TEI), based on the transformation of Toxic Unit (TU) data that were integrated as logarithmic sum, and the Weighted Average Toxicity Index (WATI), starting from toxicity classes integrated as weighted mean. Results from the indices are compared; advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed. - Two toxicity indices were set up and compared to integrate toxicity data from a battery of bioassays for the Venice lagoon.

  2. First detection of Mnemiopsis leidyi (Ctenophora, Bolinopsidae in Sardinia (S’Ena Arrubia Lagoon, Western Mediterranean: a threat for local fishery and species recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DICIOTTI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The invasive comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi is a lobate ctenophore native of coastal and estuarine waters of the temperate western Atlantic Ocean. In the last decades this species has expanded its range of distribution, colonizing marine and transitional environments in Europe. In October 2015, during a survey fishing the European eel Anguilla anguilla in Sardinia (western Mediterranean, a massive bloom of this specie was observed in the eutrophic S’Ena Arrubia Lagoon for the first time. In November 2015, sampling was conducted at three stations in the lagoon and in a fyke net, in order to estimate the abundance of M. leidyi and to determine its impact on the fishing activity. The results showed an abundance of 2.83 ctenophores m-3. Specimens were all adults, measuring 18 - 62 mm total length. The abundant number of ctenophores (6837 individuals per fyke net damaged fishing operations, reducing catches and affecting the performance of fishing gears. Since there is no effective mechanical, chemical or biological method to counter M. leidyi, the short term economic damage may be approached by new management measures of fisheries. In addition, other actions against the recurring of M. leidyi invasion, can include management strategies, in particular those finalized to reduce the high trophic state of the lagoon.

  3. Investigating the impact of land use and the potential for harmful algal blooms in a tropical lagoon of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Audrey; de Vernal, Anne; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana-Carolina

    2015-12-01

    Palynological and geochemical analyses were carried out on a sediment core collected in the shallow Alvarado lagoon (Veracruz, Southwestern Gulf of Mexico) in order to evaluate the impact of the significant decline in the surrounding native coastal vegetation on phytoplankton assemblages. The sedimentary sequence encompasses the last millennium and provides information on pre-industrial phytoplankton assemblages. Results highlight a recent increase of freshwater-sourced organic matter relative to marine organic matter in line with reduced total concentrations of cyst-producing dinoflagellates. These changes appear to be synchronous to the extensive conversion of wetlands into agricultural areas, with consequences on the stability and water retention capacity of the soils bordering the lagoon system. The data also show that Polysphaeridium zoharyi, a cyst produced by the potentially toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense, is present in high abundance in the dinoflagellate population of the lagoon. Consequently, the modern cyst bank of P. bahamense in sediment has the potential to initiate harmful blooms since surface sediments are prone to resuspension events related to strong seasonal winds and human activities.

  4. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  5. Introduction to coastal engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D' Angremond, K.; Pluim-van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    Lecture notes on genesis of the coastline, climatology, oceanography, coastal morphology, coastal formations, coastalzonde management, tidal inlets and estuaries, pollution and density problems, practical problems and common solutions.

  6. Australianness as fairness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plage, Stefanie; Willing, Indigo; Skrbis, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an account of interwoven and often competing repertoires of cosmopolitanism and nationalism on which Australians draw when encountering diversity. Using interview and focus group data the article first explores how the notion of Australianness grounded in civic virtues such ......-go’ principle at times conceptually overlaps with cosmopolitan ethics. However, it also bears the potential to hinder cosmopolitan practices. Ultimately national and cosmopolitan ethical frameworks have to be interrogated simultaneously when applied to micro-level interactions.......This article provides an account of interwoven and often competing repertoires of cosmopolitanism and nationalism on which Australians draw when encountering diversity. Using interview and focus group data the article first explores how the notion of Australianness grounded in civic virtues...

  7. Testing the saprobity hypothesis in a Mediterranean lagoon: effects of confinement and organic enrichment on benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, A; Fenzi, G A; Di Pippo, F; Gravina, M F; Magni, P

    2014-08-01

    The macrobenthic community was compared at four sites characterized by varying degrees of freshwater input, organic enrichment and confinement in the Cabras lagoon (Sardinia, Italy). Three sites, riverine (C1), confined (C2) and seaward (C3), were studied on two dates of summer 2010 and on two dates of winter 2011. A fourth site (C12), representative of the central sector of the Cabras lagoon, was included in this study using the extensive historical datasets at our disposal from previously published work. We aimed to test the hypothesis that (1) the benthos is distributed according to the recently proposed concept of habitat saprobity for coastal lagoons that unifies the Pearson-Rosenberg (sensu organic enrichment) and Guélorget-Perthuisot (sensu confinement) models, and (2) indicator species of different saprobic levels can be identified among dominant species occurring along the saprobity gradient. Salinity was also considered as an additional agent of selection in brackish environments. Irrespective of significant seasonal changes within each site, our results highlighted major environmental and biotic differences between sites. At the northward riverine site (C1), most affected by freshwater input and with limited organic matter (OM) enrichment, Corophium orientale was the single dominant species. The most confined site (C2) was characterized by the highest levels of sedimentary OM and benthic Chlorophyll-a and by mesohaline conditions; the site was inhabited mainly by the halolimnobic Hediste diversicolor and Hydrobia spp. Site C12, characterized by a high OM load and high residence time, was dominated by the opportunistic detritivorous Alitta succinea and Polydora ciliata. At the southernmost seaward site (C3) the considerable seawater renewal, resulting in high salinity (only in summer) and limited OM load, favored a much more diverse macrobenthic assemblage, essentially composed of both marine species, such as Corophium insidiosum, Gammarus aequicauda

  8. Toxicity of contaminants in lagoons and pannes of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, R.; Speelman, J.; Stewart, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminants in water and sediments of lagoons and pannes were 2--90 times greater at sites adjacent to slag and coal piles than those at reference sites. One site (Lagoon-US5) had sediments with very high concentrations of toxic organics (e.g. naphthalene, phenanthrene, dibenzofuran). Although analyses indicated a gradient of contaminant concentration with distance from their sources, toxicity assays were somewhat equivocal. With the exception of less reproduction in Ceriodaphnia at one lagoon site (US3 = 0.55 of reference), survival of fathead minnows and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia in lagoon and panne waters varied independently of the contaminant concentration. In fact, there was better Ceriodaphnia reproduction in water from two contaminated sites (Lagoon-US5, Panne-WP1) than in water from reference sites. Fathead minnow survival, Ceriodaphnia survival, Ceriodaphnia reproduction, amphipod survival, and amphipod growth varied among sites in toxicity assays with sediments, 100% mortality of fatheads at Lagoon-US5, 100% mortality of Ceriodaphnia at Lagoon-US3, and less survival of fathead minnows at Lagoon-US3 indicate possible toxicity from contaminants in sediments at these sites. Of all organisms and end-points tested, Ceriodaphnia survival seemed to be most closely associated with concentrations of contaminants in lagoon water and sediments. Amphipod survival also varied with contaminants in sediments, however, survival in sediments of contaminated sites ranged only from 0.90--0.93 of reference sites. Although the results are not consistent among organisms, toxicity assays indicate that sediments from the lagoon site with the highest contaminants (Lagoon-US5) and possibly those from another contaminated lagoon site (Lagoon-US3) could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Water and sediments from contaminated panne sites do not appear to be toxic to aquatic test organisms

  9. Persistent organochlorine pollutants (POP's) in coastal environments of Southeast Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Botello, A.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.; Rueda-Quintana, L.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses to determine the presence and concentrations of persistent organochlorine pollutants (POP's) were carried out in sediments and estuarine organisms (Crassostrea virginica) from five coastal lagoons of the Southeast Gulf of Mexico. The results of this study show high levels of POP's in sediments with high concentration of Heptachlor, Aldrin, Dieldrin and ppDDT, either in sediments or biological tissues. According to national regulations, the use and dispersion of these chemical have been severely restricted or totally prohibited in developed countries, however their presence in coastal areas indicate an extensive use and recent application of them. (author)

  10. Impact of river basin management on coastal water quality and ecosystem services: A southern Baltic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernewski, Gerald; Hürdler, Jens; Neumann, Thomas; Stybel, Nardine; Venohr, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication management is still a major challenge in the Baltic Sea region. Estuaries or coastal waters linked to large rivers cannot be managed independently. Nutrient loads into these coastal ecosystems depend on processes, utilisation, structure and management in the river basin. In practise this means that we need a large scale approach and integrated models and tools to analyse, assess and evaluate the effects of nutrient loads on coastal water quality as well as the efficiency of river basin management measures on surface waters and especially lagoons and estuaries. The Odra river basin, the Szczecin Lagoon and its coastal waters cover an area of about 150,000 km² and are an eutrophication hot-spot in the Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of an optimal nitrogen and phosphorus management scenario in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35 %) would have positive effects on coastal water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased

  11. A database of chlorophyll a in Australian waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire H.; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Baird, Mark E.; Beard, Jason; Bonham, Pru; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Crawford, Christine; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Doblin, Martina A.; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Everett, Jason D.; Furnas, Miles; Harrison, Daniel P.; Hassler, Christel; Henschke, Natasha; Hoenner, Xavier; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Keesing, John; Leterme, Sophie C.; James McLaughlin, M; Miller, Margaret; Moffatt, David; Moss, Andrew; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Nicole L.; Patten, Renee; Pausina, Sarah A.; Proctor, Roger; Raes, Eric; Robb, Malcolm; Rothlisberg, Peter; Saeck, Emily A.; Scanes, Peter; Suthers, Iain M.; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Talbot, Samantha; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul G.; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; van Ruth, Paul; Waite, Anya M.; Wright, Simon; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2018-01-01

    Chlorophyll a is the most commonly used indicator of phytoplankton biomass in the marine environment. It is relatively simple and cost effective to measure when compared to phytoplankton abundance and is thus routinely included in many surveys. Here we collate 173, 333 records of chlorophyll a collected since 1965 from Australian waters gathered from researchers on regular coastal monitoring surveys and ocean voyages into a single repository. This dataset includes the chlorophyll a values as measured from samples analysed using spectrophotometry, fluorometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The Australian Chlorophyll a database is freely available through the Australian Ocean Data Network portal (https://portal.aodn.org.au/). These data can be used in isolation as an index of phytoplankton biomass or in combination with other data to provide insight into water quality, ecosystem state, and relationships with other trophic levels such as zooplankton or fish. PMID:29461516

  12. A database of chlorophyll a in Australian waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire H.; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Baird, Mark E.; Beard, Jason; Bonham, Pru; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Crawford, Christine; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Doblin, Martina A.; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Everett, Jason D.; Furnas, Miles; Harrison, Daniel P.; Hassler, Christel; Henschke, Natasha; Hoenner, Xavier; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Keesing, John; Leterme, Sophie C.; James McLaughlin, M.; Miller, Margaret; Moffatt, David; Moss, Andrew; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Nicole L.; Patten, Renee; Pausina, Sarah A.; Proctor, Roger; Raes, Eric; Robb, Malcolm; Rothlisberg, Peter; Saeck, Emily A.; Scanes, Peter; Suthers, Iain M.; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Talbot, Samantha; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul G.; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; van Ruth, Paul; Waite, Anya M.; Wright, Simon; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2018-02-01

    Chlorophyll a is the most commonly used indicator of phytoplankton biomass in the marine environment. It is relatively simple and cost effective to measure when compared to phytoplankton abundance and is thus routinely included in many surveys. Here we collate 173, 333 records of chlorophyll a collected since 1965 from Australian waters gathered from researchers on regular coastal monitoring surveys and ocean voyages into a single repository. This dataset includes the chlorophyll a values as measured from samples analysed using spectrophotometry, fluorometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The Australian Chlorophyll a database is freely available through the Australian Ocean Data Network portal (https://portal.aodn.org.au/). These data can be used in isolation as an index of phytoplankton biomass or in combination with other data to provide insight into water quality, ecosystem state, and relationships with other trophic levels such as zooplankton or fish.

  13. Gaining insight into Clipperton's lagoon hydrology using tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourre, E.; Charlou, J.L.; Donval, J.P.; Correge, T.

    2009-01-01

    Historical descriptions of the Clipperton lagoon appear to converge on the fact that it became isolated from the surrounding ocean around 1858. Since then, because of the high precipitation rate which largely exceeds evaporation in this region of the eastern tropical Pacific, a brackish lens has formed on top of the saline oceanic waters. In 1980, literature data show that the thickness of this water body was reaching 14 m. During the 2005 Etienne's Clipperton expedition, we collected lagoon water on two vertical profiles. Salinity, δ 18 O and tritium analyses were performed on these samples with the objective of gaining further insight into the lagoon hydrology and age of the deep waters. The upper 15 m were characterized by low salinities (5.4 ± 0.2), and δ 18 O and tritium values typical of local precipitation. At depth, waters had salinity and δ 18 O similar to oceanic surface waters but with low tritium concentrations, hence pointing to quite isolated waters representing a remnant of marine waters when the lagoon was still communicating with the ocean. At lagoon closure, the excess of precipitation over evaporation raised the lagoon level, thus creating a hydraulic pressure head which favored salt expulsion through the permeable walls of the atoll. A simple geohydrological modeling of this salt expulsion process based on Darcy's law describes reasonably well the time-evolution of the brackish lens. Tritium is used to discuss the main physical processes potentially involved in the slow ventilation of the halo-cline and deep saline layer, including vertical diffusion, sinking of salty Surface water intrusions and deep horizontal exchange through fissures in the limestone. These different mechanisms give reasonable results, which are all compatible with available salinity and isotopic data (δ 18 O and tritium), and therefore are all plausible candidates. Unfortunately, the lack of a detailed description of the vertical tritium profile in the halo

  14. Evaluating the effects of climate changes on Patos Lagoon's hydrodynamics using numerical modeling techniques, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, G. P.; Marques, W. C.

    2013-05-01

    coastal region. The simulations were performed with the length of one year and the results were analyzed using a comparative way. The results are still preliminary but clear differences between both simulations can be seen. Differences in current velocities, salinity and water levels along the coast and the estuary can be observed on the results. Wavelet techniques will be applied in order to study time series temporal variability and to filter the time series, as well as obtain linear and non-linear tendencies that will be further inserted in the numerical model to simulate future scenarios. The study of the influence of freshwater discharge in the dynamics of coastal regions at long period timescales is not easily accomplished, since data series that are necessary are often not available for the region. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative methodologies to enable long-term studies of the Patos Lagoon, using preterit data and numerical modeling techniques. This methodologies will allow to evaluate the impact of climate changes on the region with a low operational cost.

  15. Thermohaline processes in a tropical coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Cecilia; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Jeronimo, Gilberto; Capurro-Filograsso, Luis

    2013-10-01

    The detailed thermohaline structure of the northern Yucatan coastal zone was obtained for the first time in order to gain an insight into the interactions between various processes in this complex tropical environment of extreme evaporation and high precipitation rates. From the continent, it has water exchange with numerous coastal lagoons (ranging from brackish to hypersaline) and receives intense submarine groundwater discharges (SGD). In the summer of 2006 a high-resolution (500 m cross-shore and 5 km along-shore) oceanographic campaign was performed starting at Holbox Island down to the mouth of Celestun Lagoon. CTD profiles were measured at 1020 stations along 69 coastal cross-shore transects. Additionally, CTD data from 2 wider surveys, covering the continental shelf (Campeche Bank) and the southern Gulf of Mexico respectively were used to complement the results. From the thermohaline properties, two main water masses were identified: (a) the Caribbean Subtropical Underwater (CSUW), upwelled from the Caribbean, which was observed at the bottom very close to the coast in more than 260 km (from the upwelling region near Cape Catoche to approximately 89.5 W during the summer of 2006) and (b) the second dominant group was a mass of warm hypersaline water which originates in Yucatan due to the high temperature and evaporation rates. We call this water mass the Yucatan Sea Water (YSW) after finding evidence of its presence in various field campaigns both in the Yucatan Sea and further to the west in the southern Gulf of Mexico. All the water masses present in the Yucatan coastal zone showed pronounced variations with important dilution and salinisation effects. The permeable karstic geology of the region prevents the continental water from discharging into the ocean through surface rivers and instead the rainfall permeates directly to the aquifer and travels through caves and fractures towards the sea. Three main regions showed evidence of continental discharges

  16. A GIS Approach for Reconstructing the Litorina Sea Lagoon in Tolkuse-Rannametsa Area, Eastern Gulf of Riga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, Hando-Laur; Rosentau, Alar; Jõeleht, Argo; Hang, Tiit; Kohv, Marko

    2015-04-01

    The eastern coast of the Gulf of Riga in the NE Baltic Sea is characterized by slow post-glacial isostatic uplift (about 1mm/yr) and slowly undulating low topography. Therefore even small increases in sea-level can easily lead to the flooding of considerable areas. The complex deglaciation history of the Baltic Sea area left, at times, south western Estonia submerged, while at other times, it emerged as terrestrial land. Different transgressive and regressive development stages of the Baltic Sea did not only shape the landscape, but also influenced the locations of the Stone Age settlements which were closely bound to the coastal areas which also include estuaries and lagoonal systems. The coastal region of the Gulf of Riga is abundant in Meso- and Neolithic settlement sites. The present study combines LiDAR, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and geological data to reconstruct development of the Litorina Sea lagoon in Tolkuse-Rannametsa area and to create prognostic palaeogeographic maps in order to search for Meso- and Neolithic coastal settlement sites. Over 47 km of GPR profiling was done; sediments were described and dated in 37 cores two riverbank outcrops. Diatoms were analysed in the master core. A semi-automatic method for the removal of modern anthropogenic features from LiDAR derived digital elevation model (DEM) was developed, tested and used. In modelling process the impact of sedimentary processes subsequent to the time being modelled was taken into account by employing a backstripping methodology. The differential glacio-isostatic uplift within the study area was taken into account by using interpolated water-level surfaces. Palaeogeographic reconstructions shed new light into region's post-glacial coastal evolution and enabled us to suggest the possible locations of the Stone Age settlements with some of the proposed areas buried under up to 3 m thick peat layer. The results of the current study provide new chronological and shore displacement data

  17. Aspects of the uptake of dissolved oxygen in Cabiúnas and Imboassica Lagoons (Macaé, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R. Brum

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe qualitative and quantitative aspects of the cycling of detritus of aquatic macrophytes and carbohydrates in two coastal lagoons of the northeastern part of the State of Rio de Janeiro. Samples of water of the Imboassica and Cabiúnas lagoons were enriched with sucrose. Samples of water of the Cabiúnas lagoon were also utilized to arrange mineralization chambers with fragments of three species of aquatic macrophytes found in these lagoons (Typha domingensis, Potamogeton stenostachys and Nymphaea ampla. Following that, the bottles were aerated and incubated (in the laboratory for a period of 8 days. The concentrations of dissolved oxygen, the pH, the electrical conductivity and the temperature were daily measured. The anaerobic processes were inhibited by periodical aeration of the bottles. The results suggested that the mineralization process in Imboassica lagoon was more efficient; in Cabiúnas lagoon the process of immobilization of the organic matter was dominant. In the short term, maximum oxygen uptake occurred in the mineralization of N. ampla, followed by the mineralization of P. stenostachys and of T. domingensis. However, it was estimated that in long term the mineralization of P. stenostachys showed a greater oxygen uptake.Nesta pesquisa, descrevemos aspectos qualitativos e quantitativos da ciclagem de detritos de macrófitas aquáticas e carboidratos em duas lagoas costeiras do nordeste do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Amostras de água das lagoas Imboassica e Cabiúnas foram enriquecidas com sacarose. Amostras de água da lagoa Cabiúnas foram também utilizadas para a montagem de câmaras de mineralização com fragmentos de três espécies de macrófitas aquáticas encontradas nestas lagoas (Typha domingensis, Potamogeton stenostachys e Nymphaea ampla. Em seguida, as garrafas foram aeradas e incubadas (no laboratório por um período de 8 dias. As concentrações de oxigênio dissolvido, o pH, a condutividade

  18. Mercury in the food chain of the Lagoon of Venice, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Janusz; Tagliapietra, Davide; Bravo, Andrea G; Sigovini, Marco; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Amouroux, David; Zonta, Roberto

    2014-11-15

    Sediments and biota samples were collected in a restricted area of the Lagoon of Venice and analysed for total mercury, monomethyl mercury (MMHg), and nitrogen and carbon isotopes. Results were used to examine mercury biomagnification in a complex food chain. Sedimentary organic matter (SOM) proved to be a major source of nutrients and mercury to primary consumers. Contrary to inorganic mercury, MMHg was strongly biomagnified along the food chain, although the lognormal relationship between MMHg and δ(15)N was less constrained than generally reported from lakes or coastal marine ecosystems. The relationship improved when logMMHg concentrations were plotted against trophic positions derived from baseline δ(15)N estimate for primary consumers. From the regression slope a mean MMHg trophic magnification factor of 10 was obtained. Filter-feeding benthic bivalves accumulated more MMHg than other primary consumers and were probably important in MMHg transfer from sediments to higher levels of the food chain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding the association of Escherichia coli with diverse macroalgae in the lagoon of Venice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Grazia M; Fasolato, Luca; Vignaroli, Carla; Luna, Gian Marco

    2015-06-04

    Recent studies provided evidence that the macroalga Cladopohora in lakes hosts associated Escherichia coli, with consequences on the environmental and human health. We expanded these investigations to other macroalgae (Ulva spp., Sargassum muticum and Undaria pinnatifida) widespread in the lagoon of Venice (Italy). Attached E. coli were abundant, accounting up to 3,250 CFU gram(-1) of alga. Macroalgal-associated isolates belonged to all E. coli phylogroups, including pathogenic ones, and to Escherichia cryptic clades. Attached E. coli showed potential to grow even at in situ temperature on macroalgal extracts as only source of carbon and nutrients, and ability to produce biofilm in vitro. The genotypic diversity of the attached isolates was high, with significant differences between algae and the overlying water. Our evidences suggest that attached populations consist of both resident and transient strains, likely resulting from the heterogeneous input of fecal bacteria from the city. We report that cosmopolitan and invasive macroalgae may serve as source of E. coli, including pathogenic genotypes, and that this habitat can potentially support their growth. Considering the global diffusion of the macroalgae here studied, this phenomenon is likely occurring in other coastal cities worldwide and deserves further investigations from either the sanitary and ecological perspectives.

  20. Seasonal changes of fish assemblages in a subtropical lagoon in the SE Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, F; Amezcua-Linares, F

    2014-01-01

    The composition and seasonal changes of the fish assemblage in a coastal lagoon system in southeastern Gulf of California were assessed from December 2001 to July 2005. A total of 20,877 organisms belonging to 191 species and 47 families were analyzed. We determined that almost all the species inhabiting the system were found; however some rare species were not captured in our study. The majority of the species found were demersal but in every season at least one pelagic or benthopelagic species showed high abundances. The moonfish, Selene peruviana, was the most abundant species, whilst the puffer, Sphoeroides annulatus, was the main species in terms of biomass. The species composition changed seasonally; results from the Simpson diversity index and the cumulative species curve show that seasonally almost all the species in the system for a given season were found. These changes were also reflected in the multivariate results. The seasonal variations could be attributed to the migration of species out of the system as they grow and the arrival of new ones, which could also be related to temperature patterns since this environmental factor changes considerably through the year.

  1. Trace metals accumulation patterns in a mangrove lagoon ecosystem, Mazatlan Harbor, southeast Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Marini, M E; Soto-Jimenez, M F; Paez-Osuna, F

    2008-07-15

    Water, surface sediments, the mussel Mytella strigata, the mangrove oyster Crassostrea corteziensis, and the green macroalgae Caulerpa sertularioides from four locations in Mazatlan Harbor on the southeast coast of the Gulf of California, were analyzed to determine concentrations and distribution patterns of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc. Total metal concentrations in water in the present study exceed the background levels in open sea and coastal waters. Total metal concentrations in sediments were ordered as follows: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cd > Hg, but for the bioavailable fraction were ordered as Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd > Hg. The concentrations in bioavailable levels fall between the Threshold Effects Level (TEL), and Probable Effects Level (PEL), criteria for sediment quality. Distribution patterns for metals in organisms were ordered Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd > Hg with seasonal variations for Pb and Zn. Correlations between Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were indicative of similar assimilation and storage mechanisms and common sources of contamination. These correlations also indicated that bioavailability was not simultaneous for Cd and Pb. Bioconcentration factors (BCF) show different patterns in different organisms. For the oyster the metals were ordered Zn > Cu > Cd approximately Hg > Pb, for the mussel Hg > Cu approximately Zn approximately Cd > Pb and for the macroalgae Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd > Hg. Based on BCF results in the lagoon system, the oyster C cortezienzes can be used as a biomonitor of Zn and Cu exposure, the mussel M. strigata of Hg exposure and the green macroalgae C. serticularioides of exposure to all five metals studied.

  2. Water Quality, Sediment Characteristics and Benthic Status of the Razim-Sinoie Lagoon System, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catianis, Irina; Secrieru, Dan; Pojar, Iulian; Grosu, Dumitru; Scrieciu, Albert; Pavel, Ana Bianca; Vasiliu, Dan

    2018-03-01

    Razim Lake is the biggest of Romania's freshwater lakes and along with other basins as Golovita, Zmeica and Sinoie constitutes a system of great ecological significance, playing also an essential role in the supply of water for irrigation, fishery exploitation, farming, flood prevention, recreational navigation and water tourism. Due to their importance, the environmental conditions in the Razim - Sinoie coastal lakes have attracted an increased public attention in contemporary society. To assess the levels, dissemination and potential sources of contamination in the above-mentioned lagoon system, random sampling was used to collect water and sediment samples from every lake and several analytical techniques were performed to investigate their environmental characteristics. The results obtained from this study indicated that, in water, concentrations of various physico-chemical parameters are, mostly, in agreement with correlated environmental standards. Slight variations and/or occasional exceeding of the maximum admissible limits were generally limited to small areas showing levels that would not warrant special concern. In sediments, the mean concentrations of some specific trace metals were below the levels of potential effect. Benthic samples revealed 31 taxa belonging to 16 zoo-benthal subdivisions. The results of this study showed good ecological status despite local several natural and anthropogenic stressors as fishery exploitation, farming, recreational navigation and water tourism.

  3. An integrated physical and biological model for anaerobic lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin; Chen, Zhenbin

    2011-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that integrates physical and biological processes for anaerobic lagoons is presented. In the model development, turbulence is represented using a transition k-ω model, heat conduction and solar radiation are included in the thermal model, biological oxygen demand (BOD) reduction is characterized by first-order kinetics, and methane yield rate is expressed as a linear function of temperature. A test of the model applicability is conducted in a covered lagoon digester operated under tropical climate conditions. The commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent, is employed to solve the integrated model. The simulation procedures include solving fluid flow and heat transfer, predicting local resident time based on the converged flow fields, and calculating the BOD reduction and methane production. The simulated results show that monthly methane production varies insignificantly, but the time to achieve a 99% BOD reduction in January is much longer than that in July. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ROBUST : The ROle of BUffering capacities in STabilising coastal lagoon ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R; Stal, LJ; Lomstein, BA; Herbert, RA; van Gemerden, H; Viaroli, P; Cecherelli, VU; Rodriguez-Valera, F; Bartoli, M; Giordani, G; Azzoni, R; Schaub, B; Welsh, DT; Donnelly, A; Cifuentes, A; Anton, J; Finster, K; Nielsen, LB; Pedersen, AGU; Neubauer, AT; Colangelo, MA; Heijs, SK

    2001-01-01

    "Buffer capacities" has been defined in ecology as a holistic concept (e.g., Integration of Ecosystem Theories: A Pattern, second ed. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1997, 388pp), but we show that it can also be worked out in mechanistic studies. Our mechanistic approach highlights that "buffering capacities"

  5. ROBUST: The ROle of BUffering capacities in STabilising coastal lagoon ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, R.; Stal, L.J.; Lomstein, B.A.; Herbert, R.A.; van Gemerden, H.; Viaroli, P.; Cecherelli, V.U.; Rodriguez-Valera, F.; Bartoli, M.; Giordani, G.; Azzoni, R.; Schaub, B.; Welsh, D.T.; Donnelly, A.; Cifuentes, A.; Anton, J.; Finster, K.; Nielsen, L.P.; Pedersen, A.G.U.; Neubauer, A.T.; Colangelo, M.A.; Heijs, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    "Buffer capacities" has been defined in ecology as a holistic concept (e.g., Integration of Ecosystem Theories: A Pattern, second ed. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1997, 388pp), but we show that it can also be worked out in mechanistic studies. Our mechanistic approach highlights that "buffering capacities"

  6. Response of west Indian coastal regions and Kavaratti lagoon to the November-2009 tropical cyclone Phyan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Mehra, P.; SanilKumar, V.; Radhakrishnan, K.V.; VijayKumar, K.; AshokKumar, K.; Agarwadekar, Y.; Bhat, U.G.; Luis, R.; Rivankar, P.; Viegas, B.

    field. Several factors such as (1) water piling-up at the coast supported by south/south-westerly wind and seaward flow of the excess water in the rivers due to heavy rains, (2) reduction of piling-up at the coast, supported by the upstream penetration...

  7. Natural diet of three species of shrimp in a tropical coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertoni Edélti Faria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut content of 495 specimens of Farfantepenaeus brasiliensis, 131 of F. paulensis (Penaeidae and 102 of Macrobrachium acanthurus (Palaemonidae were analyzed to establish the composition of their diets F. brasiliensis had as the most important feeding items in its diet larvae of Chironomidae, Polychaeta and Heleobia australis (Mollusca. For F. paulensis, the most important items were the same as for F. brasiliensis, but the order of importance of H. australis and Polychaeta was inverted. M. acanthurus had detritus as the most important item, followed by Chironomidae larvae, Odonata nymphs, and fragments of the macroalgae Chara. The results showed that the three species were omnivorous, with a varied diet including both components of macrofauna of benthos and associated to the macroalgae Chara and plant fragments and detritus.

  8. Effects of iron-ore mining and processing on metal bioavailability in a tropical coastal lagoon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, A.A.; van Hattum, A.G.M.; Brouwer, A.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Rezende, C.E.; Salomons, W.

    2008-01-01

    In water systems, water quality and geochemical properties of sediments determine the speciation of trace metals, metal transport, and sediment-water exchange, influencing metal availability and its potential effects on biota. Studies from temperate climates have shown that iron-ore mining and

  9. MACROALGAE MEDIATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC NITROGEN FLUXES IN A TEMPERATE COASTAL LAGOON. (U915532)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Oyster condition index in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828 from a heavy-metal polluted coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Rebelo

    Full Text Available The condition index (CI of oysters represents an ecophysiological approach to estimate meat quality and yield in cultured bivalve mollusks. In the present study, the CI of oysters from a heavy-metal polluted bay was analyzed with respect to Zn and Cd contamination in soft tissues, spawning, and polychaete infestation. The CI was calculated through a new technique based on molds made to measure the volume of oyster-shell internal cavities. The higher CI values (over 9 in the dry season were probably related availability of suspended particles rich in organic matter in the bay, while the rapid reduction in the CI from one season to the next at some stations suggests the effect of spawning. Polychaete infestation was considered low (18.7% and produced no clear CI effects. The Cd in the oyster tissue collected during the rainy season was weak, although still significantly correlated with the CI (r = -0.36; p < 0.05. All other comparisons of CI and metal concentrations demonstrated a non-significant correlation. The CI variations observed on the temporal and spatial scale were likely to have been caused by availability of organic matter and spawning, rather than spionid infestation or metal body burdens.

  11. The decline and restoration of a coastal lagoon (Lake Veere) in the Dutch Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, S.; Escaravage, V.L.; Daemen, E.; Hummel, H.

    2010-01-01

    The former tidal inlet Lake Veere was turned into a stagnant brackish lake in 1961. Ever since, the system has shown a continuous degradation. The current study shows the monitoring results for the macrozoobenthic communities and the abiotic conditions for the period 1990–2008. This includes the

  12. Bedrock neutralization study for the Bruin Lagoon Superfund Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patelunas, G.M.; Lenhardt, D.R.; Niece, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Bruin Lagoon site is located in Bruin Butler County, Pennsylvania, and is listed as No. 3 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencies' National Priority List. The Lagoon contains waste petroleum tars, sulfuric acid, coal combustion ash, spent bauxite and other waste materials. This paper reports on the bedrock neutralization study, conducted to assess the feasibility of injecting caustic solutions into acid-contaminated bedrock beneath the lagoon. The site is underlain by a fine to medium grain quartz sandstone which is contaminated with acid to depths in excess of 30 feet. For this investigation, Nx-cores were obtained and pressure tests conducted to a depth of 30 feet below the top of rock. Leach tests were conducted on contaminated core sections using sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate solutions. A total of 12 core sections were exposed in 3-inch diameter test cylinders and permeated under a positive pressure of 25 to 50 psi. Measurements of leachate volume, temperature, pH, and hydraulic conductivity were recorded

  13. Estrogenic potential of the Venice, Italy, lagoon waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pojana, Giulio; Bonfà, Angela; Busetti, Francesco; Collarin, Anna; Marcomini, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    The exposure of the Venice lagoon (Italy) to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from different sources was investigated. Spatial and time distribution of EDC concentrations were determined in four sampling sessions (December 2001-May 2002) by solid phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography separation coupled with mass spectrometry detection via electrospray interface (SPE-HPLC-ESI-MS), which allowed identification of natural (estradiol, estrone) and synthetic estrogenic compounds, both steroidal (ethinylestradiol, mestranol) and nonsteroidal (benzophenone, bisphenol-A, nonylphenol, nonylphenol monoethoxylate carboxylate). No significant differences in the EDC distribution were observed between stations located near selected sources (raw sewage from the historical center of Venice, treated municipal and industrial effluents from sewage treatment plants, and areas undergoing the inflow of rivers). While synthetic nonsteroidal analytes were recorded in the 1 to 1040 ng/L range (average concentration: 34 ng/L), steroidal EDC (estradiol, ethinylestradiol) concentrations were lower (1-125 ng/L; average concentration: 8 ng/L). The estrogenic activity of lagoon waters was estimated in terms of estradiol equivalent concentration (EEQ) by applying the estradiol equivalency factors (EEFs). Steroidal EDCs (estradiol, ethinylestradiol) contributed >97% to the total potential estrogenicity of the waters, which accounted for 4 to 172 ng/L (average: 25 ng/L), as total EEQs. These levels are likely to pose adverse effects on the Venice lagoon aquatic organisms.

  14. Characterization of recent sediments and evaluation of environmental effects in the lagoon of Nador, Morocco.

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    The Nador lagoon is one of the most important ports on the coast of Morocco, and the second lagoon in North Africa by extension (115Km2). The lagoon is bordered to the north-west by the volcanic products of the Gourougou volcano complex (887 m asl) and south-east by the Jurassic carbonate succession of marine environment belonging to the Complex of Kebdana (932 m asl); the rest of the area around the lagoon is flat and is characterized by arenaceous-pelitic deposits linked to the Miocene and ...

  15. Study of organic sulphur compounds (DMS, DMSP and CS2) in lagoon ecosystems: the case of the Venice lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaro, Andrea; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Andreoli, Carlo; Corami, Fabiana; Turetta, Clara; Cescon, Paolo

    2003-03-01

    This study of the origin and fate of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in a particular and complex lagoon ecosystem such as that of the Venice lagoon focuses on the temporal evolutions of DMS concentrations in surface water together with those of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), carbon disulphide (CS2), nutrients (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate, silicate), sulphate, chlorophyll a, chlorinity, water temperature and phytoplankton (composition and density). Measurements were made from 3 March 1997 to 23 July 1998 at three stations in the central part of the Venice lagoon. The temporal trends of DMS concentration showed an absolute maximum concentration in winter (65 nmol S/l, 19/2/1998, Stn. 1; 119 nmol S/l, 19/2/1998, Stn. 2; 29 nmol S/l, 17/2/1998, Stn. 3) and two relative maxima in the spring-summer period. The spring-summer secondary maxima of DMS concentration were related to the maxima of DMSP and chlorophyll a concentrations and consequently to phytoplanktonic abundance while the winter DMS maximum showed no relation to DMSP or to chlorophyll a suggesting that the production and the fate of DMS could be different for the two periods. According to previous studies the CS2 concentration increased in the spring, achieved its maximum in summer, decreased in autumn and fell to its minimum in winter.

  16. Coastal inlets and tidal basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.; Dronkers, J.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Dongeren, A.; Wang, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    lecture note: Tidal inlets and their associated basins (lagoons) are a common feature of lowland coasts all around the world. A significant part ofthe world's coastlines is formed by barrier island coasts, and most other tidal coasts are interrupted by estuaries and lagoon inlets. These tidal

  17. Bottom shear stress and salinity distribution in a windy Mediterranean lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Roux, Bernard; Kuznetsov, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    This work concerns the wind influence on bottom shear stress and salinity levels in a Mediterranean semi-enclosed coastal lagoon (Etang de Berre), with respect to a replanting program of Zostera noltii. The MARS3D numerical model is used to analyze the 3D current, salinity and temperature distribution induced by three meteorological, oceanic and anthropogenic forcings in this lagoon. The numerical model has been carefully validated by comparison with daily observations of the vertical salinity and temperature profiles at three mooring stations, for one year. Then, two modelling scenarios are considered. The first scenario (scen.#1), starting with an homogeneous salinity of S=20 PSU and without wind forcing, studies a stratification process under the influence of a periodic seawater inflow and a strong freshwater inflow from an hydropower plant (250 m3/s). Then, in the second scenario (scen.#2), we study how a strong wind of 80 km/h can mix the haline stratification obtained at the end of scen.#1. The most interesting results concern four nearshore replanting areas ; two are situated on the eastern side of EB and two on the western side. The results of scen.#2 show that all these areas are subject to a downwind coastal jet. Concerning bottom salinity, the destratification process is very beneficial; it always remains greater than 12 PSU for a N-NW wind of 80 km/h and a hydropower runoff of 250 m3/s. Special attention is devoted to the bottom shear stress (BSS) for different values of the bottom roughness parameter (for gravels, sands and silts), and to the bottom salinity. BSS presents a maximum near the shoreline and decreases along transects perpendicular to the shoreline. There exists a zone, parallel to the shoreline, where BSS presents a minimum (close to zero). When comparing the BSS value at the four replanting areas with the critical value, BSScr, at which the sediment mobility would occur, we see that for the smaller roughness values (ranging from z0=3.5 e

  18. Lagoon islets as indicators of recent environmental changes in the South Pacific - The New Caledonian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Manuel; Vendé-Leclerc, Myriam; Maurizot, Pierre; Le Cozannet, Gonéri; Robineau, Bernard; Nicolae-Lerma, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    The question of the impacts of climate change and sea level rise on small islands is currently much discussed. The many thousands of Pacific islands in their different contexts (geodynamic, climatic, etc.) and the insufficient data available explain why it is difficult to clearly discern the specific role of climate change in the recent evolution of these islands. To address this question, we investigated the recent changes affecting 21 islets in New Caledonia's lagoon. These islets are either located on small patch-reefs inside the New Caledonia Island lagoon or lie directly on the barrier reef. Based on the studies we conducted (field surveys, reconstruction of changes in the islets over the last decades, shoreline changes) we were able to define a typology of the islets that includes 6 stages and a life expectancy index. Using the life expectancy index, we found that of the 21 islets studied, 19% are in a highly critical situation, meaning they are very likely to be endangered in the short term (within the next few years), 9.5% are in a critical situation, i.e., likely to disappear in the near future and very likely to disappear in the medium term (next few decades), 19% are evolving rapidly, which could lead to their disappearance in the medium term but not in the short term, 9.5% are not endangered in the short and medium term and 43% are not endangered at all (stable or accreting, large area, relatively higher altitude). In this context, the rise in sea level induced by climate change is an adverse factor which is likely to lower the resilience of the islets to erosion processes. Other factors like the degradation of the reef ecosystem due to variations in ocean salinity, temperature and acidity, lower sediment stocks on the beaches and foreshores, human visitors, coastal development and so on are other adverse factors that could modify the capacity for resilience of these islets. Due to their variety and sensitivity, New Caledonia's islets could thus serve

  19. An AHP-derived method for mapping the physical vulnerability of coastal areas at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cozannet, G.; Garcin, M.; Bulteau, T.; Mirgon, C.; Yates, M. L.; Méndez, M.; Baills, A.; Idier, D.; Oliveros, C.

    2013-05-01

    Assessing coastal vulnerability to climate change at regional scales is now mandatory in France since the adoption of recent laws to support adaptation to climate change. However, there is presently no commonly recognised method to assess accurately how sea level rise will modify coastal processes in the coming decades. Therefore, many assessments of the physical component of coastal vulnerability are presently based on a combined use of data (e.g. digital elevation models, historical shoreline and coastal geomorphology datasets), simple models and expert opinion. In this study, we assess the applicability and usefulness of a multi-criteria decision-mapping method (the analytical hierarchy process, AHP) to map physical coastal vulnerability to erosion and flooding in a structured way. We apply the method in two regions of France: the coastal zones of Languedoc-Roussillon (north-western Mediterranean, France) and the island of La Réunion (south-western Indian Ocean), notably using the regional geological maps. As expected, the results show not only the greater vulnerability of sand spits, estuaries and low-lying areas near to coastal lagoons in both regions, but also that of a thin strip of erodible cliffs exposed to waves in La Réunion. Despite gaps in knowledge and data, the method is found to provide a flexible and transportable framework to represent and aggregate existing knowledge and to support long-term coastal zone planning through the integration of such studies into existing adaptation schemes.

  20. An AHP-derived method for mapping the physical vulnerability of coastal areas at regional scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le Cozannet

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing coastal vulnerability to climate change at regional scales is now mandatory in France since the adoption of recent laws to support adaptation to climate change. However, there is presently no commonly recognised method to assess accurately how sea level rise will modify coastal processes in the coming decades. Therefore, many assessments of the physical component of coastal vulnerability are presently based on a combined use of data (e.g. digital elevation models, historical shoreline and coastal geomorphology datasets, simple models and expert opinion. In this study, we assess the applicability and usefulness of a multi-criteria decision-mapping method (the analytical hierarchy process, AHP to map physical coastal vulnerability to erosion and flooding in a structured way. We apply the method in two regions of France: the coastal zones of Languedoc-Roussillon (north-western Mediterranean, France and the island of La Réunion (south-western Indian Ocean, notably using the regional geological maps. As expected, the results show not only the greater vulnerability of sand spits, estuaries and low-lying areas near to coastal lagoons in both regions, but also that of a thin strip of erodible cliffs exposed to waves in La Réunion. Despite gaps in knowledge and data, the method is found to provide a flexible and transportable framework to represent and aggregate existing knowledge and to support long-term coastal zone planning through the integration of such studies into existing adaptation schemes.

  1. Initial crop growth in soil collected from a closed animal waste lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Kirkham, M B

    2003-03-01

    In the 21st century, remediation of the soil beneath animal waste lagoons will become an important issue, as they are closed due to environmental regulations or to abandonment. The possibility of growing crops in the soil, which has high concentrations of ammonium-N, has not been studied. The objective of this experiment was to determine if crop species would germinate and grow in lagoon soil. Soil was gathered from a lagoon that had received wastes from swine (Sus scrofa) and beef (Bos taurus) since 1968. Eight crops were grown in greenhouse pots containing the lagoon soil: winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Weskan'); field corn (Zea mays L., Cargill's hybrid 7997); 'Plainsman' winter rapeseed [Brassica napus L. spp. oleifera (Metzg.) Sinsk. f. biennis]; soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. 'KS 4694'); forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench 'Norkan']; sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. 'Hysun 354'); and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)--two cultivars: '2137' and 'Turkey.' Plants were grown for 35 days in lagoon soil or an agricultural soil (Haynie very fine sandy loam; coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, calcareous, mesic Mollic Udifluvent) obtained from a field near the closed lagoon. Ammonium-N (average value of 692 mg/kg) was about 70-85 times greater than the average value of 8-10 mg/kg NH4-N in Kansan soils. The lagoon soil was nonsodic and had a salinity ranking of "medium" with an electrical conductivity averaging 2.29 dS/m. The high ammonium-N concentration in the lagoon soil was not inhibitory to emergence and growth. The eight crops grew taller in the lagoon soil than in the agricultural soil. Except for '2137' wheat, dry weight was higher in the lagoon soil than in the agricultural soil. The results showed that the lagoon soil is not detrimental to early growth of eight crops.

  2. Evolution of the Rømø barrier island in the Wadden Sea: Impacts of sea-level change on coastal morphodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter

    Sandy coastal barriers are abundant along most continents, and they are often intensively engineered to prevent erosion. Therefore, it is important to develop projections of the evolution of this coastal type in periods with changing climate and sea-level. We have used a multidisciplinary approach......, and falling sea-level, whereas wash-over sedimentation was promoted during periods of rapid sea-level rise when shoreface, beach and coastal dune deposits were reworked. In contrast, lagoonal sedimentation has been relatively continuous and kept pace with th