WorldWideScience

Sample records for austere critical care

  1. EU TYPE OF AUSTERITY: BRIEF ANALYSIS AND CRITICISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONELA BALTATESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has become a common place to blame austerity policies for lengthening the economic downturn of EU economies, the figures reveal that public spending increased in most of the EU countries between 2007 and 2013. Although budget deficits from EU countries were indeed reduced in the last 4 years, the cutbacks were more the result of increasing government revenues and hiking taxes than of decreasing public expenditures. The article will feature: (1 a brief analysis of the evolution of public spending compared to government revenues in EU countries and also, (2 a concise literature review on austerity, highlighting some of the most important theoretical controversies on this topic. The main thesis defended in the article is that – although EU type of austerity, narrowly focusing on fiscal consolidation, drove indeed to unfavorable economic consequences – the criticism formulated by pro stimulus economists is rather flimsy, given the fact that public expenditures actually increased in most of the EU countries.

  2. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  3. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health. PMID:26825100

  4. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health.

  5. MEDEVAC: critical care transport from the battlefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R A

    2010-01-01

    In current military operations, the survival rates of critically injured casualties are unprecedented. An often hidden aspect of casualty care is safe transport from the point of injury to a field hospital and subsequently on to higher levels of care. This en route critical care, which is provided by flight medics under the most austere and rigorous conditions, is a crucial link in the care continuum. This article introduces the role and capabilities of US Army MEDEVAC and reflects the author's recent experience in Afghanistan as a flight medic. This article provides an assessment of the operational issues, medical capabilities, and transport experiences to provide a real-world view of critical care transport from the battlefield. The MEDEVAC helicopter environment is one of the most difficult, if not the most demanding, critical care environments. This overview brings to light a small but important piece of the care continuum.

  6. Effects of the financial crisis and Troika austerity measures on health and health care access in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Karanikolos, Marina; Hernandez-Plaza, Sonia; de Freitas, Cláudia; Bernardo, Luís; Padilla, Beatriz; Sá Machado, Rita; Diaz-Ordaz, Karla; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although Portugal has been deeply affected by the global financial crisis, the impact of the recession and subsequent austerity on health and to health care has attracted relatively little attention. We used several sources of data including the European Union Statistics for Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) which tracks unmet medical need during the recession and before and after the Troika's austerity package. Our results show that the odds of respondents reporting having an unmet medical need more than doubled between 2010 and 2012 (OR=2.41, 95% CI 2.01-2.89), with the greatest impact on those in employment, followed by the unemployed, retired, and other economically inactive groups. The reasons for not seeking care involved a combination of factors, with a 68% higher odds of citing financial barriers (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.32-2.12), more than twice the odds of citing waiting times and inability to take time off work or family responsibilities (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.20-3.98), and a large increase of reporting delaying care in the hope that the problem would resolve on its own (OR=13.98, 95% CI 6.51-30.02). Individual-level studies from Portugal also suggest that co-payments at primary and hospital level are having a negative effect on the most vulnerable living in disadvantaged areas, and that health care professionals have concerns about the impact of recession and subsequent austerity measures on the quality of care provided. The Portuguese government no longer needs external assistance, but these findings suggest that measures are now needed to mitigate the damage incurred by the crisis and austerity. PMID:27263063

  7. Effects of the financial crisis and Troika austerity measures on health and health care access in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Karanikolos, Marina; Hernandez-Plaza, Sonia; de Freitas, Cláudia; Bernardo, Luís; Padilla, Beatriz; Sá Machado, Rita; Diaz-Ordaz, Karla; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although Portugal has been deeply affected by the global financial crisis, the impact of the recession and subsequent austerity on health and to health care has attracted relatively little attention. We used several sources of data including the European Union Statistics for Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) which tracks unmet medical need during the recession and before and after the Troika's austerity package. Our results show that the odds of respondents reporting having an unmet medical need more than doubled between 2010 and 2012 (OR=2.41, 95% CI 2.01-2.89), with the greatest impact on those in employment, followed by the unemployed, retired, and other economically inactive groups. The reasons for not seeking care involved a combination of factors, with a 68% higher odds of citing financial barriers (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.32-2.12), more than twice the odds of citing waiting times and inability to take time off work or family responsibilities (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.20-3.98), and a large increase of reporting delaying care in the hope that the problem would resolve on its own (OR=13.98, 95% CI 6.51-30.02). Individual-level studies from Portugal also suggest that co-payments at primary and hospital level are having a negative effect on the most vulnerable living in disadvantaged areas, and that health care professionals have concerns about the impact of recession and subsequent austerity measures on the quality of care provided. The Portuguese government no longer needs external assistance, but these findings suggest that measures are now needed to mitigate the damage incurred by the crisis and austerity.

  8. Financial crisis and austerity measures in Greece: their impact on health promotion policies and public health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A; Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonou, Foteini H; Kalofonos, Haralabos P

    2013-11-01

    This review study explores the available data relating to the impact of financial crisis and subsequently applied austerity measures on the health care, social services and health promotion policies in Greece. It is evident that Greece is affected more than any other European country by the financial crisis. Unemployment, job insecurity, income reduction, poverty and increase of mental disorders are among the most serious consequences of crisis in the socioeconomic life. The health system is particularly affected by the severe austerity measures. The drastic curtailing of government spending has significantly affected the structure and functioning of public hospitals that cope with understaffing, deficits, drug shortage and basic medical supplies. Moreover, health promotion policies are constrained, inhibiting thus the relevant initiatives toward disease prevention and health promotion education practices. Overall, the current economic situation in Greece and its impact on real life and health care is quite concerning. Policy makers should not disregard the implications that austerity and fiscal policies have on the health sector. Greater attention is needed in order to ensure that individuals would continue getting public health care and having access to preventive and social support services. To face the economic hardship, policy makers are expected to implement human-centered approaches, safeguarding the human dignity and the moral values.

  9. The effects of the financial crisis and austerity measures on the Spanish health care system: a qualitative analysis of health professionals' perceptions in the region of Valencia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Liceras, Francisco; McKee, Martin; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The recent financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system. However, the impacts are not yet well documented. We describe the findings from a qualitative study that explored health care professionals' perception of the effects of austerity measures in the Spanish Autonomous Community of Valencia. A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals, recorded and fully transcribed. We coded all interviews using an inductive approach, drawing on techniques used in the constant comparative method. Health professionals reported increases in mental health conditions and malnutrition linked to a loss of income from employment and cuts to social support services. Health care professionals perceived that the quality of health care had become worse and health outcomes had deteriorated as a result of austerity measures. Interviewees also suggested that increased copayments meant that a growing number of patients could not afford necessary medication. While a few supported reforms and policies, such as the increase in copayments for pharmaceuticals, most opposed the privatization of health care facilities, and the newly introduced Royal Decree-law 16/2012, particularly the exclusion of non-residents from the health care system. The prevailing perception is that austerity measures are having negative effects on the quality of the health care system and population health. In light of this evidence there is an urgent need to evaluate the austerity measures recently introduced and to consider alternatives such as the derogation of the Royal Decree-law 16/2012.

  10. Capitalism, the state and health care in the age of austerity: a Marxist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to provide satisfactory nursing care is being increasingly compromised by current trajectories of healthcare funding and governance. The purpose of this paper is to examine how well Marxist theories of the state and its relationship with capital can explain these trajectories in this period of ever-increasing austerity. Following a brief history of the current crisis, it examines empirically the effects of the crisis, and of the current trajectory of capitalism in general, upon the funding and organization of the UK and US healthcare systems. The deleterious effect of growing income inequalities to the health of the population is also addressed. Marx's writings on the state and its relation to the capitalist class were fragmentary and historically and geographically specific. From them, we can extract three theoretical variants: the instrumentalist theory of the state, where the state has no autonomy from capital; the abdication theory, whereby capital abstains from direct political power and relies on the state to serve its interests; and the class-balance theory, whereby the struggle between two opposed classes allows the state to assert itself. Discussion of modern Marxist interpretations includes Poulantzas's abdication theory and Miliband's instrumentalist theory. It is concluded that, despite the pluralism of electoral democracies, the bourgeoisie do have an overweening influence upon the state. The bourgeoisie's ownership of the means of production provides the foundation for its influence because the state is obliged to rely on it to manage the supply of goods and services and the creation of wealth. That power is further reinforced by the infiltration of the bourgeoisie into the organs of state. The level of influence has accelerated rapidly over recent decades. One of the consequences of this has been that healthcare systems have become rich pickings for the evermore confident bourgeoisie.

  11. Capitalism, the state and health care in the age of austerity: a Marxist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to provide satisfactory nursing care is being increasingly compromised by current trajectories of healthcare funding and governance. The purpose of this paper is to examine how well Marxist theories of the state and its relationship with capital can explain these trajectories in this period of ever-increasing austerity. Following a brief history of the current crisis, it examines empirically the effects of the crisis, and of the current trajectory of capitalism in general, upon the funding and organization of the UK and US healthcare systems. The deleterious effect of growing income inequalities to the health of the population is also addressed. Marx's writings on the state and its relation to the capitalist class were fragmentary and historically and geographically specific. From them, we can extract three theoretical variants: the instrumentalist theory of the state, where the state has no autonomy from capital; the abdication theory, whereby capital abstains from direct political power and relies on the state to serve its interests; and the class-balance theory, whereby the struggle between two opposed classes allows the state to assert itself. Discussion of modern Marxist interpretations includes Poulantzas's abdication theory and Miliband's instrumentalist theory. It is concluded that, despite the pluralism of electoral democracies, the bourgeoisie do have an overweening influence upon the state. The bourgeoisie's ownership of the means of production provides the foundation for its influence because the state is obliged to rely on it to manage the supply of goods and services and the creation of wealth. That power is further reinforced by the infiltration of the bourgeoisie into the organs of state. The level of influence has accelerated rapidly over recent decades. One of the consequences of this has been that healthcare systems have become rich pickings for the evermore confident bourgeoisie. PMID:23279579

  12. About Critical Care Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... requiring intense and vigilant nursing care. Number of Critical Care Nurses in the United States According to "The Registered ... nurses who work in a hospital setting. Where Critical Care Nurses Work According to "The Registered Nurse Population" study, ...

  13. Critical care during epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinson, Lewis; O'Toole, Tara

    2005-01-01

    We recommend several actions that could improve hospitals' abilities to deliver critical care during epidemics involving large numbers of victims. In the absence of careful pre-event planning, demand for critical care services may quickly exceed available intensive care unit (ICU) staff, beds and equipment, leaving the bulk of the infected populace without benefit of potentially lifesaving critical care. The toll of death may be inversely proportional to the ability to augment critical care c...

  14. Critical Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of these areas: Surgery Internal medicine Pediatrics Anesthesiology Critical care nurse: A highly skilled nurse who provides all aspects ... and can often uphold the patient's wishes. The critical care nurse becomes an important part of decision-making with ...

  15. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  16. Austere conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluwstein, Jevgeniy; Moyo, Francis; Kicheleri, Rose Peter

    2016-01-01

    . Our findings suggest that WMAs foster very limited ownership, participation and collective action at the community level, because WMA governance follows an austere logic of centralized control over key resources. Thus, we suggest that it is difficult to argue that WMAs are community-owned conservation...... initiatives until a genuinely devolved and more flexible conservation model is implemented to give space for popular participation in rule-making....

  17. Human Security Workers Deployed in Austere Environments: A Brief Guide to Self-Care, Sustainment, and Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Ditzler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s, the human security movement has sought to expand the concept of security beyond the traditional military defense of national borders to focus on the intra-state security needs of populations at the individual level. Specific initiatives frequently address problems of population health, ethnic conflict, religious extremism, human rights, environmental or natural disasters, and other critical issues. For expatriate human security workers in the field, the environment may present meaningful challenges to their wellbeing and productivity. This can be especially so for those who have relatively more experience in academic, business, or administrative settings, and less in the field. The authors' goal is to illuminate practices that have demonstrated their efficacy in enhancing wellness, sustainment, and productivity for human security and other humanitarian and development workers deployed to austere environments. The content represents a synoptic consensus of best general practices and guidance from a range of resources comprising United Nations agencies and activities, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGO's, private volunteer organ­izations (PVO's, national military services, and international business concerns.

  18. Critical care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwadia, F E; Guntupalli, K K; Vidyasagar, D

    1997-04-01

    India is a vast democracy of nearly one billion people. Before the British rule ended in 1947, the life span of an Indian was a mere 21 years. Within a short span of 50 years, it increased to an impressive 63 years, largely due to public health measures initiated by the government. This created a pool of more than 300 million middle class Indians who could afford the benefits of modern and specialized care when needed. Critical care medicine, as practiced in the West, is still confined to large Metropolitan areas. A large pool of expatriate Indian physicians from all over the world are helping bridge the resource gap between the West and India by transfer of technology and providing appropriate training to physicians and paramedical personnel. This article describes the history and current status of development of critical care medicine in India. PMID:9107510

  19. Society of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care App Social Media Critical Care Statistics eCommunity Media Relations SmartBrief SCCM App Education Center Annual Congress Program ... Care App Social Media Critical Care Statistics eCommunity Media Relations SmartBrief SCCM App Education Center Annual Congress Program ...

  20. Sepsis in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joan E

    2007-03-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome produced by the accelerated activity of the inflammatory immune response, the clotting cascade, and endothelial damage. It is a systematic process that can progress easily into septic shock and MODS. The chemical mediators or cytokines produce a complex self-perpetuating process that impacts all body systems. It is critical for the nurse first to identify patients at risk for developing sepsis and to assess patients who have SIRS and sepsis continually for signs and symptoms of organ involvement and organ dysfunction. Once sepsis has been diagnosed, evidence-based practice indicates initiation of fluid resuscitation. Vasopressor therapy, positive inotropic support, and appropriate antibiotic therapy should be started within the first hour. Within a 6-hour timeframe the goal is stabilization of the CVP, MAP, and UOP to prevent further organ damage. The challenge for nurses caring for septic patients is to support the treatment goals, to prevent added complications including stress ulcers, DVTs, aspiration pneumonia, and the progression to MODS, and to address the patient's and the family's psychosocial needs. As complex as the pathophysiology of sepsis is, the nursing care is equally complex but also rewarding. Patients who previously might have died now recover as vigilant nursing care combines forces with new drug therapies and evidence-based practice guidelines.

  1. Austerity for Whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen McBride

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the recent multi-billion dollar bailouts offered to leading sectors of capital, fiscal austerity is poised to make a comeback worldwide. Labour will be forced to pay for the public debt accumulated in the aftermath of the recent global financial and economic crisis. Notwithstanding change and evolution in the neoliberal model over time, this return to austerity is consistent with overall policy in the neoliberal period which can be considered an era of permanent restraint in most areas of social spending. This article examines a variety of trends that have emerged over the past thirty years of neoliberal rule: the various facets of neoliberal policy and their temporal dimensions; as well as the results of market-reliance and spending reforms: growing affluence for a minority of Canadians while the majority lose ground and inequalities are further entrenched. Asking 'austerity for whom' directs attention at the interconnections between affluence and austerity that exist in Canada.

  2. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well t...

  3. Health inequalities after austerity in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Kentikelenis, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of economic crisis, Greece has been experiencing unprecedented levels of unemployment and profound cuts to public budgets. Health and welfare sectors were subject to severe austerity measures, which have endangered provision of as well as access to services, potentially widening health inequality gap. European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions data show that the proportion of individuals on low incomes reporting unmet medical need due to cost doubled from 7 % in 2008 to 13.9 % in 2013, while the relative gap in access to care between the richest and poorest population groups increased almost ten-fold. In addition, austerity cuts have affected other vulnerable groups, such as undocumented migrants and injecting drug users. Steps have been taken in attempt to mitigate the impact of the austerity, however addressing the growing health inequality gap will require persistent effort of the country's leadership for years to come. PMID:27245588

  4. Critical Care of Pet Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey Rowe

    2016-05-01

    Successful care of the critical pet bird patient is dependent on preparation and planning and begins with the veterinarian and hospital staff. An understanding of avian physiology and pathophysiology is key. Physical preparation of the hospital or clinic includes proper equipment and understanding of the procedures necessary to provide therapeutic and supportive care to the avian patient. An overview of patient intake and assessment, intensive care environment, and fluid therapy is included. PMID:27131161

  5. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  6. Making Sense of Austerity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Riisbjerg Thomsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    elements are part of a sensemaking process where people are trying to understand their personal situation, changes to their households, and the national economy. We apply this logic to a study of online comments’ sections for 240 newspaper articles on austerity in Denmark and the United Kingdom. Characters...

  7. Update in Critical Care 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dres, Martin; Mancebo, Jordi; Curley, Gerard F

    2016-07-01

    This review documents important progress made in 2015 in the field of critical care. Significant advances in 2015 included further evidence for early implementation of low tidal volume ventilation as well as new insights into the role of open lung biopsy, diaphragmatic dysfunction, and a potential mechanism for ventilator-induced fibroproliferation. New therapies, including a novel low-flow extracorporeal CO2 removal technique and mesenchymal stem cell-derived microparticles, have also been studied. Several studies examining the role of improved diagnosis and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia also showed relevant results. This review examines articles published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and other major journals that have made significant advances in the field of critical care in 2015. PMID:27367886

  8. Critical issues in burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James H

    2008-01-01

    Burn care, especially for serious burn injuries, represents a considerable challenge for the healthcare system. The American Burn Association has established a number of strategies for the management of burn patients and dedicates its efforts and resources to promoting and supporting burn-related research, education, care, rehabilitation, and prevention, often in collaboration with other organizations. The American Burn Association has recommended that patients with serious burns be referred to a designated burn center, ie, a hospital outfitted with specialized personnel and equipment dedicated to burn care. Burn centers have been operational for over 50 years, but the complexity and costs of providing specialized burn care have given rise to a number of critical administrative and political issues. These include logistical limitations imposed by the uneven national distribution of burn centers and a potential shortage of burn beds, both during everyday conditions and in the event of a mass disaster. Burn surgeon shortages have also been identified, stemming, in part, from a lack of specialized burn care training opportunities. There is currently a lack of quality outcome data to support evidence-based recommendations for burn care, and burn care centers are compromised by problems obtaining reimbursement for the care of uninsured and publicly insured out-of-state burn patients. Initiatives are underway to maintain efficient burn care facilities that are fully funded, easily accessible, and most importantly, provide optimal, evidence-based care on a daily basis, and are well-equipped to handle a surge of patients during a disaster situation.

  9. Glucose control in critical care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control among critically-ill patients has beena topic of considerable attention for the past 15 years.An initial focus on the potentially deleterious effects ofhyperglycemia led to a series of investigations regardingintensive insulin therapy strategies that targeted tightglycemic control. As knowledge accumulated, the pursuitof tight glycemic control among critically-ill patients cameto be seen as counterproductive, and moderate glycemiccontrol came to dominate as the standard practice inintensive care units. In recent years, there has beenincreased focus on the importance of hypoglycemicepisodes, glycemic variability, and premorbid diabeticstatus as factors that contribute to outcomes amongcritically-ill patients. This review provides a survey ofkey studies on glucose control in critical care, and aimsto deliver perspective regarding glycemic managementamong critically-ill patients.

  10. Hybridlitteratur: Paul Auster

    OpenAIRE

    Steensen Møller, Christoffer Jr.; Højmark-Jensen, Gustav Jr.; Hoeck, Caroline Mandrup Jr.; Gersbøll, Sigrid Dam Jr.; Schiødte Rasmussen, Simone Puk Jr.; Mølgaard, Katrine Jr.; Rove, Kristina Jr.; Sørensen, Katrin á Dul Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to analyse and discuss the hybrid, postmodern detective novel City of Glass written by Paul Auster - both in terms of narrative form, but also in terms of examining the underlying postmodern features and elements which the novel continuously displays. All factors will be made evident throughout the dissertation by incorporating coherent analytic observations based on the accumulated theoretical material. In terms of analysing the postmodern features the study will primaril...

  11. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Pediatric critical care specialists coordinate the care of these children which is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists. They use the ...

  12. Human Security Workers Deployed in Austere Environments: A Brief Guide to Self-Care, Sustainment, and Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas F. Ditzler; Abigail D. Hoeh; Patricia R. Hastings

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the human security movement has sought to expand the concept of security beyond the traditional military defense of national borders to focus on the intra-state security needs of populations at the individual level. Specific initiatives frequently address problems of population health, ethnic conflict, religious extremism, human rights, environmental or natural disasters, and other critical issues. For expatriate human security workers in the field, the environment may ...

  13. Financial crisis, austerity, and health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Mladovsky, Philipa; Cylus, Jonathan; Thomson, Sarah; Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Mackenbach, Johan P; McKee, Martin

    2013-04-13

    The financial crisis in Europe has posed major threats and opportunities to health. We trace the origins of the economic crisis in Europe and the responses of governments, examine the effect on health systems, and review the effects of previous economic downturns on health to predict the likely consequences for the present. We then compare our predictions with available evidence for the effects of the crisis on health. Whereas immediate rises in suicides and falls in road traffic deaths were anticipated, other consequences, such as HIV outbreaks, were not, and are better understood as products of state retrenchment. Greece, Spain, and Portugal adopted strict fiscal austerity; their economies continue to recede and strain on their health-care systems is growing. Suicides and outbreaks of infectious diseases are becoming more common in these countries, and budget cuts have restricted access to health care. By contrast, Iceland rejected austerity through a popular vote, and the financial crisis seems to have had few or no discernible effects on health. Although there are many potentially confounding differences between countries, our analysis suggests that, although recessions pose risks to health, the interaction of fiscal austerity with economic shocks and weak social protection is what ultimately seems to escalate health and social crises in Europe. Policy decisions about how to respond to economic crises have pronounced and unintended effects on public health, yet public health voices have remained largely silent during the economic crisis.

  14. Financial crisis, austerity, and health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Mladovsky, Philipa; Cylus, Jonathan; Thomson, Sarah; Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Mackenbach, Johan P; McKee, Martin

    2013-04-13

    The financial crisis in Europe has posed major threats and opportunities to health. We trace the origins of the economic crisis in Europe and the responses of governments, examine the effect on health systems, and review the effects of previous economic downturns on health to predict the likely consequences for the present. We then compare our predictions with available evidence for the effects of the crisis on health. Whereas immediate rises in suicides and falls in road traffic deaths were anticipated, other consequences, such as HIV outbreaks, were not, and are better understood as products of state retrenchment. Greece, Spain, and Portugal adopted strict fiscal austerity; their economies continue to recede and strain on their health-care systems is growing. Suicides and outbreaks of infectious diseases are becoming more common in these countries, and budget cuts have restricted access to health care. By contrast, Iceland rejected austerity through a popular vote, and the financial crisis seems to have had few or no discernible effects on health. Although there are many potentially confounding differences between countries, our analysis suggests that, although recessions pose risks to health, the interaction of fiscal austerity with economic shocks and weak social protection is what ultimately seems to escalate health and social crises in Europe. Policy decisions about how to respond to economic crises have pronounced and unintended effects on public health, yet public health voices have remained largely silent during the economic crisis. PMID:23541059

  15. Year in review 2013: Critical Care - respirology

    OpenAIRE

    Curley, Gerard F; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    This review documents important progress made in 2013 in the field of critical care respirology, in particular with regard to acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Twenty-five original articles published in the respirology and critical care sections of Critical Care are discussed in the following categories: pre-clinical studies, protective lung ventilation – how low can we go, non-invasive ventilation for respiratory failure, diagnosis and prognosis in acute resp...

  16. Critical care procedure logging using handheld computers

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Martinez-Motta, J; Walker, Robin; Stewart, Thomas E; Granton, John; Abrahamson, Simon; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an internet-linked handheld computer procedure logging system in a critical care training program. Methods Subspecialty trainees in the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care at the University of Toronto received and were trained in the use of Palm handheld computers loaded with a customized program for logging critical care procedures. The procedures were entered into the handheld device using checkboxes an...

  17. Opportunities for pharmaceutical care with critical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K E

    1995-01-01

    Critical pathways are multidisciplinary tools designed to improve patient care and efficiency. Almost every path requires some type of pharmacotherapeutic intervention, from selection of surgical prophylaxis to management of anticoagulation. Pharmacists should become involved with the critical pathway process because it offers an excellent opportunity to incorporate pharmaceutical care and to meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization compliance criteria.

  18. [Severe infection in critical emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Takatani, Yudai; Higashi, Tomoko; Inaba, Masato; Ejima, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    In the emergency and critical care medicine, infection is easy to merge to various basic conditions and diseases. In the social structure aging in critical care, the immune weakness was revealed as the result of severe infection and septic shock in the reduced function of neutrophils and lymphocytes. In the life-saving emergency care, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic renal failure and lever dysfunction are often observed, and the underlying diseases have the foundation of biological invasion after a first inflammatory attack of surgery, trauma, burn, and systemic injury. It will be placed into a susceptible situation such as artificial respiratory management. In this review, we discussed severe infection in emergency and critical care. It is necessary to pay attention to the drug resistance bacterias in own critical care setting by trends.

  19. [Severe infection in critical emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Takatani, Yudai; Higashi, Tomoko; Inaba, Masato; Ejima, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    In the emergency and critical care medicine, infection is easy to merge to various basic conditions and diseases. In the social structure aging in critical care, the immune weakness was revealed as the result of severe infection and septic shock in the reduced function of neutrophils and lymphocytes. In the life-saving emergency care, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic renal failure and lever dysfunction are often observed, and the underlying diseases have the foundation of biological invasion after a first inflammatory attack of surgery, trauma, burn, and systemic injury. It will be placed into a susceptible situation such as artificial respiratory management. In this review, we discussed severe infection in emergency and critical care. It is necessary to pay attention to the drug resistance bacterias in own critical care setting by trends. PMID:26915247

  20. Critical care issues in cervical cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, R; Janicek, M F; Schoell, W M

    1999-01-01

    Radical pelvic surgery in gynecologic oncology patients poses a challenge to the surgeon and the ancillary team in charge of the peri-operative care. The high frequency of medical problems observed in this patient population, in conjunction with the stresses of radical surgery, necessitates careful monitoring of patients' medical status. A comprehensive team approach in the perioperative period is critical to patient care. Early intervention and anticipation of potential problems for the patient at risk in the postoperative period minimizes morbidity and mortality. This article will review the essentials of critical care as it relates to patients undergoing radical pelvic operations. PMID:10225307

  1. Surviving sepsis in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The management of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care environment is a complex task requiring the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign provides systematic guidelines for the recognition, early intervention, and supportive management of sepsis. Critical care nurses are instrumental in ensuring that these guidelines and other sources of evidence-based practice are used for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. This article discusses the pathophysiologic processes in severe sepsis and septic shock and discusses the appropriate interventions as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Recommended early treatments are reviewed along with interventions related to hemodynamics, perfusion, and supportive care in the critical care environment.

  2. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Certification APRN Resources Education State-of-the-art educational programs provide evidence- based knowledge, directly applicable to practice ... Policy Disclaimer © American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Learn ...

  3. Critical Care Glucose Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, S N; Jones, M; Hermayer, K L; Zhu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within an acceptable range is a goal for patients with diabetes mellitus. Point-of-care glucose meters initially designed for home self-monitoring in patients with diabetes have been widely used in the hospital settings because of ease of use and quick reporting of blood glucose information. They are not only utilized for the general inpatient population but also for critically ill patients. Many factors affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing, particularly in critical care settings. Inaccurate blood glucose information can result in unsafe insulin delivery which causes poor glucose control and can be fatal. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the limitations of point-of-care glucose testing. This chapter will first introduce glucose regulation in diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia/hypoglycemia in the intensive care unit, importance of glucose control in critical care patients, and pathophysiological variables of critically ill patients that affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing. Then, we will discuss currently available point-of-care glucose meters and preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical sources of variation and error in point-of-care glucose testing. PMID:27645817

  4. Critical paths: maximizing patient care coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, P L

    1995-01-01

    1. With today's emphasis on horizontal and vertical integration of patient care services and the new initiatives prompted by these challenges, OR nurses are considering new methods for managing the perioperative period. One such method is the critical path. 2. A critical path defines an optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff members for a particular diagnosis or procedure, designed to better use resources, maximize quality of care, and minimize delays. 3. Hospitals implementing path-based patient care have reported cost reductions and improved team-work. Critical paths have been shown to reduce patient care costs by improving hospital efficiency, not merely by reducing physician practice variations.

  5. Austere Human Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Hoppy; Hawkins, Alisa; Radcliffe, Torrey

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible mission architecture for a more austere Mars mission, than the one developed by NASA outlined in the Design Reference Architecture 5 (DRA 5). "Austere" architecture is scaled back from DRA 5 and might offer lower development cost, lower flight cost, and lower development risk. This approach will not meet all the DRA 5 mission requirements. Included in the presentation are the elements of an Austere mission, diagrams of the trans-Mars injection (TMI), cruise, and Mars Orbital Insertion for various phases of the mission, the entry descent landing (EDL) concept. The key features of the Transit Habitat (TransHab), the Earth Departure Stage (EDS), the landers, are reviewed. A chart shows the Mass in tons, of the conceptual types of Mars Landers. The EDL concept, EDL Phase diagrams for the Mars Lander are reviewed. New technologies that would be required are also reviewed. Flight test programs for the various parts of the architecture and a flight schedule are reviewed.

  6. A leadership programme for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Linda

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the genesis, design and implementation of a leadership programme for critical care. This was an initiative funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Nursing Leadership Project and had at the core of its design flexibility to meet the needs of the individual hospitals, which took part in it. Participation was from the multi-disciplinary critical care team. Six NHS hospitals took part in the programme which was of 20 days duration and took place on hospital sites. The programme used the leadership model of as its template and had a number of distinct components; a baseline assessment, personal development, principles of leadership and critical case reviews. The programme was underpinned by three themes; working effectively in multi-professional teams to provide patient focussed care, managing change through effective leadership and developing the virtual critical care service. Each group set objectives pertinent to their own organisation's needs. The programme was evaluated by a self-reporting questionnaire; group feedback and feedback from stakeholders. Programme evaluation was positive from all the hospitals but it was clear that the impact of the programme varied considerably between the groups who took part. It was noted that there was some correlation between the success of the programme and organisational 'buy in' as well as the organisational culture within which the participants operated. A key feature of the programme success was the critical case reviews, which were considered to be a powerful learning tool and medium for group learning and change management. PMID:16621563

  7. A leadership programme for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Linda

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the genesis, design and implementation of a leadership programme for critical care. This was an initiative funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Nursing Leadership Project and had at the core of its design flexibility to meet the needs of the individual hospitals, which took part in it. Participation was from the multi-disciplinary critical care team. Six NHS hospitals took part in the programme which was of 20 days duration and took place on hospital sites. The programme used the leadership model of as its template and had a number of distinct components; a baseline assessment, personal development, principles of leadership and critical case reviews. The programme was underpinned by three themes; working effectively in multi-professional teams to provide patient focussed care, managing change through effective leadership and developing the virtual critical care service. Each group set objectives pertinent to their own organisation's needs. The programme was evaluated by a self-reporting questionnaire; group feedback and feedback from stakeholders. Programme evaluation was positive from all the hospitals but it was clear that the impact of the programme varied considerably between the groups who took part. It was noted that there was some correlation between the success of the programme and organisational 'buy in' as well as the organisational culture within which the participants operated. A key feature of the programme success was the critical case reviews, which were considered to be a powerful learning tool and medium for group learning and change management.

  8. Reimbursement for critical care services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Jayaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are significant variations in critical care practices, costs, and reimbursements in various countries. Of note, there is a paucity of reliable information on remuneration and reimbursement models for intensivists in India. This review article aims to analyze the existing reimbursement models in United States and United Kingdom and propose a frame-work model that may be applicable in India.

  9. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    2000-01-01

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse outco

  10. Intrahospital Transit Care of the Critically Ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagappan R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal patient transport system should indeed be a mobile ICU. Optimal features to be desired are light weight, unhindered access for patient evaluation and management, uncluttered environment for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in transit, low cost and, where relevant, adaptability to surface and air transportation. In appropriate situations, suitability for inter-hospital and intra-hospital transport of the critically ill with the same transit-care equipment will be an added advantage. Such systems could also be adapted for pre-hospital evacuation of the critically ill. The investment of time, intellect and technological labour in devising and maintaining a good transit care team with affordable equipment and trained medical and nursing staff is an integral part of running an intensive care service.

  11. Pain: advances and issues in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M; Cotanch, P H

    1987-09-01

    The milieu of the critical care unit is stressful for both the patient and health care professionals. As such, it has the potential to increase pain perception in patients, and decrease the nurse's awareness of pain relief needs of the patient. Several physical and pharmacologic methods of pain relief were discussed in this article. Nontechnologic analgesia such as hypnosis and relaxation were introduced as adjuncts or alternatives to more familiar methods of pain relief. Although critically ill patients are not always able to express their discomfort, it is the responsibility of the nurse to recognize the potential for pain, and plan treatment accordingly. This article suggests several strategies for dealing with pain in critically ill patients. PMID:3302958

  12. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health Care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health care professionals and for patients. PMID:27369038

  13. A Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals. A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. PMID:27367887

  14. Incorporating educational theory into critical care orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashotte, Judy; Thomas, Margot

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of a critical care total education system, which includes an orientation program. The educational process in this unit reflects Benner's model of novice to expert integrated with Schon's theory of reflective practice and Cranton's transformational learning theory. This program reflects an educational philosophy that facilitates learning on entry into the new workplace, and an established continuum of expected acquisition of knowledge, practice skills, attitudes, and critical thinking abilities promoting the transition from novice to expert. PMID:12046715

  15. Year in review in Critical Care, 2003 and 2004: respirology and critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Brander, Lukas; Slutsky, Arthur

    2005-01-01

    We summarize all original research in the field of respirology and critical care published in 2003 and 2004 in Critical Care. Articles were grouped into the following categories to facilitate a rapid overview: pathophysiology, therapeutic approaches, and outcome in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome; hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension; mechanical ventilation; liberation from mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy; ventilator-associated pneumonia; multidrug-resista...

  16. Respiratory Review of 2013: Critical Care Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hye Sook

    2013-01-01

    Several papers on respiratory and critical care published from March 2012 to February 2013 were reviewed. From these, this study selected and summarized ten articles, in which the findings were notable, new, and interesting: effects of high-frequency oscillation ventilation on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); safety and efficacy of hydroxyethyl starch as a resuscitation fluid; long-term psychological impairments after ARDS; safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine for sedation; B-typ...

  17. Year in review 2009: Critical Care - shock

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Wolfgang; Bracht, Hendrik; Radermacher, Peter; Thomas, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The research papers on shock that have been published in Critical Care throughout 2009 are related to four major subjects: first, alterations of heart function and, second, the role of the sympathetic central nervous system during sepsis; third, the impact of hemodynamic support using vasopressin or its synthetic analog terlipressin, and different types of fluid resuscitation; as well as, fourth, experimental studies on the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present review ...

  18. Critical care in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The volume and duration of stay of the critically ill in the emergency department (ED) is increasing and is affected by factors including case-mix, overcrowding, lack of available and staffed intensive care beds and an ageing population. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical activity associated with these high-acuity patients and to quantify resource utilization by this patient group. METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of ED notes from all patients referred directly to the intensive care team over a 6-month period from April to September 2004. We applied a workload measurement tool, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS)-28, which has been validated as a surrogate marker of nursing resource input in the intensive care setting. A nurse is considered capable of delivering nursing activities equal to 46 TISS-28 points in each 8-h shift. RESULTS: The median score from our 69 patients was 19 points per patient. Applying TISS-28 methodology, we estimated that 3 h 13 min nursing time would be spent on a single critically ill ED patient, with a TISS score of 19. This is an indicator of the high levels of personnel resources required for these patients in the ED. ED-validated models to quantify nursing and medical staff resources used across the spectrum of ED care is needed, so that staffing resources can be planned and allocated to match service demands.

  19. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in neurological critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH is a clinical disorder mainly caused by traumatic brain injury, stroke, encephalitis and other types of brain injury. The clinical features are episodes of hypertension, tachycardia, tachypnea, fever and dystonic postures. In this study, we described clinical profile and outcome of six patients of PSH admitted in neurocritical care unit. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study conducted at neurology critical care unit of a tertiary care center. All patients admitted at neurology critical unit during 6-month period from August 2013 to January 2014 were screened for the occurrence of PSH. The clinical details and outcome was documented. Results: PSH was observed in 6 patients. Male to female ratio was 5:1. Mean age ± SD was 36.67 ± 15.19 years. The leading causes were traumatic brain injury (two patients, stroke (two patients and Japanese encephalitis (JE (one patient and tuberculous meningitis (one patient. Conclusion: PSH is an unusual complication in neurocritical care. It prolonged the hospitalization and hampers recovery. The other life-threatening conditions that mimic PSH should be excluded. The association with JE and tuberculous meningitis was not previously described in literature.

  20. Exploring the impact of austerity-driven policy reforms on the quality of the long-term care provision for older people in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, David; Jongen, Wesley; Schröder-Bäck, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this case study, European quality benchmarks were used to explore the contemporary quality of the long-term care provision for older people in the Belgian region of Flanders and the Netherlands following recent policy reforms. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with various experts on the long-term care provision. The results show that in the wake of the economic crisis and the reforms that followed, certain vulnerable groups of older people in Belgium and the Netherlands are at risk of being deprived of long-term care that is available, affordable and person-centred. Various suggestions were provided on how to improve the quality of the long-term care provision. The main conclusion drawn in this study is that while national and regional governments set the stage through regulatory frameworks and financing mechanisms, it is subsequently up to long-term care organisations, local social networks and informal caregivers to give substance to a high quality long-term care provision. An increased reliance on social networks and informal caregivers is seen as vital to ensure the sustainability of the long-term care systems in Belgium and in the Netherlands, although this simultaneously introduces new predicaments and difficulties. Structural governmental measures have to be introduced to support and protect informal caregivers and informal care networks. PMID:27531456

  1. Physiotherapy in critical care in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Susan; Haines, Kimberley; Denehy, Linda

    2012-03-01

    A physiotherapist is part of the multidisciplinary team in most intensive care units in Australia. Physiotherapists are primary contact practitioners and use a comprehensive multisystem assessment that includes the respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems to formulate individualized treatment plans. The traditional focus of treatment has been the respiratory management of both intubated and spontaneously breathing patients. However, the emerging evidence of the longstanding physical impairment suffered by survivors of intensive care has resulted in physiotherapists re-evaluating treatment priorities to include exercise rehabilitation as a part of standard clinical practice. The goals of respiratory physiotherapy management are to promote secretion clearance, maintain or recruit lung volume, optimize oxygenation, and prevent respiratory complications in both the intubated and spontaneously breathing patient. In the intubated patient, physiotherapists commonly employ manual and ventilator hyperinflation and positioning as treatment techniques whilst in the spontaneously breathing patients there is an emphasis on mobilization. Physiotherapists predominantly use functional activities for the rehabilitation of the critically ill patient in intensive care. While variability exists between states and centers, Australian physiotherapists actively treat critically ill patients targeting interventions based upon research evidence and individualized assessment. A trend toward more emphasis on exercise rehabilitation over respiratory management is evident. PMID:22807651

  2. Critical Care In Korea: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae-Man; Kwak, Sang-Hyun; Suh, Gee Young; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-11-01

    Critical (or intensive) care medicine (CCM) is a branch of medicine concerned with the care of patients with potentially reversible life-threatening conditions. Numerous studies have demonstrated that adequate staffing is of crucial importance for patient outcome. Adequate staffing also showed favorable cost-effectiveness in terms of ICU stay, decreased use of resources, and lower re-admission rates. The current status of CCM of our country is not comparable to that of advanced countries. The global pandemic episodes in the past decade showed that our society is not well prepared for severe illnesses or mass casualty. To improve CCM in Korea, reimbursement of the government must be amended such that referral hospitals can hire sufficient number of qualified intensivists and nurses. For the government to address these urgent issues, public awareness of the role of CCM is also required.

  3. Austerity, Discipline and Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asja Hrvatin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the manifestations of the global crisis of financial capitalism and the policies arising from it was the imposition of austerity measures, which not only resulted in privatization of the commons and general expropriation of the people, but also managed to introduce new mechanisms of discipline and punishment. Debt, being the fundament of relations in society, forced itself into the system of social security: new legislation, regulating welfare benefits, has now shifted to a method for the criminalization of poverty, deepening class differences and transforming social workers (and the system of social security as a whole into a moralizing, bureaucratic machine for disciplining the population. The new legislation also shows a lack of reflection on the changes that need to be made to the welfare state in order to create social services that meet the needs and desires of individuals. Instead of improvements that provide decent living conditions and a new system of social rights (to deal with the problems resulting from precarious working conditions, people are faced with depersonalization, humiliation and increased hate speech and other fascist practices. The effect of austerity measures on the social security system does not end with the devastation of service users’ lives and their communities, which are slowly becoming exhausted, individualized and devoid of solidarity. It also means a big step backwards for the core ethics and principles of social work. Social workers are increasingly alienated from their clients and the communities they live in. They function more in the service of the government and its policies rather than as advocates of people’s rights.

  4. Experiences of critical care nurses caring for unresponsive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, N E

    1999-08-01

    Grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of critical care nurses caring for patients who were unable to respond due to a traumatic brain injury or receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. The registered nurses participating in the study worked in a neuroscience intensive care unit. Saturation of the categories was achieved with 16 interviews. The core category that emerged from the study is Giving the Patient a Chance. The subcategories of Learning about My Patient, Maintaining and Monitoring, Talking to My Patient, Working with Families, Struggling with Dilemmas and Personalizing the Experience all centered upon the focus of doing everything to help the patient attain the best possible outcome. Factors influencing each of the subcategories were identified such as the acuity of the patient, experience level of the nurse and the presence or absence of family members or significant others. These factors accounted for the variations in the nurses' experience. Several reasons accounting for the variations were determined. The study identified areas that need to be addressed in both general nursing education and nursing practice, such as instruction on talking to comatose patients, working with families and orientation information for nurses new to caring for these populations. Recommendations for improvement in these areas, as well as for future studies are discussed. PMID:10553569

  5. Fiscal Austerity Versus Growth in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Škare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of fiscal austerity has been questioned for centuries, but a rapidly increasing deficit along with the financial crisis in 2007/2008 influenced a renewed debate on the economics of austerity. This paper analyzes the role of austerity versus the role of economic growth. It also attempts to highlight the role of the theoretical context of austerity policy and the economic history lesson learned during the transition from the Bretton Woods model to Washington’s consensus. Despite numerous studies and polarized debate, no consensus on the implementation of fiscal austerity has been achieved because this complex subject has not been the subject of a sufficient methodological exploration. Emphasis should be placed on defining the methodology of austerity and gathering statistical data to influence the implementation of social transfer policies. In addition, it is necessary not only to take a hybrid approach to fiscal and monetary policy but also to adopt economic laws and quantitative economic relationships. The benchmarking country used in this paper is Croatia. The outcome of this research can serve as the basis for future decision-making and research.

  6. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  7. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  8. August 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Raschke took a well-deserved vacation, and in his absence we did another quick-fire critical care journal club reviewing 7 articles.Davies AR, Morrison SS, Bailey MJ, Bellomo R, Cooper DJ, Doig GS, Finfer SR, Heyland DK; for the ENTERIC Study Investigators and the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing early nasojejunal with nasogastric nutrition in critical illness. Crit Care Med 2012;40:2342-8. (Click here for abstractThis was a randomized control trial, which enrolled 181 patients from multiple medical-surgical ICUs to receive either nasojejunal or nasogastric nutrition. The number of patients selected for this study provided an 80% power to detect a 12% difference in mean energy delivery. Inclusion criteria for the study were patient that were admitted to the ICU, needing mechanically ventilated, narcotic drips for sedation as well as elevated gastric residuals (>150ml. Patients were excluded if patient had abnormal anatomy or imminent death…

  9. October 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajo TM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Raschke was out of town when Critical Care Journal Club was held this month. Dr. Tom Bajo, the senior critical care physician at Good Samaritan, moderated the journal club. We reviewed 5 articles and 1 editorial. Thiele H, Zeymer U, Neumann FJ. Intraaortic balloon support for myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock. N Engl J Med 2012 ;367:1287-96. This is an important article for those who manage myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock. The ACA/AHA guidelines recommend intraaortic balloon counterpulsation as a class I treatment for cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction. However, the evidence is based mainly on registry data, and there is a paucity of randomized clinical trials. In this randomized, prospective, open-label, multicenter trial, 600 patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction were randomized to intraaortic balloon counterpulsation or no intraaortic balloon counterpulsation. All patients were expected to undergo early revascularization (by means of percutaneous coronary intervention …

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  11. Critical care: advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Singer, Mervyn

    2010-10-16

    Intensive care offers a standard of monitoring, intervention, and organ support that cannot be readily delivered in a general ward. Its expansion in the past few decades, including the creation of emergency and outreach teams, emphasises that intensive care has an increasingly prominent role within the hospital. Although outcomes are clearly improving, intensive care remains a nascent specialty in which we are still learning how to harness a powerful ability to manipulate physiology, biochemistry, and immunology to achieve best outcomes for the patient. The results of many multicentre studies have not lent support to, or have even confounded, expectations, drawing attention to several issues related to patient heterogeneity, trial design, and elucidation of underlying pathophysiological processes. However, these results have generated constructive introspection and reappraisal of treatments and management strategies that have benefited the patient. In addition to the medical, financial, and logistical challenges in the future, exciting opportunities will arise as new developments in diagnostic tests, therapeutic interventions, and technology are used to exploit an increasing awareness of how critical illness should be managed.

  12. Factors influencing job valuation: a comparative study of critical care and non-critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, W; Najman, J; Dunn, S

    2001-04-01

    This study sought to identify the relationship between three predictor variables, perceived collaboration with medical staff, autonomy and independent actions and an outcome, the value hospital nurses placed on their work. In total 189 critical care and 366 non-critical care nurses completed a mailed survey. Critical care nurses perceived themselves to have a more collaborative relationship with the medical staff, described performing actions independent of medical orders more frequently and perceived their jobs to have more value than non-critical care nurses. However the latter group perceived themselves to have more autonomy in their work. Within both groups collaboration and autonomy were significantly, but weak to moderately correlated with job valuation. Simply expanding the work hospital nurses do is unlikely to result in nurses valuing their jobs more, however promoting an environment of respect and sharing between the medical and nursing staff and supporting nurses when they act in an autonomous fashion may positively influence nurses' perceptions of their work. PMID:11223056

  13. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  14. April 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. We welcomed intensivists from Banner Health to video-conference with us as we discussed several articles, and evaluated the ACP Journal Club – another good resource for keeping up to date.Hill NS. Review: Lower rather than higher tidal volume benefits ventilated patients without ARDS. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158:JC4. AbstractLauzier F. Hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and saline did not differ for mortality at 90 days in ICU patients. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158:JC5. AbstractThe April ACP Journal Club reviewed two critical care articles – a meta-analysis that concluded that low tidal volume ventilation reduced mortality in patients without ARDS, and a large RCT that showed no mortality difference between critically-ill patients resuscitated with hydroxyethyl starch versus saline. Both articles were awarded 6/7 stars for “clinical impact”, yet neither article had any impact on our clinical practice. This troubled us.We could think of 4 necessary criteria in order for research to have legitimate …

  15. November 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Mehta S, Burry L, Cook D, Fergusson D, et al. Daily sedation interruption in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients cared for with a sedation protocol. JAMA 2012;308:1985-92. PDFThis study was a multi-center, randomized controlled trial that compared protocolized sedation with protocolized sedation plus daily sedation interruption. The protocol used to titrate benzodiazepine and opioid infusions incorporated a validated scale (Sedation-agitation Scale (SAS or Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS in order to maintain a comfortable but arousable state. Four hundred and thirty mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients were recruited from medical and surgical ICUs in 16 institutions in North America. The study showed no benefit in the group that underwent daily sedation interruption - length of intubation was 7 days, length of ICU stay was 10 days and length of hospital stay was 20 days in both groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of delirium (53 vs. ...

  16. Austerity and health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglio, Gianluca; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Van Woensel, Lieve; Arnold, Elleke; McDaid, David

    2013-11-01

    Many European governments have abundantly cut down public expenditure on health during the financial crisis. Consequences of the financial downturn on health outcomes have begun to emerge. This recession has led to an increase in poor health status, raising rates of anxiety and depression among the economically vulnerable. In addition, the incidence of some communicable diseases along with the rate of suicide has increased significantly. The recession has also driven structural reforms, and affected the priority given to public policies. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how austerity impacts health in Europe and better understand the response of European health systems to the financial crisis. The current economic climate, while challenging, presents an opportunity for reforming and restructuring health promotion actions. More innovative approaches to health should be developed by health professionals and by those responsible for health management. In addition, scientists and experts in public health should promote evidence-based approaches to economic and public health recovery by analyzing the present economic downturn and previous crisis. However, it is governance and leadership that will mostly determine how well health systems are prepared to face the crisis and find ways to mitigate its effects. PMID:24176290

  17. ON SPACELIKE AUSTERE SUBMANIFOLDS IN PSEUDO-EUCLIDEAN SPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yuxin; Han Yingbo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we construct some spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo- Euclidean spaces. We also get some indefinite special Lagrangian submanifolds by con- structing twisted normal bundle of spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo-Euclidean spaces.

  18. Do Austerity Measures Harm International Trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Iulian CHIRIŢOIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the trade relations between Romania and the PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece, and Spain in order to verify whether the exports of Romania have been positively or negatively affected by the austerity measures adopted by these Eurozone periphery countries, thus diminishing Romania’s export performance in such markets. Hence, our main research question is whether austerity measures harm or affect in any way the inflows and outflows of international trade in the studied countries. To assess this hypothesis, we focused on the external trade relations, and their linkages with the macroeconomic environment, rather than the competitiveness of a state explained by a detailed sectoral analysis. In this respect, we use comparative and descriptive statistics in order to observe the consequences of the internal devaluation, and implicitly austerity measures, on the PIIGS-Romanian trade relations. Our findings suggest that the effects of austerity measures are not homogenous because they depend on the scale of trade exchanges and on the way in which the austerity measures were applied.

  19. The Critical Care Obesity Paradox and Implications for Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayshil J; Rosenthal, Martin D; Miller, Keith R; Codner, Panna; Kiraly, Laszlo; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has been increasing and is associated with an increased risk for other co-morbidities. In the critical care setting, nearly one third of patients are obese. Obese critically ill patients pose significant physical and on-physical challenges to providers, including optimization of nutrition therapy. Intuitively, obese patients would have worse critical care-related outcome. On the contrary, emerging data suggests that critically ill obese patients have improved outcomes, and this phenomenon has been coined "the obesity paradox." The purposes of this review will be to outline the historical views and pathophysiology of obesity and epidemiology of obesity, describe the challenges associated with obesity in the intensive care unit setting, review critical care outcomes in the obese, define the obesity-critical care paradox, and identify the challenges and role of nutrition support in the critically ill obese patient. PMID:27422122

  20. Spirituality, stress, and retention of nurses in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duane

    2013-01-01

    Providing care to patients in critical care units generates stress. Helping the critical care nurse manage this stress can lead to better patient experiences and higher nursing retention. While providing holistic care to patients produces better outcomes, addressing the holistic needs of the caregiver must also be considered. Included in the holistic needs of the nurse is their spiritual well-being. A study that measures spiritual well-being, stress, and nursing retention is the focus of this review.

  1. July 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words.Over the past thirty years or so, we have seen multiple therapies related to sepsis management that appeared beneficial in initial clinical trials but were later found to be useless or even harmful. Examples include goal-directed resuscitation to achieve maximal oxygen delivery, steroids for ARDS, tight glycemic control, and adrenal replacement therapy, among others. An overview of the history of evidence-based critical care medicine provides a strong argument for humility and caution. The story of Xigris provides another chapter for the fellows to consider as they move forward in their careers, and are asked to appraise new therapies that come along.The story of activated protein C – also designated as drotrecogin alfa (recombinant - or Xigris® began with stellar expectations. The PROWESS trial was published in the NEJM in 2001 (1. It was a randomized controlled trial that enrolled 1690 patients, comparing 28-day survival of patients treated with Xigris vs. …

  2. February 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Ferguson ND, Cook DJ, Guyatt GH, Mehta S, Hand L, Austin P, Zhou Q, Matte A, Walter SD, Lamontagne F, Granton JT, Arabi YM, Arroliga AC, Stewart TE, Slutsky AS, Meade MO; the OSCILLATE Trial Investigators and the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. High-Frequency Oscillation in Early Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:795-805. Young D, Lamb SE, Shah S, Mackenzie I, Tunnicliffe W, Lall R, Rowan K, Cuthbertson BH; the OSCAR Study Group. High-Frequency Oscillation for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:806-13. Malhotra A, Drazen JM. High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation on Shaky Ground. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:863-5. Two articles and an accompanying editorial, the later co-authored by none less than the editor, appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine this week. These all dealt with the use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. As the editorial points …

  3. Burnout in critical care nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Kirstin

    2012-01-01

    Burnout and its development in critical care nurses is a concept that has received extensive study, yet remains a problem in Canada and around the world. Critical care nurses are particularly vulnerable to developing burnout due to the chronic occupational stressors they are exposed to, including high patient acuity, high levels of responsibility, working with advanced technology, caring for families in crisis, and involved in morally distressing situations, particularly prolonging life unnecessarily. The purpose of this article is to explore how the chronic stressors that critical care nurses are exposed to contribute to the development of burnout, and strategies for burnout prevention. A review of the literature between the years 2007 and 2012 was conducted and included the search terms burnout, moral distress, compassion fatigue, intensive care, critical care, and nursing. The search was limited to the adult population, English language, and Western cultures. The results revealed that nurse managers play a crucial role in preventing burnout by creating a supportive work environment for critical care nurses. Strategies for nurse managers to accomplish this include being accessible to critical care nurses, fostering collegial relationships among the different disciplines, and making a counsellor or grief team available to facilitate debriefing after stressful situations, such as a death. In addition, critical care nurses can help prevent burnout by being a support system for each other and implementing self-care strategies.

  4. False alarm reduction in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Li, Qiao; Kella, Danesh; Chahin, Abdullah; Kooistra, Tristan; Perry, Diane; Mark, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    High false alarm rates in the ICU decrease quality of care by slowing staff response times while increasing patient delirium through noise pollution. The 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge provides a set of 1250 multi-parameter ICU data segments associated with critical arrhythmia alarms, and challenges the general research community to address the issue of false alarm suppression using all available signals. Each data segment was 5 minutes long (for real time analysis), ending at the time of the alarm. For retrospective analysis, we provided a further 30 seconds of data after the alarm was triggered. A total of 750 data segments were made available for training and 500 were held back for testing. Each alarm was reviewed by expert annotators, at least two of whom agreed that the alarm was either true or false. Challenge participants were invited to submit a complete, working algorithm to distinguish true from false alarms, and received a score based on their program's performance on the hidden test set. This score was based on the percentage of alarms correct, but with a penalty that weights the suppression of true alarms five times more heavily than acceptance of false alarms. We provided three example entries based on well-known, open source signal processing algorithms, to serve as a basis for comparison and as a starting point for participants to develop their own code. A total of 38 teams submitted a total of 215 entries in this year's Challenge. This editorial reviews the background issues for this challenge, the design of the challenge itself, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Additionally we make some recommendations for future changes in the field of patient monitoring as a result of the Challenge. PMID:27454172

  5. The essential nature of healthcare databases in critical care medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Greg S.

    2008-01-01

    Medical databases serve a critical function in healthcare, including the areas of patient care, administration, research and education. The quality and breadth of information collected into existing databases varies tremendously, between databases, between institutions and between national boundaries. The field of critical care medicine could be advanced substantially by the development of comprehensive and accurate databases.

  6. Openness, Technologies, Business Models and Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Open education emerged when the state had an active role in shaping and financing post-secondary education. In the twenty-first century, two pressures influence the way openness is conceived. The first is the compounding of neo-liberal economics with austerity following the financial crash of 2008. The second is the consolidation of networked and…

  7. Inflation Rather Than Austerity - Hungary's Economic Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Mihalyi

    2011-01-01

    During the last years, Hungary’s standard of living rose dynamically, but at the same time, government debt increased. The Orban government tries to reduce these debts not by austerity but by eroding purchasing power through induced inflation. By this, Hungary departs further and further from fulfilling the Maastricht criteria.

  8. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future. PMID:22948575

  9. Critical care nurses’ views on medication administration: an organizational perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Mansour

    2009-01-01

    The Organizational Safety Space Model (OSSM) was developed as a tool to investigate the factors which influence the safety of industrial operations. It is applied in this study to investigate the safety of medication administration in adult critical care settings, including Intensive Care Units and High Dependency Units. In this study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 adult critical care nurses. The participants’ views on the safety of medication administration were analyzed ...

  10. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness. PMID:26974557

  11. Year in review 2010: Critical Care - infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagani, Leonardo; Afshari, Arash; Harbarth, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Infections remain among the most important concerns in critically ill patients. Early and reliable diagnosis of infection still poses difficulties in this setting but also represents a crucial step toward appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Increasing antimicrobial resistance challenges ...

  12. Opportunity and health care: criticisms and suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L

    1983-11-01

    orman Daniels' proposal to distribute health care on the basis of fair equality of opportunity, is, in this writer's opinion, unworkable. His concepts of species-typical activity and normal opportunity range are unclear; so is the relationship between them. His view that justice accords disease a better claim on the health dollar than other causes of death, pain, and disability, commits him unknowingly to indefensible positions on particular sorts of health care, such as the care of the aging and of pregnant women. Daniels' concept of opportunity is so inclusive, his notion of balancing opportunities so vague, that his theory loses systematic power. I offer a different account from Daniels' concerning why health care needs are objective and of special importance. I also argue for a voucher system which levels out class inequalities and which finances current medical practices more or less uncritically, but allows for change through a diversity of insurance plans available to consumers. This system is just, and more practical than rating health care needs by impact on opportunity.

  13. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  14. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  15. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  16. Physiotherapy in Critical Care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Berney, Susan; Haines, Kimberley; Denehy, Linda

    2012-01-01

    A physiotherapist is part of the multidisciplinary team in most intensive care units in Australia. Physiotherapists are primary contact practitioners and use a comprehensive multisystem assessment that includes the respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems to formulate individualized treatment plans. The traditional focus of treatment has been the respiratory management of both intubated and spontaneously breathing patients. However, the emerging evidence of the l...

  17. Critical care: Are we customer friendly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Rajnibala, V.; Abraham, Babu K.; Rajagopalan, Senthilkumar; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assessing and enhancing family satisfaction are imperative for the provision of comprehensive intensive care. There is a paucity of Indian data exploring family's perception of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. We wanted to explore family satisfaction and whether it differed in families of patients admitted under intensivists and nonintensivists in our semi-open ICU. Methodology: We surveyed family members of 200 consecutive patients, between March and September 2009 who were in ICU for >3 days. An internationally validated family satisfaction survey was adapted and was administered to a family member, on day 4 of the patient's stay. The survey consisted of 15 questions in five categories - patient care, medical counseling, staff interaction, visiting hours, and facilities and was set to a Likert scale of 1–4. Mean, median, and proportions were computed to describe answers for each question and category. Results: A total of 515 patients were admitted during the study period, of which 200 patients stayed in the ICU >3 days. One family member each of the 200 patients completed the survey with 100% response rate. Families reported the greatest satisfaction with patient care (94.5%) and least satisfaction with visiting hours (60.5%). Chi-square tests performed for each of the five categories revealed no significant difference between satisfaction scores of intensivists and nonintensivists' patients. Conclusion: Family members of ICU patients were satisfied with current care and communication, irrespective of whether they were admitted under intensivists or nonintensivists. Family members preferred open visiting hours policy than a time limited one. PMID:26430335

  18. Managing Under Austerity, Delivering Under Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Wanna, John; Lee, Hsu-Ann; Yates, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary public managers find themselves under pressure on many fronts. Coming off a sustained period of growth in their funding and some complacency about their performance, they now face an environment of ferocious competitiveness abroad and austerity at home. Public managers across Australia and New Zealand are finding themselves wrestling with expenditure reduction, a smaller public sector overall, sustained demands for productivity improvement, and the imperative to think differently...

  19. May 2016 Phoenix critical care journal club

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins RA; Rashke RA

    2016-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Panwar R, Hardie M, Bellomo R, Barrot L, Eastwood GM, Young PJ, Capellier G, Harrigan PW, Bailey M; CLOSE Study Investigators; ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. Conservative versus liberal oxygenation targets for mechanically ventilated patients. A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2016 Jan 1;193(1):43-51. We continue to debate the appropriate level of oxygenation for a variety of patients. This study a...

  20. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of healthcare professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care healthcare professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care healthcare professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care healthcare professionals and for patients. PMID:27309157

  1. Teaching and evaluating critical thinking in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishoe, Shelley C; Hernlen, Kitty

    2005-09-01

    The capacity to perform critical thinking in respiratory care may be enhanced through awareness and education to improve skills, abilities, and opportunities. The essential skills for critical thinking in respiratory care include prioritizing, anticipating, troubleshooting, communicating, negotiating, decision making, and reflecting. In addition to these skills, critical thinkers exhibit certain characteristics such as critical evaluation, judgment,insight, motivation, and lifelong learning. The teaching of critical thinking may be accomplished though problem-based learning using an evidenced-based approach to solve clinical problems similar to those encountered in professional practice. Other traditional strategies such as discussion, debate, case study, and case presentations can be used. Web-based curriculum and technologic advances have created opportunities such as bulletin boards, real-time chats, and interactive media tools that can incorporate critical thinking. Many concerns and controversies surround the assessment of critical thinking, and individuals who administer critical thinking tests must be aware of the strengths and limitations of these assessment tools, as well as their relevance to the workplace. The foundational works reported in this article summarize the current status of assessment of critical thinking and can stimulate further investigation and application of the skills, characteristics, educational strategies, and measurement of critical thinking in respiratory care. PMID:16168915

  2. Frailty in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jonathan P; Lederer, David J; Baldwin, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Conceptualized first in the field of geriatrics, frailty is a syndrome characterized by a generalized vulnerability to stressors resulting from an accumulation of physiologic deficits across multiple interrelated systems. This accumulation of deficits results in poorer functional status and disability. Frailty is a "state of risk" for subsequent disproportionate declines in health status following new exposure to a physiologic stressor. Two predominant models have emerged to operationalize the measurement of frailty. The phenotype model defines frailty as a distinct clinical syndrome that includes conceptual domains such as strength, activity, wasting, and mobility. The cumulative deficit model defines frailty by enumerating the number of age-related things wrong with a person. The biological pathways driving frailty include chronic systemic inflammation, sarcopenia, and neuroendocrine dysregulation, among others. In adults with chronic lung disease, frailty is independently associated with more frequent exacerbations of lung disease, all-cause hospitalization, declines in functional status, and all-cause mortality. In addition, frail adults who become critically ill are more likely develop chronic critical illness or severe disability and have higher in-hospital and long-term mortality rates. The evaluation of frailty appears to provide important prognostic information above and beyond routinely collected measures in adults with chronic lung disease and the critically ill. The study of frailty in these populations, however, requires multipronged efforts aimed at refining clinical assessments, understanding the mechanisms, and developing therapeutic interventions. PMID:27104873

  3. Patient Mobility in Times of Austerity: A Legal and Policy Analysis of the Petru Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischhut, Markus; Fahy, Nick

    2016-03-01

    The case-law of the Court of Justice (ECJ) on patient mobility was recently challenged by a ruling that a patient could go to Germany for treatment when facilities in Romanian hospitals were inadequate. Given the reported impact of austerity measures in the field of health care this raises the question; what is the impact of the ECJ's ruling on how Member States can manage expenditure and limit outflows of patients and how should such measures be legally evaluated? The objective of this article is to analyse potential impact on health systems in the context of increasing pressure on public financing for health. While the ECJ mainly referred to the requirement of treatment in due time, we also analyse possible austerity reductions of the basket of care against the background of EU law (i.e., EGJ case-law, patient mobility directive, Charter of Fundamental rights and social security regulation).

  4. Patient Mobility in Times of Austerity: A Legal and Policy Analysis of the Petru Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischhut, Markus; Fahy, Nick

    2016-03-01

    The case-law of the Court of Justice (ECJ) on patient mobility was recently challenged by a ruling that a patient could go to Germany for treatment when facilities in Romanian hospitals were inadequate. Given the reported impact of austerity measures in the field of health care this raises the question; what is the impact of the ECJ's ruling on how Member States can manage expenditure and limit outflows of patients and how should such measures be legally evaluated? The objective of this article is to analyse potential impact on health systems in the context of increasing pressure on public financing for health. While the ECJ mainly referred to the requirement of treatment in due time, we also analyse possible austerity reductions of the basket of care against the background of EU law (i.e., EGJ case-law, patient mobility directive, Charter of Fundamental rights and social security regulation). PMID:27044171

  5. May 2016 Phoenix critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Panwar R, Hardie M, Bellomo R, Barrot L, Eastwood GM, Young PJ, Capellier G, Harrigan PW, Bailey M; CLOSE Study Investigators; ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. Conservative versus liberal oxygenation targets for mechanically ventilated patients. A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2016 Jan 1;193(1:43-51. We continue to debate the appropriate level of oxygenation for a variety of patients. This study attempted to address the question of appropriate oxygenation targets for intensive care unit (ICU patients. At four multidisciplinary ICUs, 103 adult patients were randomly allocated to either a conservative oxygenation strategy with target oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 of 88-92% (n = 52 or a liberal oxygenation strategy with target SpO2 of greater than or equal to 96% (n = 51. There were no significant between-group differences in any measures of new organ dysfunction, or ICU or 90-day mortality. Although the study is underpowered, it does ...

  6. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement-Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. PMID:27396776

  7. Critical care computing. Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiver, A

    2000-10-01

    With rapidly increasing processing power, networks, and bandwidth, we have ever more powerful tools for ICU computing. The challenge is to use these tools to build on the work of the Innovators and Early Adopters, who pioneered the first three generations of systems, and extend computing to the Majority, who still rely on paper. What is needed is compelling evidence that these systems reduce cost and improve quality. The experience of other industries suggests that we need to address fundamental issues, such as clinical organization, roles, behavior, and incentives, before we will be able to prove the benefits of computing technology. When these preconditions are met, the promise of computing will be realized, perhaps with the upcoming fourth-generation systems. ICU computing can then finally cross the chasm and become the standard of care. PMID:11070807

  8. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: tiny bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 59 year old woman with a past medical history significant for stage IV MALT lymphoma (after chemotherapy and in remission presented from a long term care facility for respiratory distress and altered mental status. The patient was in hypercarbic respiratory failure with a severe lactic acidosis. Her blood pressure deteriorated, she was begun on vasopressors and intubated. Pertinent labs demonstrated a white blood cell count of 0.9 X106 /ml, a hemoglobin of 7.1 g/dl, and a platelet count 66 X106 /ml. The patient was started on Cefepime and Linezolid presumptively for septic shock. Ultrasounds of her thorax were performed (Videos 1 & 2. What is the best explanation for the ultrasound findings shown above?1. Large pleural effusion; 2. Pneumothorax; 3. Consolidation due to pneumonia; 4. Ruptured diaphragm; 5. Lung abscess

  9. [Antibiotic multiresistance in critical care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pueyo, M J; Barcenilla-Gaite, F; Amaya-Villar, R; Garnacho-Montero, J

    2011-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms with acquired resistance to multiple antibiotics complicates the management and outcome of critically ill patients. The intensivist, in his/her daily activity, is responsible for the prevention and control of the multiresistance and the challenge of prescribing the appropriate treatment in case of an infection by these microorganisms. We have reviewed the literature regarding the definition, important concepts related to transmission, recommendations on general measures of control in the units and treatment options. We also present data on the situation in our country known primarily through the ENVIN-UCI register. Addressing the multiresistance not only requires training but also teamwork with other specialists and adaptation to the local environment. PMID:21215489

  10. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care.

  11. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  12. November 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Four manuscripts were reviewed. The first two were review articles from the New England Journal of Medicine. Both are good assessments of the current state of the art of fluid resuscitation and shock in the intensive care unit. Myburgh JA, Mythen MG. Resuscitation fluids. N Engl J Med. 2013;369 (13:1243-51. Fluid administration is one of the most common interventions in medicine. The authors review the use of resuscitation fluids and point out that until recently that the evidence basis for the selection, timing, and doses of intravenous fluids was empiric, based more on training and preference than data. The authors summarize the literature nicely in Table 2 of their manuscript with the following being major points of the manuscript: No currently available resuscitation fluid can be considered to be ideal. Fluids should be administered with the same caution that is used with any intravenous drug. Fluid resuscitation is a component …

  13. January 2014 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Kamps MJ, Horn J, Oddo M, Fugate JE, Storm C, Cronberg T, Wijman CA, Wu O, Binnekade JM, Hoedemaekers CW. Prognostication of neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients after mild therapeutic hypothermia: a meta-analysis of the current literature. Intensive Care Med. 2013;39(10:1671-82. [CrossRef] [PubMed] Cohort studies performed prior to the advent of therapeutic hypothermia had shown that severe deficits in motor response to painful stimuli, or deficits in certain cranial nerve reflexes, could be used to rule-out the possibility of meaningful neurological recovery in patients who did not regain consciousness within 48-72 hours after cardiac arrest. However, subsequent reports have challenged the reliability of these findings in patients who received therapeutic hypothermia – some of whom recovered despite grim neurological findings. These authors performed a meta-analysis to determine whether neurological findings performed 72 hours after cardiac arrest (of all causes could be used to prognosticate neurological outcome in patients who received ...

  14. New media and critical care ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Michał

    2014-12-01

    The paper discusses the issue of spreading medical knowledge, connected particularly with ultrasonography, by the social media. Such a way of sharing knowledge and experience results from the needs of recipients - physicians who daily have limited free time. The paper presents the phenomenon of the free open access medical education (FOAM) along with its genesis, an open and global nature as well as the main communication channels. It is emphasized that education via the social media is becoming an element of the mainstream medical didactics. The aforementioned phenomenon is depicted in greater detail in the context of emergency ultrasonography. US imaging is one of the more popular issues in the FOAM community. The paper focuses on the Ultrasound Podcast and the initiative associated with it. Our native (Polish) project, CriticalUSG, is also presented together with its numerous editions. Apart from these two projects, other initiatives, which are equally important not only due to ultrasonography, are also briefly mentioned. The aim of the paper is to interest the reader with the FOAM phenomenon as an open access, free and global medical discussion. PMID:26673154

  15. Taiwanese nurses' appraisal of a lecture on spiritual care for patients in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, F J; Gau, M L; Mao, H C; Chen, C H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a lecture on spiritual care for adult critical care trainees, and to evaluate the trainees' appraisal of the effectiveness of this lecture in preparing them to provide spiritual care for their clients in a critical care setting. A between-method triangulation research design encompassing a questionnaire and descriptive qualitative content analysis was used. A convenience sample consisting of 64 registered nurses who attended an adult critical care nurse training programme in a leading medical centre in northern Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A total of 64 female participants completed the questionnaire. Ninety-two per cent (59) of the subjects considered the lecture on spiritual care to be helpful in assisting them to provide holistic care for critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Three types of help were identified by the subjects: (1) help in clarifying the abstract concepts related to spiritual care (86%); (2) help in self-disclosing the nurses' personal beliefs and values regarding life goals, nursing, and spiritual needs (67%); (3) help in learning how to provide spiritual care to patients in a critical care setting (34%). Twenty per cent of the subjects thought that inclusion of the following content in the lecture would have been helpful to provide a more comprehensive picture of spiritual care: religious practices and rituals (11%); the culturally bonded nursing care plan (9%); the development of human spirituality (3%); patients' families' spiritual needs in the ICU (3%); and resources for nurses in providing spiritual care (2%). Thirteen per cent of the subjects suggested that the instructor might employ the following strategies to improve the quality of teaching: providing more empirical examples (5%); discussion with the students in classes of smaller size following the lecture or extending the instruction time (5%); and providing a syllabus with detailed information (3%).

  16. Compassion fatigue: A Study of critical care nurses in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Dikmen, Yurdanur; Aydın, Yasemin; Tabakoğlu, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the level of compassion fatigue which experienced by nurses who work in intensive care units and factors that affecting it.In a cross sectional design, critical nurses were surveyed by using questionnaire and  compassion fatigue (CF) subscale of the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL R-IV) to measure levels of compassion fatigueat a large National Education and ResearchHospital located in northwestof Turkey. A total of 69 critical care nurses part...

  17. Year in review 2007: Critical Care – shock

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Florian; Baumgart, Katja; Simkova, Vladislava; Georgieff, Michael; Radermacher, Peter; Calzia, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    The research papers on shock published in Critical Care throughout 2007 are related to three major subjects: the modulation of the macrocirculation and microcirculation during shock, focusing on arginine vasopressin, erythropoietin and nitric oxide; studies on metabolic homeostasis (acid–base status, energy expenditure and gastrointestinal motility); and basic supportive measures in critical illness (fluid resuscitation and sedation, and body-temperature management). The present review summar...

  18. Mobilizing Patients Along the Continuum of Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Christina D; Price, Deborah M; King, Elizabeth A; Dickinson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The progressive care unit implemented an evidenced-based intensive care unit mobility protocol with their chronically critically ill patient population. The labor/workload necessary to meet mobility standards was an identified barrier to implementation. Workflow redesign of patient care technicians, interdisciplinary teamwork, and creating a culture of meeting mobility standards led to the successful implementation of this protocol. Data revealed that mobility episodes increased from 1.4 at preinitiative to 4.7 at 12 months postinitiative, surpassing the goal of 3 episodes per 24 hours. PMID:26627065

  19. [Systematization of nursing assistance in critical care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppel, Thiago Christel; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Calixto, Riciana do Carmo; Peruzzo, Simone Aparecida; Crozeta, Karla

    2009-01-01

    This is a methodological research, which aimed at organizing the systematization of nursing assistance in a critical care unit. The following steps were carried out: description of the nursing practice; transcription of nursing diagnoses; elaboration of a protocol for nursing diagnosis based in International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP); determination of nursing prescriptions and the elaboration of guidelines for care and procedures. The nursing practice and care complexity in ICU were characterized. Thus, systematization of nursing assistance is understood as a valuable tool for nursing practice.

  20. Compassion fatigue: A Study of critical care nurses in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdanur Dikmen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the level of compassion fatigue which experienced by nurses who work in intensive care units and factors that affecting it. In a cross sectional design, critical nurses were surveyed by using questionnaire and  compassion fatigue (CF subscale of the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL R-IV to measure levels of compassion fatigueat a large National Education and ResearchHospital located in northwestof Turkey. A total of 69 critical care nurses participated in the study, for a response rate of 78%.A series of cross tab analyses examined the relationship between nurses demographics and compassion fatigue (CF subscale. To analyze the data further, participants were recategorized into 2 groups for CF scores: (1 higher than 17: high risk and (2 lower than 17: low risk. Findings show that critical care nurses were at high risk (52.7% and low risk (47.3% for CF. Nurses informed significant differences in compassion fatigue on the basis of age, years of critical care experience, working hours (weekly.

  1. Starting with Self: Teaching Autoethnography to Foster Critically Caring Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camangian, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates the application of critical literacy (Freire & Macedo, 1987; Gutierrez, 2008; Morrell, 2007) pedagogies that draw from young people's funds of knowledge (Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992) to actively nurture personally, authentically, and culturally caring relationships (Howard, 2002; Noddings, 1992; Valenzuela, 1999)…

  2. Year in review 2006: Critical Care – respirology

    OpenAIRE

    Vasquez, Daniela; Singh, Jeffrey M; Ferguson, Niall D

    2007-01-01

    The present article summarises and places in context original research articles from the respirology section published in Critical Care in 2006. Twenty papers were identified and were grouped by topic into those addressing acute lung injury and ventilator-induced lung injury, those examining high-frequency oscillation, those studying pulmonary physiology and mechanics, those assessing tracheostomy, and those exploring other topics.

  3. Physical outcome measure for critical care patients following intensive care discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; McPeake, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the most suitable physical outcome measures to be used with critical care patients following discharge. ICU survivors experience physical problems such as reduced exercise capacity and intensive care acquired weakness. NICE guideline ‘Rehabilitation after critical illness’ (1) recommends the use of outcome measures however does not provide any specific guidance. A recent Cochrane review noted wide variability in measures...

  4. Care-related pain in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayasrah, S

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in pain management, critically ill patients continue to have unacceptably high rates of uncontrolled pain. Using the Behavioural Pain Scale and physiological indicators of pain, this study examines pain levels in mechanically ventilated patients prior to and during routine nursing procedures. A prospective descriptive design was used to assess and describe care-related pain associated with nociceptive procedures (repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, and vascular punctures) and non-nociceptive procedures (mouth care, eye care and dressing change). A sample of 247 mechanically ventilated Jordanian patients was recruited from intensive care units in a military hospital. The overall mean procedural pain score of 6.34 (standard deviation [SD] 2.36) was significantly higher than the mean preprocedural pain score of 3.43 (SD 0.67, t[246]=20.82, Pindicating that patients were either anxious or responsive to command only. The mean physiological indicators of pain increased during repositioning and endotracheal suctioning and decreased during the rest of the procedures. Mechanically ventilated patients experience pain prior to and during routine nursing procedures. Harmless and comfort procedures are actually painful. When caring for nonverbal critically ill patients, clinicians need to consider care-related pain associated with their interventions. Relying on changes in vital signs as a primary indicator of pain can be misleading. PMID:27456175

  5. Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of sepsis in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Savitri; Adams, Kate; Barlow, Gavin

    2011-04-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. Delay in diagnosis and initiation of antibiotics have been shown to increase mortality in this cohort. However, differentiating sepsis from non-infectious triggers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is difficult, especially in critically ill patients who may have SIRS for other reasons. It is this conundrum that predominantly drives broad-spectrum antimicrobial use and the associated evolution of antibiotic resistance in critical care environments. It is perhaps unsurprising, therefore, that the search for a highly accurate biomarker of sepsis has become one of the holy grails of medicine. Procalcitonin (PCT) has emerged as the most studied and promising sepsis biomarker. For diagnostic and prognostic purposes in critical care, PCT is an advance on C-reactive protein and other traditional markers of sepsis, but is not accurate enough for clinicians to dispense with clinical judgement. There is stronger evidence, however, that measurement of PCT has a role in reducing the antibiotic exposure of critical care patients. For units intending to incorporate PCT assays into routine clinical practice, the cost-effectiveness of this is likely to depend on the pre-implementation length of an average antibiotic course and the subsequent impact of implementation on emerging antibiotic resistance. In most of the trials to date, the average baseline duration of the antibiotic course was longer than is currently standard practice in many UK critical care units. Many other biomarkers are currently being investigated. To be highly useful in clinical practice, it may be necessary to combine these with other novel biomarkers and/or traditional markers of sepsis.

  6. Austere kindness or mindless austerity: the efects of gift-giving to beggars in east London

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Lenhard

    2014-01-01

    The current austerity policies in the United Kingdom are creating a precarious situation for many people on the margins of society. Employing micro-level ethnographic analysis, this article addresses how government decisions affect people living on the street. Observations of how local policies demonize gift-giving to street people led me to revisit arguments about the positive and negative effects of gifts. Four months of fieldwork amongst people who beg in the City of London confirmed the M...

  7. Austerity Surveillance” in Greece under the Austerity Regime (2010−2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Samatas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have tried to analyze “austerity surveillance” (AS, its features, and its functions under the extreme austerity regime in Greece during 2010−2014, before the election of the leftist government. AS is a specific kind of coercive neoliberal surveillance, which in the name of fighting tax evasion and corruption is targeting the middle and lower economic strata and not the rich upper classes. It is based mainly on “coveillance,” i.e. citizen-informers’ grassing, public naming, and shaming. Functioning as a domination and disciplinary control mechanism of the entire population, it works within a post-democratic setting without accountability or democratic control. We provide empirical evidence of these features and functions, including some indicative personal testimonies of austerity surveillance subjects. After presenting some cases of electronic surveillance as an indispensable supplement to AS, we then briefly underline the negative personal, and socio-political impact of this surveillance. In conclusion, a tentative assessment is made of AS’ efficiency in the Greek case, comparing it with other types of past and present authoritarian surveillance in Greece and in other current surveillance societies, considering also the prospects for its abolition or its reproduction by the new leftist government.

  8. Communication Needs of Critical Care Patients Who Are Voiceless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszalinski, Rebecca S; Tappen, Ruth M; Hickman, Candice; Melhuish, Tracey

    2016-08-01

    Voice is crucial for communication in all healthcare settings. Evidence-based care highlights the need for clear communication. Clear communication methods must be applied when caring for special populations in order to assess pain effectively. Communication efforts also should be offered to patients who are in end-of-life care and would like to make independent decisions. A computer communication application was offered to patients in intensive care/critical care units in three hospitals in South Florida. Inclusion criteria included the age of 18 years or older, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale between -1 and +1, ability to read and write English, and willingness to use the computer application. Exclusion criteria included inability to read and write English, agitation as defined by the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale, and any patient on infection isolation protocol. Four qualitative themes were revealed, which directly relate to two published evidence-based guidelines. These are the End of Life Care and Decision Making Evidence-Based Care Guidelines and the Pain Assessment in Special Populations Guidelines. This knowledge is important for developing effective patient-healthcare provider communication. PMID:27315366

  9. Augmentation of hospital critical care capacity after bioterrorist attacks or epidemics: recommendations of the Working Group on Emergency Mass Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, Lewis; Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Talmor, Daniel S; O'Toole, Tara; Kramer, Bradley R; Inglesby, Thomas V

    2005-10-01

    The Working Group on Emergency Mass Critical Care was convened by the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the Society of Critical Care Medicine to provide recommendations to hospital and clinical leaders regarding the delivery of critical care services in the wake of a bioterrorist attack resulting in hundreds or thousands of critically ill patients. In these conditions, traditional hospital and clinical care standards in general, and critical care standards in particular, likely could no longer be maintained, and clinical guidelines for U.S. hospitals facing these situations have not been developed. The Working Group offers recommendations for this situation.

  10. Provision of critical care services for the obstetric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, P; Arulkumaran, N; Rhodes, A

    2013-12-01

    Management of the peripartum patient is a challenging aspect of critical care that requires consideration of both the physiological changes associated with pregnancy as well as the well-being of the foetus. In the UK, for every maternal death, approximately 118 near-miss events or severe acute maternal morbidities (SAMMs) occur. While a dedicated anaesthetic cover is usually provided on larger labour wards in the UK and US, a close communication with intensive care and other medical specialties must still be maintained. Medical outreach teams and early warning scores may help facilitate the early identification of clinical deterioration and prompt treatment. Ultimately level of care is allocated according to the clinical need, not the location, which may be a designated room, a normal labour room or a recovery area. Specialist obstetric units that provide high-dependency care facilities show lower rates of maternal transfer to critical care units and improved continuity of care before and after labour. The benefits of obstetric high-dependency units (HDUs) are likely to be determined by a number of logistic aspects of the hospital organisation, including hospital size and available resources. There remains a striking contrast in the burden of maternal mortality and morbidity and intensive care unit (ICU) resources between high- and low-income countries. The countries with the highest maternal mortality rates have the lowest number of ICU beds per capita. In under-resourced countries, patients admitted to ICUs tend to have higher illness severity scores, suggesting delayed admission to the ICU. The appropriate training of midwives is essential for successful HDUs located within labour wards. PMID:23972289

  11. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 1. Transport of critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, M J; Pagliarello, G

    1988-09-01

    Interhospital transportation of critically ill patients over long distances is common in the tiered health care systems of North America. The authors describe their 1-year experience with a physician-assisted transport system, operating out of the surgical intensive care unit at the Toronto General Hospital. The application of a well-known severity of illness measure (therapeutic intervention scoring system) allowed them to correlate severity of illness, as assessed over the telephone before patient transfer, with eventual outcome after admission to the surgical intensive care unit. Their analysis of 107 critically ill patients transported by this system led them to conclude that the system is reliable and is associated with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:3138018

  12. Increasing Registered Nurse Retention Using Mentors in Critical Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroyer, Coreena C; Zellers, Rebecca; Abraham, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Recruiting and training 1 newly hired registered nurse can cost thousands of dollars. With a high percentage of these newly hired nurses leaving their first place of employment within their first year, the financial implications may be enormous. It is imperative that health care facilities invest in recruiting and retention programs that retain high-quality nurses. Mentorship programs in retaining and easing the transition to practice for new graduate nurses, re-entry nurses, and nurses new to a specialty area are critical in nurse retention. Discussion in this study includes the effect of implementing a mentor program into the critical care services area of a 325-bed not-for-profit community hospital in northern Indiana. Based on this study, nurses with a mentor were retained at a 25% higher rate than those not mentored. Implementation of a mentor program reduced the training cost to the facility and increased retention and morale. PMID:27455367

  13. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the potential therapeutic benefits of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care are presented. This article aims to review the physiological properties of melatonin and how these could prove useful for several clinical applications in perioperative management, critical care and pain medicine. The topic was handsearched from textbooks and journals and electronically from PubMed, and Google scholar using text words.

  14. Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Daniel S.; Jepson, Annette; Turton, Jane F.; Ashworth, Simon; Donaldson, Hugo; Holmes, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is an infrequent colonizer of the respiratory tract; its pathogenicity is uncertain. In the context of a 22-month outbreak of E. meningoseptica acquisition affecting 30 patients in a London, UK, critical care unit (3% attack rate) we derived a measure of attributable morbidity and determined whether E. meningoseptica is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. We found monomicrobial E. meningoseptica acquisition (n = 13) to have an attributable morbidity rate of 54% (systemic inflammatory response syndrome >2, rising C-reactive protein, new radiographic changes), suggesting that E. meningoseptica is a pathogen. Epidemiologic and molecular evidence showed acquisition was water-source–associated in critical care but identified numerous other E. meningoseptica strains, indicating more widespread distribution than previously considered. Analysis of changes in gram-negative speciation rates across a wider London hospital network suggests this outbreak, and possibly other recently reported outbreaks, might reflect improved diagnostics and that E. meningoseptica thus is a pseudo-emerging pathogen. PMID:26690562

  15. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  16. Introducing Critical Care Forum's ongoing review of medical statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, Elise; Ball, Jonathon

    2002-01-01

    Statistics is increasingly used in all fields of medicine but is often poorly understood and incorrectly applied. Critical Care is therefore launching a series of articles aimed at providing a simple introduction or refresher to some of the more commonly used statistical tools and ideas. This series does not aim to be an exhaustive review of medical statistics but rather a starting point to inform readers and stimulate more thought and investigation as to the most appropriate statistical meth...

  17. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs. PMID:25532924

  18. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs.

  19. February 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart TM

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after the first page. A 32 year-old, previously healthy, female hospital visitor had been participating in a family care conference regarding her critically ill grandmother admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit. During the care conference, she felt unwell and had some mild chest discomfort; she collapsed and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR was initiated (1. Upon arrival of the code team, she was attached to the monitor and mask ventilation was initiated. Her initial rhythm is shown in Figure 1. In addition to DC cardioversion which of the following should be administered immediately? 1. Lidocaine; 2. Magnesium sulfate; 3. Procainamide ; 4. 1 and 3; 5. All of the above. ...

  20. Billing, coding, and documentation in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, S M

    2000-06-01

    Optimal conduct of modern-day physician practices involves a thorough understanding and application of the principles of documentation, coding, and billing. Physicians' role in these activities can no longer be secondary. Surgeons practicing critical care must be well versed in these concepts and their effective application to ensure that they are competitive in an increasingly difficult and demanding environment. Health care policies and regulations continue to evolve, mandating constant education of practicing physicians and their staffs and surgical residents who also will have to function in this environment. Close, collaborative relationships between physicians and individuals well versed in the concepts of documentation, coding, and billing are indispensable. Similarly, ongoing educational and review processes (whether internal or consultative from outside sources) not only can decrease the possibility of unfavorable outcomes from audit but also will likely enhance practice efficiency and cash flow. A financially viable practice is certainly a prerequisite for a surgical critical care practice to achieve its primary goal of excellence in patient care. PMID:10897279

  1. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  2. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, Saurabh; Sharma, Jai Prakash; Dhurwe, Ritika; Kumar, Sanjay; Gurjar, Mohan

    2015-09-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) in today's modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21(st) century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI), meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios. PMID:26430341

  3. Critical Care Delivery: The Importance of Process of Care and ICU Structure to Improved Outcomes: An Update From the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weled, Barry J; Adzhigirey, Lana A; Hodgman, Tudy M; Brilli, Richard J; Spevetz, Antoinette; Kline, Andrea M; Montgomery, Vicki L; Puri, Nitin; Tisherman, Samuel A; Vespa, Paul M; Pronovost, Peter J; Rainey, Thomas G; Patterson, Andrew J; Wheeler, Derek S

    2015-07-01

    In 2001, the Society of Critical Care Medicine published practice model guidelines that focused on the delivery of critical care and the roles of different ICU team members. An exhaustive review of the additional literature published since the last guideline has demonstrated that both the structure and process of care in the ICU are important for achieving optimal patient outcomes. Since the publication of the original guideline, several authorities have recognized that improvements in the processes of care, ICU structure, and the use of quality improvement science methodologies can beneficially impact patient outcomes and reduce costs. Herein, we summarize findings of the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care: 1) An intensivist-led, high-performing, multidisciplinary team dedicated to the ICU is an integral part of effective care delivery; 2) Process improvement is the backbone of achieving high-quality ICU outcomes; 3) Standardized protocols including care bundles and order sets to facilitate measurable processes and outcomes should be used and further developed in the ICU setting; and 4) Institutional support for comprehensive quality improvement programs as well as tele-ICU programs should be provided. PMID:25803647

  4. August 2013 critical care journal club: less is more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Our August journal club reviewed failed efforts to impact the mortality of critical illness over the past 25 years. We looked at six landmark randomized controlled trials with certain things in common. They each addressed treatment of a major aspect of critical illness. Each was well-supported by previous literature, and biologically plausible. Each resulted in a statistically-significant mortality benefit, and was published in a well-respected journal. And each had an immediate, and in many cases, lasting effect on the bedside practice of critical care. Yet the positive result of each of these six studies was subsequently convincingly refuted. It is important to note, that these studies make up a good part of what we’ve learned in critical care over the past 25 years. There have been some influential positive studies as well, but a great deal of effort has been spent implementing evidence-based practice, based on studies that were later …

  5. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) In Critical Care Areas, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Critical Care Areas (CCAs) are nursing care areas that provide intensive observation, diagnosis, and therapeutic procedures for patients who are critically ill....

  6. Update on the critical care management of severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Kevin R; Makley, Amy T; Kagan, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Care of the severely injured patient with burn requires correct diagnosis, appropriately tailored resuscitation, and definitive surgical management to reduce morbidity and mortality. Currently, mortality rates related to severe burn injuries continue to steadily decline due to the standardization of a multidisciplinary approach instituted at tertiary health care centers. Prompt and accurate diagnoses of burn wounds utilizing Lund-Browder diagrams allow for appropriate operative and nonoperative management. Coupled with diagnostic improvements, advances in resuscitation strategies involving rates, volumes, and fluid types have yielded demonstrable benefits related to all aspects of burn care. More recently, identification of comorbid conditions such as inhalation injury and malnutrition have produced appropriate protocols that aid the healing process in severely injured patients with burn. As more patients survive larger burn injuries, the early diagnosis and successful treatment of secondary and tertiary complications are becoming commonplace. While advances in this area are exciting, much work to elucidate immune pathways, diagnostic tests, and effective treatment regimens still remain. This review will provide an update on the critical care management of severe burns, touching on accurate diagnosis, resuscitation, and acute management of this difficult patient population.

  7. Obtaining a critical care pharmacist position: a marketing case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, T P; Wu, B; Nakagawa, R S

    1993-06-01

    Marketing theory is used to explain how Pharmacy Department managers at a Vancouver-area hospital secured a new ICU pharmacist position in a period of severe fiscal constraint. Market segmentation, target marketing and pull marketing strategy were combined to obtain support for the new position. Improved drug information services for ICU nurses were promoted to Nursing Administration and enhanced pharmacotherapy monitoring was promoted to the two critical care physicians primarily responsible for patient care in the ICU. These physicians and Nursing Administration voiced their support for the new position to the V.P. of Nursing (the functional officer for Pharmacy), who then promoted the new position to Hospital Administration. A half-time DUR commitment by the ICU pharmacist was offered to Hospital Administration, expanding this already successful service and guaranteeing cost recovery for the new position. Hospital Administration approved the new ICU clinical pharmacist position in a budget which saw other hospital departments lose several positions. PMID:10126865

  8. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  9. Novel biomarkers in critical care: utility or futility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Gareth L; Mythen, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    One of the holy grails of modern medicine, across a range of clinical sub-specialties, is establishing highly sensitive and specific biomarkers for various diseases. Significant success has been achieved in some of these clinical areas, most notably identifying high-sensitivity C-reactive peptide, troponin I/T and brain natriuretic peptide as significant prognosticators for both the acute outcome and the development of cardiovascular pathology. However, it is highly debatable whether this translates to complex, multi-system pathophysiological insults. Is critical care immune from the application of these novel biomarkers, given the numerous confounding factors interfering with their interpretation?

  10. [Risk management in anesthesia and critical care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisold, C; Heller, A R

    2016-06-01

    Throughout its history, anesthesia and critical care medicine has experienced vast improvements to increase patient safety. Consequently, anesthesia has never been performed on such a high level as it is being performed today. As a result, we do not always fully perceive the risks involved in our daily activity. A survey performed in Swiss hospitals identified a total of 169 hot spots which endanger patient safety. It turned out that there is a complex variety of possible errors that can only be tackled through consistent implementation of a safety culture. The key elements to reduce complications are continuing staff education, algorithms and standard operating procedures (SOP), working according to the principles of crisis resource management (CRM) and last but not least the continuous work-up of mistakes identified by critical incident reporting systems. PMID:27273109

  11. 6. Oral care competency and practices among critical care nurses for mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Abed-Eddin

    2016-07-01

    Result: A total of 131 nurses out of 150 completed the questioners, 100% were females, 86% of nurses are Baccalaureate degree, 93% with 7–9 years’ experience in critical care units, 80% of nurses have adequate time to provide oral care at least once a day, 20.4% only of the nurses are using a toothbrush with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution every 2–4 h for oral care at least Once a Day, 75.8% of nurses prefer to use oral swab with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution q 2–4 h, 98% has positive attitude toward mouth care practice.Conclusions The survey provided useful information on the oral care knowledge and practices of nurses caring for Mechanically Ventilated Patients. Almost all the nurses perceived oral care to be a high priority. Very low number of nurses are using the toothbrush with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution every 2–4 h, this figure must be studied for further action. The majority of nurses had some formal training in oral care, but would appreciate an opportunity to improve their knowledge and skills.

  12. Critical care nurses’ perceptions of stress and stress-related situations in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Moola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical care nurses (CCNs experience stressful situations in their daily working environments. A qualitative research approach (exploratory, descriptive and contextual was used to explore and describe the stressful situations experienced by critical care nurses in the Tshwane metropolitan are of South Africa. Focus group interviews were conducted with critical care nurses.

  13. Satisfaction survey on the critical care response team services in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Al Qahtani

    2011-01-01

    Saad Al Qahtani1,21Intensive Care Department, Critical Care Response Team, King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), National Guard Health Affairs, 2King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Patient care and safety is the main goal and mission of any health care provider. We surveyed nurses in the wards and obtained their feedback about the quality of care delivered by the Critical Care Response Team (CCRT).Methods: Our...

  14. French validation of the critical care family needs inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu-Wakulczyk, G; Chartier, L

    1990-03-01

    This study is a contribution to the French validation of Molter and Leske Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI). The importance of this validation study is based on the presumption that evaluation of family needs relies on the use of measures that are reliable and valid for a specific population. The preliminary validation of the French text of the CCFNI was carried out by back translation method of the French form into English by three translators. Then the final French version was selected. The study was conducted in the surgical intensive care unit of the University Hospital in Sherbrooke, Canada. The sample consisted of 207 voluntary subjects selected from adult members of the immediate family visiting a patient in the intensive care unit. The data collection was spread over a 10-week period. The French version of the CCFNI was given to subjects for self-reporting at the end of a 15-minute face-to-face interview. The reliability of the French version yielded 0.91 as Cronbach alpha coefficient. The Spearman-Brown split-half coefficient was 0.89, and the Guttman split-half coefficient was 0.88. Principal-component analysis and factorial matrices were used to examine the clustering structure of the French version of this instrument.

  15. Anti-Austerity Adult Education in Canada: A Survey of a Nascent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGray, Robert

    2015-01-01

    As the realities of austerity agendas exert pressure on adult education around the globe, this paper attempts to map the developing, albeit small, field of anti-austerity adult education in Canada. In doing so, I attempt to trace the connections between anti-austerity education and existing fields of adult education. I argue that the cases we see…

  16. Critical thinking: optimal outcomes through end user involvement in the design of critical care areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Debra; Barnhardt, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Including end users in evidence-based design is vital to outcomes. The physical environment impacts caregiver efficiencies, safety, satisfaction, and quality of patient outcomes. End users are more than members of the organization: patients should have representation as well. Patients bring value by offering insight from a different perspective. Timing is key; therefore, it is critical in obtaining desired outcomes, to include end users as early as possible, gaining the most insight into the design of the build. Consideration should also be given to best practice standards, regulatory compliance, progressive sciences, and technologies. Another vital factor is education of the end users on their role and expectations for participation in a design team. When end users are educated and understand the significance of input, the design team will be able to conceive a critical care unit that will meet needs for today and be able to adapt to needs for the future. PMID:24309458

  17. Handover patterns: an observational study of critical care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Handover (or 'handoff' is the exchange of information between health professionals that accompanies the transfer of patient care. This process can result in adverse events. Handover 'best practices', with emphasis on standardization, have been widely promoted. However, these recommendations are based mostly on expert opinion and research on medical trainees. By examining handover communication of experienced physicians, we aim to inform future research, education and quality improvement. Thus, our objective is to describe handover communication patterns used by attending critical care physicians in an academic centre and to compare them with currently popular, standardized schemes for handover communication. Methods Prospective, observational study using video recording in an academic intensive care unit in Ontario, Canada. Forty individual patient handovers were randomly selected out of 10 end-of-week handover sessions of attending physicians. Two coders independently reviewed handover transcripts documenting elements of three communication schemes: SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendations; SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan; and a standard medical admission note. Frequency and extent of questions asked by incoming physicians were measured as well. Analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results Mean (± standard deviation duration of patient-specific handovers was 2 min 58 sec (± 57 sec. The majority of handovers' content consisted of recent and current patient status. The remainder included physicians' interpretations and advice. Questions posed by the incoming physicians accounted for 5.8% (± 3.9% of the handovers' content. Elements of all three standardized communication schemes appeared repeatedly throughout the handover dialogs with no consistent pattern. For example, blocks of SOAP's Assessment appeared 5.2 (± 3.0 times in patient handovers; they followed Objective blocks in only 45

  18. How critical care nurses' roles and education affect organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawoniyi, Oluwafunmilayo Ololade; Gormley, Kevin

    Organ and tissue dysfunction and failure cause high mortality rates around the world. Tissue and organs transplantation is an established, cost-effective, life-saving treatment for patients with organ failure. However, there is a large gap between the need for and the supply of donor organs. Acute and critical care nurses have a central role in the organ donation process, from identifying and assessing potential donors and supporting their families to involvement in logistics. Nurses with an in-depth knowledge of donation understand its clinical and technical aspects as well as the moral and legal considerations. Nurses have a major role to play in tackling organ and tissue shortages. Such a role cannot be adequately performed if nurses are not fully educated about donation and transplant. Such education could be incorporated into mandatory training and completed by all nurses. PMID:26153810

  19. Austere kindness or mindless austerity: the efects of gift-giving to beggars in east London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lenhard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The current austerity policies in the United Kingdom are creating a precarious situation for many people on the margins of society. Employing micro-level ethnographic analysis, this article addresses how government decisions affect people living on the street. Observations of how local policies demonize gift-giving to street people led me to revisit arguments about the positive and negative effects of gifts. Four months of fieldwork amongst people who beg in the City of London confirmed the Maussian ambiguity of gift exchange. The material benefit of monetary gifts is often accompanied by shared time and conversation; gifts to beggars can go beyond materiality and are hence able to create bonds of sociability.

  20. Effect of caring behavior on disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Eng, Cheng-Joo; Ko, Hui-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between caring behavior and the disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students in clinical practice. A structural equation model was used to test the hypothesized relationship between caring behavior and critical thinking skills. Caring is the core of nursing practice, and the disposition toward critical thinking is needed for competent nursing care. In a fast-paced and complex environment, however, "caring" may be lost. Because nursing students will become professional nurses, it is essential to explore their caring behaviors and critical thinking skills and to understand how to improve their critical thinking skills based on their caring behavior. A cross-sectional study was used, with convenience sampling of students who were participating in associate degree nursing programs at 3 colleges of nursing. The following instruments were used: critical thinking disposition inventory Chinese version and caring behaviors scale. The study found that individuals with a higher frequency of caring behaviors had a higher score on critical thinking about nursing practice (β = .44, t = 5.14, P critical thinking. The findings of this study revealed the importance of caring behavior and its relationship with the disposition toward critical thinking. Thus, it is recommended that nursing education should emphasize a curriculum related to caring behavior to improve the disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students.

  1. Where does political influence go when austerity sets in?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling; Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    Economic crisis is argued to be an opportunity to push through political changes, which otherwise can be difficult to make. Fiscal austerity is likely to change the political agenda and in some cases also the coalitions which can be formed. Based on the asymmetric distribution of preferences betw...

  2. Reading the Conjuncture: State, Austerity and Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flohr, Mikkel; Harrison, Yannick Nehemiah Antonio

    2016-01-01

    and the rise of political capitalism are seen as leading to a loss of temporal sovereignty, problems of crisis management, an assault on democracy, and the rise of the austerity state. Closing remarks address the role of left-wing social movements and parties, such as SYRIZA and Podemos, and the difficulties...

  3. Effect of the essentials of critical care orientation (ECCO) program on the development of nurses' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud A

    2010-09-01

    It is essential for nurses to develop critical thinking skills to ensure their ability to provide safe and effective care to patients with complex and variable needs in ever-changing clinical environments. To date, very few studies have been conducted to examine how nursing orientation programs develop the critical thinking skills of novice critical care nurses. Strikingly, no research studies could be found about the American Association of Critical Care Nurses Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO) program and specifically its effect on the development of nurses' critical thinking skills. This study explored the perceptions of new graduate nurses regarding factors that helped to develop their critical thinking skills throughout their 6-month orientation program in the intensive care unit. A convenient non-probability sample of eight new graduates was selected from a hospital that used the ECCO program. Data were collected with demographic questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. An exploratory qualitative research method with content analysis was used to analyze the data. The study findings showed that new graduate nurses perceived that they developed critical thinking skills that improved throughout the orientation period, although there were some challenges in the ECCO program. This study provides data that could influence the development and implementation of future nursing orientation programs.

  4. Construct validity of the Chelsea critical care physical assessment tool: an observational study of recovery from critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Corner, Evelyn J; Soni, Neil; Handy, Jonathan M.; Stephen J Brett

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is common in survivors of critical illness, resulting in global weakness and functional deficit. Although ICU-AW is well described subjectively in the literature, the value of objective measures has yet to be established. This project aimed to evaluate the construct validity of the Chelsea Critical Care Physical Assessment tool (CPAx) by analyzing the association between CPAx scores and hospital-discharge location, as a measure of fu...

  5. Critical care 24 × 7: But, why is critical nutrition interrupted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Adequate nutritional support is crucial in prevention and treatment of malnutrition in critically ill-patients. Despite the intention to provide appropriate enteral nutrition (EN, meeting the full nutritional requirements can be a challenge due to interruptions. This study was undertaken to determine the cause and duration of interruptions in EN. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a multidisciplinary critical care unit (CCU of a tertiary care hospital from September 2010 to January 2011 and who received EN for a period >24 h were included in this observational, prospective study. A total of 327 patients were included, for a total of 857 patient-days. Reasons and duration of EN interruptions were recorded and categorized under four groups-procedures inside CCU, procedures outside CCU, gastrointestinal (GI symptoms and others. Results: Procedure inside CCU accounted for 55.9% of the interruptions while GI symptoms for 24.2%. Although it is commonly perceived that procedures outside CCU are the most common reason for interruption, this contributed only to 18.4% individually; ventilation-related procedures were the most frequent cause (40.25%, followed by nasogastric tube aspirations (15.28%. Although GI bleed is often considered a reason to hold enteral feed, it was one of the least common reasons (1% in our study. Interruption of 2-6 h was more frequent (43% and most of this (67.1% was related to "procedures inside CCU". Conclusion: Awareness of reasons for EN interruptions will aid to modify protocol and minimize interruptions during procedures in CCU to reach nutrition goals.

  6. ROLE OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE IN ANESTHESIA AND CRITICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljit Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential uses of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly selective α2- adrenoceptor agonist are very diverse Although not orally active, DEX shows good bioavailability when administered via various other routes like intranasal, buccal, IM than intra-venous. DEX has similar pharmacokinetics in all age groups. Its side effects are predictable and easily treatable; hence it has found a place as a part of fast-tracking anesthesia regimens in children. DEX is the sedative of choice for peri-operative use in high- risk patients, since it is cardioprotective, neuroprotective and renoprotective. Premedication with DEX obtunds the autonomic pressor responses due to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when used as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. DEX in high doses offers another approach to manage morbidly obese patients and patients with a compromised airway; without causing any cardiorespiratory depression. It is near ideal hypotensive agent used for controlled hypotension. Availability of an antidote (Atipamezole with similar elimination half-life is taking the drug into new frontiers .The aim of this review is to present the most recent topics regarding the advantages in using dexmedetomidine in clinical anesthesia and in critical care, while discussing the controversial issues of its harmful effects.

  7. February 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: subgroup analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Sun X, Ioannidis JP, Agoritsas T, Alba AC, Guyatt G. How to use a subgroup analysis: users' guide to the medical literature. JAMA. 2014;311(4:405-11. One of Dr. Raschke's pet peeves is unplanned subgroup analysis. In the September 2013 Banner Good Samaritan / Phoenix VA Critical Care Journal Club (1 he commented on an article by Hung et al. (2 that used a post hoc subgroup analysis. He felt strongly enough to write to the editor about why post hoc subgroup analysis should not be acceptable as a basis for scientific conclusions and his letter was published this month (3. Therefore, we have been on the lookout for a review article to discuss subgroup analysis and came across this timely publication in JAMA. The authors cite a number of examples and provide 5 criteria to use when assessing the validity of subgroup analyses: 1. Can chance explain the apparent subgroup effect ...

  8. Feasibility of Eyetracking in Critical Care Environments - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Andreas; Röhrig, Rainer; Lipprandt, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Achieving a good understanding of the socio-technical system in critical or emergency situations is important for patient safety. Research in human-computer interaction in the field of anesthesia or surgery has the potential to improve usability of the user interfaces and enhance patient safety. Therefore eye-tracking is a technology for analyzing gaze patterns. It can also measure what is being perceived by the physician during medical procedures. The aim of this review is the applicability of eye-tracker in the domain of simulated or real environments of anesthesia, surgery or intensive care. We carried out a literature research in PubMed. Two independent researchers screened the titles and abstracts. The remaining 8 full-papers were analyzed based on the applicability of eye-trackers. The articles contain topics like training of surgeons, novice vs. experts or the cognitive workload. None of the publications address our goal. The applicability or limitations of the eye-tracker technology were stated incidentally. PMID:27577455

  9. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH DIABETES CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotiu Madalina-Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer satisfaction represents one of the core principles of marketing as it is acknowledged that organizations survive and prosper only by properly meeting the needs and wants of their customers. The same logic can be applied to the healthcare sector, especially in the current context of increased public scrutiny and funding pressure. Furthermore, research shows that patient satisfaction is linked to positive effects from both a marketing and a medical point of view. From a marketing point of view, patient satisfaction is closely linked to positive word of mouth and likelihood to recommend, while from a medical poinbt of view, research suggests that satisfied patients are more inclined toward treatment adherence, are less likely to seek another opinion elsewhere thus delaying treatment, while medical staff tend to have a higher morale. Yet, research regarding patient satisfaction with a particular illness is scarce with studies rarely building on previous results. The article takes on this challenge and aims to critically analyse several empirical studies conducted on patient satisfaction with diabetes care in order to synthesize results on particular determinants and suggest areas for further research. Diabetes is currently one of the most spread chronic disease around the world, while also affecting both old and younger patients. At the same time, it is a chronic disease characterised by the need for disease management efforts on behalf of the patients as well as high treatment adherence in order to avoid complications. It is also a costly chronic disease especially because of the numerous complications which patients may arrive to face during their struggle with this disease. In order to achieve the aim of this article we have chosen to adopt a marketing approach meaning that we see diabetes patients as clients of the medical institutions. Results show that diabetes particularities call for a broader view on patient satisfaction

  10. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians’ professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees.

  11. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sangeeta; Menon, Kusum; Piquette, Dominique; Gottesman, Ronald; Hutchison, James; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  12. Challenges in conducting end-of-life research in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Debra Lynn-McHale; Norton, Sally A; Baggs, Judith Gedney

    2008-01-01

    Critical care units present some unique challenges to the researcher, especially when the research topic of interest is related to end-of-life care. The purpose of this article is to address some of the methodological and practical issues related to conducting end-of-life research in the critical care setting. Recruitment barriers include gaining access to a clinical site, gaining access to patients, and prognostic uncertainty. Additional barriers include challenges related to informed consent, data collection, the research team, and ethical considerations. Strategies are described that can be used to guide researchers to conduct end-of-life research successfully in critical care. PMID:18560286

  13. Thinking with 'White Dee': The Gender Politics of 'Austerity Porn'

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Allen; Imogen Tyler; Sara De Benedictis

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on Benefits Street, and specifically the figure of White Dee, this rapid response article offers a feminist analysis of the relationship between media portrayals of people living with poverty and the gender politics of austerity. To do this we locate and unpick the paradoxical desires coalescing in the making and remaking of the figure of 'White Dee' in the public sphere. We detail how Benefits Street operates through forms of classed and gendered shaming to generate public consent f...

  14. Examples of austere orbits of the isotropy representations for semisimple pseudo-Riemannian symmetric spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Kurando(Department of General Education, Fukushima National College of Technology, Fukushima, 970-8034, Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Harvey-Lawson and Anciaux introduced the notion of austere submanifolds in pseudo-Riemannian geometry. We give an equivalent condition for an orbit of the isotropy representations for semisimple pseudo-Riemannian symmetric space to be an austere submanifold in a pseudo-sphere in terms of restricted root system theory with respect to Cartan subspaces. By using the condition we give examples of austere orbits.

  15. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vi Am Dinh; Giri, Paresh C.; Inimai Rathinavel; Emilie Nguyen; David Hecht; Ihab Dorotta; H. Bryant Nguyen; Chrissian, Ara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS), standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM) fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows' attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ system...

  16. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  17. Subterranean Currents: Research and the Radical Imagination in the Age of Austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Khasnabish

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Against a backdrop of austerity, securitization, and the rampant enclosure of public spaces and democratic processes including the university and scholarship, this article critically explores what prefigurative engaged research – research capable of not simply documenting what is but contributing to struggles for social justice and social change – might look like, what it can contribute, and what its limitations are. Beyond familiar calls for a “public” or “applied” social science and drawing on a two-year-long project focused on radical social movements and the radical imagination in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, this article explores what politically-engaged social science research might offer to social justice struggles aiming to construct a more just, democratic, dignified, liberated, and peaceful world.

  18. Meeting the milestones. Strategies for including high-value care education in pulmonary and critical care fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Weinberger, Steven E; Wagner, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Physician decision making is partially responsible for the roughly 30% of U.S. healthcare expenditures that are wasted annually on low-value care. In response to both the widespread public demand for higher-quality care and the cost crisis, payers are transitioning toward value-based payment models whereby physicians are rewarded for high-value, cost-conscious care. Furthermore, to target physicians in training to practice with cost awareness, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has created both individual objective milestones and institutional requirements to incorporate quality improvement and cost awareness into fellowship training. Subsequently, some professional medical societies have initiated high-value care educational campaigns, but the overwhelming majority target either medical students or residents in training. Currently, there are few resources available to help guide subspecialty fellowship programs to successfully design durable high-value care curricula. The resource-intensive nature of pulmonary and critical care medicine offers unique opportunities for the specialty to lead in modeling and teaching high-value care. To ensure that fellows graduate with the capability to practice high-value care, we recommend that fellowship programs focus on four major educational domains. These include fostering a value-based culture, providing a robust didactic experience, engaging trainees in process improvement projects, and encouraging scholarship. In doing so, pulmonary and critical care educators can strive to train future physicians who are prepared to provide care that is both high quality and informed by cost awareness. PMID:25714122

  19. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation......OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... intubated patients included unpredictability, ambiguous needs and complex actions, while the rewarding aspects included personal interaction. Three sub-themes were identified: (i) caring for and with the patient, (ii) negotiating relational and instrumental care and (iii) managing physical and emotional...

  20. Proper care for the dying: a critical public issue.

    OpenAIRE

    Crispell, K R; Gomez, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of the medical profession to sustain life, or more appropriately, to prolong dying, in patients with terminal illness, creates a most complex and controversial situation for all involved: the patient, if mentally alert; the patient's family; and the medical care team including physicians, nurses and attendants. This situation is especially complex in large acute care hospitals where medical and nursing students, residents and house officers receive advanced medical training. A maj...

  1. Critical views on postpartum care expressed by new mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldenström Ulla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women's evaluation of hospital postpartum care has consistently been more negative than their assessment of other types of maternity care. The need to further explore what is wrong with postpartum care, in order to stimulate changes and improvements, has been stressed. The principal aim of this study was to describe women's negative experiences of hospital postpartum care, expressed in their own words. Characteristics of the women who spontaneously gave negative comments about postpartum care were compared with those who did not. Methods Data were taken from a population-based prospective longitudinal study of 2783 Swedish-speaking women surveyed at three time points: in early pregnancy, at two months, and at one year postpartum. At the end of the two follow-up questionnaires, women were asked to add any comment they wished. Content analysis of their statements was performed. Results Altogether 150 women gave negative comments about postpartum care, and this sample was largely representative of the total population-based cohort. The women gave a diverse and detailed description of their experiences, for instance about lack of opportunity to rest and recover, difficulty in getting individualised information and breastfeeding support, and appropriate symptom management. The different statements were summarised in six categories: organisation and environment, staff attitudes and behaviour, breastfeeding support, information, the role of the father and attention to the mother. Conclusion The findings of this study underline the need to further discuss and specify the aims of postpartum care. The challenge of providing high-quality follow-up after childbirth is discussed in the light of a development characterised by a continuous reduction in the length of hospital stay, in combination with increasing public demands for information and individualised care.

  2. Health care for the indigent: overview of critical issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzoli, G J

    1986-01-01

    Health care for the indigent is a major problem in the United States. This review of the literature on health care for the indigent was undertaken to determine which major questions remain unresolved. Overall, this article finds that a very large pool of individuals under age 65 are at risk of being medically indigent. A myriad of health programs for some economically disadvantaged individuals do exist, but their level of funding has fluctuated over time--and many poor individuals must rely e...

  3. Carbon dioxide kinetics and capnography during critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Cynthia T; Breen, Peter H

    2000-01-01

    Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of carbon dioxide kinetics during steady and nonsteady state should improve, we believe, clinical care during intensive care treatment. Capnography and the measurement of end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2) will gradually be augmented by relatively new measurement methodology, including the volume of carbon dioxide exhaled per breath (VCO2,br) and average alveolar expired PCO2 (PA̅E̅CO2). Future directions include the study of oxy...

  4. Nurse′s perceptions of physiotherapists in critical care team: Report of a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranati Gupte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional relationship plays a major role in effective patient care. Specialized units such as critical care require multidisciplinary care where perception about every members role may affect the delivery of patient care. The objective of this study was to find out nurses′ perceptions of the role of physiotherapists in the critical care team. Methods: Qualitative study by using semi-structured interview was conducted among the qualified nurses working in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital. The interview consisted of 19 questions divided into 3 sections. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. In-depth content analysis was carried out to identify major themes in relation to the research question. Results: Analysis identified five major issues which included role and image of a physiotherapist, effectiveness of treatment, communications, teamwork, and interprofessional relations. Physiotherapists were perceived to be an important member of the critical team with the role of mobilizing the patients. The respondents admitted that there existed limitations in interprofessional relationship. Conclusion: Nurses perceived the role of physiotherapist in the critical care unit as an integral part and agreed on the need for inclusion of therapist multidisciplinary critical care team.

  5. [Cuts, austerity and health. SESPAS report 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Benedicto, Andreu

    2014-06-01

    Since 2009, the economic recession has led to cuts in spending on social welfare policy and in health care. The most important risks to health depend on negative changes in social determinants. Notable among these determinants are unemployment and the large proportion of people at risk of poverty, which affects 30% of children younger than 14 years. Social inequalities have increased significantly, much more than health inequalities, probably because the value of retirement pensions has been maintained until now. Most of the population is fairly satisfied with the public health system, although it is under considerable pressure. Mortality statistics have not been affected so far, but there has been an increase in mood disorders and mental health problems. Health services utilization has decreased and the number of publicly prescribed drugs has fallen dramatically. This restriction accounts for much of the decrease in public spending on health, since the hospital care budget has not decreased, despite the fall in primary care and public health spending. The crisis could encourage community health and the inclusion of health in all policies. It is the responsibility of professionals and public health institutions monitoring the trend in health problems and their determinants to avoid irreversible situations as far as possible. PMID:24863988

  6. A step ahead: strategies for excellence in critical care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Amy; Elliott, Sheila; Lusardi, Paula; Scott, Susan; Thomas, Diane

    2005-06-01

    The adult intensive care unit (ICU) at Baystate Medical Center is a 24-bed medical-surgical-trauma ICU that provides high-quality care to critically ill patients. Collaboration and expertise among the nursing staff, intensivists, and interdisciplinary colleagues have contributed to its development into a Beacon Award-winning unit. Its primary goal is reflected in the unit's mission: "Care for our patients is guided by knowledge, motivated by compassion, and performed in collaboration with others." Common interests, values, and purposes have created an environment of communication that supports the delivery of exceptional critical care to patients and their families. PMID:15862740

  7. Net4Care : Towards a Mission-Critical Software Ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2012-01-01

    The demographics of the western world is changing: people are getting older and as a partial consequence get an increasing number of chronic diseases such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and coronary disease. At the same time, healthcare systems are stressed for resources...... propose a software ecosystem approach for telemedicine applications, providing a framework, Net4Care, encapsulating national/global design decisions with respect to standardization while allowing for local innovation. This paper presents an analysis of existing systems, of requirements for a software...... ecosystem for telemedicine, and a summary of initial design decisions for the Net4Care framework....

  8. Critical perspectives on danish early childhood education and care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver; Broström, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses trends in contemporary Danish early childhood education and care (ECEC). Data are sourced from various policy documents, along with material from ongoing research projects in which the authors are involved. It is claimed that contemporary policy on Danish day care services has...... a tendency to emphasize narrow curriculum improvements and standardized testing. The democratic dimensions are still relatively strong, but at the moment these dimensions are interpreted within a skills-and-testing framework, which is leading to a situation where the political masquerades as the technical....

  9. The emotional intelligence of a group of critical-care nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Towell

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Critical-care nurses often look after three or more critically-ill patients during a shift. The workload and emotional stress can lead to disharmony between the nurse’s body, mind and spirit. Nurses with a high emotional intelligence have less emotional exhaustion and psychosomatic symptoms; they enjoy better emotional health; gain more satisfaction from their actions (both at work and at home; and have improved relationships with colleagues at work. The question arises: what is the emotional intelligence of critical-care nurses? A quantitative survey was conducted. The target population was registered nurses working in critical-care units who attended the Critical Care Congress 2009 (N = 380. Data were collected with the use of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Short Form and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. The sample (n= 220 was mainly a mature, female and professionally-experienced group of registered nurses. They held a variety of job descriptions within various critical-care units. Statistics indicated that the standard deviations were small and no aberrant aspects such as demographics skewed the findings. The conclusion was made that registered nurses who are older and that have more experience in critical care appear to have a higher range of emotional intelligence.

  10. A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, Leanne; Sorensen, Jens C; Pedersen, Preben U

    2010-01-01

    A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care......A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care...

  11. Austerity/Immiseration Capitalism and Islamophobia--or Twenty-First-Century Multicultural Socialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This article is in three parts. In part one, the author begins by examining the onset of austerity/immiseration capitalism in the United Kingdom. Austerity/immiseration capitalism has witnessed the decline of state multiculturalism and increasing attempts to deflect attention away from the failures of capitalism by playing the "race…

  12. Not Learning in the Workplace: Austerity and the Shattering of "Illusio" in Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to discuss the impact of UK government austerity policies on learning in public service work, specifically youth support work. It also aims to argue that austerity policies intensify "ethics work", create emotional suffering, and obstruct workplace learning in a variety of ways. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  13. Does Fiscal Austerity Affect Decision Makers’ Use and Perception of Performance Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholt, Bente; Bækgaard, Martin; Houlberg, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    of performance information is tested using survey and documentary data from Danish municipalities. The article concludes that politicians who face high fiscal austerity use performance information to a lesser extent than colleagues who face less fiscal austerity, thus indicating the use of performance...

  14. For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

  15. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  16. Let’s Talk Critical. Development and Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Critical Care Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Howes, Jennifer M.; Keene, Adam B.; Fausto, James A.; Pinto, Priya A.; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although expert communication between intensive care unit clinicians with patients or surrogates improves patient- and family-centered outcomes, fellows in critical care medicine do not feel adequately trained to conduct family meetings. Objectives: We aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate a communication skills program that could be easily integrated into a U.S. critical care fellowship. Methods: We developed four simulation cases that provided communication challenges that critical care fellows commonly face. For each case, we developed a list of directly observable tasks that could be used by faculty to evaluate fellows during each simulation. We developed a didactic curriculum of lectures/case discussions on topics related to palliative care, end-of-life care, communication skills, and bioethics; this month-long curriculum began and ended with the fellows leading family meetings in up to two simulated cases with direct observation by faculty who were not blinded to the timing of the simulation. Our primary measures of effectiveness were the fellows’ self-reported change in comfort with leading family meetings after the program was completed and the quality of the communication as measured by the faculty evaluators during the family meeting simulations at the end of the month. Measurements and Main Results: Over 3 years, 31 critical care fellows participated in the program, 28 of whom participated in 101 family meeting simulations with direct feedback by faculty facilitators. Our trainees showed high rates of information disclosure during the simulated family meetings. During the simulations done at the end of the month compared with those done at the beginning, our fellows showed significantly improved rates in: (1) verbalizing an agenda for the meeting (64 vs. 41%; Chi-square, 5.27; P = 0.02), (2) summarizing what will be done for the patient (64 vs. 39%; Chi-square, 6.21; P = 0.01), and (3) providing a follow-up plan (60 vs. 37%; Chi

  17. Critical care nurses' experiences caring for the casualties of war evacuated from the front line: lessons learned and needs identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah J; Hull, Mary S

    2008-03-01

    Nursing in a critical care environment is stressful, particularly when patients are young, previously healthy soldiers who have experienced multiple severe, life-threatening injuries. These injuries not only devastate the injured soldiers and their families, but also significantly impact the nurses caring for these patients. This article discusses some stressors identified by critical care nurses in two military medical treatment facilities where the most severely injured soldiers undergo definitive care, and examines the evolution of the concept of compassion fatigue, its symptoms, and methods of coping. Examples of how the nurses currently working with these young soldiers manage their own stressors are discussed and suggestions for successful coping strategies are provided. PMID:18206583

  18. The ethical dimension in published animal research in critical care: the public face of science

    OpenAIRE

    Bara, Meredith; Ari R. Joffe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ethical quality of animal research is important for many reasons, including for maintaining public support. We aimed to determine the reported attention to the ethical dimensions of the 3Rs (Refinement, Reduction, and Replacement) in critical care animal research published in 2012. Methods A data-collection form and instruction manual were created based on published recommendations, and completed for all consecutive critical care animal research (using mammals) publications f...

  19. The effect of neuro-linguistic programming on occupational stress in critical care nurses

    OpenAIRE

    HemmatiMaslakpak, Masumeh; Farhadi, Masumeh; Fereidoni, Javid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of coping strategies in reducing the adverse effects of stress can be helpful. Nero-linguistic programming (NLP) is one of the modern methods of psychotherapy. This study aimed to determine the effect of NLP on occupational stress in nurses working in critical care units of Urmia. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out quasi-experimentally (before–after) with control and experimental groups. Of all the nurses working in the critical care units of Urmia Imam Khom...

  20. The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, M.; Graham, S.; Bonacum, D

    2004-01-01

    Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members...

  1. A systematic evaluation of the quality of meta-analyses in the critical care literature

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, Anthony; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Ferland, Andre; Manns, Braden; Laupland, Kevin B; Doig, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Meta-analyses have been suggested to be the highest form of evidence available to clinicians to guide clinical practice in critical care. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the quality of meta-analyses that address topics pertinent to critical care. Methods To identify potentially eligible meta-analyses for inclusion, a systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken, using broad search terms relevant to in...

  2. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    OpenAIRE

    Roemi Fernández; Francisco Palacios; Teodor Akinfiev; Abraham Otero

    2010-01-01

    Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a pate...

  3. Critical care resources in the Solomon Islands: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westcott Mia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are minimal data available on critical care case-mix, care processes and outcomes in lower and middle income countries (LMICs. The objectives of this paper were to gather data in the Solomon Islands in order to gain a better understanding of common presentations of critical illness, available hospital resources, and what resources would be helpful in improving the care of these patients in the future. Methods This study used a mixed methods approach, including a cross sectional survey of respondents' opinions regarding critical care needs, ethnographic information and qualitative data. Results The four most common conditions leading to critical illness in the Solomon Islands are malaria, diseases of the respiratory system including pneumonia and influenza, diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis. Complications of surgery and trauma less frequently result in critical illness. Respondents emphasised the need for basic critical care resources in LMICs, including equipment such as oximeters and oxygen concentrators; greater access to medications and blood products; laboratory services; staff education; and the need for at least one national critical care facility. Conclusions A large degree of critical illness in LMICs is likely due to inadequate resources for primary prevention and healthcare; however, for patients who fall through the net of prevention, there may be simple therapies and context-appropriate resources to mitigate the high burden of morbidity and mortality. Emphasis should be on the development and acquisition of simple and inexpensive tools rather than complicated equipment, to prevent critical care from unduly diverting resources away from other important parts of the health system.

  4. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Unique Concerns for the Critical Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhartz, Jacob L; Shieck, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation originated in children more than 50 years ago, and these youngest patients, while comprising the minority of liver transplant recipients nationwide, can have some of the best and most rewarding outcomes. The indications for liver transplantation in children are generally more diverse than those seen in adult patients. This diversity in underlying cause of disease brings with it increased complexity for all who care for these patients. Children, still being completely dependent on others for survival, also require a care team that is able and ready to work with parents and family in addition to the patient at the center of the process. In this review, we aim to discuss diagnoses of particular uniqueness or importance to pediatric liver transplantation. We also discuss the evaluation of a pediatric patient for liver transplant, the system for allocating them a new liver, and also touch on postoperative concerns that are unique to the pediatric population. PMID:27254643

  5. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: complication of a distant malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Sante SC; Boivin M

    2016-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. An 82-year-old woman with prior medical history of stage IV colon cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented to the medical intensive care unit with newly diagnosed community acquired pneumonia and acute kidney injury. The patient presented with acute onset of shortness of breath, nausea, generalized weakness, bilateral lower extremity swelling and decreased urine output. She was transferred for short term dialysis in ...

  6. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: a tempting dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Marzouk I; Melendres L; Boivin M

    2014-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 46 year old woman presented with progressive severe hypoxemia and a chronic appearing pulmonary embolus on chest CT angiogram to the intensive care unit. The patient was hemodynamically stable, but had an oxygen saturation of 86% on a high-flow 100% oxygen mask. The patient had been previously investigated for interstitial lung disease over the past 2 year, this was felt to be due to non-specific interstitial pneumonitis. Her echocar...

  7. Critical cultural competence for culturally diverse workforces: toward equitable and peaceful health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; Rondney, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we argue that attaining equity, and therefore peace in health care delivery, necessitates that nursing and other health care professions more carefully attend to the sociocultural context in which health care is delivered. That sociocultural context includes culturally diverse patients, families, and communities, as well as health care providers who are themselves culturally diverse. We draw on findings from Almutairi's doctoral research with health care providers in Saudi Arabia to argue for what he has identified as critical cultural competence for health care providers. In so doing, we explicate the complexity of cultural and linguistic issues and power relations induced by race, class, and gender that can contribute to vulnerabilities for health care providers and recipients alike. PMID:23907302

  8. Critical Issues in Foster Care: Lessons the Children's Ark Learned from Barbara and Nathan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Kretchmar, Molly D.; Worsham, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Using an attachment theory framework, this article explores several critical issues in foster care as reflected in the case of Barbara and her 9-month-old son, Nathan. Barbara and Nathan participated in The Children's Ark, an innovative intervention for families in foster care that allowed mothers who had lost custody of their children to live,…

  9. Year in review 2005: Critical Care – Respirology: mechanical ventilation, infection, monitoring, and education

    OpenAIRE

    Haitsma, Jack J; Villar, Jesús; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2006-01-01

    We summarize all original research in the field of respiratory intensive care medicine published in 2005 in Critical Care. Twenty-seven articles were grouped into the following categories and subcategories to facilitate rapid overview: mechanical ventilation (physiology, spontaneous breathing during mechanical ventilation, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, side effects of mechanical ventilation, sedation, and prone positioning); infection (pneumonia and sepsis); monitoring (ventilatory ...

  10. The health and social consequences of an alcohol related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design: In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants ( patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting: The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients ...

  11. Health and social consequences of an alcohol-related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants (patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients were allocate...

  12. Communication of bed allocation decisions in a critical care unit and accountability for reasonableness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swota Alissa H

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication may affect perceptions of fair process for intensive care unit bed allocation decisions through its impact on the publicity condition of accountability for reasonableness. Methods We performed a qualitative case study to describe participant perceptions of the communication of bed allocation decisions in an 18-bed university affiliated, medical-surgical critical care unit at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre. Interviewed participants were 3 critical care physicians, 4 clinical fellows in critical care, 4 resource nurses, 4 "end-users" (physicians who commonly referred patients to the unit, and 3 members of the administrative staff. Median bed occupancy during the study period (Jan-April 2003 was 18/18; daily admissions and discharges (median were 3. We evaluated our description using the ethical framework "accountability for reasonableness" (A4R to identify opportunities for improvement. Results The critical care physician, resource nurse, critical care fellow and end-users (trauma team leader, surgeons, neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists functioned independently in unofficial "parallel tracks" of bed allocation decision-making; this conflicted with the official designation of the critical care physician as the sole authority. Communication between key decision-makers was indirect and could exclude those affected by the decisions; notably, family members. Participants perceived a lack of publicity for bed allocation rationales. Conclusion The publicity condition should be improved for critical care bed allocation decisions. Decision-making in the "parallel tracks" we describe might be unavoidable within usual constraints of time, urgency and demand. Formal guidelines for direct communication between key participants in such circumstances would help to improve the fairness of these decisions.

  13. Stress levels of critical care doctors in India: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Amte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctors working in critical care units are prone to higher stress due to various factors such as higher mortality and morbidity, demanding service conditions and need for higher knowledge and technical skill. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the stress level and the causative stressors in doctors working in critical care units in India. Materials and Methods: A two modality questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was conducted. In manual mode, randomly selected delegates attending the annual congress of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine filled the questionnaire. In the electronic mode, the questionnaires were E-mailed to critical care doctors. These questionnaires were based on General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12. Completely filled 242 responses were utilized for comparative and correlation analysis. Results: Prevalence of moderate to severe stress level was 40% with a mean score of 2 on GHQ-12 scale. Too much responsibility at times and managing VIP patients ranked as the top two stressors studied, while the difficult relationship with colleagues and sexual harassment were the least. Intensivists were spending longest hours in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU followed by pulmonologists and anesthetists. The mean number of ICU bed critical care doctors entrusted with was 13.2 ± 6.3. Substance abuse to relieve stress was reported as alcohol (21%, anxiolytic or antidepressants (18% and smoking (14%. Conclusion: Despite the higher workload, stress levels measured in our survey in Indian critical care doctors were lower compared to International data. Substantiation of this data through a wider study and broad-based measures to improve the quality of critical care units and quality of the lives of these doctors is the need of the hour.

  14. Intensive care diaries reduce new onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Christina; Bäckman, Carl; Capuzzo, Maurizia;

    2010-01-01

    Patients recovering from critical illness have been shown to be at risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). This study was to evaluate whether a prospectively collected diary of a patient's intensive care unit (ICU) stay when used during convalescence following critical illness...

  15. Financing Mental Health Care in Spain: Context and critical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Salvador-Carulla

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Financing and the way in which funds are then allocated are key issues in health policy. They can act as an incentive or barrier to system reform , can prioritise certain types or sectors of care and have long term consequences for the planning and delivery of services. The way in which these issues can impact on the funding of mental health services across Europe has been a key task of the Mental Health Economics European Network. (MHEEN This paper draws on information prepared for MHEEN and provides an analysis of the context and the main issues related to mental health financing in Spain. METHODS: A structured questionnaire developed by the MHEEN group was used to assess the pattern of financing, eligibility and coverage for mental healthcare. In Spain contacts were made with the Mental Health agencies of the 17 Autonomous Communities (ACs, and available mental health plans and annual reports were reviewed. A direct collaboration was set up with four ACs (Madrid, Navarre, Andalusia, Catalonia. RESULTS: In Spain, like many other European countries mental healthcare is an integral part of the general healthcare with universal coverage funded by taxation. Total health expenditure accounted for 7.7% of GDP in 2003 (public health expenditure was 5.6% of GDP. Although the actual percentage expended in mental care is not known and estimates are unreliable, approximately 5% of total health expenditure can be attributed to mental health. Moreover what is often overlooked is that many services have been shifted from the health to the social care sector as part of the reform process. Social care is discretionary, and provides only limited coverage. This level of expenditure also appears low by European standards, accounting for just 0.6% of GDP. COMMENTS: In spite of its policy implications, little is known about mental healthcare financing in Spain. Comparisons of expenditure for mental health across the ACs are problematic, making it

  16. Financing Mental Health Care in Spain: Context and critical issues

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador-Carulla, L.; Garrido, M.; McDaid, D; Haro, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Financing and the way in which funds are then allocated are key issues in health policy. They can act as an incentive or barrier to system reform , can prioritise certain types or sectors of care and have long term consequences for the planning and delivery of services. The way in which these issues can impact on the funding of mental health services across Europe has been a key task of the Mental Health Economics European Network. (MHEEN) This paper draws on information prepared ...

  17. Extra Physiotherapy in Critical Care (EPICC) Trial Protocol: a randomised controlled trial of intensive versus standard physical rehabilitation therapy in the critically ill

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kirsty; Wright, Stephen E.; Watson, Gillian; Baker, Catherine; Stafford, Victoria; Wade, Clare; Chadwick, Thomas J.; Mansfield, Leigh; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Shen, Jing; Deverill, Mark; Bonner, Stephen; Hugill, Keith; Howard, Philip; Henderson, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients discharged from Critical Care suffer from excessive longer term morbidity and mortality. Physical and mental health measures of quality of life show a marked and immediate fall after admission to Critical Care with some recovery over time. However, physical function is still significantly reduced at 6 months. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guideline on rehabilitation after critical illness, identified the need for high-quality randomised c...

  18. Nurses’ Burnout in Oncology Hospital Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz İrem Tunçel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is common in intensive care units (ICU because of high demands and difficult working conditions. The aim of this study was to analyse nurses’ burnout in our oncology ICU and to determine which factors are associated with. Material and Method: The study was carried out in Ankara Oncology Hospital ICU. A self- reporting questionnaire in an envelope was used for the evaluation of burnout (Turkish- language version of Maslach Burnout Inventory and depression (Beck Depression Scale. Results: From a total of 37 ICU nurses, 35 participated in the study (%94,5 response rate. High levels of emotional exhaustion in 82% and depersonalization in 51,4% of nurses was determined. Personal accomplishment was higher at 80%. Mild to moderate emotional state and mild anxiety was revealed. Years in profession,finding salary insufficient, finding the profession in its proper, choosing the profession of his own accord, work environment satisfaction and finding the social activity adequate were associated with burnout (p≤0.05. Conclusion: In our study, intensive care unit nurses’ burnout scores were found to be higher. Burnout was rare in nurses that choose the profession of his own accord, find the nursing profession in its proper, and social activity adequate and are satisfied with the work environment. Therefore, we believe that attention should be given to individual needs and preferences in the selection of ICU staff.

  19. Professional stress and health among critical care nurses in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Golubović, Boris; Brkić, Nina; Prokeš, Bela

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse professional stressors, evaluate the level of stress in nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and assess the correlation between the perception of stress and psychological and somatic symptoms or diseases shown by nurses. The research, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out in the Intensive Care Units (ICU), in health centres in Serbia. The sample population encompassed 1000 nurses. Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) was used as the research instrument. ENSS revealed a valid metric characteristic within our sample population. Nurses from ICUs rated situations involving physical and psychological working environments as the most stressful ones, whereas situations related to social working environment were described as less stressful; however, the differences in the perception of stressfulness of these environments were minor. Socio-demographic determinants of the participants (age, marital status and education level) significantly affected the perception of stress at work. Significant differences in the perception of stressfulness of particular stress factors were observed among nurses with respect to psychological and somatic symptoms (such as headache, insomnia, fatigue, despair, lower back pain, mood swings etc.) and certain diseases (such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus etc). In view of permanent escalation of professional stressors, creating a supportive working environment is essential for positive health outcomes, prevention of job-related diseases and better protection of already ill nurses. PMID:22728799

  20. Long-term mortality after critical care: what is the starting point?

    OpenAIRE

    Ranzani, Otavio T.; Zampieri, Fernando G.; Park, Marcelo; Salluh, Jorge IF

    2013-01-01

    Mortality is still the most assessed outcome in the critically ill patient and is routinely used as the primary end-point in intervention trials, cohort studies, and benchmarking analysis. Despite this, interest in patient-centered prognosis after ICU discharge is increasing, and several studies report quality of life and long-term outcomes after critical illness. In a recent issue of Critical Care, Cuthbertson and colleagues reported interesting results from a cohort of 439 patients with sep...

  1. Strategies of organization and service for the critical-care laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, M; Schwartz, M K

    1990-08-01

    Critical-care medicine requires rapidity of treatment decisions and clinical management. To meet the objectives of critical-care medicine, the critical-care laboratory must consider four major aspects of laboratory organization in addition to analytical responsibilities: specimen collection and delivery, training of technologists, selection of reliable instrumentation, and efficient data dissemination. One must also consider the advantages and disadvantages of centralization vs decentralization, the influence of such a laboratory on patient care and personnel needs, and the space required for optimal operation. Centralization may lead to workflow interruption and increased turnaround time (TAT); decentralization requires redundancy of instrumentation and staff but may shorten TAT. Minimal TAT is the hallmark of efficient laboratory service. We surveyed 55 laboratories in 33 hospitals and found that virtually all hospitals with 200 or more beds had a critical-care laboratory operating as a satellite of the main laboratory. We present data on actual TAT, although these were available in only eight of the 15 routine laboratories that provided emergency service and in eight of the 40 critical-care laboratories. In meeting the challenges of an increasing workload, a reduced clinical laboratory work force, and the need to reduce TAT, changes in traditional laboratory practice are mandatory. An increased reliance on whole-blood analysis, for example, should eliminate delays associated with sample preparation, reduce the potential hazards associated with centrifugation, and eliminate excess specimen handling.

  2. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vi Am Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS, standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows’ attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ systems was assessed including abdominal, pulmonary, vascular, and cardiac systems. Subjects served as self-controls and were assessed just prior to, within 1 week after, and 3 months after the course. Results. There was a significant improvement in CCM fellows’ written test scores, image acquisition ability, and pathologic image interpretation 1 week after the course and it was retained 3 months after the course. Fellows also had self-reported increased confidence and usage of CCUS applications after the course. Conclusions. Implementation of a 2-day critical care ultrasound course covering general CCUS and basic critical care echocardiography using a combination of didactics, live models, and ultrasound simulators is effective in improving critical care fellows’ proficiency and confidence with ultrasound use in both the short- and long-term settings.

  3. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vi Am; Giri, Paresh C; Rathinavel, Inimai; Nguyen, Emilie; Hecht, David; Dorotta, Ihab; Nguyen, H Bryant; Chrissian, Ara A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS), standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM) fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows' attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ systems was assessed including abdominal, pulmonary, vascular, and cardiac systems. Subjects served as self-controls and were assessed just prior to, within 1 week after, and 3 months after the course. Results. There was a significant improvement in CCM fellows' written test scores, image acquisition ability, and pathologic image interpretation 1 week after the course and it was retained 3 months after the course. Fellows also had self-reported increased confidence and usage of CCUS applications after the course. Conclusions. Implementation of a 2-day critical care ultrasound course covering general CCUS and basic critical care echocardiography using a combination of didactics, live models, and ultrasound simulators is effective in improving critical care fellows' proficiency and confidence with ultrasound use in both the short- and long-term settings. PMID:26346694

  4. Nurse care assesment at the end of life in intensive critical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Cristina Pascual Fernández

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To die nowadays is not the critical instant of our existence in occidental societies. Technological and scientific advances in health sciences have not been developed equally company and humanization in care. Nurses play an important and responsible role at end of life care, to provide patients and their families comfort cares in dying process. The main objective was to describe and analyze the professionals’ cares in Intensive Care Unit at the end of life process. An observational study was developed and 472 surveys to critical care nurses of six high complexity hospitals of Madrid Community were made. The questionnaire on the evaluation from the cares to the children that die in Pediatrics Intensive Care was applied. We have obtained that nurses said that most of the families remained with their patient in the moment of the death and needed support and empathy from the staff. As a conclusion we could say that the cares to the patients in Intensive Care Unit should be improved.

  5. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: complication of a distant malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante SC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. An 82-year-old woman with prior medical history of stage IV colon cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented to the medical intensive care unit with newly diagnosed community acquired pneumonia and acute kidney injury. The patient presented with acute onset of shortness of breath, nausea, generalized weakness, bilateral lower extremity swelling and decreased urine output. She was transferred for short term dialysis in the setting of multiple electrolyte abnormalities, including hyperkalemia of 6.4 mmol/l, as well as a creatinine of 6.5 mg/dl. The following imaging of the right internal jugular vein was performed with ultrasound during preparation for placement of a temporary triple lumen hemodialysis catheter. Based on the above imaging what would be the best location to place the dialysis catheter? 1. Left internal jugular vein; 2. Right femoral vein; 3. Right internal jugular vein; 4. Right subclavian vein. ...

  6. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: shortness of breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas MJK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract not available. Article truncated after first page. An 85 year old woman with a history of congestive heart failure and diabetes presented to the emergency department with progressive shortness of breath. She had recently been discharged from another hospital where she had been admitted for several days for community acquired pneumonia. The patient was in respiratory distress on arrival with tachypnea, increased work of breathing, and hypoxia despite supplemental oxygen with a non-rebreather mask and she was subsequently intubated. ED point-of-care ultrasound was performed of the right hemithorax. What does Figure 1 demonstrate? 1. Intravascular volume depletion; 2. Normal lung aeration; 3. Numerous B-lines; 4. Pleural effusion and consolidation; 5. Pneumothorax.

  7. Technology and the lifeworld of critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A J

    1995-08-01

    Traditionally, nursing scholars have concerned themselves with philosophies of science. This perspective reflects the Platonic dominance of theory over practice. The consequence of this view is that technology is conceived as an applied science. Furthermore, technology is considered as a neutral instrument of science. The primacy of theory was challenged by the philosopher Martin Heidegger, who argued that the correct relationship between these two concepts was a technology-science one. This reconceptualization suggests that practice precedes theory. This paper examines the developing body of literature concerning the philosophy of technology. Specifically, the philosophies of Martin Heidegger, Don Ihde, Albert Borgmann and Langdon Winner are explored from a nursing perspective, and how they may offer nursing a way of conceptualizing the ever expanding technological environment of the intensive care unit is discussed. PMID:7593956

  8. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: a tempting dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzouk I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 46 year old woman presented with progressive severe hypoxemia and a chronic appearing pulmonary embolus on chest CT angiogram to the intensive care unit. The patient was hemodynamically stable, but had an oxygen saturation of 86% on a high-flow 100% oxygen mask. The patient had been previously investigated for interstitial lung disease over the past 2 year, this was felt to be due to non-specific interstitial pneumonitis. Her echocardiogram findings are as presented below (Figures 1 and 2. The patient had refractory hypoxemia despite trials of high flow oxygen and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. She had mild symptoms at rest but experienced severe activity intolerance secondary to exertional dyspnea. Vitals including blood pressure remained stable and normal during admission and the patient had a pulsus paradoxus measurement of < 10 mmHg. She had previously had an echocardiogram 6 months before that revealed significant pulmonary hypertension. What would be the ...

  9. August 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis JL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: The patient is a previously healthy, albeit anxious, 15-year-old girl seen by her primary care physician. She has had several months of general malaise and ongoing fatigue and an increased frequency in night terrors over the past few weeks. Her family attributes this to stress of school and her new job. She was noted to have lost 3 kg in the previous nine weeks. PMH, SH, and FH: Her PMH was unremarkable. She is a student and denies smoking, drinking or drug abuse. Her family history is noncontributory. Physical Examination: Vital signs: BP 100/60 mm Hg, P 90 beats/min and regular, R 16 breaths/min, T 100.8 ºF, BMI 15; Diffuse, non-tender lymphadenopathy through the submandibular and upper anterior cervical chains; Lungs: clear; Heart: regular rhythm without murmur: Abdomen: slightly rounded and firm. Which of the following are diagnostic considerations at this time? 1. Anorexia nervosa 2. ...

  10. Management of Acute Pancreatitis in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güniz Meyancı Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammation occuring due to digestion of pancreatic self tissues and other organs after activation of digestive enzymes which are stable under normal conditions . For all the pancreatitis cases, the mortality rate is <%15. In the acute pancreatitis cases, the monitorization of the inspiration system, cardiovascular system and the metabolic status are needed. There is no primary therapy for the pancreatitis. All the therapy protocols are support therapy. The basic support therapy methods are: Liquid replacement, respiration support, pain management, pancreas secretion inhibition, metabolic support, intra-abdominal monitoring and decompression, nutrition, antibiotherapy, immunomodulation, coagulation mechanism monitoring. In the acute pancreatitis, the causes of early deaths are pancreatic shock and acute pulmonary thrombohemorrhage, within the first 7 days the causes of the 75% deaths are pulmonary shock and congestion and after 7 days the causes of the 77% are pancreas abscess, MOF (multiple organ failure, purulent peritonitis and erosive hemorrhage. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 85-9

  11. Care of critically ill newborns in India. Legal and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K N; Paul, V K

    1995-06-01

    The nature of neonatal care in India is changing. While the quality of care will most likely improve as the economy grows, the eventual scope of change remains to be seen. Attitudinal and behavioral changes, in addition to better economic conditions, are needed to realize more appropriate interventions in neonatal care. Economic, cultural, religious, social, political, and other considerations may limit or affect neonatal care, especially for ELBW infants or infants with congenital malformations or brain injury. Various protections for critically ill newborns exist under Indian law and the Constitution of India. New laws are being enacted to enhance the level of protection conferred, including laws which ban amniocentesis for sex determination and define brain death in connection with the use of human organs for therapeutic purposes. The applicability of consumer protection laws to medical care is also being addressed. It is noted, however, that India lacks a multidisciplinary bioethics committee. An effort should be made to discuss the legal and ethical issues regarding the care of critically ill newborns, with discussions considering religious, cultural, traditional, and family values. Legal and ethical guidelines should be developed by institutions, medical councils, and society specific to newborn care, and medical, nursing, and other paramedical schools should include these issues as part of the required coursework. Physicians, nurses, philosophers, and attorneys with expertise in law and ethics should develop and teach these courses. Such measures over the long term will ensure that future health care providers are exposed to these issues, ideally with a view toward enhancing patient care.

  12. Modernisation as a professionalising strategy: the case of critical care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Judith; Durand, Mary Alison; Hutchings, Andrew; Black, Nick

    2011-09-01

    There has been broad agreement about how to characterise the processes of 'modernisation' of the public sector in welfare societies, but rather less consensus on the impact of this modernisation on professionals. This paper takes critical care in England as a case study to explore how professionals in one setting account for the changes associated with modernisation. In contrast to reports from other arenas, critical care professionals were positive about the processes and outcomes of 'modernisation' in general, and there was a surprising lack of nostalgia in their accounts of organisational changes. However, joking comments suggested considerable scepticism about the initiatives explicitly associated with the national organisation that was charged with 'modernising' critical care, the Modernisation Agency. We suggest that the relative optimism of staff is in part explained by historical and political contingencies which meant that critical care, as a relatively new clinical specialty, benefited in tangible ways from modernisation. Further, all staff groups were able to attribute gains, rather than losses, in autonomy and authority to the modernisation of critical care. Their accounts suggest that modernisation can be a professionalising strategy, with responses to change being neither resistant nor compliant, but sceptically strategic. PMID:21314690

  13. Modernisation as a professionalising strategy: the case of critical care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Judith; Durand, Mary Alison; Hutchings, Andrew; Black, Nick

    2011-09-01

    There has been broad agreement about how to characterise the processes of 'modernisation' of the public sector in welfare societies, but rather less consensus on the impact of this modernisation on professionals. This paper takes critical care in England as a case study to explore how professionals in one setting account for the changes associated with modernisation. In contrast to reports from other arenas, critical care professionals were positive about the processes and outcomes of 'modernisation' in general, and there was a surprising lack of nostalgia in their accounts of organisational changes. However, joking comments suggested considerable scepticism about the initiatives explicitly associated with the national organisation that was charged with 'modernising' critical care, the Modernisation Agency. We suggest that the relative optimism of staff is in part explained by historical and political contingencies which meant that critical care, as a relatively new clinical specialty, benefited in tangible ways from modernisation. Further, all staff groups were able to attribute gains, rather than losses, in autonomy and authority to the modernisation of critical care. Their accounts suggest that modernisation can be a professionalising strategy, with responses to change being neither resistant nor compliant, but sceptically strategic.

  14. Challenges to the provision of emergency services and critical care in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Renae E; Morrison, Catherine A; Godfrey, Godwin; Mahalu, William

    2014-09-01

    The practice of intensive care unit (ICU) care in Sub-Saharan Africa is challenging and can have a significant impact on the lives of people in the region. Sub-Saharan Africa bears a disproportionate global burden of disease compared with the rest of the world. Inadequate emergency care services and transportation infrastructure; long lead times to hospital admission, evaluation, treatment and transfer to ICU; inadequate ICU and hospital infrastructure and, unreliable consumable and medical equipment supply chains all present significant challenges to the provision of ICU care in Sub-Saharan Africa. These challenges, coupled with an inadequate supply of trained healthcare workers and biomedical technicians and a lack of formal ICU-related research in Sub-Saharan Africa, would seem to be insurmountable. However, ICU care is being provided in district and regional hospitals throughout the region. We describe some of the challenges to the provision of emergency services and critical care in Tanzania. PMID:25667183

  15. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Hodkinson; Andrew Argent; Lee Wallis; Steve Reid; Rafael Perera; Sian Harrison; Matthew Thompson; Mike English; Ian Maconochie; Alison Ward

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided. Methods A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission or emergency dep...

  16. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU.

  17. The influence of gender on conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources: justice versus care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, D J; Olivarez, M

    1993-03-01

    After noting that the principle of autonomy has been inadequate for the resolution of many of the complex and difficult moral dilemmas involving conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources, this paper analyzes the concepts of justice and care as alternative solutions to moral problems and applies them to the issue of repeat organ transplants to a single recipient. These concepts are found to be the basis of the notions of moral reasoning and moral orientation, respectively, which serve in moral development theory as two fundamentally different ways to approach moral problem solving. Following an elaboration of moral reasoning as found in Kohlberg's cognitive moral development theory, the influence of gender on moral reasoning is investigated. The empirical data show that women (mean Defining Issues Test score, 47.18) score significantly higher (P justice for resolving moral dilemmas. Following an elaboration of moral orientation as found in Gilligan's moral theory of the ethics of care, the influence of gender on moral orientation is investigated. The empirical data show that women use the concept of care significantly more often (P justice in the resolution of moral dilemmas, such as the conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources, but that if women do use, or are required by the social system to use, justice in the resolution of moral dilemmas, they do a better job of it than men.

  18. Volatile Anesthetics. Is a New Player Emerging in Critical Care Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Angela; Parotto, Matteo; Wasowicz, Marcin; Ferguson, Niall D

    2016-06-01

    Volatile anesthetic agent use in the intensive care unit, aided by technological advances, has become more accessible to critical care physicians. With increasing concern over adverse patient consequences associated with our current sedation practice, there is growing interest to find non-benzodiazepine-based alternative sedatives. Research has demonstrated that volatile-based sedation may provide superior awakening and extubation times in comparison with current intravenous sedation agents (propofol and benzodiazepines). Volatile agents may possess important end-organ protective properties mediated via cytoprotective and antiinflammatory mechanisms. However, like all sedatives, volatile agents are capable of deeply sedating patients, which can have respiratory depressant effects and reduce patient mobility. This review seeks to critically appraise current volatile use in critical care medicine including current research, technical consideration of their use, contraindications, areas of controversy, and proposed future research topics. PMID:27002466

  19. Cardiac critical care in resource-limited environments: lessons from Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillo, Pilly; Humphrey, Stephen H; Meda, John; Kerry, Vanessa B

    2014-09-01

    The concept of cardiac critical care is emerging as a tool in the management of cardiovascular diseases in many Sub-Saharan African countries. The region is undergoing significant epidemiological transition. There remains a significant burden of infectious and nutritional disease, but cardiovascular disease, notably hypertension and coronary artery disease, as well as other noncommunicable diseases (NCD) are emerging rapidly, placing a double burden on existing healthcare systems. Within this complex, heterogeneous, and changing epidemiologic setting, efforts to diagnose and treat cardiovascular diseases have increased. As more patients are diagnosed with acute cardiac conditions, the number requiring management in a cardiac critical care unit is also increasing. In this review, using the Tanzanian experience, we attempt to chronicle the appearance of cardiac critical care services and the many challenges to their implementation in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25667182

  20. Volatile Anesthetics. Is a New Player Emerging in Critical Care Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Angela; Parotto, Matteo; Wasowicz, Marcin; Ferguson, Niall D

    2016-06-01

    Volatile anesthetic agent use in the intensive care unit, aided by technological advances, has become more accessible to critical care physicians. With increasing concern over adverse patient consequences associated with our current sedation practice, there is growing interest to find non-benzodiazepine-based alternative sedatives. Research has demonstrated that volatile-based sedation may provide superior awakening and extubation times in comparison with current intravenous sedation agents (propofol and benzodiazepines). Volatile agents may possess important end-organ protective properties mediated via cytoprotective and antiinflammatory mechanisms. However, like all sedatives, volatile agents are capable of deeply sedating patients, which can have respiratory depressant effects and reduce patient mobility. This review seeks to critically appraise current volatile use in critical care medicine including current research, technical consideration of their use, contraindications, areas of controversy, and proposed future research topics.

  1. ROMANIA’S AUSTERITY POLICIES IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor ARPAD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic recession starting in 2007 with the collapse of the US Bank Lehman Brothers triggered waves of economic shock across the world. Various states were hit more or less hard through different mechanisms and reacted with different intensities to adjust to the crisis situation. In this article, I employ a comparative methodology to assess the austerity policies undertook by Romania during the Great recession period as regards the policies adopted at the level of other EU member states. Thus, I aim to offer an initial evaluation of the degree of similarity of Romania’s recession policy responses to that of some other EU member states, and the degree to which Romania can be labeled as an outlier. The comparative analysis tests the explanatory power of three different theoretical approaches on the causal factors explaining variation in policy responses: power resources theories, functionalist approaches and blame-avoidance.

  2. Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison Jennifer R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of "wellness coaches". Emphasis is placed on providing students with exercises in critical thinking in an effort to prepare them for the challenge of inter...

  3. Relationship of anxiety and burnout with extrasystoles in critical care nurses in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Denat, Yildiz; Gokce, Serap; Gungor, Hasan; Zencir, Cemil; AKGULLU, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between levels of anxiety and burnout and prevalence of atrial extrasystoles (AESs) and ventricular extrasystoles (VESs) among critical care nurses. Methods: The sample of study included 51 nurses who worked in the intensive care units of a university hospital located in western Turkey. Beck’s Anxiety Inventory and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were used in the study. Results: The mean emotional exhaustion score of the nurses was 14.68±6.10, the mean p...

  4. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 4. Abdominal crisis in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, P; Prodger, J D

    1988-09-01

    Abdominal crises are common in critically ill patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit for problems unrelated to the abdomen. General surgeons may be asked to assess these patients for such reasons as pain, distension, possible sepsis, radiologic or laboratory abnormalities. Since many of the diagnostic signs and symptoms of acute abdomen are blunted or absent in critically ill patients who may be comatose or have been given analgesics or steroids, frequent thorough physical examination and close cooperation with the service admitting the patient are necessary to ensure early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of the abdominal crisis. PMID:3046730

  5. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients. PMID:27249962

  6. Critical interactionism: an upstream-downstream approach to health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Diane Cocozza; Burbank, Patricia M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, per capita health care expenditures in the United States are more than 20% higher than any other country in the world and more than twice the average expenditure for European countries, yet the United States ranks 37th in life expectancy. Clearly, the health care system is not succeeding in improving the health of the US population with its focus on illness care for individuals. A new theoretical approach, critical interactionism, combines symbolic interactionism and critical social theory to provide a guide for addressing health care problems from both an upstream and downstream approach. Concepts of meaning from symbolic interactionism and emancipation from critical perspective move across system levels to inform and reform health care for individuals, organizations, and societies. This provides a powerful approach for health care reform, moving back and forth between the micro and macro levels. Areas of application to nursing practice with several examples (patients with obesity; patients who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender; workplace bullying and errors), nursing education, and research are also discussed. PMID:22067231

  7. Critical appraisal skills training for health care professionals: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN46272378

    OpenAIRE

    Ewings Paul E; Reeves Barnaby C; Taylor Rod S; Taylor Rebecca J

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Critical appraisal skills are believed to play a central role in an evidence-based approach to health practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and costs of a critical appraisal skills educational intervention aimed at health care professionals. Methods This prospective controlled trial randomized 145 self-selected general practitioners, hospital physicians, professions allied to medicine, and healthcare managers/administrators from the South West...

  8. International recommendations on competency in critical care ultrasound: pertinence to Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Anthony S

    2011-03-01

    The use of echocardiography and other applications of ultrasound in the management of critically ill patients is becoming mainstream. With increased accessibility to equipment, the main challenges are in providing training and drawing up an outline of what levels of competency should be achieved. An international body of experienced critical care physician sonographers has reached consensus on guidelines in training and on two levels of competency - basic and advanced. Formal structures to aid the physician have been developed in Australia and New Zealand.

  9. Managing austerity: rhetorical and real responses to fiscal stress in local government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmans, Tom; Noordegraaf, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Coping with fiscal stress is a major challenge. Four responses can be identified for managing austerity: decline, cutbacks, retrenchment, and downsizing. Responses are primarily fiscally oriented, or organizational; they focus predominantly on stability, or change. Explorative research indicates the

  10. Assessing and developing critical-thinking skills in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinny, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    A lot of resources are spent on the development of new staff in the intensive care unit (ICU). These resources are necessary because the environment in the ICU is complex and the patients are critically ill. Nurses need an advanced knowledge base, the ability to accurately define and change priorities rapidly, good communication and teamwork skills, and the ability to work in a stressful environment in order to succeed and give their patients quality care. Critical thinking helps the nurse to navigate the complex and stressful environment of the ICU. Critical thinking includes more than just nursing knowledge. It includes the ability to think through complex, multifaceted problems to anticipate needs, recognize potential and actual complications, and to expertly communicate with the team. A nurse who is able to think critically will give better patient care. Various strategies can be used to develop critical thinking in ICU nurses. Nurse leaders are encouraged to support the development of critical-thinking skills in less experienced staff with the goal of improving the nurse's ability to work in the ICU and improving patient outcomes.

  11. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country. PMID:27288625

  12. Critical pathways for the management of preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia in institutionalised health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daftari Ashi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preeclampsia is a complex disease in which several providers should interact continuously and in a coordinated manner to provide proper health care. However, standardizing criteria to treat patients with preeclampsia is problematical and severe flaws have been observed in the management of the disease. This paper describes a set of critical pathways (CPs designed to provide uniform criteria for clinical decision-making at different levels of care of pregnant patients with preeclampsia or severe preeclampsia. Methods Clinicians and researchers from different countries participated in the construction of the CPs. The CPs were developed using the following steps: a Definition of the conceptual framework; b Identification of potential users: primary care physicians and maternal and child health nurses in ambulatory settings; ob/gyn and intensive care physicians in secondary and tertiary care levels. c Structural development. Results The CPs address the following care processes: 1. Screening for preeclampsia, risk assessment and classification according to the level of risk. 2. Management of preeclampsia at primary care clinics. 3. Evaluation and management of preeclampsia at secondary and tertiary care hospitals: 4. Criteria for clinical decision-making between conservative management and expedited delivery of patients with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion Since preeclampsia continues to be one of the primary causes of maternal deaths and morbidity worldwide, the expected impact of these CPs is the contribution to improving health care quality in both developed and developing countries. The CPs are designed to be applied in a complex health care system, where different physicians and health providers at different levels of care should interact continuously and in a coordinated manner to provide care to all preeclamptic women. Although the CPs were developed using evidence-based criteria, they could require careful evaluation and

  13. Ethical Issues in Surgical Critical Care: The Complexity of Interpersonal Relationships in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Malini D; Angelos, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in the era of shared medical decision making is the navigation of complex relationships between the physicians, patients, and surrogates who guide treatment plans for critically ill patients. This review of ethical issues in adult surgical critical care explores factors influencing interactions among the characters most prominently involved in health care decisions in the surgical intensive care unit: the patient, the surrogate, the surgeon, and the intensivist. Ethical tensions in the surgeon-patient relationship in the elective setting may arise from the preoperative surgical covenant and the development of surgical complications. Unlike that of the surgeon, the intensivist's relationship with the individual patient must be balanced with the need to serve other acutely ill patients. Due to their unique perspectives, surgeons and intensivists may disagree about decisions to pursue life-sustaining therapies for critically ill postoperative patients. Finally, although surrogates are asked to make decisions for patients on the basis of the substituted judgment or best interest standards, these models may underestimate the nuances of postoperative surrogate decision making. Strategies to minimize conflicts regarding treatment decisions are centered on early, honest, and consistent communication between all parties.

  14. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing. PMID:26262049

  15. By supporting pro-austerity parties in Greece the EU has forgotten its founding values

    OpenAIRE

    Tellidis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Is the EU still a force for democracy? In the lead up to the recent elections in Greece, the EU has supported the pro-austerity PASOK and New Democracy parties, both well known for cronyism and corruption when in government. Ioannis Tellidis argues that rather than delegitimising anti-austerity parties in Greece, the EU should have had a more negotiated approach to Greece by supporting policies that would improve governance and governability.

  16. Awareness of bispectral index monitoring system among the critical care nursing personnel in a tertiary care hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bispectral index monitoring system (BIS is one of the several systems used to measure the effects of anaesthetic and sedative drugs on the brain and to track changes in the patient′s level of sedation and hypnosis. BIS monitoring provides information clinically relevant to the adjustment of dosages of sedating medication. It can help the nursing personnel in preventing under- and over sedation among intensive care unit (ICU patients. Objective: The present study was conducted to assess the knowledge of nursing personnel working in the ICU regarding BIS. Methods: Fifty-four subjects participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess the knowledge of the nursing personnel regarding BIS. Focus group discussions were held among the nursing personnel to know their views regarding BIS. Results: Mean age (years of the subjects was 30.7΁7.19 (21-47 years, with a female preponderance. Although the use of BIS in ICU is not common, majority (94.44% were aware of BIS and its purpose. 79.62% of the subjects knew about its implication in patient care. The mean knowledge score of the subjects was 11.87΁2.43 (maximum score being 15. Conclusion: There exists an awareness among the critical care nursing staff in our institution regarding BIS and its clinical implications. Its use in the critical care setting may benefit the patients in terms of providing optimal sedation.

  17. Relationship of anxiety and burnout with extrasystoles in critical care nurses in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denat, Yildiz; Gokce, Serap; Gungor, Hasan; Zencir, Cemil; Akgullu, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between levels of anxiety and burnout and prevalence of atrial extrasystoles (AESs) and ventricular extrasystoles (VESs) among critical care nurses. Methods: The sample of study included 51 nurses who worked in the intensive care units of a university hospital located in western Turkey. Beck’s Anxiety Inventory and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were used in the study. Results: The mean emotional exhaustion score of the nurses was 14.68±6.10, the mean personal accomplishment score was 19.19±7.08, the mean depersonalization score was 5.31±3.84 and the mean anxiety score was 12.37±11.12. The rates of VESs and AESs detected in the critical care nurses were 21.6% and 35.3%, respectively. No relationship was found between levels of anxiety and burnout and the prevalence of AESs and VESs among the critical care nurses. A positive correlation was found between personal accomplishment scores and numbers of VESs (r= 0.693, p=0.001) and AESs (r= 0.700, p= 0.001). Conclusion: In the present study, there were low mean scores of burnout and anxiety among nurses working in intensive care units. No relationship was found between levels of anxiety and burnout and the prevalence of AESs and VESs among nurses who work in intensive care units. It was found that the people feeling more personal accomplishment have more VES or AES. The prevalence of AESs and VESs among the critical care nurses suffering from burnout and anxiety may be studied in the future studies. PMID:27022374

  18. Clinicians' perceptions of rationales for rehabilitative exercise in a critical care setting: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Nickels, M.; Aitken, L. M.; Walsham, J.; L. Watson; McPhail, S.

    2016-01-01

    Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Background: Rehabilitative exercise for critically ill patients may have many benefits; however, it is unknown what intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians perceive to be important rationale for the implementation of rehabilitative exercise in critical care settings. Objective: To identify which rationales for rehabilitative exercise interventions were perceived by ICU clinicians to be important and determine whether perceptions were consistent acr...

  19. Satisfaction survey on the critical care response team services in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al Qahtani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Saad Al Qahtani1,21Intensive Care Department, Critical Care Response Team, King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC, National Guard Health Affairs, 2King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Patient care and safety is the main goal and mission of any health care provider. We surveyed nurses in the wards and obtained their feedback about the quality of care delivered by the Critical Care Response Team (CCRT.Methods: Our hospital has 900 beds. A self-administered survey was given onsite to all ward nurses. Survey items were identified, discussed, reviewed, piloted, and finalized over a 3-month period in a focus group discussion format during three CCRT core group meetings. Responses were anonymous and collected by the nurses onsite.Results: The total number of returned and analyzed surveys was 274 (98.6%. Ninety-seven percent agreed that CCRT staff arrived in a timely manner. Ninety-four percent reported that CCRT staff helped in managing sick patients and ~70% reported that it strengthened team dynamics. Only 50% of the nurses felt CCRT staff improved competence at the bedside. The overall satisfaction was 100%; none of the nurses were dissatisfied with the team.Conclusion: The CCRT helped manage sick patients in the wards. However, CRRT staff should remember to involve and communicate with the team initiator and the patient’s physician to optimize patient health care.Keywords: rapid response team, medical emergency team, critical care response team, satisfaction

  20. Medication error in anaesthesia and critical care: A cause for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kothari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in medical profession, and anaesthesia and critical care are no exception to it. Man, medicine, machine and modus operandi are the main contributory factors to it. In this review, incidence, types, risk factors and preventive measures of the medication errors are discussed in detail.

  1. Measuring Person-Centered Care: A Critical Comparative Review of Published Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, David; Innes, Anthea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To present a critical comparative review of published tools measuring the person-centeredness of care for older people and people with dementia. Design and Methods: Included tools were identified by searches of PubMed, Cinahl, the Bradford Dementia Group database, and authors' files. The terms "Person-centered,"…

  2. A perspective on Serum Lactic acid, Lactic Acidosis in a Critical Care Unit

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    Agela A.Elbadri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the major surgical problems encountered in Libya. Lactic acidosis is a universal complication in breast cancer patients and can be considered a possible prognostic marker. Therefore, it will be beneficial to correctly understand and review the biochemistry underlying lactic acidosis and its possible significance as a prognostic marker in critical care patients, including breast cancer.

  3. A novel technique of differential lung ventilation in the critical care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuwagata Yasuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential lung ventilation (DLV is used to salvage ventilatory support in severe unilateral lung disease in the critical care setting. However, DLV with a double-lumen tube is associated with serious complications such as tube displacement during ventilatory management. Thus, long-term ventilatory management with this method may be associated with high risk of respiratory incidents in the critical care setting. Findings We devised a novel DLV technique using two single-lumen tubes and applied it to five patients, two with severe unilateral pneumonia and three with thoracic trauma, in a critical care setting. In this novel technique, we perform the usual tracheotomy and insert two single-lumen tubes under bronchoscopic guidance into the main bronchus of each lung. We tie the two single-lumen tubes together and suture them directly to the skin. The described technique was successfully performed in all five patients. Pulmonary oxygenation improved rapidly after DLV induction in all cases, and the three patients with thoracic trauma were managed by DLV without undergoing surgery. Tube displacement was not observed during DLV management. No airway complications occured in either the acute or late phase regardless of the length of DLV management (range 2-23 days. Conclusions This novel DLV technique appears to be efficacious and safe in the critical care setting.

  4. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  5. Adaptation of the Critical Care Family Need Inventory to the Turkish population and its psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükçoban, Sibel; Çiçeklioğlu, Meltem; Demiral Yılmaz, Nilüfer; Civaner, M Murat

    2015-01-01

    In the complex environment of intensive care units, needs of patients' relatives might be seen as the lowest priority. On the other hand, because of their patients' critical and often uncertain conditions, stress levels of relatives are quite high. This study aims to adapt the Critical Care Family Need Inventory, which assesses the needs of patients' relatives, for use with the Turkish-speaking population and to assess psychometric properties of the resulting inventory. The study was conducted in a state hospital with the participation of 191 critical care patient relatives. Content validity was assessed by expert opinions, and construct validity was examined by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to determine internal consistency. The translated inventory has a content validity ratio higher than the minimum acceptable level. Its construct validity was established by the EFA. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the entire scale was 0.93 and higher than 0.80 for subscales, thus demonstrating the translated version's reliability. The Turkish adaptation appropriately reflects all dimensions of needs in the original CCFNI, and its psychometric properties were acceptable. The revised tool could be useful for helping critical care healthcare workers provide services in a holistic approach and for policymakers to improve quality of service. PMID:26357593

  6. The research agenda in ICU telemedicine: a statement from the Critical Care Societies Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Hill, Nicholas S; Lilly, Craig M; Angus, Derek C; Jacobi, Judith; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Sales, Anne E; Scales, Damon C; Mathers, James A L

    2011-07-01

    ICU telemedicine uses audiovisual conferencing technology to provide critical care from a remote location. Research is needed to best define the optimal use of ICU telemedicine, but efforts are hindered by methodological challenges and the lack of an organized delivery approach. We convened an interdisciplinary working group to develop a research agenda in ICU telemedicine, addressing both methodological and knowledge gaps in the field. To best inform clinical decision-making and health policy, future research should be organized around a conceptual framework that enables consistent descriptions of both the study setting and the telemedicine intervention. The framework should include standardized methods for assessing the preimplementation ICU environment and describing the telemedicine program. This framework will facilitate comparisons across studies and improve generalizability by permitting context-specific interpretation. Research based on this framework should consider the multidisciplinary nature of ICU care and describe the specific program goals. Key topic areas to be addressed include the effect of ICU telemedicine on the structure, process, and outcome of critical care delivery. Ideally, future research should attempt to address causation instead of simply associations and elucidate the mechanism of action in order to determine exactly how ICU telemedicine achieves its effects. ICU telemedicine has significant potential to improve critical care delivery, but high-quality research is needed to best inform its use. We propose an agenda to advance the science of ICU telemedicine and generate research with the greatest potential to improve patient care.

  7. A journey of critical consciousness: an educational strategy for health care leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzlaf, Beverley A; Osborne, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare leaders who develop a critical perspective of the relationship between culture and health; value respect for differences, inclusiveness, equity, and social justice; and use their power to enact these values in their spheres of influence, both professionally and personally, are better able to improve care for a diversity of clients. Graduate students can be assisted to develop such a critical perspective through a course designed as a journey of critical consciousness. We describe this journey that takes students through phases of awareness, reflection, and action in which they come to understand the concepts of critical theory and discourse analysis and begin to use these to create changes in their work settings in the direction of equity and social justice. We suggest broader implications for programs and invite readers to begin their own journeys of critical consciousness.

  8. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  9. Eluding meaninglessness: a note to self in regard to Camus, critical care, and the absurd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimos, Thomas John

    2014-01-01

    Here I present a medical narrative, as a catharsis, regarding Albert Camus’s The Myth of Sisyphus in an attempt to elude meaninglessness in my difficult everyday practice of critical care medicine. It is well documented that physicians who practice critical care medicine are subject to burnout. The sense of despair that occasionally overwhelms me prompted my rereading of Camus’s classic text and caused me to recount his arguments that life is meaningless unless one is willing to take a leap of faith to the divine or, alternately, to commit suicide. This set up the examination of his third alternative, acceptance of a life without prima facie evidence of purpose and meaning, a view that may truly have some bearing on my professional life in the intensive care unit.

  10. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  11. Developing professional attributes in critical care nurses using Team-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Judy; Eustace, Paula; Oldland, Elizabeth; Glanville, David; Story, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Australian nurses prepare for specialty practice by undertaking postgraduate theoretical and clinical education in partnership models between universities and hospitals. In our global healthcare system, nurses require advanced critical thinking and strong communication skills to provide safe, high quality patient care. Yet, few education programs focus on developing these skills. Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a specific educational strategy that encourages and rewards students to think critically and solve clinical problems individually and in teams. The aim of this study was to investigate critical care nursing students' perceptions and experiences of TBL after it was introduced into the second half of their postgraduate specialty course. Following Ethics Committee approval, thirty-two students were invited to participate in an extended response questionnaire on their perceptions of TBL as part of a larger study. Data were analyzed thematically. Postgraduate students perceived their professional growth was accelerated due to the skills and knowledge acquired through TBL. Four themes underpinned the development and accelerated acquisition of specialty nurse attributes due to TBL: Engagement, Learning Effectiveness, Critical Thinking, and Motivation to Participate. Team-Based Learning offered deep and satisfying learning experiences for students. The early acquisition of advanced critical thinking, teamwork and communication skills, and specialty practice knowledge empowered nurses to provide safe patient care with confidence.

  12. Care of critically ill newborns in India. Legal and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K N; Paul, V K

    1995-06-01

    The nature of neonatal care in India is changing. While the quality of care will most likely improve as the economy grows, the eventual scope of change remains to be seen. Attitudinal and behavioral changes, in addition to better economic conditions, are needed to realize more appropriate interventions in neonatal care. Economic, cultural, religious, social, political, and other considerations may limit or affect neonatal care, especially for ELBW infants or infants with congenital malformations or brain injury. Various protections for critically ill newborns exist under Indian law and the Constitution of India. New laws are being enacted to enhance the level of protection conferred, including laws which ban amniocentesis for sex determination and define brain death in connection with the use of human organs for therapeutic purposes. The applicability of consumer protection laws to medical care is also being addressed. It is noted, however, that India lacks a multidisciplinary bioethics committee. An effort should be made to discuss the legal and ethical issues regarding the care of critically ill newborns, with discussions considering religious, cultural, traditional, and family values. Legal and ethical guidelines should be developed by institutions, medical councils, and society specific to newborn care, and medical, nursing, and other paramedical schools should include these issues as part of the required coursework. Physicians, nurses, philosophers, and attorneys with expertise in law and ethics should develop and teach these courses. Such measures over the long term will ensure that future health care providers are exposed to these issues, ideally with a view toward enhancing patient care. PMID:7636406

  13. Deciding intensive care unit-admission for critically ill cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiery Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 15 years, the management of critically ill cancer patients requiring intensive care unit admission has substantially changed. High mortality rates (75-85% were reported 10-20 years ago in cancer patients requiring life sustaining treatments. Because of these high mortality rates, the high costs, and the moral burden for patients and their families, ICU admission of cancer patients became controversial, or even clearly discouraged by some. As a result, the reluctance of intensivists regarding cancer patients has led to frequent refusal admission in the ICU. However, prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has been improved over the past 10 years leading to an urgent need to reappraise this reluctance. In this review, the authors sought to highlight that critical care management, including mechanical ventilation and other life sustaining therapies, may benefit to cancer patients. In addition, criteria for ICU admission are discussed, with a particular emphasis to potential benefits of early ICU-admission.

  14. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes.

  15. Dignity in health-care: a critical exploration using feminism and theories of recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Jones, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Growing concerns over undignified health-care has meant the concept of dignity is currently much discussed in the British National Health Service. This has led to a number of policies attempting to reinstate dignity as a core ethical value governing nursing practice and health-care provision. Yet these initiatives continue to draw upon a concept of dignity which remains reliant upon a depoliticised, ahistorical and decontexualised subject. In this paper, we argue the need to revise the dignity debate through the lens of feminism and theories of recognition. Postmodern feminist theories provide major challenges to what remain dominant liberal approaches as they pay attention to the contingent, reflexive, and affective aspects of care work. Theories of recognition provide a further critical resource for understanding how moral obligations and responsibilities towards others and our public and private responses to difference arise. This re-situates dignity as a highly contested and politicised concept involving complex moral deliberations and diverse political claims of recognition. The dignity debate is thus moved beyond simplistic rational injunctions to care, or to care more, and towards critical discussions of complex politicised, moral practices infused with power that involve the recognition of difference in health-care. PMID:20712663

  16. Dignity in health-care: a critical exploration using feminism and theories of recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Jones, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Growing concerns over undignified health-care has meant the concept of dignity is currently much discussed in the British National Health Service. This has led to a number of policies attempting to reinstate dignity as a core ethical value governing nursing practice and health-care provision. Yet these initiatives continue to draw upon a concept of dignity which remains reliant upon a depoliticised, ahistorical and decontexualised subject. In this paper, we argue the need to revise the dignity debate through the lens of feminism and theories of recognition. Postmodern feminist theories provide major challenges to what remain dominant liberal approaches as they pay attention to the contingent, reflexive, and affective aspects of care work. Theories of recognition provide a further critical resource for understanding how moral obligations and responsibilities towards others and our public and private responses to difference arise. This re-situates dignity as a highly contested and politicised concept involving complex moral deliberations and diverse political claims of recognition. The dignity debate is thus moved beyond simplistic rational injunctions to care, or to care more, and towards critical discussions of complex politicised, moral practices infused with power that involve the recognition of difference in health-care.

  17. Welfare Queens, Thrifty Housewives, and Do-It-All Mums: Celebrity motherhood and the cultural politics of austerity

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, K; Mendick, H; Harvey, L.; Ahmad, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider how the cultural politics of austerity within Britain plays out on the celebrity maternal body. We locate austerity as a discursive and disciplinary field and contribute to emerging feminist scholarship exploring how broader political and socio-economic shifts interact with cultural constructions of femininity and motherhood. To analyse the symbolic function of mediated celebrity maternity within austerity, the paper draws on a textual analysis of three celebrity mo...

  18. Epidemiology of fungal infections in critical care setting of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India: a prospective surveillance study

    OpenAIRE

    Tirath Singh; Anil Kumar Kashyap; Gautam Ahluwalia; Deepinder Chinna; Sandeep Singh Sidhu

    2014-01-01

    Background: During recent years, fungal infections have risen exponentially and are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, especially in the critical care setting. There is paucity of data from India on fungal pathogens. Methods: We prospectively studied patients admitted to medical and surgical critical care section of a tertiary care institute in northern India. The clinical samples of patients were processed in Department of Microbiology for isolatio...

  19. Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (=17, recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

  20. Stakeholder Engagement to Identify Priorities for Improving the Quality and Value of Critical Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry T Stelfox

    Full Text Available Large amounts of scientific evidence are generated, but not implemented into patient care (the 'knowledge-to-care' gap. We identified and prioritized knowledge-to-care gaps in critical care as opportunities to improve the quality and value of healthcare.We used a multi-method community-based participatory research approach to engage a Network of all adult (n = 14 and pediatric (n = 2 medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs in a fully integrated geographically defined healthcare system serving 4 million residents. Participants included Network oversight committee members (n = 38 and frontline providers (n = 1,790. Network committee members used a modified RAND/University of California Appropriateness Methodology, to serially propose, rate (validated 9 point scale and revise potential knowledge-to-care gaps as priorities for improvement. The priorities were sent to frontline providers for evaluation. Results were relayed back to all frontline providers for feedback.Initially, 68 knowledge-to-care gaps were proposed, rated and revised by the committee (n = 32 participants over 3 rounds of review and resulted in 13 proposed priorities for improvement. Then, 1,103 providers (62% response rate evaluated the priorities, and rated 9 as 'necessary' (median score 7-9. Several factors were associated with rating priorities as necessary in multivariable logistic regression, related to the provider (experience, teaching status of ICU and topic (strength of supporting evidence, potential to benefit the patient, potential to improve patient/family experience, potential to decrease costs.A community-based participatory research approach engaged a diverse group of stakeholders to identify 9 priorities for improving the quality and value of critical care. The approach was time and cost efficient and could serve as a model to prioritize areas for research quality improvement across other settings.

  1. Knowledge of Critical Care Provider on Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Chiki Sherpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in ventilated patient. Prevention of VAP in critically ill patient is significant concern for health care team in intensive care units (ICUs. Knowledge on prevention of VAP would have a significant impact on patient outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess knowledge on prevention of VAP in critical care providers and to find the association between knowledge on prevention of VAP and educational qualification and years of experience in ICUs. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in 5 different ICUs of Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, and using descriptive study design. Material and Methods: The study involved a purposive sample of 138 critical care providers. Critical care providers who were willing to participate in the study were included. Tools on demographic proforma and self-administered structured knowledge questionnaire on prevention of VAP were developed and content validity was established. The reliability of the tools was established.The data was categorized and analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The SPSS 16.0 version was used for the analysis of the study. Result: Majority 89.1% of the participant were 20-29 years, 63% unmarried 51.4% had completed diploma course and majority 81.2% were from nursing discipline. The study revealed that only 55.80% of subjects were having adequate knowledge on prevention of VAP based on median score. There was no significant association between knowledge score and educational qualification (÷²=0, p=0.833, years of experience in ICU (÷²= 2.221, p=0.329.

  2. Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison Jennifer R

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of "wellness coaches". Emphasis is placed on providing students with exercises in critical thinking in an effort to prepare them for the challenge of interfacing with an increasingly evidence based health care system. Methods This case study describes how health may be promoted and disease prevented through development of personalized wellness programs. As critical thinking is essential to the provision of evidence based wellness care, diverse learning opportunities for developing and refining critical thinking skills have been created. Three of the learning opportunities are an intrinsic component of the subject and, taken together, contributed over 50% of the final grade of the unit. They include a literature review, developing a client wellness contract and peer evaluation. In addition to these 3 compulsory exercises, students were also given an opportunity to develop their critical appraisal skills by undertaking voluntary self- and unit evaluation. Several opportunities for informal self-appraisal were offered in a structured self-study guide, while unit appraisal was undertaken by means of a questionnaire and group discussion at which the Head of School was present. Results Formal assessment showed all students capable of preparing a wellness program consistent with current thinking in contemporary health care. The small group of students who appraised the unit seemed to value the diversity of learning experiences provided. Opportunities for voluntary unit and self-appraisal were used to varying degrees. Unit evaluation provided useful feedback that led to substantial changes in unit structure

  3. When Antimicrobial Stewardship Isn't Watching: The Educational Impact of Critical Care Prospective Audit and Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Dimitra; Ali, Karim F; Matelski, John; D'Sa, Ryan; Powis, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Prospective audit and feedback (PAF) is an effective strategy to optimize antimicrobial use in the critical care setting, yet whether skills gained during PAF influence future antimicrobial prescribing is uncertain. This multisite study demonstrates that knowledge learned during PAF is translated and incorporated into the practice of critical care physicians even when not supported by an antimicrobial stewardship program. PMID:27382599

  4. Heptaoxygenated xanthones as anti-austerity agents from Securidaca longepedunculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibwe, Dya Fita; Awale, Suresh; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-15

    In a course of our search for anticancer agent based on a novel anti-austerity strategy, we found that the CHCl3 extract of the roots of Securidaca longepedunculata (Polygalaceae), collected at Democratic Republic of Congo, killed PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells preferentially in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM). Phytochemical investigation on the CHCl3 extract led to the isolation of 28 compounds including five new polymethoxylated xanthones [1,6,8-trihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (1), 1,6-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5,8-pentamethoxyxanthone (2), 8-hydroxy-1,4,5,6-tetramethoxy-2,3-methylenedioxyxanthone (3), 4,6,8-trihydroxy-1,2,3,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (4), 4,8-dihydroxy-1,2,3,5,6-pentamethoxyxanthone (5)] and a new benzyl benzoate [benzyl 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoate (6)]. Among them, 1,6,8-trihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (1) and 1,6-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5,8-pentamethoxyxanthone (2) displayed the potent preferential cytotoxicity with PC50 of 22.8 and 17.4 μM, respectively. They triggered apoptosis-like PANC-1 cell death in NDM with a glucose-sensitive mode. PMID:24216090

  5. Examining Police Strategic Resource Allocation in a Time of Austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth den Heyer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of proactive policing has highlighted the need to ensure that the police utilise their resources both efficiently and effectively. Traditionally, police agencies have allocated resources in response to their operational demands or requirements, with the majority of resources being distributed in response to political demands and public calls for service. In recent years there has been a greater emphasis by police to deliver services proactively, and to direct resources to specific geographic areas of high crime or to specific crimes, and to apply intelligence led targeted policing initiatives. The changing operating environment to a public service ethos of accountability and ‘do more with less’ means that historical methods of allocating police officers may not meet an agency's strategic goals. This paper examines if an economic approach to allocating police strategic resources is an appropriate and equitable method in a time of austerity. This greater emphasis on proactive, rather than reactive policing, which also represents a shift from centralised control, underlines the need to ensure the efficient and effective use of resources.

  6. Critical Illness Polyneuromyopathy Developing After Diabetic Ketoacidosis in an Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Salih Sevdi; Meltem Turkay; Tolga Totoz; Serdar Demirgan; Melahat Karatmanlı Erol; Ali Özalp; Kerem Erkalp; Ayşin Alagöl

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM) is a primary axonal-degenerative condition that occurs in sensory and motor fibers after the onset of a critical illness. It is thought that it develops due to tissue damage due to hypoxia/ischemia. When 24-year-old female patient was followed in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to diabetic ketoacidosis, she was extubated on the second day. She was reintubated on the third day because of respiratory acidosis. Sedation was withdrawn on the fifth day,...

  7. [Respiratory care with prone position for diffuse atelectasis in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Y; Ujike, Y; Kurihara, M; Yamamoto, S; Oota, K; Tsukamoto, M; Imaizumi, H; Kaneko, M

    1991-01-01

    Diffuse atelectasis often occurs in the dorsal region of the lung of critically ill patients under long term mechanical ventilation. Conventional physical therapies (ex. PEEP, Sigh) have little effect on diffuse dorsal atelectasis. We provided respiratory care with prone position for 7 patients with severe respiratory distress (Two patients were treated twice). Improvement of their Respiratory Indexes (RI, mean 2.97) was obtained in the prone position for 6-163 (mean 35.8) hours. Ventilation efficiency also improved. Static lung compliance didn't change. It was assumed that the prone position was the factor responsible for the improvement of pulmonary V/Q ratio, the change of movement pattern of the diaphragm, and the ease of postural drainage of sputum. There were no complications. We conclude that prone position respiratory care has high utility for critically ill patients with diffuse dorsal atelectasis. PMID:2024073

  8. Validation of the Danish version of the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, J B; Poulsen, Kristian S.O.; Laerkner, E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing pain in critically ill patients is a challenge even in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a no sedation protocol. The aim of this study was to validate the Danish version of the pain assessment method; Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in an ICU with a no sedation...... in the data collection and CPOT scores were blinded to each other. Calculations of interrater reliability, criterion validity and discriminant validity were performed to validate the Danish version of CPOT. RESULTS: The results indicated a good correlation between the two raters (all scores > 0.9 and P ....05). About 48 (68.6%) of the included patients were able to self-report pain. We found a significantly higher mean CPOT score at the nociceptive procedure than at rest or the non-nociceptive procedure (P

  9. Prophylactic use of dressings for pressure ulcer prevention in the critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Elaine

    2016-06-23

    Multiple comorbidities and intensive therapy increase the risk of pressure ulcer (PU) development in critical care unit (CCU) patients. Given the high number of risk factors that CCU patients present with, it is important to acknowledge that not all PUs are entirely preventable, and incidence is thought to be between 14% and 42%. The consequences of acquiring a PU in critical care include increased mortality, morbidity and longer length of stay. Implementing prevention strategies as soon as the patient enters the unit can significantly reduce incidence. By adopting a proactive versus reactive mind-set, one CCU abandoned traditional PU risk assessment and implemented a number of intensive interventions, including the use of a prophylactic sacral dressing as an adjunct. As a result, PU incidence fell from 19.9 per 1000 patient population to 0.84 per 1000 patient population in 2014. In addition, 310 PU-free days were achieved. PMID:27345087

  10. Ultrasound findings in critical care patients: the "liver sign" and other abnormal abdominal air patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahine, Joseph; Giard, Annie; Chagnon, David-Olivier; Denault, André

    2016-12-01

    In critical care patients, point of care abdominal ultrasound examination, although it has been practiced for over 30 years, is not as widespread as its cardiac or pulmonary counterparts. We report two cases in which detection of air during abdominal ultrasound allowed the early detection of life-threatening pathologies. In the first case, a patient with severe Clostridium difficile was found to have portal venous gas but its significance was confounded by a recent surgery. Serial ultrasonographic exams triggered a surgical intervention. In the second case, we report what we call the "liver sign" a finding in patients with pneumoperitoneum. These findings, all obtained prior to conventional abdominal imaging, had immediate clinical impact and avoided unnecessary delays and radiation. Detection of abdominal air should be part of the routine-focused ultrasonographic exam and for critically ill patients an algorithm is proposed. PMID:26968407

  11. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  12. Reflections on the status of the contemporary artist in the struggle against the official discourses: Paul Auster, literature and history doi:10.5007/1807-1384.2010v7n2p210

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Reichert Coelho

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a reading of The New York Trilogy (1987, Leviathan (1992 and The Brooklyn Follies (2005, by Paul Auster, through the articulation between subjectivities and discourses, notably literature and history. The effort was guided by the observation of the criticism constructed by the writer in relation to the United States' national myth, in the perspective of a movement that resounds other writers' criticism, overall the north-American ones, among which Auster presents himself as a genealogical heir. In digging the discursive and historical viscera on the "origin" of the American nation, the writer presents some reflections on the national identity issue, mainly in relation to the symbols and to the way the characters deal with the official representations.

  13. Critical appraisal skills training for health care professionals: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN46272378

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewings Paul E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Critical appraisal skills are believed to play a central role in an evidence-based approach to health practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and costs of a critical appraisal skills educational intervention aimed at health care professionals. Methods This prospective controlled trial randomized 145 self-selected general practitioners, hospital physicians, professions allied to medicine, and healthcare managers/administrators from the South West of England to a half-day critical appraisal skills training workshop (based on the model of problem-based small group learning or waiting list control. The following outcomes were assessed at 6-months follow up: knowledge of the principles necessary for appraising evidence; attitudes towards the use of evidence about healthcare; evidence seeking behaviour; perceived confidence in appraising evidence; and ability to critically appraise a systematic review article. Results At follow up overall knowledge score [mean difference: 2.6 (95% CI: 0.6 to 4.6] and ability to appraise the results of a systematic review [mean difference: 1.2 (95% CI: 0.01 to 2.4] were higher in the critical skills training group compared to control. No statistical significant differences in overall attitude towards evidence, evidence seeking behaviour, perceived confidence, and other areas of critical appraisal skills ability (methodology or generalizability were observed between groups. Taking into account the workshop provision costs and costs of participants time and expenses of participants, the average cost of providing the critical appraisal workshops was approximately £250 per person. Conclusions The findings of this study challenge the policy of funding 'one-off' educational interventions aimed at enhancing the evidence-based practice of health care professionals. Future evaluations of evidence-based practice interventions need to take in account this trial's negative findings

  14. Exercise rehabilitation following intensive care unit discharge for recovery from critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Bronwen; Salisbury, Lisa; O'Neill, Brenda; Geneen, Louise; Douiri, Abdel; Grocott, Michael PW; Hart, Nicholas; Walsh, Timothy S; Blackwood, Bronagh; Griffith, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle wasting and weakness are significant complications of critical illness, associated with degree of illness severity and periods of reduced mobility during mechanical ventilation. They contribute to the profound physical and functional deficits observed in survivors. These impairments may persist for many years following discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) and can markedly influence health-related quality of life. Rehabilitation is a key strategy in the reco...

  15. Exercise rehabilitation following intensive care unit discharge for recovery from critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Bronwen; Salisbury, Lisa; O'Neill, Brenda; Geneen, Louise; Douiri, Abdel; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Hart, Nicholas; Walsh, Timothy S; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle wasting and weakness are significant complications of critical illness, associated with the degree of illness severity and periods of reduced mobility during mechanical ventilation. They contribute to the profound physical and functional deficits observed in survivors. These impairments may persist for many years following discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) and may markedly influence health-related quality of life. Rehabilitation is a key strategy in the ...

  16. Video laryngoscopy in pre-hospital critical care – a quality improvement study

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode, Marianne Grønnebæk; Vandborg, Mads Partridge; Bladt, Vibeke; Rognås, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation is challenging and repeated endotracheal intubation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether the introduction of the McGrath MAC video laryngoscope as the primary device for pre-hospital endotracheal intubation could improve first-pass success rate in our anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital critical care services. We also investigated the incidence of failed pre-hospital endotracheal intubation, the use of...

  17. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 2. Complications of monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, T R

    1988-09-01

    Current invasive monitoring techniques, although valuable in the care of critically ill patients, also have disadvantages. Complications of these techniques include errors in interpretation of measurements and complications of venous access and indwelling lines. To prevent these, the author recommends a standard routine for inserting and changing catheters, regular calibration of transducers and insertion of Swan-Ganz catheters with the balloon inflated with 1.0 to 1.5 ml of air. PMID:3046728

  18. Clinical accompaniment: the critical care nursing students’ experiences in a private hospital

    OpenAIRE

    N. Tsele; Marie Muller

    2000-01-01

    The quality of clinical accompaniment of the student enrolled for the post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General) is an important dimension of the educational/learning programme. The clinical accompanist/mentor is responsible for ensuring the student’s compliance with the clinical outcomes of the programme in accordance with the requirements laid down by the Nursing Education Institution and the South African Nursing Council. The purpose of this...

  19. The ethical dimension in published animal research in critical care: the dark side of our moon

    OpenAIRE

    Huet, Olivier; de Haan, Judy B.

    2014-01-01

    The replacement, refinement, and reduction (3Rs) guidelines are the cornerstone of animal welfare practice for medical research. Nowadays, no animal research can be performed without being approved by an animal ethics committee. Therefore, we should expect that any published article would respect and promote the highest standard of animal welfare. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Bara and Joffe reported an unexpected finding: animal welfare is extremely poorly reported in crit...

  20. The ‘Common Sense’ of Austerity in Europe’s Historic Bloc: A Gramscian Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben LUONGO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Euro-area efforts to address recession have moved Europe decisively into an era of harsh austerity despite budget cuts and other fiscal measures facing massive resistance from the public. Moreover, economists continue to express doubts concerning austerity and warn Euro-area officials that fiscal tightening only increases debt relative to GDP. Far from reflecting either popular or economic opinion, I argue that Europe’s pro-austerity discourse both reflects and is constructed by the hegemonic interests of transnational capital. Specifically, advocacy groups representing the business-finance community manufacture the ‘common sense’ of fiscal tightening within narratives of European profligacy and exploding debt. In reality, however, austerity only reinforces the neoliberal structure underlying Europe’s integration into the Single Market. Forces of transnational capital not only serve as the intellectual leaders behind this neoliberal integration but, as my research shows, work to maintain this structure by advancing pro-austerity discourses in a way that ensures their hegemonic position within the historic bloc.

  1. Critical Care Medicine Beds, Use, Occupancy, and Costs in the United States: A Methodological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Neil A; Pastores, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    This article is a methodological review to help the intensivist gain insights into the classic and sometimes arcane maze of national databases and methodologies used to determine and analyze the ICU bed supply, use, occupancy, and costs in the United States. Data for total ICU beds, use, and occupancy can be derived from two large national healthcare databases: the Healthcare Cost Report Information System maintained by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the proprietary Hospital Statistics of the American Hospital Association. Two costing methodologies can be used to calculate U.S. ICU costs: the Russell equation and national projections. Both methods are based on cost and use data from the national hospital datasets or from defined groups of hospitals or patients. At the national level, an understanding of U.S. ICU bed supply, use, occupancy, and costs helps provide clarity to the width and scope of the critical care medicine enterprise within the U.S. healthcare system. This review will also help the intensivist better understand published studies on administrative topics related to critical care medicine and be better prepared to participate in their own local hospital organizations or regional critical care medicine programs. PMID:26308432

  2. What is supportive when an adult next-of-kin is in critical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ingrid; Fridlund, Bengt; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2005-01-01

    There is little documented knowledge about what is supportive from the perspective of relatives with a critically ill next-of-kin in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the present study was to generate a theoretical understanding of what relatives experience as supportive when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin admitted to critical care. The study was designed using a grounded theory methodology. Interviews were conducted with 29 adult relatives of adult ICU patients in southwest Sweden. Relatives described the need to be empowered and that support was needed to enable them to use both internal and external resources to cope with having a next-of-kin in critical care. To achieve empowerment, the relatives described the need to trust in oneself, to encounter charity and to encounter professionalism. The findings can contribute understanding and sensitivity to the situation of the relatives as well as indicating what form social support should take. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand how important it is for relatives to have control over their vulnerable situation and that they also reflect upon how they would like to be treated themselves in a similar situation. Recommendations for future practice are presented. PMID:16255336

  3. How to protect incompetent clinical research subjects involved in critical care or emergency settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamperetti, Nereo; Piccinni, Mariassunta; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Gristina, Giuseppe; Giannini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Clinical research is an essential component of medical activity, and this is also true in intensive care. Adequate information and consent are universally considered necessary for the protection of research subjects. However, in emergency situations, the majority of critical patients are unable to consent and a valid legal representative is often unavailable. The situation is even more complex in Italy, where the relevant legislation fails to specify how investigators should manage research in emergency or critical care setting when it involves incompetent patients who do not have an appointed legal representative. While special measures for the protection of incompetent subjects during emergency research are necessary, not allowing such research at all dooms critically ill patients to receive non-evidence-based treatments without the prospect of improvement. The recently-issued EU Regulation n. 536/2014 will probably help shed light on this situation. Indeed, it specifically addresses the issue of "research in emergency situations" and introduces detailed rules aimed at protecting patients while allowing research. In this article, we argue that obtaining informed consent during emergency research on incompetent subjects in unrealistic, and that in most cases substituted judgment on the part of a proxy carries major flaws. Strict criteria in evaluating the risk-benefit ratio of proposed intervention and a careful evaluation of the trial by a local or national Research Ethics Committee are perhaps the most practicable solution. PMID:26154445

  4. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a patent-pending device capable of automatically recording and supervising the urine output of a critical care patient. A high precision scale is used to measure the weight of a commercial urine meter. On the scale’s pan there is a support frame made up of Bosch profiles that isolates the scale from force transmission from the patient’s bed, and guarantees that the urine flows properly through the urine meter input tube. The scale’s readings are sent to a PC via Bluetooth where an application supervises the achievement of the therapeutic goals. The device is currently undergoing tests at a research unit associated with the University Hospital of Getafe in Spain.

  5. Mechanical circulatory assist devices: a primer for critical care and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ayan; Larson, Joel S; Kashani, Kianoush B; Libricz, Stacy L; Patel, Bhavesh M; Guru, Pramod K; Alwardt, Cory M; Pajaro, Octavio; Farmer, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices are now commonly used in the treatment of severe heart failure as bridges to cardiac transplant, as destination therapy for patients who are not transplant candidates, and as bridges to recovery and "decision-making". These devices, which can be used to support the left or right ventricles or both, restore circulation to the tissues, thereby improving organ function. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are the most common support devices. To care for patients with these devices, health care providers in emergency departments (EDs) and intensive care units (ICUs) need to understand the physiology of the devices, the vocabulary of mechanical support, the types of complications patients may have, diagnostic techniques, and decision-making regarding treatment. Patients with LVADs who come to the ED or are admitted to the ICU usually have nonspecific clinical symptoms, most commonly shortness of breath, hypotension, anemia, chest pain, syncope, hemoptysis, gastrointestinal bleeding, jaundice, fever, oliguria and hematuria, altered mental status, headache, seizure, and back pain. Other patients are seen for cardiac arrest, psychiatric issues, sequelae of noncardiac surgery, and trauma. Although most patients have LVADs, some may have biventricular support devices or total artificial hearts. Involving a team of cardiac surgeons, perfusion experts, and heart-failure physicians, as well as ED and ICU physicians and nurses, is critical for managing treatment for these patients and for successful outcomes. This review is designed for critical care providers who may be the first to see these patients in the ED or ICU. PMID:27342573

  6. Case-management for nursing care of patient with stroke: a cross-cultural critical reflective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Theofanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stroke remains a heavy financial burden on health care systems around the world. Yet, health care reforms have called for sophisticated management systems in order to provide high-quality care on equal terms for the entire population within a cost-conscious environment.  Aim: The main aim of this discussion paper is to define and reflect cross-culturally on the merits of the Case-Management (CM) approach for contemporary stroke care delivery. Methods: Critical refle...

  7. Documentation of best interest by intensivists: a retrospective study in an Ontario critical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scales Damon C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care physicians often must rely on substitute decision makers to address all dimensions of the construct of "best interest" for incapable, critically ill patients. This task involves identifying prior wishes and to facilitate the substitute decision maker's understanding of the incapable patient's condition and their likely response to treatment. We sought to determine how well such discussions are documented in a typical intensive care unit. Methods Using a quality of communication instrument developed from a literature search and expert opinion, 2 investigators transcribed and analyzed 260 handwritten communications for 105 critically ill patients who died in the intensive care unit between January and June 2006. Cohen's kappa was calculated before analysis and then disagreements were resolved by consensus. We report results on a per-patient basis to represent documented communication as a process leading up to the time of death in the ICU. We report frequencies and percentages for discrete data, median (m and interquartile range (IQR for continuous data. Results Our cohort was elderly (m 72, IQR 58-81 years and had high APACHE II scores predictive of a high probability of death (m 28, IQR 23-36. Length of stay in the intensive care unit prior to death was short (m 2, IQR 1-5 days, and withdrawal of life support preceded death for more than half (n 57, 54%. Brain death criteria were present for 18 patients (17%. Although intensivists' communications were timely (median 17 h from admission to critical care, the person consenting on behalf of the incapable patient was explicitly documented for only 10% of patients. Life support strategies at the time of communication were noted in 45% of charts, and options for their future use were presented in 88%. Considerations relevant to determining the patient's best interest in relation to the treatment plan were not well documented. While explicit survival estimates were

  8. Bretton Woods Institution Narratives about Inequality and Economic Vulnerability on the Eve of South African Austerity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, at a time when National Health Insurance should be generously funded (7 years after its approval as public policy by the ruling party), state fiscal austerity appears certain to nip the initiative in the bud. The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund issued separate reports about South Africa in late 2014, following a new finance minister's mid-term budget speech. In justifying austerity, they revealed 2 important conceptual blockages regarding inequality and international financial relations. The resulting political bias in the macroeconomic debate has, in turn, given neoliberal policy advocates intellectual weaponry to impose deeper austerity. In contrast, the rise of a "united front" of labor, community-based, and social movement activists, along with a vigorous left opposition party in Parliament, ensure that one of the world's most visible class struggles ratchets up in intensity in the years ahead.

  9. Bretton Woods Institution Narratives about Inequality and Economic Vulnerability on the Eve of South African Austerity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, at a time when National Health Insurance should be generously funded (7 years after its approval as public policy by the ruling party), state fiscal austerity appears certain to nip the initiative in the bud. The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund issued separate reports about South Africa in late 2014, following a new finance minister's mid-term budget speech. In justifying austerity, they revealed 2 important conceptual blockages regarding inequality and international financial relations. The resulting political bias in the macroeconomic debate has, in turn, given neoliberal policy advocates intellectual weaponry to impose deeper austerity. In contrast, the rise of a "united front" of labor, community-based, and social movement activists, along with a vigorous left opposition party in Parliament, ensure that one of the world's most visible class struggles ratchets up in intensity in the years ahead. PMID:26077853

  10. Taking values seriously: Ethical challenges in organ donation and transplantation for critical care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulisio, Mark P; Devita, Michael; Luebke, Donna

    2007-02-01

    Last year, >28,000 people received organ transplants from >14,000 donors in the United States. Unfortunately, the wait list now tops 91,000, with the gap between recipient needs and available donor organs at around 60,000. This has motivated a host of efforts to increase organ supply, including driver's license and donor registry initiatives, educational and advertising campaigns, and "required request" and mandatory Organ Procurement Organization notification when a patient's death is imminent. Other more controversial efforts to increase the donor pool include expanded criteria for cadaveric donors, such as older or sicker donors and so-called non-heart-beating donation, now referred to as donation after cardiac death. Perhaps the most controversial of all efforts to address the organ shortage have focused on increasing the number of living organ donors, which in 2001 for the first time exceeded the number of cadaveric donors. Critical care professionals know the sad reality behind the statistical scarcity of organ supply. They must manage anxious patients and family members who may be waiting for an organ that never comes, triage patients into and out of the intensive care unit, and work through the propriety of shifting goals from cure to comfort when those same patients deteriorate to the point that transplant may no longer be an appropriate medical option or when a transplant fails. Equally significant ethical challenges arise on the donor side, whether it is working through difficult end-of-life decisions, identifying when to call the organ procurement organization, caring for brain-dead patients, managing a candidate for donation after cardiac death, or caring for a living donor postoperatively. This article discusses some of the difficult ethical challenges raised by organ donation and transplantation for critical care professionals, focusing on end-of-life decision making, donation after cardiac death, and living organ donation. PMID:17242610

  11. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Irish critical care units: results of a pilot prevalence survey, June 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-11-10

    The epidemiology of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in Ireland is changing, with an increase in the number of reported cases in late 2010 and early 2011. Reported cases were predominantly linked to critical care units. In June 2011, a four-week national pilot survey took place in 40 Irish critical care units (37 adult and three paediatric) to examine the prevalence of rectal carriage of CPE and inform national CPE screening guidelines. A total of 760 screening swabs were taken over the study period, and CPE were not detected in any of the participating critical care units.

  12. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu B Pattanshetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP and critical illness myopathy (CIM, is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU. Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU.

  13. The meaning of posttraumatic stress-reactions following critical illness or injury and intensive care treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Ingrid; Samuelson, Karin A M; Fridlund, Bengt; Thomé, Bibbi

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic events connected with a critical condition and treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) may result in subsequent posttraumatic stress-reactions. The aim of this phenomenological study was to describe the meaning of posttraumatic stress-reactions as experienced by individuals following a critical illness or injury and intensive care. Fourteen informants, testing positive for posttraumatic stress-reactions as a clinical concern, were interviewed. The data was analysed following the principles indicated by Giorgi [Giorgi A. The theory, practice, and evaluation of the phenomenological method as a qualitative research procedure. J Phenomenol Psychol 1997;28:235-61]. The essence of the phenomenon of posttraumatic stress-reactions was understood as a transition to a life-situation beyond control, where the traumatic experiences have a profound impact and are ever-present. The variations of the phenomenon presented themselves as a need to make sense of the traumatic memories, which live on; being haunted by the trauma; a need to escape; distress and strain in the life-situation; transformation of self and, finally, interactions with others affected. The need for caring strategies and support is emphasised, both in the ICU and afterwards, thus preventing or alleviating some of the suffering. PMID:17449252

  14. Development road of critical care medicine in China: reference, integration and improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-tao ZHANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental critical care medicine (FCCM and specialty critical care medicine (SCCM have their own independent developmental itinerary and have made indelible contributions to intensive treatment in the long history of CCM. The experts in FCCM are usually dominant in the cross-sectional study for various severe illnesses, and lay emphases on balancing the relationship among the dysfunctional organs under the guidance of overall treatment concept. SCCM experts emphasize longitudinal in-depth study for a specialized subject or special disease in order to solve the principal problem of the severe illness under the guidance of its own principal. At present, the main challenge of CCM is to avoid the habitual linear thinking. It is necessary for the members of FCCM to learn the knowledge of different problems pertaining to various specialties from SCCM, thus FCCM doctors would be able to take care of patients suffering from derangements of specific organs. SCCM members also need to learn from FCCM for strengthening the concept of overall treatment, optimizing various treatment resources, and improving treatment effects. Members of FCCM and SCCM need to learn from each other, in order to integrate and improve treatment strategies together, so as to complement each other. This will broaden the knowledge of SCCM and deepen that of FCCM. The integration of knowledge and skill will enrich the connotation of the CCM.

  15. Factors affecting ED length-of-stay in surgical critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B; Sullivan, S; Levine, A; Dallara, J

    1995-09-01

    To determine what patient characteristics are associated with prolonged emergency department (ED) length-of-stay (LOS) for surgical critical care patients, the charts of 169 patients admitted from the ED directly to the operating room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU) during a 6-week period in 1993 were reviewed. The ED record was reviewed for documentation of factors that might be associated with prolonged ED LOS, such as use of computed tomographic (CT), radiology special procedures, and the number of plain radiographs and consultants. ED LOS was considered to be the time from triage until a decision was made to admit the patient. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, use of CT and special procedures were the strongest independent predictors of prolonged ED length-of-stay. The number of plain radiographs and consultants had only a minimal effect. Use of a protocol-driven trauma evaluation system was associated with a shorter ED LOS. In addition to external factors that affect ED overcrowding, ED patient management decisions may also be associated with prolonged ED length-of-stay. Such ED-based factors may be more important in surgical critical care patients, whose overall ED LOS is affected more by the length of the ED work-up rather than the time spent waiting for a ICU bed or operating suite.

  16. European legislation impedes critical care research and fails to protect patients' rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Rossel, Peter Johannes Hancke

    2011-01-01

    The European Clinical Trials Directive requires an informed consent from the patient or a proxy in drug trials. Although informed consent is a valuable tool to protect patients' rights in clinical trials, this requirement largely impedes research in critical care settings, and if pursued in this ......The European Clinical Trials Directive requires an informed consent from the patient or a proxy in drug trials. Although informed consent is a valuable tool to protect patients' rights in clinical trials, this requirement largely impedes research in critical care settings, and if pursued...... in this context, it does not provide the patient with adequate protection. Instead of insisting on informed consent, we suggest that the focus should be shifted towards two other ethically relevant elements in human experimentation: risk assessment and selection of research subjects. When reviewing protocols...... in which a waiver of consent is deemed necessary, the Ethical Review Board should ensure that non-therapeutic risks are minimal, that the research is specifically designed to benefit critically ill patients, and that it cannot be conducted under circumstances where an informed consent can be obtained...

  17. Skin care in nursing: A critical discussion of nursing practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Surber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Skin (self-)care is part of human life from birth until death. Today many different skin care practices, preferences, traditions and routines exist in parallel. In addition, preventive and therapeutic skin care is delivered in nursing and healthcare by formal and informal caregivers. The aim of this contribution is a critical discussion about skin care in the context of professional nursing practice. An explicit skin assessment using accurate diagnostic statements is needed for clinical decision making. Special attention should be paid on high risk skin areas, which may be either too dry or too moist. From a safety perspective the protection and maintenance of skin integrity should have the highest priority. Skin cleansing is the removal of unwanted substances from the skin surface. Despite cleansing efficacy soap, other surfactants and water will inevitably always result in the destruction of the skin barrier. Thousands of products are available to hydrate, moisturize, protect and restore skin properties dependent upon their formulation and the concentration of ingredients. These products intended to left in contact with skin exhibit several actions on and in the skin interfering with skin biology. Unwanted side effects include hyper-hydration and disorganization of lipid bilayers in the stratum corneum, a dysfunctional barrier, increased susceptibility to irritants and allergies, and increases of skin surface pH. Where the skin barrier is impaired appropriate interventions, e.g. apply lipophilic products in sufficient quantity to treat dry skin or protect the skin from exposure to irritants should be provided. A key statement of this contribution is: every skin care activity matters. Every time something is placed on the skin, a functional and structural response is provoked. This response can be either desired or undesired, beneficial or harmful. The choice of all skin care interventions in nursing and healthcare practice must be based on an accurate assessment

  18. Skin care in nursing: A critical discussion of nursing practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Surber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Skin (self-)care is part of human life from birth until death. Today many different skin care practices, preferences, traditions and routines exist in parallel. In addition, preventive and therapeutic skin care is delivered in nursing and healthcare by formal and informal caregivers. The aim of this contribution is a critical discussion about skin care in the context of professional nursing practice. An explicit skin assessment using accurate diagnostic statements is needed for clinical decision making. Special attention should be paid on high risk skin areas, which may be either too dry or too moist. From a safety perspective the protection and maintenance of skin integrity should have the highest priority. Skin cleansing is the removal of unwanted substances from the skin surface. Despite cleansing efficacy soap, other surfactants and water will inevitably always result in the destruction of the skin barrier. Thousands of products are available to hydrate, moisturize, protect and restore skin properties dependent upon their formulation and the concentration of ingredients. These products intended to left in contact with skin exhibit several actions on and in the skin interfering with skin biology. Unwanted side effects include hyper-hydration and disorganization of lipid bilayers in the stratum corneum, a dysfunctional barrier, increased susceptibility to irritants and allergies, and increases of skin surface pH. Where the skin barrier is impaired appropriate interventions, e.g. apply lipophilic products in sufficient quantity to treat dry skin or protect the skin from exposure to irritants should be provided. A key statement of this contribution is: every skin care activity matters. Every time something is placed on the skin, a functional and structural response is provoked. This response can be either desired or undesired, beneficial or harmful. The choice of all skin care interventions in nursing and healthcare practice must be based on an accurate assessment

  19. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; McCallum, Louise; Siirala, Eriikka; Haataja, Marjaana; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Lin, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients' admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1) explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2) delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22-67% of discharges, and (3) redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review. PMID:26558286

  20. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Maria Peltonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients’ admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1 explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2 delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22–67% of discharges, and (3 redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review.

  1. Concerns about usage of smartphones in operating room and critical care scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J P Attri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones and tablets have taken a central place in the lives of health care professionals. Their use has dramatically improved the communication and has become an important learning tool as the medical information can be assessed online at anytime. In critical care settings, use of smartphone facilitates quick passage of information through E-mail messaging and getting feedback from the concerned physician quickly, thereby reducing medical errors. However, in addition to the benefits offered, these devices have become a significant source of nosocomial infections, distraction for medical professionals and interfere with medical equipments. They may also put privacy and security of patients at stake. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and over use are not kept in check. This review article focuses on various applications of smartphones in healthcare practices, drawback of the use of these devices and the recommendations regarding the safe use of these devices.

  2. Computer-assisted learning in critical care: from ENIAC to HAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, K; Ibsen, L; Goldstein, B

    2001-08-01

    Computers are commonly used to serve many functions in today's modern intensive care unit. One of the most intriguing and perhaps most challenging applications of computers has been to attempt to improve medical education. With the introduction of the first computer, medical educators began looking for ways to incorporate their use into the modern curriculum. Prior limitations of cost and complexity of computers have consistently decreased since their introduction, making it increasingly feasible to incorporate computers into medical education. Simultaneously, the capabilities and capacities of computers have increased. Combining the computer with other modern digital technology has allowed the development of more intricate and realistic educational tools. The purpose of this article is to briefly describe the history and use of computers in medical education with special reference to critical care medicine. In addition, we will examine the role of computers in teaching and learning and discuss the types of interaction between the computer user and the computer. PMID:11496040

  3. A critical review of Singapore's policies aimed at supporting families caring for older members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalyani K

    2006-01-01

    This article critically examines the family-oriented social policies of the Singapore government aimed at supporting families caring for older members. The sectors focused on are financial security, health, and housing. Singaporeans have been reminded that the family should be the first line of defense for aging families, followed by the community - the state would step in as the last resort. Drawing from recent research and examination of the state policies, the author argues that more should be done to help family caregivers looking after elder relatives. Recommendations for innovative ways to recognize and reward family carers conclude the paper.

  4. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Hantikainen Virpi; Jeitziner Marie-Madlen; Conca Antoinette; Hamers Jan PH

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs), such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and...

  5. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Jeitziner, Marie-Madlen; Hantikainen, Virpi; Conca, Antoinette; Hamers, Jan PH

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs), such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and the cons...

  6. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Jeitziner, Marie-Madlen; Hantikainen, Virpi; Conca, Antoinette; Hamers, Jan P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs), such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and the ...

  7. Arterial waveform analysis in anesthesia and critical care: Theory, practical applications, and use in goal-directed strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Montenij, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac output and preload are important variables in the hemodynamic optimization of critically ill patients in the operating room and intensive care unit. Arterial waveform analysis (AWA) enables continuous, minimally invasive measurement of CO from an arterial line, and provides dynamic assessment of cardiac preload. The present thesis investigates the theory and current applications of AWA in anesthesia and critical care, explores the methodological challenges in CO method comparison rese...

  8. Teaching effectiveness and learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students in a critical care practicum: a lebanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, S; Dumit, N Y; Adra, M; Kassak, K

    2001-01-01

    This process-product replicated study examines the relationship between the clinical teacher behavior effectiveness of critical care instructors and baccalaureate nursing students' learning outcomes in a critical care practicum. Teacher behaviors that were found to be significantly associated with student learning outcomes included flexibility, giving opportunity to observe, quality of answering questions, quality of discourse, feedback specificity, and concern for the learner's progress and problems.

  9. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hodkinson

    Full Text Available Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided.A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission or emergency department death, using expert panel review of medical records and caregiver interview. Main outcomes were expert assessment of overall quality of care; avoidability of severity of illness and PICU admission or death and the identification of modifiable factors.The study enrolled 282 children, 252 emergency PICU admissions, and 30 deaths. Global quality of care was graded good in 10% of cases, with half having at least one major impact modifiable factor. Key modifiable factors related to access to care and identification of the critically ill, assessment of severity, inadequate resuscitation, and delays in decision making and referral. Children were transferred with median time from first presentation to PICU admission of 12.3 hours. There was potentially avoidable severity of illness in 185 (74% of children, and death prior to PICU admission was avoidable in 17/30 (56.7% of children.The study presents a novel methodology, examining quality of care across an entire system, and highlighting the complexity of the pathway and the modifiable events amenable to interventions, that could reduce mortality and morbidity, and optimize utilization of scarce critical care resources; as well as demonstrating the importance of continuity and quality of care.

  10. Improvement critical care patient safety: using nursing staff development strategies, at Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuni, Enas M; Bayoumi, Magda M

    2015-01-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provide lifesaving care for the critically ill patients and are associated with significant risks. Moreover complexity of care within ICUs requires that the health care professionals exhibit a trans-disciplinary level of competency to improve patient safety. This study aimed at using staff development strategies through implementing patient safety educational program that may minimize the medical errors and improve patient outcome in hospital. The study was carried out using a quasi experimental design. The settings included the intensive care units at General Mohail Hospital and National Mohail Hospital, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from March to June 2012. A convenience sample of all prevalent nurses at three shifts in the aforementioned settings during the study period was recruited. The program was implemented on 50 staff nurses in different ICUs. Their age ranged between 25-40 years. Statistically significant relation was revealed between safety climate and job satisfaction among nurses in the study sample (p=0.001). The years of experiences in ICU ranged between one year 11 (16.4) to 10 years 20 (29.8), most of them (68%) were working in variable shift, while 32% were day shift only. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on ICUs after implementing a safety program. On the heels of this improvement; nurses' total knowledge, skills and attitude were enhanced regarding patient safety dimensions. Continuous educational program for ICUs nursing staff through organized in-service training is needed to increase their knowledge and skills about the importance of improving patient safety measure. Emphasizing on effective collaborative system also will improve patient safety measures in ICUS. PMID:25716409

  11. Association of Patient Care with Ventilator-Associated Conditions in Critically Ill Patients: Risk Factor Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Nakahashi

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated conditions (VACs, for which new surveillance definitions and methods were issued by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, are respiratory complications occurring in conjunction with the use of invasive mechanical ventilation and are related to adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. However, to date, risk factors for VACs have not been adequately established, leading to a need for developing a better understanding of the risks. The objective of this study was to explore care-related risk factors as a process indicator and provide valuable information pertaining to VAC preventive measures.This retrospective, single-center, cohort study was conducted in the intensive-care unit (ICU of a university hospital in Japan. Patient data were automatically sampled using a computerized medical records system and retrospectively analyzed. Management and care-related, but not host-related, factors were exhaustively analyzed using multivariate analysis for risks of VACs. VAC correlation to mortality was also investigated.Of the 3122 patients admitted in the ICU, 303 ventilated patients meeting CDC-specified eligibility criteria were included in the analysis. Thirty-seven VACs (12.2% were found with a corresponding rate of 12.1 per 1000 ventilator days. Multivariate analysis revealed four variables related to patient care as risk factors for VACs: absence of intensivist participation in management of ventilated patients [adjusted HR (AHR: 7.325, P < 0.001], using relatively higher driving pressure (AHR: 1.216, P < 0.001, development of edema (AHR: 2.145, P = 0.037, and a larger body weight increase (AHR: 0.058, P = 0.005. Furthermore, this research confirmed mortality differences in patients with VACs and statistically derived risks compared with those without VACs (HR: 2.623, P = 0.008.Four risk factors related to patient care were clearly identified to be the key factors for VAC preventive measures.

  12. Use of blood components in critically ill patients in the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital

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    Makroo R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The art of fluid administration and hemodynamic support is one of the most challenging aspects of treating critically ill patients. Transfusions of blood products continue to be an important technique for resuscitating patients in the intensive care settings. Concerns about the rate of inappropriate transfusion exist, particularly given the recognized risks of transfusions and the decreasing availability of donor blood. We investigated the current transfusion practice in the critically ill patients at our hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 1817 consecutive critically ill patients admitted between January 2006 and December 2006 were included in this retrospective study. The blood request forms of the patients were analyzed, and their pretransfusion investigations, indications for transfusions, etc. were studied. Results: Nine hundred and eleven (50.1% critically ill patients, comprising 71.6% males and 28.4% females, received blood/blood components. About 43.8% patients were administered packed red cells (PRC, 18.27% fresh frozen plasma (FFP and 8.4% transfused platelets. Among those receiving PRC, 31.1% had a pretransfusion Hb below 7.5g%, 34.4% had Hb between 7.5 and 9g%, while 21.4% had Hb above 9g%. Among those receiving FFP, 14.5% had an international normalized ratio INR < 1.5, and 19% had a pretransfusion platelet count above 50,000/cumm. During the study, there were 7% of the patients who received red cells and FFP, 2% of the patients received red cells and platelets, 1% of the patients received platelets and FFP, and 5% of the patients had received all the three components, i.e., red cells, FFP and Platelets. The baseline investigations and/or clinical indications were not mentioned in 13.1% of patients receiving PRC, 57% receiving FFP and 49.7% receiving platelets. Conclusion: About 21.4% of PRC, 14.5% of FFP, and 19% of platelets were inappropriately indicated. Clinicians in our centre were conservative in keeping

  13. Which experiences of health care delivery matter to service users and why? A critical interpretive synthesis and conceptual map

    OpenAIRE

    Entwistle, Vikki; Firnigl, Danielle; Ryan, Mandy; Francis, Jillian; Kinghorn, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Objective Patients' experiences are often treated as health care quality indicators. Our aim was to identify the range of experiences of health care delivery that matter to patients and to produce a conceptual map to facilitate consideration of why they matter. Methods Broad-based review and critical interpretive synthesis of research literature on patients' perspectives of health care delivery. We recorded experiences reported by a diverse range of patients on ‘concept cards’, considered why...

  14. Embodiment and dementia: exploring critical narratives of selfhood, surveillance, and dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Martin, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade there has been a notable increase in efforts to expand understandings of dementia by incorporating the body and theorizing its interrelationship with the larger social order. This emerging subfield of dementia studies puts the body and embodied practices at the center of explorations of how dementia is represented and/or experienced. This shift towards a greater recognition of the way that humans are embodied has expanded the horizon of dementia studies, providing the intellectual and narrative resources to examine experiences of dementia, and their interconnections with history, culture, power, and discourse. Our aim in this paper is to critically explore and review dimensions of this expanding research and literature, specifically in relation to three key narratives: (1) rethinking selfhood: exploring embodied dimensions; (2) surveillance, discipline, and the body in dementia and dementia care; and (3) embodied innovations in dementia care practice. We argue that this literature collectively destabilizes dementia as a taken-for-granted category and has generated critical texts on the interrelationship between the body and social and political processes in the production and expression of dementia.

  15. Clinical accompaniment: the critical care nursing students’ experiences in a private hospital

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    N. Tsele

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of clinical accompaniment of the student enrolled for the post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General is an important dimension of the educational/learning programme. The clinical accompanist/mentor is responsible for ensuring the student’s compliance with the clinical outcomes of the programme in accordance with the requirements laid down by the Nursing Education Institution and the South African Nursing Council. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of the students enrolled for a post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General, in relation to the clinical accompaniment in a private hospital in Gauteng. An exploratory, descriptive and phenomenological research design was utilised and individual interviews were conducted with the ten students in the research hospital. A content analysis was conducted and the results revealed both positive and negative experiences by the students in the internal and external worlds. The recommendations include the formulation of standards for clinical accompaniment of students. the evaluation of the quality of clinical accompaniment of students and empowerment of the organisation, clinical accompanists/mentors and clinicians.

  16. April 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: early goal-directed therapy

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    Raschke RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. We were fortunate to be joined in our discussion by Dr. Frank LoVecchio, one of the primary investigators of the ProCESS trial, and doctors Robbins, Bajo, Mand and Thomas, as well as our pulmonary critical care fellows. The ProCESS trial was important for two reasons: first, it showed that early goal-directed therapy (EGDT does not benefit patient mortality; second, it provides another example of how the evidence-based practice of critical care medicine has often been misguided by invalid evidence. In this aspect, EGDT joins the ranks of tight glucose control, drotrecogin alpha (Xigris®, Swan Ganz catheter-guided resuscitation, corticosteroids, and other interventions in our field that were once part of evidence-based practice, but ultimately found to lack benefit or even be harmful to our patients. That recurrent theme in our literature is the main point of this Journal Club. The first example of an algorithm for goal-directed therapy (GDT that we ...

  17. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

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    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  18. Critical decisions for older people with advanced dementia: a prospective study in long-term institutions and district home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toscani, F.; Steen, J.T. van der; Finetti, S.; Giunco, F.; Pettenati, F.; Villani, D.; Monti, M.; Gentile, S.; Charrier, L.; Giulio, P. Di

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the decisions critical for survival or quality of life [critical decisions (CDs)] made for patients with advanced dementia in nursing homes (NHs) and home care (HC) services. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with a follow-up of 6 months. SETTING: Lombardy Region (N

  19. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm3 increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm3 (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm3 predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  20. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

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    Ahmad-Ali Asadi-Noghabi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness. Methods: Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT. Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management. Results: Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used. Conclusion: Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management.

  1. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  2. Critical issues in implementing low vision care in the Asia-Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Pei-Chia Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-thirds of the world′s population with low vision resides in the Asia-Pacific region. Provision of comprehensive low vision services is important to improve vision-related quality of life (QoL for people with this condition. This review outlines the critical issues and challenges facing the provision of low vision services in the Asia-Pacific region. The review offers possible strategies to tackle these issues and challenges facing service providers and policy makers in lieu of Vision 2020 strategies in this area. Pertinent findings from the global survey of low vision services and extensive ground work conducted in the region are used; in addition, a discussion on the availability of services, human resources and training, and funding and the future sustainability of low vision care will be covered. In summary, current issues and challenges facing the region are the lack of specific evidence-based data, access, appropriate equipment and facilities, human resources, funding, and sustainability. These issues are inextricably interlinked and thus cannot be addressed in isolation. The solutions proposed cover all areas of the VISION 2020 strategy that include service delivery, human resources, infrastructure and equipment, advocacy and partnership; and include provision of comprehensive care via vertical and horizontal integration; strengthening primary level care in the community; providing formal and informal training to enable task shifting and capacity building; and promoting strong government and private sector partnership to achieve long-term service financial sustainability.

  3. Critical issues in implementing low vision care in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Peggy Pei-Chia; Marella, Manjula; Ormsby, Gail; Keeffe, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Two-thirds of the world's population with low vision resides in the Asia-Pacific region. Provision of comprehensive low vision services is important to improve vision-related quality of life (QoL) for people with this condition. This review outlines the critical issues and challenges facing the provision of low vision services in the Asia-Pacific region. The review offers possible strategies to tackle these issues and challenges facing service providers and policy makers in lieu of Vision 2020 strategies in this area. Pertinent findings from the global survey of low vision services and extensive ground work conducted in the region are used; in addition, a discussion on the availability of services, human resources and training, and funding and the future sustainability of low vision care will be covered. In summary, current issues and challenges facing the region are the lack of specific evidence-based data, access, appropriate equipment and facilities, human resources, funding, and sustainability. These issues are inextricably interlinked and thus cannot be addressed in isolation. The solutions proposed cover all areas of the VISION 2020 strategy that include service delivery, human resources, infrastructure and equipment, advocacy and partnership; and include provision of comprehensive care via vertical and horizontal integration; strengthening primary level care in the community; providing formal and informal training to enable task shifting and capacity building; and promoting strong government and private sector partnership to achieve long-term service financial sustainability.

  4. Quality Improvement in Critical Care: Selection and Development of Quality Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A. Chrusch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caring for critically ill patients is complex and resource intensive. An approach to monitor and compare the function of different intensive care units (ICUs is needed to optimize outcomes for patients and the health system as a whole. Objective. To develop and implement quality indicators for comparing ICU characteristics and performance within and between ICUs and regions over time. Methods. Canadian jurisdictions with established ICU clinical databases were invited to participate in an iterative series of face-to-face meetings, teleconferences, and web conferences. Eighteen adult intensive care units across 14 hospitals and 5 provinces participated in the process. Results. Six domains of ICU function were identified: safe, timely, efficient, effective, patient/family satisfaction, and staff work life. Detailed operational definitions were developed for 22 quality indicators. The feasibility was demonstrated with the collection of 3.5 years of data. Statistical process control charts and graphs of composite measures were used for data display and comparisons. Medical and nursing leaders as well as administrators found the system to be an improvement over prior methods. Conclusions. Our process resulted in the selection and development of 22 indicators representing 6 domains of ICU function. We have demonstrated the feasibility of such a reporting system. This type of reporting system will demonstrate variation between units and jurisdictions to help identify and prioritize improvement efforts.

  5. Quality Improvement in Critical Care: Selection and Development of Quality Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrusch, Carla A; Martin, Claudio M; Project, The Quality Improvement In Critical Care

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caring for critically ill patients is complex and resource intensive. An approach to monitor and compare the function of different intensive care units (ICUs) is needed to optimize outcomes for patients and the health system as a whole. Objective. To develop and implement quality indicators for comparing ICU characteristics and performance within and between ICUs and regions over time. Methods. Canadian jurisdictions with established ICU clinical databases were invited to participate in an iterative series of face-to-face meetings, teleconferences, and web conferences. Eighteen adult intensive care units across 14 hospitals and 5 provinces participated in the process. Results. Six domains of ICU function were identified: safe, timely, efficient, effective, patient/family satisfaction, and staff work life. Detailed operational definitions were developed for 22 quality indicators. The feasibility was demonstrated with the collection of 3.5 years of data. Statistical process control charts and graphs of composite measures were used for data display and comparisons. Medical and nursing leaders as well as administrators found the system to be an improvement over prior methods. Conclusions. Our process resulted in the selection and development of 22 indicators representing 6 domains of ICU function. We have demonstrated the feasibility of such a reporting system. This type of reporting system will demonstrate variation between units and jurisdictions to help identify and prioritize improvement efforts.

  6. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In adult oncology, there is evidence to suggest early specialist palliative care improves HRQOL, mood, treatment decision-making, health care utilization, advanced care planning, patient satisfaction, and end-of-life care. There is moderate evidence to support the role of early specialist palliative care intervention in improvement of symptoms, survival, and health-related communication. There is limited evidence at present to support role of early specialist palliative care interventions in pediatric and geriatric oncology. Qualitative studies on barriers and negative patient outcomes may provide useful insights toward restructuring early specialist palliative care interventions.

  7. Prophylaxis for venous thrombo-embolism in neurocritical care: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Ahmed M; Fields, Jeremy D; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2010-04-01

    Venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) is frequently encountered in critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients admitted to intensive care units. This patient population includes those with brain neoplasm, intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pre- and post-operative patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures and those with traumatic brain injury, and acute spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a wide variability in clinical practice for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, in part due to paucity of data based on randomized clinical trials. Here, we review the current literature on the incidence of VTE in the critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients as well as appraise available data to support particular practice paradigms for specific subsets of these patients. Data synthesis was conducted via search of Medline, Cochrane databases, and manual review of article bibliographies. Critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients have higher susceptibility to VTE. Intermittent compression devices with or without anti-thrombotics is generally the method of choice for thromboprophylaxis. Low molecular weight heparin is the method of choice in certain patient subgroups such as those with SCI and ischemic stroke. Inferior vena cava filters may play a role in thromboprophylaxis in selected cases. Without clear guidelines that can be universally applied to this diverse group of patients, prophylaxis for VTE should be tailored to the individual patient with cautious assessment of benefits versus risks. There is a need for higher level evidence to guide VTE prophylaxis in certain subgroups of this patient population.

  8. Critical Illness Polyneuromyopathy Developing After Diabetic Ketoacidosis in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Sevdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM is a primary axonal-degenerative condition that occurs in sensory and motor fibers after the onset of a critical illness. It is thought that it develops due to tissue damage due to hypoxia/ischemia. When 24-year-old female patient was followed in the intensive care unit (ICU due to diabetic ketoacidosis, she was extubated on the second day. She was reintubated on the third day because of respiratory acidosis. Sedation was withdrawn on the fifth day, however the patient could not recover consciousness until the 14th day and tetraplegia was found during her neurological examination. Motor peripheral nerve-transmission response in the upper-and lower-extremity was evaluated to be of low amplitude in the conducted needle electroneuromyography. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation on the 23rd day. The neuromuscular symptoms developing as a result of critical illnesses reflect themselves as an increase in the hospitalization duration in the ICU, a difficulty in separation from the mechanical ventilator and an extension of rehabilitation.

  9. Do Malawian women critically assess the quality of care? A qualitative study on women’s perceptions of perinatal care at a district hospital in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumbani Lily C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malawi has a high perinatal mortality rate of 40 deaths per 1,000 births. To promote neonatal health, the Government of Malawi has identified essential health care packages for improving maternal and neonatal health in health care facilities. However, regardless of the availability of health services, women’s perceptions of the care is important as it influences whether the women will or will not use the services. In Malawi 95% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from skilled attendants, but the number is reduced to 71% deliveries being conducted by skilled attendants. The objective of this study was to describe women’s perceptions on perinatal care among the women delivered at a district hospital. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using semi-structured interview guides collecting information on women’s perceptions on perinatal care. A total of 14 in depth interviews were conducted with women delivering at Chiradzulu District Hospital from February to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum. They were also asked about the information they received during provision of care. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Two themes from the study were good care and unsatisfactory care. Subthemes under good care were: respect, confidentiality, privacy and normal delivery. Providers’ attitude, delay in providing care, inadequate care, and unavailability of delivery attendants were subthemes under unsatisfactory care. Conclusions Although the results show that women wanted to be well received at health facilities, respected, treated with kindness, dignity and not shouted at, they were not critical of the care they received. The women did not know the quality of care to expect because they

  10. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated.

  11. Reducing neonatal mortality in India: critical role of access to emergency obstetric care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Rammohan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal mortality currently accounts for 41% of all global deaths among children below five years. Despite recording a 33% decline in neonatal deaths between 2000 and 2009, about 900,000 neonates died in India in 2009. The decline in neonatal mortality is slower than in the post-neonatal period, and neonatal mortality rates have increased as a proportion of under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality rates are higher among rural dwellers of India, who make up at least two-thirds of India's population. Identifying the factors influencing neonatal mortality will significantly improve child survival outcomes in India. METHODS: Our analysis is based on household data from the nationally representative 2008 Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. We use probit regression techniques to analyse the links between neonatal mortality at the household level and households' access to health facilities. The probability of the child dying in the first month of birth is our dependent variable. RESULTS: We found that 80% of neonatal deaths occurred within the first week of birth, and that the probability of neonatal mortality is significantly lower when the child's village is closer to the district hospital (DH, suggesting the critical importance of specialist hospital care in the prevention of newborn deaths. Neonatal deaths were lower in regions where emergency obstetric care was available at the District Hospitals. We also found that parental schooling and household wealth status improved neonatal survival outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the main causes of neonatal deaths in India--preterm deliveries, asphyxia, and sepsis--requires adequacy of specialised workforce and facilities for delivery and neonatal intensive care and easy access by mothers and neonates. The slow decline in neonatal death rates reflects a limited attention to factors which contribute to neonatal deaths. The suboptimal quality and coverage of Emergency

  12. ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae in critical care areas – a clinical and cost analysis from a tertiary health care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hena Rani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: ESBLs pose a major threat in clinical therapeutics. In the present study we have tried to do clinical analysis of one hundred ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from various clinical specimens from patients admitted in critical care areas. Methods: ESBLs detection was done by CLSI, DDS and Vitek methods. Clinical analysis of each patient was done by regularly visiting in CCA and reviewing patient’s status and medical records. Results: All of the 13 patients on foley’s catheter grew ESBLs positive isolates and amongst 10 non catheterized patients, 9 grew ESBLs negative isolates. Thirteen out of 14 patients on CVP/arterial line grew ESBLs positive isolates. Out of 24 patients who underwent surgery, 22 grew ESBLs positive isolate. Forty seven out of 68 patients who were on 3rd or 4th generation cephalosporins within last 1 month of giving the sample grew ESBLs positive isolates. Conclusion: We have found a statistically significant (p<0.0.05 relationship in between foley’s catheterization and production of ESBLs from urinary isolates. There was no statistically significant association in between CVP/arterial line and blood culture isolates. We did not find difference in mortality rates in between patients infected with ESBLs positive or negative isolates. The mortality in patients was associated with their primary illness or associated co-morbid conditions. We found that the detection of ESBLs is important for the de-escalation of therapy thereby saving net cost of treatment.

  13. Critical Anthropology of Global Health "takes a stand" statement: a critical medical anthropological approach to the U.S.'s Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah; Abadía, Cesar; Mulligan, Jessica; Thompson, Jennifer Jo

    2014-03-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010--the U.S.'s first major health care reform in over half a century-has sparked new debates in the United States about individual responsibility, the collective good, and the social contract. Although the ACA aims to reduce the number of the uninsured through the simultaneous expansion of the private insurance industry and government-funded Medicaid, critics charge it merely expands rather than reforms the existing fragmented and costly employer-based health care system. Focusing in particular on the ACA's individual mandate and its planned Medicaid expansion, this statement charts a course for ethnographic contributions to the on-the-ground impact of the ACA while showcasing ways critical medical anthropologists can join the debate. We conclude with ways that anthropologists may use critiques of the ACA as a platform from which to denaturalize assumptions of "cost" and "profit" that underpin the global spread of market-based medicine more broadly.

  14. The effect of preceptor behavior on the critical thinking skills of new graduate nurses in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud A

    2013-11-01

    Little research has been conducted to examine the effect of preceptor behaviors on the critical thinking of new graduate nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study explored the perceptions of new graduates on the effect of preceptor behaviors and strategies on the development of their critical thinking skills, using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design. Data were collected with demographic surveys and semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis approach. The study showed that relationships between new graduates and their preceptors played a key role in the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses, and specific practical implications were suggested. The study data are useful for critical care nurses, preceptors, nurse educators, and clinical nurse specialists. The findings contribute to efforts to enhance the preceptor-preceptee relationship and develop critical thinking skills in new graduates.

  15. An ethical analysis of proxy and waiver of consent in critical care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Rossel, Peter J. Hancke

    2013-01-01

    It is a central principle in medical ethics that vulnerable patients are entitled to a degree of protection that reflects their vulnerability. In critical care research, this protection is often established by means of so-called proxy consent. Proxy consent for research participation constitutes...... a substituted judgement by a close relative or friend, based on knowledge of patient's values, preferences, and view of life. For the consent to be genuine, the proxy must be informed of and understand three fundamental aspects of research practice: (1) that participation is voluntary and the consent can...... be withdrawn at any time; (2) that the research is designed to benefit future patients and society as a whole, and not the individual study participant; and (3) that participation involves an incremental non-therapeutic risk. If this is not fulfilled because the research is to be conducted under circumstances...

  16. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder*Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada, *Dr Rick Hodder passed away on Tuesday April 17,2012. Please see the Dedication for more information on Dr Hodder.Abstract: Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1 an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2 a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician.Keywords: acute asthma, acute lung injury, ARDS, acute respiratory failure

  17. Care of the Critically Ill Emergency Department Patient with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Joslin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI is common and associated with significant mortality and complications. Exact data on the epidemiology of AKI in the Emergency Department (ED are sparse. This review aims to summarise the key principles for managing AKI patients in the ED. Principal Findings. Timely resuscitation, goal-directed correction of fluid depletion and hypotension, and appropriate management of the underlying illness are essential in preventing or limiting AKI. There is no specific curative therapy for AKI. Key principles of secondary prevention are identification of patients with early AKI, discontinuation of nephrotoxic medication where possible, attention to fluid resuscitation, and awareness of the risks of contrast-induced nephropathy. In patients with advanced AKI, arrangements for renal replacement therapy need to be made before the onset of life-threatening uraemic complications. Conclusions. Research and guidelines regarding AKI in the ED are lacking and AKI practice from critical care departments should be adopted.

  18. FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Todd; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources. FOAMSearch, a custom search engine (CSE), was developed to find relevant, high-quality online resources for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC) clinicians. Using Google™ algorithms, it searches a vetted list of >300 blogs, podcasts, wikis, knowledge translation tools, clinical decision support tools and medical journals. Utilisation has increased progressively to >3000 users/month since its launch in 2011. Further study of the role of CSEs to find medical resources is needed, and it might be possible to develop similar CSEs for other areas of medicine. PMID:25939364

  19. FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Todd; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources. FOAMSearch, a custom search engine (CSE), was developed to find relevant, high-quality online resources for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC) clinicians. Using Google™ algorithms, it searches a vetted list of >300 blogs, podcasts, wikis, knowledge translation tools, clinical decision support tools and medical journals. Utilisation has increased progressively to >3000 users/month since its launch in 2011. Further study of the role of CSEs to find medical resources is needed, and it might be possible to develop similar CSEs for other areas of medicine.

  20. Making big data useful for health care: a summary of the inaugural mit critical data conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Omar; Brennan, Thomas; Celi, Leo Anthony; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Ippolito, Andrea; Johnson, Alistair; Mark, Roger G; Mayaud, Louis; Moody, George; Moses, Christopher; Naumann, Tristan; Pimentel, Marco; Pollard, Tom J; Santos, Mauro; Stone, David J; Zimolzak, Andrew

    2014-08-22

    With growing concerns that big data will only augment the problem of unreliable research, the Laboratory of Computational Physiology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology organized the Critical Data Conference in January 2014. Thought leaders from academia, government, and industry across disciplines-including clinical medicine, computer science, public health, informatics, biomedical research, health technology, statistics, and epidemiology-gathered and discussed the pitfalls and challenges of big data in health care. The key message from the conference is that the value of large amounts of data hinges on the ability of researchers to share data, methodologies, and findings in an open setting. If empirical value is to be from the analysis of retrospective data, groups must continuously work together on similar problems to create more effective peer review. This will lead to improvement in methodology and quality, with each iteration of analysis resulting in more reliability.

  1. Experiences of fathering a baby admitted to neonatal intensive care: a critical gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Kathleen; Lohan, Maria; Spence, Dale; Parkes, Jackie

    2012-09-01

    More fathers than ever before attend at the birth of their child and, internationally, there is a palpable pressure on maternity and neonatal services to include and engage with fathers. It is, thus, more important than ever to understand how fathers experience reproductive and neonatal health services and to understand how fathers can be successfully accommodated in these environments alongside their partners. In this paper we advance a theoretical framework for re-thinking fatherhood and health services approaches to fatherhood based on Critical Studies on Men (CSM). We illustrate the importance of this feminist informed theoretical approach to understanding the gendered experiences of fathers in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) setting in Northern Ireland. Using a longitudinal follow-up research design, with two data collection points, a total of 39 in-depth semi-structured interviews was conducted with 21 fathers of infants admitted to the NICU between August 2008 and December 2009. The findings demonstrate: (i) how men are forging new gendered identities around the birth of their baby but, over time, acknowledge women as the primary caregivers; (ii) how social class is a key determinant of men's ability to enact hegemonic forms of 'involved fatherhood' in the NICU, and; (iii) how men also encounter resistance from their partners and health professionals in challenging a gender order which associates women with the competent care of infants. An understanding of these gendered experiences operating at both individual and structural levels is critical to leading change for the inclusion of fathers as equal parents in healthcare settings. PMID:22694990

  2. Trained or professional doulas in the support and care of pregnant and birthing women: a critical integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Amie; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon; Diezel, Helene

    2015-05-01

    The professionalisation of doula care and research interest in this area of maternity care/support have both grown internationally in recent years highlighting important broader issues around the access, continuity and delivery of maternity care services. However, no work to date has provided a critical appraisal of the international literature on this topic. In response, this paper presents the first critical review of international empirical literature examining professional doula care for pregnant and birthing women. A database search of AMED, CINAHL, Maternity and Infant Care, and MEDLINE using the search term, "doula" was undertaken. A total of 48 papers published between 1980 and March 2013 involving trained or professional doulas were extracted. Four descriptive categories were identified from the review: 'workforce and professional issues in doula care'; 'trained or professional doula's role and skill'; 'physical outcomes of trained or professional doula care'; and 'social outcomes of trained or professional doula care'. Of the studies evaluating outcomes of doula care, there were a number with design and methodology weaknesses. The review highlights a number of gaps in the research literature including a lack of research examining doula workforce issues; focus upon the experience and perspective of significant stakeholders such as expectant fathers with regard to trained or professional doula care; clinical trials measuring both subjective experiences and physical outcomes of trained or professional doula support; synergy between the design of clinical trials research examining trained or professional doula care and the clinical reality of professional doula practice. It is imperative that key aspects of trained doula care be subject to further rigorous, empirical investigation to help establish an evidence base to guide policy and practice relating to this area of support and care for pregnant and birthing women.

  3. Conflict resolution with end of life decisions in critical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C; Sweeney, M A

    1995-01-01

    This demonstration will present the key modules from an innovative videodisc-based program that was designed as an educational tool for health care professionals. It provides a resource for learning to deal with patients and families regarding the increasing problematic area of end-of-life-decisions. Tough Choices: Ethics, the Elderly, and Life-Sustaining Technologies is an interactive program that combines abstract ethical approaches with the realistic drama of a critical care setting. The format integrates scientific facts about the patient with value questions regarding the utilization of life-sustaining technologies. The unique program provides health care personnel with strategies on how to guide family decision-making as well as examples of the various interventions. This interactive multimedia program opens up an opportunity for health care providers to participate in a clinical case in which life and death decisions are made. Learners can explore various perspectives and treatment options within the framework of the dramatic case presentation without the usual time constraints or worries about causing harm to patients. The program involves learners in a variety of ethical and legal dilemmas that centers around a patient, her family, and a variety of health care professionals. Dramatic advances in the development of life-sustaining medical technologies have given hope to many people whose conditions would have meant certain death only a few years ago. As access to the technologies has expanded, concern for their appropriate utilization has become an issue worthy of increasing attention. Questions about the benefits of life-sustaining treatments are being raised in many quarters, particularly when the technology is viewed as a modern means of postponing death and prolonging suffering. Tough Choices brings to life the story of Irene Sullivan, an elderly widow who has an unexpected heart attack. Suddenly, her very existence depends on the life-support provided

  4. A critical narrative analysis of shared decision-making in acute inpatient mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Gemma; Felton, Anne; Morgan, Alastair; Stickley, Theo; Willis, Martin; Diamond, Bob; Houghton, Philip; Johnson, Beverley; Dumenya, John

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is a high priority in healthcare policy and is complementary to the recovery philosophy in mental health care. This agenda has been operationalised within the Values-Based Practice (VBP) framework, which offers a theoretical and practical model to promote democratic interprofessional approaches to decision-making. However, these are limited by a lack of recognition of the implications of power implicit within the mental health system. This study considers issues of power within the context of decision-making and examines to what extent decisions about patients' care on acute in-patient wards are perceived to be shared. Focus groups were conducted with 46 mental health professionals, service users, and carers. The data were analysed using the framework of critical narrative analysis (CNA). The findings of the study suggested each group constructed different identity positions, which placed them as inside or outside of the decision-making process. This reflected their view of themselves as best placed to influence a decision on behalf of the service user. In conclusion, the discourse of VBP and SDM needs to take account of how differentials of power and the positioning of speakers affect the context in which decisions take place. PMID:26833106

  5. Do not resuscitate: An expanding role for critical care response team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M Gouda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Do not resuscitate (DNR order is an important aspect of medical practice. Since the implementation of critical care response team (CCRT, frequently we have encountered with patients in the wards that should have been made DNR. Initiating DNR became an important part of CCRT activity. We were obliged to extended the role of CCRT - beyond managing seriously ill patients - in addressing the code status for patients after discussion with the managing teams. Purpose: We compare the trend of initiation of DNR orders in the regular ward before and after implementing CCRT. Methods: Our hospital is 1200 bed tertiary care center. CCRT has been launched in January 1, 2008. The CCRT is 24/7 service led by in-house North American certified intensivists. Cohort analysis of prospectively collected data of 5406 CCRT activation from January 1, 2008, to September 30, 2013. Data before implementation of CCRT was available for 299 patients from the period of June 1, 2007, to December 31, 2007. A comparison made between the two groups (before and after implementation of CCRT for demographic data and percentage of patients in whom DNR order initiated. Results: Before CCRT implementation, 299 patients were attended by Intensive Care Unit physician for regular consultation, 41.1% were females and 52.4% were males with mean of age 58.44 ± 18.47 standard deviation (SD. DNR was initiated in 2.7% of patients. After CCRT implementation, 5904 CCRT activations, 47.6% females and 52.4% males with mean of age 59.17 ± 20.07 SD DNR initiated in 468 (7.9% of cases. There was 5.2% increase in DNR orders initiation and completion after CCRT introduced to our institute. Conclusion: CCRT plays an important role in addressing and initiating DNR.

  6. An analysis of business phenomena and austerity narratives in the arts sector from a new materialist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Oakes, H.; Oakes, S

    2015-01-01

    The paper adopts a lens of new materialism to analyse narratives of managers in the arts sector in response to the master narrative of austerity and proposed solutions using business models (including accounting). It explores the complex trajectories of the master narrative through the analysis of a diverse range of funding and arts organisations. Accounting, business models and austerity reveal rhizomatic characteristics as they diverge from their origin and are implicated in uncertainty abo...

  7. Surgical procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit on critically ill neonates: feasibility and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transferring unstable, ill neonates to and from the operating rooms carries significant risks and can lead to morbidity. We report on our experience in performing certain procedures in critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We examined the feasibility and safety for such an approach. All surgical procedures performed in the NICU between January 1999 and December 2005 were analyzed in terms of demographic data, diagnosis, preoperative stability of the patient, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Operations were performed at beside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, in neonates of low birth weight (<1000 gm) and in neonates on special equipments like higher frequency ventilators and nitrous oxide. Thirty-seven surgical procedures were performed including 12 laparotomies, bowel resection and stomies, 7 repairs of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, 4 ligations of patent ductus arteriosus and various others. Birth weights ranged between 850 gm and 3500 gm (mean 2000 gm). Gestational age ranged between 25 to 42 weeks (mean, 33 weeks). Age at surgery was between 1 to 30 days (mean, 30 days). Preoperatively, 19 patients (51.3%) were on inotropic support and all were intubated and mechanically ventilated. There was no mortality related to surgical procedures. Postoperatively, one patient developed wound infection and disruption. Performing major surgical procedures in the NICU is both feasible and safe. It is useful in very low birth weight, critically ill neonates who have definite risk attached to transfer to the operating room. No special area is needed in the NICU to perform complication-free surgery, but designing an operating room within the NICU will be ideal. (author)

  8. A study to explore the experiences of patient and family volunteers in a critical care environment: a phenomenological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, J.; Struthers, R; CRAWFORD, R; Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: ICU survivors suffer persistent physical, psychological and social problems in the months and years after discharge from critical care (1). Caregivers of these patients also suffer similar problems (2). As a result, an innovative, peer supported rehabilitation programme- Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) was created in Glasgow Royal Infirmary. This 5 week multi disciplinary programme, which is co facilitated ...

  9. Emergency and critical care procedures in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), and prairie dogs (Cynomys spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Angela M

    2007-05-01

    Less common exotic pet mammals are gaining in popularity. The Australian Sugar Glider, African Hedgehog, and prairie dog are seen regularly in exotic animal practices. They are subject to the same types of medical emergencies as more traditional pets, with the unfortunate addition of all too common underlying nutritional and husbandry-related disorders. Emergency stabilization and critical care are important first steps before collection of diagnostic test samples and administration of definitive medical care. PMID:17577562

  10. Emergency and critical care procedures in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), and prairie dogs (Cynomys spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Angela M

    2007-05-01

    Less common exotic pet mammals are gaining in popularity. The Australian Sugar Glider, African Hedgehog, and prairie dog are seen regularly in exotic animal practices. They are subject to the same types of medical emergencies as more traditional pets, with the unfortunate addition of all too common underlying nutritional and husbandry-related disorders. Emergency stabilization and critical care are important first steps before collection of diagnostic test samples and administration of definitive medical care.

  11. Neoliberal austerity and corporate crime: the collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Charles; Juska, Arunas

    2014-01-01

    The roof collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia on November 21, 2013 left 54 dead. This analysis identifies the disaster as a "safety crime." Neoliberal deregulatory measures, intensified by the global economic and financial crisis and a programme of radical austerity, together with corporate and state disregard of public safety and well-being, combined to produce the disaster. The wider context and underlying causes of catastrophic safety failure exemplify the inherently contradictory character of the neoliberal "Baltic model" of austerity, recently much in vogue with international policymakers in both Europe and the United States. The authors conclude that the current renewed drive by the European Commission towards reducing regulation for business, especially in the aftermath of the crisis, further justifies longstanding anti-regulatory preferences of neoliberal domestic elites, with the result that the costs of disregard for public safety are externalized onto the general populace.

  12. Neoliberal austerity and corporate crime: the collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Charles; Juska, Arunas

    2014-01-01

    The roof collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia on November 21, 2013 left 54 dead. This analysis identifies the disaster as a "safety crime." Neoliberal deregulatory measures, intensified by the global economic and financial crisis and a programme of radical austerity, together with corporate and state disregard of public safety and well-being, combined to produce the disaster. The wider context and underlying causes of catastrophic safety failure exemplify the inherently contradictory character of the neoliberal "Baltic model" of austerity, recently much in vogue with international policymakers in both Europe and the United States. The authors conclude that the current renewed drive by the European Commission towards reducing regulation for business, especially in the aftermath of the crisis, further justifies longstanding anti-regulatory preferences of neoliberal domestic elites, with the result that the costs of disregard for public safety are externalized onto the general populace. PMID:25085827

  13. Introduction and executive summary: care of the critically ill and injured during pandemics and disasters: CHEST consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Michael D; Devereaux, Asha V; Dichter, Jeffrey R; Rubinson, Lewis; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2014-10-01

    Natural disasters, industrial accidents, terrorism attacks, and pandemics all have the capacity to result in large numbers of critically ill or injured patients. This supplement provides suggestions for all of those involved in a disaster or pandemic with multiple critically ill patients, including front-line clinicians, hospital administrators, professional societies, and public health or government officials. The current Task Force included a total of 100 participants from nine countries, comprised of clinicians and experts from a wide variety of disciplines. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted to identify studies upon which evidence-based recommendations could be made. No studies of sufficient quality were identified. Therefore, the panel developed expert-opinion-based suggestions that are presented in this supplement using a modified Delphi process. The ultimate aim of the supplement is to expand the focus beyond the walls of ICUs to provide recommendations for the management of all critically ill or injured adults and children resulting from a pandemic or disaster wherever that care may be provided. Considerations for the management of critically ill patients include clinical priorities and logistics (supplies, evacuation, and triage) as well as the key enablers (systems planning, business continuity, legal framework, and ethical considerations) that facilitate the provision of this care. The supplement also aims to illustrate how the concepts of mass critical care are integrated across the spectrum of surge events from conventional through contingency to crisis standards of care. PMID:25144202

  14. Enteral nutritional therapy in septic patients in the intensive care unit: compliance with nutritional guidelines for critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Castro, Kamila; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the compliance of septic patients' nutritional management with enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients. Methods Prospective cohort study with 92 septic patients, age ≥18 years, hospitalized in an intensive care unit, under enteral nutrition, evaluated according to enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients, compliance with caloric and protein goals, and reasons for not starting enteral nutrition early or for discontinuing it. Prognostic scores...

  15. The austerity bargain and the social self: conceptual clarity surrounding health cutbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A

    2013-01-01

    As necessary austerity measures make major inroads into western health services, this paper investigates the philology of austerity and finds that there are two subtly similar yet importantly different derivations from the Latin and the Greek. The Latin austerus is an abstract term meaning dry, harsh, sour; whereas the Greek austeros has a more embodied and literal meaning of making the tongue dry. What seems an initially subtle difference between the metaphorical and the metonymic plays out as involving seriously different outcomes between harsh economic measures and the literal effects on the people suffering under measures that actually make the tongue dry. The paper argues that between the trope and the literal that which Wittgenstein described as 'a language game' ensues wherein the metaphorical through a sleight of grammar is passed off as being real while, the literal effects on real people is downplayed as metaphorical 'collateral damage'. The paper further argues that within this grammar that forces itself upon us, the game of capital is played out through what the author terms an austerity bargain that is levelled by the financial elites: healthy capitalism equals a healthy society. The paper then examines the six elements of the social determinants of health and what actually contributes to a healthy society. Rather than being under an individual threat of exclusion from what Marx termed a superabundance, the paper considers the irreducible differences between the game of capital's individualism, and, the social determinants of health's social inclusion, legitimization and that which Habermas termed public authentication. The paper concludes that not only do necessary austerity measures need to be critiqued but that they radically undermine what determines a healthy society. It follows also that the social determinants of health, radically undermine the bargain inherent for the privileged few within the game of capital.

  16. Europe and Italy: Expansionary Austerity, Expansionary Precariousness and the Italian Jobs Act

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Antonioli; Paolo Pini

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008 the economic crisis has reduced income and drastically brought down employment levels, and the recovery promised in 2014 will not reabsorb unemployment, particularly in Europe. The ILO and IMF have forecast a jobless recovery. Nevertheless, economic policy in Europe will remain in line with the past, based on two mainstays: fiscal austerity and labour flexibility. Wage policy for European countries aims to align wages to real productivity at firm level, and leaves little room for n...

  17. The impact of fiscal austerity on suicide: on the empirics of a modern Greek tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Collins, Alan

    2014-07-01

    Suicide rates in Greece (and other European countries) have been on a remarkable upward trend following the global recession of 2008 and the European sovereign debt crisis of 2009. However, recent investigations of the impact on Greek suicide rates from the 2008 financial crisis have restricted themselves to simple descriptive or correlation analyses. Controlling for various socio-economic effects, this study presents a statistically robust model to explain the influence on realised suicidality of the application of fiscal austerity measures and variations in macroeconomic performance over the period 1968-2011. The responsiveness of suicide to levels of fiscal austerity is established as a means of providing policy guidance on the extent of suicide behaviour associated with different fiscal austerity measures. The results suggest (i) significant age and gender specificity in these effects on suicide rates and that (ii) remittances have suicide-reducing effects on the youth and female population. These empirical regularities potentially offer some guidance on the demographic targeting of suicide prevention measures and the case for 'economic' migration. PMID:24788115

  18. A new biomedical device for in vivo multiparametric evaluation of tissue vitality in critical care medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Deutsch, Assaf; Dekel, Nava; Pevzner, Eliyahu; Jaronkin, Alex

    2005-04-01

    Real time Monitoring of mitochondrial function in vivo is a significant factor in the understanding of tissue vitality. Nevertheless a single parameter monitoring device is not appropriate and effective in clinical diagnosis of tissue vitality. Therefore we have developed a multi-parametric monitoring system that monitors, in addition to mitochondrial NADH redox state, tissue microcirculatory blood flow, tissue total back-scattered light as an indication of blood volume and blood oxygenation (Hb02). In the present communication a new device named "CritiView" is described. This device was developed in order to enable real time monitoring of the four parameters from various organs in the body. The main medical application of the CritiView is in critical care medicine of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and intraoperatively in operating rooms. The physiological basis for our clinical monitoring approach is based on the well known response to the development of body emergency situation, such as shock or trauma. Under such conditions a process of blood flow redistribution will give preference to vital organs (Brain, Heart) neglecting less vital organs (Skin, G-I tract or the urinary system). Under such condition the brain will by hyperperfused and O2 supply will increase to provide the need of the activated mitochondria. The non-vital organs will be hypoperfused and mitochondial function will be inhibited leading to energy failure. This differentiation between the two types of organs could be used for the early detection of body deterioration by monitoring of the non-vital organ vitality. A fiber optic sensor was embedded in a Foley catheter, enabling the monitoring of Urethral wall vitality, to serve as an early warning signal of body deterioration.

  19. Perceived barriers to the regionalization of adult critical care in the United States: a qualitative preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubenfeld Gordon D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regionalization of adult critical care services may improve outcomes for critically ill patients. We sought to develop a framework for understanding clinician attitudes toward regionalization and potential barriers to developing a tiered, regionalized system of care in the United States. Methods We performed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of critical care stakeholders in the United States, including physicians, nurses and hospital administrators. Stakeholders were identified from a stratified-random sample of United States general medical and surgical hospitals. Key barriers and potential solutions were identified by performing content analysis of the interview transcriptions. Results We interviewed 30 stakeholders from 24 different hospitals, representing a broad range of hospital locations and sizes. Key barriers to regionalization included personal and economic strain on families, loss of autonomy on the part of referring physicians and hospitals, loss of revenue on the part of referring physicians and hospitals, the potential to worsen outcomes at small hospitals by limiting services, and the potential to overwhelm large hospitals. Improving communication between destination and source hospitals, provider education, instituting voluntary objective criteria to become a designated referral center, and mechanisms to feed back patients and revenue to source hospitals were identified as potential solutions to some of these barriers. Conclusion Regionalization efforts will be met with significant conceptual and structural barriers. These data provide a foundation for future research and can be used to inform policy decisions regarding the design and implementation of a regionalized system of critical care.

  20. Nosocomial Candiduria in Critically Ill Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Units in Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiasian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A broad variety of fungi, especially Candida species, are becoming increasingly common causes of urinary tract infections in hospital settings. Objectives The current cross-sectional descriptive study aimed to determine the causative agents, risk factors and incidence rate of candiduria in critically ill patients, hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs of four Iranian hospitals. Patients and Methods A total of 155 children and adult patients, admitted to ICUs of the four university educational hospitals, who demonstrated Candida-positive urine cultures, were examined. Samples were processed via mycological procedures by direct microscopy and culture. Results Candiduria was confirmed in 50 (32.26 % patients and Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species representing 60.0% of isolates, followed by 14.0% C. glabrata, 12.0% C. parapsilosis, 10.0% C. krusei, and 4.0% C. tropicalis. Most patients were female (58% with a mean age of 46.7 years old. Generally, 39.7% and 62% of adults and children showed candiduria, respectively. The commonest predisposing factors were antibiotic therapy (98.0%, urinary catheterization (92.0%, corticotherapy (84.0%, being female (42.6 %, use of feeding tube (56%, and extended hospitalization, respectively. Conclusions The high frequency of candiduria in ICU patients can be decreased by shortening the duration of urinary catheterization, avoiding extra antibiotics and corticosteroids, as well as controlling the predisposing factors and underlying conditions.

  1. Recommendations for the Critical Care Management of Devastating Brain Injury: Prognostication, Psychosocial, and Ethical Management : A Position Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souter, Michael J; Blissitt, Patricia A; Blosser, Sandralee; Bonomo, Jordan; Greer, David; Jichici, Draga; Mahanes, Dea; Marcolini, Evie G; Miller, Charles; Sangha, Kiranpal; Yeager, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Devastating brain injuries (DBIs) profoundly damage cerebral function and frequently cause death. DBI survivors admitted to critical care will suffer both intracranial and extracranial effects from their brain injury. The indicators of quality care in DBI are not completely defined, and despite best efforts many patients will not survive, although others may have better outcomes than originally anticipated. Inaccuracies in prognostication can result in premature termination of life support, thereby biasing outcomes research and creating a self-fulfilling cycle where the predicted course is almost invariably dismal. Because of the potential complexities and controversies involved in the management of devastating brain injury, the Neurocritical Care Society organized a panel of expert clinicians from neurocritical care, neuroanesthesia, neurology, neurosurgery, emergency medicine, nursing, and pharmacy to develop an evidence-based guideline with practice recommendations. The panel intends for this guideline to be used by critical care physicians, neurologists, emergency physicians, and other health professionals, with specific emphasis on management during the first 72-h post-injury. Following an extensive literature review, the panel used the GRADE methodology to evaluate the robustness of the data. They made actionable recommendations based on the quality of evidence, as well as on considerations of risk: benefit ratios, cost, and user preference. The panel generated recommendations regarding prognostication, psychosocial issues, and ethical considerations.

  2. Nurse-led implementation of a ventilator-associated pneumonia care bundle in a children's critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charlotte

    2016-05-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of death with hospital-acquired infections, and preventing it is one of the Saving Lives initiatives ( Department of Health 2007 ). This article discusses the implementation of a purpose-designed VAP care bundle in a children's intensive care unit and examines the unique role of nurses in the management of the change process. A nurse-led VAP education, implementation and surveillance programme was set up. Nurse education was paramount, as nursing staff acceptance and involvement was a key feature. A multi-method training strategy was implemented, providing staff with multiple training opportunities and introducing VAP project education as a routine part of staff induction. Bundle compliance was monitored regularly and graphs of the results produced quarterly; feedback proved to be useful in keeping staff informed and engaged in VAP reduction. Comparison of VAP incidence before and after introduction of the care bundle showed a reduction after its implementation. With a co-ordinated, multidisciplinary approach, VAP care bundles can result in significant and sustained reductions in VAP rates in the paediatric intensive care unit. Effective co-ordination and leadership is crucial to successful implementation of the VAP bundle, and nurses are well placed to undertake this role. PMID:27156419

  3. Variability of DKA Management Among Pediatric Emergency Room and Critical Care Providers: A Call for More Evidence-Based and Cost-Effective Care?

    OpenAIRE

    G Clark, Matthew; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Management protocols have been shown to be effective in the pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) and pediatric critical care (PCC) settings. Treatment protocols define clear goals which are achieved with consistency in implementation. Over the last decade, many new recommendations have been proposed on managing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Although no perfect set of guidelines exist, many institutions are developing DKA treatment protocols. We sought to determine the variability between institu...

  4. The Social Media Index: Measuring the Impact of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoma, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of educational resources created for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC that incorporate social media has increased dramatically. With no way to assess their impact or quality, it is challenging for educators to receive scholarly credit and for learners to identify respected resources. The Social Media index (SMi was developed to help address this. Methods: We used data from social media platforms (Google PageRanks, Alexa Ranks, Facebook Likes, Twitter Followers, and Google+ Followers for EMCC blogs and podcasts to derive three normalized (ordinal, logarithmic, and raw formulas. The most statistically robust formula was assessed for 1 temporal stability using repeated measures and website age, and 2 correlation with impact by applying it to EMCC journals and measuring the correlation with known journal impact metrics. Results: The logarithmic version of the SMi containing four metrics was the most statistically robust. It correlated significantly with website age (Spearman r=0.372; p<0.001 and repeated measures through seven months (r=0.929; p<0.001. When applied to EMCC journals, it correlated significantly with all impact metrics except number of articles published. The strongest correlations were seen with the Immediacy Index (r=0.609; p<0.001 and Article Influence Score (r=0.608; p<0.001. Conclusion: The SMi’s temporal stability and correlation with journal impact factors suggests that it may be a stable indicator of impact for medical education websites. Further study is needed to determine whether impact correlates with quality and how learners and educators can best utilize this tool. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:242–249.

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice of pediatric critical care nurses towards pain: Survey in a developing country setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Nurses′ knowledge, sensitivity and attitudes about pain in children and its management affect their response and therefore management of pediatric pain. Children in critical care units undergo more painful procedures than those in general wards. Aims : To study the knowledge, attitude and practice of nursing personnel catering to critically ill children in a developing country. Settings and Design : Prospective questionnaire-based survey. Materials and Methods : The survey was carried out in a tertiary care teaching hospital on nursing personnel in three pediatric/neonatal intensive care units. The domains studied were: i. Training and experience, ii. Knowledge of pediatric pain, iii. Individual attitude towards pain in children, iv. Personal practice(s for pain alleviation, v. Pain assessment, and vi. Non-pharmacological measures adopted. Statistical Analysis : Descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Results : Of the 81 nursing personnel working in the three critical care units, 56 (69.1% responded to the questionnaire. Only one-third of them had received formal training in pediatric nursing. Fifty percent of the respondents felt that infants perceive less pain than adults. Training in pediatric nursing was a significant contributing factor in the domain of knowledge (P=0.03. Restraint and distraction were the common modalities employed to facilitate painful procedures. Scientific approaches like eutectic mixture of local anesthetic and the judicious use of sedatives were not adopted routinely. Observing a child′s face and posture were widely used parameters to assess pain (83%. None of the three critical care areas used a scoring system to assess pain. Conclusions : There are several lacunae in the knowledge and practice of nurses in developing countries which need to be improved by training.

  6. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ayala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05 and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05. Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01, working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01, and inversely associated with age (p<0.05. Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential

  7. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  8. A Critical Care and Transplantation-Based Approach to Acute Respiratory Failure after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbahlawan, Lama; Srinivasan, Ashok; Morrison, R Ray

    2016-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure contributes significantly to nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although there is a trend of improved survival over time, mortality remains unacceptably high. An understanding of the pathophysiology of early respiratory failure, opportunities for targeted therapy, assessment of the patient at risk, optimal use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, strategies to improve alveolar recruitment, appropriate fluid management, care of the patient with chronic lung disease, and importantly, a team approach between critical care and transplantation services may improve outcomes. PMID:26409244

  9. The boundary of a boundary principle in field theories and the issue of austerity of the laws of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boundary of a boundary principle has been suggested by J. A. Wheeler as a realization of the austerity idea in field theories. This principle is described in three basic field theories---electrodynamics, Yang--Mills theory, and general relativity. It is demonstrated that it supplies a unified geometric interpretation of the source current in each of the three theories in terms of a generalized E. Cartan moment of rotation. The extent to which the boundary of a boundary principle represents the austerity principle is discussed. It is concluded that it works in a way analogous to thermodynamic relations and it is argued that deeper principles might be needed to comprehend the nature of austerity

  10. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Stocker M.; Pilgrim SB; Burmester M.; Allen ML; Gijselaers WH

    2016-01-01

    Martin Stocker,1 Sina B Pilgrim,2 Margarita Burmester,3 Meredith L Allen,4 Wim H Gijselaers5 1Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Lucerne, Lucerne, 2Pediatric Intensive Care, University Children's Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland; 3Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Pediatrics, The Royal Children's Hospital, Victoria, Australia; 5Educational Research and Development, School of Business and Ec...

  11. The role of leadership in overcoming staff turnover in critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Kelly; Brunet, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    This commentary discusses Laporta and coworkers analysis of a case study on the causes of and solutions for staff turnover in an intensive care setting. Staff turnover is a significant issue for health care leaders due to the shrinking workforce in Western countries and an increased demand for intensive care services as the population ages. The commentary considers reasons for turnover such as burnout and generational diversity, and highlights the importance of a team work approach to address...

  12. In-airway molecular flow sensing: A new technology for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of oxygen consumption in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffoni, Luca; O'Neill, David P; Couper, John H; Ritchie, Grant A D; Hancock, Gus; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    There are no satisfactory methods for monitoring oxygen consumption in critical care. To address this, we adapted laser absorption spectroscopy to provide measurements of O2, CO2, and water vapor within the airway every 10 ms. The analyzer is integrated within a novel respiratory flow meter that is an order of magnitude more precise than other flow meters. Such precision, coupled with the accurate alignment of gas concentrations with respiratory flow, makes possible the determination of O2 consumption by direct integration over time of the product of O2 concentration and flow. The precision is illustrated by integrating the balance gas (N2 plus Ar) flow and showing that this exchange was near zero. Measured O2 consumption changed by <5% between air and O2 breathing. Clinical capability was illustrated by recording O2 consumption during an aortic aneurysm repair. This device now makes easy, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of O2 consumption for intubated patients in critical care possible.

  13. INTRODUCTION: COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE AGE OF AUSTERITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Giuseppe; Hansen, Morten Balle; Johanson, Jan-Erik;

    2016-01-01

    reporting by local governments. Using multicountry survey data, Wynen and Verhoest provide an understanding of the effect of organizational autonomy and external result control on the use of internal performance-based steering toward lower hierarchical levels in public sector organizations. Bjørnholt......, Houlberg, and Bækgaard study the link between fiscal austerity and politicians’ use of performance information by using survey and documentary data from Danish municipalities. Grossi, Reichard, and Ruggiero examine the interest of politicians and public managers in the use of performance information...

  14. Austerity, Competitiveness and Neoliberalism Redux: Ontario Responds to the Great Recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fanelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the deepening integration of market imperatives throughout the province of Ontario. We do this by, first, examining neoliberalism’s theoretical underpinnings, second, reviewing Ontario’s historical context, and third, scrutinizing the Open Ontario Plan, with a focus on proposed changes to employment standards legislation. We argue that contrary to claims of shared restraint and the pressing need for public austerity, Premier McGuinty’s Liberal’s have re-branded and re-packaged core neoliberal policies in such a manner that costs are socialized and profits privatized, thereby intensifying class polarization along with its racialized and gendered diversities.

  15. A prospective survey of critical care procedures performed by physicians in helicopter emergency medical service: is clinical exposure enough to stay proficient?

    OpenAIRE

    Sollid, Stephen J M; Bredmose, Per P; Nakstad, Anders R; Sandberg, Mårten

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians in prehospital care must be proficient in critical care procedures. Procedure proficiency requires a combination of training, experience and continuous clinical exposure. Most physicians in helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) in Norway are well-trained and experienced anaesthesiologists, but we know little about their exposure to critical care procedures in the prehospital arena. This knowledge is required to plan clinical training and in-hospital practice to mai...

  16. Change in attitudes and performance of critical care teams after a multi-disciplinary simulation-based intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Weller; Robert Frengley; Jane Torrie; Webster, Craig S.; Susan Tomlinson; Kaylene Henderson

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an in-depth exploration of the self-reported long-term change in attitudes and performance after a full-day multidisciplinary simulation-based course focussed on team management of emergency events in the Critical Care Unit. To address the current lack of knowledge of factors which can lead to improved teamwork performance and their measurement through identification of measurable markers of behaviour and attitude change. Methods: A purposive sample of course participan...

  17. Chest physiotherapy on intracranial pressure of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcomes of increased or decreased intracranial pressure and/or the decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from respiratory physiotherapy on critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Methods Through a systematic review of the literature, clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. The search involved the LILACS, SciELO, MedLine and PEDro databases using the keywords "physical therapy", "physiotherapy", "respiratory ther...

  18. Scientific publications in critical care medicine journals from East Asia: A 10-year survey of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhenyu; Ou, Chongyang; Teng, Hongfei; Liu, Xiguang; Tang, Hongxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The quantity and quality of publications in critical care medicine from East Asia haven’t been reported. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of publications from East Asia. Methods: Articles from China, Japan and South Korea in 2005 to 2014 were retrieved from Web of Science and Pubmed. The number of publications, impact factor, citation, and article types were analyzed. Results: There were 3076 publications from East Asia (1720 from China, 913 from Japan, and 443 from...

  19. Free Open Access Meducation (FOAM): the rise of emergency medicine and critical care blogs and podcasts (2002-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Mike; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Disruptive technologies are revolutionising continuing professional development in emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC). Data on EMCC blogs and podcasts were gathered prospectively from 2002 through November 2013. During this time there was a rapid expansion of EMCC websites, from two blogs and one podcast in 2002 to 141 blogs and 42 podcasts in 2013. This paper illustrates the explosive growth of EMCC websites and provides a foundation that will anchor future research in this burgeoning field.

  20. Parental Employment and Child Care Trends: Some Critical Issues and Suggested Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilman, Catherine S.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews pertinent research concerning effects of parental employment and various kinds of substitute child care on very young children and their mothers and fathers. Summarizes recent federal legislation concerning child care provisions for young children of working parents, income supports for working poor population, and job-training provisions…

  1. Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

  2. A student paper: music in critical care setting for clients on mechanical ventilators: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van; Chang, Sue; Olivas, Rosa; Almacen, Catherine; Dimanlig, Marbert; Rodriguez, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This article written by baccalaureate nursing students briefly discusses the use of music therapy in clients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care units. The article explores the possible benefits of music therapy and its use in other aspects of health care. PMID:23042464

  3. Model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness of neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Towell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in order to develop a model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness in neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa. A theory-generative, explorative, descriptive, contextual research design was used. The model was developed utilising the four steps of theory generation as proposed by Dickoff, James, and Wiedenbach (1968, Chinn and Kramer (2011 and Walker and Avant (2011. Step one dealt with the empirical phase in which the concepts were distilled. The facilitation of inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience was the main concept of the model. Step two comprised the definition and classification of central and related concepts. Step three provides a description of the model. The model operates in three phases namely the dependent phase, partially dependent phase and the independent phase. Step four entailed the description of guidelines for operationalizing the model. During the three phases of the model a new nurse who starts to work in critical care moves from a latent ability to develop an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience to a state of developing an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience. This model provides a structured framework for the facilitation of emotional intelligence (EI to promote wholeness in nurses who commence to work in critical care units.

  4. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their

  5. Nursing care plans versus concept maps in the enhancement of critical thinking skills in nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinatra-Wilhelm, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate and effective critical thinking and problem solving is necessary for all nurses in order to make complex decisions that improve patient outcomes, safety, and quality of nursing care. With the current emphasis on quality improvement, critical thinking ability is a noteworthy concern within the nursing profession. An in-depth review of literature related to critical thinking was performed. The use of nursing care plans and concept mapping to improve critical thinking skills was among the recommendations identified. This study compares the use of nursing care plans and concept mapping as a teaching strategy for the enhancement of critical thinking skills in baccalaureate level nursing students. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test was used as a method of comparison and evaluation. Results indicate that concept mapping enhances critical thinking skills in baccalaureate nursing students.

  6. Training of clinical thinking in critical care medicine%重症医学临床思路的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏民; 刘大为

    2015-01-01

    重症患者情况复杂,重症医生需要及时掌握病情变化,迅速确定针对性干预措施。重症医生临床思路的培养包含以下三个方面的内容:牢固的重症医学理论基础;扎实的临床操作技能;充分的临床实践工作历练。%Most patients in ICU are critically ill. The physician in charge should be able to evaluate and deal with the critical condition in a timely and accurately manner. The clinical thinking for intensivists entail abilities in the following three aspects: solid foundation of critical care theory; experienced clinical operation skill; enough clinical training.

  7. Training of clinical thinking in critical care medicine%重症医学临床思路的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏民; 刘大为

    2015-01-01

    重症患者情况复杂,重症医生需要及时掌握病情变化,迅速确定针对性干预措施。重症医生临床思路的培养包含以下三个方面的内容:牢固的重症医学理论基础;扎实的临床操作技能;充分的临床实践工作历练。%Most patients in ICU are critically ill. The physician in charge should be able to evaluate and deal with the critical condition in a timely and accurately manner. The clinical thinking for intensivists entail abilities in the following three aspects:solid foundation of critical care theory;experienced clinical operation skill;enough clinical training.

  8. Academic Medicine's Critical Role in the "Third Curve" of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Harold L

    2016-05-01

    Over the last several years, the health care landscape has changed at an unprecedented rate due to new economic and regulatory forces ushered in by the Affordable Care Act and the introduction of innovative technologies, such as personalized medicine, that are poised to open the door to consumer-driven health care. Tremendous pressure exists on academic health centers to rapidly evolve clinically while not abandoning their unique academic mission. The convergence of personalized medicine, new digital technologies, and changes in health professionals' scope of practice alongside new payment structures will accelerate the move to a patient-centered health system. In this Commentary, the author argues that these new tools and resources must be embraced to improve the health of patients. With the traditional, fee-for-service model of care as "Curve I" and the post-Flexner era of population-based medicine as "Curve II," the author identifies the emergence of "Curve III," which is characterized by patient-centered, consumer-directed models of care. As the old models of health care undergo transition and the impact of technology and analytics grow, future practitioners must be trained to embrace this change and function effectively in the "third curve" of consumer-driven health care.

  9. Ethics of the Physician's Role in Health-Care Cost Control: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Joseph; Iorio, Richard; Barber, Thomas; Barron, Chloe; Caplan, Arthur

    2016-07-20

    The United States health-care expenditure is rising precipitously. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that, in 2025, at our current rate of increased spending, 25% of the gross domestic product will be allocated to health care. Our per-capita spending on health care also far exceeds that of any other industrialized country. Health-care costs must be addressed if our country is to remain competitive in the global marketplace and to maintain its financial solvency. If unchecked, the uncontrolled rise in health-care expenditures will not only affect our capacity to provide our patients with high-quality care but also threaten the ability of our nation to compete economically on the global stage. This is not hyperbole but fiscal reality.As physicians, we are becoming increasingly familiar with the economics impacting health-care policy. Thus, we are in a unique position to control the cost of health care. This includes an increased reliance on creating and adhering to evidence-based guidelines. We can do this and still continue to respect the primacy of patient welfare and the right of patients to act in their own self-interest. However, as evidenced by the use of high-volume centers of excellence, each strategy adapted to control costs must be vetted and must be monitored for its unintended ethical consequences.The solution to this complex problem must involve the input of all of the health-care stakeholders, including the patients, payers, and providers. Physicians ought to play a role in designing and executing a remedy. After all, we are the ones who best understand medicine and whose moral obligation is to the welfare of our patients. PMID:27440574

  10. The role of leadership in overcoming staff turnover in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kelly; Brunet, Fabrice

    2005-10-01

    This commentary discusses Laporta and coworkers analysis of a case study on the causes of and solutions for staff turnover in an intensive care setting. Staff turnover is a significant issue for health care leaders due to the shrinking workforce in Western countries and an increased demand for intensive care services as the population ages. The commentary considers reasons for turnover such as burnout and generational diversity, and highlights the importance of a team work approach to address the issue of turnover. PMID:16277725

  11. The Ethics of Rationing of Critical Care Services: Should Technology Assessment Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Bloomfield

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The costs of health care continue to increase rapidly and steeply in the United States. One area of great expense is that of intensive care units (ICUs. The causes of inflation have not been addressed effectively. ICU resources could become stretched such that they may no longer be available. This paper discusses some of the ethics and concerns behind decision making when providing ICU services in the United States. In particular, the use of electronic records with decision making tools, risk-analysis methods, and documentation of patient wishes for extraordinary care may help with better utilization of resources in the future.

  12. Critical Care Nurses on Duty: Information‐Rich but Time‐Poor. A review of: McKnight, Michelynn. “The Information Seeking of On‐Duty Critical Care Nurses: Evidence from Participant Observation and In‐Context Interviews.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 94.2 (Apr. 2006): 145‐51.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Objective – To describe critical care nurses’ on‐duty information‐seeking behavior.Design – Participatory action research using ethnographic methods.Setting – A twenty‐bed critical care unit in a 275‐bed community (non‐teaching) hospital.Subjects – A purposive sample of six registered nurses (RNs) working shifts in the critical care unit.Methods – The researcher accompanied six RNs on various shifts (weekdays and weekends, day and night shifts) in the critical care unit and used participant o...

  13. A New Proposal for Management of Severe Frostbite in the Austere Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchy, Emmanuel; Davis, Christopher B; Pasquier, Mathieu; Meyer, Eric F; Hackett, Peter H

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in outdoor clothing and medical management of frostbite, individuals still experience catastrophic amputations. This is a particular risk for those in austere environments, due to resource limitations and delayed definitive treatment. The emerging best therapies for severe frostbite are thrombolytics and iloprost. However, they must be started within 24 hours after rewarming for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and within 48 hours for iloprost. Evacuation of individuals experiencing frostbite from remote environments within 24 to 48 hours is often impossible. To date, use of these agents has been confined to hospitals, thus depriving most individuals in the austere environment of the best treatment. We propose that thrombolytics and iloprost be considered for field treatment to maximize chances for recovery and reduce amputations. Given the small but potentially serious risk of complications, rt-PA should only be used for grade 4 frostbite where amputation is inevitable, and within 24 hours of rewarming. Prostacyclin has less risk and can be used for grades 2 to 4 frostbite within 48 hours of rewarming. Until more field experience is reported with these agents, their use should probably be restricted to experienced physicians. Other modalities, such as local nerve blocks and improving oxygenation at high altitude may also be considered. We submit that it remains possible to improve frostbite outcomes despite delayed evacuation using resource-limited treatment strategies. We present 2 cases of frostbite treated with rt-PA at K2 basecamp to illustrate feasibility and important considerations.

  14. Physical Therapy in Palliative Care: From Symptom Control to Quality of Life: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Senthil P; Anand Jim

    2010-01-01

    Physiotherapy is concerned with identifying and maximizing movement potential, within the spheres of promotion, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. Physical therapists practice in a broad range of inpatient, outpatient, and community-based settings such as hospice and palliative care centers where as part of a multidisciplinary team of care, they address the physical and functional dimensions of the patients′ suffering. Physiotherapy treatment methods like therapeutic exercise, electric...

  15. Computerized nursing process in critical care unit using the ICNP--Beta2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Sasso, Grace T M; Peres, Heloísa Ciqueteo; Silveira, Denise Tolfo

    2006-01-01

    The process of nursing is an assertive solving problem approach to the identification and care of patients' problems as well as an instrument of education in Nursing. At the CCU, due to the complexity of care, constant changes in the clinical situation of patients and the elevated amount of information, the informatics is seen as a way to the development of the nursing process and consequently improvement of the quality of care. Therefore, this methodological study and technological production was developed with 05 nurses of the CCU aiming describing the development of the nursing computerized process in the CCU from the ICNP Beta 2 and demonstrating the contributions to the improvement of nursing care. The ethical principals of the resolution 196/96 of CNS were followed and constituted 03 production phases: planning, development and production of the B version. The evaluation process interposed the system production phases and made it possible necessary modifications to be done. The evaluations make noteworthy that a new conception of nursing care practice is established; the process of nursing informatics makes the care more notorious, organized and permits the early mistake detection; the program allows a continuous learning and explicit clinical decision making of the nurse. Therefore, information systems and related technology are necessary in order to create, democratize, and apply knowledge in nursing.

  16. Novos anticoagulantes em cuidados intensivos New anticoagulants in critical care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Adrian Prync Flato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eventos tromboembólicos são complicações comuns em pacientes críticos. Podem apresentar sinais e sintomas pouco específicos e estão associados a um substancial aumento na morbimortalidade dos pacientes internados em unidades de terapia intensiva. Os agentes antitrombóticos são o pilar no tratamento e prevenção do tromboembolismo. Esta classe é também utilizada na prevenção do acidente vascular encefálico, na fibrilação atrial, na prevenção de eventos embólicos da insuficiência cardíaca, em pacientes com próteses valvares e têm sido associados a antiplaquetários na prevenção secundária da síndrome coronária aguda. Agentes antitrombóticos, como aspirina, clopidogrel, antagonistas da vitamina K e foundaparinux (inibidor indireto do fator Xa já foram incorporados na prática clínica rotineira dos serviços de terapia intensiva. Recentemente, tem-se demonstrado grande interesse nos agentes que inibem seletivamente o fator Xa e a trombina. Estes apresentam estrutura molecular pequena e inibem simultaneamente o fator da coagulação livre no plasma e ligado ao trombo. Entre os novos anticoagulantes orais, dabigatran, rivaroxaban e apixaban são os que apresentam estudos clínicos em fases mais avançadas e uso na prática clínica já licenciado em alguns países. O objetivo desta revisão é salientar os principais estudos da literatura sobre novos anticoagulantes no cenário das unidades de terapia intensivaThromboembolic events commonly occur in critically ill patients, and although they do not consistently present with specific signs and symptoms, they are associated with high morbity and mortality. Antithrombotic agents are the mainstay of the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, and they are also used for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, embolism prevention in heart failure, and anticoagulation of prosthetic valves. These drugs have been combined with antiplatelet therapy for the

  17. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocker M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin Stocker,1 Sina B Pilgrim,2 Margarita Burmester,3 Meredith L Allen,4 Wim H Gijselaers5 1Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Lucerne, Lucerne, 2Pediatric Intensive Care, University Children's Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland; 3Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Pediatrics, The Royal Children's Hospital, Victoria, Australia; 5Educational Research and Development, School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: Aiming for and ensuring effective patient safety is a major priority in the management and culture of every health care organization. The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU has become a workplace with a high diversity of multidisciplinary physicians and professionals. Therefore, delivery of high-quality care with optimal patient safety in a PICU is dependent on effective interprofessional team management. Nevertheless, ineffective interprofessional teamwork remains ubiquitous.Methods: We based our review on the framework for interprofessional teamwork recently published in association with the UK Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education. Articles were selected to achieve better understanding and to include and translate new ideas and concepts.Findings: The barrier between autonomous nurses and doctors in the PICU within their silos of specialization, the failure of shared mental models, a culture of disrespect, and the lack of empowering parents as team members preclude interprofessional team management and patient safety. A mindset of individual responsibility and accountability embedded in a network of equivalent partners, including the patient and their family members, is required to achieve optimal interprofessional care. Second, working competently as an interprofessional team is a learning process. Working declared as a learning process, psychological safety, and speaking up are pivotal

  18. Evaluating medical residents as managers of care: a critical appraisal of assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari JO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamiu O Busari,1,2 Lorette A Stammen,2 Lokke M Gennissen,2 Rob M Moonen1 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Henri Dunantstraat 5, 6401 CX Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands Introduction: The increasing demands for effective and efficient health care delivery systems worldwide have resulted in an expansion of the desired competencies that physicians need to possess upon graduation. Presently, medical residents require additional professional competencies that can prepare them to practice adequately in a continuously changing health care environment. Recent studies show that despite the importance of competency-based training, the development and evaluation of management competencies in residents during residency training is inadequate. The aim of this literature review was to find out which assessment methods are currently being used to evaluate trainees' management competencies and which, if any, of these methods make use of valid and reliable instruments. Methods: In September 2012, a thorough search of the literature was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase®, MEDLINE®, and ERIC databases. Additional searches included scanning the references of relevant articles and sifting through the “related topics” displayed by the databases. Results: A total of 25 out of 178 articles were selected for final review. Four broad categories emerged after analysis that best reflected their content: 1 measurement tools used to evaluate the effect of implemented curricular interventions; 2 measurement tools based on recommendations from consensus surveys or conventions; 3 measurement tools for assessing general competencies, which included care-management; and 4 measurement tools focusing exclusively on care-management competencies. Conclusion: Little information was found about (validated assessment tools being used to measure care-management competence

  19. Clinical Care Pathways for Patients With Hepatitis C: Reducing Critical Barriers to Effective Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Nik; Lattimore, Sam; Irving, William Lucien; Thomson, Brian James

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Engagement of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with care pathways remains a major barrier to realizing the benefits of new and more effective antiviral therapies. After an exploratory study, we have undertaken an evidence-based redesign of care pathways for HCV, including the following: (1) reflex testing of anti-HCV-positive samples for HCV RNA; (2) annotation of laboratory results to recommend referral of actively infected patients to specialist clinics; (3) educational programs for primary care physicians and nurses; and (4) the establishment of needs-driven community clinics in substance misuse services. Methods.  In this study, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of progression through care pathways of individuals with a new diagnosis of HCV infection made between January 2010 and January 2012. We also analyzed patient flow through new care pathways and compared this with our baseline study of identical design. Results.  A total of 28 980 samples were tested for anti-HCV antibody during the study period and yielded 273 unique patients with a new diagnosis of HCV infection. Of these, 38% were tested in general practice, 21% were tested in substance misuse services, 23% were tested in secondary care, and 18% were tested in local prisons. Overall, 80% of patients were referred to specialist clinics, 70% attended for assessment, and 38% commenced treatment, in comparison to 49%, 27%, and 10%, respectively, in the baseline study. Referral rates from all testing sources improved. Conclusions.  This study provides timely evidence that progression through care pathways can be enhanced, and it demonstrates reduction of key barriers to eradication of HCV. PMID:26900576

  20. 世界危重病学护士联盟介绍%Introduction of World Federation of Critical Care Nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永强

    2005-01-01

    作为“香港危重病学护士协会”(Hong Kong Association of Critical Care Nurses,HKACCN)委员之一,笔者于2004年9月12~16日参加了在英国剑桥举办的“第二届英国危重病学护士协会(British Association of Critical Care Nurses,BACCN)国际研讨会暨第一届世界危重病学护士联盟(World Federation of Critical Care Nurses,WFCCN)会议”。

  1. Data Acquisition and Complex Systems Analysis in Critical Care: Developing the Intensive Care Unit of the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Jacono

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern hospitals are equipped with sophisticated monitoring equipment that displays enormous volumes of raw data about the cardiopulmonary and neural functions of patients. The latest generation of bedside monitors attempts to present these data to the clinician in an integrated fashion to better represent the overall physiological condition of the patient. However, none of these systems are capable of extracting potentially important indices of pattern variability inherent within biological signals. This review has three main objectives. (1 To summarize the current state of data acquisition in the intensive care unit and identify limitations that must be overcome to achieve the goal of real-time processing of biological signals to capture subtleties identifying “early warning signals” hidden in physiologic patterns that may reflect current severity of the disease process and, more importantly, predict the likelihood of adverse progression and death or improvement and resolution. (2 To outline our approach to analyzing biological waveform data based on work in animal models of human disease. (3 To propose guidelines for the development, testing and implementation of integrated software and hardware solutions that will facilitate the novel application of complex systems approaches to biological waveform data with the goal of risk assessment.

  2. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hantikainen Virpi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs, such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and the consequences in older critically ill patients. The overall aim of this study is to identify how an ICU stay influences an older person's experiences later in life. More specific, this study has the following objectives: (1 to explore the relationship between pain, anxiety and agitation during ICU stays and experiences of the same symptoms in later life; and (2 to explore the associations between pain, anxiety and agitation experienced during ICU stays and their effect on subsequent health-related quality of life, use of the health care system (readmissions, doctor visits, rehabilitation, medication use, living situation, and survival after discharge and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Methods/Design A prospective, longitudinal study will be used for this study. A total of 150 older critically ill patients in the ICU will participate (ICU group. Pain, anxiety, agitation, morbidity, mortality, use of the health care system, and health-related quality of life will be measured at 3 intervals after a baseline assessment. Baseline measurements will be taken 48 hours after ICU admission and one week thereafter. Follow-up measurements will take place 6 months and 12 months after discharge from the ICU. To be able to interpret trends in scores on outcome variables in the ICU group, a comparison group of 150 participants, matched by age and gender, recruited from the Swiss population, will be interviewed at the same intervals as the ICU group. Discussion Little

  3. Physical therapy in palliative care: From symptom control to quality of life: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiotherapy is concerned with identifying and maximizing movement potential, within the spheres of promotion, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. Physical therapists practice in a broad range of inpatient, outpatient, and community-based settings such as hospice and palliative care centers where as part of a multidisciplinary team of care, they address the physical and functional dimensions of the patients′ suffering. Physiotherapy treatment methods like therapeutic exercise, electrical modalities, thermal modalities, actinotherapy, mechanical modalities, manual physical therapy and assistive devices are useful for a range of life-threatening and life-limiting conditions like cancer and cancer-associated conditions; HIV; neurodegenerative disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis; respiratory disorders like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; and altered mental states. The professional armamentarium is still expanding with inclusion of other miscellaneous techniques which were also proven to be effective in improving quality of life in these patients. Considering the scope of physiotherapy in India, and in palliative care, professionals in a multidisciplinary palliative care team need to understand and mutually involve toward policy changes to successfully implement physical therapeutic palliative care delivery.

  4. Development of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Cestari, Idagene A.; Hamamoto, Gina; Bacht, Simão; Rebelo, Marina S.; Silva, João E. M. M.; Lage, Silvia G.

    2008-03-01

    The current study describes the experience in the implementation of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Recently, mobile devices connected to a WiFi network were incorporated to the Hospital information System, providing the same functionalities of common desktop counterpart. However, the use of commercially devices like PDAs and Pocket PCs presented a series of problems that are more emphasized in the ICUs 1) low autonomy of the batteries, which need constant recharges; 2) low robustness of the devices; 3) insufficient display area to show medical images and vital signals; 4) data entry remains a major problem and imposes an extra time consumption to the staff; 5) high cost when fully equipped with WiFi connection, optical reader to access bar codes and memory. To address theses problems we developed a mobile workstation (MedKart) that provides access the HIS and PACS systems, with all resources and an ergonomic and practical design to be used by physicians and nurses inside the ICU. The system fulfills the requirements to assist, in the point-of-care, critical cardiac patients in Intensive Care Units.

  5. Coping strategies when an adult next-of-kin/close friend is in critical care: a grounded theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ingrid; Hildingh, Cathrine; Fridlund, Bengt

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the study was to generate a theoretical model of how relatives/close friends cope when faced with having an adult next-of-kin/close friend admitted to critical care. Using interviews, data were collected from 18 relatives/close friends of adult patients in thoracic surgical, neurosurgical, coronary, and general ICUs in south-west Sweden. The design incorporated grounded theory methodology. The results indicate the relatives/close friends tried to make the experience of their situation easier, but that the approaches used differed in accordance with the individual's internal and external resources. Four coping strategies exhibiting different characteristics were identified: the relatives/close friends alleviated, recycled, mastered, or excluded their feelings. Factors determining the choice of coping strategy were social background, previous experience of ICU-care and how the situation was apprehended. The theoretical model described in this article can contribute to expanding nurses' understanding of the coping strategies of relatives/close friends in critical care. PMID:12353657

  6. Delivery of enteral nutrition after the introduction of practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in pediatric critical care clinical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Emma; Mara, Jackie; Diamantidi, Krystalia; Alfheeaid, Hani A; Spenceley, Neil; Davidson, Mark; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2014-12-01

    Provision of optimal nutrition is often difficult to achieve in the critically ill child, but can improve with better nutritional support practices. This study evaluated the joint impact of the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds on enteral nutrition (EN) intake and practices in children in intensive care. Nutritional intake and EN practices were audited before (period A) and after (period B) the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds in a pediatric intensive care unit. Information was collected on a daily basis and nutritional intake was compared with predefined targets and the United Kingdom dietary reference values. There were 65 patients and 477 nutritional support days in period A and 65 patients and 410 nutritional support days in period B. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) energy requirements were achieved in a larger proportion of nutritional support days in period B (BMR achieved [% nutritional support days]; period A: 27% vs period B: 48.9%; Pnutritional intake in some patients in critical care, but can have limited benefit for children admitted for corrective heart surgery.

  7. Local government austerity policies in the Netherlands : the effectiveness of social dialogue in preserving public service employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weske, Ulrike; Leisink, Peter; Knies, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The financial and economic crisis has led to fiscal austerity measures and reform policies in the Netherlands that have had a direct impact on municipalities. Decreased municipal budgets have forced municipalities to cut public services and lower the employment conditions of municipal employees. It

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  9. A critical review of recent US market level health care strategy literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R; Banaszak-Holl, J

    2000-09-01

    In this review, we argue that it would be profitable if the neoclassical economic theories that have dominated recent US market level health care strategy research could be complemented by greater use of sociological frameworks. Sociological theory can address three central questions that neoclassical economic theories have tended to slight: (1) how decision-makers' preferences are determined; (2) who the decision-makers are; and (3) how decision-makers' plans are translated into organizational action. We suggest five sociological frameworks that would enable researchers to address these issues better relative to market level strategy in health care. The frameworks are (1) institutional theory, (2) organizational ecology, (3) social movements, (4) social networks, and (5) internal organizational change. A recent global trend toward privatization of health care provision makes US market level strategy research increasingly applicable to non-US readers. PMID:10975225

  10. Therapeutic effect of insulin in reduction of critical illness polyneuropathy and Myopathy in pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nemat BILAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Fayyazi A, Karimzadeh P, Torabian S, Damadi S, Khaje A. Comparison of Intravenous Midazolam Drip with Intermittent Intravenous Diazepam in The Treatment of Refractory Serial Seizures in Children. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 15-19.ObjectiveHyperglycemia may occur in the patients affected by any kind of critical illness.This complication makes an adverse effect on the clinical outcome of thesepatients by causing polyneuropathy and myopathy. It has been recently shownthat treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin administration significantly reducesthe prevalence of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM andon the other hand reduces the demand for long-term mechanical ventilation inthe patients admitted to the ICU for more than 1 week. The aim of this studywas to determine the therapeutic effect of insulin in reducing the incidence ofCIPNM in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU.Materials & MethodsIn this study, we recruited 30 patients admitted to the PICU of Tabriz PediatricHospital. The incidence of CIPNM following hyperglycemia was evaluated inthese patients. The patients were categorized into two groups. In the case group,blood sugar was controlled in the range of 140-180mg/dl by administration of0.05 unit per kilogram body weight of insulin as drip protocol in an hour and inthe control group, placebo was used. Consequently, the incidence of CIPNM,duration of PICU and duration of mechanical ventilation were comparedbetween the two groups.ResultsThe incidence of CIPNM and duration of PICU stay and mechanical ventilationwere significantly reduced in the patients treated with insulin compared to thecontrol group.ConclusionThis study shows that blood sugar control decreases the incidence of CIPNM.ReferencesVan den Berghe G. Insulin therapy in critical illness. Can J Diabetes. 2004;28(1:43-9.Bolton CF, Gilbert JJ, Hahn AF, Sibbald WJ.Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry

  11. [Critical review of instruments to assess pain in the non communicative brain injured persons in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Marie-José; Goulet, Céline; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to critically appraise the pain assessment tools for non communicative persons in intensive care available in the literature and to determine their relevance for those with brain injury. Nursing and medical electronic databases were searched to identify pain tools, with a description of psychometric proprieties, in English and French. Seven of the ten tools were considered relevant and systematically evaluated according to the criteria and the indicators in the following five areas: conceptualisation, target population, feasibility and clinical utility, reliability and validity. Results indicate a number of well designed pain tools, but additional work is necessary to establish their accuracy and adequacy for the brain injured non communicative person in intensive care. Recommendations are made to choose the best tool for clinical practice and for research.

  12. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 3. Monitoring and investigation of intra-abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S M

    1988-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal sepsis continue to be major problems in critically ill patients. Multiple system organ failure secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis continues to cause serious morbidity and death. The first step in management is to recognize the infection, while providing careful supportive therapy. A number of radiologic investigations, including ultrasonography and computed tomography, will help to diagnose a potential source of infection, which can be positively identified by fine-needle aspiration and culture. The septic focus must be drained either percutaneously or, if this fails, surgically. Use of specific antibiotics is imperative. Delay in diagnosis and surgery increases the death rate, so all available diagnostic modalities should be utilized, but these should not replace careful ongoing clinical assessment. PMID:3046729

  13. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments.

  14. Biochemical markers in the surgical intensive care : Identifying critically ill surgical patients with complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.C. Meyer (Zainna)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Introductie Patiënten die postoperatief op de intensive care (IC) worden opgenomen hebben een hogere kans op het ontwikkelen van complicaties. Het is belangrijk om deze complicaties vroegtijdig te kunnen identificeren bij de kritiek zieke chirurgische patiënten op de IC

  15. Electromagnetic interference from radio frequency identification inducing potentially hazardous incidents in critical care medical equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togt, R. van der; Lieshout, E.J. van; Hensbroek, R.; Beinat, E.; Binnekade, J.M.; Bakker, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Health care applications of autoidentification technologies, such as radio frequency identification (RFID), have been proposed to improve patient safety and also the tracking and tracing of medical equipment. However, electromagnetic interference (EMI) by RFID on medical devices has never b

  16. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben Munksgaard; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already...

  17. Evidence based evaluation of immuno-coagulatory interventions in critical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Cochrane systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomised trials provide guidance for clinical practice and health-care decision-making. In case of disagreements between research evidence and clinical practice, high quality systematic reviews can facilitate implementation or deimplementation o...

  18. Marland and Pastoral Care: Critical Reflections, Change and an "Ability to Swim against the Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stan

    2015-01-01

    This reflective piece was written in response to Best's article, published in Pastoral in Education in September 2014, on Michael Marland's seminal text "Pastoral Care." It uses examples from previously published work carried out by the author, to explore some of the key concepts and ideas explored within the book and their…

  19. Five Critical Skills for Mental Health Counselors in Managed Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistline, John L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Provides overview of basic knowledge and skills needed for mental health counselors to function effectively as employees or providers for managed care organizations. Skills include orientation to brief targeted psychotherapy; familiarity with mental health and substance abuse disorders; experience in working in crisis situations; an understanding…

  20. Standard instruction versus simulation: Educating registered nurses in the early recognition of patient deterioration in paediatric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Jessica; Nash, Robyn; Lewis, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and stabilising deterioration in a child with significant clinical compromise is both a challenging and necessary role of the paediatric critical care nurse. Within adult critical care research, high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been shown to positively impact learner outcomes regarding identification and management of a deteriorating patient; however, there is a paucity of evidence examining the use of HFPS in paediatric nursing education. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFPS on nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge for recognising and managing paediatric deterioration. Further, participants' perceptions of the learning experiences specific to the identification and management of a deteriorating child were also explored. Registered nurses working in a tertiary-referral paediatric critical care unit were recruited for this quasi-experimental study. Using a pre-test/post-test control-group design, participants were assigned to one of two learning experiences: HFPS or standard instruction. Following the learning experience, nurses were also invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. 30 nurses participated in the study (control n=15, experiment n=15). Participants in the HFPS intervention were most likely to demonstrate an increase in both perceived self-efficacy (p=experiment group compared to the control. HFPS also yielded higher follow-up knowledge scores (p=0.01) compared to standard instruction. Ten nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified four themes: self-awareness, hands-on learning, teamwork, and maximising learning. The results of this study suggest that HFPS can positively influence nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge test scores specific to the recognition and management of paediatric deterioration. PMID:26249644

  1. Has Austerity Succeeded in Ameliorating the Economic Climate? The Cases of Ireland, Cyprus and Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcell Zoltán Végh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Great Recession that began in 2008 hit the economy of the European Union extremely hard. The year 2009 brought decline to the majority of the member states, inducing a desperate crisis management process. The few common EU-level crisis management measures that were implemented have brought about little success due to the modest volume of the common budget and the inertia of decision making attempting to harmonize often contradicting interests. As there was no credible crisis management at the EU level, most member states introduced their own set of measures. The efficiency of these was influenced by the economic performance of primary trading and investing partners, and by the volatility of the bond markets. In terms of economic performance, member states of the EU followed various paths and experienced various levels of recession in 2009, then various levels of upswing in 2010–2011, only to be hit by a second wave of recession of various extents after 2011. Although many member states took their own measures, general tendencies in crisis management can be defined. At first, the restoration of the functioning of the markets was targeted by generating additional demand through fiscal stimulus, but was then gradually replaced by imperative fiscal consolidation and austerity measures. The effectiveness of austerity programs is questionable: while the bond markets’ volatility called for the correction of fiscal balances, tax hikes and governmental spending cuts tendentiously pushed back economic performance and postponed recovery, making economic growth possible only by increasing public debts. In this study, I present arguments in favour of the view that, in the current economic climate of the EU, prosperity could not be restored exclusively by austerity. Accordingly, I present case studies of the three member states with the largest increases in public debts: Ireland, Cyprus and Greece. My aim is to assess the efficiency of these member

  2. Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Related Factors Among Patients Discharged From Critical Care Units in Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD is a severe anxiety disorder occurred due to past adverse experiences. Several researches have demonstrated that PTSD is quite common among patients discharged from critical care unit. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of PTSD and its related factors among patients discharged from critical care units in Kashan, Iran, during 2014. Patients and Methods A descriptive prospective study was performed on 332 patients admitted to critical care units of Kashan Shahid Beheshti Hospital using a convenience sampling method. Data were collected in wards during hospitalization and one month after their discharge from hospital using questionnaires on demographic, medical information and PTSD Checklist (PCL. The PCL scores of 45 or more were considered as PTSD. Data were analyzed using chi-square, t-test, Mann-Whitney U and logistic regression. Results From a total of 332 patients, 160 cases (48.2% had PTSD and the mean total PCL score in participants was 44.24 ± 19.89. There was a significant difference between the total score of PTSD and its domains in patients with and without PTSD. the univariate analysis showed a significant association between PTSD and increasing age, increased length of hospital stay, more children, having additional comorbidities, unemployed, use of mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001, drug abuse (P = 0.003 and single patients (P = 0.028. However, there was no significant association between PTSD and gender, type of the critical care unit, level of education and admission due to trauma. However, in multivariate analysis using logistic regression, factors associated with PTSD were older age of the participants, use of mechanical ventilation having additional comorbidities, unemployed (P<0.001 and being single (P=0.04 Conclusions Prevalence of PTSD is high among patients discharged from ICUs and some medical individual factors such as elderly, unemployed, being single

  3. A critical study of quality parameters in health care establishment: developing an integrated quality model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azam, M.; Rahman, Z.; Talib, F.; Singh, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to identify and critically analyze healthcare establishment (HCE) quality parameters described in the literature. It aims to propose an integrated quality model that includes technical quality and associated supportive quality parameters to achieve optimum pat

  4. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit-II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rello, Jordi; Manuel, Oriol; Eggimann, Philippe;

    2016-01-01

    This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) or the emerge......This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU......) or the emergency department. This document is a cooperative effort between members of two European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) study groups and was coordinated by Hakan Leblebicioglu and Jordi Rello for ESGITM (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Travellers and Migrants...

  5. A laminar flow unit for the care of critically ill newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez JM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jose MR Perez,1 Sergio G Golombek,2 Carlos Fajardo,3 Augusto Sola41Stella Maris Hospital, International Neurodevelopment Neonatal Center (CINN, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2M Fareri Children’s Hospital, Westchester Medical Center, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA; 3University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; 4St Jude Hospital, Fullerton, California, CA, USAIntroduction: Medical and nursing care of newborns is predicated on the delicate control and balance of several vital parameters. Closed incubators and open radiant warmers are the most widely used devices for the care of neonates in intensive care; however, several well-known limitations of these devises have not been resolved. The use of laminar flow is widely used in many fields of medicine, and may have applications in neonatal care.Objective: To describe the neonatal laminar flow unit, a new equipment we designed for care of ill newborns.Methods: The idea, design, and development of this device was completed in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The unit is an open mobile bed designed with the objective of maintaining the advantages of the incubator and radiant warmer, while overcoming some of their inherent shortcomings; these shortcomings include noise, magnetic fields and acrylic barriers in incubators, and lack of isolation and water loss through skin in radiant warmers. The unit has a pump that aspirates environmental air which is warmed by electrical resistance and decontaminated with High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter (HEPA filters (laminar flow. The flow is directed by an air flow directioner. The unit has an embedded humidifier to increase humidity in the infant’s microenvironment and a servo control mechanism for regulation of skin temperature.Results: The laminar flow unit is open and facilitates access of care providers and family, which is not the case in incubators. It provides warming by convection at an air velocity of 0.45 m/s, much faster than an incubator (0.1 m/s. The system

  6. The Care for the Dying: A critical historical analysis of occupational therapy in hospice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Russell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an historical analysis of occupational therapy’s role in hospice care with relation to past and current hospice practices, as well as cultural forces that impact that role. Since the beginning of the movement, hospice has developed into a strong component of end-of-life care, and occupational therapy practice models and interventions are unique in addressing the occupational needs of clients during this stage of life. Despite compelling evidence of the positive impact of employing occupational therapists, there continue to be significant barriers to implementation of services. The author proposes that the concept of occupation, as experienced at the end-of-life stage, needs to be more clearly defined and occupational therapy’s role broadened in order to strengthen the profession’s presence in the hospice setting.

  7. Biochemical markers in the surgical intensive care: Identifying critically ill surgical patients with complications

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Zainna

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Introductie Patiënten die postoperatief op de intensive care (IC) worden opgenomen hebben een hogere kans op het ontwikkelen van complicaties. Het is belangrijk om deze complicaties vroegtijdig te kunnen identificeren bij de kritiek zieke chirurgische patiënten op de IC om tijdig adequate therapie te kunnen starten. Hierom bestudeerden wij de klinische voorspellende waarde van dagelijks gebruikte biomarkers C-reactief proteïne CRP), lactaat, procalcitonine (PCT) e...

  8. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: now my heart is still somewhat full

    OpenAIRE

    Chan K; Jalil B

    2016-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 48-year-old man with a history of hypertension, intravenous drug abuse, hepatitis C, and cirrhosis presented with 1 day of melena and hematemesis. While in the Emergency Department, the patient was witnessed to have approximately 700 mL of hematemesis with tachycardia and hypotension. The patient was admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit for hypotension secondary to acute blood loss. He was found to have a decreased hemoglobin...

  9. [Critically ill patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis - New aspects and intensive care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeier, Miriam; Hüsing, Anna; Schmidt, Hartmut; Kabar, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of liver cirrhosis in the German population is about 1 %. Clinically, compensated liver cirrhosis should be distinguished from decompensated cirrhosis with poor prognosis. Decompensated cirrhosis is defined by the occurrence of complications and consequences of portal hypertension (such as ascites, variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome) and progressive liver failure. Optimizing the management of these patients in the intensive care unit could essentially improve their outcome. PMID:26445254

  10. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jeffs, Lianne P.; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-v...

  11. Late onset and persistence of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in survivors of critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Khitab; John Reid; Vern Bennett; G Camelia Adams; Lloyd Balbuena

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several recent studies have reported that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent occurrence in survivors of an intensive care unit (ICU) admission.OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of PTSD symptoms at three and nine months post-ICU admission and examine possible risk factors that predispose to the development of PTSD symptoms.METHOD: Using the following scales: Davidson Trauma Scale, Impact of Event Scale and the Post-traumatic Symptom Scale, 69 ICU survivors were as...

  12. Pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza: Experience from a critical care unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series details our experience with seven patients with pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza from an intensive care unit in India. All the patients had respiratory failure requiring ventilation except one; two patients developed pneumothorax. Of the seven patients, two died (28.5% and five recovered. Four patients had co-morbid conditions and one was morbidly obese; all the five patients were discharged alive.

  13. Advanced nursing apprenticeship program: a strategy for retention of experienced critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, B

    1990-05-01

    Most hospitals are frantically planning recruitment strategies to attract new nurses for intensive care units. The direct cost associated with orientation of one of these nurses is estimated at greater than $2000, plus 6 months' to 1 year's salary per nurse. An interim strategy of using registered nurses to fill a full-time position for 1 year can cost upwards of $75,000 a year. Germane to the acclimatization of these nurses to the intensive care unit is the nurturing role of experienced nurses during the orientation and in assuring continuity of high-quality patient care. By virtue of their position, experienced nurses also model leadership behavior, and they are exposed to many day-to-day stresses that may leave them frustrated and feeling a lack of accomplishment. These factors, coupled with the scarcity of educational opportunities designed specifically for experienced nurses and a perceived absence of challenges, can lead to burnout. In this article I will describe an innovation in practice that uses the clinical nurse specialist role to stimulate and challenge experienced nurses. The program taught, supported, and nurtured unit-based change initiated by experienced nurses.

  14. War is the Enemy of Health. Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine in War-Torn Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahloul, Mohammed Z; Monla-Hassan, Jaber; Sankari, Abdulghani; Kherallah, Mazen; Atassi, Bassel; Badr, Safwan; Abbara, Aula; Sparrow, Annie

    2016-02-01

    The Syrian crisis, now in its fifth year, has created an unprecedented strain on health services and systems due to the protracted nature of the warfare, the targeting of medics and health care infrastructure, the exodus of physicians and nurses, the shortage of medical supplies and medications, and the disruption of medical education and training. Within a few short years, the life expectancy of resident Syrians has declined by 20 years. Over the first 4 years of the conflict, more than 75,000 civilians died from injuries incurred in the violence. More than twice as many civilians, including many women and children, have died prematurely of infectious and noninfectious chronic diseases for want of adequate health care. Doctors, local administrators, and nongovernmental organizations are struggling to manage the consequences of the conflict under substandard conditions, often using unorthodox methods of health care delivery in field hospitals and remotely by telehealth communication. Much-needed medical supplies are channeled through dangerous routes across the borders from Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey. Physicians in the United States and other western nations have helped Syrian physicians make the most of the situation by providing training on introducing innovations in technology and treatment. Portable ultrasound machines have been introduced and are being used extensively in the management of trauma and shock. This report, prepared by members of the Syrian American Medical Society, documents current needs for health care relief within Syria, focusing on pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine, and some of the efforts currently underway to meet those needs. PMID:26784922

  15. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS, PREDICTABILITY AND FETO MATERNAL OUTCOME IN A CRITICAL PATIENT S ADMITTED IN OBSTETRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNIT IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Care of the critically ill parturient is a unique challenge in obstetrics particularly because of its unpredictability. Hemorrhage , toxemia , anemia and septicemia are common causes of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Obstetric critical care in developing countries continues to be ra dically different from developed countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To analyze all cases of critically ill obstetric patients admitted to an obstetric intensive care unit in relation to causes for admissions, interventions required, course during their ICU st ay and fetal maternal outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A one year retrospective analysis of all obstetric admissions to the ICU at our referral hospital was conducted, observations made and results were analyzed . RESULTS AND ANALYSIS : There were 24 ICU admi ssions with mean age of 25.21±4.075 years and mean gestational age of 36.04±3.862 weeks. Postpartum admissions were significantly higher (83.33%, n=20, P <0.05 with more patients presenting with obstetric complications (91.66%, n=22, P <0.01 as compared to medical complications (8.32%, n=2. Obstetric hemorrhage (n=15, 62.5% and hemodynamic instability (n=20, 83.33% were considered to be significant risk factors for ICU admission ( P =0.000. Inotropic support was required in 22 patients (91.66% while 17 p atients (70.83% required ventilatory support. The mean duration of ventilation (30.17±21.65 h and ICU stay (39.42±33.70 h were of significantly longer duration in survivors ( P =0.01, P =0.00 respectively versus non - survivors. The observed mortality n=10, 41.67% was significantly higher since ours is a referral tertiary center and delay in reaching the tertiary center from the place of occurrence of the mishap is a usual occurrence. CONCLUSION: Obstetric hemorrhage leading to hemodynamic instability remains the leading cause of ICU admissions and maternal mortality.

  16. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN TIMES OF ECONOMIC AUSTERITY: A SPARKLE OF LIGHT FOR THE ECONOMIES IN CRISIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini SARRI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Even though Social entrepreneurship as a concept dates back to the second half of the 18th, it is still poorly defined. It has been defined via the use of terms such as social enterprise, social innovation, nonprofit ventures and social responsibility. Its boundaries to the other fields are unclear and its practice is in low level. However, social entrepreneurship is an emerging area of entrepreneurship, and literature on this field, has grown the last two decades. It attracts attention mainly to its high importance for the economies in terms of social and economic value creation. This paper studies social entrepreneurship and its role in economies of austerity, with emphasis placed on European countries and it provides a mapping of the situation. “When we will stop thinking the poor people as victims and instead recognize them as creative and future entrepreneurs the sparkle of light will be the sun”.

  17. Redistribution, recognition, power: Austerity or an alternative Kaleckian feminist macroeconomic model in the EU?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Paulì

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is twofold. The first is to highlight the regressive impacts on gender equality in Europe of the EU’s macroeconomic model and governance, despite the claims in official EU do­cuments that the intention is to close the gender gap, with reference to research into gender and gender-blind austerity policies and feminist commentary on the social content of macroeconomic policies. The second aim is to assess these processes from both a political-philosophical and an economic perspective. From a political-philosophical perspective this paper aims to update Nancy Fraser’s focus on “redistribu­tion/recognition”, in order to show how the austerity paradigm – by increasing economic disadvantages for women – prevents women’s equal participation in the public sphere and fosters political practices of “institu­tio­na­lized misrecognition”. The review of Fraser’s analytical perspective serves to highlight the com­­plici­ty between economic injustice and maldistribution (exploitation, female economic marginaliza­tion, insecurity, female unemployment and cultural injustice and misrecognition, and to focus attention on the fundamental need for gender-aware distributional policies. In a Feminist-Post-Keynesian/Kaleckian eco­no­­mic paradigm, new research emphasizes the economic relevance of gender-aware redistribution, star­ting from a range of hypotheses. At the same time, in this theoretical perspective, the inherently confron­tational nature of gender-aware distribution policies is shown. The interdisciplinary approach propo­sed in this paper provides an analytical framework for debating women’s political claims in Europe

  18. Inequality and Austerity after the Global Financial Crisis: Law, Gender and Sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Seuffert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Onati Socio-legal Series analyses legal and economic inequality, and policies of austerity after the global financial crisis (GFC at the intersections of gender and sexuality. Each of the articles included in this issue speak to one or more of these themes. Collectively, the articles place questions of gender and sexuality at the centre of an analysis of reforms motivated by ‘economic rationalisation’ and austerity measures. They highlight the political economy of policies that differentially impact women, indigenous populations and socially or economically marginalised groups. Este número especial de la Oñati Socio-legal Series analiza la desigualdad legal y económica, y las políticas de austeridad después de la crisis financiera global (CFG en las intersecciones entre género y sexualidad. Cada uno de los artículos de este número tratan sobre uno o más de estos temas. De forma colectiva, los artículos plantean cuestiones sobre género y sexualidad en el centro de un análisis de las reformas motivadas por la “racionalización económica” y las medidas de austeridad. Destacan la política economía de las políticas que impactan de forma diferente en mujeres, población indígena y grupos marginados social o económicamente. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2736309

  19. Making space for belonging: critical reflections on the implementation of personalised adult social care under the veil of meaningful inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    This paper critically reflects on the way in which recent adult social care reform has been evolving beneath the alleged policy goal of prioritising the cultivation of meaningful inclusion and 'belonging' in the community. With this goal, there has been a focus away from 'services' for persons with intellectual disabilities, to supporting natural connections within the community. This paper draws on a grounded theory study of the perspectives of those responsible for overseeing community living arrangements for persons with disabilities, drawing on interviews and focus groups with service providers and relevant government officials. It examines the socio-spatial implications of the gradual shift towards 'belonging' as a disability policy goal, as it has evolved in two discrete settings - British Columbia, Canada and Ireland. The findings identify the complexities involved in facilitating active community connection for persons with intellectual disabilities and reveal important cautionary lessons for other jurisdictions where community living policy has arguably been moving away from communal services towards self-managed supports in 'real' communities through personal budgets in an effort to remove barriers to participation. The paper thus critically reflects on the rapid pursuit for transformation in personalised adult social care in government policy, arguing that the process of fostering meaningful community inclusion will and should take time.

  20. Thorax, Trachea, and Lung Ultrasonography in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine: Assessment of an Objective Structured Training Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study objective. Focused lung ultrasound (LUS examinations are important tools in critical care medicine. There is evidence that LUS can be used for the detection of acute thoracic lesions. However, no validated training method is available. The goal of this study was to develop and assess an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE curriculum for focused thorax, trachea, and lung ultrasound in emergency and critical care medicine (THOLUUSE. Methods. 39 trainees underwent a one-day training course in a prospective educational study, including lectures in sonoanatomy and -pathology of the thorax, case presentations, and hands-on training. Trainees’ pre- and posttest performances were assessed by multiple choice questionnaires, visual perception tests by interpretation video clips, practical performance of LUS, and identification of specific ultrasound findings. Results. Trainees postcourse scores of correct MCQ answers increased from 56±4% to 82±2% (mean± SD; P<0.001; visual perception skills increased from 54±5% to 78±3% (P<0.001; practical ultrasound skills improved, and correct LUS was performed in 94%. Subgroup analysis revealed that learning success was independent from the trainees’ previous ultrasound experience. Conclusions. THOLUUSE significantly improves theoretical and practical skills for the diagnosis of acute thoracic lesions. We propose to implement THOLUUSE in emergency medicine training.

  1. Work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care providers and the risk of post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Boer; A. Lok; E. van't Verlaat; H.J. Duivenvoorden; A.B. Bakker; B.J. Smit

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed existing data on the impact of work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care professionals. Work-related critical incidents may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms or even post-traumatic stress disorder (FTSD), anxiety, and depression and may negatively

  2. 香港重症监护概况%Overview of critical care in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永强

    2005-01-01

    重症监护(critical care or intensive care)是一个新兴的医疗专科。其主要任务就是处理及护理患有严重生理机能失调或衰竭的危重患者,如:急性呼吸衰竭,感染性休克。重症监护的起源及发展可以追溯到1949~1952年。北欧发生了脊髓灰质炎的暴发流行,许多患者发生了急性呼吸衰竭。为了集中资源及有效、方便地护理患者.专家把他们都集中在同一个病房处理。因而出现了重症监护室(intensive care unit,ICU)。带动了正压呼吸机及临床监测技术的急速发展。

  3. Academic Institutions' Critical Guidelines for Health Care Workers Who Deploy to West Africa for the Ebola Response and Future Crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Hilarie; Aschkenasy, Miriam; Wildes, Ryan; Kayden, Stephanie; Bangsberg, David; Niescierenko, Michelle; Kemen, Katie; Hsiao, Kai-Hsun; VanRooyen, Michael; Burkle, Frederick M; Biddinger, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The unprecedented Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, with its first cases documented in March 2014, has claimed the lives of thousands of people, and it has devastated the health care infrastructure and workforce in affected countries. Throughout this outbreak, there has been a critical lack of health care workers (HCW), including physicians, nurses, and other essential non-clinical staff, who have been needed, in most of the affected countries, to support the medical response to EVD, to attend to the health care needs of the population overall, and to be trained effectively in infection protection and control. This lack of sufficient and qualified HCW is due in large part to three factors: 1) limited HCW staff prior to the outbreak, 2) disproportionate illness and death among HCWs caused by EVD directly, and 3) valid concerns about personal safety among international HCWs who are considering responding to the affected areas. These guidelines are meant to inform institutions who deploy professional HCWs. PMID:26271314

  4. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiung NH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Huan Hsiung,1 Yen Yang,1 Ming Shinn Lee,2 Koustuv Dalal,3 Graeme D Smith4 1Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Curriculum Design and Human Potentials Development, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Public Health Science, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 4School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. Keywords: pain, scales, BPS, CPOT, Taiwan

  5. Free living amoebae in water sources of critical units in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of free-living amoebae (FLA is reported sparsely from water taps, ventilators, air conditioners, haemodialysis units and dental irrigation systems of hospitals worldwide. Their prevalence in hospital environment especially in wards having immunocompromised patients may pose a risk to this group of susceptible population as they may cause disease themselves or may carry pathogens inside them. No study from India has performed such surveillance. Objective: To evaluate extent of FLA contamination in water sources of bone marrow transplant (BMT intensive care unit (ICU, transplant ICU, haemodialysis unit and high dependency unit in a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: A total of hundred samples including fifty each of tap water samples and swabs from mouth of taps used for drinking, bathing and hand washing purposes in these units were collected according to standard procedure. Samples were inoculated onto non-nutrient agar plates at room temperature followed by morphological confirmation. Molecular identification including polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing was performed in culture positive samples. Results: Four tap water samples and ten swab samples showed growth of trophozoites and cyst formation. Morphologically, four amoebae resembled Acanthamoeba spp. which was further confirmed by PCR and sequencing showed them to be of T3 and T4 genotypes. Conclusion: The presence of these FLA in hospital water sources emphasises the urgent need of implementing effective preventive measures. Further studies are required to estimate the true prevalence of FLA in Indian hospitals by taking larger number of samples.

  6. March 2015 critical care case of the month: it's not always sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 57-year-old man with multiple co-morbidities including diabetes mellitus presented with wet gangrene of the right foot and hypotension. He had diabetic ketoacidosis and acute kidney injury. He was admitted to the medical intensive care unit, given intravenous fluids and treated with insulin therapy, piperacillin/tazobactam and vancomycin. Initial blood cultures grew Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The podiatry service performed a right transmetatarsal amputation. Subsequently, he did well and was transferred to a medical floor for further care. Three weeks later, following resolution of the initial sepsis, he developed persistently high fevers with hemodynamic instability despite continued antibiotic therapy. He was transferred back to the MICU for presumed sepsis.Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: The past medical history was significant for diabetes, hypertension, COPD, coronary artery disease and hepatitis C. He did not smoke nor drink alcohol. Family history was non-contributory. Physical Examination: On ...

  7. September 2013 critical care case of the month: revenge of the pharaohs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulos E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness The patient was a 68 year-old man, admitted to our ICU through the emergency room (ER in July 2013 with suspected urinary tract origin sepsis. The patient was evaluated in ER by the ICU team. He was in his usual state of general good health until he visited his primary care physician for what he felt was a left inguinal hernia, and underwent a prostate examination, four days previously. The patient associated this prostate examination with the onset of fevers and chills that began the next morning. He was seen in an urgent care center where he was told his urinalysis was normal, and antibiotics were not prescribed. Over the intervening 3 days, he suffered recurrent fevers, had vomited three times, and had one diarrheal bowel movement. Earlier on the day of presentation, he had been mowing his lawn (in >100° F environment and had become …

  8. Beppe Grillo’s success is not a rejection of austerity, but a protest against the corruption and inefficiency of the Italian political system

    OpenAIRE

    Simoni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The success of Beppe Grillo’s ‘5 Stars Movement’ in Italy’s elections on the 24-25 February has been regarded by some commentators as a rejection of austerity by the Italian electorate. Marco Simoni argues that rather than rejecting austerity, Italian voters were primarily protesting against decades of economic stagnation, and a political system which is prone to corruption and clientelism. He concludes that unless mainstream politics can reorganise around a credible reform agenda, populist m...

  9. Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage amongst Healthcare Workers of the Critical Care Units in a Nigerian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fadeyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA Nosocomial Infection (NI outbreaks and prevalence among various populations are well reported in literature particularly for developed countries. NI due to MRSA is a known cause of increased hospital stay, cost, morbidity and mortality especially among the critically ill. There is paucity of information on MRSA in developing nations including the carriage by critical healthcare givers who are potential transmitters. In most hospital in developing countries like Nigeria, there is neither surveillance system or control policy for MRSA. Approach: We screened healthcare workers in the critical care units of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH, Ilorin, Nigeria for MRSA and determined vancomycin susceptibility of the isolates. Swabs of both anterior nares and web spaces of the hands were taken, transported and incubated in Tween 80 at 35°C overnight aerobically before inoculation onto Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA. Inoculated MSA were incubated aerobically at 35°C for 18-24 h. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as Gram positive cocci with positive catalase, coagulase and DNAse test. MRSA were identified by combined oxacillin and cefoxitin discs diffusion method. Sensitivity to vancomycin was by vancomycin discs diffusion and vancomycin agar screen plating. Results: Of the 198 healthcare workers screened, 104 had MRSA either in the nose, hand or both giving a carriage rate of 52.5%. Nasal carriage (38.9% was higher than hand (25.3%. Doctors (22.7% and Nurses (16.7% were the predominant carriers. MRSA isolates were resistant to commonly available antibiotics. Only 1 (1.3% of the nasal isolates was vancomycin resistant. Conclusion: MRSA carriage among healthcare workers in the critical care units of the Nigerian hospital is high with doctors and nurses being the major carriers. The MRSA isolates were multi-drug resistant which may lead to increased morbidity and mortality if

  10. Designing phase 3 sepsis trials: application of learned experiences from critical care trials in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Laterre, Pierre François; Russell, James A; Bergmann, Andreas; Gattinoni, Luciano; Gayat, Etienne; Harhay, Michael O; Hartmann, Oliver; Hein, Frauke; Kjolbye, Anne Louise; Legrand, Matthieu; Lewis, Roger J; Marshall, John C; Marx, Gernot; Radermacher, Peter; Schroedter, Mathias; Scigalla, Paul; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Struck, Joachim; Van den Berghe, Greet; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Angus, Derek C

    2016-01-01

    Substantial attention and resources have been directed to improving outcomes of patients with critical illnesses, in particular sepsis, but all recent clinical trials testing various interventions or strategies have failed to detect a robust benefit on mortality. Acute heart failure is also a critical illness, and although the underlying etiologies differ, acute heart failure and sepsis are critical care illnesses that have a high mortality in which clinical trials have been difficult to conduct and have not yielded effective treatments. Both conditions represent a syndrome that is often difficult to define with a wide variation in patient characteristics, presentation, and standard management across institutions. Referring to past experiences and lessons learned in acute heart failure may be informative and help frame research in the area of sepsis. Academic heart failure investigators and industry have worked closely with regulators for many years to transition acute heart failure trials away from relying on dyspnea assessments and all-cause mortality as the primary measures of efficacy, and recent trials have been designed to assess novel clinical composite endpoints assessing organ dysfunction and mortality while still assessing all-cause mortality as a separate measure of safety. Applying the lessons learned in acute heart failure trials to severe sepsis and septic shock trials might be useful to advance the field. Novel endpoints beyond all-cause mortality should be considered for future sepsis trials. PMID:27034779

  11. Inter-Observer Agreement Among Medical Professionals in Critical Care of Neonates and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnat Tourgeman-Bashkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-observer agreement is essential to medical staff members and has a major effect on communication. The goal of the study was to examine the way medical professionals evaluate the potential severity of Almost Adverse Events (AAEs that were observed in two intensive care units (ICUs. One hundred and fourteen AAEs were observed and recorded in both units by engineering students. Each AAE was rated independently by five senior medical staff members from each ICU, chosen by the unit manager, on a three- point severity level scale. Statistical analysis (K statistic and Cohen's Kappa yielded relatively low levels of agreement among raters in both ICUs (< 0.3, but significantly greater agreement was found among nurses than among physicians in both ICUs. Low levels of agreement are attributed to the nature of work and characteristics of each ICU. Recommendations for improving agreements including forming shared mental models are specified.

  12. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: the pleura and the answers that lie within

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson HL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 67-year-old woman with a 40-pack-year smoking history was admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure secondary to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the setting of pneumococcal bacteremia. On admission, she required endotracheal intubation and vasopressor support. She was ventilated using a low tidal volume strategy and was relatively easy to oxygenate with a PEEP of 5 and 40% FiO2. After 48 hours of clinical improvement, the patient developed sudden onset tachypnea and increased peak and plateau airway pressures. A bedside ultrasound was subsequently performed (Figures 1 and 2. What is the cause of this patient’s acute respiratory decompensation and increased airway pressures? 1. Pericardial effusion; 2. Pneumothorax; 3. Pulmonary edema; 4. Pulmonary embolism ...

  13. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: now my heart is still somewhat full

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 48-year-old man with a history of hypertension, intravenous drug abuse, hepatitis C, and cirrhosis presented with 1 day of melena and hematemesis. While in the Emergency Department, the patient was witnessed to have approximately 700 mL of hematemesis with tachycardia and hypotension. The patient was admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit for hypotension secondary to acute blood loss. He was found to have a decreased hemoglobin, elevated international normalized ratio (INR, and sinus tachycardia. A bedside echocardiogram was performed. What is the best explanation for the echocardiographic findings shown above? 1. Atrial Fibrillation ; 2.\tAtrial Myxoma; 3. Cardiac Lymphoma; 4. Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis; 5. Tumor Thrombus ...

  14. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Beigmohammadi, Mohammadtaghi; Iranpour, Afshin; Sanaie, Sarvin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2). Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:27076705

  15. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001. Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01. Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2. Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia.

  16. The WHO near miss criteria are appropriate for admission of critically ill pregnant women to intensive care units in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-qing; GE Qing-gang; WANG Jing; NIU Ji-hong; HUANG Chao; ZHAO Yang-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the severity of the pregnant women with suitable admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)is very important for obstetricians.By now there are no criteria for critically ill obstetric patients admitted to the ICU.In this article,we investigated the admission criteria of critically ill patients admitted to the ICU in order to provide a referral basis of reasonable use of the ICU.Methods A retrospective analysis of critically ill pregnant women admitted to the ICU in Perking University Third Hospital in China in the last 6 years (from January 2006 to December 2011) was performed,using acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ (APACHE-Ⅱ),Marshall and WHO near miss criteria to assess the severity of illness of patients.Results There were 101 critically ill pregnant patients admitted to the ICU.Among them,25.7% women were complicated with internal or surgical diseases,and 23.8% women were patients of postpartum hemorrhage and 23.8% women were patients of pregnancy-induced hypertension.Sixty-nine cases (68.3%) were administrated with adjunct respiration with a respirator.Sixteen cases (15.8%) required 1-2 types of vasoactive drugs.Fifty-five cases (54.5%)required a hemodynamic monitoring.Seventy-three cases (72.3%) had multiple organ dysfunctions (MODS).The average duration in ICU was (7.5±3.0) days.A total of 12.9%,23.8% and 74.3% of women were diagnosed as critically ill according to the APACHE-Ⅱ,Marshall and WHO near miss criteria,respectively.The rate was significantly different according to the three criteria (P<0.01).Conclusions The WHO near miss criteria can correctly reflect the severity of illness of pregnant women,and the WHO near miss criteria are appropriate for admission of critically ill pregnant women to ICU in China.

  17. February 2014 critical care case of teh month: a rush of blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udovcic M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 51 year old African-American woman was admitted from the emergency department with hemoptysis. She had blood tinged sputum earlier in the day followed by about ½ cup of hemoptysis which led her to seek care. PMH, SH, FH: She is known to have stage IV sarcoidosis with bronchiectasis and cavitation. A right upper lobectomy was performed in 1996 and embolization of 3 left bronchial arteries in 2011 for hemoptysis. She has a history of anaphylaxis with iodinated radiocontrast dye. However, no reaction occurred with premedication in 2011. She also has a history of asthma, but has been out of her medications for several days. Since this time she has noted increased cough. She is a nonsmoker and a Jehovah’s Witness. Her family history is noncontributory. Medications: Albuterol HFA, Montelukast, Fluticasone propionate nasal spray, Loratidine. Physical Examination: VS: 36.9°C, 106 beats/min, 135/83 ...

  18. Austerity, Cyclical Adjustment and How to use the Remaining Leeway for Expansionary Fiscal Policies Within the Current EU Fiscal Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Truger, Achim; Nagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Fiscal policy in the Euro area has been dominated by austerity measures implemented under the institutional setting of the 'reformed' stability and growth pact, and the even stricter 'fiscal compact' for some years. Since mid-2014 calls for a more expansionary fiscal policy to overcome the economic crisis have become more frequent.  The EU-Commission in this spirit has launched the Juncker-Plan to stimulate (public) investment and is using a less strict interpretation of the Stabili...

  19. A Balancing Act at Times of Austerity: Matching the Supply and Demand for Skills in the Greek Labour Market

    OpenAIRE

    Pouliakas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an evidence-based assessment of the current situation prevailing in the Greek market for skills and jobs. The synthesis of available skills intelligence for Greece, the country most severely affected by the global economic crisis of 2008, is crucial as it is currently faced with tough decisions regarding the allocation of limited resources in the face of economic austerity. The paper engages in a comparative overview of Greece's performance on flagship Europe 2020 indicato...

  20. Economic nationalism and the cultural politics of consumption under austerity: the rise of ethnocentric consumption in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Lekakis, Eleftheria J

    2015-01-01

    By nuancing the politics of consumption in the context of austerity, this article highlights the rise of economic nationalism and the reconfiguration of consumer cultures at the aftermath of the global financial crisis. As it argues, in the context of Greece, three types of consumer culture have manifested; these are evoking consumption as resilience, resistance or reinforcement. This work focuses on the latter through the phenomenon of ethnocentric consumption, which is part and parcel of ec...

  1. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  2. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Emergency medical care and dose estimation for the severely overexposed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Makoto; Ishigure, Nobuhito [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    A criticality accident occurred in JCO, a plant for nuclear fuel production in 1999 and three workers were exposed to extremely high-level radiation (neutron and {gamma}-ray). This report describes outlines of the clinical courses and the medical cares for the patients of this accident and the emergent medical system for radiation accident in Japan. One (A) of the three workers of JCO had vomiting and diarrhea within several minutes after the accident and another one (B) had also vomiting within one hour after. Based on these evidences, the exposure dose of A and B were estimated to be more than 8 and 4 GyEq, respectively. Generally, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is assigned into three phases; prodromal phase, critical or manifestation phase and recovery phase or death. In the prodromal phase, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea often develop, whereas the second phase is asymptotic. In the third phase, various syndromes including infection, hemorrhage, dehydration shock and neurotic syndromes are apt to occur. It is known that radiation exposure at 1 Gy or more might induce such acute radiation syndromes. Based on the clinical findings of Chernobyl accident, it has been thought that exposure at 0.5 Gy or more causes a lowering of lymphocyte level and a decrease in immunological activities within 48 hours. Lymphocyte count is available as an indicator for the evaluation of exposure dose in early phase, but not in later phase The three workers of JCO underwent chemical analysis of blood components, chromosomal analysis and analysis of blood {sup 24}Na immediately after the arrival at National Institute of Radiological Sciences via National Mito Hospital specified as the third and the second facility for the emergency medical care system in Japan, respectively. (M.N.)

  3. [Sleep-apnea syndrome, mechanical ventilation and critical care in Archivos de Bronconeumología (December 2009-December 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad Fernández, Araceli; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Hernández, Concepción; Sampol, Gabriel; Terán-Santos, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    The present study aims to review all the major articles on respiratory sleep disorders, mechanical ventilation, and respiratory critical care published in the last year in Archivos de bronconeumología. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 15 studies on these topics were published in Archivos de bronconeumología. Ten of these studies dealt with respiratory sleep disorders, consisting of six original articles, one special article, one review article, one letter to the editor and one supplement on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its association with sleep apneas. Five articles were published on non-invasive mechanical ventilation: one editorial, one special article, one article in a supplement and two original articles. As in previous years, there was a marked difference in the number of articles published on non-invasive mechanical ventilation and sleep-apnea syndrome, with a greater number of articles being published on the latter. Although some articles highlight the importance of the place where ventilation is commenced, no study specifically dealing with intermediate care units was published in Archivos de bronconeumología in 2010. This absence could be interpreted as a result of the low implantation of this type of unit in Spain, contrasting with the high activity undertaken in this field by pneumology services. PMID:21300219

  4. Role of clevidipine butyrate in the treatment of acute hypertension in the critical care setting: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S Awad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Awad, Michael E GoldbergDepartment of Anesthesiology, Cooper University Hospital, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden Campus, Camden, New Jersey, USAAbstract: Acutely elevated blood pressure in the critical care setting is associated with a higher risk of acute end-organ damage (eg, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and renal failure and perioperative bleeding. Urgent treatment and careful blood pressure control are crucial to prevent significant morbidity. Clevidipine butyrate (Cleviprex™ is an ultrashort-acting, third-generation intravenous calcium channel blocker. It is an arterial-selective vasodilator with no venodilatory or myocardial depressive effects. Clevidipine has an extremely short half-life of approximately 1 minute as it is rapidly metabolized by blood and tissue esterases. These metabolites are then primarily eliminated through urine and fecal pathways. The rapid onset and the short duration of action permit tighter and closer adjustment of the blood pressure than is possible with other intravenous agents.Keywords: calcium channel blocker, antihypertensive medications, end-organ damage, hypertensive crisis, hypertensive urgency

  5. Learning to plan? A critical fiction about the facilitation of professional and practice development plans in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Hocking, Paul; Burtonwood, Ann; Harry, Karan; Turner, Arthur

    2002-11-01

    A shift from continuing medical education towards professional and organisational development policies, coupled with the introduction of accountability frameworks (clinical governance), has generated interest in professional and practice development plans (PPDPs) in general practice. The problems of implementing this change in an independent contractor-based service remain unexplored and the aims of this study were to focus on the facilitator's experience of the issues that hampered or fostered development in general practice. Facilitators of PPDPs were asked to document their experience of supporting 12 practices in an all Wales feasibility study. In order to maintain organisational anonymity while reporting accurate accounts of the obstacles encountered, a method known as critical fiction was employed. This method allowed the authors to write detailed reflective accounts that were then fictionalised. The culture of general practice reflects the development of an independent contractor service that has developed into partnerships that employ some professionals (practice nurses, managers and administrative staff) and collaborate with others in variable arrangements (community nurses, health visitors, midwives and others). Developing organisation-wide systems in so-called 'primary health care teams' is a difficult exercise, given the ethos of autonomous decision-making processes and the lack of experience of 'whole systems' approaches in primary care. The potential for multiprofessional synergy and the evidence that systematic changes lead to sustained health care improvements are well established. But the implementation issues of these concepts have not been addressed. Existing educational policies are based in uniprofessional paradigms and the protected time requirements and funding streams required for PPDPs have not been clarified. PMID:12487843

  6. Therapeutic effect of insulin in reduction of critical illness polyneuropathy and Myopathy in pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nemat bilan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Hyperglycemia may occur in the patients affected by any kind of critical illness. This complication makes an adverse effect on the clinical outcome of these patients by causing polyneuropathy and myopathy. It has been recently shown that treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin administration significantly reduces the prevalence of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM and on the other hand reduces the demand for long-term mechanical ventilation in the patients admitted to the ICU for more than 1 week. The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of insulin in reducing the incidence of CIPNM in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU.Materials & Methods In this study, we recruited 30 patients admitted to the PICU of Tabriz Pediatric Hospital. The incidence of CIPNM following hyperglycemia was evaluated in these patients. The patients were categorized into two groups. In the case group, blood sugar was controlled in the range of 140-180mg/dl by administration of 0.05 unit per kilogram body weight of insulin as drip protocol in an hour and in the control group, placebo was used. Consequently, the incidence of CIPNM, duration of PICU and duration of mechanical ventilation were compared between the two groups.Results The incidence of CIPNM and duration of PICU stay and mechanical ventilation were significantly reduced in the patients treated with insulin compared to the control group.ConclusionThis study shows that blood sugar control decreases the incidence of CIPNM.

  7. Clinical and microbiological outcome in septic patients with extremely low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at initiation of critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, G; Vallecoccia, M S; Schiattarella, A; Di Gravio, V; Cutuli, S L; Bello, G; Montini, L; Pennisi, M A; Spanu, T; Zuppi, C; Quraishi, S A; Antonelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A relationship between vitamin D status and mortality in patients in intensive care units (ICU) has been documented. The present study aims to describe the clinical profile and sepsis-related outcome of critically ill septic patients with extremely low (7 ng/mL (80.7% versus 58%, p 0.02; 35.3% versus 68%; p 0.03, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed that, in the extremely low vitamin D group, the 52 patients with pneumonia showed a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (9 days (3.75-12.5 days) versus 4 days (2-9 days), p 0.04) and the 66 with septic shock needed vasopressor support for a longer period of time (7 days (4-10 days) versus 4 days (2-7.25 days), p 0.02). Our results suggest that in critical septic patients extremely low vitamin D levels on admission may be a major determinant of clinical outcome. Benefits of vitamin D replacement therapy in this population should be elucidated. PMID:26721785

  8. Anesthesia and critical-care delivery in weightlessness: A challenge for research in parabolic flight analogue space surgery studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G.; Keaney, Marilyn A.; Chun, Rosaleen; Groleau, Michelle; Tyssen, Michelle; Keyte, Jennifer; Broderick, Timothy J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    stability through an IV route (within multiple transport vehicles and differing gravitational environments). Standardization and pre-packaging of anesthesia, emergency pharmaceuticals, and consumables were found to facilitate the interchange of the veterinary anesthesia team members between flights. This operational process was extremely challenging. ConclusionsWith careful organization of caregivers, equipment and protocols, providing anesthesia and life support in weightlessness is theoretically possible. Unfortunately, human resource costs are extensive and likely overwhelming. Comprehensive algorithms for extended spaceflight must recognize these costs prior to making assumptions or attempting to provide critical care in space.

  9. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Lockey David; Fevang Espen; Thompson Julian; Lossius Hans

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-...

  10. Building capacity for quality and safety in critical care: A roundtable discussion from the second international patient safety conference in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen M Arabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion from the Second International Patient Safety Conference held in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to: (1 review the conceptual framework for building capacity in quality and safety in critical care. (2 examine examples of leading international experiences in building capacity. (3 review the experience in Saudi Arabia in this area. (4 discuss the role of building capacity in simulation for patient safety in critical care and (5 review the experience in building capacity in an ongoing improvement project for severe sepsis and septic shock.

  11. From Risk Models to Loan Contracts: Austerity as the Continuation of Calculation by Other Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Pénet

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses how financial actors sought to minimise financial uncertainties during the European sovereign debt crisis by employing simulations as legal instruments of market regulation. We first contrast two roles that simulations can play in sovereign debt markets: ‘simulation-hypotheses’, which work as bundles of constantly updated hypotheses with the goal of better predicting financial risks; and ‘simulation-fictions’, which provide fixed narratives about the present with the purpose of postponing the revision of market risks. Using ratings reports published by Moody’s on Greece and European Central Bank (ECB regulations, we show that Moody’s stuck to a simulationfiction and displayed rating inertia on Greece’s trustworthiness to prevent the destabilising effects that further downgrades would have on Greek borrowing costs. We also show that the multi-notch downgrade issued by Moody’s in June 2010 followed the ECB’s decision to remove ratings from its collateral eligibility requirements. Then, as regulators moved from ‘regulation through model’ to ‘regulation through contract’, ratings stopped functioning as simulation-fictions. Indeed, the conditions of the Greek bailout implemented in May 2010 replaced the CRAs’ models as the main simulation-fiction, which market actors employed to postpone the prospect of a Greek default. We conclude by presenting austerity measures as instruments of calculative governance rather than ideological compacts

  12. Précarité alimentaire, austérité / Food insecurity and austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherina Perianu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article vise à examiner les pratiques alimentaires quotidiennes dans le contexte des contraintes normatives exercées par la politique d’Etat dans les années quatre-vingt en Roumanie. A partir d’une démarche basée sur l’analyse micro anthropologique (observation des pratiques quotidiennes des habitants, entretiens, recueil de témoignages accrédités du point de vue scientifique sur le ravitaillement pendant la période historique en discussion, nous nous proposons d’examiner la manière dont l’accès aux aliments a structuré l’expérience sociale et nutritionnelle de l’individu, dans le cas de la société roumaine pendant sa dernière décennie communiste.This paper explores everyday food practices in the context of austerity measures, through normative constraints imposed by the Romanian government in the 1980s, as applied by State policies. Based on a micro-anthropological approach (observation of everyday food practices, focused interviews and accounts concerning the historical period above-mentioned, this work proposes to examine how food accessibility structured the social and nutritional experience of individuals, in the case of the Romanian society during the last decade of the Romanian Communist regime.

  13. Enhancing the Human Factors Engineering Role in an Austere Fiscal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jack W.

    2003-01-01

    An austere fiscal environment in the aerospace community creates pressures to reduce program costs, often minimizing or sometimes even deleting the human interface requirements from the design process. With an assumption that the flight crew can recover real time from a poorly human factored space vehicle design, the classical crew interface requirements have been either not included in the design or not properly funded, though carried as requirements. Cost cuts have also affected quality of retained human factors engineering personnel. In response to this concern, planning is ongoing to correct the acting issues. Herein are techniques for ensuring that human interface requirements are integrated into a flight design, from proposal through verification and launch activation. This includes human factors requirements refinement and consolidation across flight programs; keyword phrases in the proposals; closer ties with systems engineering and other classical disciplines; early planning for crew-interface verification; and an Agency integrated human factors verification program, under the One NASA theme. Importance is given to communication within the aerospace human factors discipline, and utilizing the strengths of all government, industry, and academic human factors organizations in an unified research and engineering approach. A list of recommendations and concerns are provided in closing.

  14. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Critically-Ill Neonates Admitted To Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Zagazig University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab A M Albanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is defined as nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients. It is considered to be most important cause of infection-related death in intensive care unit. We studied the characteristics and risk factors of VAP in critically-ill neonates.Methods: Fifty six consecutive neonates with different diagnosis admitted from January to October 2010 to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, Zagazig University Hospitals who needed mechanical ventilation were included in the study. There were 32 neonates, 18 males and 14 females with proven diagnosis of VAP, and 24 neonates, 11 males and 13 females without VAP served as control group. All studied neonates were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, routine investigations (Complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, blood culture and liver and kidney function tests, and chest X-ray daily as well as non-bronchoscopic alveolar lavage culture for VAP group only.Findings: Of 56 neonates who needed mechanical ventilation, 57.1% developed VAP. Prematurity, low birth weight and prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation were risk factors for developing VAP. Increased total leucocytic count, CRP and hypoalbuminemia were significantly presented in VAP-group. There were significant differences between VAP and non-VAP groups regarding hypothermia, mucopurulent endotracheal tube secretion, PaCO2 and PaO2. Microorganisms associated with blood stream infection in VAP diagnosed group were Klebsiella (15.6%, S. aureus (12.5%, Pseudomonas (9.4%, E. coli (6.2%, Candida (3.1%; 53.1% of obtained blood cultures were sterile. Of non-bronchoscopic alveolar lavage cultures obtained from VAP patients, 68.6% showed gram negative infection, 21.8% showed gram positive organisms and 9.3% revealed Candida infection.Conclusion: The most important risk factors of VAP are prematurity, low birth weight, prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation

  15. Prospective observational study of emergency airway management in the critical care environment of a tertiary hospital in Melbourne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyett, J F; Moser, M S; Tobin, A E

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the population of patients receiving emergency airway management outside operating theatres at our institution, a tertiary referral centre in Melbourne. A registry of all patients receiving emergency airway management in the emergency department, ICU and on the wards as part of Medical Emergency Response teams' care, was prospectively collected. There were 128 adults and one paediatric patient requiring emergency airway management recruited to the study. Data for analysis included patient demographics, pre-oxygenation and apnoeic oxygenation, staff, drugs, details of laryngoscopic attempts, adjuncts, airway manoeuvres, complications sustained and method of confirmation of endotracheal tube placement. Over a 12-month period, there were 139 intubations of 129 patients, requiring a total of 169 attempts. Respiratory failure was the most common indication for intubation. Intubation was successful on the first episode of laryngoscopy in 116 (83.5%) patients. Complications occurred in 48 patients. In the cohort of patients without respiratory failure, nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation significantly reduced the incidence of hypoxaemia (0 out of 31 [0.0%] versus 10 out of 60 [16.7%], P=0.016; absolute risk reduction 16.7%; number needed to treat: 6). Waveform capnography was used to confirm endotracheal tube placement in 133 patients and there were four episodes of oesophageal intubation, all of which were recognised immediately. In the critical care environment of our institution, emergency airway management is achieved with a first-attempt success rate that is comparable to overseas data. Nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation appears to significantly reduce the risk of hypoxaemia in patients without respiratory failure and the use of waveform capnography eliminates episodes of unrecognised oesophageal intubation. PMID:26310407

  16. Toward a Theory of Culturally Relevant Critical Teacher Care: African American Teachers' Definitions and Perceptions of Care for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mari Ann

    2010-01-01

    Growing research evidence on the ethic of care suggests that caring should be an integral part of the pedagogical methods implemented in schools. However, the colour blind "community of care" often described in the literature does not disaggregate lines of ethnicity or race and much of this existing literature concerns elementary- and…

  17. Obstetric critical care: A prospective analysis of clinical characteristics, predictability, and fetomaternal outcome in a new dedicated obstetric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1 year prospective analysis of all critically ill obstetric patients admitted to a newly developed dedicated obstetric intensive care unit (ICU was done in order to characterize causes of admissions, interventions required, course and foetal maternal outcome. Utilization of mortality probability model II (MPM II at admission for predicting maternal mortality was also assessed.During this period there were 16,756 deliveries with 79 maternal deaths (maternal mortality rate 4.7/1000 deliveries. There were 24 ICU admissions (ICU utilization ratio 0.14% with mean age of 25.21±4.075 years and mean gestational age of 36.04±3.862 weeks. Postpartum admissions were significantly higher (83.33% n=20, P<0.05 with more patients presenting with obstetric complications (91.66%, n=22, P<0.01 as compared to medical complications (8.32% n=2. Obstetric haemorrhage (n=15, 62.5% and haemodynamic instability (n=20, 83.33% were considered to be significant risk factors for ICU admission (P=0.000. Inotropic support was required in 22 patients (91.66% while 17 patients (70.83% required ventilatory support but they did not contribute to risk factors for poor outcome. The mean duration of ventilation (30.17±21.65 h and ICU stay (39.42±33.70 h were of significantly longer duration in survivors (P=0.01, P=0.00 respectively versus non-survivors. The observed mortality (n=10, 41.67% was significantly higher than MPM II predicted death rate (26.43%, P=0.002. We conclude that obstetric haemorrhage leading to haemodynamic instability remains the leading cause of ICU admission and MPM II scores at admission under predict the maternal mortality.

  18. What Is the Impact of Health Reforms on Uncompensated Care in Critical Access Hospitals? A 5-Year Forecast in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Joseph; Fry, Benjamin; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Gary; Short, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Context: The 2008 financial crisis had a far-reaching impact on nearly every sector of the economy. As unemployment increased so did the uninsured. Already operating on a slim margin and poor payer mix, many critical access hospitals are facing a tough road ahead. Purpose: We seek to examine the increasing impact of uncompensated care on the…

  19. Time to wean after tracheotomy differs among subgroups of critically ill patients: Retrospective analysis in a mixed medical/surgical intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.W.J. van der Lely; D.P. Veelo; D.A. Dongelmans; J.C. Korevaar; M.B. Vroom; M.J. Schultz

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the time to wean from mechanical ventilation and time spent off the ventilator per day after tracheotomy in critically ill patients in a 28-bed mixed medical and surgical intensive care unit (ICU) in Amsterdam, Netherlands. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of co

  20. The Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance Administer Antibiotics with Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atabak Najafi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The empiric antibiotic therapy can result in antibiotic overuse, development of bacterial resistance and increasing costs in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of procalcitonin (PCT guide treatment on antibiotic use and clinical outcomes of patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS.  A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups, cases that underwent antibiotic treatment based on serum level of PCT as PCT group (n=30 and patients who undergoing antibiotic empiric therapy as control group (n=30. Our primary endpoint was the use of antibiotic treatment. Additional endpoints were changed in clinical status and early mortality. Antibiotics use was lower in PCT group compared to control group (P=0.03. Current data showed that difference in SOFA score from the first day to the second day after admitting patients in ICU did not significantly differ (P=0.88. Patients in PCT group had a significantly shorter median ICU stay, four days versus six days (P=0.01. However, hospital stay was not statistically significant different between two groups, 20 days versus 22 days (P=0.23.  Early mortality was similar between two groups. PCT guidance administers antibiotics reduce antibiotics exposure and length of ICU stay, and we found no differences in clinical outcomes and early mortality rates between the two studied groups.