WorldWideScience

Sample records for australasian trauma society

  1. The Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases Annual Scientific Meeting 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya N; Daveson, Kathryn L

    2010-10-01

    The 2010 Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases Annual Scientific Meeting took place in May in the Northern Territory (Australia) and focussed on infections in the region. The meeting highlights included the changing spectrum of malaria and dengue in endemic regions, the latest on influenza epidemiology, multidrug-resistant organisms and infectious diseases in the Australian indigenous population. This was complemented by subspeciality interest group research encompassing mycobacterial disease, infection control, mycology and virology.

  2. Identifying the bleeding trauma patient: predictive factors for massive transfusion in an Australasian trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeremy Ming; Hitos, Kerry; Fletcher, John P

    2013-09-01

    Military and civilian data would suggest that hemostatic resuscitation results in improved outcomes for exsanguinating patients. However, identification of those patients who are at risk of significant hemorrhage is not clearly defined. We attempted to identify factors that would predict the need for massive transfusion (MT) in an Australasian trauma population, by comparing those trauma patients who did receive massive transfusion with those who did not. Between 1985 and 2010, 1,686 trauma patients receiving at least 1 U of packed red blood cells were identified from our prospectively maintained trauma registry. Demographic, physiologic, laboratory, injury, and outcome variables were reviewed. Univariate analysis determined significant factors between those who received MT and those who did not. A predictive multivariate logistic regression model with backward conditional stepwise elimination was used for MT risk. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS PASW. MT patients had a higher pulse rate, lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, lower systolic blood pressure, lower hemoglobin level, higher Injury Severity Score (ISS), higher international normalized ratio (INR), and longer stay. Initial logistic regression identified base deficit (BD), INR, and hemoperitoneum at laparotomy as independent predictive variables. After assigning cutoff points of BD being greater than 5 and an INR of 1.5 or greater, a further model was created. A BD greater than 5 and either INR of 1.5 or greater or hemoperitoneum was associated with 51 times increase in MT risk (odds ratio, 51.6; 95% confidence interval, 24.9-95.8). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.859. From this study, a combination of BD, INR, and hemoperitoneum has demonstrated good predictability for MT. This tool may assist in the determination of those patients who might benefit from hemostatic resuscitation. Prognostic study, level III.

  3. German Society for Immunology and Australasian Society for Immunology joint Workshop 3(rd) -4(th) December 2015 - Meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurts, Christian; Gottschalk, Catherine; Bedoui, Sammy; Heinzel, Susanne; Godfrey, Dale; Enders, Anselm

    2016-02-01

    The German Society for Immunology (DGfI) and the Australasian Society for Immunology (ASI) hosted the first DGfI-ASI joint workshop from December 3-4, 2015 in Canberra, Australia. A delegation of 15 distinguished German immunologists discussed the workshop topic "immune regulation in infections and immune mediated diseases" with the aim to establish new German-Australasian collaborations, discuss new concepts in the field of immune regulation and build a scientific network to create more utilizable resources for excellent (trans-border) immunological research. The workshop was associated with the 45(th) Annual Scientific Meeting of the ASI held from Nov 29-Dec 3, 2015, opening up even more opportunities for finding new collaboration partners. A return meeting will be linked to the annual DGfI meeting that will take place in 2017 in Erlangen. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Proceedings of the 2013 Meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Murphy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Australasian section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS held their biennial meeting in Newcastle, Australia from 6 to 8 November, 2013. Over 150 scientists, researchers and industry representatives gathered for three days of talks and discussions on a variety of lipid related topics. The AAOCS awarded its inaugural AAOCS Award for Scientific Excellence in Lipid Research to Dr Allan Green from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO. Dr Green is deputy chief of the CSIRO Division of Plant Industry and has been active in lipid research for several decades. His main research focus is on plant breeding and genetic engineering techniques to develop improved oilseeds with enhanced human nutritional value and novel industrial uses. Refer to “AAOCS Award for Scientific Excellence in Lipid Research” for more detail of his contributions [1].

  5. The Australasian radiation protection society's position statement on risks from low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don, Higson; Ches, Mason; Andrew, McEwan; Peter, Burns; Riaz, Akber; Ron, Cameron; Pamela, Sykes; Joe, Young

    2006-01-01

    At its Annual General Meeting in 2004, the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (A.R.P.S.) set up a working group to draft a statement of the Society's position on risks from low levels of exposure to ionizing radiation. The resulting position statement was adopted by the Society at its Annual General Meeting in 2005. Its salient features are as follows: First, there is insufficient evidence to establish a dose-effect relationship for doses that are less than a few tens of milli sieverts in a year. A linear extrapolation from higher dose levels should be assumed only for the purpose of applying regulatory controls. Secondly, estimates of collective dose arising from individual doses that are less than some tens of milli sieverts in a year should not be used to predict numbers of fatal cancers. Thirdly, the risk to an individual of doses significantly less than 100 micro sieverts in a year is so small, if it exists at all, that regulatory requirements to control exposure at this level are not warranted. (authors)

  6. The Australasian radiation protection society's position statement on risks fro low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Controversy continues in the radiation protection literature on whether or not ionizing radiation is harmful at low doses, with unresolved scientific uncertainty about effects below a few tens of millisieverts. To settle what regulatory controls (if any) should apply in this dose region, an assumption has to be made relating dose to the possibility of harm or benefit. The assumption made and the way it is applied can have far-reaching effects, not only on the scale of regulatory compliance required but also on public perception of risk, and therefore on the technological choices made by society. It is important therefore that decisions reached concerning the regulation of low doses of ionizing radiation derive from rational arguments and are perceived to have an ethical basis. It is also important that such decisions are neither portrayed nor perceived as resolving the scientific uncertainties: rather, they serve merely to facilitate the implementation of appropriate measures to ensure safety. At its Annual General Meeting in 2004, the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (ARPS) set up a working group to draft a statement of the Society's position on this matter. The resulting position statement was adopted by the Society at its Annual General Meeting on 14 November 2005. Its salient features are as follows: There is insufficient evidence to establish a dose-effect relationship for doses that are less than a few tens of millisieverts in a year. A linear extrapolation from higher dose levels should be assumed only for the purpose of applying regulatory controls; Estimates of collective dose arising from individual doses that are less than some tens of millisieverts in a year should not be used to predict numbers of fatal cancers; The risk to an individual of doses significantly less than 100 microsieverts in a year is so small, if it exists at all, that regulatory requirements to control exposure at this level are not warranted. The paper will

  7. The Australasian radiation protection society's position statement on risks from low levels of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don, Higson; Ches, Mason; Andrew, McEwan; Peter, Burns; Riaz, Akber; Ron, Cameron; Pamela, Sykes; Joe, Young [Australasian Radiation Protection Society (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    At its Annual General Meeting in 2004, the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (A.R.P.S.) set up a working group to draft a statement of the Society's position on risks from low levels of exposure to ionizing radiation. The resulting position statement was adopted by the Society at its Annual General Meeting in 2005. Its salient features are as follows: First, there is insufficient evidence to establish a dose-effect relationship for doses that are less than a few tens of milli sieverts in a year. A linear extrapolation from higher dose levels should be assumed only for the purpose of applying regulatory controls. Secondly, estimates of collective dose arising from individual doses that are less than some tens of milli sieverts in a year should not be used to predict numbers of fatal cancers. Thirdly, the risk to an individual of doses significantly less than 100 micro sieverts in a year is so small, if it exists at all, that regulatory requirements to control exposure at this level are not warranted. (authors)

  8. The history of Croatian Trauma Society - a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakota, B; Vlahovic, T; Staresinic, M; Dobric, I; Civaric, T

    2013-09-01

    Croatian Trauma Society (CTS) has a 51 year of history and tradition. This article represents a brief overview from the times when it was founded, June 30, 1961, until the present time. It tells us about the idea how, where and when the "Section for Traumatology" was founded, its activities and influence not only to promote patient trauma care but initiation of other societies dealing with traumatized patients as well, including the evolution of the CTS itself. The authors thank to all the contributors that made this article possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Academic model of trauma healing in post-war societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delić, Amra; Hasanović, Mevludin; Avdibegović, Esmina; Dimitrijević, Aleksandar; Hancheva, Camellia; Scher, Carmen; Stefanović-Stanojević, Tatjana; Streeck-Fischer, Annette; Hamburger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the implications for healing in a contemporary Balkan post-war context, and to provide a bridge-building model of trauma transformation, reconciliation and recovery through academic reconstruction and cross-border dialogue. Post-war societies are marked by the effects of massive, large group traumatization, and if not properly dealt with, long-term rehabilitation and social recovery cannot be expected. Unprocessed cumulative trauma that has become deeply embedded in the collective memory of the Balkan peoples over centuries, "chosen trauma", its trans-generational transmission and periodical reactivations across the Balkan have often been addressed in recent literature, in ethno-psychology, psychoanalysis, psychiatry, sociology and anthropology. In order to deepen our understanding of the roots of collective (social) trauma and the specific traumatic experiences of different groups, and to offer different perspectives and information on how trauma can be dealt with, the "Trauma Trust Memory" multinational interdisciplinary research network is being established, and a groundbreaking workshop was held in May 2013 in Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina. The Tuzla Workshop showed that the active participation of affected groups in adequate coping with the past is required for post-conflict reconstruction, trauma healing and peacebuilding in the long run. Copyright © 2014 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  10. Academic model of trauma healing in post-war societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Delić

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to examine the implications for healing in a contemporary Balkan post-war context, and to provide a bridge-building model of trauma transformation, reconciliation and recovery through academic reconstruction and cross-border dialogue. Post-war societies are marked by the effects of massive, large group traumatization, and if not properly dealt with, long-term rehabilitation and social recovery cannot be expected. Unprocessed cumulative trauma that has become deeply embedded in the collective memory of the Balkan peoples over centuries, „chosen trauma“, its trans-generational transmission and periodical reactivations across the Balkan have often been addressed in recent literature, in ethno-psychology, psychoanalysis, psychiatry, sociology and anthropology. In order to deepen our understanding of the roots of collective (social trauma and the specific traumatic experiences of different groups, and to offer different perspectives and information on how trauma can be dealt with, the “Trauma Trust Memory” multinational interdisciplinary research network is being established, and a groundbreaking workshop was held in May 2013 in Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Conclusion. The Tuzla Workshop showed that the active participation of affected groups in adequate coping with the past is required for post-conflict reconstruction, trauma healing and peacebuilding in the long run.

  11. Trauma and Pain in Family-Orientated Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ilhan Kizilhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People from family-oriented societies in particular, in addition to having a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD suffer from chronic pain and physical complaints. Such people have a different understanding of physical illness and pain and, compared to patients from western societies, have different ideas on healing, even when confronted with the therapist. Hitherto, these factors have not been sufficiently taken into account in modern, multi-module therapy approaches. Trauma can be perceived via pain and physical complaints, whereby the pain is not restricted to one part of the body but is seen as covering the body as a whole. Therefore, in the treatment and above all in the patient-therapist relationship, it is necessary to understand what importance is attached to the perceived pain in relation to the trauma. The afflicted body expresses the trauma in the shape of its further-reaching consequences such as the patient’s social, collective, economic and cultural sensitivity. Therefore, for the effective treatment of trauma and chronic pain, it is necessary to use a multi-modal, interdisciplinary, and culture-sensitive approach when treating patients from traditional cultural backgrounds.

  12. Surgery Goes Social: The Extent and Patterns of Social Media Utilization by Major Trauma, Acute and Critical Care Surgery Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifeh, Jawad M; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2017-01-01

    The evolving influence of social media in trauma, acute, and critical care surgery (TACCS) cannot be ignored. We sought to investigate the extent and patterns of use of social networks by major regional, national and international TACCS societies. The two leading social networking sites, Facebook (FB) and Twitter (TW), were thoroughly examined for the presence of official accounts for each of the major TACCS societies. An official FB or TW account was defined as one which has a blue verified badge and/or is linked the society's official website. For societies with confirmed official accounts, the extent and patterns of use of the two platforms were systematically examined over a 2-week period through: (1) manual inspection of the societies' FB and TW pages, (2) the SQLite database containing downloaded samples of posts, and (3) the TW analytics database, symplur.com. Standardized social media metrics were calculated for each society. Posted content was categorized as being: (1) society news updates, (2) event announcements, or (3) general medical information. From a total of 64 TACCS societies, only 27 (42%) had FB and/or TW accounts. Ten out of the 12 American societies had accounts compared to 13/39 of European, 2/9 of Australasian, and 0/2 of international societies. For the societies with social media presence, the mean numbers of monthly tweets and FB posts per society were 22 and 8, respectively. We summarize the FB and TW activity of the studied TACCS societies. Most tweets/posts were society news updates and event announcements intended to the society's constituents not the general public. A text cloud was constructed to summarize the major featured topics. Less than half of the TACCS societies are currently using social media; those that do are arguably underutilizing its potential. Non-American societies in particular lag behind in their use of social networking.

  13. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  14. Report from the Biennial Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS Held in Adelaide, November 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Miller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Australasian section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS held their biennial meeting in Adelaide, Australia on 8–11 November 2011. Over 70 scientists, researchers and industry representatives gathered for three days of talks and discussions on lipid related topics. A highlight was the hot topic symposium on the new olive oil standard being introduced in Australia. Paul Miller, Australian Olives Association, gave a compelling address on why the standard was needed. He demonstrated that the increase in price and demand for high quality olive oils has led to products falsely or misleadingly labelled. Furthermore, the genetic and seasonal variation in minor components of olive oil has led to misclassifications. An extensive scientific and political process in Australia and overseas led to development of this new standard. Dr. Leandro Ravetti, Mordern Olives, demonstrated the development of two new methods, for analysis of pyropheophytins and diacylglycerols, are good indicators of modification by deodorisation of oils and show excellent correlation with organoleptic assessment with aging/degradation of extra virgin olive oils. Professor Rod Mailer finished this session with studies of actual adulteration cases in Australia and overseas, further highlighting the need for this new standard. [...

  15. Proceedings of the Joint Conference of Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine and IEAust College of Biomedical Engineers; Asia/Pacific Region of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is a celebration of the centenary of Rontgen''s discovery of Xrays. It is also the 50th anniversary of the first hospital physicist appointment in New Zealand. The historical element of the programme will complement the emphasis on current applications of the physical and engineering sciences to medicine and an anticipation of future developments. For the first time the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, together with the IEAust College of Biomedical Engineers, are joined by the Asia/Pacific Region of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society to make this a truly international conference. The proceedings include many papers on radiology and radiotherapy

  16. 2014 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly astronomy maps, viewing tips and highlights, and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to estimate local rise and set times for the Sun, Moon and planets. The 2014 Australasian Sky Guide also provides information on the solar system, updated with the latest findings from space probes. Published annually since 1991, the Sky Guide continues to be a favourite with photographers,

  17. 2015 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide has been providing star gazers with everything they need to know about the southern night sky for the past 25 years. The 2015 guide will celebrate this landmark with highlights from the past as well as monthly astronomy maps, viewing tips and highlights, and details of the year's exciting celestial events.Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to estimate local rise and set times for the Sun, Moon and planets. The 2015 Australasian Sky Guide also provides information on the solar system, updated with the l

  18. Development of the Australasian vascular surgical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Bernie M; Beiles, Charles Barry; Thomson, Ian A; Grigg, Michael J; Fitridge, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Australasian Vascular Audit that was created to unify audit activities under the umbrella of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Vascular Surgery as a Web-based application. Constitutional change in late 2008 deemed participation in this audit compulsory for Society members. The Web-based application was developed and tested during 2009. Data for all open vascular surgery and for all endovascular procedures are collected at two points in the admission episode: at the time of operation and at discharge, and entered into the application. Data are analyzed to produce risk-adjusted outcomes. An algorithm has been developed to deal with outliers according to natural justice and to comply with the requirements of regulatory bodies. The Audit is protected by legislated privilege and is officially endorsed and indemnified by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Confidentiality of surgeons and patients alike is ensured by a legally protected coding system and computer encryption system. Validation is by a verification process of 5% of members per year who are randomly selected. The application is completely funded by the Society. Data entry commenced on January 1, 2010. Over 40,000 vascular procedures were entered in the first year. The Audit application allows instantaneous on-line access to individual data and to deidentified group data and specific reports. It also allows real-time instantaneous production of log books for vascular trainees. The Audit has already gained recognition in the Australasian public arena during its first year of operation as an important benchmark of correct professional surgical behavior. Compliance has been extremely high in public hospitals but less so in private hospitals such that only 60% of members received a certificate of complete participation at the end of its first year of operation. An Internet-based compulsory audit of complete surgical practice is

  19. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trauma and on most vascular injuries. South Africa is one of the few .... scan of the brain and abdomen showed a sliver of left subdural and subarachnoid .... and especially on RT. In the event of a life-threatening condition, the rapid response ...

  20. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... However, the physical and financial resources to manage this massive burden of disease are inadequate. This is especially the case in terms of access to critical care facilities. The development of an electronic trauma registry at our institution has allowed us to capture data in real time on all patients and.

  1. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... unit in Durban, and to correlate it with injury severity, length of hospital stay ... and via a password protected mobile application program within 6 ..... usage and costs performed in larger numbers on major trauma patients will ...

  2. Prognostic Performance Evaluation of the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis and the Korean Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis Scores in the Early Phase of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Sug; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Byung Kook; Cho, Yong Soo

    2018-01-15

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) contributes to poor outcome in the early phase of trauma. We aimed to analyze and compare the prognostic performances of the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) and the Korean Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (KSTH) scores in the early phase of trauma. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to examine the prognostic performance of both scores, and multivariate analysis was used to estimate the prognostic impact of the ISTH and KSTH scores in the early phase of trauma. The primary outcome was 24-hour mortality and the secondary outcome was massive transfusion. Of 1,229 patients included in the study, the 24-hour mortality rate was 7.6% (n = 93), and 8.1% (n = 99) of patients who received massive transfusions. The area under the curves (AUCs) of the KSTH and ISTH scores for 24-hour mortality were 0.784 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.760-0.807) and 0.744 (95% CI, 0.718-0.768), respectively. The AUC of KSTH and ISTH scores for massive transfusion were 0.758 (95% CI, 0.734-0.782) and 0.646 (95% CI, 0.619-0.673), respectively. The AUCs of the KSTH score was significantly different from those of the ISTH score. Overt DIC according to KSTH criteria only, was independently associated with 24-hour mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.630; 95% CI, 1.456-4.752). Only the KSTH score was independently associated with massive transfusion (OR, 1.563; 95% CI, 1.182-2.068). The KSTH score demonstrates a better prognostic performance for outcomes than the ISTH score in the early phase of trauma. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  3. A risk-adapted approach is beneficial in the management of bilateral femoral shaft fractures in multiple trauma patients: an analysis based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhausen, Eva; Lefering, Rolf; Tjardes, Thorsten; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Bouillon, Bertil; Rixen, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Today, there is a trend toward damage-control orthopedics (DCO) in the management of multiple trauma patients with long bone fractures. However, there is no widely accepted concept. A risk-adapted approach seems to result in low acute morbidity and mortality. Multiple trauma patients with bilateral femoral shaft fractures (FSFs) are considered to be more severely injured. The objective of this study was to validate the risk-adapted approach in the management of multiple trauma patients with bilateral FSF. Data analysis is based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (1993-2008, n = 42,248). Multiple trauma patients with bilateral FSF were analyzed in subgroups according to the type of primary operative strategy. Outcome parameters were mortality and major complications as (multiple) organ failure and sepsis. A total of 379 patients with bilateral FSF were divided into four groups as follows: (1) no operation (8.4%), (2) bilateral temporary external fixation (DCO) (50.9%), bilateral primary definitive osteosynthesis (early total care [ETC]) (25.1%), and primary definitive osteosynthesis of one FSF and DCO contralaterally (mixed) (15.6%). Compared with the ETC group, the DCO group was more severely injured. The incidence of (multiple) organ failure and mortality rates were higher in the DCO group but without significance. Adjusted for injury severity, there was no significant difference of mortality rates between DCO and ETC. Injury severity and mortality rates were significantly increased in the no-operation group. The mixed group was similar to the ETC group regarding injury severity and outcome. In Germany, both DCO and ETC are practiced in multiple trauma patients with bilateral FSF so far. The unstable or potentially unstable patient is reasonably treated with DCO. The clearly stable patient is reasonably treated with nailing. When in doubt, the patient is probably not totally stable, and the safest precaution may be to use DCO as a risk

  4. A trauma network with centralized and local health care structures: Evaluating the effectiveness of the first certified Trauma Network of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstberger, Antonio; Koller, Michael; Zeman, Florian; Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Hilber, Franz; Diepold, Eva; Loss, Julika; Herbst, Tanja; Nerlich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Trauma is a global burden of disease and one of the main causes of death worldwide. Therefore, many countries around the world have implemented a wide range of different initiatives to minimize mortality rates after trauma. One of these initiatives is the bundling of treatment expertise in trauma centers and the establishment of trauma networks. Germany has a decentralized system of trauma care medical centers. Severely injured patients ought to receive adequate treatment in both level I and level II centers. This study investigated the effectiveness of a decentralized network and the question whether level I and level II centers have comparable patient outcome. In 2009, the first trauma network DGU® in Germany was certified in the rural area of Eastern Bavaria. All patients admitted to the 25 participating hospitals were prospectively included in this network in the framework of a study sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research between March 2012 and February 2014. 2 hospitals were level I centers (maximal care centers), 8 hospitals were level II centers, and 15 hospitals were level III centers. The criterion for study inclusion was an injury severity score (ISS) ≥ 16 for patients´ primarily admitted to a level I or a level II center. Exclusion criteria were transferal to another hospital within 48 h, an unknown revised injury severity classification II score (RISC II), or primary admittance to a level III center (n = 52). 875 patients were included in the study. Univariate analyses were used regarding the preclinical and clinical parameters, the primary endpoint mortality rate, and the secondary endpoints length of stay, organ failure, and neurological outcome (GOS). The primary endpoint was additionally evaluated by means of multivariable analysis. Indices for injury severity (GCS, AISHead, ISS, and NISS) as well as the predicted probability of death (RISC II) were higher in level I centers than in level II centers. No significant

  5. Alcohol and Trauma: A Summary of the Satellite Symposium at the 30th Annual Meeting of the Shock Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Melanie D.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Molina, Patricia E.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the research presented at the Alcohol and Trauma Satellite Symposium at the 30th Annual Shock Society Annual Meeting. The satellite meeting was held on June 8th and 9th in Baltimore, MD. Its purpose was to discuss recent findings in the areas of alcohol and injury, including the effect of alcohol use on patients in the trauma unit of hospitals. The meeting consisted of three sessions, with plenary talks by invited speakers, short talks from selected abstracts, and a poster session. Participants presented data on the effects of alcohol on organ function, healing, and immune processes after a variety of injuries including burn, hemorrhagic shock, sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:19393863

  6. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  7. [Safety culture in orthopedics and trauma surgery : Course concept: interpersonal competence by the German Society for Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU) and Lufthansa Aviation Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepfer, A-K; Seemann, R; Merschin, D; Stange, R; Egerth, M; Münzberg, M; Mutschler, M; Bouillon, B; Hoffmann, R

    2017-10-01

    Patient safety has become a central and measurable key factor in the routine daily medical practice. The human factor plays a decisive role in safety culture and has moved into focus regarding the reduction of treatment errors and undesired critical incidents. Nonetheless, the systematic training in communication and interpersonal competences has so far only played a minor role. The German Society of Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU) in cooperation with the Lufthansa Aviation Training initiated a course system for interpersonal competence. Several studies confirmed the reduction of critical incidents and costs after implementation of a regular and targeted human factor training. The interpersonal competence should be an essential component of specialist training within the framework of a 3‑column model.

  8. Assessment and management of bone health in women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy: Position statement of the Endocrine Society of Australia, the Australian and New Zealand Bone & Mineral Society, the Australasian Menopause Society and the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Mathis; Ramchand, Sabashini; Milat, Frances; Vincent, Amanda; Lim, Elgene; Kotowicz, Mark A; Hicks, Jill; Teede, Helena

    2018-05-09

    To formulate clinical consensus recommendations on bone health assessment and management of women with oestrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy. Representatives appointed by relevant Australian Medical Societies used a systematic approach for adaptation of guidelines (ADAPTE) to derive an evidence-informed position statement addressing five key questions. Women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors and the subset of premenopausal woman on tamoxifen have accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Both bisphosphonates and denosumab prevent bone loss, additionally denosumab has proven anti-fracture benefit. Women considering endocrine therapy need fracture risk assessment, including clinical risk factors, biochemistry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, with monitoring based on risk factors. Weight-bearing exercise, vitamin D and calcium sufficiency is recommended routinely. Antiresorptive treatment should be considered in women with prevalent or incident clinical or morphometric fractures, a T-score (or Z-scores in women <50 years) of <-2.0 at any site, or if annual bone loss is ≥5%, considering baseline BMD and other fracture risk factors. Duration of antiresorptive treatment can be individualised based on absolute fracture risk. Relative to their skeletal benefits, risks of adverse events with antiresorptive treatments are low. Skeletal health should be considered in the decision-making process regarding choice and duration of endocrine therapy. Before and during endocrine therapy, skeletal health should be assessed regularly, optimised by nonpharmacological intervention and where indicated antiresorptive treatment, in an individualised, multidisciplinary approach. Clinical trials are needed to better delineate long-term fracture risks of adjuvant endocrine therapy, and to determine the efficacy of interventions designed to minimise these risks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This

  9. Blunt chest trauma in a non-specialist centre: Right treatment, right place?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lesley; Jayathissa, Sisira

    2016-12-01

    To compare patient characteristics, management and outcomes for patients admitted with isolated blunt chest trauma, managed by medical or surgical teams. We reviewed adult patients admitted with blunt chest trauma between 1 September 2006 and 31 August 2011 to a secondary hospital in New Zealand. Inclusion criteria were: blunt chest trauma, with at least one radiologically demonstrated rib fracture. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcomes were development of pneumonia, and use of analgesia. Seventy-two patients were included. Thirty-three patients were managed by medical teams and 39 by surgical teams. In-hospital mortality was greater amongst medical patients 5/33 (15%) versus surgical 0/39 (0%); P = 0.012. Pneumonia occurred in 15/33 (45%); medical patients versus surgical 2/39 (5%), P trauma fall compared to surgically managed patients (28/33 [85%] vs 9/39 [27%]; P chest trauma, those managed by medical teams were older, had more comorbidities and were more likely to have become injured with a low trauma fall than those managed by surgical teams. They had less access to analgesic options, developed pneumonia more often and had higher mortality. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  10. Impact microcraters on an Australasian microtektite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.; Sudhakar, M.

    Microcraters attributable to impact have been discovered on an Australasian microtektite from a core in the Central Indian Basin. The craters resemble lunar microcraters and those generated during impact experiments. The largest crater here, which...

  11. Perioperative care for lumbar microdiscectomy: a survey of Australasian neurosurgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kai Zheong; Ghosh, Peter; Goldschlager, Tony

    2018-01-01

    Background Lumbar microdiscectomy is the most commonly performed spine surgery procedure. Over time it has evolved to a minimally invasive procedure. Traditionally patients were advised to restrict activity following lumbar spine surgery. However, post-operative instructions are heterogeneous. The purpose of this report is to assess, by survey, the perioperative care practices of Australasian neurosurgeons in the minimally invasive era. Methods A survey was conducted by email invitation sent to all full members of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia (NSA). This consisted of 11 multi-choice questions relating to operative indications, technique, and post-operative instructions for lumbar microdiscectomy answered by an electronically distributed anonymized online survey. Results The survey was sent to all Australasian Neurosurgeons. In total, 68 complete responses were received (28.9%). Most surgeons reported they would consider a period of either 4 to 8 weeks (42.7%) or 8 to 12 weeks (32.4%) as the minimum duration of radicular pain adequate to offer surgery. Unilateral muscle dissection with unilateral discectomy was practiced by 76.5%. Operative microscopy was the most commonly employed method of magnification (76.5%). The majority (55.9%) always refer patients to undergo inpatient physiotherapy. Sitting restrictions were advised by 38.3%. Lifting restrictions were advised by 83.8%. Conclusions Australasian neurosurgical lumbar microdiscectomy perioperative care practices are generally consistent with international practices and demonstrate a similar degree of heterogeneity. Recommendation of post-operative activity restrictions by Australasian neurosurgeons is still common. This suggests a role for the investigation of the necessity of such restrictions in the era of minimally invasive spine surgery. PMID:29732417

  12. The role of whole-body computed tomography in the diagnosis of thoracic injuries in severely injured patients - a retrospective multi-centre study based on the trauma registry of the German trauma society (TraumaRegister DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patricia; Kulla, Martin; Kerwagen, Fabian; Lefering, Rolf; Friemert, Benedikt; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2017-08-15

    Thoracic injuries are a leading cause of death in polytrauma patients. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) has largely replaced traditional imaging techniques such as conventional radiographs and focused computed tomography (CT) as diagnostic tools in severely injured patients. It is still unclear whether WBCT has led to higher rates of diagnosis of thoracic injuries and thus to a change in outcomes. In a retrospective study based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU ® ), we analysed data from 16,545 patients who underwent treatment in 59 hospitals between 2002 and 2012 (ISS ≥ 9). The 3 years preceding and the 3 years following the introduction of WBCT as a standard imaging modality for the investigation of severely injured patients were assessed for every hospital. Accordingly, patients were assigned to either the pre-WBCT or the WBCT group. We compared the numbers of thoracic injuries and the outcomes of patients before and after the routine use of WBCT. A total of 13,564 patients (pre-WBCT: n = 5005, WBCT: n = 8559) were included. Relevant thoracic injuries were detected in 47.8%. There were no major differences between the patient groups in injury severity (pre-WBCT: median ISS 21; WBCT: median ISS 22), injury patterns and demographics. After the introduction of WBCT, only minor changes were observed regarding the rates of most thoracic injuries. Clinically relevant injuries were pulmonary contusions (pre-WBCT: 18.5%; WBCT: 28.7%), injuries to the lung parenchyma (pre-WBCT: 12.6%; WBCT: 5.9%), multiple rib fractures (pre-WBCT: 10.6%; WBCT: 21.6%), and pneumothoraces (pre-WBCT: 17.3%; WBCT: 21.6%). The length of stay in the intensive care unit (pre-WBCT: 10.8 days; WBCT: 9.7 days) and in hospital (pre-WBCT: 26.2 days; WBCT: 23.3 days) decreased. There was no difference in overall mortality (pre-WBCT: 15.5%; WBCT: 15.6%). The routine use of WBCT in the

  13. "Recommendations for uniform reporting of data following major trauma--the Utstein style" (as of July 17, 1999). An International Trauma Anaesthesia and Critical Care Society (ITACCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, W F; Baskett, P J; Grande, C; Delooz, H; Kloeck, W; Lackner, C; Lipp, M; Mauritz, W; Nerlich, M; Nicholl, J; Nolan, J; Oakley, P; Parr, M; Seekamp, A; Soreide, E; Steen, P A; van Camp, L; Wolcke, B; Yates, D

    2000-01-01

    Basic and advanced care of trauma patients has always been an important aspect of prehospital and immediate in-hospital emergency medicine, involving a broad spectrum of disciplines, specialties and skills delivered through Emergency Medical Services Systems which, however, may differ significantly in structure, resources and operation. This complex background has, at least in part, hindered the development of a uniform pattern or set of criteria and definitions. This in turn has hitherto rendered data incompatible, with the consequence that such differing systems or protocols of care cannot be readily evaluated or compared with acceptable validity. Guided by previous consensus processes evolved by the ERC, the AHA and other International Organizations--represented in ILCOR--on 'Uniform reporting of data following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest--the Utstein style' an international working group of ITACCS has drafted a document, 'Recommendations for uniform reporting of data following major trauma--the Utstein style'. The reporting system is based on the following considerations: A structured reporting system based on an "Utstein style template" which would permit the compilation of data and statistics on major trauma care, facilitating and validating independent or comparative audit of performance and quality of care (and enable groups to challenge performance statistics which did not take account of all relevant information). The recommendations and template should encompass both out-of-hospital and in-hospital trauma care. The recommendations and template should further permit intra- and inter-system evaluation to improve the quality of delivered care and identification of the relative benefits of different systems and innovative initiatives. The template should facilitate studies setting out to improve epidemiological understanding of trauma; for example such studies might focus on the factors that determine survival. The document is structured

  14. Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation trial statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony; Peake, Sandra L; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cameron, Peter; Holdgate, Anna; Howe, Belinda; Higgins, Alisa; Presneill, Jeffrey; Webb, Steve

    2013-10-01

    study. This will minimise analytic bias and conforms to current best practice in conducting clinical trials. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  15. Prehospital endotracheal intubation and chest tubing does not prolong the overall resuscitation time of severely injured patients: a retrospective, multicentre study of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Martin; Helm, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Walcher, Felix

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and chest tube placement is unnecessarily time consuming in severely injured patients. A retrospective, multicentre study including all adult patients (ISS ≥9; 2002-7) of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery who were not secondarily transferred to a trauma centre and received a definitive airway and a chest tube. Creating four groups: AA (n=963) receiving ETI and chest tube on scene, AB (n=1547) ETI performed in the prehospital setting but chest tubing later in the emergency department (ED) and BB (n=640) receiving both procedures in the ED. The BA collective (ETI performed in the ED, but chest tubing on scene) was excluded from the study because of the small sample size (n=41). The trauma resuscitation time (TRT), demographic data, injuries, treatment and outcome of the remaining three collectives were compared. The prehospital TRT of the AA collective was longer than the AB and BB subgroups (80±37 min vs 77±44 min 65±46 min; pchest tube placement do not prolong the total TRT of severely injured patients.

  16. Comparison of trauma care systems in Asian countries: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Se Jin; Oh, Moon Young; Kim, Na Rae; Jung, Yoo Joong; Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do

    2017-12-01

    The study aims to compare the trauma care systems in Asian countries. Asian countries were categorised into three groups; 'lower middle-income country', 'upper middle-income country' and 'high-income country'. The Medline/PubMed database was searched for articles published from January 2005 to December 2014 using relevant key words. Articles were excluded if they examined a specific injury mechanism, referred to a specific age group, and/or did not have full text available. We extracted information and variables on pre-hospital and hospital care factors, and regionalised system factors and compared them across countries. A total of 46 articles were identified from 13 countries, including Pakistan, India, Vietnam and Indonesia from lower middle-income countries; the Islamic Republic of Iran, Thailand, China, Malaysia from upper middle-income countries; and Saudi Arabia, the Republic of Korea, Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore from high-income countries. Trauma patients were transported via various methods. In six of the 13 countries, less than 20% of trauma patients were transported by ambulance. Pre-hospital trauma teams primarily comprised emergency medical technicians and paramedics, except in Thailand and China, where they included mainly physicians. In Iran, Pakistan and Vietnam, the proportion of patients who died before reaching hospital exceeded 50%. In only three of the 13 countries was it reported that trauma surgeons were available. In only five of the 13 countries was there a nationwide trauma registry. Trauma care systems were poorly developed and unorganised in most of the selected 13 Asian countries, with the exception of a few highly developed countries. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. A Predictive Model on North Korean Refugees' Adaptation to South Korean Society: Resilience in Response to Psychological Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hee Lim, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The results suggest that resilience can be improved through self-efficacy. It was the most significant factor decreasing psychological trauma and increasing resilience. Therefore, we need to develop programs for self-efficacy. The results also provide basic data for policy making for North Korean refugees.

  18. Australasian disasters of national significance: an epidemiological analysis, 1900-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, David A; Bartley, Bruce; Hibble, Belinda A; Varshney, Kavita

    2015-04-01

    A regional epidemiological analysis of Australasian disasters in the 20th century to present was undertaken to examine trends in disaster epidemiology; to characterise the impacts on civil society through disaster policy, practice and legislation; and to consider future potential limitations in national disaster resilience. A surveillance definition of disaster was developed conforming to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) criteria (≥10 deaths, ≥100 affected, or declaration of state emergency or appeal for international assistance). The authors then applied economic and legislative inclusion criteria to identify additional disasters of national significance. The surveillance definition yielded 165 disasters in the period, from which 65 emerged as disasters of national significance. There were 38 natural disasters, 22 technological disasters, three offshore terrorist attacks and two domestic mass shootings. Geographic analysis revealed that states with major population centres experienced the vast majority of disasters of national significance. Timeline analysis revealed an increasing incidence of disasters since the 1980s, which peaked in the period 2005-2009. Recent seasonal bushfires and floods have incurred the highest death toll and economic losses in Australasian history. Reactive hazard-specific legislation emerged after all terrorist acts and after most disasters of national significance. Timeline analysis reveals an increasing incidence in natural disasters over the past 15 years, with the most lethal and costly disasters occurring in the past 3 years. Vulnerability to disaster in Australasia appears to be increasing. Reactive legislation is a recurrent feature of Australasian disaster response that suggests legislative shortsightedness and a need for comprehensive all-hazards model legislation in the future. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Heterogeneity in cervical spine assessment in paediatric trauma: A survey of physicians' knowledge and application at a paediatric major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Aaron J; Bressan, Silvia; Jowett, Helen; Johnson, Michael B; Teague, Warwick J

    2016-10-01

    Evidence-based decision-making tools are widely used to guide cervical spine assessment in adult trauma patients. Similar tools validated for use in injured children are lacking. A paediatric-specific approach is appropriate given important differences in cervical spine anatomy, mechanism of spinal injury and concerns over ionising radiation in children. The present study aims to survey physicians' knowledge and application of cervical spine assessment in injured children. A cross-sectional survey of physicians actively engaged in trauma care within a paediatric trauma centre was undertaken. Participation was voluntary and responses de-idenitified. The survey comprised 20 questions regarding initial assessment, imaging, immobilisation and perioperative management. Physicians' responses were compared with available current evidence. Sixty-seven physicians (28% registrars, 17% fellows and 55.2% consultants) participated. Physicians rated altered mental state, intoxication and distracting injury as the most important contraindications to cervical spine clearance in children. Fifty-four per cent considered adequate plain imaging to be 3-view cervical spine radiographs (anterior-posterior, lateral and odontoid), whereas 30% considered CT the most sensitive modality for detecting unstable cervical spine injuries. Physicians' responses reflected marked heterogeneity regarding semi-rigid cervical collars and what constitutes cervical spine 'clearance'. Greater consensus existed for perioperative precautions in this setting. Physicians actively engaged in paediatric trauma care demonstrate marked heterogeneity in their knowledge and application of cervical spine assessment. This is compounded by a lack of paediatric-specific evidence and definitions, involvement of multiple specialties and staff turnover within busy departments. A validated decision-making tool for cervical spine assessment will represent an important advance in paediatric trauma. © 2016 Australasian

  20. Mental health problems in Pakistani society as a consequence of violence and trauma: a case for better integration of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Khalily

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper discusses the increasing incidence of mental health problems in Pakistan, and specifically in the Swat valley, in relation to the growing insurgency and current violence in Pakistani society. The paper argues that the health care system's response in Pakistan is not adequate to meet the current challenges and that changes in policy are needed to build mental health care services as an important component of the basic health package at primary care level in the public sector. Method: This paper reviews the existing mental health situation in Pakistan with reference to the findings of a case study in the Swat valley in Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa Pakistan. The figures presented in the case study are used to support the need for an integrated national mental health policy. Conclusion: Mental health care needs to be incorporated as a core service in primary care and supported by specialist services. There is a strong need to provide adequate training for general practitioners and postgraduate training for mental health professionals to meet the current demands. A collaborative network between stakeholders in the public and private sector, as well as non-governmental organisations are required that promotes mental health care and advocates for changes in mental health policy.

  1. Mental health problems in Pakistani society as a consequence of violence and trauma: a case for better integration of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Khalily

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper discusses the increasing incidence of mental health problems in Pakistan, and specifically in the Swat valley, in relation to the growing insurgency and current violence in Pakistani society. The paper argues that the health care system's response in Pakistan is not adequate to meet the current challenges and that changes in policy are needed to build mental health care services as an important component of the basic health package at primary care level in the public sector.Method: This paper reviews the existing mental health situation in Pakistan with reference to the findings of a case study in the Swat valley in Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa Pakistan. The figures presented in the case study are used to support the need for an integrated national mental health policy.Conclusion: Mental health care needs to be incorporated as a core service in primary care and supported by specialist services. There is a strong need to provide adequate training for general practitioners and postgraduate training for mental health professionals to meet the current demands. A collaborative network between stakeholders in the public and private sector, as well as non-governmental organisations are required that promotes mental health care and advocates for changes in mental health policy.

  2. The Australasian Psoriasis Collaboration view on methotrexate for psoriasis in the Australasian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Marius; Gupta, Monisha; Andrews, Megan; Armour, Katherine; Baker, Chris; Foley, Peter; Gebauer, Kurt; George, Jacob; Rubel, Diana; Sullivan, John

    2017-08-01

    The Australasian Psoriasis Collaboration reviewed methotrexate (MTX) in the management of psoriasis in the Australian and New Zealand setting. The following comments are based on expert opinion and a literature review. Low-dose MTX (< 0.4 mg/kg per week) has a slow onset of action and has moderate to good efficacy, together with an acceptable safety profile. The mechanism of action is anti-inflammatory, rather than immunosuppressive. For pretreatment, consider testing full blood count (FBC), liver and renal function, non-fasting lipids, hepatitis serology, HbA1c and glucose. Body mass index and abdominal circumference should also be measured. Optional investigations in at-risk groups include an HIV test, a QuantiFERON-TB Gold test and a chest X-ray. In patients without complications, repeat the FBC at 2-4 weeks, then every 3-6 months and the liver/renal function test at 3 months and then every 6 months. There is little evidence that a MTX test dose is of value. Low-dose MTX rarely causes clinically significant hepatotoxicity in psoriasis. Most treatment-emergent liver toxicity is related to underlying metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Alcohol itself is not contraindicated, but should be limited to < 20 gm/day. [Correction added on 6 January 2017, after first online publication: '20 mg/day' has been corrected to '20 gm/day'.] Although MTX is a potential teratogen post-conception, there is little evidence for this pre-conception. MTX does not affect the quality of sperm. There is no evidence that MTX reduces healing, so there is no specific need to stop MTX peri-surgery. MTX may be used in combination with cyclosporine, acitretin, prednisone and anti-tumour necrosis factor biologics. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  3. Results from the Australasian Vascular Surgical Audit: the inaugural year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, C Barry; Bourke, Bernie; Thomson, Ian

    2012-03-01

    The Australian and New Zealand Society for Vascular Surgery has incorporated a constitutional change to administer a self-funded compulsory vascular surgery audit since January 2010. This is a bi-national quality assurance activity that captures all procedures performed in both countries. Data is collected at two points in the clinical admission; at operation and at discharge and data entry is via the Internet. Security is stringent and confidentiality is guaranteed by Commonwealth privilege. Data privacy is maximized by encryption. The application is flexible and administered by a dedicated administrator with a help-desk facility. Reports are available to provide real-time feedback of user performance compared with the peer group data in key categories of arterial surgery. A structured hierarchy for data management has been established to assess four main categories of performance: mortality after aortic surgery, stroke and death after carotid surgery, patency and limb salvage after infrainguinal bypass and patency after arteriovenous access for haemodialysis. Data is analysed using risk-adjustment techniques and an algorithm for management of underperformance has been followed. Data validation has been performed. The outcomes in all categories have been of a high standard and correction of erroneous data in a single statistical outlier has negated underperformance. The audit has captured only 65% of the estimated procedures in Australia in the first year, but data quality is good. The feasibility of a complete compulsory bi-national audit has now been established and will be the benchmark for other craft groups in the current environment of accountability. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Age of the Australasian Tektite Strewn Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izokh, E. P.

    1993-07-01

    As Fig. 1 shows, the widespread belief that the age of the Australasian tektite strewn field (AATSF) is ~0.7 m.y. appeared to be conventional. Tektites of different fission-track ages were found within the AATSF: 0.83 m.y. [1], 3.54-4.25 m.y. [2], and ~11 m.y. [3]. The first systematic investigation of the tektites, which were collected from a single stratigraphic layer in Vietnam, revealed three statistically discrete tektite age groups: 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 m.y. [4]. Similar tektites 0.75 m.y. and 1.1 m.y. in age are typical of the Zhamanshin impact crater, which represents an eminent part of the AATSF [5]. Fig. 1, which appears here in the hard copy, shows radiogenic dating: 1-2: AATSF; 3-4: Zhamanshin; 1,3: data with known annealing correction. Compiled after Zahringer, 1963; Fleischer and Price, 1964; Gentner et al., 1969; McDougal and Lovering, 1969; Fleischer et al., 1969; Storzer and Wagner, 1979, 1980; Watanabe et al., 1985; Virk, 1985; Shukolukov et al., 1986; Kashkarov et al, 1986, 1987; Kolesnikov et al., 1987; Storzer and Muller-Sonhius, 1986; Arakelyants et al., 1988; etc. The very young geological age of the AATSF was established in Australia, and was confirmed by the author in Vietnam and in the Zhamanshin impact crater. This well-known tektite age paradox strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin of tektites. The paradox is fatal to the currently dominating Earth- impact theory of tektite origin, and we are not surprised that there are no continued attempts to either silence or disavow its significance. As a matter of fact, the formation of the gigantic AATSF can be considered as the main reason for the abrupt catastrophic climatic global changes and mass extinction of species on the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary 10,000 years ago [5,6]. The age-paradox scope dictates that tektites have been periodically formed and accumulated somewhere on an as-yet-unknown planetary body and then delivered to the Earth. The extraterrestrial volcanic eruptions seem

  5. Biodiversity and parasites of wildlife: helminths of Australasian marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Ian; Spratt, David M

    2015-04-01

    Despite current attempts to document the extent of biodiversity on Earth, significant problems exist in fully documenting the helminth parasites of wildlife. Using the Australasian marsupials as an example, we examine some of these difficulties, including challenges in collecting uncommon host species, the ongoing description of new species of marsupials, the presence of cryptic species, and the decline in taxonomic expertise in Australia. Although optimistic global predictions have been made concerning the rate of discovery and description of new species of animals, these predictions may not apply in the case of specific groups of animals such as the Australasian marsupials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospects after Major Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. After patients survived major trauma, their prospects, in terms of the consequences for functioning, are uncertain, which may impact severely on patient, family and society. The studies in this thesis describes the long-term outcomes of severe injured patients after major trauma. In

  7. Setting the pace: the 2011 Australasian Podiatry Council conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Australasian Podiatry Council conference was held from April 26 to 29 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. This commentary provides a brief overview of the conference, including the speakers and topic areas covered, selected original research highlights, and award winning presentations. PMID:21762520

  8. Setting the pace: the 2011 Australasian Podiatry Council conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firth Julia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 2011 Australasian Podiatry Council conference was held from April 26 to 29 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. This commentary provides a brief overview of the conference, including the speakers and topic areas covered, selected original research highlights, and award winning presentations.

  9. Unveiling the diversification dynamics of Australasian predaceous diving beetles in the Cenozoic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Condamine, Fabien L; Hawlitschek, Oliver; Watts, Chris H; Porch, Nick; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    During the Cenozoic, Australia experienced major climatic shifts that have had dramatic ecological consequences for the modern biota. Mesic tropical ecosystems were progressively restricted to the coasts and replaced by arid-adapted floral and faunal communities. Whilst the role of aridification has been investigated in a wide range of terrestrial lineages, the response of freshwater clades remains poorly investigated. To gain insights into the diversification processes underlying a freshwater radiation, we studied the evolutionary history of the Australasian predaceous diving beetles of the tribe Hydroporini (147 described species). We used an integrative approach including the latest methods in phylogenetics, divergence time estimation, ancestral character state reconstruction, and likelihood-based methods of diversification rate estimation. Phylogenies and dating analyses were reconstructed with molecular data from seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) for 117 species (plus 12 outgroups). Robust and well-resolved phylogenies indicate a late Oligocene origin of Australasian Hydroporini. Biogeographic analyses suggest an origin in the East Coast region of Australia, and a dynamic biogeographic scenario implying dispersal events. The group successfully colonized the tropical coastal regions carved by a rampant desertification, and also colonized groundwater ecosystems in Central Australia. Diversification rate analyses suggest that the ongoing aridification of Australia initiated in the Miocene contributed to a major wave of extinctions since the late Pliocene probably attributable to an increasing aridity, range contractions and seasonally disruptions resulting from Quaternary climatic changes. When comparing subterranean and epigean genera, our results show that contrasting mechanisms drove their diversification and therefore current diversity pattern. The Australasian Hydroporini radiation reflects a combination of processes that promoted both diversification

  10. Involuntary psychiatric attendances at an Australasian emergency department: A comparison of police and health-care worker initiated presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellin, Peter; Arendts, Glenn; Weeden, Jacqueline; Pethebridge, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    To identify any significant differences in the population of patients brought in to a hospital ED under involuntary mental health orders, based on whether the orders are initiated by police or health professionals. A retrospective analysis of consecutive presentations to a tertiary hospital ED with a co-located psychiatric emergency care centre over a 12 month period, with univariate and multivariate statistical comparisons. Two hundred and eighty-two patients (making 378 ED presentations) met the case definition and were analysed. Compared with patients on medical orders, patients on police orders had significantly more presentations related to violence, longer stays in ED and lower rates of admission to an inpatient bed, but were no more likely to require restraint or security intervention within the ED. Patients on police and medical orders differ considerably, but the impact of these differences on ED workload is small. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Potassium isotope abundances in Australasian tektites and microtektites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Berger, E. L.; Delaney, J. S.; Glass, B. P.

    2008-10-01

    We report electron microprobe determinations of the elemental compositions of 11 Australasian layered tektites and 28 Australasian microtektites; and ion microprobe determinations of the 41K/39K ratios of all 11 tektites and 13 of the microtektites. The elemental compositions agree well with literature values, although the average potassium concentrations measured here for microtektites, 1.1 1.6 wt%, are lower than published average values, 1.9 2.9 wt%. The potassium isotope abundances of the Australasian layered tektites vary little. The average value of δ41K, 0.02 ± 0.12‰ (1σ mean), is indistinguishable from the terrestrial value (= 0 by definition) as represented by our standard, thereby confirming four earlier tektite analyses of Humayun and Koeberl (2004). In agreement with those authors, we conclude that evaporation has significantly altered neither the isotopic nor the elemental composition of Australasian layered tektites for elements less volatile than potassium. Although the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites, 1.1 ± 1.7‰ (1σ mean), is also statistically indistinguishable from the value for the standard, the individual ratios vary over a very large range, from -10.6 ± 1.4‰ to +13.8 ± 1.5‰ and at least three of them are significantly different from zero. We interpret these larger variations in terms of the evaporation of isotopically light potassium; condensation of potassium in the vapor plume; partial or complete stirring and quenching of the melts; and the possible uptake of potassium from seawater. That the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites equals the terrestrial value suggests that the microtektite-forming system was compositionally closed with respect to potassium and less volatile elements. The possibility remains open that 41K/39K ratios of microtektites vary systematically with location in the strewn field.

  12. Validation of Australian data in the Australasian Vascular Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, Charles Barry; Bourke, Bernie M

    2014-09-01

    Accuracy of data is important in any clinical audit. It is necessary to determine how complete the dataset is as well as the accuracy of the data that have been entered. The Australasian Vascular Audit has been operational for 4 years and a data validation process has been undertaken. An independent data source is available, which is collected by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This collects all public and private hospital data and is available for interrogation. Similarly, private-only data are available from the Medicare website. This has been compared with the Australasian Vascular Audit dataset to establish completeness of data collection. Quality of data collected has been verified by comparing accuracy of data fields with that present in patient records in a 5% random sample. For the 2 years studied, there was a 63% capture rate in Australia for all patients. In the private sector, only 50% of patients were captured with a significant decrease noted in 2013. The quality of data entered had a 2.6% error rate. There is a need to increase compliance with vascular audit in Australia and data accuracy is acceptable but could be improved. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Are Australasian Genetic Counselors Interested in Private Practice at the Primary Care Level of Health Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Vrunda; Humphreys, Linda; Peterson, Madelyn

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the perceived interest in development of private genetic counseling services in collaboration with primary care physicians in the Australasian setting by online survey of members of the Australasian Society of Genetic Counselors. Four hypothetical private practice models of professional collaboration between genetic counselors and primary care physicians or clinical geneticists were proposed to gauge interest and enthusiasm of ASGC members for this type of professional development. Perceived barriers and facilitators were also evaluated. 78 completed responses were included for analysis. The majority of participants (84.6 %) showed a positive degree of interest and enthusiasm towards potential for clinical work in private practice. All proposed practice models yielded a positive degree of interest from participants. Model 4 (the only model of collaboration with a clinical geneticist rather than primary care physician) was the clearly preferred option (mean = 4.26/5), followed by Model 2 (collaboration with a single primary care practice) (mean = 4.09/5), Model 3 (collaboration with multiple primary care clinics, multidisciplinary clinic or specialty clinic) (mean = 3.77/5) and finally, Model 1 (mean = 3.61/5), which was the most independent model of practice. When participants ranked the options in the order of preference, Model 4 remained the most popular first preference (44.6 %), followed by model 2 (21.6 %), model 3 (18.9 %) and model 1 was again least popular (10.8 %). There was no significant statistical correlation between demographic characteristics (age bracket, years of work experience, current level of work autonomy) and participants' preference for private practice models. Support from clinical genetics colleagues and the professional society was highly rated as a facilitator and, conversely, lack of such support as a significant barrier.

  14. Management of colorectal trauma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ju Yong; Keshava, Anil

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic colorectal injuries are common during times of military conflict, and major improvements in their care have arisen in such periods. Since World War II, many classification systems for colorectal trauma have been proposed, including (i) Flint Grading System; (ii) Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index; (iii) Colonic/Rectal Injury Scale; and (iv) destructive/non-destructive colonic injuries. The primary goal of these classifications was to aid surgical management and, more particularly, to determine whether a primary repair or faecal diversion should be performed. Primary repair is now the preferred surgical option. Patients who have been identified as having destructive injuries have been found to have higher anastomotic leak rates after a primary repair. Damage control principles need to be adhered to in surgical decision-making. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of injury, classifications, clinical presentation and current recommendations for the management of colorectal trauma. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest in developing an appropriate and sustainable trauma system in South ... trauma evolved with the social instability which accompanied political change in the ... increased use of military style assault weapons resulted in severe injuries ...

  16. Assessing the feasibility of a web-based registry for multiple orphan lung diseases: the Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) experience

    OpenAIRE

    Casamento, K.; Laverty, A.; Wilsher, M.; Twiss, J.; Gabbay, E.; Glaspole, I.; Jaffe, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the feasibility of using an online registry to provide prevalence data for multiple orphan lung diseases in Australia and New Zealand. Methods A web-based registry, The Australasian Registry Network of Orphan Lung Diseases (ARNOLD) was developed based on the existing British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease Registry. All adult and paediatric respiratory physicians who were members of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand in Australia and New Zealand were s...

  17. Physical Activity Promotion, Beliefs, and Barriers Among Australasian Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Pühringer, Petra; Olsen, Alicia; Sargeant, Sally; Jones, Lynnette M; Climstein, Mike

    2017-03-01

    To describe the physical activity (PA) promotion practices, beliefs, and barriers of Australasian oncology nurses and gain preliminary insight into how PA promotion practices may be affected by the demographics of the nurses.
. Cross-sectional survey.
. Australia and New Zealand.
. 119 registered oncology nurses.
. Self-reported online survey completed once per participant.
. Questions assessed the PA promotion beliefs (e.g., primary healthcare professionals responsible for PA promotion, treatment stage), PA benefits (e.g., primary benefits, evidence base), and PA promotion barriers of oncology nurses.
. Oncology nurses believed they were the major providers of PA advice to their patients. They promoted PA prior to, during, and post-treatment. The three most commonly cited benefits of PA for their patients were improved quality of life, mental health, and activities of daily living. Lack of time, lack of adequate support structures, and risk to patient were the most common barriers to PA promotion. Relatively few significant differences in the oncology nurses' PA promotion practices, beliefs, and barriers were observed based on hospital location or years of experience.
. Despite numerous barriers, Australasian oncology nurses wish to promote PA to their patients with cancer across multiple treatment stages because they believe PA is beneficial for their patients.
. Hospitals may need to better support oncology nurses in promoting PA to their patients and provide better referral pathways to exercise physiologists and physiotherapists.

  18. Habitat-specific foraging strategies in Australasian gannets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie R. Wells

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of top predator foraging adaptability is imperative for predicting their biological response to environmental variability. While seabirds have developed highly specialised techniques to locate prey, little is known about intraspecific variation in foraging strategies with many studies deriving information from uniform oceanic environments. Australasian gannets (Morus serrator typically forage in continental shelf regions on small schooling prey. The present study used GPS and video data loggers to compare habitat-specific foraging strategies at two sites of contrasting oceanographic regimes (deep water near the continental shelf edge, n=23; shallow inshore embayment, n=26, in south-eastern Australia. Individuals from the continental shelf site exhibited pelagic foraging behaviours typical of gannet species, using local enhancement to locate and feed on small schooling fish; in contrast only 50% of the individuals from the inshore site foraged offshore, displaying the typical pelagic foraging strategy. The remainder adopted a strategy of searching sand banks in shallow inshore waters in the absence of conspecifics and other predators for large, single prey items. Furthermore, of the individuals foraging inshore, 93% were male, indicating that the inshore strategy may be sex-specific. Large inter-colony differences in Australasian gannets suggest strong plasticity in foraging behaviours, essential for adapting to environmental change.

  19. Trauma and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yılmaz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding and coagulation disorders related to trauma are pathological processes which are frequently seen and increase mortality. For the purpose, trauma patients should be protected from hypoperfusion, hypothermia, acidosis and hemodilution which may aggravate the increase in physiological responses to trauma as anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Performing damage control surgery and resuscitation and transfusion of adequate blood and blood products in terms of amount and content as stated in protocols may increase the rate of survival. Medical treatments augmenting fibrin formation (fibrinogen, desmopressin, factor VIIa or preventing fibrin degradation (tranexamic acid have been proposed in selected cases but the efficacy of these agents in trauma patients are not proven. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:71-6

  20. Australasian microtektites: Impactor identification using Cr, Co and Ni ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, L.; Glass, B. P.; D'Orazio, M.; Rochette, P.

    2018-02-01

    Impactor identification is one of the challenges of large-scale impact cratering studies due to the dilution of meteoritic material in impactites (typically ratios in a Co/Ni vs Cr/Ni space (46 microtektites analyzed in this work by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma -Mass Spectrometry and 31 from literature by means of Neutron Activation Analyses with Cr, Co and Ni concentrations up to ∼370, 50 and 680 μg/g, respectively). Despite substantial overlap in Cr/Ni versus Co/Ni composition for several meteorite types with chondritic composition (chondrites and primitive achondrites), regression calculation based on ∼85% of the studied microtektites best fit a mixing line between crustal compositions and an LL chondrite. However, due to some scatter mainly in the Cr versus Ni ratios in the considered dataset, an LL chondrite may not be the best fit to the data amongst impactors of primitive compositions. Eight high Ni/Cr and five low Ni/Cr outlier microtektites (∼15% in total) deviate from the above mixing trend, perhaps resulting from incomplete homogenization of heterogeneous impactor and target precursor materials at the microtektite scale, respectively. Together with previous evidence from the ∼35 Myr old Popigai impact spherules and the ∼1 Myr old Ivory Coast microtektites, our finding suggests that at least three of the five known Cenozoic distal impact ejecta were generated by the impacts of large stony asteroids of chondritic composition, and possibly of ordinary chondritic composition. The impactor signature found in Australasian microtektites documents mixing of target and impactor melts upon impact cratering. This requires target-impactor mixing in both the two competing models in literature for the formation of the Australasian tektites/microtektites: the impact cratering and low-altitude airburst plume models.

  1. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy position statement: Summary of allergy prevention in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Susan L; Tang, Mimi L K

    2005-05-02

    A family history of allergy and asthma identifies children at high risk of allergic disease. Dietary restrictions in pregnancy are not recommended. Avoiding inhalant allergens during pregnancy has not been shown to reduce allergic disease, and is not recommended. Breastfeeding should be recommended because of other beneficial effects, but if breast feeding is not possible, a hydrolysed formula is recommended (rather than conventional cow's milk formulas) in high-risk infants only. Maternal dietary restrictions during breastfeeding are not recommended. Soy formulas and other formulas (eg, goat's milk) are not recommended for reducing food allergy risk. Complementary foods (including normal cow's milk formulas) should be delayed until a child is aged at least 4-6 months, but a preventive effect from this measure has only been demonstrated in high-risk infants. There is no evidence that an elimination diet after age 4-6 months has a protective effect, although this needs additional investigation. Further research is needed to determine the relationship between house dust mite exposure at an early age and the development of sensitisation and disease; no recommendation can yet be made about avoidance measures for preventing allergic disease. No recommendations can be made about exposure to pets in early life and the development of allergic disease. If a family already has pets it is not necessary to remove them, unless the child develops evidence of pet allergy (as assessed by an allergy specialist). Women should be advised not to smoke while pregnant, and parents should be advised not to smoke. No recommendations can be made on the use of probiotic supplements (or other microbial agents) for preventing allergic disease at this time. Immunotherapy may be considered as a treatment option for children with allergic rhinitis, and may prevent the subsequent development of asthma.

  2. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  3. Smaller beaks for colder winters: Thermoregulation drives beak size evolution in Australasian songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nicholas R; Harmáčková, Lenka; Economo, Evan P; Remeš, Vladimír

    2017-08-01

    Birds' beaks play a key role in foraging, and most research on their size and shape has focused on this function. Recent findings suggest that beaks may also be important for thermoregulation, and this may drive morphological evolution as predicted by Allen's rule. However, the role of thermoregulation in the evolution of beak size across species remains largely unexplored. In particular, it remains unclear whether the need for retaining heat in the winter or dissipating heat in the summer plays the greater role in selection for beak size. Comparative studies are needed to evaluate the relative importance of these functions in beak size evolution. We addressed this question in a clade of birds exhibiting wide variation in their climatic niche: the Australasian honeyeaters and allies (Meliphagoidea). Across 158 species, we compared species' climatic conditions extracted from their ranges to beak size measurements in a combined spatial-phylogenetic framework. We found that winter minimum temperature was positively correlated with beak size, while summer maximum temperature was not. This suggests that while diet and foraging behavior may drive evolutionary changes in beak shape, changes in beak size can also be explained by the beak's role in thermoregulation, and winter heat retention in particular. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C S; de Jong, C E; Meers, J; Henning, J; Wang, L- F; Field, H E

    2016-03-01

    Following the SARS outbreak, extensive surveillance was undertaken globally to detect and identify coronavirus diversity in bats. This study sought to identify the diversity and prevalence of coronaviruses in bats in the Australasian region. We identified four different genotypes of coronavirus, three of which (an alphacoronavirus and two betacoronaviruses) are potentially new species, having less than 90% nucleotide sequence identity with the most closely related described viruses. We did not detect any SARS-like betacoronaviruses, despite targeting rhinolophid bats, the putative natural host taxa. Our findings support the virus-host co-evolution hypothesis, with the detection of Miniopterus bat coronavirus HKU8 (previously reported in Miniopterus species in China, Hong Kong and Bulgaria) in Australian Miniopterus species. Similarly, we detected a novel betacoronavirus genotype from Pteropus alecto which is most closely related to Bat coronavirus HKU9 identified in other pteropodid bats in China, Kenya and the Philippines. We also detected possible cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses, and the apparent enteric tropism of these viruses. Thus, our findings are consistent with a scenario wherein the current diversity and host specificity of coronaviruses reflects co-evolution with the occasional host shift.

  5. Utility of an Australasian registry for children undergoing radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of an Australasian registry ('the Registry') for children undergoing radiation treatment (RT). Children under the age of 16years who received a course of radiation between January 1997 and December 2010 and were enrolled on the Registry form the subjects of this study. A total of 2232 courses of RT were delivered, predominantly with radical intent (87%). Registrations fluctuated over time, but around one-half of children diagnosed with cancer undergo a course of RT. The most prevalent age range at time of RT was 10–15years, and the most common diagnoses were central nervous system tumours (34%) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (20%). The Registry provides a reflection of the patterns of care of children undergoing RT in Australia and a mechanism for determining the resources necessary to manage children by RT (human, facilities and emerging technologies, such as proton therapy). It lacks the detail to provide information on radiotherapy quality and disease outcomes which should be the subject of separate audit studies. The utility of the Registry has been hampered by its voluntary nature and varying needs for consent. Completion of registry forms is a logical requirement for inclusion in the definition of a subspecialist in paediatric radiation oncology.

  6. Comprehensive Australasian multicentre dosimetric intercomparison: issues, logistics and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, M A; Harrison, K M; Cornes, D; Howlett, S J; Joseph, D J; Kron, T; Hamilton, C S; Denham, J W

    2009-02-01

    The present paper describes the logistics of the 2004-2008 Australasian Level III Dosimetry Intercomparison. Dosimetric intercomparisons (or 'audits') can be used in radiotherapy to evaluate the accuracy and quality of radiation delivery. An intercomparison was undertaken in New Zealand and Australia to evaluate the feasibility and logistics of ongoing dosimetric intercomparisons that evaluate all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, known as a 'Level III' intercomparison. The study commenced in 2002 with the establishment of a study team, definition of the study protocol, acquisition of appropriate equipment and recruitment of participating radiotherapy centres. Measurements were undertaken between October 2004 and March 2008, and included collation of data on time, costs and logistics of the study. Forty independent Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres agreed to participate. Measurement visits were made to 37 of these centres. Data is presented on the costs of the study and the level of support required. The study involved the participation of 16 staff at the study centre who invested over 4000 hours in the study, and of over 200 professionals at participating centres. Recommendations are provided for future phantom-based intercomparisons. It is hoped that the present paper will be of benefit to any centres or groups contemplating similar activities by identifying the processes involved in establishing the study, the potential hazards and pitfalls, and expected resource requirements.

  7. Paediatric horse-related trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Jane E; Theodore, Sigrid G; Stockton, Kellie A; Kimble, Roy M

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective cohort study reported on the epidemiology of horse-related injuries for patients presenting to the only tertiary paediatric trauma hospital in Queensland. The secondary outcome was to examine the use of helmets and adult supervision. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was examined in relation to helmet use. Morbidity and mortality were also recorded. Included were all patients presenting with any horse-related trauma to the Royal Children's Hospital in Brisbane from January 2008 to August 2014. Data were retrospectively collected on patient demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), mechanism of injury (MOI), safety precautions taken, diagnoses and surgical procedures performed. Included in the analysis were 187 incidents involving 171 patients. Most patients were aged 12-14 years (36.9%) and female (84.5%). The most common MOI were falls while riding horses (97.1%). Mild TBI (24.6%) and upper limb fractures (20.9%) were common injuries sustained. Patients who wore helmets had significantly reduced hospital LOS and severity of TBI when compared with those who did not wear helmets (P horses, in addition to being a compulsory requirement whilst horse riding. Prompts in documentation may assist doctors to record the use of safety attire and adult supervision. This will allow future studies to further investigate these factors in relation to clinical outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Trauma Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y. Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available “Major Trauma. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately.” Even though I have been working at Edendale Hospital as a trauma registrar for over a year, whenever I hear this announcement over the hospital intercom system, my heart beats just a little faster than normal. When I first arrived at Edendale my colleagues told me that the adrenaline rush I would experience after being called out to attend a new emergency would decrease over time, and indeed they were right. However, it is also true to say that on some occasions more than others, it is still felt more strongly than ever.

  9. Tailbone trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    For tailbone trauma when no spinal cord injury is suspected: Relieve pressure on the tailbone by sitting on an inflatable rubber ring or cushions. Take acetaminophen for pain. Take a stool softener to avoid constipation. If you suspect injury ...

  10. Paediatric trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town ... projects, educational initiatives and advocacy roles on child safety initiatives regarding child injuries as well as child abuse. ... The development of the total body digital.

  11. An Australasian hockey stick and associated climate wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, David; Gergis, Joelle; Neukom, Raphael; Gallant, Ailie

    2017-04-01

    Multiproxy warm season (September-February) temperature reconstructions are presented for the combined land-ocean region of Australasia (0°-50°S, 110°E-180°) covering the last millennium (1000-2001CE). Using between 2 (R2) and 28 (R28) paleoclimate records, four 1000-member ensemble reconstructions of regional temperature are developed using four different statistical methods: principal component regression (PCR), composite plus scale (CPS), Bayesian hierarchical models (LNA), and pairwise comparison (PaiCo). The reconstructions are then compared with a three-member ensemble of GISS-E2-R climate model simulations and independent paleoclimate records. Decadal fluctuations in Australasian temperatures are remarkably similar between the four reconstruction methods. There are, however, differences in the amplitude of temperature variations between the different statistical methods and proxy networks. When the largest R28 network is used, the warmest 30-yr periods occur after 1950 in 77% of ensemble members over all methods. However, reconstructions based on only the longest records (R2 and R3 networks) indicate that single 30- and 10-yr periods of similar or slightly higher temperatures than in the late twentieth century may have occurred during the first half of the millennium. Regardless, the most recent instrumental temperatures (1985-2014) are above the 90th percentile of all 12 reconstruction ensembles (four reconstruction methods based on three proxy networks — R28, R3, and R2). An earlier manuscript describing this study and its results was accepted for publication in the Journal of Climate in May 2012, after two thorough rounds of review. However, as described by Gergis (2016), after the early online release of the paper, a typo in the methods section was identified. While the paper said the study had used "detrended" data - observed temperature data from which the longer-term trends had been removed - the study had in fact used raw data. Both raw and

  12. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  13. Sexual Size Dimorphism and Body Condition in the Australasian Gannet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren P Angel

    Full Text Available Sexual size dimorphism is widespread throughout seabird taxa and several drivers leading to its evolution have been hypothesised. While the Australasian Gannet (Morus serrator has previously been considered nominally monomorphic, recent studies have documented sexual segregation in diet and foraging areas, traits often associated with size dimorphism. The present study investigated the sex differences in body mass and structural size of this species at two colonies (Pope's Eye, PE; Point Danger, PD in northern Bass Strait, south-eastern Australia. Females were found to be 3.1% and 7.3% heavier (2.74 ± 0.03, n = 92; 2.67 ± 0.03 kg, n = 43 than males (2.66 ± 0.03, n = 92; 2.48 ± 0.03 kg, n = 43 at PE and PD, respectively. Females were also larger in wing ulna length (0.8% both colonies but smaller in bill depth (PE: 2.2%; PD: 1.7% than males. Despite this dimorphism, a discriminant function provided only mild accuracy in determining sex. A similar degree of dimorphism was also found within breeding pairs, however assortative mating was not apparent at either colony (R2 < 0.04. Using hydrogen isotope dilution, a body condition index was developed from morphometrics to estimate total body fat (TBF stores, where TBF(% = 24.43+1.94*(body mass/wing ulna length - 0.58*tarsus length (r2 = 0.84, n = 15. This index was used to estimate body composition in all sampled individuals. There was no significant difference in TBF(% between the sexes for any stage of breeding or in any year of the study at either colony suggesting that, despite a greater body mass, females were not in a better condition than males. While the driving mechanism for sexual dimorphism in this species is currently unknown, studies of other Sulids indicate segregation in foraging behaviour, habitat and diet may be a contributing factor.

  14. Huperzine alkaloids from Australasian and southeast Asian Huperzia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei-Han; Goodger, Jason Q D; Field, Ashley R; Holtum, Joseph A M; Woodrow, Ian E

    2010-09-01

    The pharmaceutical alkaloid huperzine A (HupA), currently used in herbal supplements and medicines worldwide, is predominantly sourced from the Chinese lycopod Huperzia serrata (Thunb. ex Murray) Trev. (Lycopodiaceae), which on average contains only 0.08 mg HupA g(-1) dry weight, and is experiencing a rapid decline in China due to over-harvesting. To find a high-yielding, natural source of HupA and/or the related huperzine B (HupB) that could potentially be used as the starting material in a commercial propagation program. We surveyed 17 Huperzia species (15 indigenous to Australia and southeast Asia) for their foliar HupA and HupB concentrations. We also studied intra-specific variation for the huperzines in four species that were available in sufficient numbers, and determined tissue-specific accumulation in larger specimens. HupA was detected in 11 Australasian and southeast Asian species, with eight also containing HupB, albeit at much lower concentrations. A H. elmeri (Herter) Holub plant from the Philippines had one of the highest HupA concentrations recorded (1.01 mg g(-1) dry wt) and it also had the highest HupB content of all plants surveyed (0.34 mg g(-1) dry wt). Intra-specific HupA and HupB concentrations were extremely variable, and at the intra-plant level, reproductive strobili were found to accumulate the highest HupA concentrations. Select Huperzia species from Australia and southeast Asia have potential as the starting material for establishing commercial HupA plantations, but the high intra-specific variability observed suggests that detailed screening is needed to isolate high huperzine-yielding individuals.

  15. Appropriate working hours for surgical training according to Australasian trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Harper, Simon; Loveday, Benjamin; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    The demands of surgical training, learning and service delivery compete with the need to minimize fatigue and maintain an acceptable lifestyle. The optimal balance of working hours is uncertain. This study aimed to define the appropriate hours to meet these requirements according to trainees. All Australian and New Zealand surgical trainees were surveyed. Roster structures, weekly working hours and weekly 'sleep loss hours' (work practices were then correlated with sufficiency of training time, time for study, fatigue and its impacts, and work-life balance preferences. Multivariate and univariate analyses were performed. The response rate was 55.3% with responders representative of the total trainee body. Trainees who worked median 60 h/week (interquartile range: 55-65) considered their work hours to be appropriate for 'technical' and 'non-technical' training needs compared with 55 h/week (interquartile range: 50-60) regarded as appropriate for study/research needs. Working ≥65 h/week, or accruing ≥5.5 weekly 'sleep loss hours', was associated with increased fatigue, reduced ability to study, more frequent dozing while driving and impaired concentration at work. Trainees who considered they had an appropriate work-life balance worked median 55 h/week. Approximately, 60 h/week proved an appropriate balance of working hours for surgical training, although study and lifestyle demands are better met at around 55 h/week. Sleep loss is an important determinant of fatigue and its impacts, and work hours should not be considered in isolation. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Geriatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sasha D; Holcomb, John B

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of trauma is changing due to an aging population. Geriatric patients represent an increasing number and proportion of trauma admissions and deaths. This review explores recent literature on geriatric trauma, including triage criteria, assessment of frailty, fall-related injury, treatment of head injury complicated by coagulopathy, goals of care, and the need for ongoing education of all surgeons in the care of the elderly. Early identification of high-risk geriatric patients is imperative to initiate early resuscitative efforts. Geriatric patients are typically undertriaged because of their baseline frailty being underappreciated; however, centers that see more geriatric patients do better. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is important in preventing progression of brain injury. Anticipation of difficult disposition necessitates early involvement of physical therapy for rehabilitation and case management for appropriate placement. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be based on the well established tenets of trauma resuscitation and injury repair, but with distinct elements that address the physiological and anatomical challenges presented by geriatric patients.

  18. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  19. Radiotherapy for early infradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease: the Australasian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, M; Boyages, J; Crennan, E; Davis, S; Fisher, R J; Hook, C; Johnson, N; Joseph, D; Khoo, V; Liew, K H; Morgan, G; O'Brien, P; Pendlebury, S; Pratt, G; Quong, G; Roos, D E; Thornton, D; Trotter, G; Walker, Q; Wallington, M

    1996-04-01

    To review the Australasian results of Stage I and IIA Infradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's Disease (IHD) treated solely by irradiation. Eligible patients had IHD only and were treated by irradiation with curative intent over the period of 1969 to 1988. Ten radiation oncology centres from within Australia and New Zealand were surveyed for patient, tumour and treatment variables. Disease free rates, survival and complications were analysed. 106 patients with IHD were studied. The average potential follow up was 9.4 years. The male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The median age was 37.5 years. Histological subgroups were as follows; lymphocyte predominant 43%, mixed cellularity 21%, lymphocyte depleted 5%, nodular sclerosing 27% and unclassifiable 4%. Fifty nine patients had laparotomy of which 22 (37%) were positive for tumour. Nine laparotomies were performed for diagnosis and the remainder for staging. One patient was up-staged by laparotomy and three were down-staged. Sixty-eight patients presented with inguinal disease alone, five with abdominal disease alone, 19 with two sites of involvement and 12 with inguinal, pelvic and abdominal disease. In two patients the site was unknown. There was no correlation between site of involvement, age, sex or histological subtype. Forty seven cases were clinically staged (CS) as follows: CS IA-23, CS IIA-24. The other 59 were pathologically staged (PS) as follows: PS IA-37, PS IB-1, PS IIA-21. Treatment consisted of involved field alone (16), inverted Y (68), inverted Y and spleen (13), para-aortic irradiation only (3), or total nodal irradiation (6). Mean dose was 37 Gy. There were 30 recurrences to give an acturial 10-year disease-free rate of 70%. In multivariate analysis lower number of tumour sites, lymphocyte predominant histology and higher dose were all significantly correlated with higher disease free rates. Eight patients died of Hodgkin's disease and 19 of other causes. The 10-year overall survival rate was 71%. Older age and

  20. Radiotherapy for early infradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease: the Australasian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.; Boyages, J.; Crennan, E.; Davis, S.; Fisher, R.J.; Hook, C.; Johnson, N.; Joseph, D.; Khoo, V.; Liew, K.H.; Morgan, G.; O'Brien, P.; Pendlebury, S.; Pratt, G.; Quong, G.; Roos, D.E.; Thornton, D.; Trotter, G.; Walker, Q.; Wallington, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To review the Australasian results of Stage I and IIA Infradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's Disease (IHD) treated solely by irradiation. Methods and materials: Eligible patients had IHD only and were treated by irradiation with curative intent over the period of 1969 to 1988. Ten radiation oncology centres from within Australia and New Zealand were surveyed for patient, tumour and treatment variables. Disease free rates, survival and complications were analysed. Results: 106 patients with IHD were studied. The average potential follow up was 9.4 years. The male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The median age was 37.5 years. Histological subgroups were as follows; lymphocyte predominant 43%, mixed cellularity 21%, lymphocyte depleted 5%, nodular sclerosing 27% and unclassifiable 4%. Fifty nine patients had laparotomy of which 22 (37%) were positive for tumour. Nine laparotomies were performed for diagnosis and the remainder for staging. One patient was up-staged by laparotomy and three were down-staged. Sixty-eight patients presented with inguinal disease alone, five with abdominal disease alone, 19 with two sites of involvement and 12 with inguinal, pelvic and abdominal disease. In two patients the site was unknown. There was no correlation between site of involvement, age, sex or histological subtype. Forty seven cases were clinically staged (CS) as follows: CS IA - 23, CS IIA - 24. The other 59 were pathologically staged (PS) as follows: PS IA - 37, PS IB - 1, PS IIA - 21. Treatment consisted of involved field alone (16), inverted Y (68), inverted Y and spleen (13), para-aortic irradiation only (3), or total nodal irradiation (6). Mean dose was 37 Gy. There were 30 recurrences to give an actuarial 10-year disease-free rate of 70%. In multivariate analysis lower number of tumour sites, lymphocyte predominant histology and higher dose were all significantly correlated with higher disease free rates. Eight patients died of Hodgkin's disease and 19 of other causes. The 10

  1. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  2. Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Diaz, Fabio F; Buitrago Mejia, Francisco; Ulloa Guerrero, Luis Heber

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is the organ that is injured during the closed trauma with more frequency and it is the cause more common of foregone death in the patients with wounded abdominal. At the present time the complications of the splenic trauma are related with their severity, associate wounds, diagnostic fail or inadequate treatments. The lesions that are diagnosed in early form are managed quick and satisfactorily, but the forgotten wounds or the diagnoses and late treatments take for themselves high rates of morbid-mortality. The paper includes their phyto pathology, diagnoses, classification and treatment

  3. Ballistic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Devi Munishwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunshot injuries are rather serious but uncommon type of trauma in India. Radiologists can contribute substantially in the evaluation and treatment of patients with gunshot wounds. Foreign bodies that enter a patient as a result of trauma are contaminated and produce a range of symptoms. Oral and maxillofacial gunshot injuries are usually fatal due to close proximity with vital structures. Here, we report a case in which radiographic evidence of foreign bodies in the right orofacial region exposed a history of a gunshot injury. The patient did not have any major complaints except for reduced mouth opening. These foreign bodies were clinically silent for approximately 12 years.

  4. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014: Practicing 'Citizen-Science' in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Turney, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Government funding is the cornerstone of modern science. But with declining investment in science across most of the Western World, a major challenge for society is where best to place what little resource we have. Which research questions should have the greatest priority? Nowhere are these issues more pressing than in the Antarctic, where bases have and continue to play host to 'big-science', multi-year programmes of research, locking up logistical support and costs. But in a warming world, the areas with the greatest effects of climate change aren't always near government research stations. With this in mind, in 2012 a plan was formed to visit Commonwealth Bay, a remote area off the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, where in 2010, an iceberg the size of Rhode Island, known as B09B, dramatically knocked a 60-mile long tongue of ice off the Mertz Glacier into the Southern Ocean, setting off a cascade of change. Inspired by the expeditions of the past, we advertised berths for sale to take citizen scientists south with us, harnessing their interest, experience and investment. People responded far and wide. We were oversubscribed, and the Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014 was born. With the Russian-owned MV Akademik Shokalskiy as the expedition vessel, we set out south from the New Zealand port of Bluff in late November 2013. During our journey south and on the ice we undertook a number of scientific firsts for the region actively engaging the volunteer scientists on board in projects ranging from oceanography, biology, ecology, geology and glaciaology. The expedition demostrated how private funding could support targeted programmes of research and communicate it to the wider world. Small-science research can capture the public's imagination and also reap real scientific outputs. Although it is a funding model developed in the Antarctic a hundred years ago, the beauty is it can applied anywhere in the world.

  6. Trauma Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Maria

    There are two main trends in psychological approaches to human suffering related to what we term trauma. Although they have their respective limitations both approaches may help us explore and alleviate human suffering. One trend, primarily using concepts like traumatic events and traumatisation ...

  7. Australasian emergency nurses' willingness to attend work in a disaster: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Paul; Ranse, Jamie; Cusack, Lynette; Considine, Julie; Shaban, Ramon Z; Woodman, Richard J; Bahnisch, Laura; Kako, Mayumi; Hammad, Karen; Mitchell, Belinda

    2013-05-01

    The type of disaster, individual demographic factors, family factors and workplace factors, have been identified in the international, multidisciplinary literature as factors that influence a person's willingness to attend and assist in their workplace during a disaster. However, it is unknown if these factors are applicable to Australasian emergency nurses. The research aims to determine the extent to which Australasian emergency nurses are willing to attend their workplace in a disaster. This research was exploratory and descriptive study design, using online and paper based surveys as a means of data collection. Australasian emergency nurses from two Australasian emergency nursing colleges and four Australian hospitals were recruited to participate. Data analysis was conducted using both descriptive and inferential statistics. In total, 451 Australasian emergency nurses participated in this research. Participants were more willing to attend their workplace during a conventional disaster (p ≤ 0.001), if they worked full-time (p = 0.01), had received formal education pertaining to disasters (p ≤ 0.001), had a family disaster plan (p = 0.008), did not have children (p = 0.001) and worked in an environment in which they perceived their colleagues, managers and organisation to be prepared. The factors that influenced Australasian emergency nurses to attend their workplace in a disaster were similar to that described in the international multidisciplinary literature. Of particular note, improving disaster knowledge and skills, having a family disaster plan and improving the perceptions of the nurses' workplace preparedness can enhance the nurses' willingness to assist in a disaster. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathways to change: Use trajectories following trauma-informed treatment of women with co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castro, Teresa; Hu, Mei-Chen; Papini, Santiago; Ruglass, Lesia M; Hien, Denise A

    2015-05-01

    Despite advances towards integration of care for women with co-occurring substance use disorder (SUD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), low abstinence rates following SUD/PTSD treatment remain the norm. The utility of investigating distinct substance use trajectories is a critical innovation in the detection and refining of effective interventions for this clinical population. The present study reanalysed data from the largest randomised clinical trial to date for co-occurring SUD and PTSD in women (National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network; Women and Trauma Study). Randomised participants (n = 353) received one of two interventions in addition to treatment as usual for SUD: (i) trauma-informed integrative treatment for PTSD/SUD; or (ii) an active control psychoeducation course on women's health. The present study utilised latent growth mixture models (LGMM) with multiple groups to estimate women's substance use patterns during the 12-month follow-up period. Findings provided support for three different trajectories of substance use in the post-treatment year: (i) consistently low likelihood and use frequency; (ii) consistently high likelihood and use frequency; and (iii) high likelihood and moderate use frequency. Covariate analyses revealed improvement in PTSD severity was associated with membership in a specific substance use trajectory, although receiving trauma-informed treatment was not. Additionally, SUD severity, age and after-care efforts were shown to be related to trajectory membership. Findings highlight the necessity of accounting for heterogeneity in post-treatment substance use, relevance of trauma-informed care in SUD recovery and benefits of incorporating methodologies like LGMM when evaluating SUD treatment outcomes. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  9. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  10. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Australasian Journal of Educational Technology," 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Camey Andersen; Clegg, J. Aleta; Hickman, Garrett R.; Huyett, Sabrina Lynn; Jensen, Hyrum C.; West, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    The authors analyzed all research articles in the "Australasian Journal of Educational Technology" from 2003 to 2012 to determine the types of research methodologies published, major contributing authors, and most frequently referenced keywords, abstract terms, and cited articles. During this decade, the majority of articles published…

  11. Australasian microtektites in a substrate: A new constraint on ferromanganese crust accumulation rates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.

    composition. The ferromanganese crust has a thickness range of 6-17 mm, and its chemistry and mineralogy indicate hydrogenic accretion. Because the Australasian strewn field has an age of approximately 0.77 Ma, this finding implies that the overlying Fe...

  12. Changes in the management of liver trauma leading to reduced mortality: 15-year experience in a major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Kary; Skandarajah, Anita R; Knowles, Brett; Judson, Rodney; Thomson, Benjamin N

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, the evolution of management of liver injury has resulted in improved outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the trend in the management and outcomes of patients with liver injury. Primary outcomes were defined as mortality and hospital length of stay. The secondary aim was to identify independent predictors of mortality. This study utilized hospital trauma registry data of all trauma patients with liver injuries admitted from 1999 to 2013. Patients in this 15-year period were divided into three periods of 5 years each and compared in terms of demographics, management and outcomes. A total of 725 patients with hepatic trauma were included. Patient demographics were similar, except for an increase in patient transfers from rural locations. Non-operative management increased significantly. There was a significant increase in the use of damage control surgery with perihepatic packing in high-grade liver injuries managed operatively. Hepatic angioembolization commenced midway through the study period. The overall mortality decreased by approximately threefold (P trauma service has led to an evolution in the management of hepatic trauma, favouring non-operative management, damage control surgery and the use of hepatic angioembolization. We experienced a significantly improved mortality within 24 h of arrival to hospital in patients with liver trauma. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Urethral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, B.M.; Hricak, H.; Dixon, C.; McAninch, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging in posterior urethral trauma. Fifteen patients with posttraumatic membranous urethral strictures underwent prospective MR imaging with a 1.5-T unit before open urethroplasty. All patients had transaxial T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/70) spin-echo images and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images (matrix, 192 x 256; section thickness, 4 mm with 20% gap). Conventional retrograde and cystourethrography were performed preoperatively. Compared with conventional studies, MR imaging defined the length and location of the urethral injury and provided additional information regarding the direction and degree of prostatic and urethral dislocation

  14. Images in kidney trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Sonia Pilar; Manzano, Ana Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 3 years old female patient, who suffered blunt lumbar trauma (horse kick) with secondary kidney trauma, is reported. Imaging findings are described. Renal trauma classification and imaging findings are reviewed

  15. Key innovations and island colonization as engines of evolutionary diversification: a comparative test with the Australasian diplodactyloid geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Porta, J; Ord, T J

    2013-12-01

    The acquisition of key innovations and the invasion of new areas constitute two major processes that facilitate ecological opportunity and subsequent evolutionary diversification. Using a major lizard radiation as a model, the Australasian diplodactyloid geckos, we explored the effects of two key innovations (adhesive toepads and a snake-like phenotype) and the invasion of new environments (island colonization) in promoting the evolution of phenotypic and species diversity. We found no evidence that toepads had significantly increased evolutionary diversification, which challenges the common assumption that the evolution of toepads has been responsible for the extensive radiation of geckos. In contrast, a snakelike phenotype was associated with increased rates of body size evolution and, to a lesser extent, species diversification. However, the clearest impact on evolutionary diversification has been the colonization of New Zealand and New Caledonia, which were associated with increased rates of both body size evolution and species diversification. This highlights that colonizing new environments can drive adaptive diversification in conjunction or independently of the evolution of a key innovation. Studies wishing to confirm the putative link between a key innovation and subsequent evolutionary diversification must therefore show that it has been the acquisition of an innovation specifically, not the colonization of new areas more generally, that has prompted diversification. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. Identifying seminal papers in the Australasian Journal on Ageing 1982-2011: a Delphi consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Lynne; Richardson, Kristy; Sims, Jane; Wells, Yvonne; Naganathan, Vasi; Brooke, Elizabeth; Lindley, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify seminal Australasian Journal on Ageing papers published over 30 years through a Delphi consensus process. The main data collection was a three-round Delphi consensus study with 38 past and current members of the Australasian Journal on Ageing Editorial Board, Editorial Team and Management Committee. Three papers were agreed as top-ranking. One of the top-ranking articles was also highly cited. One article was published in the 1990 s, two in 2001. While it is difficult to judge how well the top-ranking papers represent seminal papers arising over 30 years, these papers do represent three different research strengths in Australasia, they do span three different disciplines, and they do reflect some of the diversity that characterises ageing research in Australasia over 30 years. © 2013 ACOTA.

  17. The phylogenetic relationships of endemic Australasian trichostrongylin families (Nematoda: Strongylida) parasitic in marsupials and monotremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Neil B; Huby-Chilton, Florence; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B; Beveridge, Ian

    2015-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the endemic (or largely endemic) Australasian trichostrongylin nematode families Herpetostrongylidae, Mackerrastrongylidae and Nicollinidae as well as endemic trichostrongylin nematodes currently placed in the families Trichostrongylidae and Molineidae were examined using the complete large subunit (28S) ribosomal RNA gene. The Herpetostrongylinae proved to be monophyletic. However, representatives of the Nicollinidae nested with the Herpetostrongylinae. The Mackerrastrongylidae was also a monophyletic group and included Peramelistrongylus, currently classified within the Trichostrongylidae. The Globocephaloidinae, currently considered to be a subfamily of the Herpetostrongylidae, was excluded from the family in the current analysis. Ollulanus and Libyostrongylus, included for the first time in a molecular phylogenetic analysis, were placed within the Trichostrongylidae. This study provided strong support for the Herpetostrongylidae (including within it the Nicollinidae, but excluding the Globocephaloidinae) and the Mackerrastrongylidae as monophyletic assemblages. Additional studies are required to resolve the relationships of the remaining endemic Australasian trichostrongylin genera.

  18. DNA hybridization evidence for the Australasian affinity of the American marsupial Dromiciops australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, J A; Dickerman, A W; Reig, O A; Springer, M S

    1991-01-01

    DNA hybridization was used to compare representatives of the major groups of marsupials and a eutherian outgroup. Because of the large genetic distances separating marsupial families, trees were calculated from normalized percentages of hybridization; thermal-melting statistics, however, gave identical topologies for the well-supported clades. The most notable results were the association of the only extant microbiotheriid, Dromiciops australis, an American marsupial, with the Australasian Diprotodontia, and of both together with the Dasyuridae. Estimates of the rate of divergence among marsupial genomes suggest that the Dromiciops-Diprotodontia split occurred approximately 50 million years ago, well after the establishment of the major clades of marsupials but before deep oceanic barriers prohibited dispersal among Australia, Antarctica, and South America. Because Dromiciops is nested within an Australasian group, it seems likely that dispersal from Australia accounts for its present distribution. Images PMID:1961710

  19. On a possible parent crater for Australasian tektites: Geochemical, isotopic, geographical and other constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk; Kameník, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 154, MAR (2016), s. 123-137 ISSN 0012-8252 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-22351S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : Australasian tektite * Parent crater * Geochemical analysis * Isotope analysis * Chinese loess * Badain Jaran Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; DD - Geochemistry (USMH-B) Impact factor: 7.051, year: 2016

  20. DNA hybridization evidence for the Australasian affinity of the American marsupial Dromiciops australis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, J A; Dickerman, A W; Reig, O A; Springer, M S

    1991-01-01

    DNA hybridization was used to compare representatives of the major groups of marsupials and a eutherian outgroup. Because of the large genetic distances separating marsupial families, trees were calculated from normalized percentages of hybridization; thermal-melting statistics, however, gave identical topologies for the well-supported clades. The most notable results were the association of the only extant microbiotheriid, Dromiciops australis, an American marsupial, with the Australasian Di...

  1. The Challenges and Opportunities for Professional Societies in Higher Education in Australasia: A PEST Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Iain; Steel, Caroline; Parrish, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Professional societies, established to support academic and professional staff in higher education, need to be vigilant of regional and international trends that affect their core business. In this paper, we provide an analysis of political, economic, social and technological factors that are impacting upon the Australasian higher education…

  2. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  3. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  4. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  5. THE AUSTRALASIAN APPROACH TO THE DEFINITION OF MENTAL DISORDER IN A MENTAL HEALTH ACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, John B

    2017-12-27

    How should the mental element be defined in the legal standards governing a person's 'sectioning' or placement under the Mental Health Act (MHA)? This article considers how this mental element is defined in many MHAs in Australasia: via a statutory list of disorders of mental function said to 'characterise' the necessary state of mind. This article assesses the assumptions behind the adoption of this approach. It discusses the views of several English law reform committees that have explored how the mental element should be defined. It examines the philosophy of psychiatry, expounded clearly by Aubrey Lewis, that lies behind the Australasian approach, one that emphasises the need to identify mental disturbance by reference to disorders of 'part-function of the mind', not by reference to behaviour alone. It considers how the Australasian statutes address the question of personality disorder's covered by the Act. In conclusion, it endorses cautiously the Australasian approach, principally on the ground that it may contribute positively to the conduct of review proceedings for compulsory patients under the Act. It may concentrate the attention of tribunals on particular features of the patient's mental state, on how those features are linked to associated dangers or risks, and on how the presence of those features may justify placing decisions about the patient's treatment in others' hands. Throughout, comparisons are made with the manner in which the mental element has been defined in mental health legislation for England and Wales. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  7. Protomedetera, a new genus from the Oriental and Australasian realms (Diptera, Dolichopodidae, Medeterinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chufei; Grootaert, Patrick; Yang, Ding

    2018-01-01

    Protomedetera gen. n. (Diptera: Dolichopodidae), a new genus of the subfamily Medeterinae, is described from the Oriental and Australasian realms based on four new species. Protomedetera singaporensis Grootaert & Tang, sp. n. is designated as type of the new genus. The genus is peculiar because of the small body size, the small globular first flagellomere (postpedicel), the simple male genitalia with indistinct or small epandrial lobe and half-hidden cercus. The following four new species are described and illustrated: P. biconvexa sp. n. , P. biseta sp. n. , P. glabra sp. n. , and P. singaporensis sp. n. A key to the species of the new genus is provided.

  8. Australasian code for reporting of mineral resources and ore reserves (the JORC code)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The latest revision of the Code first published in 1989 becomes effective in September 1999. It was prepared by the Joint Ores Reserves Committee of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Australian Institute of Geoscientists and Minerals Council of Australia (JORC). It sets out minimum standards, recommendations and guidelines for public reporting of exploration results, mineral resources and ore reserves in Australasia. In this edition, the guidelines, which were previously separated from the Code, have been placed after the respective Code clauses. The Code is applicable to all solid minerals, including diamonds, other gemstones and coal for which public reporting is required by the Australian and New Zealand Stock Exchanges.

  9. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  10. Transforming Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Dahl Højgaard, Pia

    2017-01-01

    , was a result of transforming society from a feudal system to a capitalistic and market based economy. This story is interesting in itself - but it also provides a key to understanding the cadastral system of today. The system has evolved over time and now serves a whole range of functions in society. The paper...

  11. Biologics and dermatology life quality index (DLQI) in the Australasian psoriasis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Diana; Photiou, Louise; Tacey, Mark; Dolianitis, Con; Varigos, George; Foley, Peter; Baker, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that may require long-term treatment for disease control. This analysis utilizes data from the Australasian Psoriasis Registry with particular attention to the impact of biologic therapy on DLQI, and the differences between the biologics in terms of DLQI score change. A retrospective review of patients enrolled in the Australasian Psoriasis Registry from April 2008 to August 2016 was conducted. All subjects from the registry that had DLQI and Psoriasis Assessment Severity Index (PASI) scores recorded at a baseline time point of treatment commencement, in addition to week 12 and 24 post commencement were included in the study. A window of ±3 weeks was permitted at these time points. Multivariate linear regression analysis was undertaken to identify significant predictors associated with change in DLQI. Significant predictors of reduction in DLQI and PASI score from baseline to week 24 include use of adalimumab, infliximab, secukinumab and ustekinumab. Other therapies, including etanercept and oral systemic agents did not show significant change. Each class of biologic showed significant reductions in DLQI score, with IL-12/23 blockade showing the greatest reduction. Significant predictors of lack of reduction in DLQI score include a baseline PASI score psoriasis who are treated with biologics show the greatest reduction in DLQI score, compared with other treatments. Australian dermatologists are prescribing biologics when patients qualify for them in keeping with current guidelines.

  12. Computed tomography in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented

  13. Computed tomography in trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  14. Attachment Dimensions and Post-traumatic Symptoms Following Interpersonal Traumas versus Impersonal Traumas in Young Adults in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lien; Chen, Sue-Huei; Su, Yi-Jen; Kung, Yi-Wen

    2017-08-01

    Greater risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is seen in individuals exposed to interpersonal traumatic events. Based on an attachment perspective, interpersonal trauma exposure may activate one's attachment insecurity system and disrupt affect, behaviour and interpersonal function, which may in turn create more difficulties to cope with interpersonal traumas and exacerbate PTSD symptomatology. The present study examined whether attachment anxiety relative to attachment avoidance would be a stronger predictor of greater PTSD symptoms following interpersonal traumas versus impersonal traumas in a Taiwanese sample. One hundred and sixty-two trauma-exposed Taiwanese young adults completed the measures of symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD, and attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. In this Taiwanese study, higher attachment anxiety was observed in individuals who were exposed to interpersonal traumas. The interpersonal trauma group reported greater PTSD symptoms than did the impersonal trauma group. Specifically, after controlling for age, occurrence of trauma and distress of trauma, attachment anxiety, but not attachment avoidance, predicted more PTSD total severity and avoidance symptoms in the interpersonal trauma group. The findings may be pertinent to attachment anxiety-related hyperactivating strategies, as well as specific cultural values and a forbearance strategy applied to regulate traumatic distress in a collectivist society. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Vicarious Trauma: Predictors of Clinicians' Disrupted Cognitions about Self-Esteem and Self-Intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Ineke; VanDeusen, Karen; Cottrell, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This study examined vicarious trauma in clinicians who provide sexual abuse treatment (N = 383). A random sample of clinical members from the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers and American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children were surveyed. Vicarious trauma was measured using the Trauma Stress Institute Belief Scale…

  16. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  17. Civil Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Media Facebook @oasofficial Facebook Twitter @oas_official Twitter Newsletters Documents OAS Technology Social Development Summits of the Americas Sustainable Development T Telecommunications Terrorism Tourism Trade Treaties and Agreements W Women Y Youth Strategic Partners Permanent Observers Civil Society

  18. Asian/Australasian region intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters. Asian/Australasian region radon intercomparison, September 1987 - September 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggie, J.R.; Gan, Tianghong; Solomon, S.B.

    1993-05-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for radon, thoron and daughters monitoring equipment, abbreviated IIIP, was a programme organized jointly by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP was to determine if the diverse calibration procedures used in different countries were equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust then with the details of project definition and execution. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) was selected to co-ordinate IIIP activities between OECD member countries in the Pacific region. As the regional programme precluded the participation of non-OECD member countries in the Western Pacific Region, an intercomparison series for radon was initiated by ARL in 1987 between twenty eight laboratories from nine countries in the Asian/Australasian region. The methodology and protocols for grab sampler, solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and charcoal measurements are described in this report. Generally the results showed reasonable agreement between the majority of laboratories for grab sampler measurements consistent with previous intercomparison. However there were large systematic differences in the results of the passive monitors for some laboratories. For all samplers, it was found that the overall random uncertainty or replication error, which included random uncertainties associated with the counting and calibration, were the main sources of variability between individual measurements of participants and the ARL reference value, with calibration uncertainties predominating. 23 tabs.

  19. Asian/Australasian region intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters. Asian/Australasian region radon intercomparison, September 1987 - September 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggie, J.R.; Gan, Tianghong; Solomon, S.B.

    1993-05-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for radon, thoron and daughters monitoring equipment, abbreviated IIIP, was a programme organized jointly by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP was to determine if the diverse calibration procedures used in different countries were equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust then with the details of project definition and execution. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) was selected to co-ordinate IIIP activities between OECD member countries in the Pacific region. As the regional programme precluded the participation of non-OECD member countries in the Western Pacific Region, an intercomparison series for radon was initiated by ARL in 1987 between twenty eight laboratories from nine countries in the Asian/Australasian region. The methodology and protocols for grab sampler, solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and charcoal measurements are described in this report. Generally the results showed reasonable agreement between the majority of laboratories for grab sampler measurements consistent with previous intercomparison. However there were large systematic differences in the results of the passive monitors for some laboratories. For all samplers, it was found that the overall random uncertainty or replication error, which included random uncertainties associated with the counting and calibration, were the main sources of variability between individual measurements of participants and the ARL reference value, with calibration uncertainties predominating. 23 tabs

  20. Evaluation of nutrition deficits in adult and elderly trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Charles E; Kozar, Rosemary A; Dyer, Carmel B; Bulger, Eileen M; Mourtzakis, Marina; Heyland, Daren K

    2015-05-01

    As metabolism is often escalated following injury, severely injured trauma patients are at risk for underfeeding and adverse outcomes. From an international database of 12,573 critically ill, adult mechanically ventilated patients, who received a minimum of 3 days of nutrition therapy, trauma patients were identified and nutrition practices and outcomes compared with nontrauma patients. Within the trauma population, we compared nutrition practices and outcomes of younger vs older patients. There were 1279 (10.2%) trauma patients. They were younger, were predominantly male, had lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, and had an overall lower body mass index compared with nontrauma patients. Eighty percent of trauma patients received enteral feeding compared with 78% of nontrauma patients. Trauma patients were prescribed more calories and protein yet received similar amounts as nontrauma patients. Nutrition adequacy was reduced in both trauma and nontrauma patients. Survival was higher in trauma patients (86.6%) compared with nontrauma patients (71.8%). When patients who died were included as never discharged, trauma patients were more rapidly discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital. Within the trauma population, 17.5% were elderly (≥65 years). The elderly had increased days of ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality compared with younger trauma patients. In a multivariable model, age and APACHE II score, but not nutrition adequacy, were associated with time to discharge alive from the hospital. Significant nutrition deficits were noted in all patients. Elderly trauma patients have worse outcomes compared with younger patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate whether increased nutrition intake can improve the outcomes of trauma patients, especially geriatric trauma patients. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Management of duodenal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Guo-qing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature in PubMed by the keywords of duodenal trauma, therapy, diagnosis and abdomen. It shows that because the diagnosis and management are complicated and the mortality is high, duodenal trauma should be treated in time and tactfully. And application of new technology can help improve the management. In this review, we discussed the incidence, diagnosis, management, and complications as well as mortality of duodenal trauma. Key words: Duodenum; Wounds and injuries; Diagnosis; Therapeutics

  2. What do giant titanosaur dinosaurs and modern Australasian megapodes have in common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Fiorelli, Lucas E

    2015-01-01

    Titanosauria is a globally distributed clade of sometimes extremely large Mesozoic herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs. On the basis of current evidence these giant dinosaurs seem to have reproduced in specific and localized nesting sites. However, no investigations have been performed to understand the possible ecological and geological biases that acted for the selection of these nesting sites worldwide. In this study, observations were performed on the best-known Cretaceous nesting sites around the world. Our observations strongly suggest their eggs were incubated with environmental sources of heat, in burial conditions. Taking into account the clutch composition and geometry, the nature and properties of the sediments, the eggshells' structures and conductance, it would appear that titanosaurs adopted nesting behaviors comparable to the modern Australasian megapodes, using burrow-nesting in diverse media and mound-building strategies.

  3. What do giant titanosaur dinosaurs and modern Australasian megapodes have in common?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martín Hechenleitner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanosauria is a globally distributed clade of sometimes extremely large Mesozoic herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs. On the basis of current evidence these giant dinosaurs seem to have reproduced in specific and localized nesting sites. However, no investigations have been performed to understand the possible ecological and geological biases that acted for the selection of these nesting sites worldwide. In this study, observations were performed on the best-known Cretaceous nesting sites around the world. Our observations strongly suggest their eggs were incubated with environmental sources of heat, in burial conditions. Taking into account the clutch composition and geometry, the nature and properties of the sediments, the eggshells’ structures and conductance, it would appear that titanosaurs adopted nesting behaviors comparable to the modern Australasian megapodes, using burrow-nesting in diverse media and mound-building strategies.

  4. A 2009 survey of the Australasian clinical medical physics and biomedical engineering workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, W Howell

    2010-06-01

    A survey of the Australasian clinical medical physics and biomedical engineering workforce was carried out in 2009 following on from a similar survey in 2006. 621 positions (equivalent to 575 equivalent full time (EFT) positions) were captured by the survey. Of these 330 EFT were in radiation oncology physics, 45 EFT were in radiology physics, 42 EFT were in nuclear medicine physics, 159 EFT were in biomedical engineering and 29 EFT were attributed to other activities. The survey reviewed the experience profile, the salary levels and the number of vacant positions in the workforce for the different disciplines in each Australian state and in New Zealand. Analysis of the data shows the changes to the workforce over the preceding 3 years and identifies shortfalls in the workforce.

  5. New sites of Australasian microtektites in the central Indian Ocean: Implications for the location and size of source crater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.; Mahale, V.P.; Kodagali, V.N.

    Fifteen new Australasian microtektite sites have been identified along a transect roughly N-S in the central Indian Ocean. These locations, in addition to the existing 46 sites, total to 61 microtektite sites in the oceans. We carried out regression...

  6. Management of duodenal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN Guo-qing; YANG Hua

    2011-01-01

    【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature...

  7. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  8. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  9. The practice and perception of precautionary allergen labelling by the Australasian food manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurzolo, G A; Peters, R L; Koplin, J J; de Courten, M; Mathai, M L; Tye-Din, J A; Tang, M L K; Campbell, D E; Ponsonby, A-L; Prescott, S L; Gurrin, L; Dharmage, S C; Allen, K J

    2017-07-01

    The precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) and Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labelling (VITAL ® ) tools were designed by industry to assist consumers with selecting safe foods for consumption. However, a sizeable proportion of food products bear no label, and it is unclear whether these products are free from allergens and therefore safe to consume or have simply not undergone a risk assessment and therefore remain unlabelled for that reason. To assess the prevalence of unlabelled products that have undergone a risk assessment process and to examine the factors influencing industry's uptake of the VITAL ® process. A web-based questionnaire was distributed to Australasian food and grocery manufacturers. One hundred and thirty-seven Australasian manufacturers were contacted, and 59 questionnaires were returned (response rate: 43%). The respondents represented 454 different manufacturing sites. Manufacturers reported that 23% (95% CI 19-28) of products (n=102/434) that had been through the VITAL ® risk assessment process had no PAL statement on the label. 34% (95% CI 30-38), (n=204/600) of products that had undergone another (non-VITAL ® ) risk assessment process had no PAL statement. In examining the factors that influenced industry's uptake of the VITAL ® process, 25 manufacturers reported on factors that influenced the uptake of the VITAL ® process, 76% (CI 95% 55-91) reported that VITAL ® was an effective tool because it was based on science; 52% (CI 95% 31-72) reported that it was too time-consuming and 36% (CI 95% 18-57) identified a concern with it not being endorsed by the government. Currently, we estimate that at least 30% of products may have been through a risk assessment process and yet bear no PAL statement on the label. Permissive labelling could be incorporated onto these products if they have been assessed to be safe for consumption. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Low-resolution Australasian palaeoclimate records of the last 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Bronwyn C.; Tyler, Jonathan J.; Lorrey, Andrew M.; Goodwin, Ian D.; Gergis, Joëlle; Drysdale, Russell N.

    2017-10-01

    Non-annually resolved palaeoclimate records in the Australasian region were compiled to facilitate investigations of decadal to centennial climate variability over the past 2000 years. A total of 675 lake and wetland, geomorphic, marine, and speleothem records were identified. The majority of records are located near population centres in southeast Australia, in New Zealand, and across the maritime continent, and there are few records from the arid regions of central and western Australia. Each record was assessed against a set of a priori criteria based on temporal resolution, record length, dating methods, and confidence in the proxy-climate relationship over the Common Era. A subset of 22 records met the criteria and were endorsed for subsequent analyses. Chronological uncertainty was the primary reason why records did not meet the selection criteria. New chronologies based on Bayesian techniques were constructed for the high-quality subset to ensure a consistent approach to age modelling and quantification of age uncertainties. The primary reasons for differences between published and reconstructed age-depth models were the consideration of the non-singular distribution of ages in calibrated 14C dates and the use of estimated autocorrelation between sampled depths as a constraint for changes in accumulation rate. Existing proxies and reconstruction techniques that successfully capture climate variability in the region show potential to address spatial gaps and expand the range of climate variables covering the last 2000 years in the Australasian region. Future palaeoclimate research and records in Australasia could be greatly improved through three main actions: (i) greater data availability through the public archiving of published records; (ii) thorough characterisation of proxy-climate relationships through site monitoring and climate sensitivity tests; and (iii) improvement of chronologies through core-top dating, inclusion of tephra layers where possible

  11. Summary and recommendations from the Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ross C; Smith, Sarah F; Wilson, Jeremy; Pearce, Callum; Wray, Nick; Vo, Ruth; Chen, John; Ooi, Chee Y; Oliver, Mark; Katz, Tamarah; Turner, Richard; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Rayner, Christopher; Horowitz, Michael; Holtmann, Gerald; Talley, Nick; Windsor, John; Pirola, Ron; Neale, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Because of increasing awareness of variations in the use of pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy, the Australasian Pancreatic Club decided it was timely to re-review the literature and create new Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI). A working party of expert clinicians was convened and initially determined that by dividing the types of presentation into three categories for the likelihood of PEI (definite, possible and unlikely) they were able to consider the difficulties of diagnosing PEI and relate these to the value of treatment for each diagnostic category. Recent studies confirm that patients with chronic pancreatitis receive similar benefit from pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy (PERT) to that established in children with cystic fibrosis. Severe acute pancreatitis is frequently followed by PEI and PERT should be considered for these patients because of their nutritional requirements. Evidence is also becoming stronger for the benefits of PERT in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However there is as yet no clear guide to help identify those patients in the 'unlikely' PEI group who would benefit from PERT. For example, patients with coeliac disease, diabetes mellitus, irritable bowel syndrome and weight loss in the elderly may occasionally be given a trial of PERT, but determining its effectiveness will be difficult. The starting dose of PERT should be from 25,000-40,000 IU lipase taken with food. This may need to be titrated up and there may be a need for proton pump inhibitors in some patients to improve efficacy. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Psoriasis in those planning a family, pregnant or breast-feeding. The Australasian Psoriasis Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Marius; Agnew, Karen; Andrews, Megan; Armour, Katherine; Baker, Chris; Foley, Peter; Frew, John; Gebauer, Kurt; Gupta, Monisha; Kennedy, Debra; Marshman, Gillian; Sullivan, John

    2017-05-23

    The Australasian Psoriasis Collaboration has reviewed the evidence for managing moderate to severe psoriasis in those who are pregnant or are breast-feeding, or planning a family. The severity of the psoriasis, associated comorbidities and specific anti-psoriasis treatment, along with other exposures, can have a deleterious effect on pregnancy outcomes. Psoriasis itself increases the risk of preterm and low birthweight babies, along with spontaneous and induced abortions, but no specific birth defects have been otherwise demonstrated. The baseline risk for a live born baby to have a major birth defect is 3%, and significant neuro-developmental problem is 5%. In Australia, pregnant women with psoriasis are more likely to be overweight or obese, depressed, or smoke in their first trimester, and are also less likely to take prenatal vitamins or supplements. Preconception counselling to improve maternal, pregnancy and baby health is therefore strongly encouraged. The topical and systemic therapies commonly used in psoriasis are each discussed separately, with regards to pregnancy exposure, breast-feeding and effects on male fertility and mutagenicity. The systemic therapies included are acitretin, adalimumab, apremilast, certolizumab, ciclosporin, etanercept, infliximab, ixekizumab, methotrexate, NBUVB, prednisone, PUVA, secukinumab and ustekinumab. The topical therapies include dithranol (anthralin), calcipotriol, coal tar, corticosteroids (weak, potent and super-potent), moisturisers, salicylic acid, tacrolimus, and tazarotene. As a general recommendation, effective drugs that have been widely used for years are preferable to newer alternatives with less foetal safety data. It is equally important to evaluate the risks of not treating, as severe untreated disease may negatively impact both mother and the foetus. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  13. Australasian trends in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation weaning: results of a postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Peter A; Mullany, Daniel V; Courtney, Mary; Coyer, Fiona

    2006-12-01

    To generate baseline data describing Australasian intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP) weaning practice. A five-part questionnaire was mailed in April 2005 to all 192 intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. 116 ICUs responded (response rate, 60%), and 54 reported using IABP. Most of the 54 were in hospitals which were public government-funded (65%), had between 100 and 500 beds (69%), and treated a minimum of 11 patients annually with IABP (60%). The most common method of withdrawing IABP support was ratio reduction alone (61%). ICUs most likely to undertake ratio weaning were higherend users of IABP (> 20 cases per annum) (P = 0.04). Other weaning practices involved a combination of ratio followed by volume reduction (17%), volume then ratio (11%), and volume only (4%). Approaching statistical significance, ratio reduction weaning less frequently required IABP reinsertion or inotropic increase after balloon removal (P = 0.07). ICUs with documented weaning policies were less likely to require IABP reinsertion or inotropic increase after balloon removal (P = 0.06). Criteria considered important before IABP weaning or removal were: blood pressure (92%); heart rate (76%); pulmonary artery wedge pressure (59%); noradrenaline dose (78%); adrenaline dose (57%); and dobutamine dose (57%). Ninety per cent of ICUs reported increasing inotropes after balloon removal only rarely (1:50 patients) or occasionally (1:10 patients), while 87% of ICUs reported never needing to reinsert the balloon or only rarely. The Australasian approach to IABP weaning is eclectic. While ratio reduction weaning appears the most successful manner of support withdrawal, it may be a consequence of a volume-outcome relationship, with high- end users achieving better results through IABP familiarity.

  14. Synoptic climatology, and intrahemispheric associations, of cold air mesocyclones in the Australasian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, Andrew M.; Song, Yudong

    1997-06-01

    Satellite IR images for seven months in 1992 are interpreted for cold air mesoscale cyclones (mesocyclones) occurring in the Australasian sector (˜70°E-150°W) of the Southern Ocean. Time-averaged (monthly, seasonal) distributions of mesocyclogenesis, mesocyclolysis, and tracks of movement, along with statistical summaries of mesocyclone attributes (e.g., cloud vortex size, speeds of movement), are presented and discussed in the context of the larger-scale atmospheric circulation. Maximum frequencies of mesocyclones occurred in the transitional months of April and October 1992, with a secondary peak in July. Statistically significant differences in mesocyclone track length between months appear related dominantly to changes in speed of the background flow, associated with the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of tropospheric pressure/height. The associations of mesocyclone "outbreaks" with composite anomaly fields of pressure and height are identified for three subareas of the Australasian sector suggested by the analysis of mesocyclone spatial patterns. Outbreaks occur in the strong southerly geostrophic airflow located between pressure and height anomalies that are negative (positive) to the eastward (westward). When outbreaks occurred in the New Zealand subarea in 1992, a similarly strong couplet of pressure/height anomalies developed in the southern South America/Antarctic Peninsula sector but not when outbreaks occurred south of Australia. The mesocyclone remote association that is suggested is evaluated by using polar orbiter IR imagery for the southeastern Pacific region. Frequencies of mesocyclones increase (decrease) west of Chile but decrease (increase) through Drake Passage when mesocyclone outbreaks occur near New Zealand (south of Australia). These long distance associations of mesocyclone outbreaks are consistent with the connectivity of the baroclinic waves and might prove useful in the development of techniques to forecast mesocyclones over the

  15. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 20K Loading... ...

  16. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 19K ...

  17. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 20K ...

  18. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  19. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 19K Loading... ...

  20. Perspectives of hospital emergency department staff on trauma-informed care for injured children: An Australian and New Zealand analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoysted, Claire; Babl, Franz E; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Landolt, Markus A; Jobson, Laura; Curtis, Sarah; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Lyttle, Mark D; Parri, Niccolò; Stanley, Rachel; Alisic, Eva

    2017-09-01

    To examine Australian and New Zealand emergency department (ED) staff's training, knowledge and confidence regarding trauma-informed care for children after trauma, and barriers to implementation. ED staff's perspectives on trauma-informed care were assessed using a web-based self-report questionnaire. Participants included 468 ED staff (375 nursing and 111 medical staff) from hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, χ 2 tests and multiple regressions. Over 90% of respondents had not received training in trauma-informed care and almost all respondents (94%) wanted training in this area. While knowledge was associated with a respondent's previous training and profession, confidence was associated with the respondent's previous training, experience level and workplace. Dominant barriers to the implementation of trauma-informed care were lack of time and lack of training. There is a need and desire for training and education of Australian and New Zealand ED staff in trauma-informed care. This study demonstrates that experience alone is not sufficient for the development of knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress reactions and trauma-informed care practices. Existing education materials could be adapted for use in the ED and to accommodate the training preferences of Australian and New Zealand ED staff. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Trauma and the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Witnessing horrible things may leave a person scarred for life — an effect usually referred to as psychological trauma. We do not know exactly what it does or how it worms its way into our psyche, but psychological trauma has been linked to a wide range of fear- and depression-related symptoms

  2. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  3. Rural and urban distribution of trauma incidents in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, J J; McConnell, N J; Orman, J A; Egan, G; Jansen, J O

    2013-02-01

    Trauma systems reduce mortality and improve functional outcomes from injury. Regional trauma networks have been established in several European regions to address longstanding deficiencies in trauma care. A perception of the geography and population distribution as challenging has delayed the introduction of a trauma system in Scotland. The characteristics of trauma incidents attended by the Scottish Ambulance Service were analysed, to gain a better understanding of the geospatial characteristics of trauma in Scotland. Data on trauma incidents collected by the Scottish Ambulance Service between November 2008 and October 2010 were obtained. Incident location was analysed by health board region, rurality and social deprivation. The results are presented as number of patients, average annual incidence rates and relative risks. Of the 141,668 incidents identified, 72·1 per cent occurred in urban regions. The risk of being involved in an incident was similar across the most populous regions, and decreased slightly with increasing rurality. Social deprivation was associated with greater numbers and risk. A total of 53·1 per cent of patients were taken to a large general hospital, and 38·6 per cent to a teaching hospital; the distribution was similar for the subset of incidents involving patients with physiological derangements. The majority of trauma incidents in Scotland occur in urban and deprived areas. A regionalized system of trauma care appears plausible, although the precise configuration of such a system requires further study. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  5. European trauma guideline compliance assessment: the ETRAUSS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Sophie Rym; Gauss, Tobias; Pann, Jakob; Dünser, Martin; Leone, Marc; Duranteau, Jacques

    2015-12-08

    Haemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of preventable death in trauma patients. The 2013 European trauma guidelines emphasise a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, protocol-based approach to trauma care. The aim of the present Europe-wide survey was to compare 2015 practice with the 2013 guidelines. A group of members of the Trauma and Emergency Medicine section of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine developed a 50-item questionnaire based upon the core recommendations of the 2013 guidelines, employing a multistep approach. The questionnaire covered five fields: care structure and organisation, haemodynamic resuscitation targets, fluid management, transfusion and coagulopathy, and haemorrhage control. The sampling used a two-step approach comprising initial purposive sampling of eminent trauma care providers in each European country, followed by snowball sampling of a maximum number of trauma care providers. A total of 296 responses were collected, 243 (81 %) from European countries. Those from outside the European Union were excluded from the analysis. Approximately three-fourths (74 %) of responders were working in a designated trauma centre. Blunt trauma predominated, accounting for more than 90 % of trauma cases. Considerable heterogeneity was observed in all five core aspects of trauma care, along with frequent deviations from the 2013 guidelines. Only 92 (38 %) of responders claimed to comply with the recommended systolic blood pressure target, and only 81 (33 %) responded that they complied with the target pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury. Crystalloid use was predominant (n = 209; 86 %), and vasopressor use was frequent (n = 171, 76 %) but remained controversial. Only 160 respondents (66 %) declared that they used tranexamic acid always or often. This is the first European trauma survey, to our knowledge. Heterogeneity is significant across centres with regard to the clinical protocols for trauma patients and as to locally

  6. The European Trauma Course (ETC) and the team approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lott, Carsten; Araujo, Rui; Cassar, Mary Rose

    2009-01-01

    The European Trauma Course (ETC) was officially launched during the international conference of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2008. The ETC was developed on behalf of ESTES (European Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery), EuSEM (European Society of Emergency Medicine), the ESA...... (European Society of Anaesthesiology) and the ERC. The objective of the ETC is to provide an internationally recognised and certified life support course, and to teach healthcare professionals the key principles of the initial care of severely injured patients. Its core elements, that differentiates it from...

  7. Evaluating trauma care capabilities in Mexico with the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Vega Rivera, Felipe; Romero Hicks, Eduardo; Guzmán Solana, Felipe; Porras Ramírez, Giovanni; Montiel Amoroso, Gilberto; de Boer, Melanie

    2006-02-01

    To identify affordable, sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities in Mexico, using the standards in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care, a publication that was developed by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Surgery to provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place in the various levels of health facilities in all countries. The Guidelines publication was used as a basis for needs assessments conducted in 2003 and 2004 in three Mexican states. The states were selected to represent the range of geographic and economic conditions in the country: Oaxaca (south, lower economic status), Puebla (center, middle economic status), and Nuevo León (north, higher economic status). The sixteen facilities that were assessed included rural clinics, small hospitals, and large hospitals. Site visits incorporated direct inspection of physical resources as well as interviews with key administrative and clinical staff. Human and physical resources for trauma care were adequate in the hospitals, especially the larger ones. The survey did identify some deficiencies, such as shortages of stiff suction tips, pulse oximetry equipment, and some trauma-related medications. All of the clinics had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation, even though some received substantial numbers of trauma patients. In all levels of facilities there was room for improvement in administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and uniform in-service training. This study identified several low-cost ways to strengthen trauma care in Mexico. The study also highlighted the usefulness of the recommended norms in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication in providing a standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities in nations worldwide.

  8. Assessing the feasibility of a web-based registry for multiple orphan lung diseases: the Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamento, K; Laverty, A; Wilsher, M; Twiss, J; Gabbay, E; Glaspole, I; Jaffe, A

    2016-04-18

    We investigated the feasibility of using an online registry to provide prevalence data for multiple orphan lung diseases in Australia and New Zealand. A web-based registry, The Australasian Registry Network of Orphan Lung Diseases (ARNOLD) was developed based on the existing British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease Registry. All adult and paediatric respiratory physicians who were members of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand in Australia and New Zealand were sent regular emails between July 2009 and June 2014 requesting information on patients they had seen with any of 30 rare lung diseases. Prevalence rates were calculated using population statistics. Emails were sent to 649 Australian respiratory physicians and 65 in New Zealand. 231 (32.4%) physicians responded to emails a total of 1554 times (average 7.6 responses per physician). Prevalence rates of 30 rare lung diseases are reported. A multi-disease rare lung disease registry was implemented in the Australian and New Zealand health care settings that provided prevalence data on orphan lung diseases in this region but was limited by under reporting.

  9. Urological injuries following trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, C.; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M.; Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N.; Fotheringham, T.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated

  10. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  11. Life Stories and Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongshøj, Inge Lise Lundsgaard; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Research has shown a connection between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and integration of traumatic experiences into the life story. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that life story formation begins in mid to late adolescence. Following these findings, the present study investigated...... whether experiencing trauma in youth was associated with a greater risk to integrate the trauma into the life story compared to adult traumatic exposure. Life stories were collected from 115 participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Moreover, participants filled out questionnaires regarding...... often integrate the trauma into their life story? Results will be discussed in relation to theories of development of life stories and of PTSD....

  12. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  13. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  14. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue...

  15. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  16. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  17. Urological injuries following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  18. Membership survey of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine: Quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G; Djekic, Sanja; Bishop, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The Council of the Australasian College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) considered it timely to survey its membership to determine how to best accommodate its members' needs. A questionnaire was devised, piloted and circulated amongst the 219 College members (excluding the 13 Honorary Fellows). Yield was maximised with 4 direct mailings, 4 questionnaire insertions in the quarterly College newsletter, 3 targeted emails and follow-up phone calls. The survey achieved 160 (73%) response rate of whom ∼40% were substantially involved in legal and forensic medicine and ∼40% were occasionally involved. Thirty-five participants (23%) specialised in forensic medicine and 101 (63%) held Fellowship status in other recognised medical specialities. Equal ⅓ of the members had been so for >10 years, 5-10 years or educative programs found them useful but attendance was between 32 and 49%, depending on the course. There appeared widespread satisfaction with College performance and activities but a low uptake of educative courses, other than Annual Scientific Meetings, thereby identifying marketing of courses as needing extra attention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Does the Australasian "Health Star Rating" Front of Pack Nutritional Label System Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an experiment to measure the impact of the Australasian "Health Star Rating" front of pack nutritional label system on consumer choice behaviour. This system presents a one-half to five star rating of nutritional quality via the front facings of food product packages. While this system has been recently rolled out across Australasia, no test of its impact on food choice has been conducted. A sample of 1200 consumers was recruited on exit from supermarkets in New Zealand. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used with two levels of cold cereal product nutritional status (high, five star/low, two star) and two levels of the Health Star Rating label (present/absent). The dependent variable was revealed choice behaviour. The results indicated that the presence of the label had a significant depressive effect on consumer preference, but that this impact was not moderated in any way by the nutritional status expressed by the label. The result represents a significant functional failure of the Health Star Rating label in this research environment. The nature of the failure is consistent with the consumers processing the label in much the same way as the nominal brand cues that dominate the retail food packaging.

  20. Supermatrix phylogeny and biogeography of the Australasian Meliphagides radiation (Aves: Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, Petter Z; Jønsson, Knud A; Irestedt, Martin; Nguyen, Jacqueline M T; Rahbek, Carsten; Fjeldså, Jon

    2017-02-01

    With nearly 300 species, the infraorder Meliphagides represents one of the largest and most conspicuous Australasian bird radiations. Although the group has been the focus of a number of recent phylogenetic studies, a comprehensive species-level phylogenetic hypothesis is still lacking. This has impeded the assessment of broad-scale evolutionary, biogeographic and ecological hypotheses. In the present study, we use a supermatrix approach including five mitochondrial and four nuclear markers to infer a time-calibrated phylogeny of the Meliphagides. Our phylogeny, which includes 286 of the 289 (99%) currently recognized species, is largely congruent with previous estimates. However, the addition of 60 newly sequenced species reveals some novel relationships. Our biogeographic analyses suggest an Australian origin for the group in the early Oligocene (31.3Mya, 95% HPD 25.2-38.2Mya). In addition, we find that dispersal events out of Australia have been numerous and frequent, particularly to New Guinea, which has also been the source of multiple back-colonizations to the Australian mainland. The phylogeny provides an important framework for studying a wide variety of macroecological and macroevolutionary themes, including character evolution, origin and timing of diversification, biogeographic patterns and species responses to climate change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does the Australasian “Health Star Rating” Front of Pack Nutritional Label System Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hamlin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an experiment to measure the impact of the Australasian “Health Star Rating” front of pack nutritional label system on consumer choice behaviour. This system presents a one-half to five star rating of nutritional quality via the front facings of food product packages. While this system has been recently rolled out across Australasia, no test of its impact on food choice has been conducted. A sample of 1200 consumers was recruited on exit from supermarkets in New Zealand. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used with two levels of cold cereal product nutritional status (high, five star/low, two star and two levels of the Health Star Rating label (present/absent. The dependent variable was revealed choice behaviour. The results indicated that the presence of the label had a significant depressive effect on consumer preference, but that this impact was not moderated in any way by the nutritional status expressed by the label. The result represents a significant functional failure of the Health Star Rating label in this research environment. The nature of the failure is consistent with the consumers processing the label in much the same way as the nominal brand cues that dominate the retail food packaging.

  2. Does the Australasian “Health Star Rating” Front of Pack Nutritional Label System Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an experiment to measure the impact of the Australasian “Health Star Rating” front of pack nutritional label system on consumer choice behaviour. This system presents a one-half to five star rating of nutritional quality via the front facings of food product packages. While this system has been recently rolled out across Australasia, no test of its impact on food choice has been conducted. A sample of 1200 consumers was recruited on exit from supermarkets in New Zealand. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used with two levels of cold cereal product nutritional status (high, five star/low, two star) and two levels of the Health Star Rating label (present/absent). The dependent variable was revealed choice behaviour. The results indicated that the presence of the label had a significant depressive effect on consumer preference, but that this impact was not moderated in any way by the nutritional status expressed by the label. The result represents a significant functional failure of the Health Star Rating label in this research environment. The nature of the failure is consistent with the consumers processing the label in much the same way as the nominal brand cues that dominate the retail food packaging. PMID:27258305

  3. Trauma no idoso Trauma in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ ANTONIO GOMES DE SOUZA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O crescimento populacional de idosos, associado a uma forma de vida mais saudável e mais ativa, deixa este grupo de pessoas mais exposto ao risco de acidentes. Em alguns países, o trauma do idoso responde por uma elevada taxa de mortalidade, a qual se apresenta de forma desproporcionalmente maior do que a observada entre a população de adultos jovens. Tal fato acarreta um grande consumo de recursos financeiros destinados à assistência da saúde e um elevado custo social. As características fisiológicas próprias do idoso, assim como a presença freqüente de doenças associadas, faz com que estes pacientes se comportem diferentemente e de forma mais complexa do que os demais grupos etários. Estas particularidades fazem com que o atendimento ao idoso vítima de trauma se faça de forma diferenciada. A presente revisão aborda aspectos da epidemiologia, da prevenção, da fisiologia, do atendimento e da reabilitação do idoso vítima de trauma.The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, desproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave diferently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and reabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  4. Knowledge and Confidence of a Convenience Sample of Australasian Emergency Doctors in Managing Dental Emergencies: Results of a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Samaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to determine Australasian Specialist Emergency Physicians’ and Emergency Physicians in Training (Trainees’ level of knowledge of common dental emergencies. We also explored confidence in managing dental emergencies; predictors of confidence and knowledge; and preferences for further dental education. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed electronically (September 2011 and directly (November 2011 to Fellows and Trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. It explored demographics, confidence, knowledge of dental emergencies, and educational preferences. Results. Response rate was 13.6% (464/3405 and college members were proportionally represented by region. Fewer than half (186/446; 42% had received dental training. Sixty-two percent (244/391, 95% CI 57.5–67.1 passed (>50% a knowledge test. More than 60% incorrectly answered questions on dental fracture, periodontal abscess, tooth eruption dates, and ulcerative gingivitis. Forty percent (166/416 incorrectly answered a question about Ludwig’s Angina. Eighty-three percent (360/433 were confident in the pharmacological management of toothache but only 26% (112/434 confident in recognizing periodontal disease. Knowledge was correlated with confidence (r=0.488. Interactive workshops were preferred by most (386/415, 93%. Conclusions. The knowledge and confidence of Australasian Emergency Physicians and Trainees in managing dental emergencies are varied, yet correlated. Interactive training sessions in dental emergencies are warranted.

  5. [Challenges of implementing a geriatric trauma network : A regional structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeneberg, Carsten; Hussmann, Bjoern; Wesemann, Thomas; Pientka, Ludger; Vollmar, Marie-Christin; Bienek, Christine; Steinmann, Markus; Buecking, Benjamin; Lendemans, Sven

    2018-04-01

    At present, there is a high percentage and increasing tendency of patients presenting with orthogeriatric injuries. Moreover, significant comorbidities often exist, requiring increased interdisciplinary treatment. These developments have led the German Society of Trauma Surgery, in cooperation with the German Society of Geriatrics, to establish geriatric trauma centers. As a conglomerate hospital at two locations, we are cooperating with two external geriatric clinics. In 2015, a geriatric trauma center certification in the form of a conglomerate network structure was agreed upon for the first time in Germany. For this purpose, the requirements for certification were observed. Both structure and organization were defined in a manual according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2015. Between 2008 and 2016, an increase of 70% was seen in geriatric trauma cases in our hospital, with a rise of up to 360% in specific diagnoses. The necessary standards and regulations were compiled and evaluated from our hospitals. After successful certification, improvements were necessary, followed by a planned re-audit. These were prepared by multiprofessional interdisciplinary teams and implemented at all locations. A network structure can be an alternative to classical cooperation between trauma and geriatric units in one clinic and help reduce possible staffing shortage. Due to the lack of scientific evidence, future evaluations of the geriatric trauma register should reveal whether network structures in geriatric trauma surgery lead to a valid improvement in medical care.

  6. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... Veterans Health Administration 2,027 views 25:30 Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  7. Acute coagulopathy of trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.......e., the circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally......, is an evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... Loading... Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right ...

  9. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) [for posttraumatic stress disorder]? - Duration: 2:01. Veterans Health Administration 27,844 ...

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  11. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  12. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24-2004, updated 2011 This Safety ... the harness, the environmental conditions, and the worker's psychological state all may increase the onset and severity ...

  13. Anaesthesia for trauma patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    casualty incident, or a natural disaster. ... Exposure/environmental control: completely undress the ... E. Figure 1: Advance Trauma Life Support® management priorities ..... requiring operative intervention: the patient too sick to anesthetize.

  14. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  15. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  17. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  18. Trauma team activation: Not just for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoenix Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontraumatic hemorrhage. We present two cases in which the trauma team was activated for noninjured patients in hemorrhagic shock. The utilization of the TTA protocol and subsequent management by the trauma team are reviewed as we believe these were critical factors in the successful recovery of both patients. Beyond the primary improved survival outcomes of severely injured patients, trauma center designation has a “halo effect” that encompasses patients with nontraumatic hemorrhage.

  19. The sequential trauma score - a new instrument for the sequential mortality prediction in major trauma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber-Wagner S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several well established scores for the assessment of the prognosis of major trauma patients that all have in common that they can be calculated at the earliest during intensive care unit stay. We intended to develop a sequential trauma score (STS that allows prognosis at several early stages based on the information that is available at a particular time. Study design In a retrospective, multicenter study using data derived from the Trauma Registry of the German Trauma Society (2002-2006, we identified the most relevant prognostic factors from the patients basic data (P, prehospital phase (A, early (B1, and late (B2 trauma room phase. Univariate and logistic regression models as well as score quality criteria and the explanatory power have been calculated. Results A total of 2,354 patients with complete data were identified. From the patients basic data (P, logistic regression showed that age was a significant predictor of survival (AUCmodel p, area under the curve = 0.63. Logistic regression of the prehospital data (A showed that blood pressure, pulse rate, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, and anisocoria were significant predictors (AUCmodel A = 0.76; AUCmodel P + A = 0.82. Logistic regression of the early trauma room phase (B1 showed that peripheral oxygen saturation, GCS, anisocoria, base excess, and thromboplastin time to be significant predictors of survival (AUCmodel B1 = 0.78; AUCmodel P +A + B1 = 0.85. Multivariate analysis of the late trauma room phase (B2 detected cardiac massage, abbreviated injury score (AIS of the head ≥ 3, the maximum AIS, the need for transfusion or massive blood transfusion, to be the most important predictors (AUCmodel B2 = 0.84; AUCfinal model P + A + B1 + B2 = 0.90. The explanatory power - a tool for the assessment of the relative impact of each segment to mortality - is 25% for P, 7% for A, 17% for B1 and 51% for B2. A spreadsheet for the easy calculation of the sequential trauma

  20. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  1. Patterns of ocular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, T.F.; Khan, M.T.; Marwat, M.; Shah, A.; Murad, Y.; Khan, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the patterns of ocular trauma, cause of injury and its effects on eye. A retrospective case series. Medical records of 1105 patients admitted with ocular trauma were reviewed. The details of patients regarding age, gender, literacy, cause of injury and its effects on eye were entered into specially-designed performa. Sample selection consisted of all patients with history of ocular trauma and who were admitted to hospital. Population details consisted patients who were referred to the hospital from all parts of N.W.F.P. Thus, the frequency of trauma in the hospital admissions was analysed. Ophthalmic trauma comprised 6.78% of the hospital admission. One thousand one hundred and five patients presented with eye injuries. Out of them, 21 patients suffered from trauma to both eyes. Almost 80% patients were male and 69% patients were below 30 years of age. Delayed presentation was more common and 63.61% patients presented after one week. Open globe injuries were more common (520 eyes (46.18%)) than closed globe injuries (484 eyes (42.98%)). 23.26% of open globe injuries were associated with intraocular and intra-orbital foreign bodies. Superficial non-perforating, eyelid and adnexal and burns were seen in 122 eyes (10.83%). Among the complications, lens damage and hyphema was seen in more than 50% of the patients, 16.60% eyes were infected at the time of admission and 4.88% of eyes needed enucleation or evisceration. The common causes of injury were violence in 37.37%, occupational in 24.43% and domestic accidents in 19.18%. Ophthalmic trauma is a major public health problem. Majority of the involved are male and under 30 years of age. Delayed presentation is more common. Open globe injuries are more frequent. Violence and occupational injuries are the major causes. (author)

  2. Radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease: Australasian patterns of care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Michael; Boyages, John; Crennan, Elizabeth; Davis, Sidney; Fisher, Richard J; Hook, Carolyn; Johnson, Neva; Joseph, David; Liew, Kuen H; Morgan, Graeme; O' Brien, Peter; Pendlebury, Sue; Pratt, Gary; Quong, George; Thornton, Deborah; Walker, Quenten; Wallington, Margaret; Trotter, Grant

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: Analysis of treatment outcome for Stage I-IIA supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated solely by irradiation in Australia and New Zealand. Methods and Materials: Patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease only who were treated by irradiation alone with curative intent between 1969 to 1988 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand contributed patient data to the study. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were recorded. Disease-free interval, survival, and complications were analyzed. Results: Eight hundred and twenty patients were reviewed. The median age was 29 years. There were 437 men and 383 women. The distribution of 310 clinically staged patients was 170 stage IA, 5 IB, and 135 IIA. Five hundred and ten patients received laparotomies, and pathologic staging was as follows: IA 214, IB 13, IIA 283. The 10-year acturial disease-free rate was 69% and overall survival rate was 79%. Increasing age, male sex, higher number of involved sites, the use of involved field irradiation, no staging laparotomy, and earlier year of treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse and lower survival. Actuarial 10-year survival following recurrence was 48%. Acute complications requiring interruption to treatment occurred in 46 patients (6%), but < 1% had their treatment permanently suspended. Actuarial complication rates at 10 years were: cardiac 2%, pulmonary 3% and thyroid 5%. There were 44 second malignancies including 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3 leukemias, 7 lung, and 6 breast cancers. Mean delay to the development of a second cancer was 6 years. The 10-year actuarial rate of second malignancy was 5%. Conclusions: The Australasian experience of early stage Hodgkin's disease is consistent with the results in the published literature and confirms that irradiation produces a high cure rate with minimal toxicity.

  3. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network: first national audit of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Helen; Clapin, Helen; Bruns, Loren; Cameron, Fergus J; Cotterill, Andrew M; Couper, Jennifer J; Davis, Elizabeth A; Donaghue, Kim C; Jefferies, Craig A; King, Bruce R; Sinnott, Richard O; Tham, Elaine B; Wales, Jerry K; Jones, Timothy W; Craig, Maria E

    2017-02-20

    To assess glycaemic control, anthropometry and insulin regimens in a national sample of Australian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Cross-sectional analysis of de-identified, prospectively collected data from the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) registry. Five paediatric diabetes centres in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia. Children and adolescents (aged 18 years or under) with type 1 diabetes of at least 12 months' duration for whom data were added to the ADDN registry during 2015. Glycaemic control was assessed by measuring haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS) were calculated according to the CDC-2000 reference; overweight and obesity were defined by International Obesity Task Force guidelines. Insulin regimens were classified as twice-daily injections (BD), multiple daily injections (MDI; at least three injection times per day), or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). The mean age of the 3279 participants was 12.8 years (SD, 3.7), mean diabetes duration was 5.7 years (SD, 3.7), and mean HbA1c level 67 mmol/mol (SD, 15); only 27% achieved the national HbA1c target of less than 58 mmol/mol. The mean HbA1c level was lower in children under 6 (63 mmol/mol) than in adolescents (14-18 years; 69 mmol/mol). Mean BMI-SDS for all participants was 0.6 (SD, 0.9); 33% of the participants were overweight or obese. 44% were treated with CSII, 38% with MDI, 18% with BD. Most Australian children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes are not meeting the recognised HbA1c target. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high. There is an urgent need to identify barriers to achieving optimal glycaemic control in this population.

  4. Radiation therapy for early stage Hodgkin's disease: Australasian patterns of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Michael; Boyages, John; Crennan, Elizabeth; Davis, Sidney; Fisher, Richard J.; Hook, Carolyn; Johnson, Neva; Joseph, David; Liew, Kuen H.; Morgan, Graeme; O'Brien, Peter; Pendlebury, Sue; Pratt, Gary; Quong, George; Thornton, Deborah; Walker, Quenten; Wallington, Margaret; Trotter, Grant

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of treatment outcome for Stage I-IIA supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease treated solely by irradiation in Australia and New Zealand. Methods and Materials: Patients with supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease only who were treated by irradiation alone with curative intent between 1969 to 1988 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand contributed patient data to the study. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were recorded. Disease-free interval, survival, and complications were analyzed. Results: Eight hundred and twenty patients were reviewed. The median age was 29 years. There were 437 men and 383 women. The distribution of 310 clinically staged patients was 170 stage IA, 5 IB, and 135 IIA. Five hundred and ten patients received laparotomies, and pathologic staging was as follows: IA 214, IB 13, IIA 283. The 10-year acturial disease-free rate was 69% and overall survival rate was 79%. Increasing age, male sex, higher number of involved sites, the use of involved field irradiation, no staging laparotomy, and earlier year of treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse and lower survival. Actuarial 10-year survival following recurrence was 48%. Acute complications requiring interruption to treatment occurred in 46 patients (6%), but < 1% had their treatment permanently suspended. Actuarial complication rates at 10 years were: cardiac 2%, pulmonary 3% and thyroid 5%. There were 44 second malignancies including 10 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3 leukemias, 7 lung, and 6 breast cancers. Mean delay to the development of a second cancer was 6 years. The 10-year actuarial rate of second malignancy was 5%. Conclusions: The Australasian experience of early stage Hodgkin's disease is consistent with the results in the published literature and confirms that irradiation produces a high cure rate with minimal toxicity

  5. Ceratopetalum (Cunoniaceae) fruits of Australasian affinity from the early Eocene Laguna del Hunco flora, Patagonia, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfo, María A; Hermsen, Elizabeth J

    2017-03-01

    Radially symmetrical, five-winged fossil fruits from the highly diverse early Eocene Laguna del Hunco flora of Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina, are named, described and illustrated. The main goals are to assess the affinities of the fossils and to place them in an evolutionary, palaeoecological and biogeographic context. Specimens of fossil fruits were collected from the Tufolitas Laguna del Hunco. They were prepared, photographed and compared with similar extant and fossil fruits using published literature. Their structure was also evaluated by comparing them with that of modern Ceratopetalum (Cunoniaceae) fruits through examination of herbarium specimens. The Laguna del Hunco fossil fruits share the diagnostic features that characterize modern and fossil Ceratopetalum (symmetry, number of fruit wings, presence of a conspicuous floral nectary and overall venation pattern). The pattern of the minor wing (sepal) veins observed in the Patagonian fossil fruits is different from that of modern and previously described fossil Ceratopetalum fruits; therefore, a new fossil species is recognized. An apomorphy (absence of petals) suggests that the fossils belong within crown-group Ceratopetalum . The Patagonian fossil fruits are the oldest known record for Ceratopetalum . Because the affinities, provenance and age of the fossils are so well established, this new Ceratopetalum fossil species is an excellent candidate for use as a calibration point in divergence dating studies of the family Cunoniaceae. It represents the only record of Ceratopetalum outside Australasia, and further corroborates the biogeographic connection between the Laguna del Hunco flora and ancient and modern floras of the Australasian region. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  6. The Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trial statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony P; Peake, Sandra L; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cameron, Peter; Holdgate, Anna; Howe, Belinda; Higgins, Alisa; Presneill, Jeffrey; Webb, Steve

    2013-09-01

    The Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) study is an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of early goal-directed therapy compared with standard care for patients presenting to the emergency department with severe sepsis. In keeping with current practice, and considering aspects of trial design and reporting specific to non-pharmacological interventions, our plan outlines the principles and methods for analysing and reporting the trial results. The document is prepared before completion of recruitment into the ARISE study, without knowledge of the results of the interim analysis conducted by the data safety and monitoring committee and before completion of the two related international studies. Our statistical analysis plan was designed by the ARISE chief investigators, and reviewed and approved by the ARISE steering committee. We reviewed the data collected by the research team as specified in the study protocol and detailed in the study case report form. We describe information related to baseline characteristics, characteristics of delivery of the trial interventions, details of resuscitation, other related therapies and other relevant data with appropriate comparisons between groups. We define the primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes for the study, with description of the planned statistical analyses. We have developed a statistical analysis plan with a trial profile, mock-up tables and figures. We describe a plan for presenting baseline characteristics, microbiological and antibiotic therapy, details of the interventions, processes of care and concomitant therapies and adverse events. We describe the primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes with identification of subgroups to be analysed. We have developed a statistical analysis plan for the ARISE study, available in the public domain, before the completion of recruitment into the study. This will minimise analytical bias and

  7. Male genital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references

  8. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. [The Academy of Trauma Surgery (AUC). Service provider and management organization of the DGU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, J A; Hoffmann, R

    2016-02-01

    At the beginning of this century the German Trauma Society (DGU) became extensively active with an initiative on quality promotion, development of quality assurance and transparency regarding treatment of the severely injured. A white book on "Medical care of the severely injured" was published, focusing on the requirements on structural quality and especially procedural quality. The impact of the white book was immense and a trauma network with approved trauma centers, structured and graded for their individual trauma care performance, was developed. In order to monitor and document the required quality of care, a registry was needed. Furthermore, for cooperation within the trauma networks innovative methods for digital transfer of radiological images and patient documents became necessary. Finally, the auditing criteria for trauma centers had and still have to be completed with advanced medical education and training programs. In order to realize the implementation of such a broad spectrum of economically relevant and increasingly complex activities the Academy of Trauma Surgery (AUC) was established as a subsidiary of the DGU in 2004. The AUC currently has four divisions: 1) networks and health care structures, 2) registries and research management, 3) telemedicine, 4) medical education and training, all of which serve the goal of the initiative. The AUC is a full service provider and management organization in compliance with the statutes of the DGU. According to these statutes the business operations of the AUC also cover projects for numerous groups of patients, projects for the joint society the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma (DGOU) as well as other medical institutions. This article describes the success stories of the trauma network (TraumaNetzwerk DGU®), the TraumaRegister DGU®, the telecooperation platform TKmed®, the new and fast-growing orthogeriatric center initiative (AltersTraumaZentrum DGU®) and the division of medical education and

  10. The implementation of a national trauma registry in Greece. Methodology and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Theodoraki, Maria E; Toutouzas, Kostas; Drimousis, Panagiotis G; Larentzakis, Antreas; Stergiopoulos, Spiros; Aggelakis, Christos; Lapidakis, George; Massalis, Ioannis; Theodorou, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide and a major health problem of the modern society. Trauma systems are considered the gold standard of managing patients with trauma. An integral part of any trauma system is a trauma registry. In Europe, and particularly in Greece, trauma registries and systems are in an embryonic stage. In this study, we present an attempt to record trauma in Greece. The Hellenic Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery invited all the official representatives of the society throughout the country to participate in the study. In succeeding meetings of the representatives, the reporting form was developed and the inclusion criteria were defined meticulously. Inclusion criteria were defined as patients with trauma requiring admission, transfer to a higher level center, or arrived dead or died in the emergency department of the reporting hospital. All reports were accumulated by the Hellenic Trauma society, imported in an electronic database, and analyzed. Thirty-two hospitals receiving patients with trauma participated in the country, representing 40% of the country's healthcare facilities and serving 40% of the country's population. In 12 months time, (October 2005 to September 2006), 8,862 patients were included in the study. Of them, 66.9% were men and 31.3% were women. The compilation rate of the reporting forms was surprisingly high, considering that the final reporting form included 150 data points and that there were no independent personnel in charge of filling the forms. Trauma registries are feasible even in health care systems where funding of medical research is sparse.

  11. [Trauma in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, José Antonio Gomes; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos R G

    2002-01-01

    The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, disproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave differently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and rehabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  12. Transfusion practices in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Trichur Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  13. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Meka Srinivasa; Arjun, Kalyanpur

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance

  14. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Srinivasa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance.

  15. Blunt cardiac trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Camilo; Vargas, Fernando; Guzmán, Fernando; Zárate, Alejandro; Correa, José L.; Ramírez, Alejandro; M. Quintero, Diana; Ramírez, Erika M.

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  16. Trauma cardiaco cerrado

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Alvarado; Fernando Vargas; Fernando Guzmán; Alejandro Zárate; José L. Correa; Alejandro Ramírez; Diana M. Quintero; Erika M. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  17. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  18. Eye trauma in boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Gustavo; Curreri, Anthony

    2009-10-01

    In boxing, along with a few other sports, trauma is inherent to the nature of the sport; therefore it is considered a high-risk sport for ocular injuries. The long-term morbidity of ocular injuries suffered by boxers is difficult to estimate due to the lack of structured long-term follow-up of these athletes. Complications of blunt ocular trauma may develop years after the athlete has retired from the ring and is no longer considered to be at risk for boxing-related injuries. This article describes the wide range of eye injuries a boxer can sustain, and their immediate and long-term clinical management.

  19. Splenic trauma: Is splenectomy redundant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 41 year old male, serving air warrior sustained blunt abdominal trauma, CECT revealed grade III splenic injury. He was managed conservatively with good clinical outcome. Conservatism is the new approach to splenic trauma.

  20. Childhood Trauma and Alexithymia in Patients with Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Anum; Yousaf, Aasma

    2016-07-01

    To determine the relationship between childhood trauma (physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect) and alexithymia in patients with conversion disorder, and to identify it as a predictor of alexithymia in conversion disorder. An analytical study. Multiple public sector hospitals in Lahore, from September 2012 to July 2013. Eighty women with conversion disorder were recruited on the basis of DSM IV-TR diagnostic criteria checklist to screen conversion disorder. Childhood abuse interview to measure childhood trauma and Bermond Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire, DSM-IV TR Dianostic Criteria Checklist, and Childhood Abuse Interview to assess alexithymia were used, respectively. The mean age of the sample was 18 ±2.2 years. Thirty-six cases had a history of childhood trauma, physical abuse was the most reported trauma (f = 19, 23.8%) in their childhood. Patients with conversion disorder has a significant association with alexithymia (p conversion disorder. Strategies should be devised to reduce this disorder among women in Pakistani society.

  1. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  2. Gênero e trauma Gender and trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio Ary Dillon Soares

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available As conseqüências sociais e psicológicas da violência urbana sobre os parentes e amigos de pessoas vitimadas por mortes violentas (homicídio, suicídio ou acidentes são analisadas à luz das diferenças de gênero. A literatura especializada nesta área propõe que mulheres e homens vivenciam experiências traumáticas de forma peculiar. Porém, os traumas típicos são diferentes em cada gênero, deixando em aberto a questão sobre quanto das diferenças entre as respostas se devem a gênero e quanto se devem ao tipo de trauma. Testamos a hipótese de que as mulheres são mais suscetíveis à desordem de estresse pós-trauma (DEPT numa situação traumática comum, usando dados qualitativos e quantitativos. Comparamos os sintomas do trauma e as percepções sobre o significado da perda de seus entes queridos. A amostra, de 425 mulheres (62% e 265 homens (38%, foi retirada de uma lista de parentes de pessoas que sofreram morte violenta na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Incluímos trinta relatos de parentes e amigos próximos das vítimas diretas. Os resultados revelaram que 54% das mulheres e 41% dos homens tiveram o cotidiano alterado depois da morte de um parente/amigo. Há diferenças estatisticamente significativas nos problemas de saúde e na diversão. Essa área foi a mais afetada, atingindo metade dos entrevistados. Uma variável intimamente correlacionada com os sintomas da DEPT é o contato com o corpo: controlando a extensão do contato (fez o reconhecimento do corpo; viu, mas não reconheceu e nem viu nem reconheceu. Em cada uma dessas categorias, as mulheres foram mais afetadas do que os homens. O artigo conclui que as mulheres sentem mais as perdas do que os homens, mas que parte das diferenças não são internas aos gêneros, mas externas a eles, dependendo das interações e dos contatos pessoais.The social and psychological consequences endured by friends and relatives of people victimized by violent death (homicide, suicide or

  3. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  4. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival...

  5. Trauma Aware & Safety Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The interwoven issues of trauma and safety have swept through college campuses over the last decade, and they've arrived at doors of admission offices, encouraging officials to think more carefully about those concerns and take a closer look at how they handle them. Experts recommend in this atmosphere that admission offices discuss these topics…

  6. Understanding Child Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help of a trained professional. When needed, a mental health professional trained in evidence-based trauma treatment can help children and families cope and move toward recovery. Ask your pediatrician, family physician, school counselor, or clergy member for a referral. Visit ...

  7. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging of vertebral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daffner, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This translation of the toolbook published in the 'US-ART' series, offers invaluable help to medical radiologists in the diagnostic imaging and evaluation of complex vertebral traumas which are on the rise, inter alia due to increasingly dangerous leisure sports. (orig./CB) [de

  9. When Trauma Hinders Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Donald A.

    2018-01-01

    Many kindergarten teachers have encountered children who enter school lacking the ability to control their behavior, but they may not understand the social and biological processes behind these children's disruptive behavior. The author reviews research into early childhood brain development to explain how trauma and chronic stress can make it…

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  11. Early Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  12. Traumatismos oculares Ocular traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelen Welch Ruiz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de tipo retrospectivo longitudinal cuyo universo estuvo constituido por 72 ojos de 72 pacientes con traumatismos oculares mecánicos que fueron hospitalizados en el Hospital Militar Central “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” desde enero de 1999 hasta enero de 2005. Para el análisis estadístico de la información se utilizó el programa automatizado SPSS versión 11.5 en el cual también se conformó la base de datos y se realizaron los cálculos de acuerdo con el tipo de variable analizada. Se utilizaron medidas de resumen, tendencia central y asociación estadística con un nivel de significación de p A retrospective longitudinal and descriptive study was carried out in 72 eyes from 72 patients with mechanical occular traumas, who had been hospitalized in “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” Military Hospital from December 1999 to January 2005. For the statistical data analysis, an automated program (SPSS 11.5 version was used to create the database and estimations were made according to the variable types. Summary measures, central tendency measures and statistical association with significance level equal to p < 0.05 were employed. Males prevailed (95.8%, the average age was 30.26 years with a minimum rate of 17 years and maximum rate of 82 years. The most frequent mechanisms of trauma were aggressions (23. 6% and injures from secondary projectiles (13.9%. The anterior segment traumas were more frequent (61, 1% than posterior segment traumas (6.94%. Both segments of the eyeball were affected in 39, 1% of eyes which evinced the worst visual acuity. The most common associated injures were hyphema (54, 2% and vitreous hemorrhage (16.6%. Closed trauma (contusions were more common and most of the eyes had better final visual acuity (45, 2% with vision range of 0.6-1.0 and 26.2% with vision range of 0.59-0.1. On the other hand, eyes affected by open trauma (simple wound, contusion-wound, wound with intraocular foreign body and

  13. Skeleton scintigraphy in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal trauma is common and presents both an opportunity and a problem in skeletal scintigraphy. The opportunity arises in the ability of skeletal scintigraphy to demonstrate abnormalities early after direct trauma. It is well recognized that the early detection of fractures in some sites cannot be reliably achieved by standard radiography, especially in the femoral neck and scaphoid bone. The problem comes in recognizing the effects of skeletal trauma when using skeletal scintigraphy for another purpose, such as the detection of metastatic disease. iatrogenic trauma to either the skeleton or soft tissues may be manifest scintigraphic ally. For example Craniotomy typically leaves a rim pattern at the surgical margin. Rib Retraction during thoracotomy can elicit periosteal reaction. Areas of the skeletal receiving curative levels of ionizing radiation (typically 4000 rads or greater) characteristically demonstrate decreased uptake within 6 months to 1 year after therapy. The generally high sensitivity of the skeletal scintigraphy seems to make it an ideal survey test in cases of suspected child abuse especially in which radiographs are unrevealing. Because of difficulties in obtaining a history of trauma from a preschool child or even eliciting a satisfactory description of the location and nature of the pain, skeletal scintigraphy provides a simple and reliable investigation in these children. Subtle trauma, such as that from stress fractures is often difficult to visualize on a plain radiograph. Skeletal scintigraphy is frequently positive at the time of clinical presentation. Skeletal scintigraphy is exquisitely sensitive to the remodeling process and typically shows abnormalities 1 to 2 weeks or more before the appearance of radiographic changes in stress fractures. The periosteal reaction can be visualized within hours of the injury. Insufficiency and fatigue fractures such as vertebral compression fracture, which is probably the most common consequence of

  14. Trauma treatment across Europe: where do we stand now from a perspective of seven countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Kazlauskas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of knowledge about the state of affairs of the trauma treatments in Europe. To start to fill in this gap, key persons from seven European countries—Georgia, Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, and Turkey—accepted the invitation to give their expert opinion on the state of affairs in their country at an invited panel discussion at the XIV 2015 ESTSS Conference in Vilnius, Lithuania. Brief reports from the seven countries reveal significant diversities among different European countries in terms of awareness of health problems related to trauma, the availability of trauma treatments, and treatment approaches. Political and economic differences across the European countries contribute to the diversities in the developments of trauma treatments. European national psychotrauma societies are active in establishing training curricula and dissemination of trauma-focused treatments. Despite the growing acknowledgment of trauma and dissemination of trauma-focused treatments, there is a lack of Europe-wide policies to ensure availability of trauma treatment in Europe for trauma survivors. The need for more detailed analysis of trauma treatment in all European countries and development of European-level trauma-informed health care policies is outlined.

  15. Nocturama gen. nov., Nothocladus s. lat. and other taxonomic novelties resulting from the further resolution of paraphyly in Australasian members of Batrachospermum (Batrachospermales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwisle, Timothy J; Johnston, Emily T; Lam, Daryl W; Stewart, Sarah A; Vis, Morgan L

    2016-06-01

    The informal "Australasica Group" was established in 2009 to include several Australasian endemic Batrachospermum species, a few species of the cosmopolitan Batrachospermum section Setacea, and the South American endemic Petrohua bernabei. Although useful for communication purposes, no formal taxonomic designation was proposed due to weakly supported basal nodes. The present research took a two-pronged approach of adding more taxa (29 additional specimens) as well as more sequence data (LSU, cox1, psaA, and psbA markers added to rbcL data) to provide better resolution. The resulting tree showed improved statistical support values (Bayesian posterior probability and maximum likelihood bootstrap) for most nodes providing a framework for taxonomic revision. Based on our well-resolved phylogeny, a new genus, Nocturama, is proposed for a clade of Batrachospermum antipodites specimens. The circumscription of Nothocladus is expanded to include Batrachospermum section Setacea and four additional sections composed of at least 10 species, mostly from Australia and New Zealand. One new species added to the data set, N. diatyches, did not form a clade with the other species of section Setaceus, where it was classified previously, rendering that section paraphyletic. To resolve this, N. diatyches and the morphologically similar species N. latericius are included with N. theaquus, in the new section Theaquus within Nothocladus s. lat. A specimen from Australia unaligned to these clades was sister to the Australia-New Zealand genus Psilosiphon and the cosmopolitan B. cayennense, but lacked statistical support. This specimen has the gross morphology of Batrachospermum s. lat. and is here provisionally assigned to that genus, as B. serendipidum sp. nov. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF LIVER TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dova Subba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM To estimate the incidence of Liver Trauma injuries and grade their severity of injury. To assess the factors responsible for morbidity and mortality after Liver Trauma. To study the postoperative complications and the management of Liver Trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who were admitted to Department of General Surgery for treatment who were managed operatively or non-operatively for abdominal trauma and having liver injury forms the material of the study. This study was conducted over a span of 24 months from June 2013 to November 2015. RESULTS Maximum number of patients are in the age group of 21-30 years (46%. 85% patients (85/100 are males and 15% of patients (15/100 are females. Lapse time of injury and admission varied from 25 minutes to 66 hours and 30 minutes. 75 % of the patients (75/100 presented within 24 hours after injury. Death rate of patients who reached hospital after 24 hours of injury was higher than the patients who reached hospital within 24 hours of injury. 28% of patients (28/100 had associated bony injuries, out of which 5% of patients (5/100 expired due to primary haemorrhage of fractured femur. More than one segment was injured in many patients. Segment V is involved commonly making 55% (55/100 of patients. Next common segment involved is segment VII, making 39% (39/100. CONCLUSION Mechanism of injury is the important factor which is responsible for morbidity in liver injury. Nonoperative management proved to be safe and effective and often has been used to treat patients with liver trauma.

  17. Penetrating ureteral trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo P. Fraga

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this series is to report our experience in managing ureteral trauma, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis, correct treatment, and the impact of associated injuries on the management and morbid-mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1994 to December 2002, 1487 laparotomies for abdominal trauma were performed and 20 patients with ureteral lesions were identified, all of them secondary to penetrating injury. Medical charts were analyzed as well as information about trauma mechanisms, diagnostic routine, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: All patients were men. Mean age was 27 years. The mechanisms of injury were gunshot wounds in 18 cases (90% and stab wounds in two (10%. All penetrating abdominal injuries had primary indication of laparotomy, and neither excretory urography nor computed tomography were used in any case before surgery. The diagnosis of ureteric injury was made intra-operatively in 17 cases (85%. Two ureteral injuries (10% were initially missed. All patients had associated injuries. The treatment was dictated by the location, extension and time necessary to identify the injury. The overall incidence of complications was 55%. The presence of shock on admission, delayed diagnosis, Abdominal Trauma Index > 25, Injury Severity Score > 25 and colon injuries were associated to a high complication rate, however, there was no statistically significant difference. There were no mortalities in this group. CONCLUSIONS: A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of ureteral injuries. A thorough exploration of all retroperitoneal hematoma after penetrating trauma should be an accurate method of diagnosis; even though it failed in 10% of our cases.

  18. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  19. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  20. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  1. Looking back at the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship: the most prestigious research award of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boult, Margaret; Babidge, Wendy; Pleass, Susan; Scott, David

    2015-10-01

    The John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship is a generous endowment made to the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) by the young neurosurgeon's family, following his death from a brain tumour. In this article, we examine the significance and legacy of the grant since its inception in 1979. This is the highest level of research fellowship awarded by the RACS recognizing early career excellence, as part of its significant research funding programme (over $1.7 million in 2015). John Mitchell Crouch recipients have been pioneers in various areas of medicine where they have developed new technologies, established research centres, improved patient safety and military surgery and embraced evidence-based medicine. The funds they received have directly contributed to research published in numerous highly respected peer-reviewed journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine; established new laboratories, helped fund clinical trials and allowed new directions of research to be pursued. Recipients of the John Mitchell Crouch Fellowship have been recognized with many awards including 11 Australian and New Zealand Honours to date. Many other significant research funds have been subsequently bestowed, including over 120 National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants to Australian and New Zealand recipients subsequent to their Fellowship. This article also shows the range of disciplines in which the award has supported cutting-edge research leading to benefits for patients and health care. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Australasian emergency physicians: a learning and educational needs analysis. Part Four: CPD topics desired by emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Andrew W; Weiland, Tracey J; Paltridge, Debbie

    2008-06-01

    To report the preferences of Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine for topics they would desire for their continuing professional development (CPD). A mailed survey of Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine asked for Likert type responses on the desirability of CPD on 15 procedural skills, 13 management skills, 11 clinical emergency topics, 9 topics related to teaching, 7 related to diagnostics and 5 evidence based practice topics. CPD in procedural skills of advanced and surgical airways, ED ultrasound, ventilation, skills, plastic procedures and regional anaesthesia were nominated as desirable by 85% of emergency physicians (EP). More than 90% desired CPD in ophthalmological, otorhinolaryngeal, neonatal and paediatric emergencies. Of diagnostic skills, more than 80% considered CPD on computerized tomography, electrocardiography and plain X-ray interpretation as desirable, well as CPD about teaching in general, simulation and preparing candidates for fellowship exams. Of the 12 management skills, 11 were seen as desirable topics by more than 70%, with counter disaster planning, giving feedback and dealing with complaints the most popular. All evidence based practice related skills, including interpreting statistics and undertaking literature searches were seen as desirable topics by more than 80% of EP. This information may assist in the planning of future educational interventions for emergency physicians. EP seek CPD on management, educational and other non clinical skills, as well as topics relating directly to patient care.

  3. Developing the Australasian Hepatology Association's Consensus-based Guidelines for the Nursing Care of Patients with Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jacqueline; Wheeler, Emily; Warner, Sherryne; Mason, Susan

    2014-05-03

    Abstract Purpose: Hepatology nursing is an emerging speciality. To define best practice, the Australasian Hepatology Association developed consensus-based guidelines for the nursing care of patients with liver disease. Methods: Using the Delphi technique, six rounds of consultation were conducted with Australian hepatology nurses and non-nursing hepatology professionals. Input was captured through face-to-face and electronic communication and questionnaires. Results: The experts' opinions were collated and consensus on the delivery of hepatology nursing care was achieved. In total, 90 consensus guidelines were developed. The principles underpinning the Guidelines include patient-centred care, non-discriminatory practice, cultural competence, collaboration and partnership and working within own scope of practice. Conclusion: Internationally, the Australasian Hepatology Association Guidelines are the first to document a consensus on the scope of hepatology nursing practice. The Guidelines reflect the expansion of hepatology nursing, from viral hepatitis to caring for patients with advanced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, and provides a framework for future nursing practice.

  4. Trauma care system in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar Moussa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The high burden of injuries in Iran necessitates the establishment of a comprehensive trauma care system. The purpose of this paper is to de- scribe the current status of trauma system regarding the components and function. Methods: The current status of trauma system in all components of a trauma system was described through ex- pert panels and semi-structured interviews with trauma spe- cialists and policy makers. Results: Currently, various organizations are involved in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries, but an integrative system approach to trauma is rather deficient. There has been ongoing progress in areas of pub- lic education through media, traffic regulation reinforcement, hospital care and prehospital services. Meanwhile, there are gaps regarding financing, legislations and education of high risk groups. The issues on education and training stan- dards of the front line medical team and continuing educa- tion and evaluation are yet to be addressed. Trauma regis- try has been piloted in some provinces, but as it needs the well-developed infrastructure (regarding staff, maintenance, financial resources, it is not yet established in our system of trauma care. Conclusions: It seems that one of the problems with trauma care in Iran is lack of coordination among trauma system organizations. Although the clinical management of trauma patients has improved in our country in the recent decade, decreasing the burden of injuries necessitates an organized approach to prevention and management of trauma in the context of a trauma system. Key words: Emergency medical services; Trauma centers; Wounds and injuries

  5. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  6. CT of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, B.G.; Federle, M.P.; Minagi, H.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive cases of surgically proved splenic injuries were evaluated by CT. CT correctly identified 54 splenic injuries, with one false-negative and three false-positive studies. In the single false-negative study and in two of the three false-positive studies, CT correctly indicated the presence of a large hemoperitoneum and other abdominal visceral lacerations and so correctly indicated the need for surgery. Of the 55 proved cases of splenic injury, CT revealed hemoperitoneum in 54 (99%), perisplenic clot in 47 (85%), splenic laceration in 39 (71%), and subcapsular hematoma in 13 (24%). Perisplenic clot can be distinguished from lysed blood in the peritoneal cavity and is a sensitive and specific sign of splenic trauma, even in the absence of visible splenic laceration. The authors conclude that CT is highly reliable means of evaluating splenic trauma

  7. Trauma of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the typical radiologic findings in chest trauma, and the value of conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and aortography is discussed. Conventional radiography rather than cross-sectional imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing thoracic trauma. During the critical phase with often concomitant shock, pelvic and spinal injuries tailored raiographic views or even upright chest radiographs are impractical. The severely traumatized patient is usually radiographed in the supine position and suboptimal roentgenograms may have to be accepted for several reasons. It is well documented that many abnormalities detected on CT were not apparent on conventional radiographs, but CT is reserved for hemodynamical stable patients. Nevertheless certain situations like aortic rupture require further evaluation by CT and aortography. (orig./MG)

  8. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  9. Radiology of orbital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  10. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D.; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed

  11. Rethinking historical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva, E-mail: Minerva.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Leuchter, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Leuchter@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Platon, Alexandra, E-mail: Alexandra.Platon@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D., E-mail: Christoph.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Dulguerov, Pavel, E-mail: Pavel.Dulguerov@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Varoquaux, Arthur, E-mail: Arthur.Varoquaux@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed.

  13. Trauma da Veia Porta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O trauma da veia porta é raro e freqüentemente fatal por causa de exsanguinação e alta incidência de lesões de estruturas adjacentes. Devido às pecualiaridades desta lesão e diferentes condutas propostas na literatura, o objetivo dos autores é relatar a experiência neste tipo de lesão. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo, de janeiro de 1994 e dezembro de 2001, de 1370 pacientes submetidos à laparotomia devido trauma abdominal. Entre esses, 15 pacientes apresentavam lesão da veia porta. As lesões foram classificadas conforme a sua extensão e localização. RESULTADOS: O mecanismo de trauma predominante foi o penetrante. O diagnóstico da lesão foi realizado no intraoperatório. Os procedimentos executados foram: sutura, anastomose término-terminal e ligadura da veia porta. A mortalidade foi de 53,3%. CONCLUSÃO: A lesão da veia porta possui alta taxa de mortalidade e o atendimento adequado está diretamente relacionado à sobrevida.

  14. Trauma and Memory in Magical Realism: Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach as Trauma Narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Mrak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental characteristic of magical realism is its duality, which enables alternative representations of society and history. Its specific narrative devices make magical realism a viable form for rendering traumatic experience and memories. Monkey Beach (2000 by Eden Robinson, a member of the Haisla and Heiltsuk First Nations in Canada, is a repository of memories, triggered and fuelled by trauma. Fragmented temporality, mixing of discourses, shifts in focalization, wordplays, repetition, and the magical are some of the devices the novel uses to address the complex landscape of trauma and memory. By unveiling personal memories, Monkey Beach gives way to the unconscious to enter the narrative structure, gradually revealing a much larger issue of the mistreatment of the Haisla people in Canada—and the resulting collective trauma. As trauma cannot be integrated into the narrative, it can only be uncovered indirectly and through a double distancing: firstly through the techniques of magical realism, and secondly, through the seemingly detached point of view of the narrator, who ultimately realises that her life is also encumbered with the dark stain of colonialism.

  15. An interpretation of Babette's Feast as a parable of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Sharn

    2010-09-01

    In this paper I use the film Babette's Feast as a parable to portray the impasse that often arises out of the experience of complex trauma. The experience of such trauma invokes a crisis of reality. It overflows the boundaries of rational containment. There are no mechanisms with which to apprehend such an event, and consequently it cannot be comprehended; because it cannot be comprehended it cannot be processed. The film Babette's Feast encapsulates the predicament of the individual ensnared in the web of trauma. Although removed from the location and events of her trauma, Babette remains the resident of an austere and colourless environment, her gifts repressed, her brilliance unseen. Healing comes to Babette through her willingness to revisit her true self, a self that has been crushed under the weight of grief and trauma. This revisiting costs her all she has. Yet, it is in this revisiting that she not only frees herself from the austerity of her environment but also engenders purpose and hope within the community who have taken her in. The dissonance of her life is paralleled by the dissonance of the life of the community in which she lives; it is the harmonizing of these dissonances which cannot be spoken that finally gives articulation to the incoherence of Babette's trauma. © 2010, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  16. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  17. Childhood trauma and compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Rock, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma has been empirically associated with various types of self-regulatory difficulties in adulthood. However, according to the extant literature, no study has examined relationships between various types of childhood trauma and compulsive buying behavior in adulthood. Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of 370 obstetrics/gynecology patients, we examined five types of childhood trauma before the age of 12 years (i.e. witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to compulsive buying as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). All forms of trauma demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the CBS. Using a linear regression analysis, both witnessing violence and emotional abuse significantly contributed to CBS scores. Further analyses indicated that race did not moderate the relationship between childhood trauma and compulsive buying. Findings indicate that various forms of childhood trauma are correlated with compulsive buying behavior, particularly witnessing violence and emotional abuse.

  18. Trauma Systems. An Era of Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink, K.W.W.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of an inclusive trauma system in the Netherlands during last decade of the past century, has led to an improvement in Dutch trauma care. Eleven trauma regions were formed nationwide each surrounding a level I trauma center. All hospitals in a trauma region were assigned levels I, II

  19. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Trauma Studies: prospettive e problemi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Branchini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The trauma paradigm pervades contemporary life. In newspapers, on television, on the web, even in ordinary conversation, experiences of every kind (both figurative and positive ones are described as “traumatic”. Thus the very meaning of the term is often overturned. This article seeks to reshape the limits of the concept of trauma by tracing its evolution from the psychological debate of the early nineteenth century to the recent setting up of the specific discipline of Trauma Studies.

  1. Effectiveness of regionalization of trauma care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Y; Rashidian, A; Jalili, M; Omidvari, A H; Jeddian, A

    2017-05-01

    Improving trauma systems in various forms has always been an important aspect of health policy. While several papers have reported the implementation of a structured trauma system of care, research evidence on the effectiveness of such regionalization for improvement in trauma outcome is limited. Systematic review. Medline, EMbase, EconLit and Health Management Information Consortium were searched, using sensitive search terms, for interventional studies that reported a trauma regionalization system as their intervention, and compared important outcomes such as mortality and preventable deaths. At least two authors assessed eligibility for inclusion and risk of bias, and extracted data from the included studies. As meta-analysis was not possible for all studies, two controlled before-after studies were included in the meta-analysis, and a narrative analysis was conducted for the other studies. After title and abstract sifting, 66 papers were retrieved. After reading the full texts, a total of 24 studies from the USA, UK, Canada, Australia, and the Netherlands were included in this review. In spite of variation in study specifications, most were before-after studies with a high risk of bias. Although a reduction in mortality was shown in most studies, only two studies were eligible for meta-analysis, and the results showed a significant reduction in mortality after implementation of an organized trauma system (odds ratio 0.840, 95% confidence interval 0.756-0.924; P = 0.00). Correlation was found between a regionalized network of trauma care and a reduction in trauma-related mortality, based on studies that did not exclude the effects of other concurrent changes on observed reductions. It is recommended that more studies with robust research designs should be conducted in a more diverse range of countries to assess the effectiveness of regionalization. Despite this limitation, the present findings support the regionalization of trauma care services. Copyright

  2. The value of trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  3. New Geographies of Accumulation, Globalising Firm Networks and the Role of the Auckland Region in the Australasian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Le Heron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly little theoretical or empirical research is available on Auckland’s actual functional and geographic connectivity, including developments relating to closer economic relations with Australia. This paper draws on the geography of accumulation literatures to argue that close attention must be given to developments in the three circuits of capital (trade, production and finance if the changing character and contributions of globalising firm networks are to be discerned and understood. The empirical investigations show that for Australian owned firms globalising rather than purely Australasian networks are the norm, network complexity is considerable and that it makes sense to think of Auckland’s economy in globalising terms. A globalising networks perspective means that estimates of the magnitude and assessments of the character of employment contributions of Australian owned firms to the Auckland economy reflects these interdependencies.

  4. Paediatric trauma imaging: Why do we need separate guidance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negus, S.; Danin, J.; Fisher, R.; Johnson, K.; Landes, C.; Somers, J.; Fitzsimmons, C.; Ashford, N.; Foster, J.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that the pattern of injury in children mirrors that of the adult population, but children have different anatomical proportions and the relative elasticity of their tissues results in different injury patterns. The authors of this review are members of the British Society of Paediatric Radiologists subgroup and developed the recently published 47 paediatric trauma protocols for imaging children involved in major blunt trauma. The following article has been written to bring these guidelines to the attention of the wider community of UK radiologists, and explain the rationale behind the recommendations

  5. Rainforest conifers of Eocene Patagonia: attached cones and foliage of the extant Southeast Asian and Australasian genus Dacrycarpus (Podocarpaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Eocene caldera-lake beds at Laguna del Hunco (LH, ca. 52.2 Ma) and Río Pichileufú (RP, ca. 47.7 Ma) in Argentine Patagonia provide copious information about the biological history of Gondwana. Several plant genera from these sites are known as fossils from southern Australia and New Zealand and survive only in Australasian rainforests. The potential presence of Dacrycarpus (Podocarpaceae) holds considerable interest due to its extensive foliage-fossil record in Gondwana, its remarkably broad modern distribution in Southeast Asian and Australasian rainforests, its high physiological moisture requirements, and its bird-dispersed seeds. However, the unique seed cones that firmly diagnose Dacrycarpus were not previously known from the fossil record. I describe and interpret fertile (LH) and vegetative (LH and RP) material of Dacrycarpus and present a nomenclatural revision for fossil Dacrycarpus from South America. Dacrycarpus puertae sp. nov. is the first fossil occurrence of the unusual seed cones that typify living Dacrycarpus, attached to characteristic foliage, and of attached Dacrycarpus pollen cones and foliage. Dacrycarpus puertae is indistinguishable from living D. imbricatus (montane, Burma to Fiji). Dacrycarpus chilensis (Engelhardt) comb. nov. is proposed for Eocene vegetative material from Chile. Modern-aspect Dacrycarpus was present in Eocene Patagonia, demonstrating an astonishingly wide-ranging paleogeographic history and implying a long evolutionary association with bird dispersers. Dacrycarpus puertae provides the first significant Asian link for Eocene Patagonian floras, strengthens the biogeographic connections from Patagonia to Australasia across Antarctica during the warm Eocene, and indicates high-rainfall paleoenvironments.

  6. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  7. Trauma und Terror

    OpenAIRE

    Szyszkowitz, T. (Tessa)

    2007-01-01

    1. Einleitung Ausgehend von der Fragestellung, warum gerade bei Tschetschenen und Palästinensern der Selbstmordterrorismus in den letzten Jahren so populär geworden ist, analysiert die Autorin die Geschichte dieser beiden Völker. Einer der Gründe ist bisher wenig beachtet worden. Der Einfluss eines kollektiven Traumas, das als solches nicht anerkannt, behandelt und auch nicht einer politischen Lösung zugeführt wurde. 2. Geschichte der Palästinenser und Tschetschenen Im Zuge der Err...

  8. Management of liver trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan M Alghamdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 30 years, the management of liver injury has evolved significantly. The advancement of imaging studies has played an important role in the conservative approach for management. A shift from operative to nonoperative management for most hemodynamically stable patients with hepatic injury has been prompted by speed and sensitivity of diagnostic imaging and by advances in critical care monitoring. In this review article, the up-to-date recommendation on the management approach of liver trauma will be discussed.

  9. Hypothetical source crater for Australasian tektites: Moving from Indochina to Northwest China?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk; Kameník, Jan; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 51, AUG (2016), A467-A467 ISSN 1086-9379. [79th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical-Society. 07.08.2016-12.08.2016, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-22351S; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:67985815 Keywords : ATT * Indochina * crater Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry; BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics (ASU-R)

  10. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  11. Management of liver trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Badger, S A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Blunt and penetrating liver trauma is common and often presents major diagnostic and management problems. METHODS: A literature review was undertaken to determine the current consensus on investigation and management strategies. RESULTS: The liver is the most frequently injured organ following abdominal trauma. Immediate assessment with ultrasound has replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage in the resuscitation room, but computerised tomography remains the gold standard investigation. Nonoperative management is preferred in stable patients but laparotomy is indicated in unstable patients. Damage control techniques such as perihepatic packing, hepatotomy plus direct suture, and resectional debridement are recommended. Major complex surgical procedures such as anatomical resection or atriocaval shunting are now thought to be redundant in the emergency setting. Packing is also recommended for the inexperienced surgeon to allow control and stabilisation prior to transfer to a tertiary centre. Interventional radiological techniques are becoming more widely used, particularly in patients who are being managed nonoperatively or have been stabilised by perihepatic packing. CONCLUSIONS: Management of liver injuries has evolved significantly throughout the last two decades. In the absence of other abdominal injuries, operative management can usually be avoided. Patients with more complex injuries or subsequent complications should be transferred to a specialist centre to optimise final outcome.

  12. Urinary tract trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.E. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    From a practical point of view, a woman who has blunt injury to the pelvic area with hematuria from the lower urinary tract, has a contused or ruptured bladder. In a man, such a situation calls for retrograde urethrography to determine if the injury is in the urethra or the bladder because the two organs are investigated differently. In both sexes, such injuries are usually associated with pelvic fractures. Massive bladder displacement and severe hemorrhage should alert one to the need for pelvic angiography to find and embolize the bleeding site within the first 24 hours after injury. For blunt trauma to the upper urinary tract an intravenous urogram with tomography is still the main examination. However, a normal intravenous urogram does not exclude serious injury. Therefore, if signs or symptoms persist, a computerized tomographic (CT) examination should be performed if available. Otherwise, a radionuclide study is advisable. Non-excretion on intravenous urography with tomography calls for selective renal arteriography to delineate the etiology. There can be serious renal trauma in the absence of hematuria, which may occur with renal pedicle injury or avulsion of the ureter. Minor forniceal ruptures may occasionally mask severe posterior renal lacerations.

  13. [Cervical spine trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  14. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  15. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  16. Bone scintigraphy in children: trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcke, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of radionuclide imaging in identifying skeletal trauma in children has been established. Growth plates present a set of problems unique to pediatric studies and diagnotic accuracy is very technique dependent. Imaging for sports injuries and suspected child abuse has been productive. An expanding role for bone scintigraphy in the management of orthopedic problems post-trauma is developing [fr

  17. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  18. Psychiatric diagnoses, trauma, and suicidiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elklit Ask

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to examine the associations between psychiatric diagnoses, trauma and suicidiality in psychiatric patients at intake. Methods During two months, all consecutive patients (n = 139 in a psychiatric hospital in Western Norway were interviewed (response rate 72%. Results Ninety-one percent had been exposed to at least one trauma; 69 percent had been repeatedly exposed to trauma for longer periods of time. Only 7% acquired a PTSD diagnosis. The comorbidity of PTSD and other psychiatric diagnoses were 78%. A number of diagnoses were associated with specific traumas. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported suicidal thoughts in the month prior to intake; thirty-one percent had attempted suicide in the preceding week. Suicidal ideation, self-harming behaviour, and suicide attempts were associated with specific traumas. Conclusion Traumatised patients appear to be under- or misdiagnosed which could have an impact on the efficiency of treatment.

  19. Head and neck trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan: different war, different surgery, lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The objectives are to compare and contrast the head and neck trauma experience in Iraq and Afghanistan and to identify trauma lessons learned that are applicable to civilian practice. A retrospective review of one head and neck surgeon's operative experience in Iraq and Afghanistan was performed using operative logs and medical records. The surgeon's daily operative log book with patient demographic data and operative reports was reviewed. Also, patient medical records were examined to identify the preoperative and postoperative course of care. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, with a higher percentage of emergent cases performed in Iraq. In Iraq, only 10% of patients were pretreated at a facility with surgical capabilities. In Afghanistan, 93% of patients were pretreated at such facilities. Emergent neck exploration for penetrating neck trauma and emergent airway surgery were more common in Iraq, which most likely accounted for the increased perioperative mortality also seen in Iraq (5.3% in Iraq vs. 1.3% in Afghanistan). Valuable lessons regarding soft tissue trauma repair, midface fracture repair, and mandible fracture repair were learned. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, and the future training for mass casualty trauma events should reflect these differences. Furthermore, valuable head and neck trauma lessons learned in both war zones are applicable to the civilian practice of trauma. Level 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. The Australasian Hepatology Association consensus guidelines for the provision of adherence support to patients with hepatitis C on direct acting antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond JA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline A Richmond,1,2 Suzanne Sheppard-Law,3,4 Susan Mason,5 Sherryne L Warner6,7 1Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, 2Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, 3Faculty of Health, University of Technology, 4Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, 5AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 6Department of Gastroenterology, Monash Health, 7Department of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus primarily spread through sharing of drug-injecting equipment. Approximately 150 million people worldwide and 230,000 Australians are living with chronic hepatitis C infection. In March 2016, the Australian government began subsidizing direct acting antivirals (DAAs for the treatment of hepatitis C, which are highly effective (95% cure rate and have few side effects. However, there is limited evidence to inform the provision of adherence support to people with hepatitis C on DAAs including the level of medication adherence required to achieve a cure. Methodology: In February 2016, a steering committee comprising four authors convened an expert panel consisting of six hepatology nurses, a hepatologist, a pharmacist, a consumer with hepatitis C and treatment experience, and a consumer advocate. The expert panel focused on the following criteria: barriers and enablers to DAA adherence; assessment and monitoring of DAA adherence; components of a patient-centered approach to DAA adherence; patients that may require additional adherence support; and interventions to support DAA adherence. The resultant guidelines underwent three rounds of consultation with the expert panel, Australasian Hepatology Association (AHA members (n=12, and key stakeholders (n=7 in June 2016. Feedback was considered by the steering committee and incorporated if consensus was achieved. Results

  1. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorph, S.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.)

  2. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorph, S [Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.).

  3. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  4. Trauma cardiaco cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Alvarado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestaciones clínicas están: la angina refractaria a nitratos, el dolor pleurítico, la hipotensión arterial, la taquicardia, la ingurgitación yugular que aumenta con la inspiración, el galope por tercer ruido, el frote pericárdico, los soplos de reciente aparición, los estertores crepitantes por edema pulmonar. El electrocardiograma es el primer eslabón en el algoritmo diagnóstico con hallazgos como: la taquicardia sinusal, los complejos ventriculares prematuros, la fibrilación auricular, el bloqueo de rama derecha y los bloqueos auriculoventriculares. La radiografía de tórax ayuda a descartar lesiones adicionales óseas y pulmonares. La troponina I tiene un valor predictivo negativo del 93% para el trauma cardiaco, otras enzimas como la creatina quinasa total y la creatina quinasa fracción MB son menos específicas. El ecocardiograma está indicado en caso de hipotensión persistente, electrocardiograma con alteraciones o falla cardiaca aguda. El tratamiento incluye la estabilización inicial y un manejo específico de las lesiones. Entre las complicaciones se incluyen: el taponamiento cardiaco, la contusión miocárdica, el síndrome coronario agudo, las arritmias cardíacas y la lesión aórtica. El pronóstico se determina en mayor medida por los signos vitales al ingreso y la presencia de paro cardiaco durante el abordaje inicial.

  5. COMMUNISM AND THE TRAUMA OF ITS COLLAPSE REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Löw-Beer, Catherine; Atria, Moira; Davar, Elisha

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the intertwinement of society and the psyche as a consequence of 70 years of Communist rule and the trauma of its collapse in the 90's. The trauma had profound effects on the psyche. An empirical study that was carried out in 1996/1997, which compared the personality structure of adolescents from Russia and Austria, and a research dialogue in 1999, has been re-evaluated in the light of current political events. One aim that we had was to find out whether we could discover characteristic personality features, resulting from the Communist totalitarian society in Russia, as well as from the trauma of its collapse. This led to the development of the concepts of the "impersonal self" and the "denial mode". The Russians seemed to be frozen in a protective shell with "flat" affects. They were anxious, conflict avoidant, and somewhat lost. Ideas about missing adolescence and the importance of privacy are discussed. Society was shown to not only have intruded into the individual psyche, but also into the members of the intercultural research team in the form of projective identification. The importance of the interaction between society and the individual as a basic psychoanalytic concept dating back to Freud is elaborated. Finally, considerations pertaining to mental health and democracy are presented.

  6. Acute Stress Symptoms in Seriously Injured Patients: Precipitating Versus Cumulative Trauma and the Contribution of Peritraumatic Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, John; Dias, Colin P; Semple, Randye J; Scott, Catherine; Bigras, Noémie; Godbout, Natacha

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between type of trauma exposure, cumulative trauma, peritraumatic distress, and subsequent acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms was examined prospectively in 96 individuals presenting with acute medical injuries to a Level 1 emergency/trauma department. Common precipitating traumas included motor vehicle-related events, stabbings, shootings, and physical assaults. At 2 to 3 weeks follow-up, 22.9% of participants had developed ASD. Univariate analysis revealed no relationship between type of precipitating trauma and ASD symptoms, whereas robust path analysis indicated direct effects of gender, lifetime cumulative trauma exposure, and peritraumatic distress. Peritraumatic distress did not mediate the association between cumulative trauma and symptoms, but did mediate the association between gender and symptomatology. These results, which account for 23.1% of the variance in ASD symptoms, suggest that ASD may be more due to cumulative trauma exposure than the nature of the precipitating trauma, but that cumulative trauma does not exert its primary effect by increasing peritraumatic distress to the most recent trauma. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  7. Profiles of Childhood Trauma in Patients with Alcohol Dependence and Their Associations with Addiction-Related Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzin, Annett; Haupt, Lena; von Schönfels, Julia; Wingenfeld, Katja; Schäfer, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    The high occurrence of childhood trauma in individuals with alcohol dependence is well-recognized. Nevertheless, researchers have rarely studied which types of childhood trauma often co-occur and how these combinations of different types and severities of childhood trauma are related to the patients' current addiction-related problems. We aimed to identify childhood trauma profiles in patients with alcohol dependence and examined relations of these trauma profiles with the patients' current addiction-related problems. In 347 alcohol-dependent patients, 5 types of childhood trauma (sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and physical neglect) were measured using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Childhood trauma profiles were identified using cluster analysis. The patients' current severity of addiction-related problems was assessed using the European Addiction Severity Index. We identified 6 profiles that comprised different types and severities of childhood trauma. The patients' trauma profiles predicted the severity of addiction-related problems in the domains of psychiatric symptoms, family relationships, social relationships, and drug use. Childhood trauma profiles may provide more useful information about the patient's risk of current addiction-related problems than the common distinction between traumatized versus nontraumatized patients. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Trauma-affected refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Charlotte Kærgaard

    2016-01-01

    received the same manual-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as well as social counselling. The mean length of the treatment course was 6.3 months. The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms assessed on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures were self......-reported depression and anxiety symptoms measured on Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25), self-reported social functioning measured on the Social Adjustment Scale Self Report, short version (SAS-SR), and observer-rated depression and anxiety symptoms assessed on the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Ratings Scales...... (HAM D+A ). Social support was assessed on the Crisis Support Scale (CSS), level of functioning assessed on the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), quality of life was assessed on the WHO-5, the somatisation items of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), pain in four different body areas measured on Visual...

  9. Panhypopituitarism after multisystem trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechecka, Joanna; Krzewska, Aleksandra; Droń, Izabela; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    The pituitary gland plays a key role in hormonal regulation in the organism, contributing to maintenance of balance of basic vital functions. To emphasise the need for assessment of pituitary function after head injury, as correct diagnosis and hormone replacement therapy prove to be a life-saving therapy accelerating the recovery process. A healthy, normally developing 9-year-old girl, a child of young and healthy parents, was struck by a falling tree. The results of severe head trauma included adrenal crisis, hypothyroidism, and diabetes insipidus as manifestations of damage to the anterior and posterior pituitary gland. Administration of hormone replacement therapy, i.e. hydrocortisone, L-thyroxine, and desmopressin greatly improved the patient´s condition and facilitated effective rehabilitation. Determination of pituitary hormones in children after severe head injury should be an important part of diagnosis allowing identification of an early stage of acute hypopituitarism and acceleration of recovery through hormone replacement therapy.

  10. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  11. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  12. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  13. Predicting significant torso trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Ram; Talmor, Daniel; Brasel, Karen

    2005-07-01

    Identification of motor vehicle crash (MVC) characteristics associated with thoracoabdominal injury would advance the development of automatic crash notification systems (ACNS) by improving triage and response times. Our objective was to determine the relationships between MVC characteristics and thoracoabdominal trauma to develop a torso injury probability model. Drivers involved in crashes from 1993 to 2001 within the National Automotive Sampling System were reviewed. Relationships between torso injury and MVC characteristics were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the model to current ACNS models. There were a total of 56,466 drivers. Age, ejection, braking, avoidance, velocity, restraints, passenger-side impact, rollover, and vehicle weight and type were associated with injury (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (83.9) was significantly greater than current ACNS models. We have developed a thoracoabdominal injury probability model that may improve patient triage when used with ACNS.

  14. CT of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has made a significant contribution to the radiologic assessment of the injured larynx. CT is an accurate, noninvasive modality that can rapidly diagnose both soft tissue and cartilaginous injuries. CT of the larynx involves a minimal degree of patient manipulation and discomfort and can be performed in conjunction with CT evaluation of intracranial or facial injuries. Conventional radiologic studies (anteroposterior and lateral soft tissue films of the neck, tomograms, or xerograms) are capable of demonstrating some cartilaginous fractures but are of limited value in defining the extent of soft tissue injury. In the acute trauma setting, laryngography is often technically difficult to perform because of patient discomfort and inability to cooperate. Although the overall experience is somewhat limited, CT appears to overcome many of the limitations of these conventional radiologic methods. The following is a discussion of the role of CT scanning in evaluating injuries to the larynx and cervical soft tissues

  15. EPIDEMOLOGY OF TRAUMA GLOBALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Yuniarti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This study describes the epidemiology of trauma globaly. Trauma can cause death, burden of disease and economic losses. Traffic accidents are the most common cause of injury in the whole world. Riskesdes 2007, the proportion of the highest injury of Yogyakarta, experienced by adult age group, higher in male, the high levels of injury increasing the proportion of respondents. Found in the work as an employee, in the upper midle economic level. Lower limb (leg is part most affected by injuries. Based on the types of injuries classified as serious in a row that a head injury. Traffic accidents are often caused by four factors: road user, drivers, pedestrian, and vehicle. Because the victim of traffic accident is quite high and high health costs incurred. By him that there are three phases of stage traffic accident prevention, the prevention of the pre-crash phase, the phase of the accident, when the accident occur, to minimize the injuries. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Arvieux, C; Trilling, B; Sage, P Y; Mougin, N; Perou, S; Lavagne, P; Létoublon, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic trauma (PT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; the therapeutic options remain debated. Retrospective study of PT treated in the University Hospital of Grenoble over a 22-year span. The decision for initial laparotomy depended on hemodynamic status as well as on associated lesions. Main pancreatic duct lesions were always searched for. PT lesions were graded according to the AAST classification. Of a total of 46 PT, 34 were grades II or I. Hemodynamic instability led to immediate laparotomy in 18 patients, for whom treatment was always drainage of the pancreatic bed; morbidity was 30%. Eight patients had grade III injuries, six of whom underwent immediate operation: three underwent splenopancreatectomy without any major complications while the other three who had simple drainage required re-operation for peritonitis, with one death related to pancreatic complications. Four patients had grades IV or V PT: two pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, with no major complication, while one patient underwent duodenal reconstruction with pancreatic drainage, complicated by pancreatic and duodenal fistula requiring a hospital stay of two months. The post-trauma course was complicated for all patients with main pancreatic duct involvement. Our outcomes were similar to those found in the literature. In patients with distal PT and main pancreatic duct involvement, simple drainage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. For proximal PT, the therapeutic options of drainage versus pancreatoduodenectomy must be weighed; pancreatoduodenectomy may be unavoidable when the duodenum is injured as well. Two-stage (resection first, reconstruction later) could be an effective alternative in the emergency setting when there are other associated traumatic lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. [Surgical tactics in duodenal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P A; Grishin, A V

    2004-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 61 patients with injuries of the duodenum are analyzed. The causes of injuries were stab-incised wounds in 24 patients, missile wound -- in 7, closed abdominal trauma -- in 26, trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy -- in 4. All the patients underwent surgery. Complications were seen in 32 (52.5%) patients, 21 patients died, lethality was 34.4%. Within the first 24 hours since the trauma 7 patients died due to severe combined trauma, blood loss, 54 patients survived acute period of trauma, including 28 patients after open trauma, 26 -- after closed and 4 -- after trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy. Diagnostic and surgical policies are discussed. Results of treatment depending on kind and time of surgery are regarded. It is demonstrated that purulent complications due to retroperitoneal phlegmona, traumatic pancreatitis, pneumonia are the causes of significant number of unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, it is important to adequately incise and drainage infected parts of retroperitoneal fat tissue with two-lumen drainages. Decompression through duodenal tube is the effective procedure for prophylaxis of suture insufficiency and traumatic pancreatitis. Suppression of pancreatic and duodenal secretion with octreotid improves significantly surgical treatment results.

  18. Trauma Imaging: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Jason Heath; Wertz, Christopher Ira; Onstott, Kimberly L; Wertz, Joss R

    2017-01-01

    To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess zygomaticomaxillary complex, mandibular, and temporal bone fractures. Traumatic brain injuries are difficult to assess, and broad classifications are used. Depending on the severity of cervical spine trauma, plain-film radiographs or CT imaging is adequate, with magnetic resonance imaging used as a means for further evaluation. Trauma to the thorax typically is assessed with radiography and CT, and CT is recommended for assesment of abdominal and pelvic trauma. The literature was consistent regarding which examinations to perform to best evaluate suspected injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The need for, and correct use of, imaging in evaluating trauma to the head and cervical spine is more controversial. Despite the need for additional research, emergency department care providers should be familiar with the structures most commonly injured during trauma and the role of medical imaging for diagnosis.

  19. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)], E-mail: p-taourel@chu-montpellier.fr; Vernhet, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Suau, A.; Granier, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Lopez, F.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nimes (France); Aufort, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)

    2007-10-15

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications.

  20. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taourel, P.; Vernhet, H.; Suau, A.; Granier, C.; Lopez, F.M.; Aufort, S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications

  1. Hotspots in trauma memories and their relationship to successful trauma-focused psychotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Mirjam J; Baas, Melanie A M; Olff, Miranda; Gersons, Berthold P R

    2013-02-01

    Imaginal exposure is an essential element of trauma-focused psychotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Exposure should in particular focus on the "hotspots," the parts of trauma memories that cause high levels of emotional distress which are often reexperienced. Our aim was to investigate whether differences in the focus on hotspots differentiate between successful and unsuccessful trauma-focused psychotherapies. As part of a randomized trial, 45 PTSD patients completed brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD. We retrospectively assessed audio recordings of therapy sessions of 20 patients. Frequency of hotspots and the associated emotions, cognitions, and characteristics were compared for the most successful (n = 10) versus the least successful (n = 10) treatments. The mean number of unique hotspots per patient was 3.20, and this number did not differ between successful and unsuccessful treatments. In successful treatments, however, hotspots were more frequently addressed (r = .48), and they were accompanied by more characteristics of hotspots (r = .39), such as an audible change in affect, indicating medium- to large-sized effects. Repeatedly focusing on hotspots and looking for associated characteristics of hotspots may help clinicians to enhance the efficacy of imaginal exposure for patients who would otherwise show insufficient response to treatment. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. Trauma Tapping Technique: Practical First Aid for Stress and Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show a lifetime ... include re-experiencing the traumatic event, avoidant behavior for the memories of ... Methods. Trauma tapping technique (TTT) is a procedure that uses touch ...

  3. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  4. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  5. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Renew Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy Awards, Grants, ...

  6. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  7. Surgical Stabilization of Rib Fractures in a 6-Year-Old Child After Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Ishitani, Michael B; Kim, Brian D

    2017-12-01

    When identified, rib fractures in children are associated with high-energy trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or both. Traditionally, the optimal management of rib fractures in children is supportive care. In this case report, we present a 6-year-old boy who underwent surgical rib fixation for multiple displaced and comminuted rib fractures after being stepped on by a horse. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diversity in parasitic helminths of Australasian marsupials and monotremes: a molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Ian; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-10-15

    Marsupials and monotremes are a prominent part of the mammalian fauna in Australia, and harbour an extremely diverse and highly distinctive array of helminth parasites. Their study has been relatively neglected, likely because they have no direct, adverse socioeconomic impact. As the body plans of helminths generally are very simple and morphological characterisation likely underestimates true diversity, molecular tools have been employed to assess genetic diversity. Using biochemical and/or molecular methods, recent studies show extensive diversity in helminths of marsupials, with cryptic species being commonly encountered. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge about the diversity of parasitic helminths of marsupials and monotremes, to raise questions as to whether current molecular data can be used to estimate diversity, what mechanisms lead to such diversity, to critically appraise the molecular tools that have been employed thus far to explore diversity and to discuss the directions which might be taken in the future employing improved techniques. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ruiting

    2004-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  10. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  11. The management of neglected trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    more patients could be treated in the peripheral hospitals. .... most of the inovement from Perkins exercises will occur at the fracture site .... neglected femoral neck fracture in the elderly. ... The best treatment of neglected trauma is prevention.

  12. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  13. [Current treatment of hepatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvio-Estaba, Leonardo; Madrazo-González, Zoilo; Ramos-Rubio, Emilio

    2008-05-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic approach of liver trauma injuries (by extension, of abdominal trauma) has evolved remarkably in the last decades. The current non-surgical treatment in the vast majority of liver injuries is supported by the accumulated experience and optimal results in the current series. It is considered that the non-surgical treatment of liver injuries has a current rate of success of 83-100%, with an associated morbidity of 5-42%. The haemodynamic stability of the patient will determine the applicability of the non-surgical treatment. Arteriography with angioembolisation constitutes a key technical tool in the context of liver trauma. Patients with haemodynamic instability will need an urgent operation and can benefit from abdominal packing techniques, damage control and post-operative arteriography. The present review attempts to contribute to the current, global and practical management in the care of liver trauma.

  14. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  15. The Australasian frog family Ceratobatrachidae in China, Myanmar and Thailand: discovery of a new Himalayan forest frog clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, Fang; JIANG, Ke; WANG, Kai; JIN, Jie-Qiong; SUWANNAPOOM, Chatmongkon; LI, Cheng; Jens, V. VINDUM; Rafe, M. BROWN; CHE, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to study the systematic affinities and specieslevel phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic anurans variably assigned to the genera Ingerana or Limnonectes (family Dicroglossidae), we collected new molecular sequence data for five species including four Himalayan taxa, Limnonectes xizangensis, Lim. medogensis, Lim. alpine, Ingerana borealis and one southeast Asian species, I. tasanae, and analyzed these together with data from previous studies involving other ostensibly related taxa. Our surprising results demonstrate unequivocally that Lim. xizangensis, Lim. medogensis and Lim. alpine form a strongly supported clade, the sister-group of the family Australasian forest frog family Ceratobatrachidae. This discovery requires an expansion of the definition of Ceratobatrachidae and represents the first record of this family in China. These three species are distinguished from the species of Ingerana and Limnonectes by the: (1) absence of interdigital webbing of the foot, (2) absence of terminal discs on fingers and toes, (3) absence of circumarginal grooves on the fingers and toes, and (4) absence of tarsal folds. Given their phylogenetic and morphological distinctiveness, we assign them to the oldest available generic name for this clade, Liurana Dubois 1987, and transfer Liurana from Dicroglossidae to the family Ceratobatrachidae. In contrast, Ingerana tasanae was found to be clustered with strong support with the recently described genus Alcalus (Ceratobatrachidae), a small clade of otherwise Sundaic species; this constitutes a new record of the family Ceratobatrachidae for Myanmar and Thailand. Finally, Ingerana borealis clustered with the "true" Ingerana (family Dicroglossidae), for which the type species is I. tenasserimensis. PMID:26828029

  16. Training practitioners in preparing systematic reviews: a cross-sectional survey of participants in the Australasian Cochrane Centre training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silagy Chris

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although systematic reviews of health care interventions are an invaluable tool for health care providers and researchers, many potential authors never publish reviews. This study attempts to determine why some people with interest in performing systematic reviews do not subsequently publish a review; and what steps could possibly increase review completion. Methods Cross-sectional survey by email and facsimile of the 179 participants in Australasian Cochrane Centre training events between 1998 and 2000. Results Ninety-two participants responded to the survey (51 percent. Response rate of deliverable surveys was 82 percent (92/112. The remainder of the participants had invalid or no contact information on file. More than 75 percent of respondents felt that the current workshops met their needs for training. The most critical barriers to completion of a Cochrane review were: lack of time (80 percent, lack of financial support (36 percent, methodological problems (23 percent and problems with group dynamics (10 percent. Conclusions Strategies to protect reviewer time and increase the efficiency of the review process may increase the numbers of trained reviewers completing a systematic review.

  17. Australasian Sleep Association position statement regarding the use of psychological/behavioral treatments in the management of insomnia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Melissa; Junge, Moira; Cunnington, David

    2017-08-01

    Insomnia disorder is a high prevalence condition with a high disease burden, which, left untreated, can increase risk of poorer health outcomes. Due to Insomnia's tendency towards having a chronic course, long-term treatment approaches are required to reduce the impact of Insomnia over time. After reviewing the available literature, The Australasian Sleep Association (ASA) recommends Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) as a first line treatment in the management of Insomnia. The ASA notes that in addition to CBT-I, there is emerging evidence for the use of Mindfulness Based Therapy for Insomnia when used in combination with behavioural techniques (MBT-I). CBT-I should be used whenever possible, and medications should be limited to the lowest necessary dose and shortest necessary duration. CBT-I, whilst the most effective long-term treatment, does not work for everybody across all circumstances, so there will be circumstances in which other treatments are required (e.g., pharmacotherapy). Improving access to CBT-I is an important issue which will involve raising awareness of the effectiveness of CBT-I, increasing the number of trained practitioners, and the development of effective low intensity treatments that can be offered in the first instance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An overview of the RCA/IAEA activities in the Australasian region using nuclear analysis techniques for monitoring air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markwitz, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) via the Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) has identified air particulate matter pollution as a major transboundary environmental issue in the Australasian region. Sixteen countries in the region spanning from Pakistan to the Philippines and from China to New Zealand are participating in the regional programme RAS/7/013-Improved information of urban air quality management in the RCA region' that started in 1997. New Zealand is the lead-country for this programme in which nuclear analytical techniques, such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) are used to measure key elements in PM 2.5-0 and PM 10-2.5 filters from GENT stacked samplers collected twice weekly. Major sources of air particulate matter pollution are identified using statistical source apportionment techniques. To identify transboundary air particulate matter pollution events, the data is collated in a large database. Additionally, the data is used by end-users of the participating countries in the programme. An overview is presented. (author)

  19. Australasian emergency physicians: a learning and educational needs analysis. Part two: confidence of FACEM for tasks and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltridge, Debbie; Dent, Andrew W; Weiland, Tracey J

    2008-02-01

    To determine the degree of confidence perceived by Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine for a variety of procedural, patient management, educational and research skills, and tasks that may be required of them. Mailed survey with Likert scales and grouped qualitative responses. More than 90% of emergency physicians (EP) feel usually or always confident of their skills for peripheral vascular access, procedural sedation, fluid resuscitation, tube thoracostomy, managing patients with altered conscious state, cardiac emergencies, behavioural disturbance, and interpreting acid base and other blood tests. Less than 50% felt confident performing surgical airways, ED ultrasound, managing neonatal emergencies or interpreting MRI. Of non-clinical skills, while most EP were confident of their ability to write references, debrief staff, lead group tutorials and prepare slides, a minority felt usually or always confident about budgeting and finance, preparing submissions, dealing with the media, appearing in court or marking examination papers. Whilst nearly 75% were confident about the information technology skills required of them for clinical practice, less than 25% of EP felt confident about conducting research and less than 15% were confident applying or interpreting statistics. This information may assist in the planning of future educational interventions for EP.

  20. Helicopter overtriage in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Maria; Goldstein, Seth D; Salazar, Jose; Aboagye, Jonathan; Stewart, Dylan; Efron, David; Abdullah, Fizan; Haut, Elliot R

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) have been designed to provide faster access to trauma center care in cases of life-threatening injury. However, the ideal recipient population is not fully characterized, and indications for helicopter transport in pediatric trauma vary dramatically by county, state, and region. Overtriage, or unnecessary utilization, can lead to additional patient risk and expense. In this study we perform a nationwide descriptive analysis of HEMS for pediatric trauma and assess the incidence of overtriage in this group. We reviewed records from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (2008-11) and included patients less than 16 years of age who were transferred from the scene of injury to a trauma center via HEMS. Overtriage was defined as patients meeting all of the following criteria: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, absence of hypotension, an Injury Severity Score (ISS) less than 9, no need for procedure or critical care, and a hospital length of stay of less than 24 hours. A total of 19,725 patients were identified with a mean age of 10.5 years. The majority of injuries were blunt (95.6%) and resulted from motor vehicle crashes (48%) and falls (15%). HEMS transported patients were predominately normotensive (96%), had a GCS of 15 (67%), and presented with minor injuries (ISS<9, 41%). Overall, 28 % of patients stayed in the hospital for less than 24 hours, and the incidence of overtriage was 17%. Helicopter overtriage is prevalent among pediatric trauma patients nationwide. The ideal model to predict need for HEMS must consider clinical outcomes in the context of judicious resource utilization. The development of guidelines for HEMS use in pediatric trauma could potentially limit unnecessary transfers while still identifying children who require trauma center care in a timely fashion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. CT findings of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim Young Il

    1998-01-01

    Trauma is the third leading cause of death, irrespective of age, and the leading cause of death in persons under 40 persons under 40 years of age. Most pleural, pulmonary, mediastinal, and diaphragmatic injuries are not seen on conventional chest radiographs, or are underestimated. In patients with chest trauma, CT scanning is an effective and sensitive method of detecting thoracic injuries and provides accurate information regarding their pattern and extent. (author). 5 refs., 17 figs

  2. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) includes trauma to the carotid or vertebral vessels and is noted in 0.1% of hospitalized trauma patients without an initial screening system in place. Several important topics must be addressed including determination of the appropriate screening population, the best modality of screening for diagnosis, treatment types, and required follow-up of blunt cerebrovascular injuries. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  4. Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: A survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Ranse, K; Bloomer, M; Coombs, M; Endacott, R

    2016-01-01

    publisher: Elsevier articletitle: Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: A survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses journaltitle: Australian Critical Care articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2016.08.006 content_type: article copyright: © 2016 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Narrating Animal Trauma in Bulgakov and Tolstoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassiya Andrianova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the recent “animal turn” in literary studies, which has inspired scholars to revisit traditional human-centered interpretations of texts narrated by animals, this article focuses on the convergence of animal studies and trauma theory. It offers new animal-centered close readings of Tolstoy’s Strider and Bulgakov’s Heart of a Dog, paying attention to animal pain rather than seeing it, and the text as a whole, as an allegory of human society. Like many other authors of literary fiction featuring animal narrators, Tolstoy and Bulgakov employ a kind of empathic ventriloquism to narrate animal pain, an important project which, however, given the status of both the animal and trauma outside human language, and thus susceptible to being distorted by it, produces inauthentic discourse (animal-like, rather than animal narration; therefore, these authors get closest to animal pain, not through sophisticated narration, but through the use of ellipses and onomatopoeia. Ultimately, any narratological difficulty with animal focalization is minor compared to the ethical imperative of anti-speciesist animal-standpoint criticism, and the goal is to reconceive the status of animals in literature so as to change their ontological place in the world, urging that this critical work and animal rights advocacy be continued in the classroom.

  6. Trauma in Auckland: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streat, S J; Donaldson, M L; Judson, J A

    1987-07-22

    Data are presented on all 569 subjects who, as a result of trauma, either died or were admitted to hospital in Auckland over a four week period. Median age was 23 with an overall 3:2 male:female ratio. Median injury severity score (ISS) was five with 9% of subjects having an ISS of 16 or more (major trauma). Blunt trauma accounted for 84% of all injuries. Life threatening injuries were most commonly to the head, thorax and abdomen while the largest number of less severe injuries were to the extremities. Eight subjects died before admission to hospital and a further six in hospital. Definitive care was given to 98% of patients at Middlemore and Auckland hospitals (including the onsite Princess Mary paediatric facility) but 26% had presented first to other hospitals and 43% of all patients were transferred from one hospital to another. The 561 patients used 6380 hospital days (including 314 intensive care days) and the following services--operating room 63%, orthopaedic ward 45%, plastic surgical ward 17%, paediatric ward 15%, neurosurgical ward 10%, general surgical ward 5%, intensive care 5% and CT scanner 4%. Only one hospital death was judged potentially preventable. This study reveals areas where trauma care could be improved, demonstrates the large amount of hospital resources required to treat trauma and particularly highlights the urgent need for studies into strategies for trauma prevention in New Zealand.

  7. Endovascular interventions for multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinstner, C.; Funovics, M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years interventional radiology has significantly changed the management of injured patients with multiple trauma. Currently nearly all vessels can be reached within a reasonably short time with the help of specially preshaped catheters and guide wires to achieve bleeding control of arterial und venous bleeding. Whereas bleeding control formerly required extensive open surgery, current interventional methods allow temporary vessel occlusion (occlusion balloons), permanent embolization and stenting. In injured patients with multiple trauma preinterventional procedural planning is performed with the help of multidetector computed tomography whenever possible. Interventional radiology not only allows minimization of therapeutic trauma but also a considerably shorter treatment time. Interventional bleeding control has developed into a standard method in the management of vascular trauma of the chest and abdomen as well as in vascular injuries of the upper and lower extremities when open surgical access is associated with increased risk. Additionally, pelvic trauma, vascular trauma of the superior thoracic aperture and parenchymal arterial lacerations of organs that can be at least partially preserved are primarily managed by interventional methods. In an interdisciplinary setting interventional radiology provides a safe and efficient means of rapid bleeding control in nearly all vascular territories in addition to open surgical access. (orig.) [de

  8. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  9. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  10. Radiographic evaluation of hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of significant abdominal trauma continues to rise and accounts currently for approximately 10 percent of the annual 130,000 trauma-related deaths in the United States. Over 60 percent of patients are from 10 to 40 years of age, with a striking predominance of males. Children are mostly victims of blunt trauma, while some large reviews of liver trauma in adults show a prevalence of penetrating injuries. Injury to the liver is second only to the spleen in incidence of intraperitoneal injuries. Morbidity and mortality from hepatic trauma are related to the mechanism and extent of injury. Penetrating injuries generally have a lower mortality, about 5 percent, especially if they are due to stab wounds or low velocity gunshot wounds. Shotgun and high velocity gunshot wounds may cause massive fragmentation of the liver and are associated with proportionately greater mortality. The mortality from blunt trauma is from 15 to 45 percent in many large series. Death from isolated liver injury is uncommon, but is usually due to uncontrolled hemorrhage. Injury to other abdominal organs is associated in many cases, as are injuries to the head, chest, and limbs. The extraabdominal injuries are frequently more apparent clinically, but may mask potentially life-threatening abdominal visceral injuries

  11. Multiple trauma in children: critical care overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Randall C; Burns, R Cartland

    2002-11-01

    Multiple trauma is more than the sum of the injuries. Management not only of the physiologic injury but also of the pathophysiologic responses, along with integration of the child's emotional and developmental needs and the child's family, forms the basis of trauma care. Multiple trauma in children also elicits profound psychological responses from the healthcare providers involved with these children. This overview will address the pathophysiology of multiple trauma in children and the general principles of trauma management by an integrated trauma team. Trauma is a systemic disease. Multiple trauma stimulates the release of multiple inflammatory mediators. A lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy is the direct result of trauma and secondary injury from the systemic response to trauma. Controlling and responding to the secondary pathophysiologic sequelae of trauma is the cornerstone of trauma management in the multiply injured, critically ill child. Damage control surgery is a new, rational approach to the child with multiple trauma. The selection of children for damage control surgery depends on the severity of injury. Major abdominal vascular injuries and multiple visceral injuries are best considered for this approach. The effective management of childhood multiple trauma requires a combined team approach, consideration of the child and family, an organized trauma system, and an effective quality assurance and improvement mechanism.

  12. From betrayal to the bottle: investigating possible pathways from trauma to problematic substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Brianna C; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-10-01

    Research in both community and clinical settings has found that exposure to cumulative interpersonal trauma predicts substance use problems. Less is known about betrayal as a dimension of trauma exposure that predicts substance use, and about the behavioral and psychological pathways that explain the relation between trauma and substance use. In a sample of 362 young adults, this study evaluated three intervening pathways between betrayal trauma exposure prior to age 18 years and problematic substance use: (a) substance use to cope with negative affect, (b) difficulty discerning and/or heeding risk, and (c) self-destructiveness. In addition, exposure to trauma low in betrayal (e.g., earthquake) was included in the model. Bootstrap tests of indirect effects revealed that betrayal trauma prior to age 18 years was associated with problematic substance use via posttraumatic stress and two intervening pathways: difficulty discerning/heeding risk (β = .07, p trauma was not associated with posttraumatic stress or problematic substance use. Results contribute to a trauma-informed understanding of substance use that persists despite potentially harmful consequences. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  13. A Statewide Collaboration: Ohio Level III Trauma Centers' Approach to the Development of a Benchmarking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Carrie L; Simon, Diane; Kilgore, Jane

    The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma revised the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient to include the criteria for trauma centers to participate in a risk-adjusted benchmarking system. Trauma Quality Improvement Program is currently the risk-adjusted benchmarking program sponsored by the American College of Surgeons, which will be required of all trauma centers to participate in early 2017. Prior to this, there were no risk-adjusted programs for Level III verified trauma centers. The Ohio Society of Trauma Nurse Leaders is a collaborative group made up of trauma program managers, coordinators, and other trauma leaders who meet 6 times a year. Within this group, a Level III Subcommittee was formed initially to provide a place for the Level III centers to discuss issues specific to the Level III centers. When the new requirement regarding risk-adjustment became official, the subcommittee agreed to begin reporting simple data points with the idea to risk adjust in the future.

  14. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  15. Trauma and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, F

    1995-02-01

    The author suggests a particular reading of the thesis put forward by Freud in 'Analysis terminable and interminable' that an effective and more definitive conclusion may be expected in analyses of cases with traumatic aetiology. This reading shifts the emphasis from the patient's history to the possibility of its crystallising in focal nuclei emerging within the analytic relationship under the pressure of the termination. The revival of separation anxieties which cannot be worked through, and their crystallisation in precipitating traumatic events, may give rise to decisive psychic work allowing the analysis to be brought to a conclusion. Two case histories are presented to show how the end of the analysis assumes the form of a new trauma, which reactivates in the present, traumatic anxieties from the patient's own infantile history. In the first case a premature birth and in the second a miscarriage, originally experienced as isolated automatic events without time or history, are relived in the terminal phase as vicissitudes of the transference, so that new meaning can be assigned to them and they can be withdrawn from the somatic cycle of repetition. The powerful tendency to act out and the intense countertransference pressure on the analyst are discussed in the light of the specificities of this phase, which is crucial to the success of the analysis. This leads to a re-examination, in the concluding notes, of some theoretical questions inherent in the problem of the termination and, in particular, to a discussion of the ambiguous concept of a natural ending.

  16. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    It has been said that chronic subdural hematoma cannot be diagnosed by CT. In our cases, CT was used, and the results were described. According to the density of the picture, CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma could be classified into 3 types, those of higher density than that of the cerebral paranchyma, those of isodensity, and those of lower density than that of the cerebral parenchyma. The difference among them appeared to be due to variation in the fluid in hematoma, especially that in hemoglobin concentration. Chronic subdural hematoma was found in 27 of 388 cases of head trauma in which CT was undertaken in our department of surgery for last 2 years. It is difficult to differenciate this disease from subdural edema or subarachnoideal retention of the cerebrospinal fluid. In many cases, use of contrast medium added no change to the CT picture. Cerebral angiography is necessary for definite diagnosis of the disease. Chronic subdural hematoma gives more varieties of findings than other intracranial hematomas. However, if the film is very carefully read, CT is still useful for diagnosing this disease in spite of initially remarked difficulties. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  18. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  19. Systematic review of multidisciplinary rehabilitation in patients with multiple trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F; Amatya, B; Hoffman, K

    2012-01-01

    to prioritize trauma rehabilitation, disability management and social reintegration of multiple injury survivors are discussed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. INCIDENCE OF OCULAR TRAUMA IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN VISAKHAPATNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Madusudanarao Kanukollu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ocular trauma is a major cause of preventable ocular blindness in the world. The present available data represents the tip of iceberg. The data pertaining to ocular trauma is just hospital based data which does not accurately represent the population at risk. The ocular morbidity may be disproportionate to the severity of injury. Though eyes represent only 0.21% of body surface area and 4% of facial area, they are the third most common trauma exposed areas after hands and feet. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study group consisted of 341 patients who attended ophthalmology OPD with history of ocular trauma of whom 221 were males and 121 were females. The study was conducted over a period of one year. A complete anterior and posterior segment evaluation of all the patients was done. Other accessory ocular and systemic investigations wherever essential were done. RESULTS The ocular trauma was more common in males (64.52% predominantly affecting patients of 20-40 years age group (36.07%. Most often the injuries were occupation related (73.90% and the most common work related injury observed was extraocular foreign body in 134 patients (39.29%. Closed globe injuries were more common as compared to open globe injuries. Eyes with better visual acuity at presentation had better visual prognosis. Blinding trauma was observed in 29 patients (8.50%. CONCLUSION Ocular injuries are more commonly occupation related and mostly effect young males who are the main work force of our society. Stringent implementation of preventive norms in industries to all the workers and safety precautions during sports, driving need to be enforced.

  1. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  2. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years

  3. History of the Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum...... Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long...

  4. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) Contouring Atlas and Planning Guidelines for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Michael; Leong, Trevor; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Wiltshire, Kirsty; Ngan, Samuel; Kachnic, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a high-resolution target volume atlas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning guidelines for the conformal treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A draft contouring atlas and planning guidelines for anal cancer IMRT were prepared at the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) annual meeting in September 2010. An expert panel of radiation oncologists contoured an anal cancer case to generate discussion on recommendations regarding target definition for gross disease, elective nodal volumes, and organs at risk (OARs). Clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins, dose fractionation, and other IMRT-specific issues were also addressed. A steering committee produced the final consensus guidelines. Results: Detailed contouring and planning guidelines and a high-resolution atlas are provided. Gross tumor and elective target volumes are described and pictorially depicted. All elective regions should be routinely contoured for all disease stages, with the possible exception of the inguinal and high pelvic nodes for select, early-stage T1N0. A 20-mm CTV margin for the primary, 10- to 20-mm CTV margin for involved nodes and a 7-mm CTV margin for the elective pelvic nodal groups are recommended, while respecting anatomical boundaries. A 5- to 10-mm PTV margin is suggested. When using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions to gross disease and 45 Gy to elective nodes with chemotherapy is appropriate. Guidelines are provided for OAR delineation. Conclusion: These consensus planning guidelines and high-resolution atlas complement the existing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) elective nodal ano-rectal atlas and provide additional anatomic, clinical, and technical instructions to guide radiation oncologists in the planning and delivery of IMRT for anal cancer.

  6. Perioperative management of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients with pituitary adenomas: an Australasian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, S P; Ho, J T; Doogue, M P; Burt, M G

    2012-10-01

    There is limited consensus regarding optimal glucocorticoid administration for pituitary surgery to prevent a potential adrenal crisis. To assess the investigation and management of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients undergoing trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy in Australasia. A questionnaire was sent to one endocrinologist at each of 18 centres performing pituitary surgery in Australasia. Using hypothetical case vignettes, respondents were asked to describe their investigation and management of the HPA axis for a patient with a: non-functioning macroadenoma and intact HPA axis, non-functioning macroadenoma and HPA deficiency and growth hormone secreting microadenoma undergoing trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. Responses were received from all 18 centres. Seventeen centres assess the HPA axis preoperatively by measuring early morning cortisol or a short synacthen test. Preoperative evaluation of the HPA status influenced glucocorticoid prescription by 10 centres, including 2/18 who would not prescribe perioperative glucocorticoids for a patient with a macroadenoma and an intact HPA axis. Tumour size influenced glucocorticoid prescribing patterns at 7/18 centres who prescribe a lower dose or no glucocorticoids for a patient with a microadenoma. Choice of investigations for definitive postoperative assessment of the HPA axis varied with eight centres requesting an insulin tolerance test, four centres a 250 µg short synacthen test and six centres requesting other tests. There is wide variability in the investigation and management of perioperative glucocorticoid requirements for patients undergoing pituitary surgery in Australasia. This may reflect limited evidence to define optimal management and that further well-designed studies are needed. © 2011 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis supports a Gondwanan origin of the Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) and the paraphyly of Australasian taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Daniel L; Jones, Hugh; Geneva, Anthony J; Pfeiffer, John M; Klunzinger, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater mussel family Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) has a disjunct trans-Pacific distribution in Australasia and South America. Previous phylogenetic analyses have estimated the evolutionary relationships of the family and the major infra-familial taxa (Velesunioninae and Hyriinae: Hyridellini in Australia; Hyriinae: Hyriini, Castaliini, and Rhipidodontini in South America), but taxon and character sampling have been too incomplete to support a predictive classification or allow testing of biogeographical hypotheses. We sampled 30 freshwater mussel individuals representing the aforementioned hyriid taxa, as well as outgroup species representing the five other freshwater mussel families and their marine sister group (order Trigoniida). Our ingroup included representatives of all Australian genera. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated from three gene fragments (nuclear 28S, COI and 16S mtDNA) using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference, and we applied a Bayesian relaxed clock model calibrated with fossil dates to estimate node ages. Our analyses found good support for monophyly of the Hyriidae and the subfamilies and tribes, as well as the paraphyly of the Australasian taxa (Velesunioninae, (Hyridellini, (Rhipidodontini, (Castaliini, Hyriini)))). The Hyriidae was recovered as sister to a clade comprised of all other Recent freshwater mussel families. Our molecular date estimation supported Cretaceous origins of the major hyriid clades, pre-dating the Tertiary isolation of South America from Antarctica/Australia. We hypothesize that early diversification of the Hyriidae was driven by terrestrial barriers on Gondwana rather than marine barriers following disintegration of the super-continent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial: a multicentre randomised study comparing indwelling pleural catheter versus talc pleurodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Edward T H; Thomas, Rajesh; Read, Catherine A; Lam, Ben C H; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Lee, Pyng; Piccolo, Francesco; Shrestha, Ranjan; Garske, Luke A; Lam, David C L; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Bint, Michael; Murray, Kevin; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusion can complicate most cancers. It causes breathlessness and requires hospitalisation for invasive pleural drainages. Malignant effusions often herald advanced cancers and limited prognosis. Minimising time spent in hospital is of high priority to patients and their families. Various treatment strategies exist for the management of malignant effusions, though there is no consensus governing the best choice. Talc pleurodesis is the conventional management but requires hospitalisation (and substantial healthcare resources), can cause significant side effects, and has a suboptimal success rate. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) allow ambulatory fluid drainage without hospitalisation, and are increasingly employed for management of malignant effusions. Previous studies have only investigated the length of hospital care immediately related to IPC insertion. Whether IPC management reduces time spent in hospital in the patients’ remaining lifespan is unknown. A strategy of malignant effusion management that reduces hospital admission days will allow patients to spend more time outside hospital, reduce costs and save healthcare resources. Methods and analysis The Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial is a multicentred, randomised trial designed to compare IPC with talc pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion. This study will randomise 146 adults with malignant pleural effusions (1:1) to IPC management or talc slurry pleurodesis. The primary end point is the total number of days spent in hospital (for any admissions) from treatment procedure to death or end of study follow-up. Secondary end points include hospital days specific to pleural effusion management, adverse events, self-reported symptom and quality-of-life scores. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study as have the ethics boards of all the participating hospitals. The

  9. Society-ethics-risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruh, H.; Seiler, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the workshops which was reported in this volume, was the interpretation and evaluation of catastrophic risks for society in an interdisciplinary dialogue between representation of society, ethics, as well as natural science and technology. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  10. European Respiratory Society statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Dirksen, Asger; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    lung disease. A large proportion of individuals affected remain undiagnosed and therefore without access to appropriate care and treatment.The most recent international statement on AATD was published by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society in 2003. Since then there has...

  11. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  12. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  13. Transformation of Neolithic Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rune

    and prepared the way for the appearance of Bronze Age societies. The great era of megalithic architecture came to an end as the production and exchange of gold, copper and bronze objects became the driving force in the development of Copper and Bronze Age societies. This development also had a great influence...

  14. Trauma, forgiveness and the witnessing dance: making public spaces intimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobodo-Madikizela, Pumla

    2008-04-01

    In this paper I explore the concept of forgiveness as a response to gross human rights violations. I present a conceptual examination of the effects of massive trauma in relation to what I refer to as the 'unfinished business' of trauma. Using a psychoanalytic framework, I consider the process of 'bearing witness' about trauma and examine how this process opens up the possibility of reciprocal expressions of empathy between victim and perpetrator. I then argue that, in this context of trauma testimony and witnessing, empathy is essential for the development of remorse on the part of perpetrators, and of forgiveness on the part of victims. Using a case study from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) I clarify the relationship between empathy and forgiveness, and show how the restorative model of the TRC can open up an ethical space and create the possibility of transformation for victims, perpetrators and bystanders. In my conclusion I suggest that forgiveness in politics is the only action that holds promise for the repair of brokenness in post-conflict societies, particularly if, as in South Africa, victims have to live together with perpetrators and beneficiaries in the same country.

  15. The scientific production in trauma of an emerging country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraga Gustavo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aims to examine whether the end of specialty in trauma surgery in 2003 influenced the scientific productivity of the area in Brazil. Methods We identified and classified the manuscripts and their authors, from databases such as PubMed, Scielo and Plataforma Lattes and sites like Google, in addition to the list of members of SBAIT, the sole society in Brazil to congregate surgeons involved in trauma care in the country. We applied statistical tests to compare the periods of 1997-2003 and 2004-2010. We also analyzed the following variables: impact factor of journals in which manuscripts were published, journals, regional origin of authors, time since graduation, and conducting post-doctorate abroad. Results We observed a significant increase in publication rates of the analyzed groups over the years. There was a predominance of quantitative studies from the Southeast (especially the state of São Paulo. More time elapsed after graduation and the realization of postdoctoral studies abroad influenced the individual scientific productivity. Conclusion The number of articles published by authors from the area of trauma has been growing over the past 14 years in Brazil. The end of the specialty in trauma surgery in the country did not influence the scientific productivity in the area.

  16. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiological aspects, behavior, morbidity and treatment outcomes for liver trauma. We conducted a retrospective study of patients over 13 years of age admitted to a university hospital from 1990 to 2010, submitted to surgery or nonoperative management (NOM). 748 patients were admitted with liver trauma. The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma (461 cases, 61.6%), blunt trauma occurring in 287 patients (38.4%). According to the degree of liver injury (AAST-OIS) in blunt trauma we predominantly observed Grades I and II and in penetrating trauma, Grade III. NOM was performed in 25.7% of patients with blunt injury. As for surgical procedures, suturing was performed more frequently (41.2%). The liver-related morbidity was 16.7%. The survival rate for patients with liver trauma was 73.5% for blunt and 84.2% for penetrating trauma. Mortality in complex trauma was 45.9%. trauma remains more common in younger populations and in males. There was a reduction of penetrating liver trauma. NOM proved safe and effective, and often has been used to treat patients with penetrating liver trauma. Morbidity was high and mortality was higher in victims of blunt trauma and complex liver injuries.

  17. Management of Acute Skin Trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joel W. Beam

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute skin trauma (ie, abrasions, avulsions, blisters, incisions, lacerations, and punctures) is common among individuals involved in work, recreational, and athletic activities. Appropriate management of these wounds is important to promote healing and lessen the risk of cross-contamination and infection. Wound management techniques have undergone significant changes in the past 40 years but many clinicians continue to manage acute skin trauma with long-established, traditional techniques (ie, use of hydrogen peroxide, adhesive strips/patches, sterile gauze, or no dressing) that can delay healing and increase the risk of infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss evidence-based cleansing, debridement, and dressing techniques for the management of acute skin trauma.

  18. Temporal bone trauma and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, K.; Czerny, C.; Wunderbaldinger, P.; Steiner, E.

    1997-01-01

    Fractures of the temporal bone result from direct trauma to the temporal bone or occur as one component of a severe craniocerebral injury. Complications of temporal trauma are hemotympanon, facial nerve paralysis, conductive or sensorineur hearing loss, and leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Erly recognition and an appropiate therapy may improve or prevent permanent deficits related to such complications. Only 20-30% of temporal bone fractures can be visualized by plain films. CT has displaced plain radiography in the investigation of the otological trauma because subtle bony details are best evaluated by CT which even can be reformatted in multiple projections, regardless of the original plane of scanning. Associated epidural, subdural, and intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions are better defined by MRI. (orig.) [de

  19. Cerebral infarcts resulting from trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, G.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular occlusions due to cerebral trauma have always been regarded as great rarities. However, we have found hypo-dense foci of vascular distribution in 3.5% of 3500 CT examinations for trauma during the late phase. Lesions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery are usually the result of supratentorial pressure rise from epidural and subdural haematomas, leading to compression of the vessels against the edge of the tentorium. Typical infacts in the territory of the medial and anterior cerebral arteries were found only rarely by CT after cerebral trauma. Infarcts at the watersheds between the three vascular territories were found with surprising frequency and small infarcts were found in the basal ganglia. It is assumed that these were due to ischaemic or hypoxic events due to cardiac or pulmonary complications during the initial phase. (orig.) [de

  20. Rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair: A work of the Commission Rehabilitation of the German Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery e. V. (DVSE) in collaboration with the German Association for Physiotherapy (ZVK) e. V., the Association Physical Therapy, Association for Physical Professions (VPT) e. V. and the Section Rehabilitation-Physical Therapy of the German Society for Orthopaedics and Trauma e. V. (DGOU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian; Tepohl, Lena; Tholen, Reina; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Gottfried, Thomas; Grim, Casper; Mauch, Bettina; Krischak, Gert; Ortmann, Hans; Schoch, Christian; Mauch, Frieder

    2018-01-01

    Tears and lesions of the rotator cuff are a frequent cause of shoulder pain and disability. Surgical repair of the rotator cuff is a valuable procedure to improve shoulder function and decrease pain. However, there is no consensus concerning the rehabilitation protocol following surgery. To review and evaluate current rehabilitation contents and protocols after rotator cuff repair by reviewing the existing scientific literature and providing an overview of the clinical practice of selected German Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery e. V. (DVSE) shoulder experts. A literature search for the years 2004-2014 was conducted in relevant databases and bibliographies including the Guidelines International Network, National Guidelines, PubMed, Cochrane CentralRegister of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. In addition, 63 DVSE experts were contacted via online questionnaire. A total of 17 studies, four reviews and one guideline fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Based on these results and the obtained expert opinions, a four-phase rehabilitation protocol could be developed.

  1. Perioperative care of a pregnant trauma victim: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... (until proven otherwise) in any female trauma patient of child- ... The perioperative management of pregnant trauma victims re- ... trauma, abdominal trauma, head injury, cervical spine injury, fetal injury, gun shot wounds, blunt.

  2. Trauma from a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Trauma from widespread collective violence such as genocide and ethnic cleansing has not been discussed from a global perspective. It will be argued that the Western medical model of diagnostic labeling is inadequate for understanding victims of collective violence from around the world. Phenomenology and liberation philosophy will be discussed as alternatives to understanding trauma from collective violence that move beyond the Western medical model of diagnostic labeling. The insights gained from these alternative approaches will contribute to the development of nursing education, research, and practice relevant to the health of victims of collective violence around the globe.

  3. Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach. Some experts have begun to ... The psychosocial approach is an alternative way of thinking about trauma following political violence. ... Date de début.

  4. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury

  5. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  6. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  7. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  8. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? A prospective observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Sorensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. METHODS: Observational study at a single Level I Trauma Centre. Inclusion of 80 adult trauma patients ([greater than or equal to]18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team...

  9. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. METHODS: We

  10. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; van Achterberg, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods: We

  11. External validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for early prediction of mortality in trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base excess, and

  12. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base

  13. The role of the trauma nurse leader in a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Lee Ann; Coffey, Carla; Haley, Kathy; Covert, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The trauma nurse leader role was developed by a group of trauma surgeons, hospital administrators, and emergency department and trauma leaders at Nationwide Children's Hospital who recognized the need for the development of a core group of nurses who provided expert trauma care. The intent was to provide an experienced group of nurses who could identify and resolve issues in the trauma room. Through increased education, exposure, mentoring, and professional development, the trauma nurse leader role has become an essential part of the specialized pediatric trauma care provided at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

  14. Triage and mortality in 2875 consecutive trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Rikke; Thomsen, A B; Abildstrøm, H

    2010-01-01

    Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage.......Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage....

  15. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  16. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  17. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the AES Annual Meeting. More info here . Epilepsy Currents American Epilepsy Society Journal Impact Factor More ... P450 enzyme overexpression during spontaneous recurrent seizures More Epilepsy Professional News AES Status Epilepticus guideline for treatment ...

  18. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join Now International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development ... nurses in the art and science of pediatric endocrinology nursing. Learn More Text1 2018 PENS Call for ...

  19. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  20. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  1. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apply for Membership Membership Directory Pay Your Dues Industry Mailing List License & eBlast Communications Programs Advertise on ... Hotel Discount Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. ...

  2. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  3. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  4. Addressing Trauma in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Amanda L.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Stamman, Julia; Callahan, Molly M.; Loseu, Sahar; Bevly, Cynthia M.; Cross, Kaitlin; Woehler, Elliott S.; Calzada, Richard-Michael R.; Chadwell, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is prevalent among clients with substance abuse issues, yet addictions counselors' training in trauma approaches is limited. The purpose of the current article is to provide pertinent information regarding trauma treatment including the use of assessments, empirically supported clinical approaches, self-help groups and the risk of vicarious…

  5. Decolonizing Trauma Theory : Retrospect and Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Decolonizing trauma theory has been a major project in postcolonial literary scholarship ever since its first sustained engagements with trauma theory. Since then, trauma theory and postcolonial literary studies have been uneasy bedfellows, and the time has now come to take stock of what remains in

  6. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed

  7. Helpers in Distress: Preventing Secondary Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Natasha; Kanter, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Those in close contact with trauma survivors are themselves at risk for trauma (e.g., Bride, 2007; Figley, 1995). Family, friends, and professionals who bear witness to the emotional retelling and re-enacting of traumatic events can experience what is called "secondary trauma" (Elwood, Mott, Lohr, & Galovski, 2011). The literature…

  8. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  9. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Oyama, Kosuke

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  10. Historia y trauma colectivo: Límites, usos y abusos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pérez Baquero

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the next pages I will design an analysis regarding the implications that the notion of trauma may have in relation to the evolution of the development of societies. I will offer a critical review of the contemporary theories regarding collective trauma from Cathy Caruth, Frank Ankersmitt, Wulf Kansteiner and Dominick Lacapra, in order to give an account of the limits of the transference of this category from the clinical to the social field. Consequently, I will refer to both epistemological and ethic-political issues. The last ones are especially relevant since by studying them it will be possible to explain and discredit the political use and abuse of the symbolic content that comes from traumatic experiences.

  11. Pain relief after musculoskeletal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmerhorst, G.T.T.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis showed that, in spite of seemingly similar nociception (pathophysiology), there are substantial cultural differences in experiencing and managing pain after surgery of musculoskeletal trauma. The United States and Canada are in the midst of a crisis of opioid use, misuse, overdose, and

  12. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  13. Radiology of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture.

  14. Combined trauma in peaceful time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaika V.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article epidemiological features of combined trauma (CT, characteristic for the industrial region were summarized. 486 cases of CT were analyzed for the period from 2010 to 2012. Male patients dominated. 267 (54.9% patients were the age from 25 to 44 years. Most often the damage occurred in 2 anatomic regions (AR - 224 (46.1%, 3 AR - 177 (36.4% and 4 or more - 85 (17.5%. Trau¬matic brain injury - 94.2%, skeletal trauma - 70.6%, the trauma of the chest and abdomen - 68.4% and 35.7%, respectively prevailed. Injury of the abdominal cavity as a dominant one - 148 (30.5% occupied the first place. In 17 (3.5% cases it was impossible to establish the dominant damage. Mortality rate was directly dependent on the type of the trauma and patient's age. Maximum values were found in the combined brain injury and that of abdominal organs - 28.6%, as well as in the group of patients older than 60 years - 35.1%. From 2010 to 2012 the overall mortality decreased by 3.5%.

  15. The Role of Cumulative Trauma, Betrayal, and Appraisals in Understanding Trauma Symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni; DePrince, Anne P.; Freyd, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor psychological outcomes are common among trauma survivors, yet not all survivors experience adverse sequelae. The current study examined links between cumulative trauma exposure as a function of the level of betrayal (measured by the relational closeness of the survivor and the perpetrator), trauma appraisals, gender, and trauma symptoms. Participants were 273 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event on a trauma checklist. Three cumulative indices were const...

  16. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Mauritz, Maria W.; Goossens, Peter J.J.; Draijer, Nel; Achterberg, Theo van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice.Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980-2010) and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and traumarelated dis...

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  18. 2013 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly star maps, diagrams and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to determine when the Sun, Moon and planets will rise and set throughout the year. Also included is information on the latest astronomical findings from space probes and telescopes around the world. The Sky guide has been published annually by the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, since 1991. It is recommended for photogr

  19. 2012 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly star maps, diagrams and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to determine when the Sun, Moon and planets will rise and set throughout the year. Also included is information on the latest astronomical findings from space probes and telescopes around the world.

  20. Current approach to liver traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Levent; Kurt, Necmi; Sikar, Hasan Ediz

    2017-03-01

    Liver injuries remain major obstacle for successful treatment, due to size and location of the liver. Requirement for surgery should be determined by clinical factors, most notably hemodynamical state. In this present study we tried to declare our approach to liver traumas. We also tried to emphasize the importance of conservative treatment, since surgeries for liver traumas carry high mortality rates. Patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Surgery at Kartal Research and Education Hospital, due to liver trauma were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Patient demographics, hepatic panel, APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), PT (prothrombin time), INR (international normalized ratio), fibrinogen, biochemistry panel were recorded. Hemodynamic instability was the most prominent factor for surgery decision, in the lead of current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Operation records and imaging modalities revealed liver injuries according to the Organ Injury Scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. 300 patients admitted to emergency department were included in our study (187 males and 113 females). Mean age was 47 years (range, 12-87). The overall mortality rate was 13% (40 out of 300). Major factor responsible for mortality rates and outcome was stability of cases on admission. 188 (% 63) patients were counted as stable, whereas 112 (% 37) cases were found unstable (blood pressure ≤ 90, after massive resuscitation). 192 patients were observed conservatively, whereas 108 cases received abdominal surgery. High levels of AST, ALT, LDH, INR, creatinine and low levels of fibrinogen and low platelet counts on admission were found to be associated with mortality and these cases also had Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Hemodynamic instability on admission and the type and grade of injury played major role in mortality rates). Packing was performed in 35 patients, with Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Mortality rate was %13 (40

  1. Post-Eocene climate change across continental Australia and the diversification of Australasian spiny trapdoor spiders (Idiopidae: Arbanitinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Michael G; Cooper, Steven J B; Meusemann, Karen; Klopfstein, Seraina; Harrison, Sophie E; Harvey, Mark S; Austin, Andrew D

    2017-04-01

    The formation and spread of the Australian arid zone during the Neogene was a profoundly transformative event in the biogeographic history of Australia, resulting in extinction or range contraction in lineages adapted to mesic habitats, as well as diversification and range expansion in arid-adapted taxa (most of which evolved from mesic ancestors). However, the geographic origins of the arid zone biota are still relatively poorly understood, especially among highly diverse invertebrate lineages, many of which are themselves poorly documented at the species level. Spiny trapdoor spiders (Idiopidae: Arbanitinae) are one such lineage, having mesic 'on-the-continent' Gondwanan origins, while also having experienced major arid zone radiations in select clades. In this study, we present new orthologous nuclear markers for the phylogenetic inference of mygalomorph spiders, and use them to infer the phylogeny of Australasian Idiopidae with a 12-gene parallel tagged amplicon next-generation sequencing approach. We use these data to test the mode and timing of diversification of arid-adapted idiopid lineages across mainland Australia, and employ a continent-wide sampling of the fauna's phylogenetic and geographic diversity to facilitate ancestral area inference. We further explore the evolution of phenotypic and behavioural characters associated with both arid and mesic environments, and test an 'out of south-western Australia' hypothesis for the origin of arid zone clades. Three lineages of Idiopidae are shown to have diversified in the arid zone during the Miocene, one (genus Euoplos) exclusively in Western Australia. Arid zone Blakistonia likely had their origins in South Australia, whereas in the most widespread genus Aganippe, a more complex scenario is evident, with likely range expansion from southern Western Australia to southern South Australia, from where the bulk of the arid zone fauna then originated. In Aganippe, remarkable adaptations to phragmotic burrow

  2. Emerging treatment strategies for trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, B; Fries, D

    2012-01-01

    Trauma-induced coagulopathy has a multifactorial aetiology. Coagulopathy is related to blood loss including consumption of clotting factors and platelets and haemodilution. Additionally hyperfibrinolysis, hypothermia, acidosis and metabolic changes affect the coagulation system. This is a review of pathophysiology and new treatment strategies for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Paradigms are actively changing and there is still a shortage of data. The aim of any haemostatic therapy is to control bleeding and minimize blood loss and transfusion requirements. Transfusion of allogeneic blood products as well as trauma-induced coagulopathy cause increased morbidity and mortality. Current opinion is based on present studies and results from small case series, combined with findings from experimental studies in animals, in vitro studies and expert opinions, as opposed to large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies. A summary of new and emerging strategies, including medical infusion and blood products, to beneficially manipulate the coagulation system in the critically injured patient is suggested. Future treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy may be based on systemic antifibrinolytics, local haemostatics and individualized point-of-care-guided rational use of coagulation factor concentrates such as fibrinogen, prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant factor VIIa and factor XIII. The authors speculate that timely and rational use of coagulation factor concentrates will be more efficacious and safer than ratio-driven use of transfusion packages of allogeneic blood products. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  4. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    OBJETIVO: avaliar os aspectos epidemiológicos, conduta, morbidade e resultados do tratamento trauma hepático. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de doentes com mais de 13 anos de idade admitidos em um hospital universitário de 1990 a 2010, submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico ou não operatório (TNO). RESULTADOS: foram admitidos 748 pacientes com trauma hepático. O mecanismo de trauma mais frequente foi o trauma penetrante (461 casos; 61,6%). O trauma fechado ocorreu em 287 pacientes (38,4%). De acor...

  5. TraumaNetzwerk DGU(®): optimizing patient flow and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchholtz, Steffen; Lewan, Ulrike; Debus, Florian; Mand, Carsten; Siebert, Hartmut; Kühne, Christian A

    2014-10-01

    Caring for severely injured trauma patients is challenging for all medical professionals involved both in the preclinical and in the clinical course of treatment. While the overall quality of care in Germany is high there still are significant regional differences remaining. Reasons are geographical and infrastructural differences as well as variations in personnel and equipment of the hospitals. To improve state-wide trauma care the German Trauma Society (DGU) initiated the TraumaNetzwerk DGU(®) (TNW) project. The TNW is based on five major components: (a) Whitebook for the treatment of severely injured patients; (b) evidence-based guidelines for the medical care of severe injury; (c) local auditing of participating hospitals; (d) contract of interhospital cooperation; (d) TraumaRegister DGU(®) documentation. By the end of 2013, 644 German Trauma Centres (TC) had successfully passed the audit. To that date 44 regional TNWs with a mean of 13.5 TCs had been established and certified. The TNWs cover approximately 90% of the country's surface. Of those hospitals, 2.3 were acknowledged as Supraregional TC, 5.4 as Regional TC and 6.7 as Lokal TC. Moreover, cross border TNW in cooperation with hospitals in The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Switzerland and Austria have been established. Preparing for the audit 66% of the hospitals implemented organizational changes (e.g. TraumaRegister DGU(®) documentation and interdisciplinary guidelines), while 60% introduced personnel and 21% structural (e.g. X-ray in the ER) changes. The TraumaNetzwerk DGU(®) project combines the control of common defined standards of care for all participating hospitals (top down) and the possibility of integrating regional cooperation by forming a regional TNW (bottom up). Based on the joint approach of healthcare professionals, it is possible to structure and influence the care of severely injured patients within a nationwide trauma system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender differences among recidivist trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Rita O; Cureton, Elizabeth L; Dozier, Kristopher C; Victorino, Gregory P

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences among trauma recidivist patients are not well-understood. We hypothesized that males are more likely to be repeatedly involved in the trauma system and have a shorter time to recurrence between repeat episodes of injury compared with females. A retrospective analysis of trauma patients treated at an urban university-based trauma center was performed. Variables including gender, race, insurance status, age, mechanism of injury, outcomes, and injury secondary to domestic violence were compared. Differences were compared using χ(2) tests and log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Kaplan-Meier cumulative event curves. We identified 689 trauma recidivist patients (4.0% of all trauma visits) over a 10-y period. Compared to single-visit patients, recidivist patients were more likely to be male (87% versus 73%), uninsured (78% versus 66%), and have injuries secondary to assaults (54% versus 37%) (P trauma visit was shorter for females compared with males (23 ± 2.5 versus 30 ± 1.2 mo, P trauma than were male recidivists (69% versus 43%, P trauma patients have a much shorter time to recurrence for a second traumatic injury than do males. Female recidivists have a high likelihood of assault-associated injuries and domestic violence. Trauma centers should screen for domestic violence among trauma patients to aid in preventing further repeat episodes of injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  8. Society and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsios, Stavros

    in Europe. Elaborating on the Castoriadian ontology, the book delves into the magma of social imaginary significations that characterise and associate pivotal epochs of the continent’s history, Classical Greece and Modernity, and exemplifies their incarnation in educational systems and in the formation...... countries. Nevertheless, as Moutsios suggests, the European tradition, notwithstanding its ideological usage by much of social sciences, contains an indissoluble critical and self-reflective dimension, which needs to be sustained and advanced in education and its cross-cultural comparison, perhaps, more......'Society and Education: An Outline of Comparison' explores the relation of society to education in Europe, as well as its comparative perspective towards overseas societies and their institutions. It is an enquiry into the social-historical institution of education and cross-cultural studies...

  9. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes...... and social cohesion, as well as a provider of welfare services from a welfare state in dire straits. However, such a view upholds a sharp distinction between the three sectors and their distinct logic. This article claims that the separation of spheres is a fundamental part of our ‘social imaginary......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...

  10. Adrenal trauma: Elvis Presley Memorial Trauma Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrazin, Reza; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kincade, Matthew C; Thomas, Adam C; Gold, Robert; Wake, Robert W

    2007-11-01

    Adrenal gland injury is a potentially devastating event if unrecognized in the treatment course of a trauma patient. We reviewed our single-center experience and outcomes in patients with adrenal gland trauma. We performed a retrospective review of all patients presenting with trauma to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis who had adrenal gland injuries from January 1991 through March 2006. Each chart was reviewed with attention to the demographics, associated injuries, complications, and outcomes. Patients were stratified into two subgroups according to age (35 years or younger and older than 35 years) to allow for an age-based comparison between the two groups. Of 58,000 patients presenting with trauma, 130 (0.22%) were identified with adrenal injuries, of which 8 (6.2%) were isolated and 122 (93.8%) were not. Of these 130 patients, 125 (96.2%) had their injury diagnosed by computed tomography and 5 (3.8%) had their injury diagnosed during exploratory laparotomy. Right-sided injuries predominated (78.5%), with six (4.6%) bilateral. Four patients (3.1%) underwent adrenalectomy. Seven patients (5.4%) with adrenal injuries died. One patient (0.77%) required chronic steroid therapy. Patients older than 35 years were more likely to have complications such as deep venous thrombosis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Patient age of 35 years or younger was associated with a significantly increased incidence of liver lacerations. Adrenal gland injury is uncommon, although mostly associated with greater injury severity. Although adding to morbidity, most are self-limited and do not require intervention.

  11. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  12. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  13. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  14. Research in trauma surgery: from design to execution : The construction of an RCT and methodological considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeeing, D.P.J.

    2018-01-01

    Ankle fractures are the most common lower extremity fractures. The main causes of ankle fractures are minor trauma and sports, which are typical injuries for individuals in their working age. As such, ankle fractures have high impact on both individual patients and society. Due to the occupational

  15. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  16. The Mediated Transparent Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Lise

    2001-01-01

    in the mediated transparent society. The paper concludes that, based on these analyses, the mediated panopticism working on the business segment is not an effective disciplinary apparatus, which can guarantee that business corporations are carrying out important ecological or ethical improvements....

  17. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be the exclusive property of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society which in its sole discretion may use this material as it sees fit. I agree to the terms of the Standard Photography Release.* Submit * This field is required * Please fix the validation error messages in the Form Your story was ...

  18. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  19. Exploratory of society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederman, L.-E.; Conte, R.; Helbing, D.; Nowak, A.; Schweitzer, F.; Vespignani, A.

    2012-11-01

    A huge flow of quantitative social, demographic and behavioral data is becoming available that traces the activities and interactions of individuals, social patterns, transportation infrastructures and travel fluxes. This has caused, together with innovative computational techniques and methods for modeling social actions in hybrid (natural and artificial) societies, a qualitative change in the ways we model socio-technical systems. For the first time, society can be studied in a comprehensive fashion that addresses social and behavioral complexity. In other words we are in the position to envision the development of large data and computational cyber infrastructure defining an exploratory of society that provides quantitative anticipatory, explanatory and scenario analysis capabilities ranging from emerging infectious disease to conflict and crime surges. The goal of the exploratory of society is to provide the basic infrastructure embedding the framework of tools and knowledge needed for the design of forecast/anticipatory/crisis management approaches to socio technical systems, supporting future decision making procedures by accelerating the scientific cycle that goes from data generation to predictions.

  20. Italian Society of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The abstracts of most of the papers read at the 53 National Congress of the Italian Society of Physics are presented. The Congress developed in ten sessions: high energy and elementary particle physics, physics of nuclei, condensed matter, quantum electronics, cosmic physics, geophysics, general physics, electronics and applied physics, health physics and hystory of physics. An author index is also included

  1. The Duplex Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Alvin L.

    1984-01-01

    The duplex society, in which the poor live in close proximity to others but in a separate compartment, is already with us. Unless something deeply changes about family income, more than one-third of future generations will come to adulthood having spent a portion of their childhood in official poverty. (RM)

  2. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...

  3. Pearls of mandibular trauma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Feldman, Evan M; Chike-Obi, Chuma J; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2010-11-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbidities. Whereas general principles guide the management of the majority of injuries, special consideration must be paid to the edentulous patient, complex and comminuted fractures, and pediatric patients. These topics are discussed in this article, with a special emphasis on pearls of mandibular trauma management.

  4. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  5. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children

  6. Evaluation of trauma service orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Orientation of residents to clinical services may be criticized as cumbersome, dull, and simplytoo much information. With the mandated resident-hour restrictions, the question arose: Do residents perceive the orientation to our trauma service as worthwhile? Residents attend a standardized orientation lecture on the first day of the rotation. Three weeks later, an eight-item, five-point Likert-scale survey is distributed to assess the residents' perceptions of the value of the orientation. Responses to each item were examined. Fifty-four (92%) of the residents completed the questionnaire between September 2005 and August 2006. Most indicated that orientation was helpful (85%), the Trauma Resuscitation DVD was informative (82%), the review of procedures was helpful (82%), and the instructor's knowledge was adequate (94%). Most (92%) disagreed with the statement that orientation should not be offered. Careful attention to orientation content and format is important to the perception that the orientation is worthwhile.

  7. Pediatric considerations in craniofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bernadette L

    2014-08-01

    In many respects, craniofacial trauma in children is akin to that in adults. The appearance of fractures and associated injuries is frequently similar. However, the frequencies of different types of fractures and patterns of injury in younger children vary depending on the age of the child. In addition, there are unique aspects that must be considered when imaging the posttraumatic pediatric face. Some of these are based on normal growth and development of the skull base and craniofacial structures, and others on the varying etiologies and mechanisms of craniofacial injury in children, such as injuries related to toppled furniture, nonaccidental trauma, all-terrain vehicle accidents, and impalement injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation protection and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skryabin, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The radiological protection of population, living on the contaminated territories, is actual 10 years after the Chernobyl accident. Eventually, the whole system of countermeasures application is aimed to protect society as a complex community of individuals . The variety of levels of society, i.e. family, settlement on the whole, can be considered as certain harmonic systems differing in their public consciousness levels and lifestyles, this explain the difference in their 'behaviour' in terms of radiation protection and attitude to the information obtained. Each level of society possesses a certain degree of liberty of choice, that finally influence the magnitude and the character of dose distribution within certain population groups. In general, the dose distribution in the settlement can be explained only on the bases of 'family' analysis. This concerns the rural settlement as a society too. All rural settlement can be divided into two or three classes: with low, high and intermediate social features. Small settlements (< 100 persons), where the advanced in age persons with low material income and high degree of natural economy are applied to the first class. This results in higher doses (2-3 fold), than in the settlements with higher social level. The analysis shows that in socially 'waning' settlements the countermeasures are less efficient and the term of their action is shorter. (this class is the largest, About 50% among all the rural settlements). Due to the deterioration of the economic situation in the Republic of Belarus after 1991-1992 resulted in the increase of doses mainly in the habitants first of all of this class of settlements. It seems problematic to increase countermeasures efficiency in this class of settlements without the refuse of the accustomed lifestyle and radical improvement of social-demographic and economic conditions. The present material shows the necessity of the differential approach based on 'society-analysis' in the

  9. Incremental cost-effectiveness of trauma service improvements for road trauma casualties: experience of an Australian major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Michael M; Bein, Kendall J; Hendrie, Delia; Gabbe, Belinda; Byrne, Christopher M; Ivers, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of trauma service funding enhancements at an inner city major trauma centre. Methods The present study was a cost-effectiveness analysis using retrospective trauma registry data of all major trauma patients (injury severity score >15) presenting after road trauma between 2001 and 2012. The primary outcome was cost per life year gained associated with the intervention period (2007-12) compared with the pre-intervention period (2001-06). Incremental costs were represented by all trauma-related funding enhancements undertaken between 2007 and 2010. Risk adjustment for years of life lost was conducted using zero-inflated negative binomial regression modelling. All costs were expressed in 2012 Australian dollar values. Results In all, 876 patients were identified during the study period. The incremental cost of trauma enhancements between 2007 and 2012 totalled $7.91million, of which $2.86million (36%) was attributable to road trauma patients. After adjustment for important covariates, the odds of in-hospital mortality reduced by around half (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27, 0.82; P=0.01). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was A$7600 per life year gained (95% CI A$5524, $19333). Conclusion Trauma service funding enhancements that enabled a quality improvement program at a single major trauma centre were found to be cost-effective based on current international and Australian standards. What is known about this topic? Trauma quality improvement programs have been implemented across most designated trauma hospitals in an effort to improve hospital care processes and outcomes for injured patients. These involve a combination of education and training, the use of audit and key performance indicators. What does this paper add? A trauma quality improvement program initiated at an Australian Major Trauma Centre was found to be cost-effective over 12 years with

  10. Pearls of Mandibular Trauma Management

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, John C.; Feldman, Evan M.; Chike-Obi, Chuma J.; Bullocks, Jamal M.

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbi...

  11. Primary closure in colon trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Aragón, Luis Enrique; Guevara-Torres, Lorenzo; Vaca-Pérez, Enrique; Belmares-Taboada, Jaime Arístides; Ortiz-Castillo, Fátima de Guadalupe; Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Primary repair of colon injuries is an accepted therapeutic option; however, controversy persists regarding its safety. Our objective was to report the evolution and presence of complications in patients with colon injury who underwent primary closure and to determine if the time interval (>6 h), degree of injury, contamination, anatomic site injured, PATI (Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index) >25, and the presence of other injuries in colon trauma are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This was a prospective, observational, longitudinal and descriptive study conducted at the Central Hospital "Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto," San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. We included patients with abdominal trauma with colon injury subjected to surgical treatment. chi(2) was used for basic statistical analysis. There were 481 patients with abdominal trauma who underwent surgery; 77(16.1%) had colon injury. Ninety percent (n = 69) were treated in the first 6 h; 91% (n = 70) were due to penetrating injuries, and gunshot wound accounted for 48% (n = 37). Transverse colon was the most frequently injured (38%) (n = 29). Grade I and II injuries accounted for 75.3% (n = 58). Procedures included primary repair (76.66 %) (n = 46); resection with anastomosis (8.3%) (n = 5); and colostomy (15%) (n = 9). Associated injuries were present in 76.6% (n = 59). There was some degree of contamination in 85.7% (n = 66); 82.8% (58) had PATI colon injury. Primary repair is a safe procedure for treatment of colon injuries. Patients with primary repair had lower morbidity (p <0.009). Surgery during the first 6 h (p <0.006) and in hemodynamically stable patients (p <0.014) had a lower risk of complications.

  12. Trauma Symptoms in Abused Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Mohammadkhani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are many traumatic events (including natural disasters, physical, psychological and sexual abuse that may befall children and there is clear evidence that such experiences can produce a plethora of negative psychological effects. Children’s exposure to such traumas has been associated with a wide variety of negative mental health outcomes, including anxiety and depression, post-traumatic stress and dissociation and anger and aggression. It seems that the impacts of traumatic events are significantly related to type and intensity of trauma. Materials & Method: Through a systematized clustral sampling 3042 male and female students from junior high school who were participated in a survey study for investigating point prevalence of child abuse, completed Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children-Alternate Version (TSCC-A and Child Abuse Self-report Scale (CASRS. After recognition of abused children, they were compared based on trauma symptoms. TSCC-A is a self-report measure of post-traumatic distress and related psychological symptomatology in male and female children aged 8-16 years. It is useful in the evaluation of children who have experienced traumatic events, including physical and sexual assault, victimization by peers, major losses, the witnessing of violence done to others and natural disasters. TSCC-A makes no reference to sexual issues. CASRS is a self-report scale to assess child abuse and neglect with 38 items and four subscales (psychological abuse, neglect, physical and sexual abuse. Results: Considering the type of traumatic experiences, the results showed that abused children significantly received higher scores in scales and subscales of TSCC-A than nonabused group. They specially reported more symptoms (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, anger and dissociation comparing normal children. Conclusion: It is concluded that the type and rate of traumatic event is related to intensity of symptomatology.

  13. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  14. Transfusion Practice in Military Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    al., 1969; Faringer et al., 1993; Brohi et al., 2003; MacLeod et al., 2003). All these findings suggest that there is a need for the early use of...fre- quency and serious implications for survival had not been widely appreciated (Simmons et al., 1969; Faringer et al., 1993). Coagulopathy had...Scalea, T.M. (2002) Hypotensive resuscitation during active hemorrhage: its impact on in hospital mortality. Journal of Trauma, 52, 1141 1146. Faringer

  15. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  16. Trauma patients' rights during resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Doctors and nurses working in hospital emergency departments face ethical and moral conflicts more so than in other health care units. Traditional curricular approaches to health professional education have been embedded in a discriminatory societal context and as such have not prepared health professionals adequately for the ethical realities of their practice. Furthermore, the discourse on ethical theories and ethical principles do not provide clear-cut solutions to ethical dilemmas but rather serve as a guide to ethical decision- making. Within the arena of trauma and resuscitation, fundamental ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice cannot be taken as absolutes as these may in themselves create moral conflict. Resuscitation room activities require a balance between what is “ ethically" correct and what is “pragmatically required” . Because of the urgent nature of a resuscitation event, this balance is often under threat, with resultant transgression of patients’ rights. This article explores the sources of ethical and moral issues in trauma care and proposes a culture of human rights to provide a context for preserving and protecting trauma patients’ rights during resuscitation. Recommendations for education and research are alluded to in concluding the article.

  17. Secondary reconstruction of maxillofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2017-08-01

    Craniomaxillofacial trauma is one of the most complex clinical conditions in contemporary maxillofacial surgery. Vital structures and possible functional and esthetic sequelae are important considerations following this type of trauma and intervention. Despite the best efforts of the primary surgery, there are a group of patients that will have poor outcomes requiring secondary reconstruction to restore form and function. The purpose of this study is to review current concepts on secondary reconstruction to the maxillofacial complex. The evaluation of a posttraumatic patient for a secondary reconstruction must include an assessment of the different subunits of the upper face, middle face, and lower face. Virtual surgical planning and surgical guides represent the most important innovations in secondary reconstruction over the past few years. Intraoperative navigational surgery/computed-assisted navigation is used in complex cases. Facial asymmetry can be corrected or significantly improved by segmentation of the computerized tomography dataset and mirroring of the unaffected side by means of virtual surgical planning. Navigational surgery/computed-assisted navigation allows for a more precise surgical correction when secondary reconstruction involves the replacement of extensive anatomical areas. The use of technology can result in custom-made replacements and prebent plates, which are more stable and resistant to fracture because of metal fatigue. Careful perioperative evaluation is the key to positive outcomes of secondary reconstruction after trauma. The advent of technological tools has played a capital role in helping the surgical team perform a given treatment plan in a more precise and predictable manner.

  18. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  19. Trauma management in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutserimpas, Christos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Samonis, George

    2017-08-01

    Homer's Iliad is one of the highest intellectual products of the early ancient Greek civilisation. A plethora of medical information lies within Iliad's 24 rhapsodies, and a total of 147 injuries are described. The present study records and evaluates all cases of trauma management included in this epic poem. Not only Iliad's original text but also all myths related to Iliad from the five-volume Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were meticulously studied to locate the injured person, the type of trauma, the care provider and the type of given care as well as the outcome of each case. A total of 21 cases were found and evaluated with a 5% mortality rate. The majority of these injuries were caused by an arrow (43%) and were located to the upper extremity (43%). Injuries of the head, neck and trunk were not treated as all of them were lethal. Many of the recorded trauma management techniques can be correlated to modern medicine. Furthermore, the role and skills of military doctors and paramedics, mentioned by Homer, is discussed. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Trauma to the nail complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Braga Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the results from surgical intervention to treat trauma of the nail complex.METHODS: we retrospectively reviewed a series of 94 consecutive patients with trauma of the nail complex who were treated between 2000 and 2009. In 42 patients, nail bed suturing was performed. In 27 patients, nail bed suturing was performed subsequent to osteosynthesis of the distal phalanx. In 15, immediate grafting was performed, and in 10, late-stage grafting of the nail bed. The growth, size and shape of the nail were evaluated in comparison with the contralateral finger. The results were obtained by summing scores and classifying them as good, fair or poor.RESULTS: the results were considered to be good particularly in the patients who underwent nail bed suturing or nail bed suturing with osteosynthesis of the distal phalanx. Patients who underwent immediate or late-stage nail grafting had poor results.CONCLUSION: trauma of the nail complex without loss of substance presented better results than did deferred treatment for reconstruction of the nail complex.

  1. Psychiatric and physical sequelae of childhood physical and sexual abuse and forced sexual trauma among individuals with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subica, Andrew M

    2013-10-01

    Trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently co-occur with serious mental illness, yet the unique mental and physical health influences of childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and forced sexual trauma on individuals with serious mental illness remain unevaluated. The present study of 172 individuals with serious mental illness investigated the adverse effects of CPA, CSA, and forced sexual trauma on severity of PTSD and depression, and overall mental and physical health functioning. Data analysis consisted of chi-square tests, independent t tests, bivariate odds ratios, and linear regressions. Prevalence of CPA (44.8%), CSA (29.1%), and forced sexual trauma (33.1%) were elevated, and nearly one third of participants (31.4%) reported clinical PTSD. Participants exposed to CSA or forced sexual trauma evidenced bivariate ORs ranging from 4.13 to 7.02 for PTSD, 2.44 to 2.50 for major depression, and 2.14 to 2.31 for serious physical illness/disability. Sexual trauma exposure associated with heightened PTSD and depression, and reduced mental and physical health functioning, with CSA uniquely predicting PTSD, depression, and physical health difficulties. CPA less significantly affected these clinical domains. Sexual traumas have profound negative effects on mental and physical health outcomes among individuals with serious mental illness; increased screening and treatment of sexual traumas is needed. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. The Role of Cumulative Trauma, Betrayal, and Appraisals in Understanding Trauma Symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Cromer, Lisa Demarni; Deprince, Anne P; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2013-03-01

    Poor psychological outcomes are common among trauma survivors, yet not all survivors experience adverse sequelae. The current study examined links between cumulative trauma exposure as a function of the level of betrayal (measured by the relational closeness of the survivor and the perpetrator), trauma appraisals, gender, and trauma symptoms. Participants were 273 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event on a trauma checklist. Three cumulative indices were constructed to assess the number of different types of traumas experienced that were low (LBTs), moderate (MBTs), or high in betrayal (HBTs). Greater trauma exposure was related to more symptoms of depression, dissociation, and PTSD, with exposure to HBTs contributing the most. Women were more likely to experience HBTs than men, but there were no gender differences in trauma-related symptoms. Appraisals of trauma were predictive of trauma-related symptoms over and above the effects explained by cumulative trauma at each level of betrayal. The survivor's relationship with the perpetrator, the effect of cumulative trauma, and their combined impact on trauma symptomatology are discussed.

  3. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Shimooka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Misima, Tsuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy has a strong relation to a society. However, due to accidents and scandals having occurred in recent years, people's reliability to nuclear energy has significantly swayed and is becoming existence of a worry. Analyzing such a situation and grasping the problem contained are serious problems for people engaging in nuclear field. In order that nuclear energy is properly used in society, communication with general public and in nuclear power plant site area are increasingly getting important as well as grasping the situation and surveying measures for overcoming the problems. On the basis of such an analysis, various activities for betterment of public acceptance of nuclear energy by nuclear industry workers, researchers and the government are proposed. (J.P.N.)

  4. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...... branding campaign does not just present the city, it may change the city. The relationships between the branding exercise and the city are intertwined in the evolution of the place....

  5. Society and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Society is the source of immense power. Over the past few centuries humanity has record­ed phenomenal growth in its collective capacity for accomplishment, as reflected in the 12-fold growth in global per capita income since 1800. The remarkable achievements in living standards, longevity, science, technology, industry, education, democracy, human rights, peace and global governance are the result of the exponential development of the capacity of society to harness human energies and convert them into social power for productive purposes. Today, humanity possesses the power and capabilities needed to fully meet the multi-dimensional challenges confronting global society. The source of this energy is people. Human energy is transformed into social power by the increasing reach, frequency and complexity of human relationships. Society is a complex living network of organized relationships between people. Its power issues from channelizing our collective energies in productive ways by means of organizing principles such as coordination, systems, specialization of function, hierarchy of authority, and integration. This immense social power remains largely underutilized. Social science needs to evolve a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary understanding of the roots of social power and the process by which it is generated, distributed and applied. This knowledge is the essential foundation for formulating effective social policies capable of eradicating forever persistent poverty, unemployment and social inequality. This article is based on a series of lectures delivered by the author in the WAAS-WUC course on “Toward a Trans-disciplinary Science of Society” at Dubrovnik on September 1-3, 2014. It traces the development of social power in different fields to show that human and social capital are inexhaustible in potential. The more we harness them, the more they grow. Unleashing, directing, channeling and converting human potential into social

  6. Quality and human society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  7. Cooking and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Teplá, Hedvika

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Cooking and Society" focuses on cooking, a process of food preparation. The thesis analyzes cooking as a leisure activity, type of housework and it also discusses the relation between cooking and cultural identity. It focuses on the importance of national and ethnic cuisine and deals with the differences in cooking influenced by religion and social stratification. The thesis also deals with the acquisition of cooing skills and transgeneral transfer of cooking skills. It d...

  8. Man in Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单祝堂

    1994-01-01

    Men usually want to have their own way.They want to thinkand act as they like.No one,however,can have his own way all thetime.A man cannot live in society without considering the interestsof others as well as his own interests.’Society’ means a groupof people with the same laws and the same way of life.People in

  9. The new totalitarian society

    OpenAIRE

    Vlajki Emil

    2011-01-01

    The new totalitarian society is a euphemized expression denoting the New World Order, which in itself denotes the American globalization. The underpinning of this mindset is rationality, which is characteristic of Western civilization. Christianity engendered rationality by introducing it through St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, and especially formal logic. Since it is obvious that religion and logic cannot ultimately be harmonized, this combination has proven lethal in many cases throughout hi...

  10. Creativity In Conscience Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Gh. Rosca; Dumitru Todoroi

    2011-01-01

    Creativity is a result of brain activity which differentiates individuals and could ensure an important competitive advantage for persons, for companies, and for Society in general. Very innovative branches – like software industry, computer industry, car industry – consider creativity as the key of business success. Natural Intelligence Creativity can develop basic creative activities, but Artificial Intelligence Creativity, and, especially, Conscience Intelligence Creativity should be devel...

  11. Radiation Sensitivity of Societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uray, I.; Hille, R.; Rohloff, F.

    1998-01-01

    Investigating the mean dose values as well as dose distributions of the inhabitants in a large number of settlements maybe set down, that the generally calculated mean exposure is a good measure to estimate the collective dose for a settlement or for a large region. Its uncertainty is however too high, and the dose distribution is very broad (250-300%) to estimate the external exposure of any single person. However, models may take into account more details of influencing factors. First of all the surveying of the local contamination density distribution could be more detailed and more accurate. Measure and distribution of the internal exposure (is not the subject of the present work, but it is similarly problematic. In this situation it is very difficult to search the dose-effect relationships exactly, and is also difficult to satisfy the people that their fears are unjustified. Society pays the costs of the nuclear industry and of the possible consequences as well. But society can neither control the nuclear industry nor the possible consequences at all. Both science and single people are waiting for more and detailed information. If we can not decrease the r adiation sensitivity of societies , then the consequences of Chernobyl will be growing unnecessarily, and it can strongly retard the justified development of the nuclear industry as well. (author)

  12. The new totalitarian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajki Emil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new totalitarian society is a euphemized expression denoting the New World Order, which in itself denotes the American globalization. The underpinning of this mindset is rationality, which is characteristic of Western civilization. Christianity engendered rationality by introducing it through St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, and especially formal logic. Since it is obvious that religion and logic cannot ultimately be harmonized, this combination has proven lethal in many cases throughout history. For instance, the Inquisition, which, contrary to what happened at scholastic universities, severely berated rational thinking in practice. Catholicism helped carry out genocide against the Jews, and Orthodoxy is in a certain manner tied in with Stalinism. The new totalitarian society is anchored in American Protestantism. On the whole, Christian rationalism is a sphere of science, techniques and technologies efficiently employed to promote the West to the status of a society of plenty and the conception of human rights, which turn into their opposite and irrational behavior of the worst kind. An example of such inhumanity is the attack against Yugoslavia/Serbia in 1999.

  13. Is paediatric trauma severity overestimated at triage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DO, H Q; Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe paediatric trauma is rare, and pre-hospital and local hospital personnel experience with injured children is often limited. We hypothesised that a higher proportion of paediatric trauma victims were taken to the regional trauma centre (TC). METHODS: This is an observational...... follow-up study that involves one level I TC and seven local hospitals. We included paediatric (trauma patients with a driving distance to the TC > 30 minutes. The primary end-point was the proportion of trauma patients arriving in the TC. RESULTS: We included 1934...... trauma patients, 238 children and 1696 adults. A total of 33/238 children (13.9%) vs. 304/1696 adults (17.9%) were transported to the TC post-injury (P = 0.14). Among these, children were significantly less injured than adults [median Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9 vs. 14, P 

  14. Assessing sexual trauma histories in homeless women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Sally; Hardin, Sally; Glaser, Dale; Barger, Mary; Bormann, Jill; Lizarraga, Cabiria; Terry, Micheal; Criscenzo, Jeeni; Allard, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Almost 1 out of every 3 homeless women (32%) in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia has experienced childhood sexual trauma. We assessed lifetime sexual trauma histories among 29 homeless women from three Southern California community sites: one residential safe house and two safe parking areas. More than half of the women (54%) reported a history of sexual trauma. That rate was higher (86%) among women living at the safe home than among women staying at the safe parking sites (only 42%). All four of the women who had served in the military reported having experienced military sexual trauma. The high percentages of sexual trauma found in homeless women highlight the need for effective interventions for sexual trauma.

  15. Trauma and traumatic neurosis: Freud's concepts revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried; Zepf, Florian D

    2008-04-01

    The authors examine Freud 's concepts of 'trauma', 'protective shield against stimuli ' and 'traumatic neurosis' in the light of recent findings. 'Protective shield against stimuli' is regarded as a biological concept which appears in mental life as the striving to avoid unpleasant affects. 'Trauma' is a twofold concept in that it relates to mental experience and links an external event with the specific after-effects on an individual 's psychic reality. A distinction needs to be made between mentally destructive trauma and affective trauma. A destructive trauma does not break through the protective shield but does breach the pleasure-unpleasure principle, so that in the course of its subsequent mastery it leads to a traumatic neurosis. An affective trauma can be warded off under the rule of the pleasure-unpleasure principle and leads to a psychoneurosis.

  16. Specific trauma subtypes improve the predictive validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E

    2014-12-01

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3%, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations.

  17. The transgenerational transmission of refugee trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgård, Nina Thorup; Montgomery, Edith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of family functioning in the transgenerational transmission of trauma in a sample of 30 refugee families with traumatized parents and children without a history of direct trauma exposure from the Middle East. Design/methodology/approach Based...... and lower scores on the SDQ. Originality/value These findings suggest that the transgenerational transmission of trauma may be associated with family functioning and have implications for interventions at several levels....

  18. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  19. Trauma pattern in a level I east-European trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Stoica

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our trauma pattern profile is similar to the one found in west-European countries, with a predominance of traffic-related injuries and falls. The severity and anatomical puzzle for trauma lesions were more complex secondary to motorcycle or bicycle-to-auto vehicles collisions. A trauma registry, with prospective enrollment of patients, is a very effective tool for constant improvements in trauma care.

  20. Tram-related trauma in Melbourne, Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Al Jubair, Jubair; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2010-08-01

    To establish the incidence and pattern of injuries in patients presenting to hospital with tram-related injuries. Data on tram-related injury pertaining to 2001-2008 calendar years were extracted from three datasets: the population-based Victorian State Trauma Registry for major trauma cases, the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset for ED presentations and the National Coroners' Information System for deaths. Incidence rates adjusted for the population of Melbourne, and trends in the incidence of tram-related ED presentations and major trauma cases, were analysed and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRR). There were 1769 patients who presented to ED after trauma related to trams in Melbourne during the study period. Of these, 107 patients had injuries classified as major trauma. There was a significant increase in the rate of ED presentations (IRR 1.03, P = 0.010) with falls (46%) the most commonly reported mechanism. Most falls occurred inside the trams. There was also a significant increase in the incidence rates of major trauma cases (IRR 1.12, P = 0.006) with pedestrians accounting for most major trauma cases. Most cases of trauma related to trams have minor injuries and are discharged following ED management. Primary prevention of falls in trams and the separation of pedestrians from trams are key areas requiring immediate improvement. In the face of increasing trauma associated with trams, continuing safety surveillance and targeted public safety messages are important to sustain trams as safe and effective mode of transport.

  1. Sexuality following trauma injury: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Marie Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of the quality of life (QoL of trauma injury survivors is the aim of trauma rehabilitation. It is generally acknowledged that sexuality is an important component of QoL; however, rehabilitation services frequently fall short of including sexuality as a matter of routine. The literature was reviewed to examine the experiences of trauma survivors from three groups: spinal cord injury (SCI, traumatic brain injury (TBI and burns. The focus was on the impact of trauma on the QoL to identify future research directions and to advocate for the inclusion of sexuality as an integral part of rehabilitation. Databases searched were Proquest, Ovid, Cinahl, Medline, PsycInfo and Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials. A total of 36 eligible studies were included: SCI (n = 25, TBI (n = 6, burns (n = 5. Four themes were identified across the three trauma groups that were labeled as physiological impact of trauma on sexuality, cognitive-genital dissociation (CGD, sexual disenfranchisement (SD and sexual rediscovery (SR. Trauma injury has a significant impact on sexuality, which is not routinely addressed within rehabilitation services. Further sexuality research is required among all trauma groups to improve rehabilitation services and in turn QoL outcomes for all trauma survivors.

  2. Sexuality following trauma injury: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kylie Marie Connell; Rosemary Coates; Fiona Melanie Wood

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of the quality of life (QoL) of trauma injury survivors is the aim of trauma rehabilitation. It is generally acknowledged that sexuality is an important component of QoL; however, rehabilitation services frequently fall short of including sexuality as a matter of routine. The literature was reviewed to examine the experiences of trauma survivors from three groups: spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and burns. The focus was on the impact of trauma on the QoL to ...

  3. Organizational network in trauma management in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Chiara

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, as in other western countries, trauma is a leading cause of death during the first four decades of life, with almost 18.000 of deaths per year. Since 80s organized systems for trauma care, including a pre-hospital emergency medical system and a network of hospitals designated as Trauma Centres, have been developed in north American countries. Effectiveness of trauma systems has been investigated comparing the post-system to the pre-system trauma care with the method of panel evaluation of preventable death rates and comparison of observed survival with expected probability of survival. In Italy, a pre-hospital emergency medical system has been implemented on a national scale, while a trauma network has not been developed. Nowadays, trauma patients are often admitted to the closest hospital, independently from local resources. The Superior Council of Ministry of Health has presented in 2004 a new trauma system model (SIAT based on the recognition in the field of patients with more serious injuries and the transportation to general hospitals with resources and multidisciplinary teams specialized in trauma care (trauma team. The designation of few trauma team hospitals, one highly specialized Centre (CTS and two area Centres (CTZ every two millions of inhabitants allows each Centre to treat at least 250 severe trauma patients per year to increase experience. Less severe injured patients may be treated in non-trauma team acute care facilities, according to the inclusive system model. The development of trauma team services in some Italian hospitals has demonstrated an increase in survival and a decrease in preventable death rate from 42% to 7,6%. Economic studies of Ministry of Health have established that the implementation of a trauma system model on a national scale with a 25% decrease of preventable trauma deaths and disabilities would save 7500 million of euros of public money. Therefore, in our country the concentration of severely

  4. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  5. The Selfie Wrist – Selfie induced trauma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, RF

    2017-06-01

    The selfie phenomenon has exploded worldwide over the past two years. Selfies have been linked to a large number of mortalities and significant morbidity worldwide. However, trauma associated with selfies including fractures, is rarely publicised. Here we present a case series of upper extremity trauma secondary to selfies across all age groups during the summer period. Four cases of distal radius and ulna trauma in all age groups were reported. This case series highlights the dangers associated with taking selfies and the trauma that can result.

  6. Compassionate listening - managing psychological trauma in refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Joanne; Walker, Kate

    2010-04-01

    The physical and psychosocial effects of trauma in refugees are wide ranging and long lasting. They can affect symptom presentation, the patient-doctor relationship and management of refugee victims of trauma. This article discusses how refugees survivors of trauma may present to the general practitioner and gives an approach to psychological assessment and management. A strong therapeutic relationship built by patient led, sensitive assessment over time is the foundation to care. A management framework based on trauma recovery stages and adapted for general practice, is presented.

  7. Trauma in Guilan (North of Iran: An Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehnadimoghadam Anoosh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Injuries, especially traffic accidents are so important causes of death, disability, hospital expenses, economic damages to the society which World Health Organization selected them as the main subjects for investigation and research. We have done an epidemiologic study about trauma in Guilan, a province in north of Iran. This is  a descriptive study carried out on patients with traumatic injuries, admitted in Poursina Teaching Hospital, during September 2005 to July 2006. Data were collected prospectively using a data collection form including demographic information, mechanism of trauma, anatomical site of injuries, according to AIS90 and severity of head trauma according to glasgow coma scale (GCS. Data were processed by SPSS 11.5 and are shown in tables and figures. Overall 3598 patients admitted. Mean age was 31.85 ± 17.76 years with male to female ratio  about 3.5:1. Most of patients were 25-44 years old (33.9%. Traffic accidents were the leading  cause of injuries (73.84% and then fall (15.7%. Motorcycle was the most common mode of transport in our patients (47.07% after that car (24.3%. Occurrence of traffic accidents increased through evening. Forty six percent of patients transported to hospital by people or came themselves (46.42%. Head and neck were the most common injured part of body (82.4 %, however about in 81.66% of patients were mild and then limb and pelvis (34.7%. Finally about 2.8% of them died. A trauma especially traffic accidents are an important public health issue in Guilan, we recommend conducting other studies focusing on risk factors in details, and considering injury prevention in local decision making.

  8. A survey analysis of acoustic trauma related to MR scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Toshiharu; Kamiya, Naoki; Sone, Michihiko; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Yamada, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    The maximum limit of MR scanner noise and necessity of ear protection is defined in the IEC standard (IEC60601-2-33) of MR safety. With improvements in MR scanner performance, pulse sequences generating higher scanning noise have been used clinically. In this study, we investigated the factors significantly related to potential acoustic trauma cases (PATC) after MR examinations. To consider the future direction for MR safety and prevention of acoustic trauma, issues related to noise generation by MR scanners and acoustic trauma were systematically reviewed. A statistical analysis was performed using the data set from a survey (n=974) conducted in 2010 by the Japanese Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (JSMRM) safety committee. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to extract the characteristics of the responders. With this classification as a reference, tests of independence and a residual analysis were employed to evaluate the factors related to PATC. No significant relationship was observed between the ear protection policy and the incidence or the reported outcome of PATC. While the two main clusters out of the six clusters extracted were associated with who reported the PATC and the confirmation process of the acoustic noise level of MR scanners, no cluster was associated with the frequency of PATC. An absence of PATC was significantly less reported (p=0.03) and more PATC was reported (p=0.04) by facilities with 3T MR systems. Although the total frequency was 4 cases, it should be noted that persistent hearing disturbances are a possible consequence of MR examinations. Neither the condition of the subjects nor the ear protection method was significantly related to the probability of PATC, suggesting the difficulty of predicting the potential risk of acoustic trauma. It is recommended to more systematically follow up PATC cases and clarify the risk factors. (author)

  9. An evolution of trauma care evaluation: A thesis on trauma registry and outcome prediction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, P.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction models play an invaluable role in the evaluation and improvement of modern trauma care. Trauma registries underlying these outcome prediction models need to be accurate, complete and consistent. This thesis focused on the opportunities and limitations of trauma registries and

  10. Head trauma and CT with special reference to diagnosis of complications of head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitose

    1979-01-01

    Cases in which CT was useful for the diagnosis of complications of head trauma were reported. First, complications of head trauma were given an outline, and then, cases of protrusion of the brain, traumatic pneumocephalus, and cerebro-vascular disorders caused by head trauma were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Isolated hip fracture care in an inclusive trauma system : A trauma system wide evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, J. J E M; van Lammeren, G. W.; Houwert, R. M.; van Laarhoven, Constance; Hietbrink, F.; Leenen, L. P H; Verleisdonk, E. J M M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients with a hip fracture represent a large proportion of the trauma population; however, little is known about outcome differences between different levels of trauma care for these patients. The aim of this study is to analyse the outcome of trauma care in patients with a

  12. [Terrorist attack trauma - an individual entity of polytrauma : A 10-year update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güsgen, C; Franke, A; Hentsch, S; Kollig, E; Schwab, R

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of terrorist attacks is increasing worldwide, and they have also become a permanent threat in European cities. Due to its complexity, terrorist attack trauma places high demands on the strategy of surgical treatment. The combination of various mechanisms, explosions and gunshot injuries, with the characteristic pressure (blast) damage and a high proportion of penetrating trauma with simultaneous burns are characteristic features. Unlike in military conflicts, injuries to people of all ages and without ballistic body protection (body armor) are to be expected. The mechanism of the attack and its local conditions are of relevance for the assessment of the situation and the expected injury patterns. Thus, suicide attacks result in several times higher numbers of fatalities and casualties. Explosions on free ground lead to different types of injury than those in closed or semi-enclosed spaces. The treatment principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) are based on the intrahospital care of casualties as well as damage control strategies with trigger factors. In order to prepare and educate clinics and surgeons in Germany for such scenarios, various course formats of the professional societies, the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) and the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) have now been established.

  13. ESTSS at 20 years: "a phoenix gently rising from a lava flow of European trauma".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orner, Roderick J

    2013-01-01

    Roderick J. Ørner, who was President between 1997 and 1999, traces the phoenix-like origins of the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS) from an informal business meeting called during the 1st European Conference on Traumatic Stress (ECOTS) in 1987 to its emergence into a formally constituted society. He dwells on the challenges of tendering a trauma society within a continent where trauma has been and remains endemic. ESTSS successes are noted along with a number of personal reflections on activities that give rise to concern for the present as well as its future prospects. Denial of survivors' experiences and turning away from survivors' narratives by reframing their experiences to accommodate helpers' theory-driven imperatives are viewed with alarm. Arguments are presented for making human rights, memory, and ethics core elements of a distinctive European psycho traumatology, which will secure current ESTSS viability and future integrity.

  14. Science, Society and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  15. Risk and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Vrousos, C.; Pages, J.P.; Carde, C.

    1999-01-01

    This book brings together the communications presented at the colloquium 'risk and society' held in Paris (France) on November 1998. During this colloquium, the various aspects of risk and of its management were discussed by medical specialists, historians, industrialists, engineers, philosophers, lawyers, politicians and administration representatives. The first theme concerns the controversies generated by the development of some activities (genetics, bio-technologies, nuclear and radiations use). The second theme concerns the management of risks and the way to conciliate the point of view of authorities and citizens (confidence of the public with respect to experts, scientists, industrialists, government and administrative representatives, role played by the media). The debates that took place during the colloquium have shown that the public opinion concerning the nuclear activities or the new technologies greatly depends on the ideological attitudes and on the public's likes and dislikes with respect to some categories of actors (distrust with respect to public decisions, fears with respect to changes and future, nostalgia of the past). The following aspects are reviewed: Notions of risk and hazard (risk and health, risk in today's society, medicine and society, the point of view of the industrialists and of the scientific and technical specialists); from the psychological aspects of the risk to its social aspects (survey of the risk assessment battlefield, social attenuation and amplification of risk, the feeling of risks in Europe, insecurity and delinquency, controversies around radioactivity and health); the negotiation and communication about risks (risk and public health, negotiation around risks, risks and information dissemination about the public debate, communication and crisis, evolution of risk communication, comparison between American and European approaches, the Seveso directive); the public debate and the evolution of risks management (the

  16. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K. S.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, O.

    1982-01-01

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  17. Membership in cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba Gaminde Egia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze the practical application of one of the cooperative principles, «voluntary and free membership», referring to the entering of members in cooperative societies. We will first explain the meaning of this principle, and then bring up its normative regulation, with special emphasis on those aspects in which our autonomic laws differ, and ending with a brief reference to the economic aspect and the different ways to make contributions and their consequences.Received: 31 May 2017Accepted: 14 October 2017Published online: 22 December 2017

  18. The post Chernobyl society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenofontov, Ion.

    2011-01-01

    The disaster from the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl that took place on April 26, 1986 is considered to be the worst ecologic disaster in Europe during the entire nuclear power producing history (estimated on the highest level, the seventh). The disaster had an poisonous impact on people's health and ambitions, it also gave birth to a new vision on the impact of the human factor on the universe. The post Chernobyl society is an alarming sign as regarding the human surviving perspectives, and a violent lesson on the 'global biography'. (author)

  19. Advanced information society (9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Hiroki

    This article discusses the U.S. and European national strategies and policies for information society. Coping with the declining competitiveness in high-tech products and Japanese technological advantages both have been trying hard to strengthen technology base and to deregulate the telecommunications services markets. The U.S. approach in 1980's, unlike its liberalist principle, has been characterized by technological protectlonism and defense-oriented policies. European Communities' approach has been more comprehensive and systematic, investing heavily telecommunication infrastructure, deregulating domestic market, and promoting cooperation of member countries. However, both of these approaches have, so far, been unable to achieve a considerable success.

  20. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating......, for driving innovation or for disseminating results to the scientific community and beyond. And, as a look at the CRIS2010 conference program will tell, there are many more, often little known purposes for which CRIS are used. These applications stimulate with their demands the progress in designing, building...

  1. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration......- and citizenship-regimes. Locating transnationalism as part of the political opportunity structure also indicates that the state(s) to some degree can facilitate transnationalism, directly and indirectly. A substantial part of political engagement now occurs via transnational channels. What is uncertain is to what...

  2. The plutonium society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, L.; Richter, M.

    1981-01-01

    The lectures of an institute are reported on, which took place between 25th and 27th January 1980 in Berlin. The subsequent public panel discussion with representations from the political parties is then documentated in a few press-reports. The themes of the 8 lectures are: views and facts on plutonium, plutonium as an energy resource, military aspects of the production of plutonium, economic aspects of the plutonium economy, the position of the trade unions on the industrial reconversion, the alleged inevitability of a plutonium society and the socio-political alternatives and perspectives of nuclear waste disposal. (UA) [de

  3. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  4. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient.

  5. The trauma of a recession.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S M

    2011-09-01

    Employment in construction in Ireland fell by 10% from nearly 282,000 in the second quarter of 2007 to 255,000 in the same period of 2008. Our study looks at the differences in soft tissue upper limb trauma dynamics of a pre- and post-recession Ireland. Construction accounted for 330 patients (27%) of all hand injuries in 2006, but only 18 (3%) in 2009. Our data shows a significant drop in hand injuries related to the construction industry, and more home\\/DIY cases and deliberate self-harm presenting in their stead.

  6. Trauma social y memoria colectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Iglesias Saldaña

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El trauma social y la memoria colectiva, o memorias colectivas están de la mano en la América latina post-dictatorial. Desde fines de los años ochenta, se fueron destituyendo las dictaduras latinoamericanas, la mayoría sobre bases de consensos entre las fuerzas dictatoriales y los negociadores políticos de corrientes democráticas. La fuerza de los movimientos sociales sirvió de puente para las negociaciones, pero no logró estar del todo en las transacciones hacia los procesos de transición. Si así hubiera sido, la justicia y la verdad hubieran tenido un lugar privilegiado en los procesos denominados de "transición a las democracias" en distintos países del cono sur latinoamericano. La memoria colectiva ligada al trauma social tendrá varios componentes que abarcan también la memoria individual, incluyendo los espacios de la experiencia, propia y ajena. Este artículo pretende bucear en las interacciones entre ambos ámbitos de la memoria y sus conexiones con el tiempo presente.__________ABSTRACT:Social trauma and collective memory or collective memories are linked to the post-dictatorial Latin America. Since the late eighties, Latin American dictatorships were progressively dismissing, the majority on the basis of consensus between the dictatorial forces and the political mediators of the democratic part. The strength of social movements formed the bridge to negotiations, but could not entirely participate in the transactions to the transition process. If it would have been so, justice and truth would have had a special place in the process called "transition to democracy" in several Latin American Southern Cone countries. The collective memory linked to social trauma will have several components that also include individual memory, including personal and collective spaces of experience. This article aims to analyze the interactions between the two areas of memory and its connections to the present time.

  7. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  8. Radiographic assessment of pelvic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Assessment of pelvic fractures requires an understanding of the bony and soft-tissue anatomy of the pelvis. Pelvic injuries may be classified into major and minor groups. Minor fractures usually result from athletic trauma in the young or falls in the elderly and can generally be adequately evaluated with routine radiography. Major fractures are most often caused by motor vehicle accidents, falls from a height or industrial accidents and require more sophisticated examination. However, the investigation of injuries in either category should be directed by a knowledge of the history and physical findings. The classification of pelvic injuries used at Sunnbrook Medical Centre is based on mechanisms of injury

  9. The trauma of a recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S M; Kieran, I; Shaughnessy, M O

    2011-09-01

    Employment in construction in Ireland fell by 10% from nearly 282,000 in the second quarter of 2007 to 255,000 in the same period of 2008. Our study looks at the differences in soft tissue upper limb trauma dynamics of a pre- and post-recession Ireland. Construction accounted for 330 patients (27%) of all hand injuries in 2006, but only 18 (3%) in 2009. Our data shows a significant drop in hand injuries related to the construction industry, and more home/DIY cases and deliberate self-harm presenting in their stead.

  10. Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Emergency Trauma Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc; Grottke, Oliver; Schöchl, Herbert; Sakowitz, Oliver A; Spannagl, Michael; Koscielny, Jürgen

    2016-09-05

    Direct (non-vitamin-K-dependent) oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are given as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) to prevent stroke and embolic disease in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not due to pathology of the heart valves. Fatal hemorrhage is rarer when DOACs are given (nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 0.48; 0.96], and venous thromboembolism: OR 0.54; [0.22; 1.32]). 48% of emergency trauma patients need an emergency operation or early surgery. Clotting disturbances elevate the mortality of such patients to 43%, compared to 17% in patients without a clotting disturbance. This underscores the impor tance of the proper, targeted treatment of trauma patients who are aking DOAC. This review is based on articles retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and on a summary of expert opinion and the recommendations of the relevant medical specialty societies. Peak DOAC levels are reached 2-4 hours after the drug is taken. In patients with normal renal and hepatic function, no drug accumulation, and no drug interactions, the plasma level of DOAC 24 hours after administration is generally too low to cause any clinically relevant risk of bleeding. The risk of drug accumulation is higher in patients with renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance [CrCl] of 30 mL/min or less). Dabigatran levels can be estimated from the thrombin time, ecarin clotting time, and diluted thrombin time, while levels of factor Xa inhibitors can be estimated by means of calibrated chromogenic anti-factor Xa activity tests. Routine clotting studies do not reliably reflect the anticoagulant activity of DOAC. Surgery should be postponed, if possible, until at least 24-48 hours after the last dose of DOAC. For patients with mild, non-life threatening hemorrhage, it suffices to discontinue DOAC; for patients with severe hemorrhage, there are special treatment algorithms that should be followed. DOACs in the setting of hemorrhage are a

  11. New developments in secondary stroke prevention: impact of the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT) on clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsep, Helmi L

    2007-01-01

    Secondary stroke prevention is an important goal of poststroke patient treatment. Various pharmacologic approaches have been advocated, but the relative efficacy and safety of these regimens has remained the subject of much debate. Recently released data from the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT) indicated that combination therapy with aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin monotherapy, and probably more effective than anticoagulants, for the prevention of cerebrovascular events after a stroke or transient ischemic attack. When viewed in light of results of earlier trials, these findings confirmed that combination aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole therapy improved outcomes in these patients and is a recommended option for poststroke patient treatment.

  12. A new genus of Eastern Hemisphere stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae), with a key to the supraspecific groups of Indomalayan and Australasian Meliponini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Claus; Thomas, Jennifer C.; Engel, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    and is more closely related to Lepidotrigona Moure. The species is transferred to Wallacetrigona Engel and Rasmussen, new genus, and differentiated from Geniotrigona proper as well as all other meliponines occurring in Sundaland, Wallacea, and Sahul (Australinea). The new genus occurs east of the Wallace Line...... and separate from the distribution of Geniotrigona, which is otherwise restricted to Sundaland, but Wallacetrigona is presently not known beyond the Weber Line. A hierarchical classification of Indomalayan and Australasian stingless bees is tabulated and a revised key to the genera and subgenera provided......, as well as an appendix tabulating the species and synonyms. The following new combinations are established: Wallacetrigona incisa (Sakagami and Inoue), Homotrigona (Lophotrigona) canifrons (Smith), Homotrigona (Odontotrigona) haematoptera (Cockerell), Homotrigona (Tetrigona) apicalis (Smith), H. (T...

  13. Review of Marmasoma White with lectotype designation of M. sumptuosum White and an identification key to the Australasian/Oceanian genera of Ecliminae (Diptera, Bombyliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paula Fernanda Motta; McAlister, Erica; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2017-02-15

    The bombyliid genus Marmasoma White is restricted to Australia. Marmasoma sumptuosum White, the only known species of the genus, is studied and a lectotype and paralectotypes are designated. Based on the type series and on additional material, a redescription of the species is presented and the main characters of the external morphology of adults are illustrated and photographed, including male and female genitalia. In addition, the remarkable aedeagus of M. sumptuosum, unique among all Ecliminae species by the presence of serrated projections on its apical portion, is described and photographed in detail for the first time. An identification key to the Australasian/Oceanian genera of Ecliminae and a distribution map with the known geographic records of Marmasoma are also included.

  14. Prevalence of HIV infection among trauma patients admitted to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of HIV infection among trauma patients admitted to Bugando Medical Centre, ... This was a descriptive cross sectional study involving trauma patients aged 11 years and ... A total of 250 trauma patients were recruited and studied.

  15. Surgical capacity building in Timor-Leste: a review of the first 15 years of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons-led Australian Aid programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Glenn D; Scott, David F; Xavier, Joao P; Martins, Nelson; Vreede, Eric; Chennal, Antony; Moss, Daliah; Watters, David A

    2017-06-01

    Timor-Leste suffered a destructive withdrawal by the Indonesian military in 1999, leaving only 20 Timorese-based doctors and no practising specialists for a population of 700 000 that has now grown to 1.2 million. This article assesses the outcomes and impact of Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) specialist medical support from 2001 to 2015. Three programmes were designed collaboratively with the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health and Australian Aid. The RACS team began to provide 24/7 resident surgical and anaesthesia services in the capital, Dili, from July 2001. The arrival of the Chinese and Cuban Medical Teams provided a medical workforce, and the Cubans initiated undergraduate medical training for about 1000 nationals both in Cuba and in Timor-Leste, whilst RACS focused on specialist medical training. Australian Aid provided AUD$20 million through three continuous programmes over 15 years. In the first 10 years over 10 000 operations were performed. Initially only 10% of operations were done by trainees but this reached 77% by 2010. Twenty-one nurse anaesthetists were trained in-country, sufficient to cover the needs of each hospital. Seven Timorese doctors gained specialist qualifications (five surgery, one ophthalmology and one anaesthesia) from regional medical schools in Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Indonesia and Malaysia. They introduced local specialist and family medicine diploma programmes for the Cuban graduates. Timor-Leste has developed increasing levels of surgical and anaesthetic self-sufficiency through multi-level collaboration between the Ministry of Health, Universidade Nacional de Timor Lorosa'e, and sustained, consistent support from external donors including Australian Aid, Cuba and RACS. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Nuclear power and modern society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1999-01-01

    A treatise consisting of the following sections: Development of modern society (Origin of modern society; Industrial society; The year 1968; Post-industrial society; Worldwide civic society); Historic breaks in the development of the stationary power sector (Stationary thermal power; Historic breaks in the development of nuclear power); Czech nuclear power engineering in the globalization era (Major causes of success of Czech nuclear power engineering; Future of Czech nuclear power engineering). (P.A.)

  17. Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatti, Hugo; Calland, James Forrest

    2008-08-01

    In terms of cost and years of potential lives lost, injury arguably remains the most important public health problem facing the United States. Care of traumatically injured patients depends on early surgical intervention and avoiding delays in the diagnosis of injuries that threaten life and limb. In the critical care phase, successful outcomes after injury depend almost solely on diligence, attention to detail, and surveillance for iatrogenic infections and complications.

  18. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... ever returning to any form of work.6 Dating back to the 1960s, ... team based in Sweden. Further ... fracture fixation within 3 days had significant decreases in .... 48 hours, who underwent rib fracture fixation, had significant.

  19. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... routine diagnostic laparoscopy under general anesthesia to ... Study design ... Method: A prospective, randomized control study was conducted at Groote Schuur Hospital from September 2009 through .... in patients presenting with delayed herniation of abdominal .... The optimal period of follow-up is still.

  20. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cape in each of the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 periods.4. Victims of ... 54 NO.4 NOVEMBER 2016 SAJS of district ... African working week is from Monday to Friday with work on ..... the fact that many MVCs occur during work hours, amongst.

  1. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    another significant barrier. The current course fee is set at. R 4 500 (excluding accommodation and travel expenses). Financial support for professional development training for staff in the public sector is almost non-existent and is often left to the discretion of individual departments. This is further compounded by the chronic ...

  2. Hernia Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Aghaie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare type of hernia, which follows blunt trauma to the abdomen, where disruption of the musculature and fascia occurs with the overlying skin remaining intact. Diagnosis of this problem is very difficult and delayed. Traumatic hernia is often diagnosed during laparatomy or laparascopy, but CT scan also has a role in distinguishing this pathology. Delay in diagnosis is very dangerous and can result in gangrene and necrosis of the organs in the hernia. The case report of a 35 years old man with liftruck blunt trauma is reported. His vital signs were stable. On physical examination, tenderness of RUQ was seen. He underwent Dpl for suspected hemoprotein. Dpl was followed up by laparatomy. Laparatomy revealed that the transverse and ascending colon partially herniated in the abdominal wall defect. The colon was reduced in the abdomen and repair of abdominal hernia was done. The patient was discharged after 5 day. The etiology, pathogenesis and management are discussed.

  3. Communicating Science to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  4. Nanotechnology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2007-01-01

    Past experience has shown that the successful introduction of a new technology requires careful attention to the interactions between the technology and society. These interactions are bi-directional: on the one hand, technology changes and challenges social patterns and, on the other hand, the governance structures and values of the society affect progress in developing the technology. Nanotechnology is likely to be particularly affected by these kinds of interactions because of its great promise and the unusually early public attention it has received. Moreover, it represents a new kind of experiment in packaging a rather wide range of fundamental research activities under a single 'mission-like' umbrella. Although this gives it more impetus as a field, it sets a higher bar for showing successful applications early on and because it links disparate fields, regulatory regimes reasonable for one kind of nanotechnology development may be inappropriately extended to others. There are a number of lessons to be gleaned from experience with the introduction of other technologies, which offer guidance with respect to what pitfalls to avoid and what issues to be sensitive to as we move forward with the development of nanotechnology applications. The problems encountered by nuclear power point out the dangers of over-promising and the role the need for the technology plays in ameliorating fears of risk. The public reaction to biomedical engineering and biotechnology highlights, in addition, the cultural factors that come into play when technologies raise questions about what is 'natural' and what is 'foreign' and what conceptions are involved in defining 'personhood'. In all cases, it has been clear that a main task for those introducing new technology is building public trust-in the safety of the technologies and the integrity of those introducing it. The advocates of nanotechnology have already shown that they are generally aware of the need to consider the public

  5. Emotional intelligence, trauma severity, and emotional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Min C; Chen, Yung Y

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated Emotional Intelligence (EI) as a moderator for the association between emotional expression and adaptive trauma processing, as measured by depressive symptoms. Using Pennebaker's written emotional expression paradigm, 105 participants were assigned to either a conventional trauma-writing or religious trauma-writing condition. Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and again at one-month post writing. No significant association between EI and religiousness was found at baseline. Results indicated a three-way interaction among EI, trauma severity, and writing condition on depressive symptoms at follow-up. For the religious trauma-writing condition only, there was a significant difference between high- versus low-EI participants who experienced more severe trauma in depressive symptoms at follow-up, such that low-EI participants registered less depressive symptoms than high-EI participants; while there was no significant difference between low versus high EI for participants with less severe trauma. These findings encourage further investigation of the conditions under which religion may be a beneficial factor in trauma adaptation.

  6. Dental and General Trauma in Team Handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Mateja; Kühl, Sebastian; Šlaj, Martina; Connert, Thomas; Filippi, Andreas

    Handball has developed into a much faster and high-impact sport over the past few years because of rule changes. Fast sports with close body contact are especially prone to orofacial trauma. Handball belongs to a category of sports with medium risk for dental trauma. Even so, there is only little literature on this subject. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the type of injuries, especially the occurrence of orofacial trauma, habits of wearing mouthguards, as well as degree of familiarity with the tooth rescue box. For this purpose, 77.1% (n=542/703) of all top athletes and coaches from the two highest Swiss leagues (National League A and National League B), namely 507 professional players and 35 coaches, were personally interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. 19.7% (n=100/507) of the players experienced dental trauma in their handball careers, with 40.8% (n=51/125) crown fractures being the most frequent by far. In spite of the relatively high risk of lip or dental trauma, only 5.7% (n=29/507) of the players wear mouthguards. The results of this study show that dental trauma is common among Swiss handball players. In spite of the high risk of dental trauma, the mouthguard as prevention is not adequately known, and correct procedure following dental trauma is rarely known at all.

  7. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  8. Responding with Care to Students Facing Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souers, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to trauma--which many experts view as include ongoing life stressors like poverty, parents divorcing, death of a family member, or drug abuse in the home--is prevalent among school-aged children. Teachers know that facing trauma impedes students' ability to focus and learn, but it can be challenging to keep responding caringly to a…

  9. Untangling pathways between childhood trauma and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, D.S.

    2017-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis aim to enhance our knowledge with regard to specific associations between types of trauma and the course of symptomatology and psychosocial functioning and to examine possible underlying mechanisms, by which childhood trauma influences the development of

  10. Partner preferences among survivors of betrayal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Robyn L

    2012-01-01

    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that social and cognitive development may be affected by early trauma such that individuals develop survival strategies, particularly dissociation and lack of betrayal awareness, that may place them at risk for further victimization. Several experiences of victimization in the context of relationships predicated on trust and dependence may contribute to the development of relational schema whereby abuse is perceived as normal. The current exploratory study investigates interpersonal trauma as an early experience that might impact the traits that are desired in potential romantic partners. Participants in the current study were asked to rate the desirability of several characteristics in potential romantic partners. Although loyalty was desirable to most participants regardless of their trauma history, those who reported experiences of high betrayal trauma rated loyalty less desirable than those who reported experiences of traumas that were low and medium in betrayal. Participants who reported experiences of revictimization (defined as the experience of trauma perpetrated by a close other during 2 different developmental periods) differed from participants who only reported 1 experience of high betrayal trauma in their self-reported desire for a romantic partner who possessed the traits of sincerity and trustworthiness. Preference for a partner who uses the tactic of verbal aggression was also associated with revictimization status. These preliminary findings suggest that victimization perpetrated by close others may affect partner preferences.

  11. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma publishes original papers, review articles and case reports on pathology, anaesthesia, orthopaedics and trauma. Vol 12, No 1 (2013). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Management of ...

  12. Healing Trauma, Building Resilience: SITCAP in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2014-01-01

    Childhood trauma is marked by an overwhelming sense of terror and powerlessness. Loss of loving relationships is yet another type of trauma that produces the pain of sadness and grief. The resulting symptoms only reflect the neurological, biological, and emotional coping systems mobilized in the struggle to survive. These young people need new…

  13. Trauma theory and postcolonial literary studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, I.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The plurality and growing number of responses to cultural trauma theory in postcolonial criticism demonstrate the ongoing appeal of trauma theory despite the fact that it is also increasingly critiqued as inadequate to the research agenda of postcolonial studies. In the dialogue between

  14. Trauma-Inspired Prosocial Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenifer Wolf; Allen, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Though trauma survivors sometimes emerge as leaders in prosocial causes related to their previous negative or traumatic experiences, little is known about this transition, and limited guidance is available for survivors who hope to make prosocial contributions. To understand what enables trauma-inspired prosocial leadership development, the…

  15. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma is a peer reviewed journal publishing original research articles on all aspects of trauma, musculoskeletal ... initials and surnames of all authors, their highest academic degrees, affiliations / institutions and the name, address and e-mail address of the corresponding author.

  16. Trauma-Informed Forensic Child Maltreatment Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma-informed child welfare systems (CWSs) are the focus of several recent national and state initiatives. Since 2005 social work publications have focused on systemic and practice changes within CW which seek to identify and reduce trauma to children and families experiencing child maltreatment or other distressing events, as well as to the…

  17. Accelerating recovery after trauma with free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G D; Nagle, D J; Lewis, V L; Bauer, B S

    1987-08-01

    Free flap versatility and dependability make the final result of microvascular reconstruction highly predictable. Free tissue transplantation should be considered as a primary treatment after trauma. The early use of free tissue transfer will result in fewer operations and a shortened duration of hospitalization in the initial post-trauma period.

  18. The impact of patient volume on surgical trauma training in a Scandinavian trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaarder, Christine; Skaga, Nils Oddvar; Eken, Torsten; Pillgram-Larsen, Johan; Buanes, Trond; Naess, Paal Aksel

    2005-11-01

    Some of the problems faced in trauma surgery are increasing non-operative management of abdominal injuries, decreasing work hours and increasing sub-specialisation. We wanted to document the experience of trauma team leaders at the largest trauma centre in Norway, hypothesising that the patient volume would be inadequate to secure optimal trauma care. Patients registered in the hospital based Trauma Registry during the 2-year period from 1 August 2000 to 31 July 2002 were included. Of a total of 1667 patients registered, 645 patients (39%) had an Injury Severity Score (ISS)>15. Abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 205 patients with a median ISS of 30. An average trauma team leader assessed a total of 119 trauma cases a year (46 patients with ISS>15) and participated in 10 trauma laparotomies. Although the total number of trauma cases seems adequate, the experience of the trauma team leaders with challenging abdominal injuries is limited. With increasing sub-specialisation and general surgery vanishing, fewer surgical specialties provide operative competence in dealing with complicated torso trauma. A system of additional education and quality assurance measures is a prerequisite of high quality, and has consequently been introduced in our institution.

  19. Libraries in society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael; Skouvig, Laura Henriette Christine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate the phenomenon of openness in relation to library development. The term openness is presented and related to library development from historical and theoretical perspectives. The paper elaborates on the differences over time on to how openness has been...... understood in a library setting. Historically, openness in form of the open shelves played a crucial role in developing the modern public library. The paper examines this openness-centred library policy as adopted by Danish public libraries in the beginning of the 20th century by applying the theories...... by Michel Foucault on discourse and power to the introduction of open shelves. Furthermore, the paper discusses current challenges facing the modern public library in coping with openness issues that follow from changes in society and advances in technology. These influences and developments are not least...

  20. Behaviorism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.