WorldWideScience

Sample records for austere critical care

  1. Austerity

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Niepelt; Harris Dellas

    2014-01-01

    The recent sovereign debt crisis has rekindled the debate on the role of austerity. By austerity, we mean consumption levels below those desired and supported by a country's repayment capacity. We shed light on the function, properties, and optimal size of austerity by developing a model that augments the standard sovereign debt model with incomplete information and credit rationing. We establish: First, some austerity is always inevitable. Second, intermediate levels of new loans produce les...

  2. Austerity

    OpenAIRE

    Harris Dellas; Dirk Niepelt

    2014-01-01

    We shed light on the function, properties and optimal size of austerity using the standard sovereign debt model augmented to include incomplete information about credit risk. Austerity is defined as the shortfall of consumption from the level desired by a country and supported by its repayment capacity. We find that austerity serves as a tool for securing a more favourable loan package; that it is associated with over-investment even when investment does not create collateral; and that low ri...

  3. EU TYPE OF AUSTERITY: BRIEF ANALYSIS AND CRITICISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONELA BALTATESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has become a common place to blame austerity policies for lengthening the economic downturn of EU economies, the figures reveal that public spending increased in most of the EU countries between 2007 and 2013. Although budget deficits from EU countries were indeed reduced in the last 4 years, the cutbacks were more the result of increasing government revenues and hiking taxes than of decreasing public expenditures. The article will feature: (1 a brief analysis of the evolution of public spending compared to government revenues in EU countries and also, (2 a concise literature review on austerity, highlighting some of the most important theoretical controversies on this topic. The main thesis defended in the article is that – although EU type of austerity, narrowly focusing on fiscal consolidation, drove indeed to unfavorable economic consequences – the criticism formulated by pro stimulus economists is rather flimsy, given the fact that public expenditures actually increased in most of the EU countries.

  4. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications ... a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an intensive care ...

  5. Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Maggie; Roberts, Celia; Callén, Blanca

    2013-07-01

    In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.

  6. Virtue and austerity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmark, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Virtue ethics is often proposed as a third way in health-care ethics, that while consequentialism and deontology focus on action guidelines, virtue focuses on character; all three aim to help agents discern morally right action although virtue seems to have least to contribute to political issues, such as austerity. I claim: (1) This is a bad way to characterize virtue ethics. The 20th century renaissance of virtue ethics was first proposed as a response to the difficulty of making sense of 'moral rightness' outside a religious context. For Aristotle the right action is that which is practically best; that means best for the agent in order to live a flourishing life. There are no moral considerations besides this. (2) Properly characterized, virtue ethics can contribute to discussion of austerity. A criticism of virtue ethics is that fixed characteristics seem a bad idea in ever-changing environments; perhaps we should be generous in prosperity, selfish in austerity. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that people indeed do change with their environment. However, I argue that virtues concern fixed values not fixed behaviour; the values underlying virtue allow for different behaviour in different circumstances: in austerity, virtues still give the agent the best chance of flourishing. Two questions arise. (a) In austere environments might not injustice help an individual flourish by, say, obtaining material goods? No, because unjust acts undermine the type of society the agent needs for flourishing. (b) What good is virtue to those lacking the other means to flourish? The notion of degrees of flourishing shows that most people would benefit somewhat from virtue. However, in extreme circumstances virtue might harm rather than benefit the agent: such circumstances are to be avoided; virtue ethics thus has a political agenda to enable flourishing. This requires justice, a fortiori when in austerity.

  7. Health Care Austerity Measures in Times of Crisis: The Perspectives of Primary Health Care Physicians in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-Garcia, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The current financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system, including reduced public spending, copayments, salary reductions, and reduced services for undocumented migrants. However, the impacts have not been well-documented. We present findings from a qualitative study that explores the perceptions of primary health care physicians in Madrid, Spain. This article discusses the effects of austerity measures implemented in the public health care system and their potential impacts on access and utilization of primary health care services. This is the first study, to our knowledge, exploring the health care experiences during the financial crisis of general practitioners in Madrid, Spain. The majority of participating physicians disapproved of austerity measures implemented in Spain. The findings of this study suggest that undocumented migrants should regain access to health care services; copayments should be minimized and removed for patients with low incomes; and health care professionals should receive additional help to avoid burnout. Failure to implement these measures could result in the quality of health care further deteriorating and could potentially have long-term negative consequences on population health.

  8. MEDEVAC: critical care transport from the battlefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R A

    2010-01-01

    In current military operations, the survival rates of critically injured casualties are unprecedented. An often hidden aspect of casualty care is safe transport from the point of injury to a field hospital and subsequently on to higher levels of care. This en route critical care, which is provided by flight medics under the most austere and rigorous conditions, is a crucial link in the care continuum. This article introduces the role and capabilities of US Army MEDEVAC and reflects the author's recent experience in Afghanistan as a flight medic. This article provides an assessment of the operational issues, medical capabilities, and transport experiences to provide a real-world view of critical care transport from the battlefield. The MEDEVAC helicopter environment is one of the most difficult, if not the most demanding, critical care environments. This overview brings to light a small but important piece of the care continuum.

  9. Effects of the financial crisis and Troika austerity measures on health and health care access in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Karanikolos, Marina; Hernandez-Plaza, Sonia; de Freitas, Cláudia; Bernardo, Luís; Padilla, Beatriz; Sá Machado, Rita; Diaz-Ordaz, Karla; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Although Portugal has been deeply affected by the global financial crisis, the impact of the recession and subsequent austerity on health and to health care has attracted relatively little attention. We used several sources of data including the European Union Statistics for Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) which tracks unmet medical need during the recession and before and after the Troika's austerity package. Our results show that the odds of respondents reporting having an unmet medical need more than doubled between 2010 and 2012 (OR=2.41, 95% CI 2.01-2.89), with the greatest impact on those in employment, followed by the unemployed, retired, and other economically inactive groups. The reasons for not seeking care involved a combination of factors, with a 68% higher odds of citing financial barriers (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.32-2.12), more than twice the odds of citing waiting times and inability to take time off work or family responsibilities (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.20-3.98), and a large increase of reporting delaying care in the hope that the problem would resolve on its own (OR=13.98, 95% CI 6.51-30.02). Individual-level studies from Portugal also suggest that co-payments at primary and hospital level are having a negative effect on the most vulnerable living in disadvantaged areas, and that health care professionals have concerns about the impact of recession and subsequent austerity measures on the quality of care provided. The Portuguese government no longer needs external assistance, but these findings suggest that measures are now needed to mitigate the damage incurred by the crisis and austerity.

  10. Financial crisis and austerity measures in Greece: their impact on health promotion policies and public health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifanti, Amalia A; Argyriou, Andreas A; Kalofonou, Foteini H; Kalofonos, Haralabos P

    2013-11-01

    This review study explores the available data relating to the impact of financial crisis and subsequently applied austerity measures on the health care, social services and health promotion policies in Greece. It is evident that Greece is affected more than any other European country by the financial crisis. Unemployment, job insecurity, income reduction, poverty and increase of mental disorders are among the most serious consequences of crisis in the socioeconomic life. The health system is particularly affected by the severe austerity measures. The drastic curtailing of government spending has significantly affected the structure and functioning of public hospitals that cope with understaffing, deficits, drug shortage and basic medical supplies. Moreover, health promotion policies are constrained, inhibiting thus the relevant initiatives toward disease prevention and health promotion education practices. Overall, the current economic situation in Greece and its impact on real life and health care is quite concerning. Policy makers should not disregard the implications that austerity and fiscal policies have on the health sector. Greater attention is needed in order to ensure that individuals would continue getting public health care and having access to preventive and social support services. To face the economic hardship, policy makers are expected to implement human-centered approaches, safeguarding the human dignity and the moral values.

  11. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  12. The effects of the financial crisis and austerity measures on the Spanish health care system: a qualitative analysis of health professionals' perceptions in the region of Valencia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Liceras, Francisco; McKee, Martin; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The recent financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system. However, the impacts are not yet well documented. We describe the findings from a qualitative study that explored health care professionals' perception of the effects of austerity measures in the Spanish Autonomous Community of Valencia. A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals, recorded and fully transcribed. We coded all interviews using an inductive approach, drawing on techniques used in the constant comparative method. Health professionals reported increases in mental health conditions and malnutrition linked to a loss of income from employment and cuts to social support services. Health care professionals perceived that the quality of health care had become worse and health outcomes had deteriorated as a result of austerity measures. Interviewees also suggested that increased copayments meant that a growing number of patients could not afford necessary medication. While a few supported reforms and policies, such as the increase in copayments for pharmaceuticals, most opposed the privatization of health care facilities, and the newly introduced Royal Decree-law 16/2012, particularly the exclusion of non-residents from the health care system. The prevailing perception is that austerity measures are having negative effects on the quality of the health care system and population health. In light of this evidence there is an urgent need to evaluate the austerity measures recently introduced and to consider alternatives such as the derogation of the Royal Decree-law 16/2012.

  13. Health, Austerity and Affluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Blake

    2012-01-01

    On September 28, 2012, the postgraduate students of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto organized a conference on the theme of "Health, Austerity and Affluence." It brought together academics, health-care professionals and public policy makers in a forum to discuss effective health care delivery at a time…

  14. Critical Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients and Families > About Critical Care > Team Tweet Team Page Content ​The critical care team is a group of specially trained caregivers who ... help very ill patients get better. The care team often teach the patient and family strategies that ...

  15. Capitalism, the state and health care in the age of austerity: a Marxist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to provide satisfactory nursing care is being increasingly compromised by current trajectories of healthcare funding and governance. The purpose of this paper is to examine how well Marxist theories of the state and its relationship with capital can explain these trajectories in this period of ever-increasing austerity. Following a brief history of the current crisis, it examines empirically the effects of the crisis, and of the current trajectory of capitalism in general, upon the funding and organization of the UK and US healthcare systems. The deleterious effect of growing income inequalities to the health of the population is also addressed. Marx's writings on the state and its relation to the capitalist class were fragmentary and historically and geographically specific. From them, we can extract three theoretical variants: the instrumentalist theory of the state, where the state has no autonomy from capital; the abdication theory, whereby capital abstains from direct political power and relies on the state to serve its interests; and the class-balance theory, whereby the struggle between two opposed classes allows the state to assert itself. Discussion of modern Marxist interpretations includes Poulantzas's abdication theory and Miliband's instrumentalist theory. It is concluded that, despite the pluralism of electoral democracies, the bourgeoisie do have an overweening influence upon the state. The bourgeoisie's ownership of the means of production provides the foundation for its influence because the state is obliged to rely on it to manage the supply of goods and services and the creation of wealth. That power is further reinforced by the infiltration of the bourgeoisie into the organs of state. The level of influence has accelerated rapidly over recent decades. One of the consequences of this has been that healthcare systems have become rich pickings for the evermore confident bourgeoisie.

  16. Society of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Critical Care Medicine Podcasts Hosts iCritical Care App Social Media Critical Care Statistics eCommunity Media Relations SmartBrief SCCM App Education Center Annual Congress Program Abstracts Registration and Hotel Exhibits-Sponsorship Sightseeing Activities Past and Future Critical ...

  17. Sepsis in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joan E

    2007-03-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome produced by the accelerated activity of the inflammatory immune response, the clotting cascade, and endothelial damage. It is a systematic process that can progress easily into septic shock and MODS. The chemical mediators or cytokines produce a complex self-perpetuating process that impacts all body systems. It is critical for the nurse first to identify patients at risk for developing sepsis and to assess patients who have SIRS and sepsis continually for signs and symptoms of organ involvement and organ dysfunction. Once sepsis has been diagnosed, evidence-based practice indicates initiation of fluid resuscitation. Vasopressor therapy, positive inotropic support, and appropriate antibiotic therapy should be started within the first hour. Within a 6-hour timeframe the goal is stabilization of the CVP, MAP, and UOP to prevent further organ damage. The challenge for nurses caring for septic patients is to support the treatment goals, to prevent added complications including stress ulcers, DVTs, aspiration pneumonia, and the progression to MODS, and to address the patient's and the family's psychosocial needs. As complex as the pathophysiology of sepsis is, the nursing care is equally complex but also rewarding. Patients who previously might have died now recover as vigilant nursing care combines forces with new drug therapies and evidence-based practice guidelines.

  18. Human Security Workers Deployed in Austere Environments: A Brief Guide to Self-Care, Sustainment, and Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Ditzler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s, the human security movement has sought to expand the concept of security beyond the traditional military defense of national borders to focus on the intra-state security needs of populations at the individual level. Specific initiatives frequently address problems of population health, ethnic conflict, religious extremism, human rights, environmental or natural disasters, and other critical issues. For expatriate human security workers in the field, the environment may present meaningful challenges to their wellbeing and productivity. This can be especially so for those who have relatively more experience in academic, business, or administrative settings, and less in the field. The authors' goal is to illuminate practices that have demonstrated their efficacy in enhancing wellness, sustainment, and productivity for human security and other humanitarian and development workers deployed to austere environments. The content represents a synoptic consensus of best general practices and guidance from a range of resources comprising United Nations agencies and activities, national and international non-governmental organizations (NGO's, private volunteer organ­izations (PVO's, national military services, and international business concerns.

  19. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well t...

  20. James Peacock, Understanding Paul Auster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysavgi Papayianni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Auster’s impressive gamut of work continues to incite fascination and controversy. Indeed, his compelling storytelling style taken together with his mixing of crime fiction and absurdism has made his readers and critics vacillate between praise and condemnation. James Peacock’s Understanding Paul Auster, sheds new light to otherwise obscure aspects of Auster’s novels, films, and other works undermining in this way the negative criticism of the past and thus creating a new appreciation fo...

  1. Clinical informatics in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martich, G Daniel; Waldmann, Carl S; Imhoff, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Health care information systems have the potential to enable better care of patients in much the same manner as the widespread use of the automobile and telephone did in the early 20th century. The car and phone were rapidly accepted and embraced throughout the world when these breakthroughs occurred. However, the automation of health care with use of computerized information systems has not been as widely accepted and implemented as computer technology use in all other sectors of the global economy. In this article, the authors examine the need, risks, and rewards of clinical informatics in health care as well as its specific relationship to critical care medicine.

  2. Controversies in neurosciences critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiffany R; Naval, Neeraj S; Carhuapoma, J Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    Neurocritical care is an evolving subspecialty with many controversial topics. The focus of this review is (1) transfusion thresholds in patients with acute intracranial bleeding, including packed red blood cell transfusion, platelet transfusion, and reversal of coagulopathy; (2) indications for seizure prophylaxis and choice of antiepileptic agent; and (3) the role of specialized neurocritical care units and specialists in the care of critically ill neurology and neurosurgery patients.

  3. Critical Care of Pet Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey Rowe

    2016-05-01

    Successful care of the critical pet bird patient is dependent on preparation and planning and begins with the veterinarian and hospital staff. An understanding of avian physiology and pathophysiology is key. Physical preparation of the hospital or clinic includes proper equipment and understanding of the procedures necessary to provide therapeutic and supportive care to the avian patient. An overview of patient intake and assessment, intensive care environment, and fluid therapy is included.

  4. Critical care cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, S L; Abbott, J A

    1998-11-01

    Emergency management of the patient with cardiac disease is an important part of veterinary practice. Although the causes of cardiac disease may be diverse, the understanding of basic pathophysiology will enable the clinician to formulate a rational diagnostic and therapeutic plan. The veterinary clinician must be able to triage the emergency patient, assess the clinical condition, and provide appropriate therapy. Close monitoring of the critically ill patient is crucial to patient survival and will help tailor therapy.

  5. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  6. Critical issues in burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James H

    2008-01-01

    Burn care, especially for serious burn injuries, represents a considerable challenge for the healthcare system. The American Burn Association has established a number of strategies for the management of burn patients and dedicates its efforts and resources to promoting and supporting burn-related research, education, care, rehabilitation, and prevention, often in collaboration with other organizations. The American Burn Association has recommended that patients with serious burns be referred to a designated burn center, ie, a hospital outfitted with specialized personnel and equipment dedicated to burn care. Burn centers have been operational for over 50 years, but the complexity and costs of providing specialized burn care have given rise to a number of critical administrative and political issues. These include logistical limitations imposed by the uneven national distribution of burn centers and a potential shortage of burn beds, both during everyday conditions and in the event of a mass disaster. Burn surgeon shortages have also been identified, stemming, in part, from a lack of specialized burn care training opportunities. There is currently a lack of quality outcome data to support evidence-based recommendations for burn care, and burn care centers are compromised by problems obtaining reimbursement for the care of uninsured and publicly insured out-of-state burn patients. Initiatives are underway to maintain efficient burn care facilities that are fully funded, easily accessible, and most importantly, provide optimal, evidence-based care on a daily basis, and are well-equipped to handle a surge of patients during a disaster situation.

  7. Glucose control in critical care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control among critically-ill patients has beena topic of considerable attention for the past 15 years.An initial focus on the potentially deleterious effects ofhyperglycemia led to a series of investigations regardingintensive insulin therapy strategies that targeted tightglycemic control. As knowledge accumulated, the pursuitof tight glycemic control among critically-ill patients cameto be seen as counterproductive, and moderate glycemiccontrol came to dominate as the standard practice inintensive care units. In recent years, there has beenincreased focus on the importance of hypoglycemicepisodes, glycemic variability, and premorbid diabeticstatus as factors that contribute to outcomes amongcritically-ill patients. This review provides a survey ofkey studies on glucose control in critical care, and aimsto deliver perspective regarding glycemic managementamong critically-ill patients.

  8. Austerity for Whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen McBride

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the recent multi-billion dollar bailouts offered to leading sectors of capital, fiscal austerity is poised to make a comeback worldwide. Labour will be forced to pay for the public debt accumulated in the aftermath of the recent global financial and economic crisis. Notwithstanding change and evolution in the neoliberal model over time, this return to austerity is consistent with overall policy in the neoliberal period which can be considered an era of permanent restraint in most areas of social spending. This article examines a variety of trends that have emerged over the past thirty years of neoliberal rule: the various facets of neoliberal policy and their temporal dimensions; as well as the results of market-reliance and spending reforms: growing affluence for a minority of Canadians while the majority lose ground and inequalities are further entrenched. Asking 'austerity for whom' directs attention at the interconnections between affluence and austerity that exist in Canada.

  9. Health inequalities after austerity in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Kentikelenis, Alexander

    2016-05-31

    Since the beginning of economic crisis, Greece has been experiencing unprecedented levels of unemployment and profound cuts to public budgets. Health and welfare sectors were subject to severe austerity measures, which have endangered provision of as well as access to services, potentially widening health inequality gap. European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions data show that the proportion of individuals on low incomes reporting unmet medical need due to cost doubled from 7 % in 2008 to 13.9 % in 2013, while the relative gap in access to care between the richest and poorest population groups increased almost ten-fold. In addition, austerity cuts have affected other vulnerable groups, such as undocumented migrants and injecting drug users. Steps have been taken in attempt to mitigate the impact of the austerity, however addressing the growing health inequality gap will require persistent effort of the country's leadership for years to come.

  10. Making Sense of Austerity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Riisbjerg Thomsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    elements are part of a sensemaking process where people are trying to understand their personal situation, changes to their households, and the national economy. We apply this logic to a study of online comments’ sections for 240 newspaper articles on austerity in Denmark and the United Kingdom. Characters...... such as ‘scroungers’ and ‘corporate criminals’ are identified, as are scenes such as the decline of the welfare state and the rise of technocracy. We link the storysets, story-lines, and plots together to understand how Brits and Danes are making sense of austerity. Their explanations and frustrations improve our...

  11. Open access in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Tabitha; Adair, Brigette

    2014-12-01

    Open access has become an important topic in critical care over the last 3 years. In the past, critical care had restricted access and set visitation guidelines to protect patients. This article provides a review of the literature related to open access in the critical care environment, including the impact on patients, families, and health care providers. The ultimate goal is to provide care centered on patients and families and to create a healing environment to ensure safe passage of patients through their hospital stays. This outcome could lead to increased patient/family satisfaction.

  12. Opportunities for pharmaceutical care with critical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K E

    1995-01-01

    Critical pathways are multidisciplinary tools designed to improve patient care and efficiency. Almost every path requires some type of pharmacotherapeutic intervention, from selection of surgical prophylaxis to management of anticoagulation. Pharmacists should become involved with the critical pathway process because it offers an excellent opportunity to incorporate pharmaceutical care and to meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization compliance criteria.

  13. Mentoring: nurturing the critical care nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, R M

    1990-12-01

    Mentoring is an active process that is currently receiving widespread attention in education, in the corporate world, and increasingly in health care. Job satisfaction of the critical care nurse may be related to the fulfillment of personal needs and goals. The attainment of these needs and goals ultimately will lead to increased job productivity, which in turn will promote cost-effectiveness, an outcome cherished by management. Therefore, recognizing the worth of job satisfaction to the institution and the possibility that mentoring may have an effect on it among the professional staff may be a key to the future of improved health care and cost reduction in an increasingly specialized and technologic health care environment. Certainly, the nursing shortage is no longer news to the lay public or those of us engaged in the practice of nursing. In critical care that shortage is acutely apparent. Attrition of qualified critical care nurses is increasing and various solutions to the shortage have been proposed, some being met with more enthusiasm than others. A more basic solution might be to answer the question, "How can we maintain a high quality of patient care while promoting job satisfaction and instilling a sense of self-worth within the critical care nurse?" Critical care nurses need to play a pivotal role in nurturing and developing other critical care nurses as a means to retain those individuals. How can they do that effectively? Mentoring is one answer.

  14. May austerity be counterproductive?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact that fiscal policy has on economic activity and sovereign debt during economic downturns in the euro area, mainly Germany and Spain. Our theoretical and empirical framework shows that the macroeconomic returns of austerity crucially depend on the values of fiscal multipliers. We find that, for the Spanish economy, even if policy makers just focus on the public debt ratio, ignoring output and unemployment, policies of deficit reduction may be self-defeating, ...

  15. May Austerity be Counterproductive?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact that fiscal policy has on economic activity and sovereign debt during economic downturns in the euro area, mainly Germany and Spain. Our theoretical and empirical framework shows that the feasibility of austerity measures depends crucially on the values of the fiscal multipliers. We find that, for the Spanish economy, even if policy makers just focus on the public debt ratio, ignoring output and unemployment, policies of deficit reduction are self-defeating...

  16. Gender Parity in Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sangeeta; Burns, Karen E A; Machado, Flavia R; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E; Cook, Deborah J; Calfee, Carolyn S; Ware, Lorraine B; Burnham, Ellen L; Kissoon, Niranjan; Marshall, John C; Mancebo, Jordi; Finfer, Simon; Hartog, Christiane; Reinhart, Konrad; Maitland, Kathryn; Stapleton, Renee D; Kwizera, Arthur; Amin, Pravin; Abroug, Fekri; Smith, Orla; Laake, Jon H; Shrestha, Gentle S; Herridge, Margaret S

    2017-02-27

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. These documents inform and shape patient care around the world. In this perspective we discuss the importance of diversity on guideline panels, the disproportionately low representation of women on critical care guideline panels, and existing initiatives to increase the representation of women in corporations, universities and government. We propose five strategies to ensure gender parity within critical care medicine.

  17. Austerity: a failed experiment on the people of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Karanikolos, Marina; Belcher, Paul; Stuckler, David

    2012-08-01

    Many governments in Europe, either of their own volition or at the behest of the international financial institutions, have adopted stringent austerity policies in response to the financial crisis. By contrast, the USA launched a financial stimulus. The results of these experiments are now clear: the American economy is growing and those European countries adopting austerity, including the UK, Ireland, Greece, Portugal and Spain, are stagnating and struggling to repay rising debts. An initial recovery in the UK was halted once austerity measures hit. However, austerity has been not only an economic failure, but also a health failure, with increasing numbers of suicides and, where cuts in health budgets are being imposed, increasing numbers of people being unable to access care. Yet their stories remain largely untold. Here, we argue that there is an alternative to austerity, but that ideology is triumphing over evidence. Our paper was written to contribute to discussions among health policy leaders in Europe that will take place at the 15th European Health Forum at Gastein in October 2012, as its theme 'Crisis and Opportunity - Health in an Age of Austerity'.

  18. [Severe infection in critical emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Takatani, Yudai; Higashi, Tomoko; Inaba, Masato; Ejima, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    In the emergency and critical care medicine, infection is easy to merge to various basic conditions and diseases. In the social structure aging in critical care, the immune weakness was revealed as the result of severe infection and septic shock in the reduced function of neutrophils and lymphocytes. In the life-saving emergency care, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic renal failure and lever dysfunction are often observed, and the underlying diseases have the foundation of biological invasion after a first inflammatory attack of surgery, trauma, burn, and systemic injury. It will be placed into a susceptible situation such as artificial respiratory management. In this review, we discussed severe infection in emergency and critical care. It is necessary to pay attention to the drug resistance bacterias in own critical care setting by trends.

  19. Financial crisis, austerity, and health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolos, Marina; Mladovsky, Philipa; Cylus, Jonathan; Thomson, Sarah; Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Mackenbach, Johan P; McKee, Martin

    2013-04-13

    The financial crisis in Europe has posed major threats and opportunities to health. We trace the origins of the economic crisis in Europe and the responses of governments, examine the effect on health systems, and review the effects of previous economic downturns on health to predict the likely consequences for the present. We then compare our predictions with available evidence for the effects of the crisis on health. Whereas immediate rises in suicides and falls in road traffic deaths were anticipated, other consequences, such as HIV outbreaks, were not, and are better understood as products of state retrenchment. Greece, Spain, and Portugal adopted strict fiscal austerity; their economies continue to recede and strain on their health-care systems is growing. Suicides and outbreaks of infectious diseases are becoming more common in these countries, and budget cuts have restricted access to health care. By contrast, Iceland rejected austerity through a popular vote, and the financial crisis seems to have had few or no discernible effects on health. Although there are many potentially confounding differences between countries, our analysis suggests that, although recessions pose risks to health, the interaction of fiscal austerity with economic shocks and weak social protection is what ultimately seems to escalate health and social crises in Europe. Policy decisions about how to respond to economic crises have pronounced and unintended effects on public health, yet public health voices have remained largely silent during the economic crisis.

  20. Critical care nursing: Embedded complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinier, Ruth; Liske, Lori; Nenadovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Variability in parameters such as heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure defines healthy physiology and the ability of the person to adequately respond to stressors. Critically ill patients have lost this variability and require highly specialized nursing care to support life and monitor changes in condition. The critical care environment is a dynamic system through which information flows. The critical care unit is typically designed as a tree structure with generally one attending physician and multiple nurses and allied health care professionals. Information flow through the system allows for identification of deteriorating patient status and timely interventionfor rescue from further deleterious effects. Nurses provide the majority of direct patient care in the critical care setting in 2:1, 1:1 or 1:2 nurse-to-patient ratios. The bedside nurse-critically ill patient relationship represents the primary, real-time feedback loop of information exchange, monitoring and treatment. Variables that enhance information flow through this loop and support timely nursing intervention can improve patient outcomes, while barriers can lead to errors and adverse events. Examining patient information flow in the critical care environment from a dynamic systems perspective provides insights into how nurses deliver effective patient care and prevent adverse events.

  1. Surviving sepsis in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The management of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care environment is a complex task requiring the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign provides systematic guidelines for the recognition, early intervention, and supportive management of sepsis. Critical care nurses are instrumental in ensuring that these guidelines and other sources of evidence-based practice are used for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. This article discusses the pathophysiologic processes in severe sepsis and septic shock and discusses the appropriate interventions as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Recommended early treatments are reviewed along with interventions related to hemodynamics, perfusion, and supportive care in the critical care environment.

  2. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Certification APRN Resources Education State-of-the-art educational programs provide evidence- based knowledge, directly applicable to practice ... Policy Disclaimer © American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Learn ...

  3. Critical Care Glucose Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, S N; Jones, M; Hermayer, K L; Zhu, Y

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within an acceptable range is a goal for patients with diabetes mellitus. Point-of-care glucose meters initially designed for home self-monitoring in patients with diabetes have been widely used in the hospital settings because of ease of use and quick reporting of blood glucose information. They are not only utilized for the general inpatient population but also for critically ill patients. Many factors affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing, particularly in critical care settings. Inaccurate blood glucose information can result in unsafe insulin delivery which causes poor glucose control and can be fatal. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the limitations of point-of-care glucose testing. This chapter will first introduce glucose regulation in diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia/hypoglycemia in the intensive care unit, importance of glucose control in critical care patients, and pathophysiological variables of critically ill patients that affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing. Then, we will discuss currently available point-of-care glucose meters and preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical sources of variation and error in point-of-care glucose testing.

  4. Critical paths: maximizing patient care coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, P L

    1995-01-01

    1. With today's emphasis on horizontal and vertical integration of patient care services and the new initiatives prompted by these challenges, OR nurses are considering new methods for managing the perioperative period. One such method is the critical path. 2. A critical path defines an optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff members for a particular diagnosis or procedure, designed to better use resources, maximize quality of care, and minimize delays. 3. Hospitals implementing path-based patient care have reported cost reductions and improved team-work. Critical paths have been shown to reduce patient care costs by improving hospital efficiency, not merely by reducing physician practice variations.

  5. A poesia de Paul Auster

    OpenAIRE

    Egle Pereira da Silva

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines Paul Austers extremely neglected early work: his poetry. Five books were published: Unearth (1974), Wall writing (1976), Effigies (1977), Fragments from cold (1977) and Facing the music (1980), available only at antiquarians and restrective universities libraries in the United States, as well as at the New York Public Library. Studies around Austers poetic oeuvre are restricted to papers, reviews, translators introduction, and a thesis that focus on his poetry to produce ...

  6. A leadership programme for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Linda

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the genesis, design and implementation of a leadership programme for critical care. This was an initiative funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Nursing Leadership Project and had at the core of its design flexibility to meet the needs of the individual hospitals, which took part in it. Participation was from the multi-disciplinary critical care team. Six NHS hospitals took part in the programme which was of 20 days duration and took place on hospital sites. The programme used the leadership model of as its template and had a number of distinct components; a baseline assessment, personal development, principles of leadership and critical case reviews. The programme was underpinned by three themes; working effectively in multi-professional teams to provide patient focussed care, managing change through effective leadership and developing the virtual critical care service. Each group set objectives pertinent to their own organisation's needs. The programme was evaluated by a self-reporting questionnaire; group feedback and feedback from stakeholders. Programme evaluation was positive from all the hospitals but it was clear that the impact of the programme varied considerably between the groups who took part. It was noted that there was some correlation between the success of the programme and organisational 'buy in' as well as the organisational culture within which the participants operated. A key feature of the programme success was the critical case reviews, which were considered to be a powerful learning tool and medium for group learning and change management.

  7. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    2000-01-01

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse outco

  8. Reimbursement for critical care services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Jayaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are significant variations in critical care practices, costs, and reimbursements in various countries. Of note, there is a paucity of reliable information on remuneration and reimbursement models for intensivists in India. This review article aims to analyze the existing reimbursement models in United States and United Kingdom and propose a frame-work model that may be applicable in India.

  9. A Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals. A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Carol Yuan; John Oropello; Anthony Manasia; Roopa Kohli-Seth; Ernest Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Im...

  11. Year in review 2010: Critical Care - infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagani, Leonardo; Afshari, Arash; Harbarth, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Infections remain among the most important concerns in critically ill patients. Early and reliable diagnosis of infection still poses difficulties in this setting but also represents a crucial step toward appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Increasing antimicrobial resistance challenges...... established approaches to the optimal management of infections in the intensive care unit. Rapid infection diagnosis, antibiotic dosing and optimization through pharmacologic indices, progress in the implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs, and management of fungal...

  12. Critical care in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The volume and duration of stay of the critically ill in the emergency department (ED) is increasing and is affected by factors including case-mix, overcrowding, lack of available and staffed intensive care beds and an ageing population. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical activity associated with these high-acuity patients and to quantify resource utilization by this patient group. METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of ED notes from all patients referred directly to the intensive care team over a 6-month period from April to September 2004. We applied a workload measurement tool, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS)-28, which has been validated as a surrogate marker of nursing resource input in the intensive care setting. A nurse is considered capable of delivering nursing activities equal to 46 TISS-28 points in each 8-h shift. RESULTS: The median score from our 69 patients was 19 points per patient. Applying TISS-28 methodology, we estimated that 3 h 13 min nursing time would be spent on a single critically ill ED patient, with a TISS score of 19. This is an indicator of the high levels of personnel resources required for these patients in the ED. ED-validated models to quantify nursing and medical staff resources used across the spectrum of ED care is needed, so that staffing resources can be planned and allocated to match service demands.

  13. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in neurological critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH is a clinical disorder mainly caused by traumatic brain injury, stroke, encephalitis and other types of brain injury. The clinical features are episodes of hypertension, tachycardia, tachypnea, fever and dystonic postures. In this study, we described clinical profile and outcome of six patients of PSH admitted in neurocritical care unit. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study conducted at neurology critical care unit of a tertiary care center. All patients admitted at neurology critical unit during 6-month period from August 2013 to January 2014 were screened for the occurrence of PSH. The clinical details and outcome was documented. Results: PSH was observed in 6 patients. Male to female ratio was 5:1. Mean age ± SD was 36.67 ± 15.19 years. The leading causes were traumatic brain injury (two patients, stroke (two patients and Japanese encephalitis (JE (one patient and tuberculous meningitis (one patient. Conclusion: PSH is an unusual complication in neurocritical care. It prolonged the hospitalization and hampers recovery. The other life-threatening conditions that mimic PSH should be excluded. The association with JE and tuberculous meningitis was not previously described in literature.

  14. Critical thinking in health care supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, L

    1992-06-01

    Henry Ford is reputed to have said that thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably why so few people engage in it. Perhaps many people have felt this way sometimes, especially when they viewed the foibles of the human race displayed prominently on the evening television news. Some people do stupid things; some people seem to be mindless in what they do. This applies also to some in managerial and supervisory positions in health care organizations. The percentage of these thoughtless managers and supervisors is probably comparable to the percentage of the thoughtless people in the general population. Fortunately every normal functioning human being is capable of becoming a more critical thinker. Of course, no amount of effort is adequate to the development of critical thinking when a person lacks fundamental good sense. On the other hand, no amount of genius suffices when someone does not put forth adequate effort to become a more critical thinker.

  15. Critical Care In Korea: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae-Man; Kwak, Sang-Hyun; Suh, Gee Young; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-11-01

    Critical (or intensive) care medicine (CCM) is a branch of medicine concerned with the care of patients with potentially reversible life-threatening conditions. Numerous studies have demonstrated that adequate staffing is of crucial importance for patient outcome. Adequate staffing also showed favorable cost-effectiveness in terms of ICU stay, decreased use of resources, and lower re-admission rates. The current status of CCM of our country is not comparable to that of advanced countries. The global pandemic episodes in the past decade showed that our society is not well prepared for severe illnesses or mass casualty. To improve CCM in Korea, reimbursement of the government must be amended such that referral hospitals can hire sufficient number of qualified intensivists and nurses. For the government to address these urgent issues, public awareness of the role of CCM is also required.

  16. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  17. August 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Raschke took a well-deserved vacation, and in his absence we did another quick-fire critical care journal club reviewing 7 articles.Davies AR, Morrison SS, Bailey MJ, Bellomo R, Cooper DJ, Doig GS, Finfer SR, Heyland DK; for the ENTERIC Study Investigators and the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing early nasojejunal with nasogastric nutrition in critical illness. Crit Care Med 2012;40:2342-8. (Click here for abstractThis was a randomized control trial, which enrolled 181 patients from multiple medical-surgical ICUs to receive either nasojejunal or nasogastric nutrition. The number of patients selected for this study provided an 80% power to detect a 12% difference in mean energy delivery. Inclusion criteria for the study were patient that were admitted to the ICU, needing mechanically ventilated, narcotic drips for sedation as well as elevated gastric residuals (>150ml. Patients were excluded if patient had abnormal anatomy or imminent death…

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  19. Managing austerity: comparing municipal austerity plans in the Netherlands and North Rhine-Westphalia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmans, Tom; Timm-Arnold, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article attempts to clarify the relationships between the politico-administrative system and responses to austerity by comparing municipal austerity plans in the Netherlands and North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW). Although austerity is a major topic in both states, the approaches differ. In our sampl

  20. Austere Defense: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    military advice while acquiescing to divestitures, and effectively executing the austere defense cuts required by current law through 2019 and...Could it be that our assessments of risk have, over time, become too conservative? In- deed, even with the effects of full sequestration the United... crunch . Look- ing at overhead, as Douglas Macgregor of Politico magazine reminds us, during World War II, only four four-star generals commanded a

  1. November 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Mehta S, Burry L, Cook D, Fergusson D, et al. Daily sedation interruption in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients cared for with a sedation protocol. JAMA 2012;308:1985-92. PDFThis study was a multi-center, randomized controlled trial that compared protocolized sedation with protocolized sedation plus daily sedation interruption. The protocol used to titrate benzodiazepine and opioid infusions incorporated a validated scale (Sedation-agitation Scale (SAS or Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS in order to maintain a comfortable but arousable state. Four hundred and thirty mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients were recruited from medical and surgical ICUs in 16 institutions in North America. The study showed no benefit in the group that underwent daily sedation interruption - length of intubation was 7 days, length of ICU stay was 10 days and length of hospital stay was 20 days in both groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of delirium (53 vs. ...

  2. April 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. We welcomed intensivists from Banner Health to video-conference with us as we discussed several articles, and evaluated the ACP Journal Club – another good resource for keeping up to date.Hill NS. Review: Lower rather than higher tidal volume benefits ventilated patients without ARDS. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158:JC4. AbstractLauzier F. Hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and saline did not differ for mortality at 90 days in ICU patients. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158:JC5. AbstractThe April ACP Journal Club reviewed two critical care articles – a meta-analysis that concluded that low tidal volume ventilation reduced mortality in patients without ARDS, and a large RCT that showed no mortality difference between critically-ill patients resuscitated with hydroxyethyl starch versus saline. Both articles were awarded 6/7 stars for “clinical impact”, yet neither article had any impact on our clinical practice. This troubled us.We could think of 4 necessary criteria in order for research to have legitimate …

  3. The lost art of whole blood transfusion in austere environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor A; Bjerkvig, Christopher K; Williams, Steve; Eliassen, Håkon S; Fosse, Theodor K; Torvanger, Hans; Cap, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The optimal resuscitation fluid for uncontrolled bleeding and hemorrhagic shock in both pre- and in-hospital settings has been an ongoing controversy for decades. Hemorrhage continues to be a major cause of death in both the civilian and military trauma population, and survival depends on adequacy of hemorrhage control and resuscitation between onset of bleeding and arrival at a medical treatment facility. The terms far-forward and austere are defined, respectively, as the environment where professional health care providers normally do not operate and a setting in which basic equipment and capabilities necessary for resuscitation are often not available. The relative austerity of a treatment setting may be a function of timing rather than just location, as life-saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock becomes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a feasible life-saving procedure when facing significant hemorrhage.

  4. The Critical Care Obesity Paradox and Implications for Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayshil J; Rosenthal, Martin D; Miller, Keith R; Codner, Panna; Kiraly, Laszlo; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has been increasing and is associated with an increased risk for other co-morbidities. In the critical care setting, nearly one third of patients are obese. Obese critically ill patients pose significant physical and on-physical challenges to providers, including optimization of nutrition therapy. Intuitively, obese patients would have worse critical care-related outcome. On the contrary, emerging data suggests that critically ill obese patients have improved outcomes, and this phenomenon has been coined "the obesity paradox." The purposes of this review will be to outline the historical views and pathophysiology of obesity and epidemiology of obesity, describe the challenges associated with obesity in the intensive care unit setting, review critical care outcomes in the obese, define the obesity-critical care paradox, and identify the challenges and role of nutrition support in the critically ill obese patient.

  5. Spirituality, stress, and retention of nurses in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duane

    2013-01-01

    Providing care to patients in critical care units generates stress. Helping the critical care nurse manage this stress can lead to better patient experiences and higher nursing retention. While providing holistic care to patients produces better outcomes, addressing the holistic needs of the caregiver must also be considered. Included in the holistic needs of the nurse is their spiritual well-being. A study that measures spiritual well-being, stress, and nursing retention is the focus of this review.

  6. February 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Ferguson ND, Cook DJ, Guyatt GH, Mehta S, Hand L, Austin P, Zhou Q, Matte A, Walter SD, Lamontagne F, Granton JT, Arabi YM, Arroliga AC, Stewart TE, Slutsky AS, Meade MO; the OSCILLATE Trial Investigators and the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. High-Frequency Oscillation in Early Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:795-805. Young D, Lamb SE, Shah S, Mackenzie I, Tunnicliffe W, Lall R, Rowan K, Cuthbertson BH; the OSCAR Study Group. High-Frequency Oscillation for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:806-13. Malhotra A, Drazen JM. High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation on Shaky Ground. N Engl J Med. 2013;368:863-5. Two articles and an accompanying editorial, the later co-authored by none less than the editor, appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine this week. These all dealt with the use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. As the editorial points …

  7. July 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words.Over the past thirty years or so, we have seen multiple therapies related to sepsis management that appeared beneficial in initial clinical trials but were later found to be useless or even harmful. Examples include goal-directed resuscitation to achieve maximal oxygen delivery, steroids for ARDS, tight glycemic control, and adrenal replacement therapy, among others. An overview of the history of evidence-based critical care medicine provides a strong argument for humility and caution. The story of Xigris provides another chapter for the fellows to consider as they move forward in their careers, and are asked to appraise new therapies that come along.The story of activated protein C – also designated as drotrecogin alfa (recombinant - or Xigris® began with stellar expectations. The PROWESS trial was published in the NEJM in 2001 (1. It was a randomized controlled trial that enrolled 1690 patients, comparing 28-day survival of patients treated with Xigris vs. …

  8. Burnout in critical care nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Kirstin

    2012-01-01

    Burnout and its development in critical care nurses is a concept that has received extensive study, yet remains a problem in Canada and around the world. Critical care nurses are particularly vulnerable to developing burnout due to the chronic occupational stressors they are exposed to, including high patient acuity, high levels of responsibility, working with advanced technology, caring for families in crisis, and involved in morally distressing situations, particularly prolonging life unnecessarily. The purpose of this article is to explore how the chronic stressors that critical care nurses are exposed to contribute to the development of burnout, and strategies for burnout prevention. A review of the literature between the years 2007 and 2012 was conducted and included the search terms burnout, moral distress, compassion fatigue, intensive care, critical care, and nursing. The search was limited to the adult population, English language, and Western cultures. The results revealed that nurse managers play a crucial role in preventing burnout by creating a supportive work environment for critical care nurses. Strategies for nurse managers to accomplish this include being accessible to critical care nurses, fostering collegial relationships among the different disciplines, and making a counsellor or grief team available to facilitate debriefing after stressful situations, such as a death. In addition, critical care nurses can help prevent burnout by being a support system for each other and implementing self-care strategies.

  9. Spiritual Experiences of Muslim Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Ercan; Samancioglu, Sevgin; Kilic, Serap Parlar

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to determine the experiences and perceptions of intensive care nurses (ICNs) about spirituality and spiritual care, as well as the effective factors, and increase the sensitivity to the subject. In this study, we examined spiritual experiences, using McSherry et al. (Int J Nurs Stud 39:723-734, 2002) Spirituality and spiritual care rating scale (SSCRS), among 145 ICNs. 44.8% of the nurses stated that they received spiritual care training and 64.1% provided spiritual care to their patients. ICNs had a total score average of 57.62 ± 12.00 in SSCRS. As a consequence, it was determined that intensive care nurses participating in the study had insufficient knowledge about spirituality and spiritual care, but only the nurses with sufficient knowledge provided the spiritual care to their patients.

  10. Critical Caring for People and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindel, Alexandra; Tolbert, Sara

    2017-01-01

    What role does caring play in environmental education? The development of caring relationships in formal school settings remains a foundational yet underexamined concept in environmental education research. This study examines the role of caring relationships between people and place in an urban high school in the United States. We draw upon…

  11. Exploring the impact of austerity-driven policy reforms on the quality of the long-term care provision for older people in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, David; Jongen, Wesley; Schröder-Bäck, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this case study, European quality benchmarks were used to explore the contemporary quality of the long-term care provision for older people in the Belgian region of Flanders and the Netherlands following recent policy reforms. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with various experts on the long-term care provision. The results show that in the wake of the economic crisis and the reforms that followed, certain vulnerable groups of older people in Belgium and the Netherlands are at risk of being deprived of long-term care that is available, affordable and person-centred. Various suggestions were provided on how to improve the quality of the long-term care provision. The main conclusion drawn in this study is that while national and regional governments set the stage through regulatory frameworks and financing mechanisms, it is subsequently up to long-term care organisations, local social networks and informal caregivers to give substance to a high quality long-term care provision. An increased reliance on social networks and informal caregivers is seen as vital to ensure the sustainability of the long-term care systems in Belgium and in the Netherlands, although this simultaneously introduces new predicaments and difficulties. Structural governmental measures have to be introduced to support and protect informal caregivers and informal care networks.

  12. The Evolution of Critical Care Nephrology in Edmonton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Gibney, R T Noel

    2016-01-01

    The University of Alberta (UofA) in Edmonton, Canada has a rich and productive history supporting the development of critical care medicine, nephrology and the evolving subspecialty of critical care nephrology. The first hemodialysis program for patients with chronic renal failure in Canada was developed at the University of Alberta Hospital. The UofA is also recognized for its early pioneering work on the diagnosis, etiology and outcomes associated with acute kidney injury (AKI), the development of a diagnostic scheme renal allograft rejection (Banff classification), and contributions to the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force. Edmonton was one of the first centers in Canada to provide continuous renal replacement therapy. This has grown into a comprehensive clinical, educational and research center for critical care nephrology. Critical care medicine in Edmonton now leads and participates in numerous critical care nephrology initiatives dedicated to AKI, renal replacement therapy, renal support in solid organ transplantation, and extracorporeal blood purification. Critical care medicine in Edmonton is recognized across Canada and across the globe as a leading center of excellence in critical care nephrology, as an epicenter for research innovation and for training a new generation of clinicians with critical care nephrology expertise.

  13. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future.

  14. Should critical care nurses be ACLS-trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagyard-Wiebe, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The aim of resuscitation is to sustain life with intact neurological functioning and the same quality of life previously experienced by the patient. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) was designed to achieve this aim. However the requirement for ACLS training for critical care nurses working in Canadian critical care units is inconsistent across the country. The purposes of this article are to explore the evidence surrounding ACLS training for critical care nurses and its impact on resuscitation outcomes, and to review the evidence surrounding ACLS knowledge and skill degradation with strategies to support code blue team efficiency for an effective resuscitation. Using the search terms ACLS training, resuscitation, critical care, and nursing, two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were used. The evidence supports the need for ACLS training for critical care nurses. The evidence also supports organized ongoing refresher courses, multidisciplinary mock code blue practice using technologically advanced simulator mannequins, and videotaped reviews to prevent knowledge and skill degradation for effective resuscitation efforts.

  15. Reiki therapy: a nursing intervention for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toms, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not generally associated with the complexity and intensity of critical care. Most CAM therapies involve slow, calming techniques that seem to be in direct contrast with the fast-paced, highly technical nature of critical care. However, patients in critical care often find themselves coping with the pain and stress of their illness exacerbated by the stress of the critical care environment. Complementary and alternative medicine-related research reveals that complementary therapies, such as Reiki, relieve pain and anxiety and reduce symptoms of stress such as elevated blood pressure and pulse rates. Patients and health care professionals alike have become increasingly interested in complementary and alternative therapies that do not rely on expensive, invasive technology, and are holistic in focus. Reiki is cost-effective, noninvasive, and can easily be incorporated into patient care. The purpose of this article is to examine the science of Reiki therapy and to explore Reiki as a valuable nursing intervention.

  16. Can austerity be self-defeating?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    With European governments cutting back on spending, many are asking whether this could make matters worse. In the UK for instance, recent OECD estimates suggest that 'austerity' will lead to another recession, which in turn may lead to a higher debt-to-GDP ratio than before. As the debate heats up, the following two articles attempt to provide some cool economic logic: Credible austerity plans are required by Daniel Gros and Why austerity can become self-defeating for member states of a curre...

  17. Accountable primary care a critical investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Marc D; Anderson, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Primary care physicians today can be expected to capture between 2,000 and 5,000 active patients who consider that physician to be "my physician." The geographic location of primary care physicians affects the payer mix of the hospital and its affiliated subspecialists. Hospital and health system CFOs would be wise to advocate investment in primary care physicians to secure market share. They should also develop compensation plans with a value-volume balance and establish ways to actively manage referrals.

  18. Personal reflection: death brokering for critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    End-of-life care and the dying patient have been an area lightly covered in my nursing school experience. While I expected the topics to surface in more detail in conjunction with the critical care nursing unit, this was not the case. This article is a personal reflection on my experience in critical care nursing and the deficits involving death and dying education in both institutional and professional settings.

  19. Enhancing critical thinking in clinical practice: implications for critical and acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Bridget; Follett, Corrinne; Eason, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of patients in the critical and acute care settings requires that nurses be skilled in early recognition and management of rapid changes in patient condition. The interpretation and response to these events can greatly impact patient outcomes. Nurses caring for these complex patients are expected to use astute critical thinking in their decision making. The purposes of this article were to explore the concept of critical thinking and provide practical strategies to enhance critical thinking in the critical and acute care environment.

  20. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... range of topics including regulatory issues, advanced practice, ethics, end-of-life care, legal issues and research. Browse Topics Volunteer Share your nursing expertise as a volunteer, which includes becoming an ...

  1. Critical Choices in a Time of Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Martin’s Automatic Identification Technology implementation, including RFID and UID. After successfully completing eight pilot projects, Kratz is now...guiding Lockheed Martin’s enterprise implementation of RFID . He also guides Lockheed Martin’s logistics strategic planning, performance-based...logistics efforts, logistics technology development, logistics human capital development, and cross-corporate logistics business initiatives. Previously

  2. Accountability in Times of Austerity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Foss; Kristiansen, Mads Bøge

    Like other countries Denmark has been hit by the global financial, economic and fiscal crisis. The pressure on the public finances has increased and public sector reforms such as new and/or changed accountability systems for budgetng, spending controls and financial management hav been launched...... in the form of a Budget Law and new requirements for financial management. This makes it interesting to assess how these initiatives introduced in times of austerity affect accountability in central government, and to discuss the potential effects of them. Based on a democratic, a constitutional...... and a learning perspective on public accountability, we assess the two initiatives through documentary material and interviews with civil servants who have designed or implemented the initiatives. The paper shows that the two initiatives strenthen and increase accountability from a democratic...

  3. Fiscal Austerity Versus Growth in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Škare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of fiscal austerity has been questioned for centuries, but a rapidly increasing deficit along with the financial crisis in 2007/2008 influenced a renewed debate on the economics of austerity. This paper analyzes the role of austerity versus the role of economic growth. It also attempts to highlight the role of the theoretical context of austerity policy and the economic history lesson learned during the transition from the Bretton Woods model to Washington’s consensus. Despite numerous studies and polarized debate, no consensus on the implementation of fiscal austerity has been achieved because this complex subject has not been the subject of a sufficient methodological exploration. Emphasis should be placed on defining the methodology of austerity and gathering statistical data to influence the implementation of social transfer policies. In addition, it is necessary not only to take a hybrid approach to fiscal and monetary policy but also to adopt economic laws and quantitative economic relationships. The benchmarking country used in this paper is Croatia. The outcome of this research can serve as the basis for future decision-making and research.

  4. Austerity, Discipline and Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asja Hrvatin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the manifestations of the global crisis of financial capitalism and the policies arising from it was the imposition of austerity measures, which not only resulted in privatization of the commons and general expropriation of the people, but also managed to introduce new mechanisms of discipline and punishment. Debt, being the fundament of relations in society, forced itself into the system of social security: new legislation, regulating welfare benefits, has now shifted to a method for the criminalization of poverty, deepening class differences and transforming social workers (and the system of social security as a whole into a moralizing, bureaucratic machine for disciplining the population. The new legislation also shows a lack of reflection on the changes that need to be made to the welfare state in order to create social services that meet the needs and desires of individuals. Instead of improvements that provide decent living conditions and a new system of social rights (to deal with the problems resulting from precarious working conditions, people are faced with depersonalization, humiliation and increased hate speech and other fascist practices. The effect of austerity measures on the social security system does not end with the devastation of service users’ lives and their communities, which are slowly becoming exhausted, individualized and devoid of solidarity. It also means a big step backwards for the core ethics and principles of social work. Social workers are increasingly alienated from their clients and the communities they live in. They function more in the service of the government and its policies rather than as advocates of people’s rights.

  5. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed.

  6. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  7. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Sports Injuries in an Austere Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adriane E; Falconi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    For sports injuries in an austere environment, narcotic pain medications are often unavailable or have limiting side effects like sedation or constipation. Meanwhile, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are frequently associated with gastrointestinal side effects and acetaminophen liver toxicity. A trained physician can rapidly use certain acupuncture techniques in an austere environment with potentially fewer side effects. Current medical literature notes low to moderate quality evidence for the use of acupuncture in lower back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee. There is emerging evidence for the use of acupuncture in traumatic brain injury. The U.S. military uses acupuncture in deployed settings to treat battlefield injuries with promising results. This article reviews the military's current use of acupuncture to treat injuries in a deployed setting and how this may translate to the care of a sports injury in an austere environment.

  8. Advances in military, field, and austere transfusion medicine in the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, John R; Lelkens, Charles C M; Holcomb, John B; Scalea, Thomas M

    2013-12-01

    Two decades of war in south-west Asia has demonstrated the essential role of primary resuscitation with blood products in the care of critically injured soldiers. This idea has been widely adopted and is being critically tested in civilian trauma centers. The need for red cells, plasma and platelets to be immediately available in remote locations creates a logistic burden that will best be eased by innovative new blood products such as longer-stored liquid RBCs, freeze-dried plasma, small-volume frozen platelets, and coagulation factor concentrates such as fibrinogen concentrates and prothrombin complex concentrates. Such products have long shelf-lives, low logistic burdens of weight, fragility, or needs for processing prior to use. Developing and fielding a full family of such products will improve field medical care and make products available in the evacuation chain. It also will allow treatment in other austere environments such as the hundreds of small hospitals in the US which serve as Levels 3 and 4 trauma centers but do not currently have thawed plasma or platelets available. Such small trauma centers currently care for half of all the trauma patients in the country. Proving the new generation of blood products work, will help assure their widest availability in emergencies.

  9. Physiotherapy in Critical Care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A physiotherapist is part of the multidisciplinary team in most intensive care units in Australia. Physiotherapists are primary contact practitioners and use a comprehensive multisystem assessment that includes the respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems to formulate individualized treatment plans. The traditional focus of treatment has been the respiratory management of both intubated and spontaneously breathing patients. However, the emerging evidence of the l...

  10. Critical care: Are we customer friendly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Rajnibala, V.; Abraham, Babu K.; Rajagopalan, Senthilkumar; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assessing and enhancing family satisfaction are imperative for the provision of comprehensive intensive care. There is a paucity of Indian data exploring family's perception of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. We wanted to explore family satisfaction and whether it differed in families of patients admitted under intensivists and nonintensivists in our semi-open ICU. Methodology: We surveyed family members of 200 consecutive patients, between March and September 2009 who were in ICU for >3 days. An internationally validated family satisfaction survey was adapted and was administered to a family member, on day 4 of the patient's stay. The survey consisted of 15 questions in five categories - patient care, medical counseling, staff interaction, visiting hours, and facilities and was set to a Likert scale of 1–4. Mean, median, and proportions were computed to describe answers for each question and category. Results: A total of 515 patients were admitted during the study period, of which 200 patients stayed in the ICU >3 days. One family member each of the 200 patients completed the survey with 100% response rate. Families reported the greatest satisfaction with patient care (94.5%) and least satisfaction with visiting hours (60.5%). Chi-square tests performed for each of the five categories revealed no significant difference between satisfaction scores of intensivists and nonintensivists' patients. Conclusion: Family members of ICU patients were satisfied with current care and communication, irrespective of whether they were admitted under intensivists or nonintensivists. Family members preferred open visiting hours policy than a time limited one. PMID:26430335

  11. Critical care: Are we customer friendly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessing and enhancing family satisfaction are imperative for the provision of comprehensive intensive care. There is a paucity of Indian data exploring family′s perception of Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients. We wanted to explore family satisfaction and whether it differed in families of patients admitted under intensivists and nonintensivists in our semi-open ICU. Methodology: We surveyed family members of 200 consecutive patients, between March and September 2009 who were in ICU for >3 days. An internationally validated family satisfaction survey was adapted and was administered to a family member, on day 4 of the patient′s stay. The survey consisted of 15 questions in five categories - patient care, medical counseling, staff interaction, visiting hours, and facilities and was set to a Likert scale of 1-4. Mean, median, and proportions were computed to describe answers for each question and category. Results: A total of 515 patients were admitted during the study period, of which 200 patients stayed in the ICU >3 days. One family member each of the 200 patients completed the survey with 100% response rate. Families reported the greatest satisfaction with patient care (94.5% and least satisfaction with visiting hours (60.5%. Chi-square tests performed for each of the five categories revealed no significant difference between satisfaction scores of intensivists and nonintensivists′ patients. Conclusion: Family members of ICU patients were satisfied with current care and communication, irrespective of whether they were admitted under intensivists or nonintensivists. Family members preferred open visiting hours policy than a time limited one.

  12. Developing a Business Plan for Critical Care Pharmacy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Mann, Henry J; Weber, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Critical care medicine has grown from a small group of physicians participating in patient care rounds in surgical and medical intensive care units (ICUs) to a highly technical, interdisciplinary team. Pharmacy's growth in the area of critical care is as exponential. Today's ICU requires a comprehensive pharmaceutical service that includes both operational and clinical services to meet patient medication needs. This article provides the elements for a business plan to justify critical care pharmacy services by describing the pertinent background and benefit of ICU pharmacy services, detailing a current assessment of ICU pharmacy services, listing the essential ICU pharmacy services, describing service metrics, and delineating an appropriate timeline for implementing an ICU pharmacy service. The structure and approach of this business plan can be applied to a variety of pharmacy services. By following the format and information listed in this article, the pharmacy director can move closer to developing patient-centered pharmacy services for ICU patients.

  13. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of healthcare professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care healthcare professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care healthcare professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care healthcare professionals and for patients.

  14. March 2013 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stander P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Brill S. Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us. Time. February 20, 2013. PDF available at: http://livingwithmcl.com/BitterPill.pdf (accessed 4/2/13. Editor’s Note: We had a special journal club in March. First, we reviewed an article from Time magazine rather than a traditional medical journal. Second, Paul Stander MD, the chief medical officer at Banner Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, led the discussion and agreed to author the journal club. This seemed appropriate since much of the article focuses on overbilling and administrative costs of care. The recent lengthy cover story article in Time Magazine described in great deal what many of us practicing physicians have realized for a long time – our health care system is highly dysfunctional and much of that dysfunction is a result of an arcane and outmoded financing mechanism. This payment system has a litany of perverse incentives that encourage wasteful and often ineffective care while not …

  15. ON SPACELIKE AUSTERE SUBMANIFOLDS IN PSEUDO-EUCLIDEAN SPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yuxin; Han Yingbo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we construct some spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo- Euclidean spaces. We also get some indefinite special Lagrangian submanifolds by con- structing twisted normal bundle of spacelike austere submanifolds in pseduo-Euclidean spaces.

  16. Aeromedical Evacuation Enroute Critical Care Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    during all her tasks and scenarios. This angle is above 30 degrees flexion , which is considered a critical bend angle for potentially causing...with an impalement 38 Treat a casualty with an open or closed head injury 39 Apply a cervical collar 40 Immobilize the pelvis 41 Immobilize a...01-499-3126 North American Rescue Perfit ACE® cervical collar 6515-01-541-8147 Pelvic Binder, Inc. pelvis splint 6515-01-560-0290 Vital Signs

  17. Noteworthy Articles in 2015 for Cardiothoracic Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Adam S; Mazzeffi, Michael; Ivascu, Natalia S; Dickerson, Shane; Gutsche, Jacob T

    2016-03-01

    In 2015, the demand for the presence of cardiothoracic anesthesiologists outside of the cardiac operating rooms continues to expand. Most notably, cardiothoracic anesthesiologists now find themselves called on to care for patients postoperatively in the cardiothoracic surgical intensive care unit. This article is the first in this annual series to review relevant contributions in postoperative cardiac critical care that may influence the cardiac anesthesiologist. We explore the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, management of postoperative atrial fibrillation and coagulopathy, metabolic support of the critically ill cardiothoracic surgical patient, and new insights into delirium and acute kidney injury.

  18. May 2016 Phoenix critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Panwar R, Hardie M, Bellomo R, Barrot L, Eastwood GM, Young PJ, Capellier G, Harrigan PW, Bailey M; CLOSE Study Investigators; ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. Conservative versus liberal oxygenation targets for mechanically ventilated patients. A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2016 Jan 1;193(1:43-51. We continue to debate the appropriate level of oxygenation for a variety of patients. This study attempted to address the question of appropriate oxygenation targets for intensive care unit (ICU patients. At four multidisciplinary ICUs, 103 adult patients were randomly allocated to either a conservative oxygenation strategy with target oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 of 88-92% (n = 52 or a liberal oxygenation strategy with target SpO2 of greater than or equal to 96% (n = 51. There were no significant between-group differences in any measures of new organ dysfunction, or ICU or 90-day mortality. Although the study is underpowered, it does ...

  19. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement-Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients.

  20. The emotional intelligence of registered nurses commencing critical care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Nagel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critical care is described as complex, detailed healthcare in a unique, technologically rich environment. Critical care nursing requires a strong knowledge base and exceptional clinical and technological skills to cope in this demanding environment. Many registered nurses (RNs commencing work in these areas may lack resilience, and because of the stress of the critical care environment, coping mechanisms need to be developed. To prevent burnout and to enable critical care nurses to function holistically, emotional intelligence (EI is essential in the development of such coping mechanisms.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the EI of RNs commencing work in critical care units in a private hospital group in Gauteng, South Africa.Method: The design used for this study was a quantitative descriptive survey. The target population were RNs commencing work in critical care units. Data were collected from RNs using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire – Short Form and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: The sample (n = 30 had a mean age of 32 years. Most of the participants (63% qualified through the completion of a bridging course between 2010 and 2012. The majority (62% of the sample had less than 2 years’ experience as RNs.Conclusion: The EI of RNs commencing work in a critical care environment was indicative of a higher range of Global EI, with the well-being factor scoring the highest, followed by the emotionality factor, then self-control, with the sociability factor scoring the lowest.

  1. Do Austerity Measures Harm International Trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Iulian CHIRIŢOIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the trade relations between Romania and the PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece, and Spain in order to verify whether the exports of Romania have been positively or negatively affected by the austerity measures adopted by these Eurozone periphery countries, thus diminishing Romania’s export performance in such markets. Hence, our main research question is whether austerity measures harm or affect in any way the inflows and outflows of international trade in the studied countries. To assess this hypothesis, we focused on the external trade relations, and their linkages with the macroeconomic environment, rather than the competitiveness of a state explained by a detailed sectoral analysis. In this respect, we use comparative and descriptive statistics in order to observe the consequences of the internal devaluation, and implicitly austerity measures, on the PIIGS-Romanian trade relations. Our findings suggest that the effects of austerity measures are not homogenous because they depend on the scale of trade exchanges and on the way in which the austerity measures were applied.

  2. Mobile Intensive Care Unit: Technical and clinical aspects of interhospital critical care transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Mobile Intensive Care Unit (MICU) is a combination of i) a team of critical care nurse, physician and ambulance driver, ii) a MICU-trolley (i.e. equipped with cardiovascular monitor, mechanical ventilator, syringe pumps etc. indispensable for safe transport and iii) an Intensive Care ambulance.

  3. Austerity and health in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglio, Gianluca; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Van Woensel, Lieve; Arnold, Elleke; McDaid, David

    2013-11-01

    Many European governments have abundantly cut down public expenditure on health during the financial crisis. Consequences of the financial downturn on health outcomes have begun to emerge. This recession has led to an increase in poor health status, raising rates of anxiety and depression among the economically vulnerable. In addition, the incidence of some communicable diseases along with the rate of suicide has increased significantly. The recession has also driven structural reforms, and affected the priority given to public policies. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how austerity impacts health in Europe and better understand the response of European health systems to the financial crisis. The current economic climate, while challenging, presents an opportunity for reforming and restructuring health promotion actions. More innovative approaches to health should be developed by health professionals and by those responsible for health management. In addition, scientists and experts in public health should promote evidence-based approaches to economic and public health recovery by analyzing the present economic downturn and previous crisis. However, it is governance and leadership that will mostly determine how well health systems are prepared to face the crisis and find ways to mitigate its effects.

  4. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care.

  5. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  6. [Burnout's syndrome in critical care nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Ruiz, Ma C; Hernández Vidal, P; Vizcaya Moreno, Ma F; Reig Ferrer, A

    2002-01-01

    The concept of the "Burnout Syndrome" has come as a result of the chronic work-stress developed in workers involved in human services during their professional activity. The working conditions and the specific characteristics of the job developed at the Intensive Care Units by the nursing staff, involve a high risk for this group to acquire this syndrome. The main objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in the nursing staff of the ICUs in different hospitals of the Alicante province, Spain, by means of the Malsach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. This questionnaire is self-administered and was handed to all the nursing staff at the ICUs in the University Hospitals of Alicante and Elche and in the Hospital Marina Baixa of Villajoyosa. form the total of 107 questionnaires, 83 proved to be valid. The average total of MBI was of 55.05, indicating low values of emotional tiredness, low depersonalisation, and an adequate level of personal accomplishment.

  7. Ruled Austere Submanifolds of Dimension Four

    CERN Document Server

    Ionel, Marianty

    2010-01-01

    We classify 4-dimensional austere submanifolds in Euclidean space ruled by 2-planes. The algebraic possibilities for second fundamental forms of an austere 4-fold M were classified by Bryant, falling into three types which we label A, B, and C. We show that if M is 2-ruled of Type A, then the ruling map from M into the Grassmannian of 2-planes in R^n is holomorphic, and we give a construction for M starting with a holomorphic curve in an appropriate twistor space. If M is 2-ruled of Type B, then M is either a generalized helicoid in R^6 or the product of two classical helicoids in R^3. If M is 2-ruled of Type C, then M is either a one of the above, or a generalized helicoid in R^7. We also construct examples of 2-ruled austere hypersurfaces in R^5 with degenerate Gauss map.

  8. MEDICATION ERRORS IN ANESTHESIA AND CRITICAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Reddy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors are common throughout healthcare system and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Medication related incidents are a common form of reported medical errors. In theory they should never occur. These mistakes are also called “Never events”. Some of these are avoidable and preventable events. 50% of these mistakes are preventable. “India records 5.2 million medical injuries a year”. 1 The UN body quantified the number of surgeries taking place every year globally - 234 million. It said surgeries had become common, with one in every 25 people undergoing it at any given time. China conducted the highest number of surgeries followed by Russia and India. In developing countries, the death rate was nearly 10% for a major surgery. 1 All surgeries need one or other form of anaesthesia. Anaesthetic practice is unique because anaesthetists are personally responsible for al l the steps from drug preparation to drug administration. Therefore, they need to have heightened awareness of the risk factors which create conditions for drug errors to occur. 2 Anaesthesia is unusual in requiring the administration of several potent, dan gerous, rapidly acting drugs in a relatively brief timeframe. These drugs would be harmful if given without considerable care and attention to dose, timing and order of administration. These drugs are almost exclusively administered by Anaesthetists and th e drugs are rarely checked by anyone other than the anaesthetist before administration. Drug error in relation to anaesthesia may therefore be of particular interest both to the specialty and the wider population. 3

  9. Austerity, fiscal volatility, and economic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Curatola, Giuliano; Donadelli, Michael; Gioffré, Alessandro; Grüning, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the relationship between austerity measures and economic growth. We propose a general equilibrium model where (i) agents have recursive preferences; (ii ) economic growth is endogenously driven by investments in R&D; (iii) the government is committed to a zero-deficit policy and finances public expenditures by means of a combination of labor taxes and R&D taxes. We find that austerity measures that rely on reducing resources available to the R&D...

  10. Critical Thinking in Critical Care: Five Strategies to Improve Teaching and Learning in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Margaret M; Chatterjee, Souvik; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2017-04-01

    Critical thinking, the capacity to be deliberate about thinking, is increasingly the focus of undergraduate medical education, but is not commonly addressed in graduate medical education. Without critical thinking, physicians, and particularly residents, are prone to cognitive errors, which can lead to diagnostic errors, especially in a high-stakes environment such as the intensive care unit. Although challenging, critical thinking skills can be taught. At this time, there is a paucity of data to support an educational gold standard for teaching critical thinking, but we believe that five strategies, routed in cognitive theory and our personal teaching experiences, provide an effective framework to teach critical thinking in the intensive care unit. The five strategies are: make the thinking process explicit by helping learners understand that the brain uses two cognitive processes: type 1, an intuitive pattern-recognizing process, and type 2, an analytic process; discuss cognitive biases, such as premature closure, and teach residents to minimize biases by expressing uncertainty and keeping differentials broad; model and teach inductive reasoning by utilizing concept and mechanism maps and explicitly teach how this reasoning differs from the more commonly used hypothetico-deductive reasoning; use questions to stimulate critical thinking: "how" or "why" questions can be used to coach trainees and to uncover their thought processes; and assess and provide feedback on learner's critical thinking. We believe these five strategies provide practical approaches for teaching critical thinking in the intensive care unit.

  11. [Systematization of nursing assistance in critical care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppel, Thiago Christel; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Calixto, Riciana do Carmo; Peruzzo, Simone Aparecida; Crozeta, Karla

    2009-01-01

    This is a methodological research, which aimed at organizing the systematization of nursing assistance in a critical care unit. The following steps were carried out: description of the nursing practice; transcription of nursing diagnoses; elaboration of a protocol for nursing diagnosis based in International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP); determination of nursing prescriptions and the elaboration of guidelines for care and procedures. The nursing practice and care complexity in ICU were characterized. Thus, systematization of nursing assistance is understood as a valuable tool for nursing practice.

  12. Crossing boundaries, re-defining care: the role of the critical care outreach team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Dillon, Ann

    2002-05-01

    There is clear indication that both government and professional policy in the United Kingdom supports a radical change in the role of healthcare practitioners, with a move towards a patient-focused service delivered by clinical teams working effectively together. Recent health service imperatives driving the agenda for flexible clinical teams have occurred simultaneously with an increased public and political awareness of deficits in availability of critical care services. Against this policy backdrop, working across professional and organizational boundaries is fundamental to supporting quality service improvements. In the acute care sector, the development of critical care outreach teams is an innovation that seeks to challenge the traditional support available for sick ward patients. Activity data and observations from the first 6-month evaluation of two critical care outreach teams identify the need for clinical support and education offered by critical care practitioners to ward-based teams. The experiences from such flexible clinical teams provides a foundation from which to explore key issues for intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary working across clinical areas and organizational boundaries. Adopting innovative approaches to care delivery, such as critical care outreach teams, can enable clinical teams and NHS trusts to work together to improve the quality of care for acutely ill patients, support clinical practitioners working with this client group, and develop proactive service planning.

  13. Critical care nurses' information-seeking behaviour during an unfamiliar patient care task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine M; Doran, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Critical care nurses complete tasks during patient care to promote the recovery or maintain the health of their patients. These tasks can be routine or non-routine to the nurse. Non-routine tasks are characterized by unfamiliarity, requiring nurses to seek additional information from a variety of sources to effectively complete the tasks. Critical care units are dynamic environments where decisions are often made by nurses under stress and time pressure because patient status changes rapidly. A non-routine task (e.g., administration of an unfamiliar medication) to the critical care nurse can impact patient care outcomes (e.g., increased time to complete task has consequences for the patient). In this article, the authors discuss literature reviewed on nurses' information-seeking and explore an information-seeking conceptual model that will be used as a guide to examine the main concepts found through the empirical evidence.

  14. Openness, Technologies, Business Models and Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Open education emerged when the state had an active role in shaping and financing post-secondary education. In the twenty-first century, two pressures influence the way openness is conceived. The first is the compounding of neo-liberal economics with austerity following the financial crash of 2008. The second is the consolidation of networked and…

  15. Budget reforms in times of austerity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Mads Bøge

    In the literature times of austerity is argued to give rise to centralization of decisions making. A recently published article finds evidence of a centralization cascade in times of austerity. Based on a case study of recent changes of the Danish budget institutions, the aim of this pa-per is to......In the literature times of austerity is argued to give rise to centralization of decisions making. A recently published article finds evidence of a centralization cascade in times of austerity. Based on a case study of recent changes of the Danish budget institutions, the aim of this pa......-per is to explore how such a centralization cascade may look like when zooming into a specific case. Another aim is to explore the consequences of the changes of budget institutions. The paper shows that the fiscal crisis was a window of opportunity for the Ministry of Finance to introduce a budget reform...... finally results in a more detailed control and steering carried out by the managing directors in the agencies. The paper also shows that the changes imply a range of consequences; some are functional others are more dysfunction-al. There seems therefore to be a lot of trade-offs when budget institutions...

  16. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  17. Starting with Self: Teaching Autoethnography to Foster Critically Caring Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camangian, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates the application of critical literacy (Freire & Macedo, 1987; Gutierrez, 2008; Morrell, 2007) pedagogies that draw from young people's funds of knowledge (Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992) to actively nurture personally, authentically, and culturally caring relationships (Howard, 2002; Noddings, 1992;…

  18. Critically reflective work behavior of health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Esther de; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; Beukelen, Peter van

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. METHODS: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predi

  19. Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G; Chaboyer, W; Thornsteindóttir, R; Fulbrook, P; Shelton, C; Wojner, A; Chan, D

    2001-12-01

    While critical care has been a specialty within nursing for almost 50 years, with many countries having professional organizations representing these nurses, it is only recently that the formation of an international society has been considered. A three-phased study was planned: the aim of the first phase was to identify critical care organizations worldwide; the aim of the second was to describe the characteristics of these organizations, including their issues and activities; and the aim of the third was to plan for an international society, if international support was evident. In the first phase, contacts in 44 countries were identified using a number of strategies. In the second phase, 24 (55%) countries responded to a survey about their organizations. Common issues for critical care nurses were identified, including concerns over staffing levels, working conditions, educational programme standards and wages. Critical care nursing organizations were generally favourable towards the notion of establishing a World Federation of their respective societies. Some of the important issues that will need to be addressed in the lead up to the formation of such a federation are now being considered.

  20. Staffing and training issues in critical care hyperbaric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Jacek

    2015-03-01

    The integrated chain of treatment of the most severe clinical cases that require hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) assumes that intensive care is continued while inside the hyperbaric chamber. Such an approach needs to take into account all the risks associated with transportation of the critically ill patient from the ICU to the chamber and back, changing of ventilator circuits and intravascular lines, using different medical devices in a hyperbaric environment, advanced invasive physiological monitoring as well as medical procedures (infusions, drainage, etc) during long or frequently repeated HBOT sessions. Any medical staff who take care of critically ill patients during HBOT should be certified and trained according to both emergency/intensive care and hyperbaric requirements. For any HBOT session, the number of staff needed for any HBOT session depends on both the type of chamber and the patient's status--stable, demanding or critically ill. For a critically ill patient, the standard procedure is a one-to-one patient-staff ratio inside the chamber; however, the final decision whether this is enough is taken after careful risk assessment based on the patient's condition, clinical indication for HBOT, experience of the personnel involved in that treatment and the available equipment.

  1. Compassion fatigue: A Study of critical care nurses in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdanur Dikmen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the level of compassion fatigue which experienced by nurses who work in intensive care units and factors that affecting it. In a cross sectional design, critical nurses were surveyed by using questionnaire and  compassion fatigue (CF subscale of the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL R-IV to measure levels of compassion fatigueat a large National Education and ResearchHospital located in northwestof Turkey. A total of 69 critical care nurses participated in the study, for a response rate of 78%.A series of cross tab analyses examined the relationship between nurses demographics and compassion fatigue (CF subscale. To analyze the data further, participants were recategorized into 2 groups for CF scores: (1 higher than 17: high risk and (2 lower than 17: low risk. Findings show that critical care nurses were at high risk (52.7% and low risk (47.3% for CF. Nurses informed significant differences in compassion fatigue on the basis of age, years of critical care experience, working hours (weekly.

  2. Structural elements of critical thinking of nurses in emergency care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Graça Oliveira Crossetti

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the structural elements of critical thinking (CT of nurses in the clinical decision-making process. This exploratory, qualitative study was conducted with 20 emergency care nurses in three hospitals in southern Brazil. Data were collected from April to June 2009, and a validated clinical case was applied from which nurses listed health problems, prescribed care and listed the structural elements of CT. Content analysis resulted in categories used to determine priority structural elements of CT, namely theoretical foundations and practical relationship to clinical decision making; technical and scientific knowledge and clinical experience, thought processes and clinical decision making: clinical reasoning and basis for clinical judgments of nurses: patient assessment and ethics. It was concluded that thinking critically is a skill that enables implementation of a secure and effective nursing care process.

  3. Austerity and Geometric Structure of Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyfets, Arkady

    The relation between the austerity idea and the geometric structure of the three basic field theories- -electrodynamics, Yang-Mills theory, and general relativity --is studied. The idea of austerity was originally suggested by J. A. Wheeler in an attempt to formulate the laws of physics in such a way that they would come into being only within "the gates of time" extending from big bang to big crunch, rather than exist from everlasting to everlasting. One of the most significant manifestations of the austerity idea in field theories is thought to be expressed by the boundary of a boundary principle (BBP). The BBP says that almost all content of the field theories can be deduced from the topological identity (PAR-DIFF)(CCIRC)(PAR -DIFF) = 0 used twice, at the 1-2-3-dimensional level (providing the homgeneous field equations), and at the 2-3-4-dimensional level (providing the conservation laws for the source currents). There are some difficulties in this line of thought due to the apparent lack of universality in application of the BBP to the three basic modern field theories--electrodynamics, Yang-Mills theory, and general relativity. This dissertation: (a) analyses the difficulties by means of algebraic topology, integration theory and modern differential geometry based on the concepts of principal bundles and Ehresmann connections; (b) extends the BBP to the unified Kaluza-Klein theory; (c) reformulates the inhomogeneous field equations and the BBP in terms of E. Cartan moment of rotation, in the way universal for all the three theories and compatible with the original austerity idea; (d) underlines the important role of the soldering structure on spacetime, and indicates that the future development of the austerity idea would involve the generalized theories, including the soldering form as a dynamical variable rather than as a background structure.

  4. Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of sepsis in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Savitri; Adams, Kate; Barlow, Gavin

    2011-04-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. Delay in diagnosis and initiation of antibiotics have been shown to increase mortality in this cohort. However, differentiating sepsis from non-infectious triggers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is difficult, especially in critically ill patients who may have SIRS for other reasons. It is this conundrum that predominantly drives broad-spectrum antimicrobial use and the associated evolution of antibiotic resistance in critical care environments. It is perhaps unsurprising, therefore, that the search for a highly accurate biomarker of sepsis has become one of the holy grails of medicine. Procalcitonin (PCT) has emerged as the most studied and promising sepsis biomarker. For diagnostic and prognostic purposes in critical care, PCT is an advance on C-reactive protein and other traditional markers of sepsis, but is not accurate enough for clinicians to dispense with clinical judgement. There is stronger evidence, however, that measurement of PCT has a role in reducing the antibiotic exposure of critical care patients. For units intending to incorporate PCT assays into routine clinical practice, the cost-effectiveness of this is likely to depend on the pre-implementation length of an average antibiotic course and the subsequent impact of implementation on emerging antibiotic resistance. In most of the trials to date, the average baseline duration of the antibiotic course was longer than is currently standard practice in many UK critical care units. Many other biomarkers are currently being investigated. To be highly useful in clinical practice, it may be necessary to combine these with other novel biomarkers and/or traditional markers of sepsis.

  5. Role of Transitional Care Measures in the Prevention of Readmission After Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jessica S

    2017-02-01

    Transitioning from the critical care unit to the medical-surgical care area is vital to patients' recovery and resolution of critical illness. Such transitions are necessary to optimize use of available hospital resources to meet patient care needs. One in 10 patients discharged from the intensive care unit are readmitted to the unit during their hospitalization. Critical care readmission is associated with significant increases in illness acuity, overall length of stay, and health care costs as well as a potential 4-fold increased risk of mortality. Patients with complex illness, multiple comorbid conditions, and a prolonged initial stay in the critical care unit are at an increased risk of being readmitted to the critical care unit and experiencing poor outcomes. Implementing nurse-driven measures that support continuity of care and consistent communication practices such as critical care outreach services, transitional communication tools, discharge planning, and transitional care units improves transitions of patients from the critical care environment and reduces readmission rates.

  6. Augmentation of hospital critical care capacity after bioterrorist attacks or epidemics: recommendations of the Working Group on Emergency Mass Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, Lewis; Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Talmor, Daniel S; O'Toole, Tara; Kramer, Bradley R; Inglesby, Thomas V

    2005-10-01

    The Working Group on Emergency Mass Critical Care was convened by the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the Society of Critical Care Medicine to provide recommendations to hospital and clinical leaders regarding the delivery of critical care services in the wake of a bioterrorist attack resulting in hundreds or thousands of critically ill patients. In these conditions, traditional hospital and clinical care standards in general, and critical care standards in particular, likely could no longer be maintained, and clinical guidelines for U.S. hospitals facing these situations have not been developed. The Working Group offers recommendations for this situation.

  7. Patient Mobility in Times of Austerity: A Legal and Policy Analysis of the Petru Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischhut, Markus; Fahy, Nick

    2016-03-01

    The case-law of the Court of Justice (ECJ) on patient mobility was recently challenged by a ruling that a patient could go to Germany for treatment when facilities in Romanian hospitals were inadequate. Given the reported impact of austerity measures in the field of health care this raises the question; what is the impact of the ECJ's ruling on how Member States can manage expenditure and limit outflows of patients and how should such measures be legally evaluated? The objective of this article is to analyse potential impact on health systems in the context of increasing pressure on public financing for health. While the ECJ mainly referred to the requirement of treatment in due time, we also analyse possible austerity reductions of the basket of care against the background of EU law (i.e., EGJ case-law, patient mobility directive, Charter of Fundamental rights and social security regulation).

  8. Prevention of Critical Care Complications in the Coronary Intensive Care Unit: Protocols, Bundles, and Insights From Intensive Care Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Sligl, Wendy I; Washam, Jeffrey B; Gilchrist, Ian C; Arora, Rakesh C; Katz, Jason N

    2017-01-01

    Over the past half century, coronary care units have expanded from specialized ischemia arrhythmia monitoring units into intensive care units (ICUs) for acutely ill and medically complex patients with a primary cardiac diagnosis. Patients admitted to contemporary coronary intensive care units (CICUs) are at risk for common and preventable critical care complications, yet many CICUs have not adopted standard-of-care prevention protocols and practices from general ICUs. In this article, we (1) review evidence-based interventions and care bundles that reduce the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia, excess sedation during mechanical ventilation, central line infections, stress ulcers, malnutrition, delirium, and medication errors and (2) recommend pragmatic adaptations for common conditions in critically ill patients with cardiac disease, and (3) provide example order sets and practical CICU protocol implementation strategies.

  9. Provision of critical care services for the obstetric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, P; Arulkumaran, N; Rhodes, A

    2013-12-01

    Management of the peripartum patient is a challenging aspect of critical care that requires consideration of both the physiological changes associated with pregnancy as well as the well-being of the foetus. In the UK, for every maternal death, approximately 118 near-miss events or severe acute maternal morbidities (SAMMs) occur. While a dedicated anaesthetic cover is usually provided on larger labour wards in the UK and US, a close communication with intensive care and other medical specialties must still be maintained. Medical outreach teams and early warning scores may help facilitate the early identification of clinical deterioration and prompt treatment. Ultimately level of care is allocated according to the clinical need, not the location, which may be a designated room, a normal labour room or a recovery area. Specialist obstetric units that provide high-dependency care facilities show lower rates of maternal transfer to critical care units and improved continuity of care before and after labour. The benefits of obstetric high-dependency units (HDUs) are likely to be determined by a number of logistic aspects of the hospital organisation, including hospital size and available resources. There remains a striking contrast in the burden of maternal mortality and morbidity and intensive care unit (ICU) resources between high- and low-income countries. The countries with the highest maternal mortality rates have the lowest number of ICU beds per capita. In under-resourced countries, patients admitted to ICUs tend to have higher illness severity scores, suggesting delayed admission to the ICU. The appropriate training of midwives is essential for successful HDUs located within labour wards.

  10. Health care policy development: a critical analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean E; Pauling, Carolyn D; Franzen, Debra B

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a phased approach for teaching baccalaureate nursing students critical analysis of health care policy, including refinement of existing policy or the foundation to create new policy. Central to this approach is the application of an innovative framework, the Grand View Critical Analysis Model, which was designed to provide a conceptual base for the authentic learning experience. Students come to know the interconnectedness and the importance of the model, which includes issue selection and four phases: policy focus, colleagueship analysis, evidence-based practice analysis, and policy analysis and development.

  11. Year in review 2005: critical care--nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    We summarize original research in the field of critical care nephrology accepted or published in 2005 in Critical Care and, when considered relevant or directly linked to this research, in other journals. The articles have been grouped into four categories to facilitate a rapid overview. First, physiopathology, epidemiology and prognosis of acute renal failure (ARF): an extensive review and some observational studies have been performed with the aim of describing aspects of ARF physiopathology, precise epidemiology and long-term outcomes. Second, several authors have performed clinical trials utilizing a potential nephro-protective drug, fenoldopam, with different results. Third, the issue of continuous renal replacement therapies dose has been addressed in a small prospective study and a large observational trial. And fourth, alternative indications to extracorporeal treatment of ARF and systemic inflammatory response syndrome have been explored by three original clinical studies.

  12. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the potential therapeutic benefits of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care are presented. This article aims to review the physiological properties of melatonin and how these could prove useful for several clinical applications in perioperative management, critical care and pain medicine. The topic was handsearched from textbooks and journals and electronically from PubMed, and Google scholar using text words.

  13. Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Daniel S.; Jepson, Annette; Turton, Jane F.; Ashworth, Simon; Donaldson, Hugo; Holmes, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is an infrequent colonizer of the respiratory tract; its pathogenicity is uncertain. In the context of a 22-month outbreak of E. meningoseptica acquisition affecting 30 patients in a London, UK, critical care unit (3% attack rate) we derived a measure of attributable morbidity and determined whether E. meningoseptica is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. We found monomicrobial E. meningoseptica acquisition (n = 13) to have an attributable morbidity rate of 54% (systemic inflammatory response syndrome >2, rising C-reactive protein, new radiographic changes), suggesting that E. meningoseptica is a pathogen. Epidemiologic and molecular evidence showed acquisition was water-source–associated in critical care but identified numerous other E. meningoseptica strains, indicating more widespread distribution than previously considered. Analysis of changes in gram-negative speciation rates across a wider London hospital network suggests this outbreak, and possibly other recently reported outbreaks, might reflect improved diagnostics and that E. meningoseptica thus is a pseudo-emerging pathogen. PMID:26690562

  14. New initiatives in critical care: distinguishing hype from hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, John L; Solomon, Patricia J

    2016-09-01

    Recent viewpoints on critical care have expressed frustration at the slow development of new therapeutic agents and the failure of investigator-initiated trials. Several new directions have been proposed: personalised medicine and the embracing of "omic" technologies, resolving the heterogeneity of treatment effects, and adaptive trial designs. We examine these approaches in the context of analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The curse of treatment effect heterogeneity is found not only in critical care but also in cancer oncology. We find the uncritical appeal to personalised medicine to be misplaced because such treatments are not identified at the personal level, but at the group or stratified level. The analysis of RCTs has foundered over the problem of accounting for the centre effect and rejecting the random effects approach. Enthusiasm for adaptive trial designs has been articulated at the rhetorical, not the substantive, level.

  15. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  16. Noteworthy Literature Published in 2016 for Cardiothoracic Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Adam S; Mazzeffi, Michael; Ivascu, Natalia; Noguera, Edward; Gutsche, Jacob

    2017-03-01

    In 2016, demand for the presence of cardiothoracic anesthesiologists outside of the cardiac operating rooms continues to expand. This article is the second in this annual series to review relevant contributions in postoperative cardiac critical care that may impact the cardiac anesthesiologist. We explore the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), management of postoperative atrial fibrillation, coagulopathy, respiratory failure, and role of quality in cardiac surgery.

  17. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad Samir H; Arabi Yaseen M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP...

  18. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs.

  19. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  20. August 2013 critical care journal club: less is more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Our August journal club reviewed failed efforts to impact the mortality of critical illness over the past 25 years. We looked at six landmark randomized controlled trials with certain things in common. They each addressed treatment of a major aspect of critical illness. Each was well-supported by previous literature, and biologically plausible. Each resulted in a statistically-significant mortality benefit, and was published in a well-respected journal. And each had an immediate, and in many cases, lasting effect on the bedside practice of critical care. Yet the positive result of each of these six studies was subsequently convincingly refuted. It is important to note, that these studies make up a good part of what we’ve learned in critical care over the past 25 years. There have been some influential positive studies as well, but a great deal of effort has been spent implementing evidence-based practice, based on studies that were later …

  1. CRISIS, AUSTERITY, AND COHESION: EUROPE'S STAGNATING INEQUALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauderstädt, Michael; Keltek, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Europe's high inequality, systematically underestimated by the European Union, has been falling for many years thanks to catch-up growth in the poorer countries and despite often-increasing inequality within member states. Crisis and austerity have curbed this development, however. After inequality rose again during the Great Recession of 2009 and the subsequent brief recovery, things are now going sideways in the context of generally weak growth.

  2. Rethinking critical reflection on care: late modern uncertainty and the implications for care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosman, Frans; Niemeijer, Alistair

    2017-03-22

    Care ethics as initiated by Gilligan, Held, Tronto and others (in the nineteen eighties and nineties) has from its onset been critical towards ethical concepts established in modernity, like 'autonomy', alternatively proposing to think from within relationships and to pay attention to power. In this article the question is raised whether renewal in this same critical vein is necessary and possible as late modern circumstances require rethinking the care ethical inquiry. Two late modern realities that invite to rethink care ethics are complexity and precariousness. Late modern organizations, like the general hospital, codetermined by various (control-, information-, safety-, accountability-) systems are characterized by complexity and the need for complexity reduction, both permeating care practices. By means of a heuristic use of the concept of precariousness, taken as the installment of uncertainty, it is shown that relations and power in late modern care organizations have changed, precluding the use of a straightforward domination idea of power. In the final section a proposition is made how to rethink the care ethical inquiry in order to take late modern circumstances into account: inquiry should always be related to the concerns of people and practitioners from within care practices.

  3. Overview of point-of-care abdominal ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Toru; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care abdominal ultrasound (US), which is performed by clinicians at bedside, is increasingly being used to evaluate clinical manifestations, to facilitate accurate diagnoses, and to assist procedures in emergency and critical care. Methods for the assessment of acute abdominal pain with point-of-care US must be developed according to accumulated evidence in each abdominal region. To detect hemoperitoneum, the methodology of a focused assessment with sonography for a trauma examination may also be an option in non-trauma patients. For the assessment of systemic hypoperfusion and renal dysfunction, point-of-care renal Doppler US may be an option. Utilization of point-of-care US is also considered in order to detect abdominal and pelvic lesions. It is particularly useful for the detection of gallstones and the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Point-of-case US is justified as the initial imaging modality for the diagnosis of ureterolithiasis and the assessment of pyelonephritis. It can be used with great accuracy to detect the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm in symptomatic patients. It may also be useful for the diagnoses of digestive tract diseases such as appendicitis, small bowel obstruction, and gastrointestinal perforation. Additionally, point-of-care US can be a modality for assisting procedures. Paracentesis under US guidance has been shown to improve patient care. US appears to be a potential modality to verify the placement of the gastric tube. The estimation of the amount of urine with bladder US can lead to an increased success rate in small children. US-guided catheterization with transrectal pressure appears to be useful in some male patients in whom standard urethral catheterization is difficult. Although a greater accumulation of evidences is needed in some fields, point-of-care abdominal US is a promising modality to improve patient care in emergency and critical care settings.

  4. Pastiche in Paul Auster's "The New York Trilogy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare'e, Maedeh; Eslamieh, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    This article is a Jamesonian study of Auster's "The New York Trilogy" in which one of Fredric Jameson's notions of postmodernism, pastiche, has been applied on three stories of the novel. This novel is one of Auster's outstanding postmodern works to which Jameson's theories of postmodernism, in particular, pastiche can be applicable.…

  5. Update on the critical care management of severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Kevin R; Makley, Amy T; Kagan, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Care of the severely injured patient with burn requires correct diagnosis, appropriately tailored resuscitation, and definitive surgical management to reduce morbidity and mortality. Currently, mortality rates related to severe burn injuries continue to steadily decline due to the standardization of a multidisciplinary approach instituted at tertiary health care centers. Prompt and accurate diagnoses of burn wounds utilizing Lund-Browder diagrams allow for appropriate operative and nonoperative management. Coupled with diagnostic improvements, advances in resuscitation strategies involving rates, volumes, and fluid types have yielded demonstrable benefits related to all aspects of burn care. More recently, identification of comorbid conditions such as inhalation injury and malnutrition have produced appropriate protocols that aid the healing process in severely injured patients with burn. As more patients survive larger burn injuries, the early diagnosis and successful treatment of secondary and tertiary complications are becoming commonplace. While advances in this area are exciting, much work to elucidate immune pathways, diagnostic tests, and effective treatment regimens still remain. This review will provide an update on the critical care management of severe burns, touching on accurate diagnosis, resuscitation, and acute management of this difficult patient population.

  6. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  7. Ethical persuasion: the rhetoric of communication in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, Alex

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the ethics of rhetoric in critical care. Rational appeals in critical care fail to move patients or surrogates to a better course of action. Appeals to their emotions are considered illegitimate because they may preclude autonomous choice. This article discusses whether it is always unethical to change someone's beliefs, whether persuasive communication is inherently harmful and whether it leaves no space for voluntariness. To answer these questions, the article engages with Aristotle's work, Rhetoric. In considering whether there is a place for emotionally charged messages in a patient-provider relationship, the article intends to delineate the nature of this relationship and describe the duties this relationship implies. The article presents examples of persuasive communication used in critical care and discusses whether providers may have a duty to persuade patients. This duty is supported by the fact that doctors often influence patients' and families' choices by framing presented options. Doctors should assume responsibility in recognizing these personal and contextual influences that may influence the medical choices of their patients. They should attempt to modify these contextual factors and biases in a way that would assist patients and families in reaching the desired outcomes. The opening sections surveyed a number of definitions found in relevant literature and outlined some of the concepts included in the proposed definition. This definition helps to distinguish instances of persuasion from cases of manipulation, coercion and deception. Considering the fact that patients and families often make irrational decisions and the fact that doctors inadvertently influence their choices, the article suggested that persuasion can be a positive tool in medical communication. When patients or families clearly do not understand the risks or make decisions that contradict their long-term goals, persuasion can be used as a positive influence.

  8. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  9. Novel biomarkers in critical care: utility or futility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Gareth L; Mythen, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    One of the holy grails of modern medicine, across a range of clinical sub-specialties, is establishing highly sensitive and specific biomarkers for various diseases. Significant success has been achieved in some of these clinical areas, most notably identifying high-sensitivity C-reactive peptide, troponin I/T and brain natriuretic peptide as significant prognosticators for both the acute outcome and the development of cardiovascular pathology. However, it is highly debatable whether this translates to complex, multi-system pathophysiological insults. Is critical care immune from the application of these novel biomarkers, given the numerous confounding factors interfering with their interpretation?

  10. Dose Adjustment- An Important Issue in Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. C. Joshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There is at times marked variability in drug responsiveness especially in critically ill patients admitted in the Intensive care units. In order to obtain therapeutic effectiveness with in pharmacokinetic parameters related to therapeutic dose, it is always desirable to monitor and to maintain drug dose adjustment in such a way especially in presence of organ failure like renal failure, hepatic failure or any other clinical situation necessitating Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM so that one can use safe and effective drug therapy with least toxicity due to inaccurate and invalid drug doses.

  11. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Applications in Cardiac Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Lindsay; Ha, Rich; Hill, Charles

    2015-12-01

    The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy (ECMO) in cardiac critical care has steadily increased over the past decade. Significant improvements in the technology associated with ECMO have propagated this recent resurgence and contributed to improved patient outcomes in the fields of cardiac and transplant (heart and lung) surgery. Specifically, ECMO is being increasingly utilized as a bridge to heart and lung transplantation, as well as to ventricular assist device placement. ECMO is also employed during the administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, known as extracorporeal life support. In this review, we examine the recent literature regarding the applications of ECMO and also describe emerging topics involving current ECMO management strategies.

  12. [Risk management in anesthesia and critical care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisold, C; Heller, A R

    2017-02-16

    Throughout its history, anesthesia and critical care medicine has experienced vast improvements to increase patient safety. Consequently, anesthesia has never been performed on such a high level as it is being performed today. As a result, we do not always fully perceive the risks involved in our daily activity. A survey performed in Swiss hospitals identified a total of 169 hot spots which endanger patient safety. It turned out that there is a complex variety of possible errors that can only be tackled through consistent implementation of a safety culture. The key elements to reduce complications are continuing staff education, algorithms and standard operating procedures (SOP), working according to the principles of crisis resource management (CRM) and last but not least the continuous work-up of mistakes identified by critical incident reporting systems.

  13. 6. Oral care competency and practices among critical care nurses for mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Abed-Eddin

    2016-07-01

    Result: A total of 131 nurses out of 150 completed the questioners, 100% were females, 86% of nurses are Baccalaureate degree, 93% with 7–9 years’ experience in critical care units, 80% of nurses have adequate time to provide oral care at least once a day, 20.4% only of the nurses are using a toothbrush with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution every 2–4 h for oral care at least Once a Day, 75.8% of nurses prefer to use oral swab with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution q 2–4 h, 98% has positive attitude toward mouth care practice.Conclusions The survey provided useful information on the oral care knowledge and practices of nurses caring for Mechanically Ventilated Patients. Almost all the nurses perceived oral care to be a high priority. Very low number of nurses are using the toothbrush with 2% Chlorhexidine Solution every 2–4 h, this figure must be studied for further action. The majority of nurses had some formal training in oral care, but would appreciate an opportunity to improve their knowledge and skills.

  14. Critical care nurses’ perceptions of stress and stress-related situations in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Moola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical care nurses (CCNs experience stressful situations in their daily working environments. A qualitative research approach (exploratory, descriptive and contextual was used to explore and describe the stressful situations experienced by critical care nurses in the Tshwane metropolitan are of South Africa. Focus group interviews were conducted with critical care nurses.

  15. Critical care for paediatric patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John M; Mazwi, Mjaye L; McBride, Mary E; Gambetta, Katherine E; Eltayeb, Osama; Epting, Conrad L

    2015-08-01

    This review offers a critical-care perspective on the pathophysiology, monitoring, and management of acute heart failure syndromes in children. An in-depth understanding of the cardiovascular physiological disturbances in this population of patients is essential to correctly interpret clinical signs, symptoms and monitoring data, and to implement appropriate therapies. In this regard, the myocardial force-velocity relationship, the Frank-Starling mechanism, and pressure-volume loops are discussed. A variety of monitoring modalities are used to provide insight into the haemodynamic state, clinical trajectory, and response to treatment. Critical-care treatment of acute heart failure is based on the fundamental principles of optimising the delivery of oxygen and minimising metabolic demands. The former may be achieved by optimising systemic arterial oxygen content and the variables that determine cardiac output: heart rate and rhythm, preload, afterload, and contractility. Metabolic demands may be decreased by a number of ways including positive pressure ventilation, temperature control, and sedation. Mechanical circulatory support should be considered for refractory cases. In the near future, monitoring modalities may be improved by the capture and analysis of complex clinical data such as pressure waveforms and heart rate variability. Using predictive modelling and streaming analytics, these data may then be used to develop automated, real-time clinical decision support tools. Given the barriers to conducting multi-centre trials in this population of patients, the thoughtful analysis of data from multi-centre clinical registries and administrative databases will also likely have an impact on clinical practice.

  16. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed.

  17. French validation of the critical care family needs inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu-Wakulczyk, G; Chartier, L

    1990-03-01

    This study is a contribution to the French validation of Molter and Leske Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI). The importance of this validation study is based on the presumption that evaluation of family needs relies on the use of measures that are reliable and valid for a specific population. The preliminary validation of the French text of the CCFNI was carried out by back translation method of the French form into English by three translators. Then the final French version was selected. The study was conducted in the surgical intensive care unit of the University Hospital in Sherbrooke, Canada. The sample consisted of 207 voluntary subjects selected from adult members of the immediate family visiting a patient in the intensive care unit. The data collection was spread over a 10-week period. The French version of the CCFNI was given to subjects for self-reporting at the end of a 15-minute face-to-face interview. The reliability of the French version yielded 0.91 as Cronbach alpha coefficient. The Spearman-Brown split-half coefficient was 0.89, and the Guttman split-half coefficient was 0.88. Principal-component analysis and factorial matrices were used to examine the clustering structure of the French version of this instrument.

  18. Complicated deliveries, critical care and quality in emergency obstetric care in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ø E; Ndeki, S; Norheim, O F

    2004-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the availability and quality of obstetric care to improve resource allocation in northern Tanzania. We surveyed all facilities providing delivery services (n=129) in six districts in northern Tanzania using the UN Guidelines for monitoring emergency obstetric care (EmOC). The three last questions in this audit outline are examined: Are the right women (those with obstetric complications) using emergency obstetric care facilities (Met Need)? Are sufficient quantities of critical services being provided (cesarean section rate (CSR))? Is the quality of the services adequate (case fatality rate (CFR))? Complications are calculated using Plan 3 of the UN Guidelines to assess the value of routine data for EmOC indicator monitoring. Nearly 60% of the expected complicated deliveries in the study population were conducted at EmOC qualified health facilities. 81.2% of the expected complicated deliveries are conducted in any facility (including facilities not qualifying as EmOC facilities). There is an inadequate level of critical services provided (CSR 4.6). Voluntary agencies provide most of these services in rural settings. All indicators show large variations with the setting (urban/rural location, level and ownership of facilities). Finally, there is large variation in the CFR with only one facility meeting the minimum accepted level. Utilization and quality of critical obstetric services at lower levels and in rural districts must be improved. The potential for improving the resource allocation within lower levels of the health care system is discussed. Given the small number of qualified facilities yet relatively high Met Need, we argue that it is neither the mothers' ignorance nor their lack of ability to get to a facility that is the main barrier to receiving quality care when needed, but rather the lack of quality care at the facility. Little can be concluded using the CFR to describe the quality of services provided.

  19. Austerity Resistant Social Policies to Protect Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelormino, Elena; Marino, Maurizio; Leombruni, Roberto; Costa, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    During the worse phase of the economic downturn, few social policies resisted to the austerity measures imposed to Italy by the European Union. Among them, the most important is the Wage Supplementation Fund, to protect workers and entrepreneurs from bankruptcy and unemployment. Adopting a realist methodology we studied the social mechanisms which are the roots of some political and administrative choices in that period; the public policy decision making approach gave us a theoretical base. Some main mechanisms have been discovered: technical and economic mechanisms overcame politics, social attitudes pushed political choices, the fear of political and social instability drove all parties.

  20. Greece's health crisis: from austerity to denialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentikelenis, Alexander; Karanikolos, Marina; Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2014-02-22

    Greece's economic crisis has deepened since it was bailed out by the international community in 2010. The country underwent the sixth consecutive year of economic contraction in 2013, with its economy shrinking by 20% between 2008 and 2012, and anaemic or no growth projected for 2014. Unemployment has more than tripled, from 7·7% in 2008 to 24·3% in 2012, and long-term unemployment reached 14·4%. We review the background to the crisis, assess how austerity measures have affected the health of the Greek population and their access to public health services, and examine the political response to the mounting evidence of a Greek public health tragedy.

  1. Health, economic crisis, and austerity: A comparison of Greece, Finland and Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia Granados, José A; Rodriguez, Javier M

    2015-07-01

    Reports have attributed a public health tragedy in Greece to the Great Recession and the subsequent application of austerity programs. It is also claimed that the comparison of Greece with Iceland and Finland-where austerity policies were not applied-reveals the harmful effect of austerity on health and that by protecting spending in health and social budgets, governments can offset the harmful effects of economic crises on health. We use data on life expectancy, mortality rates, incidence of infectious diseases, rates of vaccination, self-reported health and other measures to examine the evolution of population health and health services performance in Greece, Finland and Iceland since 1990-2011 or 2012-the most recent years for which data are available. We find that in the three countries most indicators of population health continued improving after the Great Recession started. In terms of population health and performance of the health care system, in the period after 2007 for which data are available, Greece did as good as Iceland and Finland. The evidence does not support the claim that there is a health crisis in Greece. On the basis of the extant evidence, claims of a public health tragedy in Greece seem overly exaggerated.

  2. Critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in family-team conflicts related to treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Marie Patricia; Throndson, Karen; Dyck, Felicia

    2012-03-01

    Conflict over treatment plans is a cause of concern for those working in critical care environments. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe critical care nurses' perceptions of their roles in situations of conflict between family members and health-care providers in intensive care units. Using a qualitative descriptive design, 12 critical care nurses were interviewed individually and 4 experienced critical care nurses participated in focus group interviews. The roles described by the nurses were as follows: providing safe, competent, quality care to patients; building or restoring relationships of trust with families; and supporting other nurses. The nurses highlighted the level of stress when conflict arises, the need to be cautious in providing care and communicating with family members, and the need for support for nurses. More research related to working in situations of conflict is required, as is enhanced education for critical care nurses.

  3. Handover patterns: an observational study of critical care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Handover (or 'handoff' is the exchange of information between health professionals that accompanies the transfer of patient care. This process can result in adverse events. Handover 'best practices', with emphasis on standardization, have been widely promoted. However, these recommendations are based mostly on expert opinion and research on medical trainees. By examining handover communication of experienced physicians, we aim to inform future research, education and quality improvement. Thus, our objective is to describe handover communication patterns used by attending critical care physicians in an academic centre and to compare them with currently popular, standardized schemes for handover communication. Methods Prospective, observational study using video recording in an academic intensive care unit in Ontario, Canada. Forty individual patient handovers were randomly selected out of 10 end-of-week handover sessions of attending physicians. Two coders independently reviewed handover transcripts documenting elements of three communication schemes: SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendations; SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan; and a standard medical admission note. Frequency and extent of questions asked by incoming physicians were measured as well. Analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results Mean (± standard deviation duration of patient-specific handovers was 2 min 58 sec (± 57 sec. The majority of handovers' content consisted of recent and current patient status. The remainder included physicians' interpretations and advice. Questions posed by the incoming physicians accounted for 5.8% (± 3.9% of the handovers' content. Elements of all three standardized communication schemes appeared repeatedly throughout the handover dialogs with no consistent pattern. For example, blocks of SOAP's Assessment appeared 5.2 (± 3.0 times in patient handovers; they followed Objective blocks in only 45

  4. The Challenge of Complementary and Alternative Medicine After Austerity: A Response to Recent Commentaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-10-26

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is frequently used in Portugal and it contributes to the improvement of people's health. CAM and Western Medicine (WM) are taken as complements both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage. The Portuguese health system is able to generate certified CAM professionals but the provision of CAM care and services is not included in the national health system. In times of austerity, this is not expected to change and access to CAM care continues to be out-of-pocket health expenditure. But the future for health in Portugal may well involve including CAM therapies in an integrated health system.

  5. The progression of holism into postgraduate curricula in critical care nursing: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Paula; O'Brien, Una; Gooney, Martina A; Reid, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Critical care education is an important part of the professional development of a competent critical care nurse. Interdependence between physiological and psychosocial theories and concepts is a key consideration in the development of critical care educational programs. This multidisciplinary educational framework fosters a deeper understanding of factors contributing to ill health. Establishing a strategic framework where research, education, clinical excellence, and quality assurance are interlinked is central to enhancing the efficacy of patient care outcomes.

  6. Diabulimia: what it is and how to recognize it in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth-Sahd, Lisa A; Schneider, Melissa; Haagen, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Critical care nurses must be able to recognize the signs of symptoms of diabulimia-a potentially life-threatening disorder. Skipping insulin is used as a means of weight control in some persons with diabetes, particularly in young women. This article focuses on the assessment, pathophysiology, critical care nursing interventions, and psychosocial initiatives of interest to critical care nurses in the care of patients with diabulimia.

  7. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Kashani, Kianoush; Carrera, Perliveh; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Sood, Amit; Onigkeit, James A; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited.Objectives: To assess 1) levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2) the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes.Methods: In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-o...

  8. Effect of caring behavior on disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Eng, Cheng-Joo; Ko, Hui-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between caring behavior and the disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students in clinical practice. A structural equation model was used to test the hypothesized relationship between caring behavior and critical thinking skills. Caring is the core of nursing practice, and the disposition toward critical thinking is needed for competent nursing care. In a fast-paced and complex environment, however, "caring" may be lost. Because nursing students will become professional nurses, it is essential to explore their caring behaviors and critical thinking skills and to understand how to improve their critical thinking skills based on their caring behavior. A cross-sectional study was used, with convenience sampling of students who were participating in associate degree nursing programs at 3 colleges of nursing. The following instruments were used: critical thinking disposition inventory Chinese version and caring behaviors scale. The study found that individuals with a higher frequency of caring behaviors had a higher score on critical thinking about nursing practice (β = .44, t = 5.14, P critical thinking. The findings of this study revealed the importance of caring behavior and its relationship with the disposition toward critical thinking. Thus, it is recommended that nursing education should emphasize a curriculum related to caring behavior to improve the disposition toward critical thinking of nursing students.

  9. Mindful meditation: healing burnout in critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William Richard

    2008-01-01

    The nursing profession is experiencing a crisis in both manpower and the ability to fend off the deleterious effects of burnout. Nursing professionals face extraordinary stress in our present medical environment, and studies have frequently found moderate-to-high levels of burnout among nurses. Nurses experience burnout for a variety of reasons, some inherent to the profession and others related to our 21st-century values that have necessitated multiple breadwinners within the household. Mindful meditation represents a complementary therapy that has shown promise in the reduction of negative stress and those extraneous factors that lead to burnout. A mindful, meditative practice can be another tool with which critical care nurses can regain the control of their careers and personal lives. The purpose of this article is to describe nurse burnout, identify those factors that contribute to burnout, and offer a solution to a continuing problem for nurses.

  10. Critical care nurses' perceptions of preparedness and ability to care for the dying and their professional quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todaro-Franceschi, Vidette

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to explore whether critical care nurses perceive that they have been adequately prepared during basic nursing education to care for the dying and their loved ones and to identify if there is a relation between their perceptions of preparedness and ability to provide end of life care and professional quality of life (PQOL). Findings indicate that there is a relationship between critical care nurse perceptions of preparedness and ability to care for the dying and their PQOL, with higher compassion satisfaction scores, lower compassion fatigue scores, and lower burnout scores for those who perceive themselves more prepared and better able to provide end of life care (N = 473). Thus, pedagogic interventions to enhance perceptions of preparedness and ability to care for the dying can potentially improved PQOL for nurses working in critical care areas, possibly diminishing the incidence of compassion fatigue and burnout.

  11. Developing the PLA critical care medicine is critical for advancing the level of battle wound treatment in the new era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-qin LI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical care medicine is an emerging unique specialty developed from the later 20th century, since then, it has been enriched with theoretical and practical experiences and becomes the most active subject in the field of clinical medicine. Critical care medicine of the PLA has attained significant achievements in the treatment and research of severe trauma, sepsis, severe heat stroke, multiple organ failure and severe acute pancreatitis. Besides, it stands in the leading position in the organ function maintenance of critically ill patients, continuous hemofiltration and nutrition support in China. Furthermore, critical care medicine plays an important role in the rescue of critically ill patients, medical support and disaster relief. As the relationship between battle wound rescue system and critical care medicine has been increasingly close, transition in the form of war in the new period brings new tasks to battle wound treatment constantly. Combined with the characteristics of information-oriented war condition in the future, developing the PLA critical care medicine and advancing the level of battle wound treatment in the new period point out the direction for the future work of critical care medicine. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.02.01

  12. Practical strategies for increasing efficiency and effectiveness in critical care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Maurice F; Berg, Sheri; Bittner, Edward A

    2017-02-04

    Technological advances and evolving demands in medical care have led to challenges in ensuring adequate training for providers of critical care. Reliance on the traditional experience-based training model alone is insufficient for ensuring quality and safety in patient care. This article provides a brief overview of the existing educational practice within the critical care environment. Challenges to education within common daily activities of critical care practice are reviewed. Some practical evidence-based educational approaches are then described which can be incorporated into the daily practice of critical care without disrupting workflow or compromising the quality of patient care. It is hoped that such approaches for improving the efficiency and efficacy of critical care education will be integrated into training programs.

  13. Practical strategies for increasing efficiency and effectiveness in critical care education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Maurice F; Berg, Sheri; Bittner, Edward A

    2017-01-01

    Technological advances and evolving demands in medical care have led to challenges in ensuring adequate training for providers of critical care. Reliance on the traditional experience-based training model alone is insufficient for ensuring quality and safety in patient care. This article provides a brief overview of the existing educational practice within the critical care environment. Challenges to education within common daily activities of critical care practice are reviewed. Some practical evidence-based educational approaches are then described which can be incorporated into the daily practice of critical care without disrupting workflow or compromising the quality of patient care. It is hoped that such approaches for improving the efficiency and efficacy of critical care education will be integrated into training programs. PMID:28224102

  14. Diagnosis of a missed central line guidewire using critical care ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Bshabshe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization, though an imperative tool in the management of critically ill patient, is associated with a variety of complications and some of which can be life-threatening. Here, we report an index case in the field of critical care of detecting a missed guidewire primarily using a bedside critical care ultrasound.

  15. Austerity Surveillance” in Greece under the Austerity Regime (2010−2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Samatas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have tried to analyze “austerity surveillance” (AS, its features, and its functions under the extreme austerity regime in Greece during 2010−2014, before the election of the leftist government. AS is a specific kind of coercive neoliberal surveillance, which in the name of fighting tax evasion and corruption is targeting the middle and lower economic strata and not the rich upper classes. It is based mainly on “coveillance,” i.e. citizen-informers’ grassing, public naming, and shaming. Functioning as a domination and disciplinary control mechanism of the entire population, it works within a post-democratic setting without accountability or democratic control. We provide empirical evidence of these features and functions, including some indicative personal testimonies of austerity surveillance subjects. After presenting some cases of electronic surveillance as an indispensable supplement to AS, we then briefly underline the negative personal, and socio-political impact of this surveillance. In conclusion, a tentative assessment is made of AS’ efficiency in the Greek case, comparing it with other types of past and present authoritarian surveillance in Greece and in other current surveillance societies, considering also the prospects for its abolition or its reproduction by the new leftist government.

  16. Effect of the essentials of critical care orientation (ECCO) program on the development of nurses' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud A

    2010-09-01

    It is essential for nurses to develop critical thinking skills to ensure their ability to provide safe and effective care to patients with complex and variable needs in ever-changing clinical environments. To date, very few studies have been conducted to examine how nursing orientation programs develop the critical thinking skills of novice critical care nurses. Strikingly, no research studies could be found about the American Association of Critical Care Nurses Essentials of Critical Care Orientation (ECCO) program and specifically its effect on the development of nurses' critical thinking skills. This study explored the perceptions of new graduate nurses regarding factors that helped to develop their critical thinking skills throughout their 6-month orientation program in the intensive care unit. A convenient non-probability sample of eight new graduates was selected from a hospital that used the ECCO program. Data were collected with demographic questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. An exploratory qualitative research method with content analysis was used to analyze the data. The study findings showed that new graduate nurses perceived that they developed critical thinking skills that improved throughout the orientation period, although there were some challenges in the ECCO program. This study provides data that could influence the development and implementation of future nursing orientation programs.

  17. Patient Outcomes of an International Telepediatric Cardiac Critical Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Andrea Victoria; Welchering, Nils; Bermon, Anderson; Castillo, Victor; Duran, Álvaro; Castro, Javier; Muñoz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An optimal model for telemedicine use in the international care setting has not been established. Our objective was to describe variables associated with patient outcome during the implementation of an international pediatric cardiac critical care (PCCC) telemedicine program. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of clinical records and a telemedicine database of patients admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Fundacion Cardiovascular de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Colombia, during the initial 10 months of our program, compared with patients admitted during a previous period. Information collected included demographic data, cardiac diagnosis and associated factors, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 classification, and perioperative events. Primary outcome was composed of CICU and hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were CICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: Of the 553 patients who were included, teleconsultation was done for 71 (12.4%), with a total of 156 encounters, including 19 for patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Three hundred twenty-one recommendations were given, and 42 real-time interventions were documented. RACHS-1 distribution was similar between study periods (p=0.427). Teleconsulted patients were significantly younger (44 versus 24 months; p=0.03) and had higher surgical complexity than nonteleconsulted patients (p=0.01). RACHS-1 adjusted hospital survival was similar between study periods. CICU and hospital LOS intervals were significantly shorter in the telemedicine period (10 versus 17 days [p=0.02] and 22 versus 28 days [p<0.001]). In surgical cases, preoperative CICU LOS was significantly shorter (3 versus 6 days; p<0.001). Variables associated with hospital mortality were higher RACHS-1 categories, lower weight, bypass time longer than 150 min, and use of circulatory arrest, as well as the presence of sepsis or necrotizing enterocolitis

  18. Critical care 24 × 7: But, why is critical nutrition interrupted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Adequate nutritional support is crucial in prevention and treatment of malnutrition in critically ill-patients. Despite the intention to provide appropriate enteral nutrition (EN, meeting the full nutritional requirements can be a challenge due to interruptions. This study was undertaken to determine the cause and duration of interruptions in EN. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a multidisciplinary critical care unit (CCU of a tertiary care hospital from September 2010 to January 2011 and who received EN for a period >24 h were included in this observational, prospective study. A total of 327 patients were included, for a total of 857 patient-days. Reasons and duration of EN interruptions were recorded and categorized under four groups-procedures inside CCU, procedures outside CCU, gastrointestinal (GI symptoms and others. Results: Procedure inside CCU accounted for 55.9% of the interruptions while GI symptoms for 24.2%. Although it is commonly perceived that procedures outside CCU are the most common reason for interruption, this contributed only to 18.4% individually; ventilation-related procedures were the most frequent cause (40.25%, followed by nasogastric tube aspirations (15.28%. Although GI bleed is often considered a reason to hold enteral feed, it was one of the least common reasons (1% in our study. Interruption of 2-6 h was more frequent (43% and most of this (67.1% was related to "procedures inside CCU". Conclusion: Awareness of reasons for EN interruptions will aid to modify protocol and minimize interruptions during procedures in CCU to reach nutrition goals.

  19. February 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: subgroup analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Sun X, Ioannidis JP, Agoritsas T, Alba AC, Guyatt G. How to use a subgroup analysis: users' guide to the medical literature. JAMA. 2014;311(4:405-11. One of Dr. Raschke's pet peeves is unplanned subgroup analysis. In the September 2013 Banner Good Samaritan / Phoenix VA Critical Care Journal Club (1 he commented on an article by Hung et al. (2 that used a post hoc subgroup analysis. He felt strongly enough to write to the editor about why post hoc subgroup analysis should not be acceptable as a basis for scientific conclusions and his letter was published this month (3. Therefore, we have been on the lookout for a review article to discuss subgroup analysis and came across this timely publication in JAMA. The authors cite a number of examples and provide 5 criteria to use when assessing the validity of subgroup analyses: 1. Can chance explain the apparent subgroup effect ...

  20. Feasibility of Eyetracking in Critical Care Environments - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Andreas; Röhrig, Rainer; Lipprandt, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Achieving a good understanding of the socio-technical system in critical or emergency situations is important for patient safety. Research in human-computer interaction in the field of anesthesia or surgery has the potential to improve usability of the user interfaces and enhance patient safety. Therefore eye-tracking is a technology for analyzing gaze patterns. It can also measure what is being perceived by the physician during medical procedures. The aim of this review is the applicability of eye-tracker in the domain of simulated or real environments of anesthesia, surgery or intensive care. We carried out a literature research in PubMed. Two independent researchers screened the titles and abstracts. The remaining 8 full-papers were analyzed based on the applicability of eye-trackers. The articles contain topics like training of surgeons, novice vs. experts or the cognitive workload. None of the publications address our goal. The applicability or limitations of the eye-tracker technology were stated incidentally.

  1. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH DIABETES CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotiu Madalina-Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer satisfaction represents one of the core principles of marketing as it is acknowledged that organizations survive and prosper only by properly meeting the needs and wants of their customers. The same logic can be applied to the healthcare sector, especially in the current context of increased public scrutiny and funding pressure. Furthermore, research shows that patient satisfaction is linked to positive effects from both a marketing and a medical point of view. From a marketing point of view, patient satisfaction is closely linked to positive word of mouth and likelihood to recommend, while from a medical poinbt of view, research suggests that satisfied patients are more inclined toward treatment adherence, are less likely to seek another opinion elsewhere thus delaying treatment, while medical staff tend to have a higher morale. Yet, research regarding patient satisfaction with a particular illness is scarce with studies rarely building on previous results. The article takes on this challenge and aims to critically analyse several empirical studies conducted on patient satisfaction with diabetes care in order to synthesize results on particular determinants and suggest areas for further research. Diabetes is currently one of the most spread chronic disease around the world, while also affecting both old and younger patients. At the same time, it is a chronic disease characterised by the need for disease management efforts on behalf of the patients as well as high treatment adherence in order to avoid complications. It is also a costly chronic disease especially because of the numerous complications which patients may arrive to face during their struggle with this disease. In order to achieve the aim of this article we have chosen to adopt a marketing approach meaning that we see diabetes patients as clients of the medical institutions. Results show that diabetes particularities call for a broader view on patient satisfaction

  2. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis.

  3. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

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    Sangeeta Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians’ professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees.

  4. The Genesis, Maturation, and Future of Critical Care Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jason N; Minder, Michael; Olenchock, Benjamin; Price, Susanna; Goldfarb, Michael; Washam, Jeffrey B; Barnett, Christopher F; Newby, L Kristin; van Diepen, Sean

    2016-07-05

    The cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) has changed considerably over time and now serves a unique patient population with a high burden of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular critical illness. Patient complexity and technological evolutions in the CICU have catalyzed the development of critical care cardiology, a fledgling discipline that combines specialization in cardiovascular diseases with knowledge and experience in critical care medicine. Numerous uncertainties and challenges threaten to stymie the growth of this field. A multidisciplinary dialogue focused on the best care design for the CICU patient is needed as we consider alternative approaches to clinical training, staffing, and investigation in this rapidly evolving arena.

  5. Anti-Austerity Adult Education in Canada: A Survey of a Nascent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGray, Robert

    2015-01-01

    As the realities of austerity agendas exert pressure on adult education around the globe, this paper attempts to map the developing, albeit small, field of anti-austerity adult education in Canada. In doing so, I attempt to trace the connections between anti-austerity education and existing fields of adult education. I argue that the cases we see…

  6. Health Behavior Theory for Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Root-Cause Analysis Project in Critical Care Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kristen R; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Bickmann, Jonathan D; Saarinen, Hannah A; Gosselin, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a behavioral theory to examine pressure ulcer prevention by nurses in a critical care setting. A root-cause analysis approach was used, including an integrative literature review, operationalization of behavioral constructs into a survey, and root-cause analysis application in a cardiovascular intensive care unit. This article highlights an innovative approach to quality improvement in critical care.

  7. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  8. Critically ill obstetric patients in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkiran, O; Dikmen, Y; Utku, T; Urkmez, S

    2003-10-01

    We aimed to determine the morbidity and mortality among obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit. In this study, we analyzed retrospectively all obstetric admissions to a multi-disciplinary intensive care unit over a five-year period. Obstetric patients were identified from 4733 consecutive intensive care unit admissions. Maternal age, gestation of newborns, mode of delivery, presence of coexisting medical problems, duration of stay, admission diagnosis, specific intensive care interventions (mechanical ventilation, continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, central venous catheterization, and arterial cannulation), outcome, maternal mortality, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score were recorded. Obstetric patients (n=125) represented 2.64% of all intensive care unit admissions and 0.89% of all deliveries during the five-year period. The overall mortality of those admitted to the intensive care unit was 10.4%. Maternal age and gestation of newborns were similar in survivors and non-survivors. There were significant differences in length of stay and APACHE II score between survivors and non-survivors P intensive care unit admission was preeclampsia/eclampsia (73.6%) followed by post-partum hemorrhage (11.2%). Intensive care specialists should be familiar with these complications of pregnancy and should work closely with obstetricians.

  9. En Route Critical Care: Evolving, Improving & Advancing Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    Conference Civilian Partnerships  ECMO Pediatric/Neonatology Consortium  58 y/o Male unresponsive to care  Needed Adult ECMO – USA ECMO MD – USAF...Neonatologist – Civilian Perfusionist – Civilian ECMO RN  Transported to Iowa 36 2011 MHS Conference International AE En Route Medical Care Conference

  10. The "virtual" obstetrical intensive care unit: providing critical care for contemporary obstetrics in nontraditional locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leovic, Michael P; Robbins, Hailey N; Foley, Michael R; Starikov, Roman S

    2016-12-01

    Management of the critically ill pregnant patient presents a clinical dilemma in which there are sparse objective data to determine the optimal setting for provision of high-quality care to these patients. This clinical scenario will continue to present a challenge for providers as the chronic illness and comorbid conditions continue to become more commonly encountered in the obstetric population. Various care models exist across a broad spectrum of facilities that are characterized by differing levels of resources; however, no studies have identified which model provides the highest level of care and patient safety while maintaining a reasonable degree of cost-effectiveness. The health care needs of the critically ill obstetric patient calls for clinicians to move beyond the traditional definition of the intensive care unit and develop a well-rounded, quickly responsive, and communicative interdisciplinary team that can provide high-quality, unique, and versatile care that best meets the needs of each particular patient. We propose a model in which a virtual intensive care unit team composed of preselected specialists from multiple disciplines (maternal-fetal medicine, neonatology, obstetric anesthesiology, cardiology, pulmonology, etc) participate in the provision of individualized, precontemplated care that is readily adapted to the specific patient's clinical needs, regardless of setting. With this team-based approach, an environment of trust and familiarity is fostered among team members and well thought-out patient care plans are developed through routine prebrief discussions regarding individual clinical care for parturients anticipated to required critical care services. Incorporating debriefings between team members following these intricate cases will allow for the continued evolution of care as the medical needs of this patient population change as well.

  11. Nurse′s perceptions of physiotherapists in critical care team: Report of a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranati Gupte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional relationship plays a major role in effective patient care. Specialized units such as critical care require multidisciplinary care where perception about every members role may affect the delivery of patient care. The objective of this study was to find out nurses′ perceptions of the role of physiotherapists in the critical care team. Methods: Qualitative study by using semi-structured interview was conducted among the qualified nurses working in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital. The interview consisted of 19 questions divided into 3 sections. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. In-depth content analysis was carried out to identify major themes in relation to the research question. Results: Analysis identified five major issues which included role and image of a physiotherapist, effectiveness of treatment, communications, teamwork, and interprofessional relations. Physiotherapists were perceived to be an important member of the critical team with the role of mobilizing the patients. The respondents admitted that there existed limitations in interprofessional relationship. Conclusion: Nurses perceived the role of physiotherapist in the critical care unit as an integral part and agreed on the need for inclusion of therapist multidisciplinary critical care team.

  12. Austere Submanifolds of Dimension Four: Examples and Maximal Types

    CERN Document Server

    Ionel, Marianty

    2009-01-01

    Austere submanifolds in Euclidean space were introduced by Harvey and Lawson in connection with their study of calibrated geometries. The algebraic possibilities for second fundamental forms of 4-dimensional austere submanifolds were classified by Bryant, into three types which we label A, B, and C. In this paper, we show that type A submanifolds correspond exactly to real Kahler submanifolds, we construct new examples of such submanifolds in R^6 and R^10, and we obtain classification results on submanifolds of types B and C with maximal second fundamental forms.

  13. [Citomegalovirus reactivation in critical ill intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Esper, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β herpesvirus and a significant human pathogen. After primary infection establishes life long latency. In immunocompetent individuals cell-mediated host immune responses prevent the development of overt CMV disease. It has increasingly come to be recognized that critically ill patients are at risk for CMV reactivation from the latency. The risk factors associated to CMV reactivation in the critically ill are infection, sepsis, trauma, transfusions, major surgery, prolonged mechanical ventilation, steroids and vasopressors. In the pathogenesis are involved immunodysfunction and imbalance in immunomodulatory mediators principally tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Several studies have shown an association between CMV reactivation in immunocompetent critically ill patients and poor clinical outcomes. Further studies are warranted to identify subsets of patients who are at risk of developing CMV reactivation and to determine the role of antiviral agents on clinically outcomes in critically ill patients.

  14. 'In a dark place, we find ourselves': light intensity in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrington, Hannah J; Clark, Richard; Greer, Ruari; Martial, Franck P; Blaikley, John; Dark, Paul; Lucas, Robert J; Ray, David W

    2017-12-01

    Intensive care units provide specialised care for critically ill patients around the clock. However, intensive care unit patients have disrupted circadian rhythms. Furthermore, disrupted circadian rhythms are associated with worse outcome. As light is the most powerful 're-setter' of circadian rhythm, we measured light intensity on intensive care unit. Light intensity was low compared to daylight during the 'day'; frequent bright light interruptions occurred over 'night'. These findings are predicted to disrupt circadian rhythms and impair entrainment to external time. Bright lighting during daytime and black out masks at night might help maintain biological rhythms in critically ill patients and improve clinical outcomes.

  15. The emotional intelligence of a group of critical-care nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Towell

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Critical-care nurses often look after three or more critically-ill patients during a shift. The workload and emotional stress can lead to disharmony between the nurse’s body, mind and spirit. Nurses with a high emotional intelligence have less emotional exhaustion and psychosomatic symptoms; they enjoy better emotional health; gain more satisfaction from their actions (both at work and at home; and have improved relationships with colleagues at work. The question arises: what is the emotional intelligence of critical-care nurses? A quantitative survey was conducted. The target population was registered nurses working in critical-care units who attended the Critical Care Congress 2009 (N = 380. Data were collected with the use of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Short Form and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. The sample (n= 220 was mainly a mature, female and professionally-experienced group of registered nurses. They held a variety of job descriptions within various critical-care units. Statistics indicated that the standard deviations were small and no aberrant aspects such as demographics skewed the findings. The conclusion was made that registered nurses who are older and that have more experience in critical care appear to have a higher range of emotional intelligence.

  16. Critical perspectives on danish early childhood education and care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver; Broström, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses trends in contemporary Danish early childhood education and care (ECEC). Data are sourced from various policy documents, along with material from ongoing research projects in which the authors are involved. It is claimed that contemporary policy on Danish day care services has...... a tendency to emphasize narrow curriculum improvements and standardized testing. The democratic dimensions are still relatively strong, but at the moment these dimensions are interpreted within a skills-and-testing framework, which is leading to a situation where the political masquerades as the technical....

  17. Emergencies and Critical Care of Commonly Kept Fowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater González, Mikel; Calvo Carrasco, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Fowl are birds belonging to one of the 2 biological orders, the game fowl or land fowl (Galliformes) and the waterfowl (Anseriformes). Studies of anatomic and molecular similarities suggest these two groups are close evolutionary relatives. Multiple fowl species have a long history of domestication. Fowl are considered food-producing animals in most countries and clinicians should follow legislation regarding reportable diseases and antibiotic use, even if they are pets. This article reviews aspects of emergency care for most commonly kept fowl, including triage, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, supportive care, short-term hospitalization, and common emergency presentations.

  18. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... a protocol of no sedation is implemented. Data were generated during participant observation in practice and by interviews with 16 nurses. Data were analysed using thematic interpretive description. FINDINGS: An overall theme emerged: "Demanding, yet rewarding". The demanding aspects of caring for more awake...... closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation...

  19. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  20. Pitfalls in ictal EEG interpretation: critical care and intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Nicolas; Hirsch, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    EEG is the cornerstone examination for seizure diagnosis, especially nonconvulsive seizures in the critically ill, but is still subject to many errors that can lead to a wrong diagnosis and unnecessary or inadequate treatment. Many of these pitfalls to EEG interpretation are avoidable. This article reviews common errors in EEG interpretation, focusing on ictal or potentially ictal recordings obtained in critically ill patients. Issues discussed include artifacts, nonepileptic events, equivocal EEG patterns seen in comatose patients, and quantitative EEG artifacts. This review also covers some difficulties encountered with intracranial EEG recordings in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery, including issues related to display resolution.

  1. Austere kindness or mindless austerity: the efects of gift-giving to beggars in east London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lenhard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The current austerity policies in the United Kingdom are creating a precarious situation for many people on the margins of society. Employing micro-level ethnographic analysis, this article addresses how government decisions affect people living on the street. Observations of how local policies demonize gift-giving to street people led me to revisit arguments about the positive and negative effects of gifts. Four months of fieldwork amongst people who beg in the City of London confirmed the Maussian ambiguity of gift exchange. The material benefit of monetary gifts is often accompanied by shared time and conversation; gifts to beggars can go beyond materiality and are hence able to create bonds of sociability.

  2. Qualitative Research and Narrative Sources in the Context of Critical and Renal Cares

    OpenAIRE

    Siles González, José; Solano Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the relevance of qualitative research in the context of critical care and renal dialysis requires using narrative sources. Also specific objectives are to identify the phases or cultural moments that are distinguished in these processes. Research Question: How can the narrative materials contribute to the study of the processes of critical care and/or qualitative research in nephrology? Method and Sources: There have been studies focusing on the narra...

  3. "In flight catering": feeding critical care patients during aeromedical evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Ruth, M J; Bruce, D L

    2008-12-01

    The benefits of early enteral nutrition are well recognised but may be incompatible with CCAST evacuation due to the risk of micro-aspiration predisposing to pneumonia. A study has been approved by the Surgeon Generals Research Strategy Group designed to quantify the risks of microaspiration during CCAST flights in order to inform DMA policy with regard to feeding critically ill casualties during flight.

  4. Ethical Issues Recognized by Critical Care Nurses in the Intensive Care Units of a Tertiary Hospital during Two Separate Periods

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2...

  5. Optimal management of the critically ill: anaesthesia, monitoring, data capture, and point-of-care technological practices in ovine models of critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemonges, Saul; Shekar, Kiran; Tung, John-Paul; Dunster, Kimble R; Diab, Sara; Platts, David; Watts, Ryan P; Gregory, Shaun D; Foley, Samuel; Simonova, Gabriela; McDonald, Charles; Hayes, Rylan; Bellpart, Judith; Timms, Daniel; Chew, Michelle; Fung, Yoke L; Toon, Michael; Maybauer, Marc O; Fraser, John F

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of critical illness are vital in biomedical research. They provide possibilities for the investigation of pathophysiological processes that may not otherwise be possible in humans. In order to be clinically applicable, the model should simulate the critical care situation realistically, including anaesthesia, monitoring, sampling, utilising appropriate personnel skill mix, and therapeutic interventions. There are limited data documenting the constitution of ideal technologically advanced large animal critical care practices and all the processes of the animal model. In this paper, we describe the procedure of animal preparation, anaesthesia induction and maintenance, physiologic monitoring, data capture, point-of-care technology, and animal aftercare that has been successfully used to study several novel ovine models of critical illness. The relevant investigations are on respiratory failure due to smoke inhalation, transfusion related acute lung injury, endotoxin-induced proteogenomic alterations, haemorrhagic shock, septic shock, brain death, cerebral microcirculation, and artificial heart studies. We have demonstrated the functionality of monitoring practices during anaesthesia required to provide a platform for undertaking systematic investigations in complex ovine models of critical illness.

  6. [Surgical therapy and critical care medicine in severely burned patients - Part 2: the basics in definite care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisz, Robert; Kauczok, Jens; Dembinski, Rolf; Pallua, Norbert; Marx, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Critical care medicine in severely burned patients should be adapted to the different pathophysiological phases. Accordingly, surgical and non-surgical therapy must be coordinated adequately. Initial stabilization of the burn victim during the first 24 hours (Surgical therapy and critical care medicine in severely burned patients - Part 1: the first 24 ours, AINS 9/12) is followed by a long lasting reconstructive period. During this time calculated fluid replacement to compensate evaporative losses by large bourn wounds is as essential as reconstruction of the integrity of the skin and the modulation of metabolic consequences following severe burn injury. Special attention has to be paid to local and systemic infections.

  7. Reading the Conjuncture: State, Austerity and Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flohr, Mikkel; Harrison, Yannick Nehemiah Antonio

    2016-01-01

    and the rise of political capitalism are seen as leading to a loss of temporal sovereignty, problems of crisis management, an assault on democracy, and the rise of the austerity state. Closing remarks address the role of left-wing social movements and parties, such as SYRIZA and Podemos, and the difficulties...

  8. Where does political influence go when austerity sets in?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling; Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    Economic crisis is argued to be an opportunity to push through political changes, which otherwise can be difficult to make. Fiscal austerity is likely to change the political agenda and in some cases also the coalitions which can be formed. Based on the asymmetric distribution of preferences...

  9. Assembling, Disassembling and Reassembling "Youth Services" in Austerity Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdell, Deborah; McGimpsey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This paper moves from a reading of processes that are transforming public services in ways that amount to a dismantling of the welfare state in the UK. In order to interrogate these processes, the paper focuses on "youth" and "youth services". Framed by an analysis of the aggressive disinvestment of "austerity", we…

  10. Democracy, Neutrality, and Value Demonstration in the Age of Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T.; Gorham, Ursula; Bertot, John Carlo; Sarin, Lindsay C.

    2013-01-01

    This Libraries and Policy essay explores the interrelationships between the public library goals of supporting democracy and remaining an apolitical institution and the expectations for demonstration of value and economic contribution at a time in which public discourse emphasizes austerity from public institutions. Libraries' positions on…

  11. Critical Issues in Foster Care: Lessons the Children's Ark Learned from Barbara and Nathan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Kretchmar, Molly D.; Worsham, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Using an attachment theory framework, this article explores several critical issues in foster care as reflected in the case of Barbara and her 9-month-old son, Nathan. Barbara and Nathan participated in The Children's Ark, an innovative intervention for families in foster care that allowed mothers who had lost custody of their children to live,…

  12. Metal minerals scarcity. A call for managed austerity and the elements of hope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederen, A.M.

    2009-03-15

    If we keep following the ruling paradigm of sustained global economic growth, we will soon run out of cheap and plentiful metal minerals of most types. Their extraction rates will no longer follow demand. The looming metal minerals crisis is being caused primarily by the unfolding energy crisis. Conventional mitigation strategies including recycling and substitution are necessary but insufficient without a different way of managing our world's resources. The stakes are too high to gamble on timely and adequate future technological breakthroughs to solve our problems. The precautionary principle urges us to take immediate action to prevent or at least postpone future shortages. As soon as possible we should impose a co-ordinated policy of managed austerity, not only to address metal minerals shortages but other interrelated resource constraints (energy, water, food) as well. The framework of managed austerity enables a transition towards application (wherever possible) of the 'elements of hope': the most abundant metal (and non-metal) elements. In this way we can save the many critical metal elements for essential applications where complete substitution with the elements of hope is not viable. We call for a transition from growth in tangible possessions and instant, short-lived luxuries towards growth in consciousness, meaning and sense of purpose, connection with nature and reality and good stewardship for the sake of next generations.

  13. Year in review 2013: critical care - respiratory infections

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Infectious complications, particularly in the respiratory tract of critically ill patients, are related to increased mortality. Severe infection is part of a multiple system illness and female patients with severe sepsis have a worse prognosis compared to males. Kallistatin is a protective hormokine released during monocyte activation and low levels in the setting of septic shock can predict adverse outcomes. Presepsin is another biomarker that was recently evaluated and is elevated in patien...

  14. Year in review 2013: Critical Care--respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2014-10-29

    Infectious complications, particularly in the respiratory tract of critically ill patients, are related to increased mortality. Severe infection is part of a multiple system illness and female patients with severe sepsis have a worse prognosis compared to males. Kallistatin is a protective hormokine released during monocyte activation and low levels in the setting of septic shock can predict adverse outcomes. Presepsin is another biomarker that was recently evaluated and is elevated in patients with severe sepsis patients at risk of dying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has introduced new definitions for identifying patients at risk of ventilator-associated complications (VACs), but several other conditions, such as pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome, may cause VACs, and not all patients with VACs may have ventilator-associated pneumonia. New studies have suggested strategies to identify patients at risk for resistant pathogen infection and therapies that optimize efficacy, without the overuse of broad-spectrum therapy in patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia. Innovative strategies using optimized dosing of antimicrobials, maximizing the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs in critically ill patients, and newer routes of drug delivery are being explored to combat drug-resistant pathogens. We summarize the major clinical studies on respiratory infections in critically ill patients published in 2013.

  15. Stress levels of critical care doctors in India: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Amte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctors working in critical care units are prone to higher stress due to various factors such as higher mortality and morbidity, demanding service conditions and need for higher knowledge and technical skill. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the stress level and the causative stressors in doctors working in critical care units in India. Materials and Methods: A two modality questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was conducted. In manual mode, randomly selected delegates attending the annual congress of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine filled the questionnaire. In the electronic mode, the questionnaires were E-mailed to critical care doctors. These questionnaires were based on General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12. Completely filled 242 responses were utilized for comparative and correlation analysis. Results: Prevalence of moderate to severe stress level was 40% with a mean score of 2 on GHQ-12 scale. Too much responsibility at times and managing VIP patients ranked as the top two stressors studied, while the difficult relationship with colleagues and sexual harassment were the least. Intensivists were spending longest hours in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU followed by pulmonologists and anesthetists. The mean number of ICU bed critical care doctors entrusted with was 13.2 ± 6.3. Substance abuse to relieve stress was reported as alcohol (21%, anxiolytic or antidepressants (18% and smoking (14%. Conclusion: Despite the higher workload, stress levels measured in our survey in Indian critical care doctors were lower compared to International data. Substantiation of this data through a wider study and broad-based measures to improve the quality of critical care units and quality of the lives of these doctors is the need of the hour.

  16. Intensive care diaries reduce new onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Christina; Bäckman, Carl; Capuzzo, Maurizia

    2010-01-01

    Patients recovering from critical illness have been shown to be at risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). This study was to evaluate whether a prospectively collected diary of a patient's intensive care unit (ICU) stay when used during convalescence following critical illness...

  17. Financing Mental Health Care in Spain: Context and critical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Salvador-Carulla

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Financing and the way in which funds are then allocated are key issues in health policy. They can act as an incentive or barrier to system reform , can prioritise certain types or sectors of care and have long term consequences for the planning and delivery of services. The way in which these issues can impact on the funding of mental health services across Europe has been a key task of the Mental Health Economics European Network. (MHEEN This paper draws on information prepared for MHEEN and provides an analysis of the context and the main issues related to mental health financing in Spain. METHODS: A structured questionnaire developed by the MHEEN group was used to assess the pattern of financing, eligibility and coverage for mental healthcare. In Spain contacts were made with the Mental Health agencies of the 17 Autonomous Communities (ACs, and available mental health plans and annual reports were reviewed. A direct collaboration was set up with four ACs (Madrid, Navarre, Andalusia, Catalonia. RESULTS: In Spain, like many other European countries mental healthcare is an integral part of the general healthcare with universal coverage funded by taxation. Total health expenditure accounted for 7.7% of GDP in 2003 (public health expenditure was 5.6% of GDP. Although the actual percentage expended in mental care is not known and estimates are unreliable, approximately 5% of total health expenditure can be attributed to mental health. Moreover what is often overlooked is that many services have been shifted from the health to the social care sector as part of the reform process. Social care is discretionary, and provides only limited coverage. This level of expenditure also appears low by European standards, accounting for just 0.6% of GDP. COMMENTS: In spite of its policy implications, little is known about mental healthcare financing in Spain. Comparisons of expenditure for mental health across the ACs are problematic, making it

  18. Improving critical care discharge summaries: a collaborative quality improvement project using PDSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Lucy; Parke, Hannah; Maharaj, Ritesh; Loveridge, Robert; McLoone, Anne; Hadfield, Sophie; Helme, Eloise; Hopkins, Philip; Sandall, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Around 110,000 people spend time in critical care units in England and Wales each year. The transition of care from the intensive care unit to the general ward exposes patients to potential harms from changes in healthcare providers and environment. Nurses working on general wards report anxiety and uncertainty when receiving patients from critical care. An innovative form of enhanced capability critical care outreach called 'iMobile' is being provided at King's College Hospital (KCH). Part of the remit of iMobile is to review patients who have been transferred from critical care to general wards. The iMobile team wished to improve the quality of critical care discharge summaries. A collaborative evidence-based quality improvement project was therefore undertaken by the iMobile team at KCH in conjunction with researchers from King's Improvement Science (KIS). Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) methodology was used. Three PDSA cycles were undertaken. Methods adopted comprised: a scoping literature review to identify relevant guidelines and research evidence to inform all aspects of the quality improvement project; a process mapping exercise; informal focus groups / interviews with staff; patient story-telling work with people who had experienced critical care and subsequent discharge to a general ward; and regular audits of the quality of both medical and nursing critical care discharge summaries. The following behaviour change interventions were adopted, taking into account evidence of effectiveness from published systematic reviews and considering the local context: regular audit and feedback of the quality of discharge summaries, feedback of patient experience, and championing and education delivered by local opinion leaders. The audit results were mixed across the trajectory of the project, demonstrating the difficulty of sustaining positive change. This was particularly important as critical care bed occupancy and through-put fluctuates which then impacts on work

  19. Long-term mortality after critical care: what is the starting point?

    OpenAIRE

    Ranzani, Otavio T; Zampieri, Fernando G; Park, Marcelo; Salluh, Jorge IF

    2013-01-01

    Mortality is still the most assessed outcome in the critically ill patient and is routinely used as the primary end-point in intervention trials, cohort studies, and benchmarking analysis. Despite this, interest in patient-centered prognosis after ICU discharge is increasing, and several studies report quality of life and long-term outcomes after critical illness. In a recent issue of Critical Care, Cuthbertson and colleagues reported interesting results from a cohort of 439 patients with sep...

  20. Spiritual wellbeing, Attitude toward Spiritual Care and its Relationship with Spiritual Care Competence among Critical Care Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Tagie Azarsa; Arefeh Davoodi; Abdolah Khorami Markani; Akram Gahramanian; Afkham Vargaeei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses’ spiritual wellbeing and their attitude toward spirituality and competence of nurses in providing of spiritual care can affect the quality of care in nursing. The aim of this study was to evaluate spiritual wellbeing, attitude toward spiritual care and its relationship with the spiritual care competence among nurses. Methods: This was a correlational descriptive study conducted on 109 nurses working in the Intensive Care Units of Imam Reza and Madani hospitals in 2015, Ta...

  1. Professional stress and health among critical care nurses in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Golubović, Boris; Brkić, Nina; Prokeš, Bela

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse professional stressors, evaluate the level of stress in nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and assess the correlation between the perception of stress and psychological and somatic symptoms or diseases shown by nurses. The research, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out in the Intensive Care Units (ICU), in health centres in Serbia. The sample population encompassed 1000 nurses. Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) was used as the research instrument. ENSS revealed a valid metric characteristic within our sample population. Nurses from ICUs rated situations involving physical and psychological working environments as the most stressful ones, whereas situations related to social working environment were described as less stressful; however, the differences in the perception of stressfulness of these environments were minor. Socio-demographic determinants of the participants (age, marital status and education level) significantly affected the perception of stress at work. Significant differences in the perception of stressfulness of particular stress factors were observed among nurses with respect to psychological and somatic symptoms (such as headache, insomnia, fatigue, despair, lower back pain, mood swings etc.) and certain diseases (such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus etc). In view of permanent escalation of professional stressors, creating a supportive working environment is essential for positive health outcomes, prevention of job-related diseases and better protection of already ill nurses.

  2. Nurses’ Burnout in Oncology Hospital Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz İrem Tunçel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is common in intensive care units (ICU because of high demands and difficult working conditions. The aim of this study was to analyse nurses’ burnout in our oncology ICU and to determine which factors are associated with. Material and Method: The study was carried out in Ankara Oncology Hospital ICU. A self- reporting questionnaire in an envelope was used for the evaluation of burnout (Turkish- language version of Maslach Burnout Inventory and depression (Beck Depression Scale. Results: From a total of 37 ICU nurses, 35 participated in the study (%94,5 response rate. High levels of emotional exhaustion in 82% and depersonalization in 51,4% of nurses was determined. Personal accomplishment was higher at 80%. Mild to moderate emotional state and mild anxiety was revealed. Years in profession,finding salary insufficient, finding the profession in its proper, choosing the profession of his own accord, work environment satisfaction and finding the social activity adequate were associated with burnout (p≤0.05. Conclusion: In our study, intensive care unit nurses’ burnout scores were found to be higher. Burnout was rare in nurses that choose the profession of his own accord, find the nursing profession in its proper, and social activity adequate and are satisfied with the work environment. Therefore, we believe that attention should be given to individual needs and preferences in the selection of ICU staff.

  3. The evolution of nutrition in critical care: how much, how soon?

    OpenAIRE

    Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Critical care is a very recent advance in the history of human evolution. Prior to the existence of ICU care, when the saber-tooth tiger attacked you had but a few critical hours to recover or you died. Mother Nature, and her survival of the fittest mentality, would never have favored the survival of the modern ICU patient. We now support ICU patients for weeks, or even months. During this period, patients appear to undergo phases of critical illness. A simplification of this concept would in...

  4. Critical care medicine for emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome: Which point to be considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2015-09-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a new emerging respiratory tract infection. This coronavirus infection is firstly reported from the Middle East, and it becomes threat for the global public health at present due to its existence in a remote area such as USA and Korea. The concern on the management of the patients is very important. Since most of the patients can develop severe respiratory illness and critical care management is needed, the issue on critical care for MERS is the topic to be discussed in critical medicine.

  5. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vi Am Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS, standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows’ attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ systems was assessed including abdominal, pulmonary, vascular, and cardiac systems. Subjects served as self-controls and were assessed just prior to, within 1 week after, and 3 months after the course. Results. There was a significant improvement in CCM fellows’ written test scores, image acquisition ability, and pathologic image interpretation 1 week after the course and it was retained 3 months after the course. Fellows also had self-reported increased confidence and usage of CCUS applications after the course. Conclusions. Implementation of a 2-day critical care ultrasound course covering general CCUS and basic critical care echocardiography using a combination of didactics, live models, and ultrasound simulators is effective in improving critical care fellows’ proficiency and confidence with ultrasound use in both the short- and long-term settings.

  6. Strategies of organization and service for the critical-care laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, M; Schwartz, M K

    1990-08-01

    Critical-care medicine requires rapidity of treatment decisions and clinical management. To meet the objectives of critical-care medicine, the critical-care laboratory must consider four major aspects of laboratory organization in addition to analytical responsibilities: specimen collection and delivery, training of technologists, selection of reliable instrumentation, and efficient data dissemination. One must also consider the advantages and disadvantages of centralization vs decentralization, the influence of such a laboratory on patient care and personnel needs, and the space required for optimal operation. Centralization may lead to workflow interruption and increased turnaround time (TAT); decentralization requires redundancy of instrumentation and staff but may shorten TAT. Minimal TAT is the hallmark of efficient laboratory service. We surveyed 55 laboratories in 33 hospitals and found that virtually all hospitals with 200 or more beds had a critical-care laboratory operating as a satellite of the main laboratory. We present data on actual TAT, although these were available in only eight of the 15 routine laboratories that provided emergency service and in eight of the 40 critical-care laboratories. In meeting the challenges of an increasing workload, a reduced clinical laboratory work force, and the need to reduce TAT, changes in traditional laboratory practice are mandatory. An increased reliance on whole-blood analysis, for example, should eliminate delays associated with sample preparation, reduce the potential hazards associated with centrifugation, and eliminate excess specimen handling.

  7. Industry-sponsored economic studies in critical and intensive care versus studies sponsored by nonprofit organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Michael; Knoth, Holger; Schulz, Diane; Knoth, Sven; Meier-Hellmann, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis of health economic studies in the field of intensive and critical care was to investigate whether any relationship could be established between type of sponsorship and (1) type of economic analysis, (2) health technology assessed, (3) sensitivity analysis performed, (4) publication status, and (5) qualitative cost assessment. Using the terms critical care or intensive care, all health economics publications in the field of critical and intensive care were identified in the Health Economic Evaluations Database (HEED, Version 1995-2001) on the basis of sponsorship and comparative studies. This search yielded a total of 42 eligible articles. Their evaluations were prepared independently by 2 investigators on the basis of specific criteria. When evaluators disagreed, a third investigator provided a deciding evaluation. There was no statistically demonstrable relationship between types of sponsorship and sensitivity analysis performed, publication status, types of economic analysis, or qualitative cost assessment.

  8. Evaluation of Critical Care Monitor Technology During the US Navy Strong Angel Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, John; Rasbury, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The NASA critical path road map identifies "trauma and acute medical problems" as a clinical capability risk category (http://criticalDath.isc.nasa.gov). Specific risks include major trauma, organ laceration or contusion, hemoperitoneum, pulmonary failure, pneumo- and hemothorax, burn, open bone fracture, blunt head trauma, and penetrating injury. Mitigation of these risks includes the capability for critical care monitoring. Currently, the International Space Station (ISS) Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) does not provide such a capability. The Clinical Space Medicine Strategic Planning Forum (4/8/97), sponsored by NASA Medical Operations, identified the development of trauma care capabilities as one of the top priorities for space medicine. The Clinical Care Capability Development Project (CCCDP) subsequently undertook the task to address this need.

  9. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs.

  10. A Critical Caring Theory of Protection for Migrants and Seasonal Farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jennifer E

    2016-11-14

    Pesticide exposures represent inequities among a vulnerable population of migrant and seasonal farmworkers. A social justice theory synthesized from an environmental health research framework, a middle range theory of critical caring, and literature on pesticide exposure is presented as a situation-specific public health practice theory. Concepts from the physiological, epistemological, vulnerability, and health protection domains are related to concepts of critical caring revealing protective strategies for vulnerable populations exposed to pesticides. The key concepts are risk exposure, community assessment, transpersonal health promotion, community competence, and controllability. Protection from exposure involves raising awareness, critically assessing communities, educating for empowerment, building capacity, and advocating to ensure social justice. Critical caring protection is provided in a mutually respectful relationship that promotes responsibility at the individual and population levels.

  11. Nurse care assesment at the end of life in intensive critical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Cristina Pascual Fernández

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To die nowadays is not the critical instant of our existence in occidental societies. Technological and scientific advances in health sciences have not been developed equally company and humanization in care. Nurses play an important and responsible role at end of life care, to provide patients and their families comfort cares in dying process. The main objective was to describe and analyze the professionals’ cares in Intensive Care Unit at the end of life process. An observational study was developed and 472 surveys to critical care nurses of six high complexity hospitals of Madrid Community were made. The questionnaire on the evaluation from the cares to the children that die in Pediatrics Intensive Care was applied. We have obtained that nurses said that most of the families remained with their patient in the moment of the death and needed support and empathy from the staff. As a conclusion we could say that the cares to the patients in Intensive Care Unit should be improved.

  12. Pediatric asthma severity score is associated with critical care interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maue, Danielle K; Krupp, Nadia; Rowan, Courtney M

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if a standardized asthma severity scoring system (PASS) was associated with the time spent on continuous albuterol and length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). METHODS This is a single center, retrospective chart review study at a major children’s hospital in an urban location. To qualify for this study, participants must have been admitted to the PICU with a diagnosis of status asthmaticus. There were a total of 188 participants between the ages of two and nineteen, excluding patients receiving antibiotics for pneumonia. PASS was calculated upon PICU admission. Subjects were put into one of three categories based on PASS: ≤ 7 (mild), 8-11 (moderate), and ≥ 12 (severe). The groups were compared based on different variables, including length of continuous albuterol and PICU stay. RESULTS The age distribution across all groups was similar. The median length of continuous albuterol was longest in the severe group with a duration of 21.5 h (11.5-27.5), compared to 15 (7.75-23.75) and 10 (5-15) in the moderate and mild groups, respectively (P = 0.001). The length of stay was longest in the severe group, with a stay of 35.6 h (22-49) compared to 26.5 (17-30) and 17.6 (12-29) in the moderate and mild groups, respectively (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION A higher PASS is associated with a longer time on continuous albuterol, an increased likelihood to require noninvasive ventilation, and a longer stay in the ICU. This may help safely distribute asthmatics to lower and higher levels of care in the future.

  13. Evidence and its uses in health care and research: the role of critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenicek, Milos; Croskerry, Pat; Hitchcock, David L

    2011-01-01

    Obtaining and critically appraising evidence is clearly not enough to make better decisions in clinical care. The evidence should be linked to the clinician's expertise, the patient's individual circumstances (including values and preferences), and clinical context and settings. We propose critical thinking and decision-making as the tools for making that link. Critical thinking is also called for in medical research and medical writing, especially where pre-canned methodologies are not enough. It is also involved in our exchanges of ideas at floor rounds, grand rounds and case discussions; our communications with patients and lay stakeholders in health care; and our writing of research papers, grant applications and grant reviews. Critical thinking is a learned process which benefits from teaching and guided practice like any discipline in health sciences. Training in critical thinking should be a part or a pre-requisite of the medical curriculum.

  14. Management of Acute Pancreatitis in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güniz Meyancı Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammation occuring due to digestion of pancreatic self tissues and other organs after activation of digestive enzymes which are stable under normal conditions . For all the pancreatitis cases, the mortality rate is <%15. In the acute pancreatitis cases, the monitorization of the inspiration system, cardiovascular system and the metabolic status are needed. There is no primary therapy for the pancreatitis. All the therapy protocols are support therapy. The basic support therapy methods are: Liquid replacement, respiration support, pain management, pancreas secretion inhibition, metabolic support, intra-abdominal monitoring and decompression, nutrition, antibiotherapy, immunomodulation, coagulation mechanism monitoring. In the acute pancreatitis, the causes of early deaths are pancreatic shock and acute pulmonary thrombohemorrhage, within the first 7 days the causes of the 75% deaths are pulmonary shock and congestion and after 7 days the causes of the 77% are pancreas abscess, MOF (multiple organ failure, purulent peritonitis and erosive hemorrhage. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 85-9

  15. August 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis JL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: The patient is a previously healthy, albeit anxious, 15-year-old girl seen by her primary care physician. She has had several months of general malaise and ongoing fatigue and an increased frequency in night terrors over the past few weeks. Her family attributes this to stress of school and her new job. She was noted to have lost 3 kg in the previous nine weeks. PMH, SH, and FH: Her PMH was unremarkable. She is a student and denies smoking, drinking or drug abuse. Her family history is noncontributory. Physical Examination: Vital signs: BP 100/60 mm Hg, P 90 beats/min and regular, R 16 breaths/min, T 100.8 ºF, BMI 15; Diffuse, non-tender lymphadenopathy through the submandibular and upper anterior cervical chains; Lungs: clear; Heart: regular rhythm without murmur: Abdomen: slightly rounded and firm. Which of the following are diagnostic considerations at this time? 1. Anorexia nervosa 2. ...

  16. Care of critically ill newborns in India. Legal and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, K N; Paul, V K

    1995-06-01

    The nature of neonatal care in India is changing. While the quality of care will most likely improve as the economy grows, the eventual scope of change remains to be seen. Attitudinal and behavioral changes, in addition to better economic conditions, are needed to realize more appropriate interventions in neonatal care. Economic, cultural, religious, social, political, and other considerations may limit or affect neonatal care, especially for ELBW infants or infants with congenital malformations or brain injury. Various protections for critically ill newborns exist under Indian law and the Constitution of India. New laws are being enacted to enhance the level of protection conferred, including laws which ban amniocentesis for sex determination and define brain death in connection with the use of human organs for therapeutic purposes. The applicability of consumer protection laws to medical care is also being addressed. It is noted, however, that India lacks a multidisciplinary bioethics committee. An effort should be made to discuss the legal and ethical issues regarding the care of critically ill newborns, with discussions considering religious, cultural, traditional, and family values. Legal and ethical guidelines should be developed by institutions, medical councils, and society specific to newborn care, and medical, nursing, and other paramedical schools should include these issues as part of the required coursework. Physicians, nurses, philosophers, and attorneys with expertise in law and ethics should develop and teach these courses. Such measures over the long term will ensure that future health care providers are exposed to these issues, ideally with a view toward enhancing patient care.

  17. Critical care research in a district general hospital: the first year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camsooksai, Julie; Barnes, Helena; Reschreiter, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    Until recently, research in critical care units has usually taken place in university teaching hospitals. The 'general' critical care unit patient population is broader than this and the research needs to reflect this. As a general critical care unit in a district general hospital we wanted to set-up research within our own department, as part of the critical care team and part of our culture. With extensive background communication, drive and hard work, the support of the hospital Research and Development department was gained and Comprehensive Local Research Network funding successfully applied for. A research team was established and a model for the Research Nurse role was developed and implemented. This model is described. Participation in national trials commenced and the research portfolio is growing. Networking with other teams also proved valuable. Research has been established as part of the 'culture' of the day-to-day work and the staff have embraced this. Dedicated Research Nurse posts and education of the whole team have ensured successful implementation and recruitment of the studies. Experiences of the first year are shared and discussed here. Sharing experience of developing research within a critical care unit in a district general hospital, and a suggested model for a new Research Nurse role, may benefit other similar units in their efforts to establish research.

  18. Modernisation as a professionalising strategy: the case of critical care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Judith; Durand, Mary Alison; Hutchings, Andrew; Black, Nick

    2011-09-01

    There has been broad agreement about how to characterise the processes of 'modernisation' of the public sector in welfare societies, but rather less consensus on the impact of this modernisation on professionals. This paper takes critical care in England as a case study to explore how professionals in one setting account for the changes associated with modernisation. In contrast to reports from other arenas, critical care professionals were positive about the processes and outcomes of 'modernisation' in general, and there was a surprising lack of nostalgia in their accounts of organisational changes. However, joking comments suggested considerable scepticism about the initiatives explicitly associated with the national organisation that was charged with 'modernising' critical care, the Modernisation Agency. We suggest that the relative optimism of staff is in part explained by historical and political contingencies which meant that critical care, as a relatively new clinical specialty, benefited in tangible ways from modernisation. Further, all staff groups were able to attribute gains, rather than losses, in autonomy and authority to the modernisation of critical care. Their accounts suggest that modernisation can be a professionalising strategy, with responses to change being neither resistant nor compliant, but sceptically strategic.

  19. Estimating C-17 Aircrew Seasoning Given a Prediction of Flying Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Estimating C-17 Aircrew Seasoning Given a Prediction of Flying Austerity GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Frank W. Rovello, Major, USAF AFIT-ENS...United States Government AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-13 Estimating C-17 Aircrew Seasoning Given a Prediction of Flying Austerity Graduate...AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-13 Estimating C-17 Aircrew Seasoning Given a Prediction of Flying Austerity Frank W. Rovello, MBA, BS Major, USAF Approved: Doral

  20. Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. Implications for insurance-related disparities in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Sarah M; Douglas, Ivor S; Cooke, Colin R

    2014-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act was intended to address systematic health inequalities for millions of Americans who lacked health insurance. Expansion of Medicaid was a key component of the legislation, as it was expected to provide coverage to low-income individuals, a population at greater risk for disparities in access to the health care system and in health outcomes. Several studies suggest that expansion of Medicaid can reduce insurance-related disparities, creating optimism surrounding the potential impact of the Affordable Care Act on the health of the poor. However, several impediments to the implementation of Medicaid's expansion and inadequacies within the Medicaid program itself will lessen its initial impact. In particular, the Supreme Court's decision to void the Affordable Care Act's mandate requiring all states to accept the Medicaid expansion allowed half of the states to forego coverage expansion, leaving millions of low-income individuals without insurance. Moreover, relative to many private plans, Medicaid is an imperfect program suffering from lower reimbursement rates, fewer covered services, and incomplete acceptance by preventive and specialty care providers. These constraints will reduce the potential impact of the expansion for patients with respiratory and sleep conditions or critical illness. Despite its imperfections, the more than 10 million low-income individuals who gain insurance as a result of Medicaid expansion will likely have increased access to health care, reduced out-of-pocket health care spending, and ultimately improvements in their overall health.

  1. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU.

  2. Volatile Anesthetics. Is a New Player Emerging in Critical Care Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Angela; Parotto, Matteo; Wasowicz, Marcin; Ferguson, Niall D

    2016-06-01

    Volatile anesthetic agent use in the intensive care unit, aided by technological advances, has become more accessible to critical care physicians. With increasing concern over adverse patient consequences associated with our current sedation practice, there is growing interest to find non-benzodiazepine-based alternative sedatives. Research has demonstrated that volatile-based sedation may provide superior awakening and extubation times in comparison with current intravenous sedation agents (propofol and benzodiazepines). Volatile agents may possess important end-organ protective properties mediated via cytoprotective and antiinflammatory mechanisms. However, like all sedatives, volatile agents are capable of deeply sedating patients, which can have respiratory depressant effects and reduce patient mobility. This review seeks to critically appraise current volatile use in critical care medicine including current research, technical consideration of their use, contraindications, areas of controversy, and proposed future research topics.

  3. Knowledge, Skills and Experience Managing Tracheostomy Emergencies: A Survey of Critical Care Medicine trainees

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nizam, AA

    2016-10-01

    Since the development of percutaneous tracheostomy, the number of tracheostomy patients on hospital wards has increased. Problems associated with adequate tracheostomy care on the wards are well documented, particularly the management of tracheostomy-related emergencies. A survey was conducted among non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) starting their Critical Care Medicine training rotation in a university affiliated teaching hospital to determine their basic knowledge and skills in dealing with tracheostomy emergencies. Trainees who had received specific tracheostomy training or who had previous experience of dealing with tracheostomy emergencies were more confident in dealing with such emergencies compared to trainees without such training or experience. Only a minority of trainees were aware of local hospital guidelines regarding tracheostomy care. Our results highlight the importance of increased awareness of tracheostomy emergencies and the importance of specific training for Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine trainees.

  4. [Surgical therapy and critical care medicine in severely burned patients - Part 1: the first 24 ours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Rolf; Kauczok, Jens; Deisz, Robert; Pallua, Norbert; Marx, Gernot

    2012-09-01

    Critical care medicine in severely burned patients should be adapted to the different pathophysiological phases. Accordingly, surgical and non-surgical therapy must be coordinated adequately. Initial wound care comprises topical treatment of less severely injured skin and surgical debridement of severely burned areas. The first 24 hours of intensive care are focused on calculated fluid delivery to provide stable hemodynamics and avoid progression of local edema formation. In the further course wound treatment with split-thickness skin grafts is the major aim of surgical therapy. Critical care is focused on the avoidance of complications like infections and ventilator associated lung injury. Therefore, lung-protective ventilation strategies, weaning and sedation protocols, and early enteral nutrition are important cornerstones of the treatment.

  5. Application of a Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program in critical care: the royal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren E; Flanders, Sonya A

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the history of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) and how it is used to foster a culture of safety. CUSP involves interdisciplinary teamwork and empowers nurses at all levels to pioneer changes and develop leadership skills. A case study is presented to show how CUSP was used effectively in critical care to create a standardized handover of patients from the operating room to the intensive care unit.

  6. Subterranean Currents: Research and the Radical Imagination in the Age of Austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Khasnabish

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Against a backdrop of austerity, securitization, and the rampant enclosure of public spaces and democratic processes including the university and scholarship, this article critically explores what prefigurative engaged research – research capable of not simply documenting what is but contributing to struggles for social justice and social change – might look like, what it can contribute, and what its limitations are. Beyond familiar calls for a “public” or “applied” social science and drawing on a two-year-long project focused on radical social movements and the radical imagination in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, this article explores what politically-engaged social science research might offer to social justice struggles aiming to construct a more just, democratic, dignified, liberated, and peaceful world.

  7. An evaluation of inpatient morbidity and critical care provision in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, P J; Kinnear, J; Bould, M D; Mwansa, S L; Rakhda, Z; Snell, D

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively measure demand for critical care services in a southern African tertiary referral centre. We carried out a point prevalence study of medical and surgical admissions over a 48-h period at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, recording the following: age; sex; diagnosis; Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) status and National Early Warning Score. One-hundred and twenty medical and surgical admissions were studied. Fifty-four patients (45%) had objective evidence of a requirement for critical care review and potential or probable admission to an intensive care unit, according to the Royal College of Physicians (UK) guidelines. A greater than expected HIV rate was also noted; 53 of 75 tested patients (71%). When applied to the estimated 17,496 annual acute admissions, this would equate to 7873 patients requiring critical care input annually at this hospital alone. In contrast to this demand, we identified 109 critical care beds nationally, and only eight at this institution.

  8. A critical analysis of the failure of nurses to raise concerns about poor patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marc

    2016-10-28

    The occurrence of poor patient care is emerging as one of the most significant, challenging, and critical issues confronting contemporary nursing and those responsible for the provision of health care more generally. Indeed, as a consequence of the increased recognition of the manner in which nurses can be implicated in the occurrence of poor patient care, there has been sustained critical debate that seeks to understand how such healthcare failings can occur and, in particular, why nurses seemingly fail to intervene, raise concerns, and effectively respond to prevent the occurrence and continuation of such poor patient care. In seeking to contribute to this critical discussion, and in contrast to those "situational explanations" that maintain that the failure to raise concerns is a consequence of the contextual factors and challenging conditions to which nurses can be subject in the clinical setting, this paper will provide a resolutely philosophical analysis of that failure. In particular, it will draw upon the work of Jean-Paul Sartre-the French philosopher generally regarded as one of the most influential thinkers of the twentieth century-in order to propose that his work can be productively recontextualized to provide a detailed, challenging, and provocative critical analysis of the occurrence and continuation of poor patient care and the role of individual nurse practitioners in such healthcare failings.

  9. The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, M; Graham, S; Bonacum, D

    2004-10-01

    Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members to unsafe situations. All too frequently, effective communication is situation or personality dependent. Other high reliability domains, such as commercial aviation, have shown that the adoption of standardised tools and behaviours is a very effective strategy in enhancing teamwork and reducing risk. We describe our ongoing patient safety implementation using this approach within Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit American healthcare system providing care for 8.3 million patients. We describe specific clinical experience in the application of surgical briefings, properties of high reliability perinatal care, the value of critical event training and simulation, and benefits of a standardised communication process in the care of patients transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. Additionally, lessons learned as to effective techniques in achieving cultural change, evidence of improving the quality of the work environment, practice transfer strategies, critical success factors, and the evolving methods of demonstrating the benefit of such work are described.

  10. Continued transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a wash hand basin tap in a critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M I; Bradley, C W; Tracey, J; Oppenheim, B

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen, colonizing hospital water supplies including taps and sinks. We report a cluster of P. aeruginosa acquisitions during a period of five months from tap water to patients occupying the same burns single room in a critical care unit. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultured from clinical isolates from four different patients was indistinguishable from water strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Water outlets in critical care may be a source of P. aeruginosa despite following the national guidance, and updated guidance and improved control measures are needed to reduce the risks of transmission to patients.

  11. Study of variables affecting critical value notification in a laboratory catering to tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rachna; Chhillar, Neelam; Tripathi, Chandra B

    2015-01-01

    During post-analytical phase, critical value notification to responsible caregiver in a timely manner has potential to improve patient safety which requires cooperative efforts between laboratory personnel and caregivers. It is widely accepted by hospital accreditors that ineffective notification can lead to diagnostic errors that potentially harm patients and are preventable. The objective of the study was to assess the variables affecting critical value notification, their role in affecting it's quality and approaches to improve it. In the present study 1,187 critical values were analysed in the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory catering to tertiary care hospital for neuropsychiatric diseases. During 25 months of study period, we evaluated critical value notification with respect to clinical care area, caregiver to whom it was notified and timeliness of notification. During the study period (25 months), the laboratory obtained 1,279 critical values in clinical chemistry. The analytes most commonly notified were sodium and potassium (20.97 & 20.8 % of total critical results). Analysis of critical value notification versus area of care showed that critical value notification was high in ICU and emergency area followed by inpatients and 64.61 % critical values were notified between 30 and 120 min after receiving the samples. It was found that failure to notify the responsible caregiver in timely manner represent an important patient safety issue and may lead to diagnostic errors. The major area of concern are notification of critical value for outpatient samples, incompleteness of test requisition forms regarding illegible writing, lack of information of treating physician and location of test ordering and difficulty in contacting the responsible caregiver.

  12. Care plans using concept maps and their effects on the critical thinking dispositions of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Selma; Karabacak, Ukke

    2012-06-01

    It is expected that nursing education improves abilities of students in solving problems, decision making and critical thinking in different circumstances. This study was performed to analyse the effects of care plans prepared using concept maps on the critical thinking dispositions of students. An experimental group and a control group were made up of a total of 80 freshman and sophomore students from the nursing department of a health school. The study used a pre-test post-test control group design. The critical thinking dispositions of the groups were measured using the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory. In addition, the care plans prepared by the experimental group students were evaluated using the criteria for evaluating care plans with concept maps. T-test was used in analysing the data. The results showed that there were no statistically significant differences in the total and sub-scale pre-test scores between the experimental group and control group students. There were also significant differences in the total and sub-scale post-test scores between the experimental group and control group students. There were significant differences between concept map care plan evaluation criteria mean scores of the experimental students. In the light of these findings, it could be argued that the concept mapping strategy improves critical thinking skills of students.

  13. The Politics of Austerity as Politics of Law

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, António Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980 the neoliberal agenda has become the strongest advocate against social and labour rights. However, the 2008 crisis emerged a new economic, political and juridical model based on the idea of austerity ― a muscled form of neoliberalism which deepens the neoliberal ideology by other means. Bearing this in mind, I have chosen to organise this paper around three topics. In the first section, my purpose is to suggest that, in addition to the obvious economic and financial aspects of the ...

  14. Further Austerity and Wage Cuts Will Worsen the Euro Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Andini, Corrado; Cabral, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This note argues that the solutions to the euro-area crisis proposed by the EU governing institutions in cooperation with the IMF, based on further austerity and wage cuts, will worsen the crisis. They are unlikely to reduce both sovereign and external debt ratios of countries experiencing these problems. Quite in contrary, they are likely to further reduce the real GDP growth of these countries.

  15. International recommendations on competency in critical care ultrasound: pertinence to Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Anthony S

    2011-03-01

    The use of echocardiography and other applications of ultrasound in the management of critically ill patients is becoming mainstream. With increased accessibility to equipment, the main challenges are in providing training and drawing up an outline of what levels of competency should be achieved. An international body of experienced critical care physician sonographers has reached consensus on guidelines in training and on two levels of competency - basic and advanced. Formal structures to aid the physician have been developed in Australia and New Zealand.

  16. The emotional intelligence of a group of critical-care nurses in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Towell; Elzabe Nel; Ann Müller

    2013-01-01

    Critical-care nurses often look after three or more critically-ill patients during a shift. The workload and emotional stress can lead to disharmony between the nurse’s body, mind and spirit. Nurses with a high emotional intelligence have less emotional exhaustion and psychosomatic symptoms; they enjoy better emotional health; gain more satisfaction from their actions (both at work and at home); and have improved relationships with colleagues at work. The question arises: what is the emotiona...

  17. Critical appraisal skills training for health care professionals: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN46272378

    OpenAIRE

    Ewings Paul E; Reeves Barnaby C; Taylor Rod S; Taylor Rebecca J

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Critical appraisal skills are believed to play a central role in an evidence-based approach to health practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and costs of a critical appraisal skills educational intervention aimed at health care professionals. Methods This prospective controlled trial randomized 145 self-selected general practitioners, hospital physicians, professions allied to medicine, and healthcare managers/administrators from the South West...

  18. Austerity and the challenges of health for all in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundana Folakemi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The economic downturn experienced by Nigeria and many sub-Saharan African countries led to the adoption of austerity to restore the country’s economy since the 1980s. Since austerity emphasizes privatization and commercialization, instead of restoration, it had, however, impacted especially the Nigerian health sector negatively. Nigeria has indeed continued to bear witness to some of the worst health and healthcare statistics in the world. Evidence from key health indicators in Nigeria also clearly shows that the country’s health situation has experienced massive deterioration. Given the above, the paper argues that austerity constitutes a major impediment to the attainment of a good state of health as well as effective and viable healthcare delivery to all in Nigeria. The paper, therefore suggests: (1 reframing and recognizing health as a human right issue; (2 integration of indigenous medicine into the Nigerian national health delivery systems; (3 recognition of State investment in social services as quite necessary and important such that budget allocation to health is increased as ways forward.

  19. Assessing and developing critical-thinking skills in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinny, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    A lot of resources are spent on the development of new staff in the intensive care unit (ICU). These resources are necessary because the environment in the ICU is complex and the patients are critically ill. Nurses need an advanced knowledge base, the ability to accurately define and change priorities rapidly, good communication and teamwork skills, and the ability to work in a stressful environment in order to succeed and give their patients quality care. Critical thinking helps the nurse to navigate the complex and stressful environment of the ICU. Critical thinking includes more than just nursing knowledge. It includes the ability to think through complex, multifaceted problems to anticipate needs, recognize potential and actual complications, and to expertly communicate with the team. A nurse who is able to think critically will give better patient care. Various strategies can be used to develop critical thinking in ICU nurses. Nurse leaders are encouraged to support the development of critical-thinking skills in less experienced staff with the goal of improving the nurse's ability to work in the ICU and improving patient outcomes.

  20. Ethical Issues in Surgical Critical Care: The Complexity of Interpersonal Relationships in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Malini D; Angelos, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in the era of shared medical decision making is the navigation of complex relationships between the physicians, patients, and surrogates who guide treatment plans for critically ill patients. This review of ethical issues in adult surgical critical care explores factors influencing interactions among the characters most prominently involved in health care decisions in the surgical intensive care unit: the patient, the surrogate, the surgeon, and the intensivist. Ethical tensions in the surgeon-patient relationship in the elective setting may arise from the preoperative surgical covenant and the development of surgical complications. Unlike that of the surgeon, the intensivist's relationship with the individual patient must be balanced with the need to serve other acutely ill patients. Due to their unique perspectives, surgeons and intensivists may disagree about decisions to pursue life-sustaining therapies for critically ill postoperative patients. Finally, although surrogates are asked to make decisions for patients on the basis of the substituted judgment or best interest standards, these models may underestimate the nuances of postoperative surrogate decision making. Strategies to minimize conflicts regarding treatment decisions are centered on early, honest, and consistent communication between all parties.

  1. Critical pathways for the management of preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia in institutionalised health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daftari Ashi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preeclampsia is a complex disease in which several providers should interact continuously and in a coordinated manner to provide proper health care. However, standardizing criteria to treat patients with preeclampsia is problematical and severe flaws have been observed in the management of the disease. This paper describes a set of critical pathways (CPs designed to provide uniform criteria for clinical decision-making at different levels of care of pregnant patients with preeclampsia or severe preeclampsia. Methods Clinicians and researchers from different countries participated in the construction of the CPs. The CPs were developed using the following steps: a Definition of the conceptual framework; b Identification of potential users: primary care physicians and maternal and child health nurses in ambulatory settings; ob/gyn and intensive care physicians in secondary and tertiary care levels. c Structural development. Results The CPs address the following care processes: 1. Screening for preeclampsia, risk assessment and classification according to the level of risk. 2. Management of preeclampsia at primary care clinics. 3. Evaluation and management of preeclampsia at secondary and tertiary care hospitals: 4. Criteria for clinical decision-making between conservative management and expedited delivery of patients with severe preeclampsia. Conclusion Since preeclampsia continues to be one of the primary causes of maternal deaths and morbidity worldwide, the expected impact of these CPs is the contribution to improving health care quality in both developed and developing countries. The CPs are designed to be applied in a complex health care system, where different physicians and health providers at different levels of care should interact continuously and in a coordinated manner to provide care to all preeclamptic women. Although the CPs were developed using evidence-based criteria, they could require careful evaluation and

  2. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    Leaders of critical care programs have significant responsibility to develop and maintain a system of intensive care. At inception, those clinician resources necessary to provide and be available for the expected range of patient illness and injury and throughput are determined. Simultaneously, non-ICU clinical responsibilities and other expectations, such as education of trainees and participation in hospital operations, must be understood. To meet these responsibilities, physicians must be recruited, mentored, and retained. The physician leader may have similar responsibilities for nonphysician practitioners. In concert with other critical care leaders, the service adopts a model of care and assembles an ICU team of physicians, nurses, nonphysician providers, respiratory therapists, and others to provide clinical services. Besides clinician resources, leaders must assure that services such as radiology, pharmacy, the laboratory, and information services are positioned to support the complexities of ICU care. Metrics are developed to report success in meeting process and outcomes goals. Leaders evolve the system of care by reassessing and modifying practice patterns to continually improve safety, efficacy, and efficiency. Major emphasis is placed on the importance of continuity, consistency, and communication by expecting practitioners to adopt similar practices and patterns. Services anticipate and adapt to evolving expectations and resource availability. Effective services will result when skilled practitioners support one another and ascribe to a service philosophy of care.

  3. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Kashani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited. Objectives: To assess 1 levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2 the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes. Methods: In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-one of the 58 critical care fellows who were in the first year of training at the time of this initial survey participated in a pre-test and 1-year post-test to determine the effects of a brief, 90-min stress management intervention. Results: Based on responses (n=58 to the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, reported burnout was significantly lower in Asian fellows (p=0.04 and substantially higher among graduating fellows (versus new and transitioning fellows (p=0.02. Among the intervention cohort, burnout did not significantly improve – though two-thirds of fellows reported using the interventional techniques to deal with stressful situations. Fellows who participated in the intervention rated the effectiveness of the course as 4 (IQR=3.75–5 using the 5-point Likert scale. Conclusions: In comparison with the new and transitioning trainees, burnout was highest among graduating critical care fellows. Although no significant improvements were found in first-year fellows’ burnout scores following the single, 90-min training intervention, participants felt the training did provide them with tools to apply during stressful situations.

  4. Awareness of bispectral index monitoring system among the critical care nursing personnel in a tertiary care hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bispectral index monitoring system (BIS is one of the several systems used to measure the effects of anaesthetic and sedative drugs on the brain and to track changes in the patient′s level of sedation and hypnosis. BIS monitoring provides information clinically relevant to the adjustment of dosages of sedating medication. It can help the nursing personnel in preventing under- and over sedation among intensive care unit (ICU patients. Objective: The present study was conducted to assess the knowledge of nursing personnel working in the ICU regarding BIS. Methods: Fifty-four subjects participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess the knowledge of the nursing personnel regarding BIS. Focus group discussions were held among the nursing personnel to know their views regarding BIS. Results: Mean age (years of the subjects was 30.7΁7.19 (21-47 years, with a female preponderance. Although the use of BIS in ICU is not common, majority (94.44% were aware of BIS and its purpose. 79.62% of the subjects knew about its implication in patient care. The mean knowledge score of the subjects was 11.87΁2.43 (maximum score being 15. Conclusion: There exists an awareness among the critical care nursing staff in our institution regarding BIS and its clinical implications. Its use in the critical care setting may benefit the patients in terms of providing optimal sedation.

  5. Relationship of anxiety and burnout with extrasystoles in critical care nurses in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denat, Yildiz; Gokce, Serap; Gungor, Hasan; Zencir, Cemil; Akgullu, Cagdas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between levels of anxiety and burnout and prevalence of atrial extrasystoles (AESs) and ventricular extrasystoles (VESs) among critical care nurses. Methods: The sample of study included 51 nurses who worked in the intensive care units of a university hospital located in western Turkey. Beck’s Anxiety Inventory and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were used in the study. Results: The mean emotional exhaustion score of the nurses was 14.68±6.10, the mean personal accomplishment score was 19.19±7.08, the mean depersonalization score was 5.31±3.84 and the mean anxiety score was 12.37±11.12. The rates of VESs and AESs detected in the critical care nurses were 21.6% and 35.3%, respectively. No relationship was found between levels of anxiety and burnout and the prevalence of AESs and VESs among the critical care nurses. A positive correlation was found between personal accomplishment scores and numbers of VESs (r= 0.693, p=0.001) and AESs (r= 0.700, p= 0.001). Conclusion: In the present study, there were low mean scores of burnout and anxiety among nurses working in intensive care units. No relationship was found between levels of anxiety and burnout and the prevalence of AESs and VESs among nurses who work in intensive care units. It was found that the people feeling more personal accomplishment have more VES or AES. The prevalence of AESs and VESs among the critical care nurses suffering from burnout and anxiety may be studied in the future studies. PMID:27022374

  6. Ventilator withdrawal: procedures and outcomes. Report of a collaboration between a critical care division and a palliative care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Sean; McHugh, Marlene; Zallman, Leah; Selwyn, Peter

    2003-10-01

    To describe an institutional procedure for ventilator withdrawal and to analyze patient responses to terminal extubation, the medical records of 21 patients who underwent withdrawal of mechanical ventilation according to the process followed by an interdisciplinary palliative care team were retrospectively reviewed. The cohort was a convenience sample of sequentially treated patients in a 1048-bed urban university-affiliated medical center. Sixteen of the 21 patients were on medical or surgical floors and five patients were in critical care units. Patients were assessed for discomfort, such as dyspnea, agitation, or anxiety. Sedative and analgesic medications were administered based on clinical parameters. Palliative care clinician observations of patient reports, tachypnea,use of accessory muscles, and signs of discomfort such as agitation or anxiety were recorded for the first 4 hours after extubation. Medication use and length of survival were recorded. Fifty-seven percent were symptomatic during the extubation process and required administration of either a benzodiazepine or opioid medication. The median survival of the 18 patients who died post-extubation was 0.83 hours (interquartile range 0.5-43.8). Bolus doses of opioid or benzodiazepine medications were effective for management of symptoms in about two-thirds of patients. One-third of patients required continuous infusions. Eighteen patients died following extubation in the medical center, and three of these patients were transferred to an inpatient hospice unit. Three patients (14%) survived to discharge from the hospital. The procedure followed provides a foundation for collaboration between palliative care and critical care services to ensure continuity of care across clinical settings/units.

  7. Adaptation of the Critical Care Family Need Inventory to the Turkish population and its psychometric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Büyükçoban

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the complex environment of intensive care units, needs of patients’ relatives might be seen as the lowest priority. On the other hand, because of their patients’ critical and often uncertain conditions, stress levels of relatives are quite high. This study aims to adapt the Critical Care Family Need Inventory, which assesses the needs of patients’ relatives, for use with the Turkish-speaking population and to assess psychometric properties of the resulting inventory. The study was conducted in a state hospital with the participation of 191 critical care patient relatives. Content validity was assessed by expert opinions, and construct validity was examined by exploratory factor analysis (EFA. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to determine internal consistency. The translated inventory has a content validity ratio higher than the minimum acceptable level. Its construct validity was established by the EFA. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the entire scale was 0.93 and higher than 0.80 for subscales, thus demonstrating the translated version’s reliability. The Turkish adaptation appropriately reflects all dimensions of needs in the original CCFNI, and its psychometric properties were acceptable. The revised tool could be useful for helping critical care healthcare workers provide services in a holistic approach and for policymakers to improve quality of service.

  8. An ethical analysis of proxy and waiver of consent in critical care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Rossel, Peter J. Hancke

    2013-01-01

    It is a central principle in medical ethics that vulnerable patients are entitled to a degree of protection that reflects their vulnerability. In critical care research, this protection is often established by means of so-called proxy consent. Proxy consent for research participation constitutes...

  9. Derivation of Candidates for the Combat Casualty Critical Care (C4) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 179, 4:370, 2014 Derivation of Candidates for the Combat Casualty Critical Care (C4) Database Maj Ian J. Stewart, USAF MC*; Col...Trauma Nurs 2008; 15: 181–4. 13. Hunt JP, Cherr GS, Hunter C, et al: Accuracy of administrative data in trauma: splenic injuries as an example. J

  10. A perspective on Serum Lactic acid, Lactic Acidosis in a Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agela A.Elbadri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the major surgical problems encountered in Libya. Lactic acidosis is a universal complication in breast cancer patients and can be considered a possible prognostic marker. Therefore, it will be beneficial to correctly understand and review the biochemistry underlying lactic acidosis and its possible significance as a prognostic marker in critical care patients, including breast cancer.

  11. Medication error in anaesthesia and critical care: A cause for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kothari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in medical profession, and anaesthesia and critical care are no exception to it. Man, medicine, machine and modus operandi are the main contributory factors to it. In this review, incidence, types, risk factors and preventive measures of the medication errors are discussed in detail.

  12. Amniotic fluid and colostrum as potential diets in the critical care of preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Viberg Østergaard, Mette; Torp Sangild, Per

    2015-01-01

    be species independent, maybe allowing colostrum from one species (i.e., lactating cows) to be used as the first enteral diet for infants for whom mother’s milk is lacking. The use of amniotic fluid and bovine colostrum in the critical care of neonates is still at an experimental stage, but animal studies...

  13. The research agenda in ICU telemedicine: a statement from the Critical Care Societies Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Hill, Nicholas S; Lilly, Craig M; Angus, Derek C; Jacobi, Judith; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Sales, Anne E; Scales, Damon C; Mathers, James A L

    2011-07-01

    ICU telemedicine uses audiovisual conferencing technology to provide critical care from a remote location. Research is needed to best define the optimal use of ICU telemedicine, but efforts are hindered by methodological challenges and the lack of an organized delivery approach. We convened an interdisciplinary working group to develop a research agenda in ICU telemedicine, addressing both methodological and knowledge gaps in the field. To best inform clinical decision-making and health policy, future research should be organized around a conceptual framework that enables consistent descriptions of both the study setting and the telemedicine intervention. The framework should include standardized methods for assessing the preimplementation ICU environment and describing the telemedicine program. This framework will facilitate comparisons across studies and improve generalizability by permitting context-specific interpretation. Research based on this framework should consider the multidisciplinary nature of ICU care and describe the specific program goals. Key topic areas to be addressed include the effect of ICU telemedicine on the structure, process, and outcome of critical care delivery. Ideally, future research should attempt to address causation instead of simply associations and elucidate the mechanism of action in order to determine exactly how ICU telemedicine achieves its effects. ICU telemedicine has significant potential to improve critical care delivery, but high-quality research is needed to best inform its use. We propose an agenda to advance the science of ICU telemedicine and generate research with the greatest potential to improve patient care.

  14. A journey of critical consciousness: an educational strategy for health care leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzlaf, Beverley A; Osborne, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare leaders who develop a critical perspective of the relationship between culture and health; value respect for differences, inclusiveness, equity, and social justice; and use their power to enact these values in their spheres of influence, both professionally and personally, are better able to improve care for a diversity of clients. Graduate students can be assisted to develop such a critical perspective through a course designed as a journey of critical consciousness. We describe this journey that takes students through phases of awareness, reflection, and action in which they come to understand the concepts of critical theory and discourse analysis and begin to use these to create changes in their work settings in the direction of equity and social justice. We suggest broader implications for programs and invite readers to begin their own journeys of critical consciousness.

  15. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  16. Eluding meaninglessness: a note to self in regard to Camus, critical care, and the absurd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimos, Thomas John

    2014-01-01

    Here I present a medical narrative, as a catharsis, regarding Albert Camus’s The Myth of Sisyphus in an attempt to elude meaninglessness in my difficult everyday practice of critical care medicine. It is well documented that physicians who practice critical care medicine are subject to burnout. The sense of despair that occasionally overwhelms me prompted my rereading of Camus’s classic text and caused me to recount his arguments that life is meaningless unless one is willing to take a leap of faith to the divine or, alternately, to commit suicide. This set up the examination of his third alternative, acceptance of a life without prima facie evidence of purpose and meaning, a view that may truly have some bearing on my professional life in the intensive care unit.

  17. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  18. Comparative Study of Job Burnout Among Critical Care Nurses With Fixed and Rotating Shift Schedules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamali, Mahdi; Shahriari, Mohsen; Babaii, Atye

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses, as health care providers, are insurmountably obliged to the practice of shift work. Literature has reported shift working as one of the inducing factors of burnout. Despite numerous studies in this area, there are inconsistencies on the relationship between shift working...... and burnout among nurses, especially in those who work in critical care settings. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the occupational burnout in critical care nurses with and without fixed shift schedules. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this comparative study, 130 nurses with rotating shift schedule...... and 130 nurses with fixed shift schedule from six university hospitals were selected using stratified random sampling. Maslach burnout inventory was used for data collection. Independent samples t-test, chi-square and one-way ANOVA tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Most of the participants...

  19. Developing professional attributes in critical care nurses using Team-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Judy; Eustace, Paula; Oldland, Elizabeth; Glanville, David; Story, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Australian nurses prepare for specialty practice by undertaking postgraduate theoretical and clinical education in partnership models between universities and hospitals. In our global healthcare system, nurses require advanced critical thinking and strong communication skills to provide safe, high quality patient care. Yet, few education programs focus on developing these skills. Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a specific educational strategy that encourages and rewards students to think critically and solve clinical problems individually and in teams. The aim of this study was to investigate critical care nursing students' perceptions and experiences of TBL after it was introduced into the second half of their postgraduate specialty course. Following Ethics Committee approval, thirty-two students were invited to participate in an extended response questionnaire on their perceptions of TBL as part of a larger study. Data were analyzed thematically. Postgraduate students perceived their professional growth was accelerated due to the skills and knowledge acquired through TBL. Four themes underpinned the development and accelerated acquisition of specialty nurse attributes due to TBL: Engagement, Learning Effectiveness, Critical Thinking, and Motivation to Participate. Team-Based Learning offered deep and satisfying learning experiences for students. The early acquisition of advanced critical thinking, teamwork and communication skills, and specialty practice knowledge empowered nurses to provide safe patient care with confidence.

  20. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes.

  1. Deciding intensive care unit-admission for critically ill cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiery Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 15 years, the management of critically ill cancer patients requiring intensive care unit admission has substantially changed. High mortality rates (75-85% were reported 10-20 years ago in cancer patients requiring life sustaining treatments. Because of these high mortality rates, the high costs, and the moral burden for patients and their families, ICU admission of cancer patients became controversial, or even clearly discouraged by some. As a result, the reluctance of intensivists regarding cancer patients has led to frequent refusal admission in the ICU. However, prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has been improved over the past 10 years leading to an urgent need to reappraise this reluctance. In this review, the authors sought to highlight that critical care management, including mechanical ventilation and other life sustaining therapies, may benefit to cancer patients. In addition, criteria for ICU admission are discussed, with a particular emphasis to potential benefits of early ICU-admission.

  2. Development and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Competency in Critical Care Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrawalla, Paru; Eisen, Lewis Ari; Shiloh, Ariel; Shah, Brijen J.; Savenkov, Oleksandr; Wise, Wendy; Evans, Laura; Mayo, Paul; Szyld, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound is an emerging technology in critical care medicine. Despite requirements for critical care medicine fellowship programs to demonstrate knowledge and competency in point-of-care ultrasound, tools to guide competency-based training are lacking. Objective We describe the development and validity arguments of a competency assessment tool for critical care ultrasound. Methods A modified Delphi method was used to develop behaviorally anchored checklists for 2 ultrasound applications: “Perform deep venous thrombosis study (DVT)” and “Qualify left ventricular function using parasternal long axis and parasternal short axis views (Echo).” One live rater and 1 video rater evaluated performance of 28 fellows. A second video rater evaluated a subset of 10 fellows. Validity evidence for content, response process, and internal consistency was assessed. Results An expert panel finalized checklists after 2 rounds of a modified Delphi method. The DVT checklist consisted of 13 items, including 1.00 global rating step (GRS). The Echo checklist consisted of 14 items, and included 1.00 GRS for each of 2 views. Interrater reliability evaluated with a Cohen kappa between the live and video rater was 1.00 for the DVT GRS, 0.44 for the PSLA GRS, and 0.58 for the PSSA GRS. Cronbach α was 0.85 for DVT and 0.92 for Echo. Conclusions The findings offer preliminary evidence for the validity of competency assessment tools for 2 applications of critical care ultrasound and data on live versus video raters. PMID:26692968

  3. Dignity in health-care: a critical exploration using feminism and theories of recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Jones, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Growing concerns over undignified health-care has meant the concept of dignity is currently much discussed in the British National Health Service. This has led to a number of policies attempting to reinstate dignity as a core ethical value governing nursing practice and health-care provision. Yet these initiatives continue to draw upon a concept of dignity which remains reliant upon a depoliticised, ahistorical and decontexualised subject. In this paper, we argue the need to revise the dignity debate through the lens of feminism and theories of recognition. Postmodern feminist theories provide major challenges to what remain dominant liberal approaches as they pay attention to the contingent, reflexive, and affective aspects of care work. Theories of recognition provide a further critical resource for understanding how moral obligations and responsibilities towards others and our public and private responses to difference arise. This re-situates dignity as a highly contested and politicised concept involving complex moral deliberations and diverse political claims of recognition. The dignity debate is thus moved beyond simplistic rational injunctions to care, or to care more, and towards critical discussions of complex politicised, moral practices infused with power that involve the recognition of difference in health-care.

  4. Austerity/Immiseration Capitalism and Islamophobia--or Twenty-First-Century Multicultural Socialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This article is in three parts. In part one, the author begins by examining the onset of austerity/immiseration capitalism in the United Kingdom. Austerity/immiseration capitalism has witnessed the decline of state multiculturalism and increasing attempts to deflect attention away from the failures of capitalism by playing the "race…

  5. Not Learning in the Workplace: Austerity and the Shattering of "Illusio" in Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to discuss the impact of UK government austerity policies on learning in public service work, specifically youth support work. It also aims to argue that austerity policies intensify "ethics work", create emotional suffering, and obstruct workplace learning in a variety of ways. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  6. The influence of gender on conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources: justice versus care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, D J; Olivarez, M

    1993-03-01

    After noting that the principle of autonomy has been inadequate for the resolution of many of the complex and difficult moral dilemmas involving conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources, this paper analyzes the concepts of justice and care as alternative solutions to moral problems and applies them to the issue of repeat organ transplants to a single recipient. These concepts are found to be the basis of the notions of moral reasoning and moral orientation, respectively, which serve in moral development theory as two fundamentally different ways to approach moral problem solving. Following an elaboration of moral reasoning as found in Kohlberg's cognitive moral development theory, the influence of gender on moral reasoning is investigated. The empirical data show that women (mean Defining Issues Test score, 47.18) score significantly higher (P moral reasoning based on the concept of justice for resolving moral dilemmas. Following an elaboration of moral orientation as found in Gilligan's moral theory of the ethics of care, the influence of gender on moral orientation is investigated. The empirical data show that women use the concept of care significantly more often (P moral dilemmas. From these data it is concluded that men are more likely than women to use justice in the resolution of moral dilemmas, such as the conflicts of interest in the allocation of limited critical care resources, but that if women do use, or are required by the social system to use, justice in the resolution of moral dilemmas, they do a better job of it than men.

  7. Childcare Markets in an Age of Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Eva; Penn, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Public support provided for European early childhood education and care (ECEC) systems varies considerably. European ECEC systems tend to form part of a mixed economy, in which the state, private-for-profit and private-not-for-profit providers all play a role in ECEC's provision, funding and regulation, representing a market model. ECEC…

  8. Interoperable Medical Instrument Networking and Access System with Security Considerations for Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gurkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent influx of electronic medical records in the health care field, coupled with the need of providing continuous care to patients in the critical care environment, has driven the need for interoperability of medical devices. Open standards are needed to support flexible processes and interoperability of medical devices, especially in intensive care units. In this paper, we present an interoperable networking and access architecture based on the CAN protocol. Predictability of the delay of medical data reports is a desirable attribute that can be realized using a tightly-coupled system architecture. Our simulations on network architecture demonstrate that a bounded delay for event reports offers predictability. In addition, we address security issues related to the storage of electronic medical records. We present a set of open source tools and tests to identify the security breaches, and appropriate measures that can be implemented to be compliant with the HIPAA rules.

  9. Patients' Perceptions of Nurses' Behaviour That Influence Patient Participation in Nursing Care: A Critical Incident Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient participation is an important basis for nursing care and medical treatment and is a legal right in many Western countries. Studies have established that patients consider participation to be both obvious and important, but there are also findings showing the opposite and patients often prefer a passive recipient role. Knowledge of what may influence patients' participation is thus of great importance. The aim was to identify incidents and nurses' behaviours that influence patients' participation in nursing care based on patients' experiences from inpatient somatic care. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT was employed. Interviews were performed with patients (=17, recruited from somatic inpatient care at an internal medical clinic in West Sweden. This study provided a picture of incidents, nurses' behaviours that stimulate or inhibit patients' participation, and patient reactions on nurses' behaviours. Incidents took place during medical ward round, nursing ward round, information session, nursing documentation, drug administration, and meal.

  10. Two Case Reports of Neuroinvasive West Nile Virus Infection in the Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo M. Flores Anticona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical course of two cases of neuroinvasive West Nile Virus (WNV infection in the critical care unit. The first case is a 70-year-old man who presented during summer with mental status changes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis revealed pleocytosis with lymphocyte predominance. WNV serology was positive in the CSF. His condition worsened with development of left-sided weakness and deterioration of mental status requiring intensive care. The patient gradually improved and was discharged with residual left-sided weakness and near-complete improvement in his mental status. The second case is an 81-year-old man who presented with mental status changes, fever, lower extremity weakness, and difficulty in walking. CSF analysis showed pleocytosis with neutrophil predominance. WNV serology was also positive in CSF. During the hospital stay his mentation worsened, eventually requiring intubation for airway protection and critical care support. The patient gradually improved and was discharged with residual upper and lower extremity paresis. Neuroinvasive WNV infection can lead to significant morbidity, especially in the elderly. These cases should be suspected in patients with antecedent outdoor activities during summer. It is important for critical care providers to be aware of and maintain a high clinical suspicion of this disease process.

  11. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Requiring Critical Care: Clinicoradiological Spectrum, Causative Pathogens and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Wei Chou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Septic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon but life-threatening disorder. However, data on patients with septic pulmonary embolism who require critical care have not been well reported. This study elucidated the clinicoradiological spectrum, causative pathogens and outcomes of septic pulmonary embolism in patients requiring critical care. METHODS: The electronic medical records of 20 patients with septic pulmonary embolism who required intensive care unit admission between January 2005 and December 2013 were reviewed. RESULTS: Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome developed in 85% of the patients, and acute respiratory failure was the most common organ failure (75%. The most common computed tomographic findings included a feeding vessel sign (90%, peripheral nodules without cavities (80% or with cavities (65%, and peripheral wedge-shaped opacities (75%. The most common primary source of infection was liver abscess (40%, followed by pneumonia (25%. The two most frequent causative pathogens were Klebsiella pneumoniae (50% and Staphylococcus aureus (35%. Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors had significantly higher serum creatinine, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores, and they were significantly more likely to have acute kidney injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation and lung abscesses. The in-hospital mortality rate was 30%. Pneumonia was the most common cause of death, followed by liver abscess. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with septic pulmonary embolism who require critical care, especially those with pneumonia and liver abscess, are associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic therapy, surgical intervention and respiratory support are essential.

  12. The evolution of nutrition in critical care: how much, how soon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Critical care is a very recent advance in the history of human evolution. Prior to the existence of ICU care, when the saber-tooth tiger attacked you had but a few critical hours to recover or you died. Mother Nature, and her survival of the fittest mentality, would never have favored the survival of the modern ICU patient. We now support ICU patients for weeks, or even months. During this period, patients appear to undergo phases of critical illness. A simplification of this concept would include an acute phase, a chronic phase, and a recovery phase. Given this, our nutrition care should probably be different in each phase, and targeted to address the evolution of the metabolic response to injury. For example, as insulin resistance is maximal in the acute phase of critical illness, perhaps we have evolved to benefit from a more hypocaloric, high-protein intervention to minimize muscle catabolism. In the chronic phase, and especially in the recovery phase, more aggressive calorie delivery and perhaps proanabolic therapy may be needed. As the body has evolved limited stores of some key nutrients, adequate nutrition may hinge on more than just how many calories we provide. The provision of adequate protein and other key nutrients at the right time may also be vital. This review will attempt to utilize the fundamentals of our evolution as humans and the rapidly growing body of new clinical research to answer questions about how to administer the right nutrients, in the right amounts, at the right time.

  13. Knowledge of Critical Care Provider on Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Chiki Sherpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in ventilated patient. Prevention of VAP in critically ill patient is significant concern for health care team in intensive care units (ICUs. Knowledge on prevention of VAP would have a significant impact on patient outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess knowledge on prevention of VAP in critical care providers and to find the association between knowledge on prevention of VAP and educational qualification and years of experience in ICUs. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in 5 different ICUs of Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, and using descriptive study design. Material and Methods: The study involved a purposive sample of 138 critical care providers. Critical care providers who were willing to participate in the study were included. Tools on demographic proforma and self-administered structured knowledge questionnaire on prevention of VAP were developed and content validity was established. The reliability of the tools was established.The data was categorized and analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The SPSS 16.0 version was used for the analysis of the study. Result: Majority 89.1% of the participant were 20-29 years, 63% unmarried 51.4% had completed diploma course and majority 81.2% were from nursing discipline. The study revealed that only 55.80% of subjects were having adequate knowledge on prevention of VAP based on median score. There was no significant association between knowledge score and educational qualification (÷²=0, p=0.833, years of experience in ICU (÷²= 2.221, p=0.329.

  14. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities.

  15. Fostering critical thinking skills: a strategy for enhancing evidence based wellness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison Jennifer R

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic has traditionally regarded itself a wellness profession. As wellness care is postulated to play a central role in the future growth of chiropractic, the development of a wellness ethos acceptable within conventional health care is desirable. This paper describes a unit which prepares chiropractic students for the role of "wellness coaches". Emphasis is placed on providing students with exercises in critical thinking in an effort to prepare them for the challenge of interfacing with an increasingly evidence based health care system. Methods This case study describes how health may be promoted and disease prevented through development of personalized wellness programs. As critical thinking is essential to the provision of evidence based wellness care, diverse learning opportunities for developing and refining critical thinking skills have been created. Three of the learning opportunities are an intrinsic component of the subject and, taken together, contributed over 50% of the final grade of the unit. They include a literature review, developing a client wellness contract and peer evaluation. In addition to these 3 compulsory exercises, students were also given an opportunity to develop their critical appraisal skills by undertaking voluntary self- and unit evaluation. Several opportunities for informal self-appraisal were offered in a structured self-study guide, while unit appraisal was undertaken by means of a questionnaire and group discussion at which the Head of School was present. Results Formal assessment showed all students capable of preparing a wellness program consistent with current thinking in contemporary health care. The small group of students who appraised the unit seemed to value the diversity of learning experiences provided. Opportunities for voluntary unit and self-appraisal were used to varying degrees. Unit evaluation provided useful feedback that led to substantial changes in unit structure

  16. The relationship between fixed and rotating shifts with job burnout in nurses working in critical care areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahriari, Mohsen; Shamali, Mahdi; Yazdannik, Ahmadreza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While critical care nurses are vulnerable to burnout because of the complex nature of patients' health problems, working in critical care areas has become even more complicated by shift working schedules. This study aimed to determine the relationship between fixed and rotating shifts...... and burnout in a sample of critical care nurses working in critical care areas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective cohort design, 170 critical care nurses from six selected hospitals were chosen using quota and random sampling and divided into two groups (exposed and non-exposed). Maslach Burnout...... no significant difference in the two groups. Furthermore, the non-exposed group had 10.1 times the odds to expose to EE and 2.2 times the odds to expose to DP in comparison with the exposed group. High levels of burnout in the non-exposed group were 60%, 32.9%, and 27.1%, and in the exposed group were 12.9%, 18...

  17. Regionalized care for time-critical conditions: lessons learned from existing networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Brendan G; Matthew Edwards, J; Martinez, Ricardo

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Beyond Regionalization" aimed to place the design of a 21st century emergency care delivery system at the center of emergency medicine's (EM's) health policy research agenda. To examine the lessons learned from existing regional systems, consensus conference organizers convened a panel discussion made up of experts from the fields of acute care surgery, interventional cardiology, acute ischemic stroke, cardiac arrest, critical care medicine, pediatric EM, and medical toxicology. The organizers asked that each member provide insight into the barriers that slowed network creation and the solutions that allowed them to overcome barriers. For ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) management, the American Heart Association's (AHA's) Mission: Lifeline aims to increase compliance with existing guidelines through improvements in the chain of survival, including emergency medical services (EMS) protocols. Increasing use of therapeutic hypothermia post-cardiac arrest through a network of hospitals in Virginia has led to dramatic improvements in outcome. A regionalized network of acute stroke management in Cincinnati was discussed, in addition to the effect of pediatric referral centers on pediatric capabilities of surrounding facilities. The growing importance of telemedicine to a variety of emergencies, including trauma and critical care, was presented. Finally, the importance of establishing a robust reimbursement mechanism was illustrated by the threatened closure of poison control centers nationwide. The panel discussion added valuable insight into the possibilities of maximizing patient outcomes through regionalized systems of emergency care. A primary challenge remaining is for EM to help to integrate the existing and developing disease-based systems of care into a more comprehensive emergency care system.

  18. The Politics of Austerity as Politics of Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Casimiro Ferreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980 the neoliberal agenda has become the strongest advocate against social and labour rights. However, the 2008 crisis emerged a new economic, political and juridical model based on the idea of austerity - a muscled form of neoliberalism which deepens the neoliberal ideology by other means. Bearing this in mind, I have chosen to organise this paper around three topics. In the first section, my purpose is to suggest that, in addition to the obvious economic and financial aspects of the austerity model, there is also a social model of reality that must be characterised sociologically. In the second, assuming that to a certain concept of law there is a certain concept of society, I state that to the austerity society correspond a certain type of law and politics. Finally, I identify four possible paths of developing research and action programmes for sociology of the law of austerity. Desde 1980, el programa neoliberal se ha convertido en el mayor partidario contra los derechos sociales y laborales. Sin embargo, la crisis de 2008 dio lugar a un nuevo modelo económico, político y jurídico basado en la idea de austeridad -una forma fortalecida del neoliberalismo que acentúa la ideología neoliberal por otros medios-.Teniendo esto en mente, este trabajo se ha organizado en torno a tres temas. En la primera sección, se pretende sugerir que, además de los aspectos económicos y financieros evidentes del modelo de austeridad, hay también un modelo social de realidad que hay que caracterizar sociológicamente. En la segunda, partiendo de que un determinado concepto de derecho está relacionado con una determinada concepción de sociedad, se defiende que la sociedad de la austeridad se corresponde con un determinado tipo de derecho y política. Por último, se identifican cuatro posibles vías de desarrollo de programas de investigación y acción para la sociología jurídica de la austeridad. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http

  19. Are There Austerity Related Policy Changes in Germany?

    OpenAIRE

    Eichhorst, Werner; Hassel, Anke

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the existence and the extent of austerity‐oriented policies in Germany in the aftermath of the 2008‐9 recession. In contrast to the intensive phase of labour market and welfare state reforms in the early 2000s aimed at 'welfare readjustment', we do not see austerity policies in Germany, rather a continuation of the path that was adopted earlier. This can be explained by the economic conditions which were, and still are, much more favourable than in many other EU Member Sta...

  20. Validation of the Danish version of the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, J B; Poulsen, Kristian S.O.; Laerkner, E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing pain in critically ill patients is a challenge even in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a no sedation protocol. The aim of this study was to validate the Danish version of the pain assessment method; Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in an ICU with a no sedation...... in the data collection and CPOT scores were blinded to each other. Calculations of interrater reliability, criterion validity and discriminant validity were performed to validate the Danish version of CPOT. RESULTS: The results indicated a good correlation between the two raters (all scores > 0.9 and P ....05). About 48 (68.6%) of the included patients were able to self-report pain. We found a significantly higher mean CPOT score at the nociceptive procedure than at rest or the non-nociceptive procedure (P

  1. Variation in southwestern hospital charges for pulmonary and critical care DRGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS released nationwide data on hospital charges and CMS payments for the top 100 disease-related groups (DRG. Data obtained from the CMS website was examined for 23 common pulmonary and critical care DRG charges and payments to hospitals in the Southwest United States (Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado. Similar to nationwide trends, charges vastly exceeded payments and varied widely. Normalizing the data to the state average for each DRG, the percent over/under the state average revealed a negative correlation between charges and payments. Urban hospitals billed more but did not receive significantly higher payments. Hospitals that were primary hospitals for residencies did not bill significantly more but did receive higher payments. These data demonstrate that charges and payments for respiratory and critical care DRGs in the Southwest mirror nationwide trends in large overcharges.

  2. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  3. Long-term mortality after critical care: what is the starting point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzani, Otavio T; Zampieri, Fernando G; Park, Marcelo; Salluh, Jorge If

    2013-09-27

    Mortality is still the most assessed outcome in the critically ill patient and is routinely used as the primary end-point in intervention trials, cohort studies, and benchmarking analysis. Despite this, interest in patient-centered prognosis after ICU discharge is increasing, and several studies report quality of life and long-term outcomes after critical illness. In a recent issue of Critical Care, Cuthbertson and colleagues reported interesting results from a cohort of 439 patients with sepsis, who showed high ongoing long-term mortality rates after severe sepsis, reaching 61% at 5 years (from a starting point of ICU admission). Follow-up may start at ICU admission, after ICU discharge, or after hospital discharge. Using ICU admission as a starting point will include patients with a wide range of illness severities and reasons for ICU admission. As a result, important consequences of the ICU, such as rehabilitation and reduced quality of life, may be diluted in an unselected population. ICU discharge is another frequently used starting point. ICU discharge is a marker of better outcome and reduced risk for acute deterioration, making this an interesting starting point for studying long-term mortality, need for ICU readmission, and critical illness rehabilitation. Finally, using hospital discharge as the starting point will include patients with the minimal requirements to sustain an adequate condition in a non-monitored environment but will add a ?survivors bias?; that is, patients who survive critical illness are a special group among the critically ill. In this commentary, we discuss the heterogeneity in long-term mortality from recent studies in critical care medicine ? heterogeneity that may be a consequence simply of changing the follow-up starting point ? and propose a standardized follow-up starting point for future studies according to the outcome of interest.

  4. Critical appraisal skills training for health care professionals: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN46272378

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewings Paul E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Critical appraisal skills are believed to play a central role in an evidence-based approach to health practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and costs of a critical appraisal skills educational intervention aimed at health care professionals. Methods This prospective controlled trial randomized 145 self-selected general practitioners, hospital physicians, professions allied to medicine, and healthcare managers/administrators from the South West of England to a half-day critical appraisal skills training workshop (based on the model of problem-based small group learning or waiting list control. The following outcomes were assessed at 6-months follow up: knowledge of the principles necessary for appraising evidence; attitudes towards the use of evidence about healthcare; evidence seeking behaviour; perceived confidence in appraising evidence; and ability to critically appraise a systematic review article. Results At follow up overall knowledge score [mean difference: 2.6 (95% CI: 0.6 to 4.6] and ability to appraise the results of a systematic review [mean difference: 1.2 (95% CI: 0.01 to 2.4] were higher in the critical skills training group compared to control. No statistical significant differences in overall attitude towards evidence, evidence seeking behaviour, perceived confidence, and other areas of critical appraisal skills ability (methodology or generalizability were observed between groups. Taking into account the workshop provision costs and costs of participants time and expenses of participants, the average cost of providing the critical appraisal workshops was approximately £250 per person. Conclusions The findings of this study challenge the policy of funding 'one-off' educational interventions aimed at enhancing the evidence-based practice of health care professionals. Future evaluations of evidence-based practice interventions need to take in account this trial's negative findings

  5. Relationship between Burnout Syndrome Symptoms and Self-Actualization Scores in Critical-Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    needs to be done. Other possible areas of study are the impact of nursing education changes, nursing inservice offerings, and organizational change...statistically significant differences were found. this study has implications for nursing adminis- trators and educators concerned with the problem of...burnout in critical care nurses . Promotion of self- actualization in both the educational and hospital 0 settings could diminish the level of burnout

  6. Evidence based evaluation of immuno-coagulatory interventions in critical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Cochrane systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomised trials provide guidance for clinical practice and health-care decision-making. In case of disagreements between research evidence and clinical practice, high quality systematic reviews can facilitate implementation or deimplementation...... of medical interventions into clinical practice. This applies especially to treatment of critically ill patients where interventions are most often costly and the clinical conditions are associated with high mortality....

  7. Ethical conflict in critical care nursing: correlation between exposure and types

    OpenAIRE

    Falcó Pegueroles, Anna M. (Anna Marta); Lluch Canut, Ma. Teresa; Roldán Merino, Juan Francisco; Goberna Tricas, Josefina; Guàrdia Olmos, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ethical conflicts in nursing have generally been studied in terms of temporal frequency and the degree of conflict. This study presents a new perspective for examining ethical conflict in terms of the degree of exposure to conflict and its typology. Objectives: The aim was to examine the level of exposure to ethical conflict for professional nurses in critical care units and to analyze the relation between this level and the types of ethical conflict and moral states. Research des...

  8. The use of computers for perioperative simulation in anesthesia, critical care, and pain medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambden, Simon; Martin, Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Simulation in perioperative anesthesia training is a field of considerable interest, with an urgent need for tools that reliably train and facilitate objective assessment of performance. This article reviews the available simulation technologies, their evolution, and the current evidence base for their use. The future directions for research in the field and potential applications of simulation technology in anesthesia, critical care, and pain medicine are discussed.

  9. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin,Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used w...

  10. Predicting postoperative acute respiratory failure in critical care using nursing notes and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Vijay; Rajan, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Sakyajit; Roy, Shourya

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF) is a serious complication in critical care affecting patient morbidity and mortality. In this paper we investigate a novel approach to predicting ARF in critically ill patients. We study the use of two disparate sources of information – semi-structured text contained in nursing notes and investigative reports that are regularly recorded and the respiration rate, a physiological signal that is continuously monitored during a patient's ICU stay. Unlike previous works that retrospectively analyze complications, we exclude discharge summaries from our analysis envisaging a real time system that predicts ARF during the ICU stay. Our experiments, on more than 800 patient records from the MIMIC II database, demonstrate that text sources within the ICU contain strong signals for distinguishing between patients who are at risk for ARF from those who are not at risk. These results suggest that large scale systems using both structured and unstructured data recorded in critical care can be effectively used to predict complications, which in turn can lead to preemptive care with potentially improved outcomes, mortality rates and decreased length of stay and cost.

  11. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already activated, while others remain subjugated to certain roles. For example, they may be labeled as "vulnerable."

  12. Blood transfusions in critical care: improving safety through technology & process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulbach, Rebecca K; Brient, Kathy; Clark, Marie; Custard, Kristi; Davis, Carolyn; Gecomo, Jonathan; Ho, Judy Ong

    2010-06-01

    A multidisciplinary safety initiative transformed blood transfusion practices at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas. An intense analysis of a mistransfusion using the principles of a Just Culture and the process of Cause Mapping identified system and human performance factors that led to the transfusion error. Multiple initiatives were implemented including technology, education and human behaviour change. The wireless technology of Pyxis Transfusion Verification by CareFusion is effective with the rapid infusion module efficient for use in critical care. Improvements in blood transfusion safety were accomplished by thoroughly evaluating the process of transfusions and by implementing wireless electronic transfusion verification technology. During the 27 months following implementation of the CareFusion Transfusion Verification there have been zero cases of transfusing mismatched blood.

  13. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben Munksgaard; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts...... of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health...... behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already...

  14. Impact of a critical care clinical information system on interruption rates during intensive care nurse and physician documentation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballermann, Mark A; Shaw, Nicola T; Arbeau, Kelly J; Mayes, Damon C; Noel Gibney, R T

    2010-01-01

    Computerized documentation methods in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) may assist Health Care Providers (HCP) with their documentation workload, but evaluating impacts remains problematic. A Critical Care clinical Information System (CCIS) is an electronic charting tool designed for ICUs that may fit seamlessly into HCP work. Observers followed ICU nurses and physicians in two ICUs in Edmonton, Canada, in which a CCIS had recently been introduced. Observers recorded amounts of time HCPs spent on documentation related tasks, interruptions encountered by HCPs, and contextual information in field notes. Interruption rates varied depending on the charting medium used, with physicians being interrupted less frequently when performing documentation tasks using the CCIS, than when performing documentation tasks using other methods. In contrast, nurses were interrupted more frequently when charting using the CCIS than when using other methods. Interruption rates coupled with qualitative observations suggest that physicians utilize strategies to avoid interruptions if interfaces for entering textual notes are not well adapted to interruption-rich environments such as ICUs. Potential improvements are discussed such that systems like the CCIS may better integrate into ICU work.

  15. Documentation of best interest by intensivists: a retrospective study in an Ontario critical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scales Damon C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care physicians often must rely on substitute decision makers to address all dimensions of the construct of "best interest" for incapable, critically ill patients. This task involves identifying prior wishes and to facilitate the substitute decision maker's understanding of the incapable patient's condition and their likely response to treatment. We sought to determine how well such discussions are documented in a typical intensive care unit. Methods Using a quality of communication instrument developed from a literature search and expert opinion, 2 investigators transcribed and analyzed 260 handwritten communications for 105 critically ill patients who died in the intensive care unit between January and June 2006. Cohen's kappa was calculated before analysis and then disagreements were resolved by consensus. We report results on a per-patient basis to represent documented communication as a process leading up to the time of death in the ICU. We report frequencies and percentages for discrete data, median (m and interquartile range (IQR for continuous data. Results Our cohort was elderly (m 72, IQR 58-81 years and had high APACHE II scores predictive of a high probability of death (m 28, IQR 23-36. Length of stay in the intensive care unit prior to death was short (m 2, IQR 1-5 days, and withdrawal of life support preceded death for more than half (n 57, 54%. Brain death criteria were present for 18 patients (17%. Although intensivists' communications were timely (median 17 h from admission to critical care, the person consenting on behalf of the incapable patient was explicitly documented for only 10% of patients. Life support strategies at the time of communication were noted in 45% of charts, and options for their future use were presented in 88%. Considerations relevant to determining the patient's best interest in relation to the treatment plan were not well documented. While explicit survival estimates were

  16. Sedation in palliative care – a critical analysis of 7 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Inge

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The administration of sedatives in terminally ill patients becomes an increasingly feasible medical option in end-of-life care. However, sedation for intractable distress has raised considerable medical and ethical concerns. In our study we provide a critical analysis of seven years experience with the application of sedation in the final phase of life in our palliative care unit. Methods Medical records of 548 patients, who died in the Palliative Care Unit of GK Havelhoehe between 1995–2002, were retrospectively analysed with regard to sedation in the last 48 hrs of life. The parameters of investigation included indication, choice and kind of sedation, prevalence of intolerable symptoms, patients' requests for sedation, state of consciousness and communication abilities during sedation. Critical evaluation included a comparison of the period between 1995–1999 and 2000–2002. Results 14.6% (n = 80 of the patients in palliative care had sedation given by the intravenous route in the last 48 hrs of their life according to internal guidelines. The annual frequency to apply sedation increased continuously from 7% in 1995 to 19% in 2002. Main indications shifted from refractory control of physical symptoms (dyspnoea, gastrointestinal, pain, bleeding and agitated delirium to more psychological distress (panic-stricken fear, severe depression, refractory insomnia and other forms of affective decompensation. Patients' and relatives' requests for sedation in the final phase were significantly more frequent during the period 2000–2002. Conclusion Sedation in the terminal or final phase of life plays an increasing role in the management of intractable physical and psychological distress. Ethical concerns are raised by patients' requests and needs on the one hand, and the physicians' self-understanding on the other hand. Hence, ethically acceptable criteria and guidelines for the decision making are needed with special regard to

  17. When the patient and family just do not get it: overcoming low health literacy in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Racquel; Kautz, Donald D

    2012-01-01

    Low health literacy in patients and families has been called a silent epidemic. Although there is a great deal of literature to assist nurses to address health literacy problems, little has focused on overcoming low health literacy in critical care. This article provides a definition of health literacy, explores how Baker's health literacy model can be applied to the critical care environment using Osborne's practical strategies, and presents 2 patient scenarios in which addressing low health literacy changed the outcomes for the patient and family. The article concludes with recommendations for critical care nurses to overcome low health literacy of patients and their families.

  18. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Irish critical care units: results of a pilot prevalence survey, June 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-11-10

    The epidemiology of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in Ireland is changing, with an increase in the number of reported cases in late 2010 and early 2011. Reported cases were predominantly linked to critical care units. In June 2011, a four-week national pilot survey took place in 40 Irish critical care units (37 adult and three paediatric) to examine the prevalence of rectal carriage of CPE and inform national CPE screening guidelines. A total of 760 screening swabs were taken over the study period, and CPE were not detected in any of the participating critical care units.

  19. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu B Pattanshetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP and critical illness myopathy (CIM, is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU. Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU.

  20. Development road of critical care medicine in China: reference, integration and improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-tao ZHANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental critical care medicine (FCCM and specialty critical care medicine (SCCM have their own independent developmental itinerary and have made indelible contributions to intensive treatment in the long history of CCM. The experts in FCCM are usually dominant in the cross-sectional study for various severe illnesses, and lay emphases on balancing the relationship among the dysfunctional organs under the guidance of overall treatment concept. SCCM experts emphasize longitudinal in-depth study for a specialized subject or special disease in order to solve the principal problem of the severe illness under the guidance of its own principal. At present, the main challenge of CCM is to avoid the habitual linear thinking. It is necessary for the members of FCCM to learn the knowledge of different problems pertaining to various specialties from SCCM, thus FCCM doctors would be able to take care of patients suffering from derangements of specific organs. SCCM members also need to learn from FCCM for strengthening the concept of overall treatment, optimizing various treatment resources, and improving treatment effects. Members of FCCM and SCCM need to learn from each other, in order to integrate and improve treatment strategies together, so as to complement each other. This will broaden the knowledge of SCCM and deepen that of FCCM. The integration of knowledge and skill will enrich the connotation of the CCM.

  1. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-02-04

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system's sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers.

  2. Factors affecting ED length-of-stay in surgical critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B; Sullivan, S; Levine, A; Dallara, J

    1995-09-01

    To determine what patient characteristics are associated with prolonged emergency department (ED) length-of-stay (LOS) for surgical critical care patients, the charts of 169 patients admitted from the ED directly to the operating room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU) during a 6-week period in 1993 were reviewed. The ED record was reviewed for documentation of factors that might be associated with prolonged ED LOS, such as use of computed tomographic (CT), radiology special procedures, and the number of plain radiographs and consultants. ED LOS was considered to be the time from triage until a decision was made to admit the patient. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, use of CT and special procedures were the strongest independent predictors of prolonged ED length-of-stay. The number of plain radiographs and consultants had only a minimal effect. Use of a protocol-driven trauma evaluation system was associated with a shorter ED LOS. In addition to external factors that affect ED overcrowding, ED patient management decisions may also be associated with prolonged ED length-of-stay. Such ED-based factors may be more important in surgical critical care patients, whose overall ED LOS is affected more by the length of the ED work-up rather than the time spent waiting for a ICU bed or operating suite.

  3. [Prognosis of intracerebral hemorrhage with coma in a neurological critical care unit in the tropics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sène Diouf, F; Mapoure, N Y; Ndiaye, M; Mbatchou Ngahane, H B; Touré, K; Thiam, A; Mboup, B; Doumbe, J N; Diop, A G; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    2008-12-01

    Thirty-five percent of stroke events observed in Dakar, Senegal involve hemorrhaging. Coma is a frequent revealing sign of the disease and a severe prognostic factor. Since specific therapy is unavailable in sub-Saharan Africa, only symptomatic medical treatment is proposed to most patients presenting intracerebral hemorrhage. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to evaluate prognosis and survival in patients presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a neurological critical care unit in Senegal. Study was conducted from April 15, 2006 to July 18, 2007 in the neurological critical unit of the Fann University Hospital Center in Dakar. Mortality and probability of survival were estimated using Kaplan Meier methods. The predictive value of factors significantly correlated with prognosis was determined by multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 51 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage were included in this study. Mean patient age was 64 years and the sex ratio was 1.13. Median survival was 7 days and mortality in the neurological critical care unit was 80.4%. The probability of survival at days 10, 30 and 90 were 43.14%, 21.57% and 13.73% respectively. Occurrence of a complication on day 3 was shown to be an independent risk factor for early death. Intracerebral hemorrhage with coma is associated with a high mortality rate. Better primary prevention is necessary.

  4. Skin care in nursing: A critical discussion of nursing practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Surber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Skin (self-)care is part of human life from birth until death. Today many different skin care practices, preferences, traditions and routines exist in parallel. In addition, preventive and therapeutic skin care is delivered in nursing and healthcare by formal and informal caregivers. The aim of this contribution is a critical discussion about skin care in the context of professional nursing practice. An explicit skin assessment using accurate diagnostic statements is needed for clinical decision making. Special attention should be paid on high risk skin areas, which may be either too dry or too moist. From a safety perspective the protection and maintenance of skin integrity should have the highest priority. Skin cleansing is the removal of unwanted substances from the skin surface. Despite cleansing efficacy soap, other surfactants and water will inevitably always result in the destruction of the skin barrier. Thousands of products are available to hydrate, moisturize, protect and restore skin properties dependent upon their formulation and the concentration of ingredients. These products intended to left in contact with skin exhibit several actions on and in the skin interfering with skin biology. Unwanted side effects include hyper-hydration and disorganization of lipid bilayers in the stratum corneum, a dysfunctional barrier, increased susceptibility to irritants and allergies, and increases of skin surface pH. Where the skin barrier is impaired appropriate interventions, e.g. apply lipophilic products in sufficient quantity to treat dry skin or protect the skin from exposure to irritants should be provided. A key statement of this contribution is: every skin care activity matters. Every time something is placed on the skin, a functional and structural response is provoked. This response can be either desired or undesired, beneficial or harmful. The choice of all skin care interventions in nursing and healthcare practice must be based on an accurate assessment

  5. Does Fiscal Austerity Affect Political Decision-Makers’ Use and Perception of Performance Information?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholt, Bente; Bækgaard, Martin; Houlberg, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates whether the fiscal environment that politicians face influences their use of performance information. It poses two competing hypotheses, suggesting that fiscal austerity either increases politicians’ use of performance information, because they are more concerned about k...

  6. Managing austerity: rhetorical and real responses to fiscal stress in local government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmans, Tom; Noordegraaf, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Coping with fiscal stress is a major challenge. Four responses can be identified for managing austerity: decline, cutbacks, retrenchment, and downsizing. Responses are primarily fiscally oriented, or organizational; they focus predominantly on stability, or change. Explorative research indicates the

  7. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Maria Peltonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients’ admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1 explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2 delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22–67% of discharges, and (3 redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review.

  8. Ethical budgets: a critical success factor in implementing new public management accountability in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosa, Iris M

    2010-05-01

    New public management accountability is increasingly being introduced into health-care systems throughout the world - albeit with mixed success. This paper examines the successful introduction of new management accounting systems among general practitioners (GPs) as an aspect of reform in the Italian health-care system. In particular, the study examines the critical role played by the novel concept of an 'ethical budget' in engaging the willing cooperation of the medical profession in implementing change. Utilizing a qualitative research design, with in-depth interviews with GPs, hospital doctors and managers, along with archival analysis, the present study finds that management accounting can be successfully implemented among medical professionals provided there is alignment between the management imperative and the ethical framework in which doctors practise their profession. The concept of an 'ethical budget' has been shown to be an innovative and effective tool in achieving this alignment.

  9. Concerns about usage of smartphones in operating room and critical care scenario

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    J P Attri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones and tablets have taken a central place in the lives of health care professionals. Their use has dramatically improved the communication and has become an important learning tool as the medical information can be assessed online at anytime. In critical care settings, use of smartphone facilitates quick passage of information through E-mail messaging and getting feedback from the concerned physician quickly, thereby reducing medical errors. However, in addition to the benefits offered, these devices have become a significant source of nosocomial infections, distraction for medical professionals and interfere with medical equipments. They may also put privacy and security of patients at stake. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and over use are not kept in check. This review article focuses on various applications of smartphones in healthcare practices, drawback of the use of these devices and the recommendations regarding the safe use of these devices.

  10. Austerity and old-age mortality in England: a longitudinal cross-local area analysis, 2007–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Taylor-Robinson, David; Barr, Ben; Stuckler, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective There has been significant concern that austerity measures have negatively impacted health in the UK. We examined whether budgetary reductions in Pension Credit and social care have been associated with recent rises in mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years and over. Design Cross-local authority longitudinal study. Setting Three hundred and twenty-four lower tier local authorities in England. Main outcome measure Annual percentage changes in mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years or over. Results Between 2007 and 2013, each 1% decline in Pension Credit spending (support for low income pensioners) per beneficiary was associated with an increase in 0.68% in old-age mortality (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.95). Each reduction in the number of beneficiaries per 1000 pensioners was associated with an increase in 0.20% (95% CI: 0.15 to 0.24). Each 1% decline in social care spending was associated with a significant rise in old-age mortality (0.08%, 95% CI: 0.0006–0.12) but not after adjusting for Pension Credit spending. Similar patterns were seen in both men and women. Weaker associations observed for those aged 75 to 84 years, and none among those 65 to 74 years. Categories of service expenditure not expected to affect old-age mortality, such as transportation, showed no association. Conclusions Rising mortality rates among pensioners aged 85 years and over were linked to reductions in spending on income support for poor pensioners and social care. Findings suggest austerity measures in England have affected vulnerable old-age adults. PMID:26980412

  11. Malignant Catatonia Warrants Early Psychiatric-Critical Care Collaborative Management: Two Cases and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Josh; Krzeminski, Sylvia; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Bandlamuri, Meghana; Carlson, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant catatonia (MC) is a life-threatening manifestation which can occur in the setting of an underlying neuropsychiatric syndrome or general medical illness and shares clinical and pathophysiological features and medical comorbidities with the Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS). The subsequent diagnosis and definitive therapy of MC are typically delayed, which increases morbidity and mortality. We present two cases of MC and review recent literature of MC and NMS, illustrating factors which delay diagnosis and management. When clinical features suggest MC or NMS, we propose early critical care consultation and stabilization with collaborative psychiatric management. PMID:28250995

  12. Malignant Catatonia Warrants Early Psychiatric-Critical Care Collaborative Management: Two Cases and Literature Review

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    Julia Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant catatonia (MC is a life-threatening manifestation which can occur in the setting of an underlying neuropsychiatric syndrome or general medical illness and shares clinical and pathophysiological features and medical comorbidities with the Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS. The subsequent diagnosis and definitive therapy of MC are typically delayed, which increases morbidity and mortality. We present two cases of MC and review recent literature of MC and NMS, illustrating factors which delay diagnosis and management. When clinical features suggest MC or NMS, we propose early critical care consultation and stabilization with collaborative psychiatric management.

  13. Malignant Catatonia Warrants Early Psychiatric-Critical Care Collaborative Management: Two Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julia; Tan, Josh; Krzeminski, Sylvia; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Bandlamuri, Meghana; Carlson, Richard W

    2017-01-01

    Malignant catatonia (MC) is a life-threatening manifestation which can occur in the setting of an underlying neuropsychiatric syndrome or general medical illness and shares clinical and pathophysiological features and medical comorbidities with the Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS). The subsequent diagnosis and definitive therapy of MC are typically delayed, which increases morbidity and mortality. We present two cases of MC and review recent literature of MC and NMS, illustrating factors which delay diagnosis and management. When clinical features suggest MC or NMS, we propose early critical care consultation and stabilization with collaborative psychiatric management.

  14. A critical review of Singapore's policies aimed at supporting families caring for older members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalyani K

    2006-01-01

    This article critically examines the family-oriented social policies of the Singapore government aimed at supporting families caring for older members. The sectors focused on are financial security, health, and housing. Singaporeans have been reminded that the family should be the first line of defense for aging families, followed by the community - the state would step in as the last resort. Drawing from recent research and examination of the state policies, the author argues that more should be done to help family caregivers looking after elder relatives. Recommendations for innovative ways to recognize and reward family carers conclude the paper.

  15. Nurses’ Experiences of Managing and Management in a Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Robyn Ogle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the major findings of an ethnographic study undertaken to investigate nurses’ experiences of managing nurses and being managed by nurses in an Australian critical care unit. Our purpose was to valorize and make space for nurses to speak of their experiences and investigate the cultural practices and knowledges that comprised nursing management discourses. Subjugated practices, knowledges, and discourses were identified, revealing how nurses were inscribed by, or resisted, the discourses, including their multiple mobile subject positions. Informed by critical, feminist, and postmodern perspectives, nine mobile subject positions were identified. Direct participant observation, participant interviews, and reflective field notes were analyzed for dominant and subjugated discourses. The major finding described is the subject position of “junior novice.” Nurses informed by dominant patriarchal and organizational discourses participated in constructing and reinscribing their own submissive identity reflected in interprofessional relations that lacked individual valuing and undermined their self-esteem.

  16. Targeting the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to nutrient deprivation: anti-austerity compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magolan, Jakob; Coster, Mark J

    2010-12-01

    The emerging "anti-austerity" anti-cancer therapeutic strategy targets the ability of certain cancer cell lines, particularly pancreatic cancer, to survive nutrient deprivation. While biochemical pathways for the tolerance to nutrient deprivation are still not well understood, a growing number of inhibitors of this process are being discovered. A number of natural products have been isolated, structurally characterized and evaluated as inhibitors of austerity, thereby providing valuable initial structure-activity relationship data.

  17. Teaching effectiveness and learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students in a critical care practicum: a lebanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, S; Dumit, N Y; Adra, M; Kassak, K

    2001-01-01

    This process-product replicated study examines the relationship between the clinical teacher behavior effectiveness of critical care instructors and baccalaureate nursing students' learning outcomes in a critical care practicum. Teacher behaviors that were found to be significantly associated with student learning outcomes included flexibility, giving opportunity to observe, quality of answering questions, quality of discourse, feedback specificity, and concern for the learner's progress and problems.

  18. Adult literacy policy and provision in an age of austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limage, Leslie J.

    1986-12-01

    Against a background of growing concern for the large numbers of semiliterate or completely illiterate school leavers and adults in the industrialized countries, this article examines four key aspects necessary for gauging a nation's response to the problem of adult illiteracy. The four aspects — awareness raising, high-level national commitment, resource allocation, and range and extent of in-school and out-of-school basic education/literacy provision — are analyzed with particular reference to the United Kingdom, the United States, France and Canada. The article indicates that, in a period of economic austerity when education budgets are being cut, provision for adult literacy and for remedial classes in school is one of the first areas to be sacrificed. The article ends on a pessimistic note with respect to the implementation of a `Right to Read' charter in all industrialized countries.

  19. ROMANIA’S AUSTERITY POLICIES IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT

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    Todor ARPAD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic recession starting in 2007 with the collapse of the US Bank Lehman Brothers triggered waves of economic shock across the world. Various states were hit more or less hard through different mechanisms and reacted with different intensities to adjust to the crisis situation. In this article, I employ a comparative methodology to assess the austerity policies undertook by Romania during the Great recession period as regards the policies adopted at the level of other EU member states. Thus, I aim to offer an initial evaluation of the degree of similarity of Romania’s recession policy responses to that of some other EU member states, and the degree to which Romania can be labeled as an outlier. The comparative analysis tests the explanatory power of three different theoretical approaches on the causal factors explaining variation in policy responses: power resources theories, functionalist approaches and blame-avoidance.

  20. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hodkinson

    Full Text Available Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided.A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission or emergency department death, using expert panel review of medical records and caregiver interview. Main outcomes were expert assessment of overall quality of care; avoidability of severity of illness and PICU admission or death and the identification of modifiable factors.The study enrolled 282 children, 252 emergency PICU admissions, and 30 deaths. Global quality of care was graded good in 10% of cases, with half having at least one major impact modifiable factor. Key modifiable factors related to access to care and identification of the critically ill, assessment of severity, inadequate resuscitation, and delays in decision making and referral. Children were transferred with median time from first presentation to PICU admission of 12.3 hours. There was potentially avoidable severity of illness in 185 (74% of children, and death prior to PICU admission was avoidable in 17/30 (56.7% of children.The study presents a novel methodology, examining quality of care across an entire system, and highlighting the complexity of the pathway and the modifiable events amenable to interventions, that could reduce mortality and morbidity, and optimize utilization of scarce critical care resources; as well as demonstrating the importance of continuity and quality of care.

  1. Use of blood components in critically ill patients in the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital

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    Makroo R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The art of fluid administration and hemodynamic support is one of the most challenging aspects of treating critically ill patients. Transfusions of blood products continue to be an important technique for resuscitating patients in the intensive care settings. Concerns about the rate of inappropriate transfusion exist, particularly given the recognized risks of transfusions and the decreasing availability of donor blood. We investigated the current transfusion practice in the critically ill patients at our hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 1817 consecutive critically ill patients admitted between January 2006 and December 2006 were included in this retrospective study. The blood request forms of the patients were analyzed, and their pretransfusion investigations, indications for transfusions, etc. were studied. Results: Nine hundred and eleven (50.1% critically ill patients, comprising 71.6% males and 28.4% females, received blood/blood components. About 43.8% patients were administered packed red cells (PRC, 18.27% fresh frozen plasma (FFP and 8.4% transfused platelets. Among those receiving PRC, 31.1% had a pretransfusion Hb below 7.5g%, 34.4% had Hb between 7.5 and 9g%, while 21.4% had Hb above 9g%. Among those receiving FFP, 14.5% had an international normalized ratio INR < 1.5, and 19% had a pretransfusion platelet count above 50,000/cumm. During the study, there were 7% of the patients who received red cells and FFP, 2% of the patients received red cells and platelets, 1% of the patients received platelets and FFP, and 5% of the patients had received all the three components, i.e., red cells, FFP and Platelets. The baseline investigations and/or clinical indications were not mentioned in 13.1% of patients receiving PRC, 57% receiving FFP and 49.7% receiving platelets. Conclusion: About 21.4% of PRC, 14.5% of FFP, and 19% of platelets were inappropriately indicated. Clinicians in our centre were conservative in keeping

  2. Quality of interhospital transport of the critically ill : impact of a Mobile Intensive Care Unit with a specialized retrieval team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Janke S.; Droogh, Joep M.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Fokkema, Janneke; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: In order to minimize the additional risk of interhospital transport of critically ill patients, we started a mobile intensive care unit (MICU) with a specialized retrieval team, reaching out from our university hospital-based intensive care unit to our adherence region in March 2009. T

  3. Clinical accompaniment: the critical care nursing students’ experiences in a private hospital

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    N. Tsele

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of clinical accompaniment of the student enrolled for the post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General is an important dimension of the educational/learning programme. The clinical accompanist/mentor is responsible for ensuring the student’s compliance with the clinical outcomes of the programme in accordance with the requirements laid down by the Nursing Education Institution and the South African Nursing Council. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of the students enrolled for a post-basic diploma in Medical and Surgical Nursing Science: Critical Care Nursing (General, in relation to the clinical accompaniment in a private hospital in Gauteng. An exploratory, descriptive and phenomenological research design was utilised and individual interviews were conducted with the ten students in the research hospital. A content analysis was conducted and the results revealed both positive and negative experiences by the students in the internal and external worlds. The recommendations include the formulation of standards for clinical accompaniment of students. the evaluation of the quality of clinical accompaniment of students and empowerment of the organisation, clinical accompanists/mentors and clinicians.

  4. Challenges in critical care services in Sub-Saharan Africa: Perspectives from Nigeria

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    Okafor U

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care services in Nigeria and other West African countries had been hampered by economic reversals resulting in low wages, manpower flight overseas, government apathy towards funding of hospitals, and endemic corruption. Since then things have somewhat improved with the government′s willingness to invest more in healthcare, and clampdown on resource diversion in some countries like Nigeria. Due to the health needs of these countries, including funding and preventive medicine, it may take a long time to reach reasonably high standards. Things are better than they were several years ago and that gives cause for optimism, especially with the debt cancellation by Western nations for most countries in the region. Since most of the earlier studies have been done by visiting doctors, mainly outside the West African subregion, this paper seeks to present a view of the challenges faced by providers of critical care services in the region, so that people do not have to rely on anecdotal evidence for future references.

  5. Comparison of methods of alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting

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    Andrew M. Harrison

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Electronic Health Record (EHR-based sepsis alert systems have failed to demonstrate improvements in clinically meaningful endpoints. However, the effect of implementation barriers on the success of new sepsis alert systems is rarely explored. Objective To test the hypothesis time to severe sepsis alert acknowledgement by critical care clinicians in the ICU setting would be reduced using an EHR-based alert acknowledgement system compared to a text paging-based system. Study Design In one arm of this simulation study, real alerts for patients in the medical ICU were delivered to critical care clinicians through the EHR. In the other arm, simulated alerts were delivered through text paging. The primary outcome was time to alert acknowledgement. The secondary outcomes were a structured, mixed quantitative/qualitative survey and informal group interview. Results The alert acknowledgement rate from the severe sepsis alert system was 3% (N = 148 and 51% (N = 156 from simulated severe sepsis alerts through traditional text paging. Time to alert acknowledgement from the severe sepsis alert system was median 274 min (N = 5 and median 2 min (N = 80 from text paging. The response rate from the EHR-based alert system was insufficient to compare primary measures. However, secondary measures revealed important barriers. Conclusion Alert fatigue, interruption, human error, and information overload are barriers to alert and simulation studies in the ICU setting.

  6. Does the Integration of Personalized Ultrasound Change Patient Management in Critical Care Medicine? Observational Trials

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    Raoul Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician’s judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS.

  7. Does the integration of personalized ultrasound change patient management in critical care medicine? Observational trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Raoul; Campo Delľ Orto, Marco; Hamm, Christian; Cuca, Colleen; Zechner, Peter M; Stenger, Tanja; Walcher, Felix; Seeger, Florian H

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS) on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician's judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS.

  8. Embodiment and dementia: exploring critical narratives of selfhood, surveillance, and dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Martin, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade there has been a notable increase in efforts to expand understandings of dementia by incorporating the body and theorizing its interrelationship with the larger social order. This emerging subfield of dementia studies puts the body and embodied practices at the center of explorations of how dementia is represented and/or experienced. This shift towards a greater recognition of the way that humans are embodied has expanded the horizon of dementia studies, providing the intellectual and narrative resources to examine experiences of dementia, and their interconnections with history, culture, power, and discourse. Our aim in this paper is to critically explore and review dimensions of this expanding research and literature, specifically in relation to three key narratives: (1) rethinking selfhood: exploring embodied dimensions; (2) surveillance, discipline, and the body in dementia and dementia care; and (3) embodied innovations in dementia care practice. We argue that this literature collectively destabilizes dementia as a taken-for-granted category and has generated critical texts on the interrelationship between the body and social and political processes in the production and expression of dementia.

  9. April 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: early goal-directed therapy

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    Raschke RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. We were fortunate to be joined in our discussion by Dr. Frank LoVecchio, one of the primary investigators of the ProCESS trial, and doctors Robbins, Bajo, Mand and Thomas, as well as our pulmonary critical care fellows. The ProCESS trial was important for two reasons: first, it showed that early goal-directed therapy (EGDT does not benefit patient mortality; second, it provides another example of how the evidence-based practice of critical care medicine has often been misguided by invalid evidence. In this aspect, EGDT joins the ranks of tight glucose control, drotrecogin alpha (Xigris®, Swan Ganz catheter-guided resuscitation, corticosteroids, and other interventions in our field that were once part of evidence-based practice, but ultimately found to lack benefit or even be harmful to our patients. That recurrent theme in our literature is the main point of this Journal Club. The first example of an algorithm for goal-directed therapy (GDT that we ...

  10. Critical thinking and contemporary mental health care: Michel Foucault's "history of the present".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marc

    2016-11-11

    In order to be able to provide informed, effective and responsive mental health care and to do so in an evidence-based, collaborative and recovery-focused way with those who use mental health services, there is a recognition of the need for mental health professionals to possess sophisticated critical thinking capabilities. This article will therefore propose that such capabilities can be productively situated within the context of the work of the French philosopher Michel Foucault, one of the most challenging, innovative and influential thinkers of the 20th century. However, rather than focusing exclusively upon the content of Foucault's work, it will be suggested that it is possible to discern a general methodological approach across that work, a methodological approach that he refers to as "the history of the present." In doing so, Foucault's history of the present can be understood as a productive, albeit provisional, framework in which to orientate the purpose and process of critical thinking for mental health professionals by emphasizing the need to both historicize and politicize the theoretical perspectives and therapeutic practices that characterize contemporary mental health care.

  11. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

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    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  12. Critical decisions for older people with advanced dementia: a prospective study in long-term institutions and district home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toscani, F.; Steen, J.T. van der; Finetti, S.; Giunco, F.; Pettenati, F.; Villani, D.; Monti, M.; Gentile, S.; Charrier, L.; Giulio, P. Di

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the decisions critical for survival or quality of life [critical decisions (CDs)] made for patients with advanced dementia in nursing homes (NHs) and home care (HC) services. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with a follow-up of 6 months. SETTING: Lombardy Region (N

  13. Demonstration of novel, secure, real-time, portable ultrasound transmission from an austere international location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedegbe, Chinwe; Morchel, Herman; Hazelwood, Vikki; Hassler, Cynthia; Feldman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There is not sufficient access to medical care or medical expertise in many parts of the world. An innovative telemedicine system has been developed to provide expert medical guidance to field caregivers [who have less medical expertise but can reach the patient population in need]. Real-time ultrasound video images have been securely transmitted from the Dominican Republic to Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack NJ (HackensackUMC), while the expert physician at HackensackUMC maintained direct voice communication with the field caregiver. Utilizing a portable ultrasound machine (Sonosite) integrated with portable broadcasting device (LiveU), extended Focused Assessment Sonography in Trauma (e-FAST) examinations were performed on healthy volunteers and transmitted via the local cellular network. Additionally, two e-FAST examinations were conducted from a remote location without cellular coverage and transmitted via broad ground area network (BGAN) satellites. The demonstration took the technology "out of the lab" and into a real life, austere environment. The conditions of the Dominican Republic ultrasound mission provided experience on how to manage and utilize this innovative technology in areas where reliable communications and medical coverage are not readily available. The resilient transmission capabilities coupled with the security features deem this portable Telesonography (TS) equipment highly useful in the telemedicine forefront by offering healthcare in underdeveloped areas as well as potentially enhancing throughput in disaster situations.

  14. The use of erythromycin as a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent in adult critical care: benefits versus risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkyard, Catherine V; Koerner, Roland J

    2007-03-01

    Erythromycin A, the first macrolide, was introduced in the 1950s and after years of clinical experience it still remains a commonly relied upon antibiotic. In the past, pharmacodynamic characteristics of macrolides beyond antimicrobial action such as anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties have been of scientific and clinical interest. The function of erythromycin as a prokinetic agent has also been investigated for a range of gastrointestinal motility disorders and more recently within the context of critically ill patients. Prokinetic agents are drugs that increase contractile force and accelerate intraluminal transit. Whilst the anti-inflammatory action may be a desirable side effect to its antibiotic action, using erythromycin A merely for its prokinetic effect alone raises the concern about promoting emergence of macrolide resistance. The objectives of this review article are: (i) to briefly summarize the modes and epidemiology of macrolide resistance, particularly in respect to that found in the Streptococcus species (a potential reservoir for the dissemination of macrolide resistance on the critical care unit); (ii) to discuss in this context the evidence for conditions promoting bacterial resistance against macrolides; and (iii) to assess the potential clinical benefit of using erythromycin A as a prokinetic versus the risks of promoting emergence of macrolide resistance in the clinical setting. We conclude, that in view of the growing weight of evidence demonstrating the potential epidemiological impact of the increased use of macrolides upon the spread of resistance, versus a lack of sufficient and convincing evidence that erythromycin A is a superior prokinetic agent to potential alternatives in the critically ill patient population, at this stage we do not advocate the use of erythromycin A as a prokinetic agent in critically ill patients unless they have failed all other treatment for impaired gastrointestinal dysmotility and are intolerant

  15. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  16. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

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    Ahmad-Ali Asadi-Noghabi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness. Methods: Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT. Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management. Results: Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used. Conclusion: Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management.

  17. Critical issues in implementing low vision care in the Asia-Pacific region.

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    Chiang, Peggy Pei-Chia; Marella, Manjula; Ormsby, Gail; Keeffe, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Two-thirds of the world's population with low vision resides in the Asia-Pacific region. Provision of comprehensive low vision services is important to improve vision-related quality of life (QoL) for people with this condition. This review outlines the critical issues and challenges facing the provision of low vision services in the Asia-Pacific region. The review offers possible strategies to tackle these issues and challenges facing service providers and policy makers in lieu of Vision 2020 strategies in this area. Pertinent findings from the global survey of low vision services and extensive ground work conducted in the region are used; in addition, a discussion on the availability of services, human resources and training, and funding and the future sustainability of low vision care will be covered. In summary, current issues and challenges facing the region are the lack of specific evidence-based data, access, appropriate equipment and facilities, human resources, funding, and sustainability. These issues are inextricably interlinked and thus cannot be addressed in isolation. The solutions proposed cover all areas of the VISION 2020 strategy that include service delivery, human resources, infrastructure and equipment, advocacy and partnership; and include provision of comprehensive care via vertical and horizontal integration; strengthening primary level care in the community; providing formal and informal training to enable task shifting and capacity building; and promoting strong government and private sector partnership to achieve long-term service financial sustainability.

  18. Critical issues in implementing low vision care in the Asia-Pacific region

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    Peggy Pei-Chia Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-thirds of the world′s population with low vision resides in the Asia-Pacific region. Provision of comprehensive low vision services is important to improve vision-related quality of life (QoL for people with this condition. This review outlines the critical issues and challenges facing the provision of low vision services in the Asia-Pacific region. The review offers possible strategies to tackle these issues and challenges facing service providers and policy makers in lieu of Vision 2020 strategies in this area. Pertinent findings from the global survey of low vision services and extensive ground work conducted in the region are used; in addition, a discussion on the availability of services, human resources and training, and funding and the future sustainability of low vision care will be covered. In summary, current issues and challenges facing the region are the lack of specific evidence-based data, access, appropriate equipment and facilities, human resources, funding, and sustainability. These issues are inextricably interlinked and thus cannot be addressed in isolation. The solutions proposed cover all areas of the VISION 2020 strategy that include service delivery, human resources, infrastructure and equipment, advocacy and partnership; and include provision of comprehensive care via vertical and horizontal integration; strengthening primary level care in the community; providing formal and informal training to enable task shifting and capacity building; and promoting strong government and private sector partnership to achieve long-term service financial sustainability.

  19. Reflections on the status of the contemporary artist in the struggle against the official discourses: Paul Auster, literature and history doi:10.5007/1807-1384.2010v7n2p210

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    Lilian Reichert Coelho

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a reading of The New York Trilogy (1987, Leviathan (1992 and The Brooklyn Follies (2005, by Paul Auster, through the articulation between subjectivities and discourses, notably literature and history. The effort was guided by the observation of the criticism constructed by the writer in relation to the United States' national myth, in the perspective of a movement that resounds other writers' criticism, overall the north-American ones, among which Auster presents himself as a genealogical heir. In digging the discursive and historical viscera on the "origin" of the American nation, the writer presents some reflections on the national identity issue, mainly in relation to the symbols and to the way the characters deal with the official representations.

  20. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

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    Michael Blaivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionally, a standardized ultrasound scan was performed to detect the extent of the thrombus. Images were interpreted offline by two independent readers. Results. Thirty-six (11.25% patients had UEDVT and a complete scan was performed. One (2.7% of these patients died, and 2 had pulmonary embolism (5.5%. Risk factors associated with UEDVT were presence of CVC [(odds ratio (OR 2.716, P=0.007], malignancy (OR 1.483, P=0.036, total parenteral nutrition (OR 1.399, P=0.035, hypercoagulable state (OR 1.284, P=0.045, and obesity (OR 1.191, P=0.049. Eight thrombi were chronic, and 28 were acute. We describe a new sonographic sign which characterized acute thrombosis: a double hyperechoic line at the interface between the thrombus and the venous wall; but its clinical significance remains to be defined. Conclusion. Presence of CVC was a strong predictor for the development of UEDVT in a cohort of critical care patients; however, the rate of subsequent PE and related mortality was low.

  1. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

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    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In adult oncology, there is evidence to suggest early specialist palliative care improves HRQOL, mood, treatment decision-making, health care utilization, advanced care planning, patient satisfaction, and end-of-life care. There is moderate evidence to support the role of early specialist palliative care intervention in improvement of symptoms, survival, and health-related communication. There is limited evidence at present to support role of early specialist palliative care interventions in pediatric and geriatric oncology. Qualitative studies on barriers and negative patient outcomes may provide useful insights toward restructuring early specialist palliative care interventions.

  2. Do Malawian women critically assess the quality of care? A qualitative study on women’s perceptions of perinatal care at a district hospital in Malawi

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    Kumbani Lily C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malawi has a high perinatal mortality rate of 40 deaths per 1,000 births. To promote neonatal health, the Government of Malawi has identified essential health care packages for improving maternal and neonatal health in health care facilities. However, regardless of the availability of health services, women’s perceptions of the care is important as it influences whether the women will or will not use the services. In Malawi 95% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from skilled attendants, but the number is reduced to 71% deliveries being conducted by skilled attendants. The objective of this study was to describe women’s perceptions on perinatal care among the women delivered at a district hospital. Methods A descriptive study design with qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Data were collected through face-to-face in-depth interviews using semi-structured interview guides collecting information on women’s perceptions on perinatal care. A total of 14 in depth interviews were conducted with women delivering at Chiradzulu District Hospital from February to March 2011. The women were asked how they perceived the care they received from health workers during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum. They were also asked about the information they received during provision of care. Data were manually analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Two themes from the study were good care and unsatisfactory care. Subthemes under good care were: respect, confidentiality, privacy and normal delivery. Providers’ attitude, delay in providing care, inadequate care, and unavailability of delivery attendants were subthemes under unsatisfactory care. Conclusions Although the results show that women wanted to be well received at health facilities, respected, treated with kindness, dignity and not shouted at, they were not critical of the care they received. The women did not know the quality of care to expect because they

  3. The capabilities and scope-of-practice requirements of advanced life support practitioners undertaking critical care transfers: A Delphi study

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    Monique Venter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Critical care transfers (CCT refer to the high level of care given during transport (via ambulance, helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft of patients who are of high acuity. In South Africa (SA, advanced life support (ALS paramedics undertake CCTs. The scope of ALS in SA has no extended protocol regarding procedures or medications in terms of dealing with these CCTs. Aim. The aim of this study was to obtain the opinions of several experts in fields pertaining to critical care and transport and to gain consensus on the skills and scope-of-practice requirements of paramedics undertaking CCTs in the SA setting. Methods. A modified Delphi study consisting of three rounds was undertaken using an online survey platform. A heterogeneous sample (n=7, consisting of specialists in the fields of anaesthesiology, emergency medicine, internal medicine, critical care, critical care transport and paediatrics, was asked to indicate whether, in their opinion, selected procedures and medications were needed within the scope of practice of paramedics undertaking CCTs. Results. After three rounds, consensus was obtained in 70% (57/81 of procedures and medications. Many of these items are not currently within the scope of paramedics’ training. The panel felt that paramedics undertaking these transfers should have additional postgraduate training that is specific to critical care. Conclusion. Major discrepancies exist between the current scope of paramedic practice and the suggested required scope of practice for CCTs. An extended scope of practice and additional training should be considered for these practitioners.

  4. Critical Illness Polyneuromyopathy Developing After Diabetic Ketoacidosis in an Intensive Care Unit

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    Mehmet Salih Sevdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM is a primary axonal-degenerative condition that occurs in sensory and motor fibers after the onset of a critical illness. It is thought that it develops due to tissue damage due to hypoxia/ischemia. When 24-year-old female patient was followed in the intensive care unit (ICU due to diabetic ketoacidosis, she was extubated on the second day. She was reintubated on the third day because of respiratory acidosis. Sedation was withdrawn on the fifth day, however the patient could not recover consciousness until the 14th day and tetraplegia was found during her neurological examination. Motor peripheral nerve-transmission response in the upper-and lower-extremity was evaluated to be of low amplitude in the conducted needle electroneuromyography. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation on the 23rd day. The neuromuscular symptoms developing as a result of critical illnesses reflect themselves as an increase in the hospitalization duration in the ICU, a difficulty in separation from the mechanical ventilator and an extension of rehabilitation.

  5. Prophylaxis for venous thrombo-embolism in neurocritical care: a critical appraisal.

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    Raslan, Ahmed M; Fields, Jeremy D; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2010-04-01

    Venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) is frequently encountered in critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients admitted to intensive care units. This patient population includes those with brain neoplasm, intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pre- and post-operative patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures and those with traumatic brain injury, and acute spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a wide variability in clinical practice for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, in part due to paucity of data based on randomized clinical trials. Here, we review the current literature on the incidence of VTE in the critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients as well as appraise available data to support particular practice paradigms for specific subsets of these patients. Data synthesis was conducted via search of Medline, Cochrane databases, and manual review of article bibliographies. Critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients have higher susceptibility to VTE. Intermittent compression devices with or without anti-thrombotics is generally the method of choice for thromboprophylaxis. Low molecular weight heparin is the method of choice in certain patient subgroups such as those with SCI and ischemic stroke. Inferior vena cava filters may play a role in thromboprophylaxis in selected cases. Without clear guidelines that can be universally applied to this diverse group of patients, prophylaxis for VTE should be tailored to the individual patient with cautious assessment of benefits versus risks. There is a need for higher level evidence to guide VTE prophylaxis in certain subgroups of this patient population.

  6. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

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    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated.

  7. Reducing neonatal mortality in India: critical role of access to emergency obstetric care.

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    Anu Rammohan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal mortality currently accounts for 41% of all global deaths among children below five years. Despite recording a 33% decline in neonatal deaths between 2000 and 2009, about 900,000 neonates died in India in 2009. The decline in neonatal mortality is slower than in the post-neonatal period, and neonatal mortality rates have increased as a proportion of under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality rates are higher among rural dwellers of India, who make up at least two-thirds of India's population. Identifying the factors influencing neonatal mortality will significantly improve child survival outcomes in India. METHODS: Our analysis is based on household data from the nationally representative 2008 Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. We use probit regression techniques to analyse the links between neonatal mortality at the household level and households' access to health facilities. The probability of the child dying in the first month of birth is our dependent variable. RESULTS: We found that 80% of neonatal deaths occurred within the first week of birth, and that the probability of neonatal mortality is significantly lower when the child's village is closer to the district hospital (DH, suggesting the critical importance of specialist hospital care in the prevention of newborn deaths. Neonatal deaths were lower in regions where emergency obstetric care was available at the District Hospitals. We also found that parental schooling and household wealth status improved neonatal survival outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the main causes of neonatal deaths in India--preterm deliveries, asphyxia, and sepsis--requires adequacy of specialised workforce and facilities for delivery and neonatal intensive care and easy access by mothers and neonates. The slow decline in neonatal death rates reflects a limited attention to factors which contribute to neonatal deaths. The suboptimal quality and coverage of Emergency

  8. Team Cognition As a Means to Improve Care Delivery in Critically Ill Patients With Cancer After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

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    McNeese, Nathan J; Khera, Nandita; Wordingham, Sara E; Arring, Noel; Nyquist, Sharon; Gentry, Amy; Tomlinson, Brian; Cooke, Nancy J; Sen, Ayan

    2016-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important and complex treatment modality for a variety of hematologic malignancies and some solid tumors. Although outcomes of patients who have undergone HCT and require care in intensive care units (ICUs) have improved over time, mortality rates remain high and there are significant associated costs. Lack of a team-based approach to care, especially during critical illness, is detrimental to patient autonomy and satisfaction, and to team morale, ultimately leading to poor quality of care. In this manuscript, we describe the case of a patient who had undergone HCT and was in the ICU setting, where inconsistent team interaction among the various stakeholders delivering care resulted in a lack of shared goals and poor outcomes. Team cognition is cognitive processing at the team level through interactions among team members and is reflected in dynamic communication and coordination behaviors. Although the patient received multidisciplinary care as needed in a medically complicated case, a lack of team cognition and, particularly, inconsistent communication among the dynamic teams caring for the patient, led to mixed messages being delivered with high-cost implications for the health-care system and the family. This article highlights concepts and recommendations that begin a necessary in-depth assessment of implications for clinical care and initiate a research agenda that examines the effects of team cognition on HCT teams, and, more generally, critical care of the patient with cancer.

  9. ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae in critical care areas – a clinical and cost analysis from a tertiary health care centre

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    Hena Rani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: ESBLs pose a major threat in clinical therapeutics. In the present study we have tried to do clinical analysis of one hundred ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from various clinical specimens from patients admitted in critical care areas. Methods: ESBLs detection was done by CLSI, DDS and Vitek methods. Clinical analysis of each patient was done by regularly visiting in CCA and reviewing patient’s status and medical records. Results: All of the 13 patients on foley’s catheter grew ESBLs positive isolates and amongst 10 non catheterized patients, 9 grew ESBLs negative isolates. Thirteen out of 14 patients on CVP/arterial line grew ESBLs positive isolates. Out of 24 patients who underwent surgery, 22 grew ESBLs positive isolate. Forty seven out of 68 patients who were on 3rd or 4th generation cephalosporins within last 1 month of giving the sample grew ESBLs positive isolates. Conclusion: We have found a statistically significant (p<0.0.05 relationship in between foley’s catheterization and production of ESBLs from urinary isolates. There was no statistically significant association in between CVP/arterial line and blood culture isolates. We did not find difference in mortality rates in between patients infected with ESBLs positive or negative isolates. The mortality in patients was associated with their primary illness or associated co-morbid conditions. We found that the detection of ESBLs is important for the de-escalation of therapy thereby saving net cost of treatment.

  10. Critical Anthropology of Global Health "takes a stand" statement: a critical medical anthropological approach to the U.S.'s Affordable Care Act.

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    Horton, Sarah; Abadía, Cesar; Mulligan, Jessica; Thompson, Jennifer Jo

    2014-03-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010--the U.S.'s first major health care reform in over half a century-has sparked new debates in the United States about individual responsibility, the collective good, and the social contract. Although the ACA aims to reduce the number of the uninsured through the simultaneous expansion of the private insurance industry and government-funded Medicaid, critics charge it merely expands rather than reforms the existing fragmented and costly employer-based health care system. Focusing in particular on the ACA's individual mandate and its planned Medicaid expansion, this statement charts a course for ethnographic contributions to the on-the-ground impact of the ACA while showcasing ways critical medical anthropologists can join the debate. We conclude with ways that anthropologists may use critiques of the ACA as a platform from which to denaturalize assumptions of "cost" and "profit" that underpin the global spread of market-based medicine more broadly.

  11. INDICATIONS AND COMPLICATIONS OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERIZATION IN CRITICALLY ILL CHILDREN IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

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    Shwetal Bhatt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nothing can be more difficult, time consuming and frustrating than obtaining vascular access in critically ill pediatric patient1 .Central venous catheters are widely used in the care of critically ill patients. Methodology: This paper reviews our experience with central lines in 28 critically ill patients including neonates and non-neonates, in a study period of October 2008 to October 2009. Of the total 28 patients, central venous catheterizations was more in those who were more than a month age and of female sex. Results: The route of insertion was femoral in approximately 89% of our patients and insertion was successful in 24 patients. The most common indication we observed for catheter use was, venous access in shock (37.1% in neonates and for monitoring the central venous pressure (32% in non neonate patients of ARDS with pulmonary edema and Shock. The central line was removed in majority of patients (60% within 24-48hrs of insertion and was kept for maximum of six days in just one patient. Organism most frequently isolated was Acinetobacter. Recommendations made include, use strict aseptic measures by restricted number of skilled operators while inserting and during maintaining central line, routine confirmatory x-ray or fluoroscopy to check the position of central line before catheter use, if possible, use for central pressure monitoring recommended. Conclusion: We concluded that central venous catheterization is a safe and effective measure so we recommend timely and judicious use of percutaneous central venous catheter in paediatric critically ill patients of PICU and NICU. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 85-88

  12. Relevance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to clinical care of critically ill patients.

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    Bulitta, Jurgen B; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Forrest, Alan; Brown, Silvia V; Neely, Michael N; Tsuji, Brian T; Louie, Arnold

    2011-12-01

    Efficacious therapy is of utmost importance to save lives and prevent bacterial resistance in critically ill patients. This review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling methods to optimize clinical care of critically ill patients in empiric and individualized therapy. While these methods apply to all therapeutic areas, we focus on antibiotics to highlight important applications, as emergence of resistance is a significant problem. Nonparametric and parametric population PK modeling, multiple-model dosage design, Monte Carlo simulations, and Bayesian adaptive feedback control are the methods of choice to optimize therapy. Population PK can estimate between patient variability and account for potentially increased clearances and large volumes of distribution in critically ill patients. Once patient- specific PK data become available, target concentration intervention and adaptive feedback control algorithms can most precisely achieve target goals such as clinical cure of an infection or resistance prevention in stable and unstable patients with rapidly changing PK parameters. Many bacterial resistance mechanisms cause PK/PD targets for resistance prevention to be usually several-fold higher than targets for near-maximal killing. In vitro infection models such as the hollow fiber and one-compartment infection models allow one to study antibiotic-induced bacterial killing and emergence of resistance of mono- and combination therapies over clinically relevant treatment durations. Mechanism-based (and empirical) PK/PD modeling can incorporate effects of the immune system and allow one to design innovative dosage regimens and prospective validation studies. Mechanism-based modeling holds great promise to optimize mono- and combination therapy of anti-infectives and drugs from other therapeutic areas for critically ill patients.

  13. The effect of preceptor behavior on the critical thinking skills of new graduate nurses in the intensive care unit.

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    Kaddoura, Mahmoud A

    2013-11-01

    Little research has been conducted to examine the effect of preceptor behaviors on the critical thinking of new graduate nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study explored the perceptions of new graduates on the effect of preceptor behaviors and strategies on the development of their critical thinking skills, using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design. Data were collected with demographic surveys and semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis approach. The study showed that relationships between new graduates and their preceptors played a key role in the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses, and specific practical implications were suggested. The study data are useful for critical care nurses, preceptors, nurse educators, and clinical nurse specialists. The findings contribute to efforts to enhance the preceptor-preceptee relationship and develop critical thinking skills in new graduates.

  14. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

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    Hodder R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder*Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada, *Dr Rick Hodder passed away on Tuesday April 17,2012. Please see the Dedication for more information on Dr Hodder.Abstract: Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1 an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2 a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician.Keywords: acute asthma, acute lung injury, ARDS, acute respiratory failure

  15. [Nursing fundamentals: critical incidents related to care provided in supervised training].

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    Valsecchi, Elizabeth Amâncio de Souza da Silva; Nogueira, Maria Suely

    2002-01-01

    The course of Nursing fundamentals introduces the students to supervised training and can result in anxiety and tension. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify positive/negative aspects related to the care provided during the supervised training, based on the critical incidents technique. The subjects were students of the 2 degrees, 3 degrees and 4 degrees years of the Nursing Undergraduate Program offered by the State University of Maringá-PR. Authors identified 95 reports: 48(50.5%) positive and 47(49.5) negative. The positive aspects were related to the faculty's presence mediating the teaching-learning process; and the negative ones were related to the professionals insensibility regarding pain and death.

  16. FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care.

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    Raine, Todd; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources. FOAMSearch, a custom search engine (CSE), was developed to find relevant, high-quality online resources for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC) clinicians. Using Google™ algorithms, it searches a vetted list of >300 blogs, podcasts, wikis, knowledge translation tools, clinical decision support tools and medical journals. Utilisation has increased progressively to >3000 users/month since its launch in 2011. Further study of the role of CSEs to find medical resources is needed, and it might be possible to develop similar CSEs for other areas of medicine.

  17. Consequences of clinical situations that cause critical care nurses to experience moral distress.

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    Wiegand, Debra L; Funk, Marjorie

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about the consequences of moral distress. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical situations that caused nurses to experience moral distress, to understand the consequences of those situations, and to determine whether nurses would change their practice based on their experiences. The investigation used a descriptive approach. Open-ended surveys were distributed to a convenience sample of 204 critical care nurses employed at a university medical center. The analysis of participants' responses used an inductive approach and a thematic analysis. Each line of the data was reviewed and coded, and the codes were collapsed into themes. Methodological rigor was established. Forty-nine nurses responded to the survey. The majority of nurses had experienced moral distress, and the majority of situations that caused nurses to experience moral distress were related to end of life. The nurses described negative consequences for themselves, patients, and families.

  18. Web-based simulation: a tool for teaching critical care nursing.

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    Barbosa, Sayonara de Fatima Faria; Marin, Heimar de Fatima

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, to implement and to evaluate a web-based simulation for critical care nursing, as a tool for teaching nursing students at the undergraduate level. An adapted methodology was used to develop teaching material in a web-based learning environment, consisting of three evaluation phases (ergonomic, pedagogical and usability), carried out by web-designers/programmers, nursing teachers/nurses, and undergraduate nursing students. The research tools used were three different evaluation forms, based on a five-point Likert scale, which were applied after using the simulation. The results garnered from the forms show positive analyses in every evaluation, with special emphasis on the encouragement of learning in the pedagogical evaluation period. In the usability evaluation, the highlight was on the students' satisfaction in using the environment and how easy it was to navigate. This shows the feasibility of using this simulation to improve the learning process.

  19. Making big data useful for health care: a summary of the inaugural mit critical data conference.

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    Badawi, Omar; Brennan, Thomas; Celi, Leo Anthony; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Ippolito, Andrea; Johnson, Alistair; Mark, Roger G; Mayaud, Louis; Moody, George; Moses, Christopher; Naumann, Tristan; Pimentel, Marco; Pollard, Tom J; Santos, Mauro; Stone, David J; Zimolzak, Andrew

    2014-08-22

    With growing concerns that big data will only augment the problem of unreliable research, the Laboratory of Computational Physiology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology organized the Critical Data Conference in January 2014. Thought leaders from academia, government, and industry across disciplines-including clinical medicine, computer science, public health, informatics, biomedical research, health technology, statistics, and epidemiology-gathered and discussed the pitfalls and challenges of big data in health care. The key message from the conference is that the value of large amounts of data hinges on the ability of researchers to share data, methodologies, and findings in an open setting. If empirical value is to be from the analysis of retrospective data, groups must continuously work together on similar problems to create more effective peer review. This will lead to improvement in methodology and quality, with each iteration of analysis resulting in more reliability.

  20. The role of the intensive care unit in the management of the critically ill surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, B H; Webster, N R

    1999-10-01

    Surgical patients make up 60-70% of the work load of intensive care units in the UK. There is a recognised short fall in the resource allocation for high dependency units (HDUs) and intensive care units (ICUs) in this country, despite repeated national audits urging that this resource be increased. British ICUs admit patients later and with higher severity of illness scores than elsewhere and this leads to higher ICU mortality. How can this situation be improved? Scoring systems that allow selection of appropriate patients for admission to ICU and avoid inappropriate admission are still in development. Pre-operative admission and optimisation in ICU is rare in this country despite increasing evidence to support this practice in high risk surgical patients. Early admission to ICU, with potential improvement in outcomes, could also be achieved using multi-disciplinary medical emergency teams. These teams would be alerted by ward staff in response to set specific conditions and physiological criteria. These proposals are still under trial but may offer benefit by reducing mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

  1. Design and validation of a questionnaire to evaluate the usability of computerized critical care information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dincklage, Falk; Lichtner, Gregor; Suchodolski, Klaudiusz; Ragaller, Maximilian; Friesdorf, Wolfgang; Podtschaske, Beatrice

    2016-06-03

    The implementation of computerized critical care information systems (CCIS) can improve the quality of clinical care and staff satisfaction, but also holds risks of disrupting the workflow with consecutive negative impacts. The usability of CCIS is one of the key factors determining their benefits and weaknesses. However, no tailored instrument exists to measure the usability of such systems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire that measures the usability of CCIS. Following a mixed-method design approach, we developed a questionnaire comprising two evaluation models to assess the usability of CCIS: (1) the task-specific model rates the usability individually for several tasks which CCIS could support and which we derived by analyzing work processes in the ICU; (2) the characteristic-specific model rates the different aspects of the usability, as defined by the international standard "ergonomics of human-system interaction". We tested validity and reliability of the digital version of the questionnaire in a sample population. In the sample population of 535 participants both usability evaluation models showed a strong correlation with the overall rating of the system (multiple correlation coefficients ≥0.80) as well as a very high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.93). The novel questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the usability of CCIS and can be used to study the influence of the usability on their implementation benefits and weaknesses.

  2. Innovations in technology--Novalung iLA: challenges for the field of critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The Novalung interventional lung assist (iLA) device is a new pumpless extracorporeal gas exchange device that imitates the native lung because it allows for protective mechanical ventilation by the reduction of tidal volumes and decreased end expiratory pressures. It is a rescue device for patients with refractory lung failure, as well as a bridge to lung transplantation. While used in Europe for some years, the Novalung iLA has been recently approved by both Health Canada and our facility, as a bridge to lung transplantation. In this article, the author discusses the introduction of this new advancement in extracorporeal gas exchange into an adult critical care setting. First, the author presents an overview of this new technology and how it differs from the traditional model of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and then shares the process in which the anticipated challenges of this device introduction were addressed in one institution. Particular attention is paid to the education of the nursing staff. A plan was developed to deliver information, education and training guidelines to prepare for patients requiring a bridge to lung transplantation with this device within the medical surgical intensive care unit in our hospital. Subsequently, these initiatives have expanded to include a workshop and a simulation experience.

  3. Do not resuscitate: An expanding role for critical care response team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M Gouda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Do not resuscitate (DNR order is an important aspect of medical practice. Since the implementation of critical care response team (CCRT, frequently we have encountered with patients in the wards that should have been made DNR. Initiating DNR became an important part of CCRT activity. We were obliged to extended the role of CCRT - beyond managing seriously ill patients - in addressing the code status for patients after discussion with the managing teams. Purpose: We compare the trend of initiation of DNR orders in the regular ward before and after implementing CCRT. Methods: Our hospital is 1200 bed tertiary care center. CCRT has been launched in January 1, 2008. The CCRT is 24/7 service led by in-house North American certified intensivists. Cohort analysis of prospectively collected data of 5406 CCRT activation from January 1, 2008, to September 30, 2013. Data before implementation of CCRT was available for 299 patients from the period of June 1, 2007, to December 31, 2007. A comparison made between the two groups (before and after implementation of CCRT for demographic data and percentage of patients in whom DNR order initiated. Results: Before CCRT implementation, 299 patients were attended by Intensive Care Unit physician for regular consultation, 41.1% were females and 52.4% were males with mean of age 58.44 ± 18.47 standard deviation (SD. DNR was initiated in 2.7% of patients. After CCRT implementation, 5904 CCRT activations, 47.6% females and 52.4% males with mean of age 59.17 ± 20.07 SD DNR initiated in 468 (7.9% of cases. There was 5.2% increase in DNR orders initiation and completion after CCRT introduced to our institute. Conclusion: CCRT plays an important role in addressing and initiating DNR.

  4. Understanding the impact on intensive care staff workflow due to the introduction of a critical care information system: a mixed methods research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N T; Mador, R L; Ho, S; Mayes, D; Westbrook, J I; Creswick, N; Thiru, K; Brown, M

    2009-01-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a complex and dynamic tertiary care environment that requires health care providers to balance many competing tasks and responsibilities. Inefficient and interruption-driven workflow is believed to increase the likelihood of medical errors and, therefore, present a serious risk to patients in the ICU. The introduction of a Critical Care Information System (CCIS), is purported to result in fewer medical errors and better patient care by streamlining workflow. Little objective research, however, has investigated these assertions. This paper reports on the design of a research methodology to explore the impact of a CCIS on the workflow of Respiratory Therapists, Pediatric Intensivists, Nurses, and Unit Clerks in a Pediatric ICU (PICU) and a General Systems ICU (GSICU) in Northern Canada.

  5. Characterization of Bacterial Etiologic Agents of Biofilm Formation in Medical Devices in Critical Care Setup

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    Sangita Revdiwala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biofilms contaminate catheters, ventilators, and medical implants; they act as a source of disease for humans, animals, and plants. Aim. Critical care units of any healthcare institute follow various interventional strategies with use of medical devices for the management of critical cases. Bacteria contaminate medical devices and form biofilms. Material and Methods. The study was carried out on 100 positive bacteriological cultures of medical devices which were inserted in hospitalized patients. The bacterial isolates were processed as per microtitre plate. All the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by VITEK 2 compact automated systems. Results. Out of the total 100 bacterial isolates tested, 88 of them were biofilm formers. A 16–20-hour incubation period was found to be optimum for biofilm development. 85% isolates were multidrug resistants and different mechanisms of bacterial drug resistance like ESBL, carbapenemase, and MRSA were found among isolates. Conclusion. Availability of nutrition in the form of glucose enhances the biofilm formation by bacteria. Time and availability of glucose are important factors for assessment of biofilm progress. It is an alarm for those who are associated with invasive procedures and indwelling medical devices especially in patients with low immunity.

  6. An ethical analysis of proxy and waiver of consent in critical care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R M G; Møller, K; Rossel, P J H

    2013-04-01

    It is a central principle in medical ethics that vulnerable patients are entitled to a degree of protection that reflects their vulnerability. In critical care research, this protection is often established by means of so-called proxy consent. Proxy consent for research participation constitutes a substituted judgement by a close relative or friend, based on knowledge of patient's values, preferences, and view of life. For the consent to be genuine, the proxy must be informed of and understand three fundamental aspects of research practice: (1) that participation is voluntary and the consent can be withdrawn at any time; (2) that the research is designed to benefit future patients and society as a whole, and not the individual study participant; and (3) that participation involves an incremental non-therapeutic risk. If this is not fulfilled because the research is to be conducted under circumstances where the proxy is unavailable, adequate protection of the patient must be ensured by other means. Thus, the research must be designed specifically to benefit critically ill patients, and the incremental non-therapeutic risk must only comprise a minimal risk.

  7. Which patients need critical care intervention after total joint arthroplasty? : a prospective study of factors associated with the need for intensive care following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, P M; Melnic, C M; Gutsche, J; Hume, E L; Lee, G-C

    2015-11-01

    Older patients with multiple medical co-morbidities are increasingly being offered and undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA). These patients are more likely to require intensive care support, following surgery. We prospectively evaluated the need for intensive care admission and intervention in a consecutive series of 738 patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. The mean age was 60.6 years (18 to 91; 440 women, 298 men. Risk factors, correlating with the need for critical care intervention, according to published guidelines, were analysed to identify high-risk patients who would benefit from post-operative critical care monitoring. A total of 50 patients (6.7%) in our series required critical care level interventions during their hospital stay. Six independent multivariate clinical predictors were identified (p 1000 mL (OR 17.36, 95% CI 5.36 to 56.19), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.90, 95% CI 4.78 to 40.36), intra-operative use of vasopressors (OR 8.10, 95% CI 3.23 to 20.27), revision hip arthroplasty (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.04 to 7.04) and body mass index > 35 kg/m(2) (OR 2.70, 95% CI 123 to 5.94). The model was then validated against an independent, previously published data set of 1594 consecutive patients. The use of this risk stratification model can be helpful in predicting which high-risk patients would benefit from a higher level of monitoring and care after elective TJA and aid hospitals in allocating precious critical care resources.

  8. The impact of fiscal austerity on suicide mortality: Evidence across the 'Eurozone periphery'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Collins, Alan

    2015-11-01

    While linkages between some macroeconomic phenomena and suicides in some countries have been explored, only two studies, hitherto, have established a causal relationship between fiscal austerity and suicide, albeit in a single country. The aim of this study is to provide the first systematic multiple-country evidence of a causal relationship of fiscal austerity on time-, gender-, and age-specific suicide mortality across five Eurozone peripheral countries, namely Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain over the period 1968-2012, while controlling for various socioeconomic differences. The impact of fiscal adjustments is found to be gender-, age- and time-specific. Specifically, fiscal austerity has short-, medium- and long-run suicide increasing effects on the male population in the 65-89 age group. A 1% reduction in government spending is associated with a 1.38%, 2.42% and 3.32% increase in the short-, medium- and long-run, respectively, of male suicides rates in the 65-89 age group in the Eurozone periphery. These results are highly robust to alternative measures of fiscal austerity. Improved labour market institutions help mitigate the negative effects of fiscal austerity on suicide mortality.

  9. The ‘Common Sense’ of Austerity in Europe’s Historic Bloc: A Gramscian Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben LUONGO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Euro-area efforts to address recession have moved Europe decisively into an era of harsh austerity despite budget cuts and other fiscal measures facing massive resistance from the public. Moreover, economists continue to express doubts concerning austerity and warn Euro-area officials that fiscal tightening only increases debt relative to GDP. Far from reflecting either popular or economic opinion, I argue that Europe’s pro-austerity discourse both reflects and is constructed by the hegemonic interests of transnational capital. Specifically, advocacy groups representing the business-finance community manufacture the ‘common sense’ of fiscal tightening within narratives of European profligacy and exploding debt. In reality, however, austerity only reinforces the neoliberal structure underlying Europe’s integration into the Single Market. Forces of transnational capital not only serve as the intellectual leaders behind this neoliberal integration but, as my research shows, work to maintain this structure by advancing pro-austerity discourses in a way that ensures their hegemonic position within the historic bloc.

  10. Multicountry survey of emergency and critical care medicine physicians' fluid resuscitation practices for adult patients with early septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Rowe, Brian H; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence to guide fluid resuscitation evidence in sepsis continues to evolve. We conducted a multicountry survey of emergency and critical care physicians to describe current stated practice and practice variation related to the quantity, rapidity and type of resuscitation fluid...... administered in early septic shock to inform the design of future septic shock fluid resuscitation trials. METHODS: Using a web-based survey tool, we invited critical care and emergency physicians in Canada, the UK, Scandinavia and Saudi Arabia to complete a self-administered electronic survey. RESULTS...... and Ringer's solutions were the preferred crystalloid fluids used 'often' or 'always' in 53.1% (n=556) and 60.5% (n=632) of instances, respectively. However, emergency physicians indicated that they would use normal saline 'often' or 'always' in 83.9% (n=376) of instances, while critical care physicians said...

  11. Can public managers make their welfare organizations adapt to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter; Pedersen, John Storm

    2014-01-01

    How has the current austerity changed the public welfare organizations’ performance landscape in modern welfare states? Can public managers make their organizations adapt to the new performance landscape shaped by the austerity? These questions are answered on the basis of the Danish case...

  12. Heptaoxygenated xanthones as anti-austerity agents from Securidaca longepedunculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibwe, Dya Fita; Awale, Suresh; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-15

    In a course of our search for anticancer agent based on a novel anti-austerity strategy, we found that the CHCl3 extract of the roots of Securidaca longepedunculata (Polygalaceae), collected at Democratic Republic of Congo, killed PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells preferentially in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM). Phytochemical investigation on the CHCl3 extract led to the isolation of 28 compounds including five new polymethoxylated xanthones [1,6,8-trihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (1), 1,6-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5,8-pentamethoxyxanthone (2), 8-hydroxy-1,4,5,6-tetramethoxy-2,3-methylenedioxyxanthone (3), 4,6,8-trihydroxy-1,2,3,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (4), 4,8-dihydroxy-1,2,3,5,6-pentamethoxyxanthone (5)] and a new benzyl benzoate [benzyl 3-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzoate (6)]. Among them, 1,6,8-trihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxyxanthone (1) and 1,6-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5,8-pentamethoxyxanthone (2) displayed the potent preferential cytotoxicity with PC50 of 22.8 and 17.4 μM, respectively. They triggered apoptosis-like PANC-1 cell death in NDM with a glucose-sensitive mode.

  13. Emergency and critical care procedures in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), and prairie dogs (Cynomys spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Angela M

    2007-05-01

    Less common exotic pet mammals are gaining in popularity. The Australian Sugar Glider, African Hedgehog, and prairie dog are seen regularly in exotic animal practices. They are subject to the same types of medical emergencies as more traditional pets, with the unfortunate addition of all too common underlying nutritional and husbandry-related disorders. Emergency stabilization and critical care are important first steps before collection of diagnostic test samples and administration of definitive medical care.

  14. Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection rate in critical care units in a tertiary care, teaching hospital in Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Chopdekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood stream infections related to central venous catheterization are one of the major device-associated infections reported. Patients admitted in critical care units requiring central venous catheterization and presenting with signs of septicemia during catheterization period were investigated for catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI. The CRBSI rate was 9.26 per 1000 catheter days in general with highest rate in neonatal intensive care unit (27.02/1000 days. Site of insertion of catheter and duration of catheterization did not show the influence on the CRBSI rate. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci were the predominant cause. Mortality of 33% was observed in patients with CRBSI. Since central venous catheters are increasingly being used in the critical care, regular surveillance for infection associated them are essential.

  15. THE LOCALIZED HERO AND ESCAPE FROM FREEDOM IN THE MUSIC OF CHANCE BY PAUL AUSTER / PAUL AUSTER’IN THE MUSIC OF CHANCE ADLI ROMANINDA SINIRLANDIRILMIŞ KAHRAMAN VE ÖZGÜRLÜKTEN KAÇIŞ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk KALAY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul Auster is a prominent American novelist, critic and poet: he was a Pen/Faulkner Award for Fiction finalist for his novel, The Music of Chance. This book’s protagonist, Jim Nashe, is an ex-fireman who has left his job and family to drive around the country and to earn money while running out of money. He and his friend named Pozzi found wounded on the motorway by him decide to gamble to make money easily: yet they are trapped in a house and forced to make a “wailing” wall because of their gambling debts for their losing. On the other hand, because Jim was a vagabond before his enslavement, Auster invokes Thomas Nashe’s picaresque novel, The Unfortunate Traveller. Critics allegorically address Jim’s home confinement from both spiritual and physical perspectives. Jim’s ethnic and cultural foundations inform his behaviors. An ethnic Jew, Auster illustrates the suffering of Holocaust survivors. Jim Nashe’s experiences are similar to those of Jews in the Holocaust or the Pogroms. He lives in a space that limits his freedom: he prefers death to living this way. The same characteristics of protagonist/writer offer a sophisticated plot for readers. Because the reader must know both the writer’s life and novel’s witty nuance. In this study, we examine Jim’s incarceration and the reasons for it.

  16. Enteral nutritional therapy in septic patients in the intensive care unit: compliance with nutritional guidelines for critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Castro, Kamila; Moraes,Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the compliance of septic patients' nutritional management with enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients. Methods Prospective cohort study with 92 septic patients, age ≥18 years, hospitalized in an intensive care unit, under enteral nutrition, evaluated according to enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients, compliance with caloric and protein goals, and reasons for not starting enteral nutrition early or for discontinuing it. Prognostic scores...

  17. Bretton Woods Institution Narratives about Inequality and Economic Vulnerability on the Eve of South African Austerity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, at a time when National Health Insurance should be generously funded (7 years after its approval as public policy by the ruling party), state fiscal austerity appears certain to nip the initiative in the bud. The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund issued separate reports about South Africa in late 2014, following a new finance minister's mid-term budget speech. In justifying austerity, they revealed 2 important conceptual blockages regarding inequality and international financial relations. The resulting political bias in the macroeconomic debate has, in turn, given neoliberal policy advocates intellectual weaponry to impose deeper austerity. In contrast, the rise of a "united front" of labor, community-based, and social movement activists, along with a vigorous left opposition party in Parliament, ensure that one of the world's most visible class struggles ratchets up in intensity in the years ahead.

  18. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252.

  19. Critical care issues in solid organ injury: Review and experience in a tertiary trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhavi Sawhney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Solid organ (spleen and liver injuries are dreaded by both surgeons and anesthesiologists because of associated high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to describe our experience of critical care concerns in solid organ injury, which otherwise has been poorly addressed in the literature. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort of solid organ injury (spleen and liver patients was done from January 2010 to December 2011 in tertiary level trauma Center. Results: Out of 624 abdominal trauma patients, a total of 212 patients (70% were admitted in intensive care unit (ICU. Their ages ranged from 6 to 74 years (median 24 years. Nearly 89% patients in liver trauma and 84% patients in splenic trauma were male. Mechanism of injury was blunt abdominal trauma in 96% patients and the most common associated injury was chest trauma. Average injury severity score, sequential organ failure assessment, lactate on admission was 16.84, 4.34 and 3.42 mmol/L and that of dying patient were 29.70, 7.73 and 5.09 mmol/L, respectively. Overall mortality of ICU admitted solid organ injury was 15.55%. Major issues of concern in splenic injury were hemorrhagic shock, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and post-splenectomy vaccination. Issues raised in liver injury are damage control surgery, deadly triad, thromboelastography guided transfusion protocols and hemostatic agents. Conclusions: A protocol-based and multidisciplinary approach in high dependency unit can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with solid organ injury.

  20. Critical care issues in solid organ injury: Review and experience in a tertiary trauma center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Chhavi; Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; Singh, P. M.; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Misra, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Solid organ (spleen and liver) injuries are dreaded by both surgeons and anesthesiologists because of associated high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to describe our experience of critical care concerns in solid organ injury, which otherwise has been poorly addressed in the literature. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort of solid organ injury (spleen and liver) patients was done from January 2010 to December 2011 in tertiary level trauma Center. Results: Out of 624 abdominal trauma patients, a total of 212 patients (70%) were admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Their ages ranged from 6 to 74 years (median 24 years). Nearly 89% patients in liver trauma and 84% patients in splenic trauma were male. Mechanism of injury was blunt abdominal trauma in 96% patients and the most common associated injury was chest trauma. Average injury severity score, sequential organ failure assessment, lactate on admission was 16.84, 4.34 and 3.42 mmol/L and that of dying patient were 29.70, 7.73 and 5.09 mmol/L, respectively. Overall mortality of ICU admitted solid organ injury was 15.55%. Major issues of concern in splenic injury were hemorrhagic shock, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and post-splenectomy vaccination. Issues raised in liver injury are damage control surgery, deadly triad, thromboelastography guided transfusion protocols and hemostatic agents. Conclusions: A protocol-based and multidisciplinary approach in high dependency unit can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with solid organ injury. PMID:25538517

  1. Austerity Economics and the Struggle for the Soul of U.S. Capitalism

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Pollin

    2013-01-01

    Amid the wreckage of the 2008-09 Wall Street collapse and Great Recession, orthodox economists and political elites in both the United States and Western Europe have been strongly pushing the idea that austerity is the only viable policy option. The basis for the austerity hawks' claim is that both the U.S. and European economies are being consumed by out-of-control levels of public indebtedness. Public spending must therefore be slashed before economic collapse becomes a real possibility. Ar...

  2. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  3. Perceived barriers to the regionalization of adult critical care in the United States: a qualitative preliminary study

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    Rubenfeld Gordon D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regionalization of adult critical care services may improve outcomes for critically ill patients. We sought to develop a framework for understanding clinician attitudes toward regionalization and potential barriers to developing a tiered, regionalized system of care in the United States. Methods We performed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of critical care stakeholders in the United States, including physicians, nurses and hospital administrators. Stakeholders were identified from a stratified-random sample of United States general medical and surgical hospitals. Key barriers and potential solutions were identified by performing content analysis of the interview transcriptions. Results We interviewed 30 stakeholders from 24 different hospitals, representing a broad range of hospital locations and sizes. Key barriers to regionalization included personal and economic strain on families, loss of autonomy on the part of referring physicians and hospitals, loss of revenue on the part of referring physicians and hospitals, the potential to worsen outcomes at small hospitals by limiting services, and the potential to overwhelm large hospitals. Improving communication between destination and source hospitals, provider education, instituting voluntary objective criteria to become a designated referral center, and mechanisms to feed back patients and revenue to source hospitals were identified as potential solutions to some of these barriers. Conclusion Regionalization efforts will be met with significant conceptual and structural barriers. These data provide a foundation for future research and can be used to inform policy decisions regarding the design and implementation of a regionalized system of critical care.

  4. Arterial waveform analysis in anesthesia and critical care: Theory, practical applications, and use in goal-directed strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montenij, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac output and preload are important variables in the hemodynamic optimization of critically ill patients in the operating room and intensive care unit. Arterial waveform analysis (AWA) enables continuous, minimally invasive measurement of CO from an arterial line, and provides dynamic assessmen

  5. 51. The use of bedside critical care US to detect occult diaphragmatic paresis in post-operative cardiac children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Hamadah

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Bed side critical care US assessment of diaphragms is a simple tool that can be easily learn and performed by PCICU intensivist. The tool can help in early detection of diaphragm motion abnormality related to cardiac surgery. Early detection can help putting management plan that may involve need for surgery or require prolong positive invasive and non-invasive ventilator support.

  6. Multicountry survey of emergency and critical care medicine physicians' fluid resuscitation practices for adult patients with early septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Rowe, Brian H; Walsh, Timothy S;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evidence to guide fluid resuscitation evidence in sepsis continues to evolve. We conducted a multicountry survey of emergency and critical care physicians to describe current stated practice and practice variation related to the quantity, rapidity and type of resuscitation fluid admin...

  7. Nosocomial Candiduria in Critically Ill Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Units in Qazvin, Iran

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    Ghiasian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A broad variety of fungi, especially Candida species, are becoming increasingly common causes of urinary tract infections in hospital settings. Objectives The current cross-sectional descriptive study aimed to determine the causative agents, risk factors and incidence rate of candiduria in critically ill patients, hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs of four Iranian hospitals. Patients and Methods A total of 155 children and adult patients, admitted to ICUs of the four university educational hospitals, who demonstrated Candida-positive urine cultures, were examined. Samples were processed via mycological procedures by direct microscopy and culture. Results Candiduria was confirmed in 50 (32.26 % patients and Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species representing 60.0% of isolates, followed by 14.0% C. glabrata, 12.0% C. parapsilosis, 10.0% C. krusei, and 4.0% C. tropicalis. Most patients were female (58% with a mean age of 46.7 years old. Generally, 39.7% and 62% of adults and children showed candiduria, respectively. The commonest predisposing factors were antibiotic therapy (98.0%, urinary catheterization (92.0%, corticotherapy (84.0%, being female (42.6 %, use of feeding tube (56%, and extended hospitalization, respectively. Conclusions The high frequency of candiduria in ICU patients can be decreased by shortening the duration of urinary catheterization, avoiding extra antibiotics and corticosteroids, as well as controlling the predisposing factors and underlying conditions.

  8. Quality of life improves with individualized home-based exercises in critical care survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayushi G Shelly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aim of the Study: This study aims to determine the effect of individualized home-based exercise on the quality of life post-Intensive Care Unit (ICU discharge. Subjects: Adult patients invasively mechanically ventilated for more than 48 h in medical ICU. Methodology: Thirty-five patients were enrolled prospectively in this study. They were interviewed to complete short form 36 (SF-36 version 2 questionnaire and were randomly allocated to control and experimental group by block randomization. The experimental group received individualized exercise information sheet and control group was asked to continue routine exercises done during their hospital stay. The experimental group also received a log book and weekly telephonic reminders. Patients were interviewed to complete the SF-36 through the telephone 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Results: Physical and mental components of the quality of life as measured by the SF-36 at the end of 4 weeks after hospital discharge showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 in the experimental group. Conclusion: A well-structured individualized exercise program improves the quality of life of critically ill patients after discharge.

  9. Development and testing of a Hyperlearning Model for design of an online critical care course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Pamela R

    2005-08-01

    Many U.S. colleges and universities are discovering innovative and exciting ways of using information technology to promote the process of teaching and learning and to extend education to new populations of students. Nurse educators in academia and service settings are developing interactive e-learning programs or courses to meet this need, and to either enhance practice concepts and basic skills or orient new associates to the clinical organization. In continuing education programs, students need flexibility and convenience to concurrently meet their personal and academic goals, and consumer demand for online instruction is increasing. The challenge is to prepare a comprehensive, high-quality, cost-effective e-learning course to meet educational standards and competencies. To meet this challenge, an instructional design model, the Hyperlearning Model, was developed based on Chickering and Gamson's principles of best practices in undergraduate education, to guide the development of an online course for basic critical care content. In this article, I describe the creation and testing of an instructional design model for developing content in this online course.

  10. Quality of Life Improves with Individualized Home-based Exercises in Critical Care Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Aayushi G.; Prabhu, Nivedita S.; Jirange, Priyanka; Kamath, Asha; Vaishali, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Aim of the Study: This study aims to determine the effect of individualized home-based exercise on the quality of life post-Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge. Subjects: Adult patients invasively mechanically ventilated for more than 48 h in medical ICU. Methodology: Thirty-five patients were enrolled prospectively in this study. They were interviewed to complete short form 36 (SF-36) version 2 questionnaire and were randomly allocated to control and experimental group by block randomization. The experimental group received individualized exercise information sheet and control group was asked to continue routine exercises done during their hospital stay. The experimental group also received a log book and weekly telephonic reminders. Patients were interviewed to complete the SF-36 through the telephone 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Results: Physical and mental components of the quality of life as measured by the SF-36 at the end of 4 weeks after hospital discharge showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the experimental group. Conclusion: A well-structured individualized exercise program improves the quality of life of critically ill patients after discharge. PMID:28250604

  11. Recommendations for the Critical Care Management of Devastating Brain Injury: Prognostication, Psychosocial, and Ethical Management : A Position Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souter, Michael J; Blissitt, Patricia A; Blosser, Sandralee; Bonomo, Jordan; Greer, David; Jichici, Draga; Mahanes, Dea; Marcolini, Evie G; Miller, Charles; Sangha, Kiranpal; Yeager, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Devastating brain injuries (DBIs) profoundly damage cerebral function and frequently cause death. DBI survivors admitted to critical care will suffer both intracranial and extracranial effects from their brain injury. The indicators of quality care in DBI are not completely defined, and despite best efforts many patients will not survive, although others may have better outcomes than originally anticipated. Inaccuracies in prognostication can result in premature termination of life support, thereby biasing outcomes research and creating a self-fulfilling cycle where the predicted course is almost invariably dismal. Because of the potential complexities and controversies involved in the management of devastating brain injury, the Neurocritical Care Society organized a panel of expert clinicians from neurocritical care, neuroanesthesia, neurology, neurosurgery, emergency medicine, nursing, and pharmacy to develop an evidence-based guideline with practice recommendations. The panel intends for this guideline to be used by critical care physicians, neurologists, emergency physicians, and other health professionals, with specific emphasis on management during the first 72-h post-injury. Following an extensive literature review, the panel used the GRADE methodology to evaluate the robustness of the data. They made actionable recommendations based on the quality of evidence, as well as on considerations of risk: benefit ratios, cost, and user preference. The panel generated recommendations regarding prognostication, psychosocial issues, and ethical considerations.

  12. Integrated quality control: implementation and validation of instrument function checks and procedural controls for a cartridge-based point-of-care system for critical care analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Paul; Mansouri, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the process used to develop and validate an integrated quality-control system for a cartridge-based, point-of-care system for critical care analysis is outlined. Application of risk management principles has resulted in a quality control system using a combination of statistical quality control with onboard reference solutions and failure pattern recognition used to flag common failure modes during the analytical phase of the testing process. A combination of traditional external quality control, integrated quality control to monitor ongoing instrument functionality, operator training, and other laboratory-implemented monitors is most effective in controlling known failure modes during the testing process.

  13. Danish national sedation strategy. Targeted therapy of discomfort associated with critical illness. Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Hein, Lars; Nibroe, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    Sedation of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation should be minimized or completely avoided. Only in selected situations is sedation indicated as first line therapy (increased intracranial pressure or therapeutic hypothermia). The critical care physicians primary objective sho...

  14. Long Term Care: Who's Responsible? Critical Debates in an Aging Society Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society on Aging, San Francisco, CA.

    When elderly persons can no longer care for themselves, they usually have only two primary options: care at home by unpaid relatives or high cost care in a nursing home; it is clear, then that a new system is needed that will offer older people more options. This report presents the major policy questions America faces in the search for a better…

  15. Paul Auster Topógrafo: O Espaço Urbano Contemporâneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Brandão Santos

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available As narrativas de Paul Auster são representações topográficas da cultura urbana contemporânea. Escrever é esboçar mapas dos espaços sociais, investigar a instabilidade desses mapas e a dimensão ficcional de tais espaços.

  16. Austerity, Ontario and Post-Secondary Education: The Case of "Canada's Capital University"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Carlo; Meades, James

    2011-01-01

    As austerity measures intensify around the world, the axe has come down particularly hard on post-secondary education (PSE). So-called education "reform" has shown itself to be a lightning rod for confrontation. In order to deal with unprecedented government budget shortfalls, caused, it must be recalled, by the lead agents of the…

  17. Training in the Public Sector in a Period of Austerity: The Case of the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewson, Nick; Felstead, Alan; Green, Francis

    2015-01-01

    This article examines what has happened to training in public sector organisations in the UK in a period of austerity. It draws on individual-level data collected over the period 2000-2012 and establishment-level data collected from employer surveys carried out between 2005 and 2012. To understand these data further, 75 qualitative interviews with…

  18. "Sharing One's Destiny": Effects of austerity on migrant health provisioning in the Mediterranean borderlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Megan A

    2017-03-01

    Italy has been on the frontlines of the European Union's "migration crisis," intercepting hundreds of thousands of migrants and asylum-seekers at sea and on its shores. Yet it has lacked adequate resources to ensure humane reception, as other forms of welfare state provisioning have also been rolled back through recent and ongoing austerity measures enforced by the EU and the IMF. While Italians face fewer employment opportunities, lower pensions, and higher taxes, migrants of precarious legal status and asylum-seekers struggle to navigate the weakened bureaucratic apparatus of the Italian state, including the health system. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the Italian provinces of Lazio and Sicily in early 2014 and 2016, this article documents the imbricated economic and health struggles of Italian citizens and noncitizens, and alludes to lived experiences of and community responses to economic austerity characterizing much of the Mediterranean borderlands. I argue that marginalization by the state of both citizens and noncitizens in this setting undergirds some of the local and community responses to economic austerity. Moreover, I suggest that contemporary struggles in this geopolitical context intersect in important ways with the repercussions of austerity legacies that have contributed to widespread displacement in neighboring regions and subsequent migration into the EU.

  19. Occurrence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in critical care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda R Vyawahare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI is the most common nosocomial infection. The etiological agents of which may be varied. Advancing age, debilitation, diabetes mellitus, duration of catheterization are the risk factors. Complications include prostatitis, epididymitis, cystitis, pyelonephritis and septicemia in high-risk patients, adding to hospitalization and morbidity. With this background the present study was undertaken Objectives: (1 To identify microbial pathogens associated with urinary tract infection (UTI in catheterized patients from Intensive Care Units (ICU (2 to determine the susceptibility pattern of these isolates to antimicrobial agents (3 to determine the effect of days of catheterization and UTI. Materials and Methods: Consecutive urine samples of 345 catheterized patients admitted in ICUs were included in the study. They were processed by standard microbiological procedures. Isolated organisms were speciated, and antibiotic susceptibility performed as per standard guidelines. Results: From the 345 urine samples of catheterized patients, 205 showed no growth and were found to be sterile. Bacterial growth was seen in 69 patients and fungal growth in 50 patients. Among the bacterial isolates, Escherichia coli were isolated in 39, followed by Klebsiella spp. 14. The other isolates included Pseudomonas spp., Group D streptococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In the fungal isolates, Candida glabrata was the most common isolate. High resistance was seen among Klebsiella isolates (nalidixic acid-86% and cefotaxime-86%. Conclusion: Development of CAUTI is common in critically ill patients. Emphasis should be placed on good catheter management and reducing the duration of catheterization rather than prophylaxis in order to reduce the incidence of catheter-related UTI. Culture and susceptibility testing play a vital role in the management if UTI occurs.

  20. Accuracy of point-of-care blood glucose measurements in critically ill patients in shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garingarao, Carlo Jan Pati-An; Buenaluz-Sedurante, Myrna; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2014-09-01

    A widely used method in monitoring glycemic status of ICU patients is point-of-care (POC) monitoring devices. A possible limitation to this method is altered peripheral blood flow in patients in shock, which may result in over/underestimations of their true glycemic status. This study aims to determine the accuracy of blood glucose measurements with a POC meter compared to laboratory methods in critically ill patients in shock. POC blood glucose was measured with a glucose-1-dehydrogenase-based reflectometric meter. The reference method was venous plasma glucose measured by a clinical chemistry analyzer (glucose oxidase-based). Outcomes assessed were concordance to ISO 15197:2003 minimum accuracy criteria for glucose meters, bias in glucose measurements obtained by the 2 methods using Bland-Altman analysis, and clinical accuracy through modified error grid analysis. A total of 186 paired glucose measurements were obtained. ISO 2003 accuracy criteria were met in 95.7% and 79.8% of POC glucose values in the normotensive and hypotensive group, respectively. Mean bias for the normotensive group was -12.4 mg/dL, while mean bias in the hypotensive group was -34.9 mg/dL. POC glucose measurements within the target zone for clinical accuracy were 90.2% and 79.8% for the normotensive and hypotensive group, respectively. POC blood glucose measurements were significantly less accurate in the hypotensive subgroup of ICU patients compared to the normotensive group. We recommend a lower threshold in confirming POC blood glucose with a central laboratory method if clinically incompatible. In light of recently updated accuracy standards, we also recommend alternative methods of glucose monitoring for the ICU population as a whole regardless of blood pressure status.

  1. The Social Media Index: Measuring the Impact of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoma, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of educational resources created for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC that incorporate social media has increased dramatically. With no way to assess their impact or quality, it is challenging for educators to receive scholarly credit and for learners to identify respected resources. The Social Media index (SMi was developed to help address this. Methods: We used data from social media platforms (Google PageRanks, Alexa Ranks, Facebook Likes, Twitter Followers, and Google+ Followers for EMCC blogs and podcasts to derive three normalized (ordinal, logarithmic, and raw formulas. The most statistically robust formula was assessed for 1 temporal stability using repeated measures and website age, and 2 correlation with impact by applying it to EMCC journals and measuring the correlation with known journal impact metrics. Results: The logarithmic version of the SMi containing four metrics was the most statistically robust. It correlated significantly with website age (Spearman r=0.372; p<0.001 and repeated measures through seven months (r=0.929; p<0.001. When applied to EMCC journals, it correlated significantly with all impact metrics except number of articles published. The strongest correlations were seen with the Immediacy Index (r=0.609; p<0.001 and Article Influence Score (r=0.608; p<0.001. Conclusion: The SMi’s temporal stability and correlation with journal impact factors suggests that it may be a stable indicator of impact for medical education websites. Further study is needed to determine whether impact correlates with quality and how learners and educators can best utilize this tool. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:242–249.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice of pediatric critical care nurses towards pain: Survey in a developing country setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Nurses′ knowledge, sensitivity and attitudes about pain in children and its management affect their response and therefore management of pediatric pain. Children in critical care units undergo more painful procedures than those in general wards. Aims : To study the knowledge, attitude and practice of nursing personnel catering to critically ill children in a developing country. Settings and Design : Prospective questionnaire-based survey. Materials and Methods : The survey was carried out in a tertiary care teaching hospital on nursing personnel in three pediatric/neonatal intensive care units. The domains studied were: i. Training and experience, ii. Knowledge of pediatric pain, iii. Individual attitude towards pain in children, iv. Personal practice(s for pain alleviation, v. Pain assessment, and vi. Non-pharmacological measures adopted. Statistical Analysis : Descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Results : Of the 81 nursing personnel working in the three critical care units, 56 (69.1% responded to the questionnaire. Only one-third of them had received formal training in pediatric nursing. Fifty percent of the respondents felt that infants perceive less pain than adults. Training in pediatric nursing was a significant contributing factor in the domain of knowledge (P=0.03. Restraint and distraction were the common modalities employed to facilitate painful procedures. Scientific approaches like eutectic mixture of local anesthetic and the judicious use of sedatives were not adopted routinely. Observing a child′s face and posture were widely used parameters to assess pain (83%. None of the three critical care areas used a scoring system to assess pain. Conclusions : There are several lacunae in the knowledge and practice of nurses in developing countries which need to be improved by training.

  3. [Comfort and communication measures in nursing caring actions for critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Franciele Soares; Stahlhoefer, Taniclaer; Felix, Jorge Vinícius Cestari; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Descriptive, quantitative study carried out at a University Hospital in Curitiba-PR, Brazil. The objective was to analyze the caring actions performed at a semi-intensive care unit, from the perspective of the caring humanization, and also to evaluate the presence of comfort and communication measures in performing these actions. The data collection occurred under a systematic non-participant observation. The caring actions were grouped, according to its frequency, and presented in graphs. The comfort measures were present at 45% of the caring actions performed, and communication establishment was present at 40% of these actions. Even today, the comfort and communication measures, as reflected in the process of caring humanization, remain as an ideal speech. However, they are too far from reality of the health care system's users and workers.

  4. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ayala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05 and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05. Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01, working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01, and inversely associated with age (p<0.05. Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential

  5. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  6. The Role of Focused Echocardiography in Pediatric Intensive Care: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Amaral Gaspar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography is a key tool for hemodynamic assessment in Intensive Care Units (ICU. Focused echocardiography performed by nonspecialist physicians has a limited scope, and the most relevant parameters assessed by focused echocardiography in Pediatric ICU are left ventricular systolic function, fluid responsiveness, cardiac tamponade and pulmonary hypertension. Proper ability building of pediatric emergency care physicians and intensivists to perform focused echocardiography is feasible and provides improved care of severely ill children and thus should be encouraged.

  7. In-airway molecular flow sensing: A new technology for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of oxygen consumption in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffoni, Luca; O'Neill, David P; Couper, John H; Ritchie, Grant A D; Hancock, Gus; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    There are no satisfactory methods for monitoring oxygen consumption in critical care. To address this, we adapted laser absorption spectroscopy to provide measurements of O2, CO2, and water vapor within the airway every 10 ms. The analyzer is integrated within a novel respiratory flow meter that is an order of magnitude more precise than other flow meters. Such precision, coupled with the accurate alignment of gas concentrations with respiratory flow, makes possible the determination of O2 consumption by direct integration over time of the product of O2 concentration and flow. The precision is illustrated by integrating the balance gas (N2 plus Ar) flow and showing that this exchange was near zero. Measured O2 consumption changed by <5% between air and O2 breathing. Clinical capability was illustrated by recording O2 consumption during an aortic aneurysm repair. This device now makes easy, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of O2 consumption for intubated patients in critical care possible.

  8. Effect of critical care pharmacist's intervention on medication errors: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiansheng; Benedict, Neal; Olsen, Keith M; Luan, Rong; Zhu, Xi; Zhou, Ningning; Tang, Huilin; Yan, Yingying; Peng, Yao; Shi, Luwen

    2015-10-01

    Pharmacists are integral members of the multidisciplinary team for critically ill patients. Multiple nonrandomized controlled studies have evaluated the outcomes of pharmacist interventions in the intensive care unit (ICU). This systematic review focuses on controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of pharmacist intervention on medication errors (MEs) in ICU settings. Two independent reviewers searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. The inclusion criteria were nonrandomized controlled studies that evaluated the effect of pharmacist services vs no intervention on ME rates in ICU settings. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis. Results suggest that pharmacist intervention has no significant contribution to reducing general MEs, although pharmacist intervention may significantly reduce preventable adverse drug events and prescribing errors. This meta-analysis highlights the need for high-quality studies to examine the effect of the critical care pharmacist.

  9. Hospital malnutrition and inflammatory response in critically ill children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Critical illness has a major impact on the nutritional status of both children and adults. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of hospital malnutrition at a pediatric tertiary intensive care unit (PICU). Serum concentrations of IL-6 in subgroups of well-nourished and malnourished patients were also evaluated in an attempt to identify those with a potential nutritional risk. METHODS: A total of 1077 patients were enrolled. Nutritional status was evaluated by Z-score (...

  10. Free Open Access Meducation (FOAM): the rise of emergency medicine and critical care blogs and podcasts (2002-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Mike; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Disruptive technologies are revolutionising continuing professional development in emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC). Data on EMCC blogs and podcasts were gathered prospectively from 2002 through November 2013. During this time there was a rapid expansion of EMCC websites, from two blogs and one podcast in 2002 to 141 blogs and 42 podcasts in 2013. This paper illustrates the explosive growth of EMCC websites and provides a foundation that will anchor future research in this burgeoning field.

  11. Model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness of neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Towell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in order to develop a model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness in neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa. A theory-generative, explorative, descriptive, contextual research design was used. The model was developed utilising the four steps of theory generation as proposed by Dickoff, James, and Wiedenbach (1968, Chinn and Kramer (2011 and Walker and Avant (2011. Step one dealt with the empirical phase in which the concepts were distilled. The facilitation of inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience was the main concept of the model. Step two comprised the definition and classification of central and related concepts. Step three provides a description of the model. The model operates in three phases namely the dependent phase, partially dependent phase and the independent phase. Step four entailed the description of guidelines for operationalizing the model. During the three phases of the model a new nurse who starts to work in critical care moves from a latent ability to develop an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience to a state of developing an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience. This model provides a structured framework for the facilitation of emotional intelligence (EI to promote wholeness in nurses who commence to work in critical care units.

  12. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their

  13. Nursing care plans versus concept maps in the enhancement of critical thinking skills in nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinatra-Wilhelm, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate and effective critical thinking and problem solving is necessary for all nurses in order to make complex decisions that improve patient outcomes, safety, and quality of nursing care. With the current emphasis on quality improvement, critical thinking ability is a noteworthy concern within the nursing profession. An in-depth review of literature related to critical thinking was performed. The use of nursing care plans and concept mapping to improve critical thinking skills was among the recommendations identified. This study compares the use of nursing care plans and concept mapping as a teaching strategy for the enhancement of critical thinking skills in baccalaureate level nursing students. The California Critical Thinking Skills Test was used as a method of comparison and evaluation. Results indicate that concept mapping enhances critical thinking skills in baccalaureate nursing students.

  14. An analysis of business phenomena and austerity narratives in the arts sector from a new materialist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Oakes, H.; Oakes, S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper adopts a lens of new materialism to analyse narratives of managers in the arts sector in response to the master narrative of austerity and proposed solutions using business models (including accounting). It explores the complex trajectories of the master narrative through the analysis of a diverse range of funding and arts organisations. Accounting, business models and austerity reveal rhizomatic characteristics as they diverge from their origin and are implicated in uncertainty abo...

  15. Can Public Managers Make Their Welfare Organizations Adapt to the New Performance Landscape Shaped by the Current Austerity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, John Storm; Aagaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    How managers try to adapt their organizations to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity by new forms of change management in Denmark, in the public sector of citizens with disabilities and socially disadvantaged people.......How managers try to adapt their organizations to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity by new forms of change management in Denmark, in the public sector of citizens with disabilities and socially disadvantaged people....

  16. Training of clinical thinking in critical care medicine%重症医学临床思路的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏民; 刘大为

    2015-01-01

    重症患者情况复杂,重症医生需要及时掌握病情变化,迅速确定针对性干预措施。重症医生临床思路的培养包含以下三个方面的内容:牢固的重症医学理论基础;扎实的临床操作技能;充分的临床实践工作历练。%Most patients in ICU are critically ill. The physician in charge should be able to evaluate and deal with the critical condition in a timely and accurately manner. The clinical thinking for intensivists entail abilities in the following three aspects: solid foundation of critical care theory; experienced clinical operation skill; enough clinical training.

  17. Training of clinical thinking in critical care medicine%重症医学临床思路的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏民; 刘大为

    2015-01-01

    重症患者情况复杂,重症医生需要及时掌握病情变化,迅速确定针对性干预措施。重症医生临床思路的培养包含以下三个方面的内容:牢固的重症医学理论基础;扎实的临床操作技能;充分的临床实践工作历练。%Most patients in ICU are critically ill. The physician in charge should be able to evaluate and deal with the critical condition in a timely and accurately manner. The clinical thinking for intensivists entail abilities in the following three aspects:solid foundation of critical care theory;experienced clinical operation skill;enough clinical training.

  18. Academic Medicine's Critical Role in the "Third Curve" of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Harold L

    2016-05-01

    Over the last several years, the health care landscape has changed at an unprecedented rate due to new economic and regulatory forces ushered in by the Affordable Care Act and the introduction of innovative technologies, such as personalized medicine, that are poised to open the door to consumer-driven health care. Tremendous pressure exists on academic health centers to rapidly evolve clinically while not abandoning their unique academic mission. The convergence of personalized medicine, new digital technologies, and changes in health professionals' scope of practice alongside new payment structures will accelerate the move to a patient-centered health system. In this Commentary, the author argues that these new tools and resources must be embraced to improve the health of patients. With the traditional, fee-for-service model of care as "Curve I" and the post-Flexner era of population-based medicine as "Curve II," the author identifies the emergence of "Curve III," which is characterized by patient-centered, consumer-directed models of care. As the old models of health care undergo transition and the impact of technology and analytics grow, future practitioners must be trained to embrace this change and function effectively in the "third curve" of consumer-driven health care.

  19. The Ethics of Rationing of Critical Care Services: Should Technology Assessment Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Bloomfield

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The costs of health care continue to increase rapidly and steeply in the United States. One area of great expense is that of intensive care units (ICUs. The causes of inflation have not been addressed effectively. ICU resources could become stretched such that they may no longer be available. This paper discusses some of the ethics and concerns behind decision making when providing ICU services in the United States. In particular, the use of electronic records with decision making tools, risk-analysis methods, and documentation of patient wishes for extraordinary care may help with better utilization of resources in the future.

  20. Critical Care Nurses on Duty: Information‐Rich but Time‐Poor. A review of: McKnight, Michelynn. “The Information Seeking of On‐Duty Critical Care Nurses: Evidence from Participant Observation and In‐Context Interviews.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 94.2 (Apr. 2006): 145‐51.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Objective – To describe critical care nurses’ on‐duty information‐seeking behavior.Design – Participatory action research using ethnographic methods.Setting – A twenty‐bed critical care unit in a 275‐bed community (non‐teaching) hospital.Subjects – A purposive sample of six registered nurses (RNs) working shifts in the critical care unit.Methods – The researcher accompanied six RNs on various shifts (weekdays and weekends, day and night shifts) in the critical care unit and used participant o...

  1. War is the Enemy of Health. Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine in War-Torn Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahloul, Mohammed Z; Monla-Hassan, Jaber; Sankari, Abdulghani; Kherallah, Mazen; Atassi, Bassel; Badr, Safwan; Abbara, Aula; Sparrow, Annie

    2016-02-01

    The Syrian crisis, now in its fifth year, has created an unprecedented strain on health services and systems due to the protracted nature of the warfare, the targeting of medics and health care infrastructure, the exodus of physicians and nurses, the shortage of medical supplies and medications, and the disruption of medical education and training. Within a few short years, the life expectancy of resident Syrians has declined by 20 years. Over the first 4 years of the conflict, more than 75,000 civilians died from injuries incurred in the violence. More than twice as many civilians, including many women and children, have died prematurely of infectious and noninfectious chronic diseases for want of adequate health care. Doctors, local administrators, and nongovernmental organizations are struggling to manage the consequences of the conflict under substandard conditions, often using unorthodox methods of health care delivery in field hospitals and remotely by telehealth communication. Much-needed medical supplies are channeled through dangerous routes across the borders from Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey. Physicians in the United States and other western nations have helped Syrian physicians make the most of the situation by providing training on introducing innovations in technology and treatment. Portable ultrasound machines have been introduced and are being used extensively in the management of trauma and shock. This report, prepared by members of the Syrian American Medical Society, documents current needs for health care relief within Syria, focusing on pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine, and some of the efforts currently underway to meet those needs.

  2. Occupational Health Screenings of Aeromedical Evacuation and Critical Care Air Transport Team Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    concerning mental health problems. 3.2.2 Physical Exercise Behaviors. Participants were asked the following: how often do you engage in physical... depression ) as a reason for an increase in mental health supp01i utilization. CCATT crew members did not rep01i any other reasons for an increase...health care. However, AE crew members also endorsed emotional distress, such as depression , leading to their increase in seeking mental health care

  3. Novos anticoagulantes em cuidados intensivos New anticoagulants in critical care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Adrian Prync Flato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eventos tromboembólicos são complicações comuns em pacientes críticos. Podem apresentar sinais e sintomas pouco específicos e estão associados a um substancial aumento na morbimortalidade dos pacientes internados em unidades de terapia intensiva. Os agentes antitrombóticos são o pilar no tratamento e prevenção do tromboembolismo. Esta classe é também utilizada na prevenção do acidente vascular encefálico, na fibrilação atrial, na prevenção de eventos embólicos da insuficiência cardíaca, em pacientes com próteses valvares e têm sido associados a antiplaquetários na prevenção secundária da síndrome coronária aguda. Agentes antitrombóticos, como aspirina, clopidogrel, antagonistas da vitamina K e foundaparinux (inibidor indireto do fator Xa já foram incorporados na prática clínica rotineira dos serviços de terapia intensiva. Recentemente, tem-se demonstrado grande interesse nos agentes que inibem seletivamente o fator Xa e a trombina. Estes apresentam estrutura molecular pequena e inibem simultaneamente o fator da coagulação livre no plasma e ligado ao trombo. Entre os novos anticoagulantes orais, dabigatran, rivaroxaban e apixaban são os que apresentam estudos clínicos em fases mais avançadas e uso na prática clínica já licenciado em alguns países. O objetivo desta revisão é salientar os principais estudos da literatura sobre novos anticoagulantes no cenário das unidades de terapia intensivaThromboembolic events commonly occur in critically ill patients, and although they do not consistently present with specific signs and symptoms, they are associated with high morbity and mortality. Antithrombotic agents are the mainstay of the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, and they are also used for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, embolism prevention in heart failure, and anticoagulation of prosthetic valves. These drugs have been combined with antiplatelet therapy for the

  4. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocker M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin Stocker,1 Sina B Pilgrim,2 Margarita Burmester,3 Meredith L Allen,4 Wim H Gijselaers5 1Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Lucerne, Lucerne, 2Pediatric Intensive Care, University Children's Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland; 3Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Pediatrics, The Royal Children's Hospital, Victoria, Australia; 5Educational Research and Development, School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: Aiming for and ensuring effective patient safety is a major priority in the management and culture of every health care organization. The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU has become a workplace with a high diversity of multidisciplinary physicians and professionals. Therefore, delivery of high-quality care with optimal patient safety in a PICU is dependent on effective interprofessional team management. Nevertheless, ineffective interprofessional teamwork remains ubiquitous.Methods: We based our review on the framework for interprofessional teamwork recently published in association with the UK Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education. Articles were selected to achieve better understanding and to include and translate new ideas and concepts.Findings: The barrier between autonomous nurses and doctors in the PICU within their silos of specialization, the failure of shared mental models, a culture of disrespect, and the lack of empowering parents as team members preclude interprofessional team management and patient safety. A mindset of individual responsibility and accountability embedded in a network of equivalent partners, including the patient and their family members, is required to achieve optimal interprofessional care. Second, working competently as an interprofessional team is a learning process. Working declared as a learning process, psychological safety, and speaking up are pivotal

  5. 世界危重病学护士联盟介绍%Introduction of World Federation of Critical Care Nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永强

    2005-01-01

    作为“香港危重病学护士协会”(Hong Kong Association of Critical Care Nurses,HKACCN)委员之一,笔者于2004年9月12~16日参加了在英国剑桥举办的“第二届英国危重病学护士协会(British Association of Critical Care Nurses,BACCN)国际研讨会暨第一届世界危重病学护士联盟(World Federation of Critical Care Nurses,WFCCN)会议”。

  6. Evaluating medical residents as managers of care: a critical appraisal of assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari JO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamiu O Busari,1,2 Lorette A Stammen,2 Lokke M Gennissen,2 Rob M Moonen1 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Henri Dunantstraat 5, 6401 CX Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands Introduction: The increasing demands for effective and efficient health care delivery systems worldwide have resulted in an expansion of the desired competencies that physicians need to possess upon graduation. Presently, medical residents require additional professional competencies that can prepare them to practice adequately in a continuously changing health care environment. Recent studies show that despite the importance of competency-based training, the development and evaluation of management competencies in residents during residency training is inadequate. The aim of this literature review was to find out which assessment methods are currently being used to evaluate trainees' management competencies and which, if any, of these methods make use of valid and reliable instruments. Methods: In September 2012, a thorough search of the literature was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase®, MEDLINE®, and ERIC databases. Additional searches included scanning the references of relevant articles and sifting through the “related topics” displayed by the databases. Results: A total of 25 out of 178 articles were selected for final review. Four broad categories emerged after analysis that best reflected their content: 1 measurement tools used to evaluate the effect of implemented curricular interventions; 2 measurement tools based on recommendations from consensus surveys or conventions; 3 measurement tools for assessing general competencies, which included care-management; and 4 measurement tools focusing exclusively on care-management competencies. Conclusion: Little information was found about (validated assessment tools being used to measure care-management competence

  7. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hantikainen Virpi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs, such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and the consequences in older critically ill patients. The overall aim of this study is to identify how an ICU stay influences an older person's experiences later in life. More specific, this study has the following objectives: (1 to explore the relationship between pain, anxiety and agitation during ICU stays and experiences of the same symptoms in later life; and (2 to explore the associations between pain, anxiety and agitation experienced during ICU stays and their effect on subsequent health-related quality of life, use of the health care system (readmissions, doctor visits, rehabilitation, medication use, living situation, and survival after discharge and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Methods/Design A prospective, longitudinal study will be used for this study. A total of 150 older critically ill patients in the ICU will participate (ICU group. Pain, anxiety, agitation, morbidity, mortality, use of the health care system, and health-related quality of life will be measured at 3 intervals after a baseline assessment. Baseline measurements will be taken 48 hours after ICU admission and one week thereafter. Follow-up measurements will take place 6 months and 12 months after discharge from the ICU. To be able to interpret trends in scores on outcome variables in the ICU group, a comparison group of 150 participants, matched by age and gender, recruited from the Swiss population, will be interviewed at the same intervals as the ICU group. Discussion Little

  8. Audit of co-management and critical care outreach for high risk postoperative patients (The POST audit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, D A; Shelton, A; Jones, D; Heland, M; Belomo, R

    2013-11-01

    Co-management and critical care outreach for high risk surgical patients have been proposed to decrease postoperative complications and mortality. We proposed that a clinical project with postoperative comanagement and critical care outreach, the Post Operative Surveillance Team: (POST), would be associated with decreased hospital length of stay. We conducted a retrospective before (control group) and after (POST group) audit of this hospital program. POST was staffed for four months in 2010 by two intensive care nurses and two senior registrars who conducted daily ward rounds for the first five postoperative days on high risk patients undergoing inpatient general or urological surgery. The primary endpoint was length of hospital stay and secondary endpoints were Medical Emergency Team (MET) calls, cardiac arrests and in-hospital mortality. There were 194 patients in the POST group and 1,185 in the control group. The length of stay in the POST group, median nine days (Inter-quartile range [IQR]: 5 to 17 days), was longer than the control group, median seven days (IQR: 4 to 13 days): difference two days longer (95.0% confidence interval [95.0% CI]: 1 to 3 days longer, P audit found that the POST service was not associated with reduced length of stay. Models of co-management, different to POST, or with different performance metrics, could be tested.

  9. Development of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Cestari, Idagene A.; Hamamoto, Gina; Bacht, Simão; Rebelo, Marina S.; Silva, João E. M. M.; Lage, Silvia G.

    2008-03-01

    The current study describes the experience in the implementation of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Recently, mobile devices connected to a WiFi network were incorporated to the Hospital information System, providing the same functionalities of common desktop counterpart. However, the use of commercially devices like PDAs and Pocket PCs presented a series of problems that are more emphasized in the ICUs 1) low autonomy of the batteries, which need constant recharges; 2) low robustness of the devices; 3) insufficient display area to show medical images and vital signals; 4) data entry remains a major problem and imposes an extra time consumption to the staff; 5) high cost when fully equipped with WiFi connection, optical reader to access bar codes and memory. To address theses problems we developed a mobile workstation (MedKart) that provides access the HIS and PACS systems, with all resources and an ergonomic and practical design to be used by physicians and nurses inside the ICU. The system fulfills the requirements to assist, in the point-of-care, critical cardiac patients in Intensive Care Units.

  10. Delivery of enteral nutrition after the introduction of practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in pediatric critical care clinical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Emma; Mara, Jackie; Diamantidi, Krystalia; Alfheeaid, Hani A; Spenceley, Neil; Davidson, Mark; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2014-12-01

    Provision of optimal nutrition is often difficult to achieve in the critically ill child, but can improve with better nutritional support practices. This study evaluated the joint impact of the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds on enteral nutrition (EN) intake and practices in children in intensive care. Nutritional intake and EN practices were audited before (period A) and after (period B) the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds in a pediatric intensive care unit. Information was collected on a daily basis and nutritional intake was compared with predefined targets and the United Kingdom dietary reference values. There were 65 patients and 477 nutritional support days in period A and 65 patients and 410 nutritional support days in period B. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) energy requirements were achieved in a larger proportion of nutritional support days in period B (BMR achieved [% nutritional support days]; period A: 27% vs period B: 48.9%; Pnutritional intake in some patients in critical care, but can have limited benefit for children admitted for corrective heart surgery.

  11. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shere-Wolfe Roger F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care of the polytrauma patient does not end in the operating room or resuscitation bay. The patient presenting to the intensive care unit following initial resuscitation and damage control surgery may be far from stable with ongoing hemorrhage, resuscitation needs, and injuries still requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust the ongoing resuscitative needs of the patient and address potential complications. In this review, we address ongoing resuscitation in the intensive care unit along with potential complications in the trauma patient after initial resuscitation. Complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome, transfusion related patterns of acute lung injury and metabolic consequences subsequent to post-trauma resuscitation are presented. Methods A non-systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to May 2012. Results and conclusion Polytrauma patients with severe shock from hemorrhage and massive tissue injury present major challenges for management and resuscitation in the intensive care setting. Many of the current recommendations for “damage control resuscitation” including the use of fixed ratios in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy remain controversial. A lack of large, randomized, controlled trials leaves most recommendations at the level of consensus, expert opinion. Ongoing trials and improvements in monitoring and resuscitation technologies will further influence how we manage these complex and challenging patients.

  12. Neoliberal austerity and corporate crime: the collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Charles; Juska, Arunas

    2014-01-01

    The roof collapse of the Maxima supermarket in Riga, Latvia on November 21, 2013 left 54 dead. This analysis identifies the disaster as a "safety crime." Neoliberal deregulatory measures, intensified by the global economic and financial crisis and a programme of radical austerity, together with corporate and state disregard of public safety and well-being, combined to produce the disaster. The wider context and underlying causes of catastrophic safety failure exemplify the inherently contradictory character of the neoliberal "Baltic model" of austerity, recently much in vogue with international policymakers in both Europe and the United States. The authors conclude that the current renewed drive by the European Commission towards reducing regulation for business, especially in the aftermath of the crisis, further justifies longstanding anti-regulatory preferences of neoliberal domestic elites, with the result that the costs of disregard for public safety are externalized onto the general populace.

  13. INTRODUCTION: COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE AGE OF AUSTERITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Giuseppe; Hansen, Morten Balle; Johanson, Jan-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The five articles in this symposium examine the issues of comparative performance management and accountability in the age of austerity from different vantage points. Brusca and Montesinos carry out an international comparison of 17 countries studying key issues in the implementation of performance......, Houlberg, and Bækgaard study the link between fiscal austerity and politicians’ use of performance information by using survey and documentary data from Danish municipalities. Grossi, Reichard, and Ruggiero examine the interest of politicians and public managers in the use of performance information...... for decisionmaking and monitoring the budget cycle provided in the newly established performance budgets of municipalities in Germany and Italy. Poocharoen examines performance management in different types of interagency collaborations, presenting six case studies of management projects in the field of natural...

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  15. Therapeutic effect of insulin in reduction of critical illness polyneuropathy and Myopathy in pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nemat BILAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Fayyazi A, Karimzadeh P, Torabian S, Damadi S, Khaje A. Comparison of Intravenous Midazolam Drip with Intermittent Intravenous Diazepam in The Treatment of Refractory Serial Seizures in Children. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 15-19.ObjectiveHyperglycemia may occur in the patients affected by any kind of critical illness.This complication makes an adverse effect on the clinical outcome of thesepatients by causing polyneuropathy and myopathy. It has been recently shownthat treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin administration significantly reducesthe prevalence of critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM andon the other hand reduces the demand for long-term mechanical ventilation inthe patients admitted to the ICU for more than 1 week. The aim of this studywas to determine the therapeutic effect of insulin in reducing the incidence ofCIPNM in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU.Materials & MethodsIn this study, we recruited 30 patients admitted to the PICU of Tabriz PediatricHospital. The incidence of CIPNM following hyperglycemia was evaluated inthese patients. The patients were categorized into two groups. In the case group,blood sugar was controlled in the range of 140-180mg/dl by administration of0.05 unit per kilogram body weight of insulin as drip protocol in an hour and inthe control group, placebo was used. Consequently, the incidence of CIPNM,duration of PICU and duration of mechanical ventilation were comparedbetween the two groups.ResultsThe incidence of CIPNM and duration of PICU stay and mechanical ventilationwere significantly reduced in the patients treated with insulin compared to thecontrol group.ConclusionThis study shows that blood sugar control decreases the incidence of CIPNM.ReferencesVan den Berghe G. Insulin therapy in critical illness. Can J Diabetes. 2004;28(1:43-9.Bolton CF, Gilbert JJ, Hahn AF, Sibbald WJ.Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry

  16. Application of Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) in a cardiovascular critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, B T

    1997-01-01

    The nursing profession is moving toward developing a standardized language. Benefits of such a language are outlined. Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) (Iowa Intervention Project, 1992), a standardized language for nursing interventions, has been recently developed by the Iowa Intervention Project. This article describes how NIC was incorporated into a nursing care plan in a tertiary acute care facility. Teaching strategies, which include aspects of adult learning theory and motivational theory, are discussed. Utilization of creativity and variability in the planning and implementation of a unit based inservice program were the most beneficial strategies used.

  17. Europe and Italy: Expansionary Austerity, Expansionary Precariousness and the Italian Jobs Act

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Antonioli; Paolo Pini

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008 the economic crisis has reduced income and drastically brought down employment levels, and the recovery promised in 2014 will not reabsorb unemployment, particularly in Europe. The ILO and IMF have forecast a jobless recovery. Nevertheless, economic policy in Europe will remain in line with the past, based on two mainstays: fiscal austerity and labour flexibility. Wage policy for European countries aims to align wages to real productivity at firm level, and leaves little room for n...

  18. Austerity on the loose in Portugal: European judicial restraint in times of crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutinho Francisco Pereira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The international bailout granted to Portugal between 2011 and 2014 was conditional on the adoption by the Portuguese State of austerity measures included in a memorandum of understanding (MoU signed by the European Commission on behalf of the European Union (EU and the Member States. The MoU was never published in an official journal or even translated into the Portuguese language. Its implementation caused a significant decrease in the level of protection of social rights.

  19. Long-run impact of the crisis in Europe: reforms and austerity measures

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Nechio

    2011-01-01

    The euro area faces its first sovereign debt crisis, highlighting the fiscal imbalances of member countries. Troubled countries are implementing austerity measures, with adjustments focusing on the short and medium run. However, a long-run solution to Europe's problems requires economic reforms that increase competitiveness and reduce labor costs in the peripheral countries. Such reforms would promote convergence of the euro-area economies and enhance the long-run sustainability of monetary u...

  20. El ilusionista de las palabras: Paul Auster y su universo creativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez López, Esther

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Paul Auster is one of the greatest writers of our time. Since 1994, to his work as novelist, poet and essayist he has added scriptwriting and film directing. Both literature and cinema appear closely linked in his creative production, so that one feeds the other and vice versa, by means of themes, common characters as well as self-referential and metafictional allusions. In novels, short stories and films, Auster reveals himself, in essence, as a great storyteller. They are stories that overlap at different narrative levels following the technique of the Chinese boxes. His work is also part of a large net of internal and external references in dialogue with each other, posing and pondering on questions that have to do with identity, writing or the intersections between fiction and reality, which appear recurrently both in its literary as in its filmic form.

    Paul Auster es uno de los grandes escritores de nuestro tiempo. Desde 1994, a su labor de novelista, poeta, traductor y ensayista ha añadido la de guionista y director de cine. Ambos medios, literatura y cine, aparecen estrechamente ligados en su producción creativa, de manera que uno nutre al otro y viceversa, a través de temas y personajes comunes, de guiños autorreferenciales y metaficcionales. En novelas, relatos y películas Auster se revela, en esencia, como un gran contador de historias. Se trata de historias múltiples que se superponen a distintos niveles narrativos siguiendo la técnica de cajas chinas. Su obra forma parte de una amplia red de referencias internas y externas que dialogan entre sí, al tiempo que plantean cuestiones en torno a la identidad, la escritura o las intersecciones entre ficción y realidad, que aparecen de manera recurrente tanto en forma literaria como fílmica.

  1. The austerity bargain and the social self: conceptual clarity surrounding health cutbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David A

    2013-01-01

    As necessary austerity measures make major inroads into western health services, this paper investigates the philology of austerity and finds that there are two subtly similar yet importantly different derivations from the Latin and the Greek. The Latin austerus is an abstract term meaning dry, harsh, sour; whereas the Greek austeros has a more embodied and literal meaning of making the tongue dry. What seems an initially subtle difference between the metaphorical and the metonymic plays out as involving seriously different outcomes between harsh economic measures and the literal effects on the people suffering under measures that actually make the tongue dry. The paper argues that between the trope and the literal that which Wittgenstein described as 'a language game' ensues wherein the metaphorical through a sleight of grammar is passed off as being real while, the literal effects on real people is downplayed as metaphorical 'collateral damage'. The paper further argues that within this grammar that forces itself upon us, the game of capital is played out through what the author terms an austerity bargain that is levelled by the financial elites: healthy capitalism equals a healthy society. The paper then examines the six elements of the social determinants of health and what actually contributes to a healthy society. Rather than being under an individual threat of exclusion from what Marx termed a superabundance, the paper considers the irreducible differences between the game of capital's individualism, and, the social determinants of health's social inclusion, legitimization and that which Habermas termed public authentication. The paper concludes that not only do necessary austerity measures need to be critiqued but that they radically undermine what determines a healthy society. It follows also that the social determinants of health, radically undermine the bargain inherent for the privileged few within the game of capital.

  2. A Review of Vitamin D Deficiency in the Critical Care Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Massey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that a large percentage of the general population is either vitamin D insufficient or deficient. Vitamin D deficiency adversely affects bone health. More recently, it has been reported that vitamin D is an important component in immune function and glycemic control Substantial data exist that demonstrate an association between vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and mortality/clinical outcomes of critically ill patients. The larger clinical trials addressing this association have demonstrated an increased odds ratio for mortality in both vitamin D insufficient and deficient patients when compared to those with sufficient vitamin D. There is also some evidence that vitamin D status worsens during critical illness without supplementation of this vitamin. Supplementation of vitamin D during critical illness of patients with vitamin D deficiency has been studied, but not in great detail. Daily supplementation of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA of vitamin D does very little to improve the 25(OHD serum concentrations in the critically ill patients with vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. There is some evidence that high-dose therapy of vitamin D improves the depressed serum concentrations of this vitamin; however, there are no clinical outcome data available yet. The association between vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency and clinical outcome in the critically ill appears to be important. Supplementation of vitamin D will increase the serum concentrations of this vitamin; however the optimal dose needs to be identified along with an assessment of clinical outcome.

  3. The impact of fiscal austerity on suicide: on the empirics of a modern Greek tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Collins, Alan

    2014-07-01

    Suicide rates in Greece (and other European countries) have been on a remarkable upward trend following the global recession of 2008 and the European sovereign debt crisis of 2009. However, recent investigations of the impact on Greek suicide rates from the 2008 financial crisis have restricted themselves to simple descriptive or correlation analyses. Controlling for various socio-economic effects, this study presents a statistically robust model to explain the influence on realised suicidality of the application of fiscal austerity measures and variations in macroeconomic performance over the period 1968-2011. The responsiveness of suicide to levels of fiscal austerity is established as a means of providing policy guidance on the extent of suicide behaviour associated with different fiscal austerity measures. The results suggest (i) significant age and gender specificity in these effects on suicide rates and that (ii) remittances have suicide-reducing effects on the youth and female population. These empirical regularities potentially offer some guidance on the demographic targeting of suicide prevention measures and the case for 'economic' migration.

  4. Harnessing the opportunities of austerity: a detailed mapping of the Greek transportation sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis Stamos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, shortly after the global economic crisis of 2008, Greece has entered into a deep recession phase. The multifaceted presence of austerity is experienced in an increasing number of sectors of the country. The Greek transportation sector is not immune to this state of affairs. The ongoing crisis had a significant impact on its economic (investment, employment, exports-imports turnover as well as its operational (transportation intensity, throughput, performance aspects and capabilities. In this paper, a detailed mapping of these impacts is laid out, correlating transport-related characteristics, trends and estimations with the respective economic ones. Specifically, the paper presents analyses of the Greek passenger and freight transportation, following a data-driven approach over several areas. Findings show a substantial decrease of activities overall. Paradoxically, however, austerity can also be said to offer opportunities, such as the development of innovative, cost-effective and outward-looking business schemes, for handling transportation-related issues. In the face of these opportunities, authorities and stakeholders have recently turned their attention to ways of harnessing them as they may arise. The paper conducts a detailed analysis of these efforts to discover prospects for development in the midst of austerity, and highlights the steps currently being taken in that direction.

  5. How nurses understand and care for older people with delirium in the acute hospital: a Critical Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Irene; Tolson, Debbie; Fleming, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    Delirium is a common presentation of deteriorating health in older people. It is potentially deleterious in terms of patient experience and clinical outcomes. Much of what is known about delirium is through positivist research, which forms the evidence base for disease-based classification systems and clinical guidelines. There is little systematic study of nurses' day-to-day practice of nursing patients with delirium. The aim was to uncover the kinds of knowledge that informs nurses' care and to explicate the basis of that knowledge. Critical Discourse Analysis is underpinned by the premise that powerful interests within society mediate how social practices are constructed. Links were made between the grammatical and lexical features of nurses' language about care in interviews and naturalistic settings, and the healthcare context. Care focused on the continuous surveillance of patients with delirium by nurses themselves or vicariously through other patients, and containment. Nurses influenced by major discourses of risk reduction and safety, constructed patients with delirium as risk objects. The philosophy of person-centred and dignified care advocated in nursing literature and government policy is an emerging discourse, though little evident in the data. The current dominant discourses on safety must give space to discourses of dignity and compassion.

  6. What follows survival of critical illness? Physical therapists' management of patients with post-intensive care syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis-Dougherty, Anita R; Smith, James M

    2013-02-01

    Historically, the management of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) has involved immobilization and sedation, with care focused on physiological impairments and survival. Because more ICU patients are now surviving their hospital stay, it is imperative that their ICU care be managed with the goal of long-term health, wellness, and functioning. The evidence confirms that mobilization and exercise are feasible in the ICU and demonstrates that the benefits of early mobilization include reduced length of stay in the ICU and hospital. In 2010, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) invited key stakeholder groups, including the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), to identify strategies to improve long-term consequences following ICU discharge, including early mobilization in the ICU and integration of the physical therapist as a member of the ICU team. This model appears to be successful in some institutions, but there is variation among institutions. The SCCM Task Force developed major areas of focus that require multidisciplinary action to improve long-term outcomes after discharge from an ICU. This article describes physical therapist practice in the management of ICU survivors, the importance of long-term follow-up after ICU discharge, and how APTA is taking steps to address the major areas of focus identified by the SCCM Task Force to improve long-term outcomes after ICU discharge.

  7. A Critical Review for Developing Accurate and Dynamic Predictive Models Using Machine Learning Methods in Medicine and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Hamdan O; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Qureshi, Kashif Naseer

    2017-04-01

    Recently, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been used widely in medicine and health care sector. In machine learning, the classification or prediction is a major field of AI. Today, the study of existing predictive models based on machine learning methods is extremely active. Doctors need accurate predictions for the outcomes of their patients' diseases. In addition, for accurate predictions, timing is another significant factor that influences treatment decisions. In this paper, existing predictive models in medicine and health care have critically reviewed. Furthermore, the most famous machine learning methods have explained, and the confusion between a statistical approach and machine learning has clarified. A review of related literature reveals that the predictions of existing predictive models differ even when the same dataset is used. Therefore, existing predictive models are essential, and current methods must be improved.

  8. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. PMID:27695360

  9. [Critical review of instruments to assess pain in the non communicative brain injured persons in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Marie-José; Goulet, Céline; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to critically appraise the pain assessment tools for non communicative persons in intensive care available in the literature and to determine their relevance for those with brain injury. Nursing and medical electronic databases were searched to identify pain tools, with a description of psychometric proprieties, in English and French. Seven of the ten tools were considered relevant and systematically evaluated according to the criteria and the indicators in the following five areas: conceptualisation, target population, feasibility and clinical utility, reliability and validity. Results indicate a number of well designed pain tools, but additional work is necessary to establish their accuracy and adequacy for the brain injured non communicative person in intensive care. Recommendations are made to choose the best tool for clinical practice and for research.

  10. Marland and Pastoral Care: Critical Reflections, Change and an "Ability to Swim against the Tide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stan

    2015-01-01

    This reflective piece was written in response to Best's article, published in Pastoral in Education in September 2014, on Michael Marland's seminal text "Pastoral Care." It uses examples from previously published work carried out by the author, to explore some of the key concepts and ideas explored within the book and their…

  11. Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy; a neuromuscular disorder encountered in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M-A.C.J. de Letter

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPatients with neuromuscular disorders encountered on the ICU can be divided into two main categories. One category has been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to an underlying neuromuscular disorder, mainly the Guillam Barre Syndrome ( GBS) and myasthenia gravis. The other cat

  12. Electromagnetic interference from radio frequency identification inducing potentially hazardous incidents in critical care medical equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togt, R. van der; Lieshout, E.J. van; Hensbroek, R.; Beinat, E.; Binnekade, J.M.; Bakker, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Health care applications of autoidentification technologies, such as radio frequency identification (RFID), have been proposed to improve patient safety and also the tracking and tracing of medical equipment. However, electromagnetic interference (EMI) by RFID on medical devices has never b

  13. Robo M.D.: A Home Care Robot for Monitoring and Detection of Critical Situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, Antoine van de; Sponselee, Anne-mie; Schouten, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Motivation - The use of a Home Care Robot combined with a sensor network could possibly improve or replace current home Tele-healthcare systems that monitor elderly people or other people with health problems. Using robot for this is a new and we want to find out what the advantages or disadvantages

  14. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit-II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rello, Jordi; Manuel, Oriol; Eggimann, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ) and ESGCIP (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Critically Ill Patients), respectively. A relevant expert on the subject of each section prepared the first draft which was then edited and approved by additional members from both ESCMID study groups. This article summarises considerations regarding clinical...... syndromes requiring ICU admission in travellers, covering immunocompromised patients....

  15. The Care for the Dying: A critical historical analysis of occupational therapy in hospice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Russell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an historical analysis of occupational therapy’s role in hospice care with relation to past and current hospice practices, as well as cultural forces that impact that role. Since the beginning of the movement, hospice has developed into a strong component of end-of-life care, and occupational therapy practice models and interventions are unique in addressing the occupational needs of clients during this stage of life. Despite compelling evidence of the positive impact of employing occupational therapists, there continue to be significant barriers to implementation of services. The author proposes that the concept of occupation, as experienced at the end-of-life stage, needs to be more clearly defined and occupational therapy’s role broadened in order to strengthen the profession’s presence in the hospice setting.

  16. A laminar flow unit for the care of critically ill newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez JM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jose MR Perez,1 Sergio G Golombek,2 Carlos Fajardo,3 Augusto Sola41Stella Maris Hospital, International Neurodevelopment Neonatal Center (CINN, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2M Fareri Children’s Hospital, Westchester Medical Center, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA; 3University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; 4St Jude Hospital, Fullerton, California, CA, USAIntroduction: Medical and nursing care of newborns is predicated on the delicate control and balance of several vital parameters. Closed incubators and open radiant warmers are the most widely used devices for the care of neonates in intensive care; however, several well-known limitations of these devises have not been resolved. The use of laminar flow is widely used in many fields of medicine, and may have applications in neonatal care.Objective: To describe the neonatal laminar flow unit, a new equipment we designed for care of ill newborns.Methods: The idea, design, and development of this device was completed in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The unit is an open mobile bed designed with the objective of maintaining the advantages of the incubator and radiant warmer, while overcoming some of their inherent shortcomings; these shortcomings include noise, magnetic fields and acrylic barriers in incubators, and lack of isolation and water loss through skin in radiant warmers. The unit has a pump that aspirates environmental air which is warmed by electrical resistance and decontaminated with High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter (HEPA filters (laminar flow. The flow is directed by an air flow directioner. The unit has an embedded humidifier to increase humidity in the infant’s microenvironment and a servo control mechanism for regulation of skin temperature.Results: The laminar flow unit is open and facilitates access of care providers and family, which is not the case in incubators. It provides warming by convection at an air velocity of 0.45 m/s, much faster than an incubator (0.1 m/s. The system

  17. Pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza: Experience from a critical care unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series details our experience with seven patients with pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza from an intensive care unit in India. All the patients had respiratory failure requiring ventilation except one; two patients developed pneumothorax. Of the seven patients, two died (28.5% and five recovered. Four patients had co-morbid conditions and one was morbidly obese; all the five patients were discharged alive.

  18. Development process and initial validation of the Ethical Conflict in Nursing Questionnaire-Critical Care Version

    OpenAIRE

    Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ethical conflicts are arising as a result of the growing complexity of clinical care, coupled with technological advances. Most studies that have developed instruments for measuring ethical conflict base their measures on the variables"frequency" and"degree of conflict". In our view, however, these variables are insufficient for explaining the root of ethical conflicts. Consequently, the present study formulates a conceptual model that also includes the variable"exposure to confli...

  19. MISPLACEMENTS OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS: INTERNAL JUGULAR VERSUS SUBCLAVIAN ACCESS IN CRITICAL CARE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Aim; In central venous catheterization (CVC), misplacement is not a rare complication since this is a blinded procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the misplacement risks of the access of internal jugular vein with that of subclavian vein catheterizations. Methods;The records of a total of 1092 patients in whom central venous catheters were placed between 2002 and 2006 in Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit and the location of the tips was confirmed radiologically were retrospe...

  20. Critical aspects of therapy in the context of child care legal proceedings: an emerging framework

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Michael Glyn

    2012-01-01

    During the last 10 years working intensively with families in the context of child-care legal proceedings I am struck by how their lives hinge precariously on the outcome of a professional's assessment of them. This is especially so with ‘experts’ who often act as final arbiters on a family’s viability by providing independent psychological, psychiatric or Social Work assessments. In some cases, during proceedings, a therapeutic issue often not previously known or considered viable can emerge...

  1. Analysis of death anxiety levels in nursing staff of critical care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Cristina Pascual Fernández

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When the patients are in the end-of-life, the cares would focus to favor a good death, for that reason the nursing staff must know how to integrate the death like a part of the life, being avoided that produces anxiety to them before the possibility of taking part its own fears to the death. The core of nursing staff in intensive care units is to maintain life of their patients, reason why the end-of life in them is not easy or natural.Objective: Evaluate the death anxiety levels in intensive care nursing staff.Material and method: An observational study was conducted descriptive cross hospital adult and Paediatric ICU General University Gregorio Marañón Hospital, through survey to nurses and auxiliary nurses of those units.The anxiety inventory was used to Death (Death Anxiety Inventory [DAI] for the assessment of anxiety before death. Outcomes: Paediatric ICU nurses have higher levels of anxiety that the adult ICU as well as the less experienced professionals and those declared not feel trained in the subject.Conclusions: Experience and the training are key elements that help professionals face to death, from management we must ensure that patients in stage terminal are served by professionals with this profile.

  2. Advanced nursing apprenticeship program: a strategy for retention of experienced critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, B

    1990-05-01

    Most hospitals are frantically planning recruitment strategies to attract new nurses for intensive care units. The direct cost associated with orientation of one of these nurses is estimated at greater than $2000, plus 6 months' to 1 year's salary per nurse. An interim strategy of using registered nurses to fill a full-time position for 1 year can cost upwards of $75,000 a year. Germane to the acclimatization of these nurses to the intensive care unit is the nurturing role of experienced nurses during the orientation and in assuring continuity of high-quality patient care. By virtue of their position, experienced nurses also model leadership behavior, and they are exposed to many day-to-day stresses that may leave them frustrated and feeling a lack of accomplishment. These factors, coupled with the scarcity of educational opportunities designed specifically for experienced nurses and a perceived absence of challenges, can lead to burnout. In this article I will describe an innovation in practice that uses the clinical nurse specialist role to stimulate and challenge experienced nurses. The program taught, supported, and nurtured unit-based change initiated by experienced nurses.

  3. Lucrative Payments to Bob Kerrey by the New School Irk Critics in a Time of Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Bob Kerrey's rocky tenure as president of the New School may seem a fading memory, but the recent disclosure that he earned $3-million from the institution last year could rekindle resentments on campus and raise questions about Mr. Kerrey's continuing and lucrative role at the college. Under fire from New School faculty over turnover in the…

  4. Thorax, Trachea, and Lung Ultrasonography in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine: Assessment of an Objective Structured Training Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Breitkreutz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study objective. Focused lung ultrasound (LUS examinations are important tools in critical care medicine. There is evidence that LUS can be used for the detection of acute thoracic lesions. However, no validated training method is available. The goal of this study was to develop and assess an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE curriculum for focused thorax, trachea, and lung ultrasound in emergency and critical care medicine (THOLUUSE. Methods. 39 trainees underwent a one-day training course in a prospective educational study, including lectures in sonoanatomy and -pathology of the thorax, case presentations, and hands-on training. Trainees’ pre- and posttest performances were assessed by multiple choice questionnaires, visual perception tests by interpretation video clips, practical performance of LUS, and identification of specific ultrasound findings. Results. Trainees postcourse scores of correct MCQ answers increased from 56±4% to 82±2% (mean± SD; P<0.001; visual perception skills increased from 54±5% to 78±3% (P<0.001; practical ultrasound skills improved, and correct LUS was performed in 94%. Subgroup analysis revealed that learning success was independent from the trainees’ previous ultrasound experience. Conclusions. THOLUUSE significantly improves theoretical and practical skills for the diagnosis of acute thoracic lesions. We propose to implement THOLUUSE in emergency medicine training.

  5. Making space for belonging: critical reflections on the implementation of personalised adult social care under the veil of meaningful inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    This paper critically reflects on the way in which recent adult social care reform has been evolving beneath the alleged policy goal of prioritising the cultivation of meaningful inclusion and 'belonging' in the community. With this goal, there has been a focus away from 'services' for persons with intellectual disabilities, to supporting natural connections within the community. This paper draws on a grounded theory study of the perspectives of those responsible for overseeing community living arrangements for persons with disabilities, drawing on interviews and focus groups with service providers and relevant government officials. It examines the socio-spatial implications of the gradual shift towards 'belonging' as a disability policy goal, as it has evolved in two discrete settings - British Columbia, Canada and Ireland. The findings identify the complexities involved in facilitating active community connection for persons with intellectual disabilities and reveal important cautionary lessons for other jurisdictions where community living policy has arguably been moving away from communal services towards self-managed supports in 'real' communities through personal budgets in an effort to remove barriers to participation. The paper thus critically reflects on the rapid pursuit for transformation in personalised adult social care in government policy, arguing that the process of fostering meaningful community inclusion will and should take time.

  6. Regarding Critical Care of the Burn Patient: The First 48 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    when it comes to these two issues. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the au- thors and are not to be construed as...Xavier Monnet, MD, PhD, Julien Jabot, MD, Jean-Louis Teboul, PD, PhD, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Bicêtre Hospital, Assistance Publique –Hôpi- taux...conditions of sepsis. In their opinion , previous reports in an an- imal sepsis model (2) and in human ab- dominal sepsis (3), which challenged this optimistic

  7. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiung NH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Huan Hsiung,1 Yen Yang,1 Ming Shinn Lee,2 Koustuv Dalal,3 Graeme D Smith4 1Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Curriculum Design and Human Potentials Development, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Public Health Science, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 4School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. Keywords: pain, scales, BPS, CPOT, Taiwan

  8. September 2013 critical care case of the month: revenge of the pharaohs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulos E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness The patient was a 68 year-old man, admitted to our ICU through the emergency room (ER in July 2013 with suspected urinary tract origin sepsis. The patient was evaluated in ER by the ICU team. He was in his usual state of general good health until he visited his primary care physician for what he felt was a left inguinal hernia, and underwent a prostate examination, four days previously. The patient associated this prostate examination with the onset of fevers and chills that began the next morning. He was seen in an urgent care center where he was told his urinalysis was normal, and antibiotics were not prescribed. Over the intervening 3 days, he suffered recurrent fevers, had vomited three times, and had one diarrheal bowel movement. Earlier on the day of presentation, he had been mowing his lawn (in >100° F environment and had become …

  9. March 2015 critical care case of the month: it's not always sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 57-year-old man with multiple co-morbidities including diabetes mellitus presented with wet gangrene of the right foot and hypotension. He had diabetic ketoacidosis and acute kidney injury. He was admitted to the medical intensive care unit, given intravenous fluids and treated with insulin therapy, piperacillin/tazobactam and vancomycin. Initial blood cultures grew Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The podiatry service performed a right transmetatarsal amputation. Subsequently, he did well and was transferred to a medical floor for further care. Three weeks later, following resolution of the initial sepsis, he developed persistently high fevers with hemodynamic instability despite continued antibiotic therapy. He was transferred back to the MICU for presumed sepsis.Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: The past medical history was significant for diabetes, hypertension, COPD, coronary artery disease and hepatitis C. He did not smoke nor drink alcohol. Family history was non-contributory. Physical Examination: On ...

  10. Health literacy: critical opportunities for social work leadership in health care and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Janet M

    2011-05-01

    One-third of U.S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to the values and concerns of the social work profession. Despite the extensive knowledge and skills that social workers can bring to bear to assist patients with low health literacy, the concept of health literacy is underused in social work scholarship.This gap reflects missed opportunities for social workers to contribute their expertise to the evolving field of health literacy and to strategically align their work with organizational and national priorities.To address this gap, this article provides an overview of health literacy, its relevance to social work, and its representation in disciplinary literature; and it outlines opportunities for health social workers to systematically incorporate health literacy concepts and tools into their practices with patients and families. Implications for a social work research and practice agenda in health literacy are discussed.

  11. Free living amoebae in water sources of critical units in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of free-living amoebae (FLA is reported sparsely from water taps, ventilators, air conditioners, haemodialysis units and dental irrigation systems of hospitals worldwide. Their prevalence in hospital environment especially in wards having immunocompromised patients may pose a risk to this group of susceptible population as they may cause disease themselves or may carry pathogens inside them. No study from India has performed such surveillance. Objective: To evaluate extent of FLA contamination in water sources of bone marrow transplant (BMT intensive care unit (ICU, transplant ICU, haemodialysis unit and high dependency unit in a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: A total of hundred samples including fifty each of tap water samples and swabs from mouth of taps used for drinking, bathing and hand washing purposes in these units were collected according to standard procedure. Samples were inoculated onto non-nutrient agar plates at room temperature followed by morphological confirmation. Molecular identification including polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing was performed in culture positive samples. Results: Four tap water samples and ten swab samples showed growth of trophozoites and cyst formation. Morphologically, four amoebae resembled Acanthamoeba spp. which was further confirmed by PCR and sequencing showed them to be of T3 and T4 genotypes. Conclusion: The presence of these FLA in hospital water sources emphasises the urgent need of implementing effective preventive measures. Further studies are required to estimate the true prevalence of FLA in Indian hospitals by taking larger number of samples.

  12. Emergency obstetric care availability: a critical assessment of the current indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrysch, Sabine; Zanger, Philipp; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring progress in reducing maternal and perinatal mortality requires suitable indicators. The density of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities has been proposed as a potentially useful indicator, but different UN documents make inconsistent recommendations, and its current formulation is not associated with maternal mortality. We compiled recently published indicator benchmarks and distinguished three sources of inconsistency: (i) use of different denominator metrics (per birth and per population), (ii) different assumptions on need for EmOC and for EmOC facilities and (iii) failure to specify facility capacity (birth load). The UN guidelines and handbook require fewer EmOC facilities than the World Health Report 2005 and do not specify capacity for deliveries or staffing levels. We recommend (i) always using births as the denominator for EmOC facility density, (ii) clearly stating assumptions on the proportion of deliveries needing basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care and the desired proportion of deliveries in EmOC facilities and (iii) specifying facility capacity and staffing and adapting benchmarks for settings with different population density to ensure geographical accessibility.

  13. Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Carriage amongst Healthcare Workers of the Critical Care Units in a Nigerian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fadeyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA Nosocomial Infection (NI outbreaks and prevalence among various populations are well reported in literature particularly for developed countries. NI due to MRSA is a known cause of increased hospital stay, cost, morbidity and mortality especially among the critically ill. There is paucity of information on MRSA in developing nations including the carriage by critical healthcare givers who are potential transmitters. In most hospital in developing countries like Nigeria, there is neither surveillance system or control policy for MRSA. Approach: We screened healthcare workers in the critical care units of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH, Ilorin, Nigeria for MRSA and determined vancomycin susceptibility of the isolates. Swabs of both anterior nares and web spaces of the hands were taken, transported and incubated in Tween 80 at 35°C overnight aerobically before inoculation onto Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA. Inoculated MSA were incubated aerobically at 35°C for 18-24 h. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as Gram positive cocci with positive catalase, coagulase and DNAse test. MRSA were identified by combined oxacillin and cefoxitin discs diffusion method. Sensitivity to vancomycin was by vancomycin discs diffusion and vancomycin agar screen plating. Results: Of the 198 healthcare workers screened, 104 had MRSA either in the nose, hand or both giving a carriage rate of 52.5%. Nasal carriage (38.9% was higher than hand (25.3%. Doctors (22.7% and Nurses (16.7% were the predominant carriers. MRSA isolates were resistant to commonly available antibiotics. Only 1 (1.3% of the nasal isolates was vancomycin resistant. Conclusion: MRSA carriage among healthcare workers in the critical care units of the Nigerian hospital is high with doctors and nurses being the major carriers. The MRSA isolates were multi-drug resistant which may lead to increased morbidity and mortality if

  14. A multicenter survey of heparin prophylaxis practice in pediatric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Margaret; da Cruz, Eduardo; Koehler, Julianne; Kaufman, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Heparin prophylaxis (HP) is commonly used for prevention of central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications among pediatric intensivists, yet efficacy of this therapy is unknown. We conducted a survey of pediatric intensivists and their experiences with HP. A total of 96 responses were received. Almost half of the respondents regularly used HP in patients with CVCs, yet most were unsure of its benefit. The majority of respondents claimed to experience no adverse effects; the complications that were reported to occur were related to bleeding or suspected heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Overall, participants felt CVC-associated HP was safe in pediatric critical illness, while acknowledging the paucity of compelling data.

  15. European legislation impedes critical care research and fails to protect patients' rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Rossel, Peter Johannes Hancke

    2011-01-01

    in this context, it does not provide the patient with adequate protection. Instead of insisting on informed consent, we suggest that the focus should be shifted towards two other ethically relevant elements in human experimentation: risk assessment and selection of research subjects. When reviewing protocols...... in which a waiver of consent is deemed necessary, the Ethical Review Board should ensure that non-therapeutic risks are minimal, that the research is specifically designed to benefit critically ill patients, and that it cannot be conducted under circumstances where an informed consent can be obtained...

  16. Checklist as a Memory Externalization Tool during a Critical Care Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Zhang, Zhan; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed user interactions with a paper-based checklist in a regional trauma center to inform the design of digital cognitive aids for safety-critical medical teamwork. An initial review of paper checklists from actual trauma resuscitations revealed that trauma team leaders frequently wrote notes on the checklist. To understand this notetaking practice, we performed content analysis of 163 checklists collected over the period of four months. We found nine major categories of information that leaders recorded during resuscitations, including patient values, physical assessment findings, and pre-hospital information. An analysis of types and amount of notes written by leaders of different experience levels showed that more experienced leaders recorded more patient values and physical findings, while less experienced leaders recorded more notes about their activities and task completion status. These findings suggested that a checklist designed for a high-risk, fast-paced medical event has evolved into a dual function tool, serving both as a compliance and memory aid. Based on these findings, we derived requirements for designing digital cognitive aids to support safety-critical medical teamwork. PMID:28269905

  17. Guided reflection as a tool to deal with the theory– practice gap in critical care nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen S. du Toit

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Critical care nursing students experience inconsistencies between the theoretical content they have learnt and what is expected from them in practice, which retards the learning process. This has been described as the theory–practice gap. There seems to be no single solution to address the integration of theory and practice. In an attempt to bridge this gap, a study was done to establish the influence of guided reflection on critical care nursing students in dealing with their theoretical and practical experiences. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was followed. An instrument for guided reflection was designed which was used during semi-structured interviews during the data collection process. Field notes and narrative descriptions were also used as means to collect data. Themes that emerged from the data included a description of incidents experienced, critical analysis of knowledge, critical analysis of feelings and changed perspective experienced. Theory–practice integration occurred to an extent in some of the categories; conversely, the inability to apply theory to practice evoked responses such as feelings of guilt and incompetence. Guided reflection appeared to have assisted the participants in clarifying theoretical and practical experiences, and in reaching a changed perspective by understanding the link between theory and practice. Guided reflection ought to be incorporated in the education of nurses from their basic training in theory and practice so that student nurses will be aware of their own competencies in order to provide optimal patient care.

    Opsomming

    Kritiekesorgverpleegstudente ervaar teenstrydighede ten opsigte van dit wat hul geleer word en wat van hul in die praktyk verwag word wat weer die leerproses vertraag. Dit word as die teorie–praktykgaping beskryf. Daar blyk geen enkelvoudige oplossing te wees vir die integrasie van teorie en praktyk nie. In ’n poging

  18. Restructuring patient flow logistics around patient care needs: implications and practicalities from three critical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Stefano; Barbieri, Marta; Lega, Federico

    2009-06-01

    To make hospitals more patient-centered it is necessary to intervene on patient flow logistics. The study analyzes three innovative redesign projects implemented at three Italian hospitals. The three hospitals have reorganized patient flow logistics around patient care needs using, as proxies, the expected length of stay and the level of nursing assistance. In order to do this, they have extensively revised their logistical configuration changing: (1) the organization of wards, (2) the hospital's physical lay-out, (3) the capacity planning system, and (4) the organizational roles supporting the patient flow management. The study describes the changes implemented as well as the results achieved and draws some general lessons that provide useful hints for those other hospitals involved in such type of redesign projects. The paper ends by discussing some policy implications. In fact, the results achieved in the three cases investigated provide interesting material for further discussion on clinical, operational, and economic issues.

  19. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: the pleura and the answers that lie within

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson HL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 67-year-old woman with a 40-pack-year smoking history was admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure secondary to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the setting of pneumococcal bacteremia. On admission, she required endotracheal intubation and vasopressor support. She was ventilated using a low tidal volume strategy and was relatively easy to oxygenate with a PEEP of 5 and 40% FiO2. After 48 hours of clinical improvement, the patient developed sudden onset tachypnea and increased peak and plateau airway pressures. A bedside ultrasound was subsequently performed (Figures 1 and 2. What is the cause of this patient’s acute respiratory decompensation and increased airway pressures? 1. Pericardial effusion; 2. Pneumothorax; 3. Pulmonary edema; 4. Pulmonary embolism ...

  20. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: now my heart is still somewhat full

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. A 48-year-old man with a history of hypertension, intravenous drug abuse, hepatitis C, and cirrhosis presented with 1 day of melena and hematemesis. While in the Emergency Department, the patient was witnessed to have approximately 700 mL of hematemesis with tachycardia and hypotension. The patient was admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit for hypotension secondary to acute blood loss. He was found to have a decreased hemoglobin, elevated international normalized ratio (INR, and sinus tachycardia. A bedside echocardiogram was performed. What is the best explanation for the echocardiographic findings shown above? 1. Atrial Fibrillation ; 2.\tAtrial Myxoma; 3. Cardiac Lymphoma; 4. Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis; 5. Tumor Thrombus ...